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ANNUAL REPORT

on curriculum, instru ction & student achievem ent

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table of contents Superintendent’s Message .... 1 Board of Education ................ 2 Our Students ......................... 3 Our Staff ................................ 6 Our Schools .......................... 8 Fund Allocation ..................... 9 School Property Taxes ......... 10 2009-10 Success Measures .............. 11 Parent Survey ...................... 13 Community Services ........... 14 Early Childhood Family Center ...................... 16 Gifted and Talented ............. 17 Curriculum Decisions........... 18 Curriculum Review .............. 19 Test Scores – GRAD ........... 21 Test Scores – MCA .............. 22 Test Scores – CALT ............. 24 Adequate Yearly Progress ... 27 Web site addresses .............. 29

OUR MISSION:

Attribution.................back cover

The Bloomington Public School District is an

educational leader developing in ALL of our learners the

www.bloomingtonschools.info

ability to thrive in a rapidly changing world.


superintendent’s message These are challenging times for schools. . .We must ensure we spend our limited resources wisely to protect our public schools and for the sake of our children’s futures.

Les Fujitake SUPERINTENDENT

Bloomington Public Schools is pleased to present the 2009-10 Annual Report. As our community partner, we want to share with you our achievements – in and out of the classroom – and challenges we face educating the leaders of tomorrow. As with most corporate annual reports, the primary intent of this publication is to update you on last year’s performance, but we also highlight some of the priorities of the current year. While we have included many different indicators of student and school performance, it is important to note that no report can adequately reflect the depth and breadth of our students’ learning experiences. We’re building strong leaders in our schools, implementing innovative programs and partnerships to keep our most at-risk students in classrooms and learning. We’re making significant strides in our early childhood education programs, which we know plays a very important role in the proper development of children. Our community recognizes the importance of early childhood development and is working to support our youngest citizens and their families. We are very encouraged about the improvement in scores at the high school level and that our new math curriculum will help improve our math proficiency levels at all grades. These are challenging times for schools. We will receive no new funding for another two years, and there is deep concern that the state’s long-term economic forecast may result in school cuts to balance the state budget. We must ensure we spend our limited resources wisely to protect our public schools and for the sake of our children’s futures. Thank you for your support of Bloomington Public Schools. We look forward to partnering with you to ensure students learn today so they can lead tomorrow.

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board of education Jim Sorum Chair

Maureen Bartolotta Vice Chair

Chuck Walter Clerk

Arlene Bush Treasurer

ucation d E f o rd a o B e th t u o b A ing body for ion is the policy-mak

The Board of Educat onsible hile the Board is resp W . ols ho Sc c bli Pu Bloomington legates some erations by law, it de op d an s m ra og pr for school e School Board e Superintendent. Th th to ity or th au at th portion of are elected by the d a Vice Chair who an air Ch a by ed rn is gove ard meets on the rship. The School Bo be em m d ar Bo ol Scho . in the Community e month at 7:00 p.m th of y da on M nd co se er, 1350 West 106th ional Services Cent at uc Ed e th at om Ro t is welcome. MN. Public commen Street Bloomington,

agement Community Ebling Education feels that c Schools Board of

The Bloomington Pu ity is necessary for d involved commun an e tiv or pp su g on a str Public dents. Bloomington stu d an ols ho sc r the success of ou providing a quality standing tradition of Schools has a longcommunity. rt of an outstanding pa e ar we e us ca education be ld public forums to ol year, the Board he ho sc 0 -1 09 20 e th During gnment. In addition and boundaries reali s itie cil fa w ne a ss d discu o visited schools an Board members als , gs tin ee m c bli pu s to cipated in numerou gular basis and parti re a on s om ro ss cla tivities. school events and ac

Tim Culver Director

To contact the

Mark Hibbs

Board of Education,

Director

please visit their web page.

Melissa Halvorson Wiklund, Director

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our students

e s o o h c s ie il m Fa Bloomington The Bloomington community consists of 11,929 potential students. Overall, families select Bloomington Public Schools as their District of choice with 85% of the eligible student population enrolled in our District last year. Bloomington Public Schools also attracts students from outside of Bloomington, which impacts the District’s net student enrollment gain - difference between non-resident students choosing BPS and resident students not choosing BPS. There are 500 non-resident students choosing the District, while 383 resident students attend school out of the District. This equals a net student enrollment gain of +117. Any positive gain in the net student enrollment provides additional funding. Elementary (K-5) .................................................... 4,480 Middle School (6-8)................................................ 2,228 High School (9-12) ................................................. 3,362

We are proud of our diverse student community. Bloomington Public Schools’ student population is filled with many different ethnic and social backgrounds. In 2009, the District’s diverse student population (minority or students of color) grew from 38 percent to 39 percent diverse students. American Indian/Alaska Native ................................1% Asian or Pacific Islander .........................................10% Black ........................................................................17% Hispanic.................................................................... 11% White .........................................................................61% Male...........................................................................52% Female ......................................................................48% Students qualifying for free and reduced lunch ....36% Special Services Students ........................................12% English as a Second Language (ESL) Students .... 11% Non-Resident Students ............................................... 5% Total Student Enrollment .................................... 10,070 3


student achievement Bloomington Jefferson High School senior Adam DeGonda made school history as the first Jefferson student to qualify for a national speech tournament in humorous.

Adam DeGonda

The Jefferson and Kennedy high school speech and debate team is among the top in the nation. The program was inducted in the National Forensics League’s 100 Club. The national recognition is reserved for the top 10 percent of high school speech and debate programs nationwide.

JEFFERSON HIGH SCHOOL A record number of Jefferson and Kennedy high school students earned College Board designation as national scholars, scholars with honor, scholars with distinction, and scholars in recognition of exceptional achievement on the college-level Advanced Placement program exams. The designation was awarded to 118 scholars between the two schools.

Victoria Dubose-Briski KENNEDY HIGH SCHOOL

Kennedy High School student Victoria Dubose-Briski was named one of 32 winners of the 2010 Minnesota ExCEL Award. ExCEL – Excellence in Community, Education and Leadership – is a unique recognition given annually to high school juniors who are leaders in their schools and who work voluntarily in their community helping others.

Oak Grove Middle School eighth grader Alexa Groenke took top honors at the Minnesota History Day competition. Groenke won first place in the State for her 10 minute individual performance entitled, “The American Indian Movement: The Innovation, Impact and Change of American Indian Activation.”

Sinchai Self Portrait KENNEDY HIGH SCHOOL

Kennedy High School seniors Nantaporn Sinchai, Olivia Wood, Karin Johnson, Jen Silverman and Raeann Oxborough are recipients of awards in this year’s Minnesota Scholastic Art Competition.

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student achievement continued Olson Elementary School

Olson Elementary School students won highest honors in the WordMasters Challenge, a national language arts competition - encouraging growth in vocabulary and verbal reasoning. Competing in the difficult Blue Division of the Challenge the school’s fourth graders placed first in the nation in the year’s first meet.

A poem written by Shane Grant, an eighth grader at Valley View Middle School, was selected as one of the top 10 poems in his grade division by Creative Communication, a poetry and essay writing resource organization.

Bloomington Jefferson High School’s Jefferson Connection show choir was named Grand Champions at the 2010 National Show Choir Championships in Branson, MO. The varsity show choir earned five other awards in the competition, including Best Combo, Best Choreography, Best Vocals, Best Show Design and Best Female Performer in Aimee Broman.

Jefferson Show Choir JEFFERSON HIGH SCHOOL

Students from Kennedy High School earned 22 medals at the A Vous la Parole oral French contest held at the University of Minnesota. The contest drew 1000 entries among students in grades 7-12.

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our staff Our Staff Bachelor’s D

egree Only ...... ... 224 (29%) Master’s Deg ree ..................... ..548 (70%) PhD .................. ........................... .................6 (1% ) Total Numbe r of K-12 Licensed Sta ff ........................ ................. 778 Average Age ........................... ....................... 4 1 Gender ............ ........................... ... 75% Female 25% Male Number of D

iverse Staff

............38 (5%

)

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staff achievement Liz Boeser, JEFFERSON HIGH SCHOOL Jefferson High School teacher Elizabeth Boeser won two national awards including the 2009 National Council of Teachers of English High School Teacher of Excellence award for the state of Minnesota and the 4th Annual Media Literacy Award.

Joan Maland, INDIAN MOUNDS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL The Minnesota Elementary School Principal’s Association (MESPA) has named Joan Maland, principal of Indian Mounds Elementary School, as one of its Leadership Achievement Award winners. The award honors principals for leadership efforts to improve education.

Mary Jo Lang & Mary Klempke,

OAK GROVE MIDDLE SCHOOL & WASHBURN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Mary Jo Lang and Mary Klempke, media specialists at Oak Grove middle and Washburn elementary schools respectively, are this year’s TIES Exceptional Teachers. The award recognizes educators who model the best practices in using technology in the classroom and engaging students in learning.

Kelly Killorn, OLSON MIDDLE SCHOOL The International Reading Association has named Kelly Killorn this year’s winner of the Nila Banton Smith award for her outstanding leadership in the classroom and working with her peers at the school and district level. Killorn is a 6th grade reading teacher and literacy leader at Olson Middle School.

Tamra Sieve, SOUTH HENNEPIN ADULT PROGRAMS Tamra Sieve, director of adult learning for South Hennepin Adult Programs in Education (SHAPE) is Minnesota’s top community educator for 2009. The Minnesota Community Education Association honored Sieve with the award that recognizes outstanding contributions to the field of community education.

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our schools Jefferson High School was selected as a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence. The award honors public and private schools that have made significant progress in student achievement under the No Child Left Behind Act.

Early Childhood Family Centers (birth to 5years) Pond Center Southwood Center

Elementary (K-5) Hillcrest Community Indian Mounds Normandale Hills Oak Grove Olson Poplar Bridge Ridgeview Valley View Washburn Westwood

Middle School (6-8) Oak Grove Middle Olson Middle Valley View Middle

Poplar Bridge Elementary School was named a Minnesota School of Excellence designee for for the second time. The Minnesota School of Excellence Program is a school improvement process that assesses six standards for quality elementary schools. The standards are leadership, vision, student learning, staff development, data and decision-making, and active community engagement.

Kennedy High School earned multiple awards for its fall musical theater production of The Wizard of Oz as part of the Hennepin Theater Trust’s Spotlight Musical Theatre Program.

High School (9-12) Thomas Jefferson John F. Kennedy

Alternative Learning Centers Beacon High School Under 21 HS Diploma

Bloomington Public Schools has earned a Local Government Innovation Award from the Humphrey Institute’s Public and Nonprofit Leadership Center for its long-range financial planning process – Budgeting for Success – which sought staff, parent and community input about how to ensure a sound financial future for schools.

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fund allocation Funds Received to Help Each Student Succeed State revenue has not kept pace with inflation for funding school districts, leaving schools struggling to meet students’ needs. That’s why many Minnesota school districts turn to their local voters for additional support for programs and services through levies. In Bloomington, 19 cents of every district revenue dollar comes from local levies.

General operating fund revenue= $100,394,684 (2010-11)

Interest: $150,000

0%

Other: $2,583,651

3%

Revenue Deta

il

State: State fo rmula for fundin g, special educat ion and other revenues. Federal: Title programs and Special Educa tion Levy: Operatin g Referendum , Safe Schools, Equity, Career Te ch and other misc. levy items Other: Fees, tu ition, rental an d other contribut ions

Levy: $18,979,899

19% Federal: $6,580,673 6%

State:

*Indicates a $6,107,056 shift in funding from State to Federal to help balance the State’s budget.

$72,100,461

72%

Funds Spent to Help Each Student Succeed Detail e s n e p x

cipals, E tant Prin is s s A rt: nt, t Suppo elopme Studen taff Dev S l r, te n e s, Socia Media C Service h lt a e ts H ialis . ling, m Spec Counse lu u ic rr and Cu Workers tendent, Superin : n o ti a tr ncipals, Adminis dent, Pri n te n ri e hool nt Sup ctor, Sc e Assista ir D n o Educati rvices Special onal Se ti c u tr s nd In Board a . stodial, directors nce: Cu a n te in a ons & M Operati Utilities. d n ance a n , te in a M ounting ort: Acc p p u S ss ayroll, Busine urces, P o s lations. e R n unity Re Huma m m o C gy and Technolo sualty and Ca y rt e p Pro nsfers. Other: Fund Tra d n a e c Insuran

Seventy-three cents of every operating dollar spent directly supports classroom instruction, special education, and career and technical education services. Other funds pay for curriculum development, teacher training and school support that ensures a high-quality learning experience for students in all grades.

General operating fund expenses=$98,471,197 (2010-11) Business Support: $3,714,612 4% Operations & Maintenance: $7,981,639 8% Other: $841,795 1% Administrative: $5,228,530 5% Regular Instruction: Student Support: $48,077,447 $9,296,205 9% 49% Special Ed & Vocational Services: $23,330,968 24%

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1


school property taxes

Comp ar Other ison to Distr icts 1,041

Eden Prairie

993

Wayzata

972

Minnetonka

Richfield

957

Edina

953

State Average

944 925

Hopkins

St. Louis Park

907

Bloomington

902 $

0

$

200

$

400

$

600

$

800

$

1,000

$

1,200

School Taxes Payable in 2010 * The above figures do not include the impact of the homestead credit, which will decrease the school portion of property taxes by varying amounts.

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2009-10 success measures Success Measures is the District’s evaluation tool for the Strategic Plan. The measures document expected outcomes, performance results, and provide a basis for improvement of the Strategic Plan’s goals. Success Measures are made up of five “strategic directions” or goals, and outline specific measures and outcomes of performance - from concern to vision - to achieve the goals. The results in this second year of reporting follow, and include a highlighted area showing the measurement’s outcome and the (actual result): Note: Data used for the Measures are found in reported results elsewhere in this year’s Annual Report.

Strategic Direction A: Maximize student achievement and eliminate the achievement gap. Measures

Concern

Satisfactory

Superior

Vision

Gap in equivalent growth in CALT measures for NCLB groups

>20% (35.4%)

11-20%

5-10%

<5%

Gap in proficiency rates for NCLB groups

>20% (47.5%)

11-20%

5-10%

<5%

Gap in graduation rates for NCLB groups

>30% (35.7%)

15-30%

5-14%

<5%

Gap in percentage of report card grades of Ds & Fs for NCLB groups

>30%

15-30%

5-14% (14.1%)

<5%

The percentage of beginning kindergarten students scoring at the "Ready to Learn" level

<60%

61-80%

81-90% (86.0%)

>90%

The percentage of adult basic education ESL students advancing one level per year as measured by Federal National Reporting System (NRS) standards

<32%

32-38%

39-69% (56%)

>69%

Strategic Direction B: Develop educational programs in response to research, best practices, and market conditions. Measures

Concern

Satisfactory

Superior

Vision

Parents

<81%

81-85% (82.8%)

86-90%

>90%

Students

<81% (73.5%)

81-85%

86-90%

>90%

Staff

<81% (66.6%)

81-85%

86-90%

>90%

No programs enhanced or started

One program enhanced

One program started

Two programs started

Satisfaction with Academic Climate and Communications (percent of satisfied/highly satisfied from annual survey)

Program Development/Review for new and existing programs

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2009-10 success measures continued Strategic Direction C: Provide meaningful staff development for ALL staff, including competency with diverse populations. Measures

Concern

Satisfactory

Superior

Vision

Professional Learning Community (PLC) Satisfaction (% of teachers satisfied/very satisfied with professional growth results from PLCs)

<70%

71-80% (71%)

81-99%

100%

Staff Development Satisfaction (% of staff with positive responses to three levels of professional development application)

<60%

61-90% (85%)

91-99%

100%

Strategic Direction D: Strengthen partnerships that expand learning opportunities and enhance our image. Measures

Concern

Satisfactory

Superior

Vision

Faith Community Partnerships

No Change

Add 1 partnership

Add 2 partnerships

Partnerships w/ all faith community

Business Community Partnerships

No Change(30 current)

Add 2 partnerships

Add 3 partnerships

Partnerships w/ all businesses

Net Enrollment Gain (difference between nonresident students choosing BPS and resident students not choosing BPS)

> 50%

51-100%

101-200% (+141)

> 200% (+104)

Overall Student Retention (percent of resident students choosing to remain in BPS)

< 75%

75-82%

83-85% (83.3%)

> 85%

Strategic Direction E: Increase our funding base and maximize our use of existing resources. Measures

Concern

Satisfactory

Superior

Vision

General Fund Balance (less Transportation and Capital) - Achieve 5% Goal

< 2 years

3 years

4 years

> 5 years

Other Fund Balance (including Transportation, Capital, Food Service and Community Education)

< $1.0 M

> $1.0 M

> $1.2 M

> $1.5 M

Budget Management (variation between budget and actual)

> 2.2%

2.2% - 1.8%

< 1.8%

< 1.0%

Annual revenue increase per pupil

< 1.5%

1.5% - 2.0%

> 2.0%

> 3.0%

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parent survey Bloomington Parents Support Schools, District Parents are a child’s first and best teacher, but teachers and other adults in a school are part of a team helping to educate their children. When parents are involved in schools and education, children have higher grades and standardized test scores, improved behavior at home and school, and better social skills and adaptation. Bloomington Public Schools embrace and encourage parent involvement in schools. We measure parent satisfaction through an annual spring survey that focuses on academics, climate and safety, and communication. The survey results are considered “convenience sampling” as the data comes from how many parents actually complete the survey. The tables below show overall survey results (strongly agree/agree responses) at each level and by survey content area. For a more detailed review of the survey results by question, please go to the Testing & Evaluation website.

Survey Results for Academics (strongly agree/agree by percentage): Level

Survey Areas

2010 Results N = 2.539

2009 Results N = 3,030

2008 Results N = 2,099

2007 Results N = 1,819

District

Academics

84.2

91.1

87.8

88.6

District

Climate & Safety

82.9

88.2

84.3

84.4

District

Communication

81.2

89.7

85.3

85.7

N = 2.539

N = 3,030

N = 2,099

N = 1,819

High School

Academics

66.4

64.6

72.5

75.2

High School

Climate & Safety

63.0

61.3

69.7

70.8

High School

Communication

62.2

64.0

70.8

76.4

N = 446

N = 542

N = 259

N = 273

Middle School

Academics

85.6

79.7

78.0

83.6

Middle School

Climate & Safety

82.6

77.1

75.7

76.5

Middle School

Communication

79.8

74.2

75.2

77.2

N = 1,614

N = 1,950

N = 1,538

N = 1,143

Elementary

Academics

91.3

91.4

92.5

93.5

Elementary

Climate & Safety

89.7

88.5

88.6

90.3

Elementary

Communication

89.2

90.2

89.8

90.2

N = Number of survey respondents

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community services Community Services Programs Youth Programs are meant to provide additional learning and development opportunities for kids of all different ages. These programs are meant for kids who need additional help with the curriculum or for working families who would like a safe and fun learning environment for their child after school. The specific programs offered include: • Early Learners Academy • Galaxy Youth Center • Kids’ SAFARI • Musical Avenues • Summer Spectrum • Targeted Services • Volunteer Connection

Bloomington Public Schoo ls supports lif learning for re elong sidents of th e Bloomingto Richfield com n and munity. The mission of B Richfield Co lo o m ingtonmmunity Serv ic e s is to b school and co ring together mmunity reso urces to mee individual’s u t each nique needs by: • Facilitating developmen t of lifelong le for all; arning • Encouragin g citizen invo lvement and participation in education and commun developmen ity t; • Building pa rtnerships an d promoting cooperation maximum and coordina tion of progra services, and ms, resources.

Learn more about Youth Programs.

Adult Basic Education provides instruction in the basic skills of reading, writing and mathematics to adult learners in order to prepare them for transitioning into the labor market or higher academic or vocational training. ABE Courses are provided through South Hennepin Adult Programs in Education (SHAPE). In 2009-10, SHAPE served 2,688 adult students and 162 students in the ALC Alternative High School program. The SHAPE program test results showed excellent student progress by meeting all 10 of the National Reporting Standards learner level gain goals set by the Minnesota Department of Education. Last year, the SHAPE program was ranked the highest on the State Report Card of all the large ABE programs in Minnesota. In 2009-10, SHAPE also awarded 97 High School Diplomas, and 59 students completed their GED.

Jefferson and Kennedy Activity Centers are a cooperative operation between Community Services and Bloomington’s two high schools. Both centers opened in 2002, adding another 150,000 square feet of recreational space for Bloomington Public Schools. Community members benefit by using the facilities to maintain active fitness lifestyles. Learn more about the Activity Centers.

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community services continued

Summer Programs are provided through Community Services, including: • GRASP, a nine-week correspondence program for K-8 students to help maintain their reading and math skills. • Operation Adventure is a program of outdoor education providing students the opportunity to observe, study and enjoy the environment through camping, canoeing, kayaking and hiking. • Summer Musical is a unique musical theater experience for students entering eighth grade through graduating seniors. Opportunities are available for dancers, orchestra, singers, set builders and technical crew. • Kids’ SAFARI offers a full-day summer program. • Summer Spectrum is a collaborative summer enrichment program for students in fourth through eighth grade, and is designed by Community Services, Bloomington Park and Recreation, and the Bloomington Art Center. • Youth Galaxy Center offers a summer of service for middle school youth. • Summer Academic Support is available for students qualifying for additional help in reading and math.

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early childhood family center

The Early Childho

Center’s mission

Early Childhood Services

strengthen fam

Bloomington Public Schools provides a high-quality educational experience for students in Kindergarten through grade twelve, and early learning opportunities for children from birth through age five.

is to

ilies through

quality educatio support in parent parent-child rela

During the 2009-10 school year, the center supported: •

od Family

n and

ing and

tionships.

1480 families in Early Childhood Family Center classes ECFE classes help parents meet the challenges of parenting and help young children (birth to 5 years) develop socially, physically, emotionally, and intellectually.

1254 children from ages three to six in Early Childhood Screening Early Childhood Screening helps identify children who may benefit from early childhood services before they enter school and connects them with the appropriate resources and programs.

488 children in Family Center Preschools Family Center preschools help children develop learning readiness skills so they will have the confidence, independence, and social abilities to become successful learners.

28 families in Family Literacy Family Literacy programs partner with SHAPE to offer courses in English and parenting education through the SHAPE Family School program.

Questio

ns?

n on formatio in e r o m For dhood arly chil e r o E ECF eral n in gen educatio Public mington o lo B it vis hildhood Early C s l’ o o h Sc ebsite. enter w C y il m Fa

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gifted & talented Gifted and Talented Programs Challenge Students

Elements/ Dimensions Academy

Gifted, talented, and creative students are effectively served in every Bloomington school. Three levels of programs and services are provided to these students to help them reach their learning potential:

Level 1 — Differentiation of Curriculum focuses on expanding, extending and enhancing learning opportunities for all students in the regular classroom. These opportunities are provided within the school’s curriculum by the classroom teacher.

Level 2 — Enrichment and Extensions are student-selected activities that extend enrichment or expansion of experiences beyond the exploration provided through the regular classroom curriculum. Gifted and Talented specialists work with schools to develop greater choices at this level.

The Elements and Dimensions Academy programs are designed to meet the needs of students grades 2-3 (Elements) and 4-5 (Dimensions) who have exceptional academic skills. The programs are designed to meet the unique educational and emotional needs of gifted students who have exceptional academic skills. Highly rigorous curriculum is provided at an accelerated pace.

Level 3 — Individualized Services provide comprehensive learning plans for those students with unique, advanced educational needs not met by Levels 1 or 2 instruction. These services include Gr. 3-5 cluster classrooms; middle school Honors classes; Honors, Advanced Placement (AP) and College in the Schools classes in the high schools.

Current Student Enrollment: Total enrollment....................47 Non-resident ............ 17 (36%)

Current Student Enrollment: Total enrollment ..................164 Non-resident ............. 57 (35%)

Retention to High School: Residents......................... 100% Non-residents .................... 22%

For more information about these programs please visit the Gifted & Talented website.

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curriculum decisions

Curriculum Decisions Come From the Community The communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice is hea rd in the curriculum review process through the District Curriculum Advisory Committee.This district-wide advisory commit tee recommends educational standards, ass essments and program evaluations to the School Board.

2010-11 Officers: Gene Andreotti, Chairperson Dawn Stiegauf, Vice Chair Fred Alonzi, Secretary

Parent and Community Representatives: Mindy Henrickson, Hillcrest Community School Kyle Elbert, Indian Mounds Elementary School Rochelle Gibbs, Normandale Hills Elementary School Stacy Wells, Oak Grove Elementary School Renee Fetzer, Olson Elementary School Steve Rosenberg, Poplar Bridge Elementary School Marcia Sytsma, Ridgeview Elementary School Tracey Dotter, Washburn Elementary School Joan Robertson, Westwood Elementary School Larry Frost, Oak Grove Middle School Wayne Terry, Oak Grove Middle School Don Bouchier, Olson Middle School Mary Chapman, Valley View Middle School Sharon Mrozek, Valley View Middle School Fred Alonzi, Jefferson High School Cindy McInroy, Kennedy High School Dawn Stiegauf, Jefferson and Kennedy high schools Jim Houlding Mike Jones Tim Anderson, District Director Jim Angermeyr, District Director Chuck Walter, School Board representative

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curriculum review Curriculum Re view Cycle Ensures Conti nuous Improv ement Blooming

ton Public Sch ools uses an review proce ongoing curr ss to ensure iculum students are the best info always expo rmation and sed to benefit from in all subject the latest kn areas. Each o wledge curriculum a five-step revi rea goes thro ew process: ugh a • Determine the best pract ices in teach • Evaluate th ing and learn e current curr ing; ic ulum and alte • Select the rnative optio curriculum m ns; aterials to m and goals; eet new stan dards • Implement the new curr iculum, inclu and support; ding staff tra and ining • Assess ho w well the ne w curriculum is being used . Each step in the review p ro cess takes o subjects are ne year, and up for review e very eight ye two subject a ars. In Fall 2 reas will imp 010, lement new resources: W cu rr iculum and orld Languag e seventh th and Languag rough twelfth e Arts for sixt grade, h through tw areas of Scie e lfth grade. Th nce, Business e and Reading process this will begin the year and ado pt new curric the next one ula and mate -two years. rials

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Science: Sixth through Twelfth Grade Science completed the first year of their curriculum revision process during the 2009 – 2010 school year. The Science Steering Team examined best practices and new state standards as they evaluated their program. In the 2010 – 2011 school year, writing teams will place and prioritize state standards into Bloomington Public Schools courses. Based on the steering team’s work, writing teams will focus on creating inquiry-based classes where students use higher order thinking skills and a variety of appropriate technologies. Teams will also focus on integrating new engineering standards into Science courses. Instructional materials that further those goals will also be selected. In 2011 – 2012, the new standards and materials will be implemented and common assessments will be written.


curriculum review continued World Language: Seventh through Twelfth Grade The World Language Steering Team completed its revision of the curriculum in grades seven through twelve. The Steering Team examined research-based practices and current national standards as they evaluated and articulated their program. The mission of the World Language program in the Bloomington Public Schools is to teach students to communicate in a language other than English and to build their cultural awareness and sense of connection to the rest of the world. The study of a world language contributes to studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; general global competence, an important skill in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world. Thanks to the power of technology, students in World Language classrooms connect to authentic resources from the many countries whose language they are studying. While the importance of learning specific skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing remains constant, our world language program emphasizes applying those skills in order to communicate authentically. Students are encouraged to continue their study of language over a number of years. World Language is an academic discipline that is sequential and skill-based in nature, and these skills must be developed over time. Most Bloomington middle school students select either French or Spanish, and high school students may choose among French, German, Japanese, Latin, and Spanish.

Language Arts: Sixth through Twelfth Grade The Language Arts Steering Team completed its revision of the curriculum in grades six through twelve. Like the World Language Steering Team, the Language Arts Team examined research-based practices and current national standards as they evaluated and articulated their program. The vision of the Language Arts Department of the Bloomington Public Schools is to provide literacy skills and knowledge, with a focus on critical reading, analytical reasoning, effective speaking, and lucid writing, so that each student can receive, access, process, and produce information as required to communicate Ahead successfully in the 21st century. ulum A Look ict Curric tr is D e r, th develop This yea As expected, the State has adopted the Common Core tee will it m m o yC g Advisor standards in English and Language Arts, and has added some regardin dations n e m m r the reco additional wording and specific standards in digital literacy. In rricula fo u c g in w des the follo e for gra c addition, there are reading and writing standards for social n ie c S year: out the 2011-12 studies, history and science that must be taught by those more ab n r a le ourse 6-12. To departments in their curricula. Because of the release of these dards, c n ta s d vise newly re nded new MN Language Arts Standards, we will do some updating to or expa , s n o ti ip descr isit the the curriculum we developed last year. We are scheduled to write uides, v g m lu u curric Language Arts assessments in the spring. ite. m webs Curriculu

20


test scores - grad Minnesota Graduation Required Assessments for Diploma (GRAD) Basic reading and math skills are needed to function in adult life. They are essential skills for employment, further education, and functioning in society. The Basic Skills in Reading, Mathematics, and Written Composition are part of the graduation requirements in Bloomington. Students must pass these tests, as well as earn passing grades in specific courses in order to receive a high school diploma. For Reading and Math, the assessments are embedded within the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2nd Edition that students take in grades 10 (Reading) and 11 (Math). The Written Composition requirement is administered to students in grade 9. Students in all grades who have not yet passed the GRAD requirements will continue to be assessed each year until they pass. For some special education students or some students with extenuating medical conditions, schools have the option of setting an alternative, individual passing score that would be lower than the state score. Table 1 below shows the status of all students enrolled at the end of the 2009-10 year on the tests they had taken.

Table 1: Spring 2010 Status of Graduation Required Assessments for Diploma (GRAD) 2009-10 Grade

Enrolled with Test Record

Subject

Number Passing at State Standard

Number Passing at Individual Standard

9

838

Writing

761 (91%)

0

10

830

Writing

764 (92%)

1

Reading

643 (78%)

0

Writing

785 (95%)

6

Reading

722 (87%)

8

Math

494 (59%)

0

Writing

876 (99%)

8

Reading

844 (95%)

22

Math1

661 (75%)

21

11

12

831

886

1

In 2009, the Minnesota legislature amended the state GRAD rule for Math to allow students who otherwise met all other course requirements and who retested a minimum of two times and who participated in a districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remediation programs to earn a diploma even if they did not reaching the passing score on the GRAD. The data reported in the table reflects actual passing rates on the test rather than the proportion who met this alternative requirement.

Students in all grades who have not yet passed the GRAD requirements will continue to be assessed each year until they pass. 21


test scores - mca Measuring students’ progress against state standards The Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments, Second Edition (MCA-II) are tests that measure how well a student has mastered the state’s academic standards, which define what a student should know and be able to do at each grade level. All grade 3 – 8 students take these tests in reading and math. In addition, grade 10 students take a reading test and grade 11 students take a math test. Students do not pass or fail the MCA-II, but are considered “proficient” if they either meet or exceed the state standards. These tests are part of Minnesota’s educational accountability system. Schools use MCA-II results to: • chart progress over time • generate information for school improvement and school accountability • allow for comparison of schools and districts in Minnesota Teachers and parents can use the results as a tool to make decisions that will help improve student achievement. The state uses MCA-II results to identify schools or districts where groups of students are not making adequate yearly progress (AYP) as defined in the federal No Child Left Behind legislation. A school or an entire school district can be identified as not making AYP if any one of nine groups of students fails to reach the state-defined performance target. These nine groups include all students, five racial/ethnic groups, special education students, students receiving limited English proficiency services, and students receiving subsidized or free lunch.

22


test scores - mca continued Figure 1: 2010 MCA-II READING Proficiency Rates for Bloomington and Total State Bloomington

Minnesota

90

82 80

75 76

76

74 72

75

72

Percent

70

77 75

74

70

68

66

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 3

4

5

6

7

8

10

Grade

Figure 2: 2010 MCA-II MATH Proficiency Rates for Bloomington and Total State Bloomington 90 80

83 77

77

74

72

69

70

Percent

Minnesota

64 66

66 64

62

58

60

48

50

43

40 30 20 10 0 3

4

5

6

7

8

10

Grade Figure 1 shows the percentage of students who scored as proficient (meets or exceeds state standard) on the MCA-II in reading for Bloomington and the State. Figure 2 shows the same information for math. Math proficiency rates decrease at higher grade levels, particularly in math. This reflects the increased difficulty of the state standards at the higher grade levels.

23

1


test scores - mca continued 2010 was third year that MCA-II Science tests were given. These innovative measures are taken by students on computers, which allow significantly more variation in the types of test questions that are asked. For example, students not only answer traditional multiple-choice and short-answer items, but also use computer tools to label graphs, drag-and-drop elements on the screen, and click on a various parts of graphics to select their answers. The Science test is taken by all students in grades 5 and 8 and in high school by all students who have completed a biology course during the school year. Science is a required test under the No Child Left Behind federal requirements; however, the scores are not used in the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) calculations. Figure 3 below shows the performance of Bloomington students compared to the state in these three grade levels tested.

Figure 3: 2010 MCA-II SCIENCE Proficiency Rates for Bloomington and Total State 80

Bloomington

Minnesota

70

Percent

60

51

50

48

46

50

48

52

40 30 20 10 0 5

8

High School

Grade

he about t n io t a m m nal infor ults fro s Additio e r g in lud ults, inc s the e r II A ilable on MC a v a is , s l building e. individua n websit io t a lu a & Ev Testing

24


test scores - calt Computerized Achievement Level Tests in Reading and Mathematics The Computerized Achievement Level Tests (CALT) in Reading and Mathematics have been used in the District since 1999 to assess student progress from year to year, as well as to evaluate program effectiveness. Like other standardized achievement measures, CALT scores can give comparisons to national or state results. Figure 1 gives the spring 2010 CALT average scale scores in Reading, the most recent data from district-wide testing. Scale scores are designed to show change from one grade to the next, and the graphic gives an indication of the developmental growth of studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reading skills as they move through the grades. The scores also show that Bloomington students perform above the average of the national sample of students who have taken these measures. Figure 2 shows the same information for the math tests. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of our curriculum and instruction, the District uses the CALT scores to measure how studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Reading and Math skills improve from one year to the next compared to what is typical for students across the nation with similar achievement levels. Looking at student growth for the same group of students is the single most effect way to evaluate whether instructional programs and district wide curricula are effective. The data in Tables 1 and 2 show the annual growth in scores for the students who were enrolled for a full year and tested in the spring of the 2009-10 school year and also in either the fall of last year or the prior spring. As the data in the tables show, our students show better than average growth at all but grade 3 in Reading. Growth in Math is better than similar performing districts in grades 2, 4 and 5, but again slightly lower than expected in grade 3 and also lower than expected in middle school. Additional information about the CALT results, including results from individual buildings, is available from the Testing & Evaluation website.

Figure 1: Spring 2010 Average Scale Score by Grade for CALT Reading Bloomington

230

National 225

Reading Score

222 220

218

218 215 211

210

210

205

203 200

198 195

190 180

188

2

3

4

5

6

7

Grade 25

1


test scores - calt continued Figure 2: Spring 2010 Average Scale Score by Grade for CALT Math Bloomington

240

232

229

230

Math Score

National

237 228

223 219

220

200 190 180

210

209

210

218

202

200 191

2

3

4

5

6

7

Grade

Table 1: Annual Gains in Reading CALT for 2009-10 Grade

Pre-Test Score

Spring Score

Average Gain

Expected Gain

2

177.7

194.7

17.4

13.7

3

194.1

203.1

9.0

9.3

4

204.2

211.5

7.3

6.7

5

213.2

220.0

6.8

4.9

6

216.5

222.1

5.6

3.9

7

220.8

225.8

5.0

3.4

Table 2: Annual Gains in Math CALT for 2009-10 Grade

Pre-Test Score

Spring Score

Average Gain

Expected Gain

2

185.2

200.9

15.7

12.8

3

201.8

210.4

8.6

10.9

4

211.3

221.0

9.7

9.3

5

222.6

231.0

8.4

7.5

6

227.2

232.3

5.1

5.8

7

232.5

237.6

5.0

5.7

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1


adequate yearly progress Adequate Yearly Progress Results Bloomington Public Schools continues to work to meet the federal Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirements of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. A school and districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AYP status is determined by aggregating the results of academic achievement measures in reading/language arts and math, student participation rates in these assessments, graduation rates, and for elementary and middle schools, the attendance rates. Many times tested subgroups at a school level are not large enough to meet the minimum group size at an individual school level. However, when all of the data is compiled into one report at the district level the number will, in many cases, reach or surpass the minimum group size, and thus, possibly identify the district as not making adequate yearly progress. In 2010, four Bloomington schools reached the necessary requirements to achieve AYP: Olson Elementary, Ridgeview, Hillcrest Community School, and Westwood. The remaining 11 schools not making AYP included Kennedy and Jefferson High Schools; Oak Grove Middle, Valley View Middle, and Olson Middle; Valley View Elementary, Normandale Hills, Indian Mounds, Poplar Bridge, Oak Grove Elementary and Washburn. While the District met the proficiency standards for reading and math for the total student population, it did not make AYP in 2010 because it did not meet proficiency targets for the following student groups: Hispanic, Black, Limited English Proficient (LEP), Special Education, and Economically Disadvantaged (students who qualify for free and reduced lunch). The District was among the more than 300 districts in Minnesota not making AYP this year.

27

1


adequate yearly progress continued The following Table provides the 2010 District AYP Reading, attendance and graduation results: Group

Total Students

Reading Proficient

Target Index

Proficient AYP Status

Attendance Rate

Graduation Rate

All Students

5403

83.37

80.84

Yes

95.40

96.99

Am. Indian

62

77.19

71.5

Yes

93.37

100.00

Asian

546

82.8

78.79

Yes

96.71

100.00

Hispanic

656

62.89

79.11

No

95.26

77.78

Black

947

71.03

79.38

Yes

94.44

93.10

White

3192

91

80.46

Yes

95.50

98.13

LEP

563

59.26

79.67

No

96.25

64.29

Sp. Ed.

773

64.05

75.59

No

93.67

87.84

F/R Lunch

2095

69.98

80.3

No

94.47

93.80

The following Table provides the 2010 District AYP Math results: Total Students

Math Proficient

Target Index

Proficient AYP Status

5375

76.37

75.48

Yes

Am. Indian

56

67.31

65.32

Yes

Asian

542

83.17

73.88

Yes

Hispanic

637

58.33

75.12

No

Black

927

55.36

74.5

No

White

3213

84.43

74.52

Yes

LEP

539

57.01

76.65

No

Sp. Ed.

766

56.79

75.13

No

F/R Lunch

2050

61.27

75.7

No

Group All Students

28


web site addresses The 2009-10 Annual Report was published as an online publication and will not be distributed in print by Bloomington Public Schools. If you would like to print this report for personal use, a list of the links provided in the report are listed below for your reference: Page 2 – Board of Education school-board.departments.bloomington.schoolfusion.us Page 13 – Parent Survey http://department.services.bloomington.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=176994 Page 14 – Youth Programs http://department.students.bloomington.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=201202 Page 14 – Activity Centers http://cs.bloomington.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=186082 Page 16 – Early Childhood Family Center http://cs.bloomington.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=176028 Page 17 – Gifted and Talented http://department.services.bloomington.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=176974 Page 20- Curriculum http://department.services.bloomington.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=199133 Page 24- Testing and Evaluation - MCA II Results http://department.services.bloomington.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=177409 Page 25- Testing and Evaluation - CALT Results http://department.services.bloomington.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=176994

For more info rmation abou t Bloomingto Public Schoo n ls, please visi t our web site at

www.blooming Have a comm

tonschools.info

ent or conce

Write us at:

rn?

commrelations@ bloomington.k 12.mn.us 29


The 2009-10 Annual Report is published by

Bloomington Public Schools 1350 W. 106th Street Bloomington, MN 55431-4126

Editor: Rick J. Kaufman, APR Executive Director of Community Relations (952) 681-6403

Writer: Jaclyn Swords Communications Specialist

Copy Reader: Nancy Eidem Deb Bunkholt

Photos: Jeff Olson


Bloomington Public Schools 2010 Annual Report