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WINNIE NGAI LAN TAM

谭 艺 琳


Syracuse University School of Architecture


WORKS

YEAR 2 YEAR 1

ONONDAGA LAKE CULTURAL CENTER DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN PAVILION FOR FILM & PHOTOGRAPHY PENTAGON UCHI SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY ALPHABETS

PHOTOGRAHY


ONONDAGA LAKE CULTURAL CENTER

Once considered among the most polluted lakes in the U.S., Onondaga Lake is a sacred site for the Onondaga Nation. It has also been the location of salt production, a recreational/entertainment center, and a conduit for commercial traffic to the city of Syracuse, NY. As environmental remediation progresses, the lake reenters the social imaginary of possible futures. This project uses parcels adjacent to the lake in the design of an Onondaga Lake Cultural Center to explore architecture in formation and matters of “site.” The site is prone to flooding that go up to 3ft above ground level. Instead of blocking the waterflow, the project preserves the existing wetlands and turns them into ‘dry’ gardens and raingardens. The ‘dry’ garden are the existing patches of vegetation that protrude from the flooding - wetland plants and grass are planted there. The raingardens are the areas between the dry gardens - on water wetland plants are planted in them. After one walks across the gardens dappled with pavilions, they are met with a double-deck waterfront which serves as the program for the cultural center. The waterfront connects to two main buildings on the lake: the longhouse - a center for exhibition, archive, and meeting - and the greenhouse that allows visitors to go above and below the water to view plants and aquatic animals.

Spring 2019 - Professor Francisco Sanin


existing ‘patches’ site plan dry garden, raingarden, waterfront

365 ft

364 ft

1/50” = 1’0 N

longhouse axon

timeline gallery

administration meeting hall open space restrooms storage

community garden


NORTHERN WHITE CEDAR YELLOW BIRCH

AMERICAN ELM RED MAPLE

RAINGARDEN: COW PARSNIPS

RAINGARDEN: SWAMP MILKWEED & CARDINAL FLOWER

SOIL MULCH PONDING AREA

garden section

longhouse section


winter

spring

summer


DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

This project begins with a focus on urban site and architectural tectonic form. Following context examination, project strategy formation, tectonic and spatial systems, design a building for the Department of Industrial Design in Syracuse University’s School of Visual and Performing Arts. The project site is a 150’ x 130’ area next to Bird Library, along Waverly Avenue, on the Syracuse University Campus. Projects will be multi-story, and incorporate exterior as well as interior public space. The final project can be broken down into three masses: sunken courtyard, library, studio. There is a core running through the center, which serves as vertical circulation and small utilities. Upon analyzing the urban context, it is most useful for the area in front of Bird Library to be engaged as the entrance because it is a very busy intersection. The primary and largest program is dedicated to the double-height studio - supported by trusses - which cantilevers slightly over the plaza entrance.

Fall 2019 - Professor Timothy Stenson


1’0=1/64”

1’0=1/16”

N


B’ B’ B’

DOWN

A’

A A’

A

UP

A’

A

UP

DOWN

UP

UP

UP

B B

1ST FLOOR

B

1’0=1/16”

N

2ND FLOOR

1’0=1/16”

N

1’0=1/16” 3RD FLOOR

N


Slivers Prize Competition

Integrate the project into a site situation, which in this case, is a on a cliff. The columns from the studio are extended to create an open space plaza, enabling people to walk through and gaze over the cliff. The rest of the project is sunk into the mountain.


PAVILION FOR FILM & PHOTOGRAPHY

Generate a tectonic form strategy in response to programmatic needs of film and photography pavilion for Syracuse University’s School of Visual and Performing Arts. The project site is a parking lot measuring 130’ x 175’, not quite central campus location, but not quite city fabric. The project interprets the film and photograhpy program as dark and light. As two types of boxes rests on top of each other - light lower boxes for photograhpy, and the dark upper boxes for film steel frames become the primary tectonic strategy. The steel frames recede from the edges of the lower half to create a skylight for the photograhpy exhibition. The film exhibition is a space enclosed by darkness and videos are projected onto panels hanging from the ceiling. The boxes are connected by small walkways in between, each box serving as a space for a different artist or event.

Fall 2019 - Professor Timothy Stenson


white cement

film panels black acrylic panel

up

down

skylight 1’0=1/16”

steel frame

N

1’0=1/16”

N


metal beam

concrete wall 0.25” airspace steel studs and soft insulation 3.25” (R-13)

sliding double-glass panels gypsum board

vapor retarder sliding metal panel concrete wall

bedroom concrete wall

reinforced concrete

electrical wiring

sliding door

kitchen

hinges

permanent concrete wall

Plan

concrete wall 0.25” airspace steel studs and soft insulation 3.25” (R-13)

gypsum board

light

vapor retarder

sliding door

hinges sliding double-glass panels

backer rod and sealant track metal beam

sliding metal panel Side elevation

plumbing concrete wall moisture barrier reinforced concrete

bedroom polystyrene foam (rigid insulation)

grade

Short section

tracks

sliding metal beam

concrete wall 0.25” airspace steel studs and soft insulation 3.25” (R-13) sliding double-glass panels

gypsum board

vapor retarder hinges tracks storage space above bathroom

sliding metal beam

electrical wiring

concrete wall

backer rod and sealant tracks

permanent metal beam plumbing

reinforced concrete polystyrene foam (rigid insulation)

concrete wall grade

Front elevation

Long section


slide in and out. The bedroom space has been placed in the floor, and can be accesed by sliding away a metal panel. A kitchennette was built along the concrete wall, and the bathroom is enclosed by two stable walls and a sliding door.

PENTAGON UCHI

1

2

3

Floor panel T track

1

2

Sliding door track

3

Sliding pannel T track

4

5

Concrete to steel hinge

4

5

Folding glass panel hinge

Detail of moving systems

Front moveable concrete wall

Steel beams on moveable panels

Folding Glass Panels

Concrete Electric space Kitchenette countertop

Beams Hinges Tracks

Double glass Hinges

Concrete Slabs

Steel Beams on concrete slab

Back stable wall

Beams Hinges Tracks

Gypsum Board Soft Insulation Air Space concrete

This project is a microhouse situated next to a beach in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. This location has a year-round temperate climate with temperatures as low as 62°F in January and as high as 90°F in August. Because of this environment, a cooling and heating system is not necessary inside the house. The microhouse is made of prefabricated parts, these are divided into two primary elements — concrete panels and double-glass panels. The concrete panels are stable whereas the glass panels are moving. The glass panels on the left half of the house can be slid up to allow entry and table space, and slid in to provide enclosure. The glass panels in the right half of the house can be slid inwards to accomodate small furniture space and ventilation. In order for the glass panels to move about, a track and hinge system is necessary. The track and hinge systems are built along the stable metal beams so the moveable beams can slide in and out. The bedroom space has been placed in the floor, and can be accesed by sliding away a metal panel. A kitchennette was built along the concrete wall, and the bathroom is enclosed by two stable walls and a sliding door.

Exploded material and tectonic system

Folding outwards Folding inwards Allows for entrance Air ventialtion in kitchenette area

Panel diagram Can function as table or shelve Air ventialtion in bedroom area

Fall 2019 - Professor Daekwon Park in collaboration with Susy Quintero & Yiqun Feng


SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY

Design a library program, an architectural intervention in the dense urban environment of New York next to the High Line. Within the program is an inherent assumption about hierarchy. Rethink the normative relationship between library and context and to develop a special programmatic element or figure that operates as the hierarchical or driving force behind the design. Consider connectivity, engagement, program, and space. This library is accessible from the High Line, and explores elements of transparency, extrusion, and wrapping. The exteriors of this library consist of a solid central facade wrapped with glass windows that are coated with transparent mesh. As visitors enter the library, rather than being met with the books, they enter into the activity space. The books rest along the other end of the glass-mesh facade. The walkways extend the visitors to the end of the hall, where they are met with a massive wall of books.

Spring 2019 - Professor Joel Kerner


Kit of Parts

TRANSPARENT MESH FACADE

CENTRAL SOLID FACADE

BOOKSHELVES

CIRCULATION & PROGRAM

TRANSPARENT MESH FACADE


FEET SECTION A

N

FEET 2 4 8 16

10

UP

11

5

11

9 1. LOBBY 2. EXHIBITION 3. MAIN READING ROOM 4. CLASSROOM 5. STACKS 6. ARCHIVE 7. OFFICE 8. OUTDOOR SPACE 9. RESTROOM 10.HIGH LINE PASSAGE 11. STUDY ROOM

FEET

3RD FL

N

2

4

8

16

2

4

8

16


producing analytical and systematic 2D drawings of objects from swept profiles, block rearrangements, and boolean sectional profiles

PROFILES ROTATED IN PLAN

PROFILE A: EXTRUDE

PROFILE B: EXTRUDE

PROFILES ROTATED IN SECTION

BLOCK REARRANGEMENT RESULT

3 VIEW TOP

4

Drawing Geometric Logic & Construction Process

PROFILES CUT

ELEVATION

1 2

TOP VIEW

ELEVATION

B A ARC182: Representa�on II Alphabets

Exercise 02C Winnie Tam

B A

PROFILE A+B EXTRUDE

BOOLEANED RESULT


ALPHABETS

selection of works in digital and photographic form that explores the Helvetic font

Spring 2019 - Professor Molly Hunker


some personal works in my free time

PHOTOGRAPHY


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Y2.2.1 Portfolio | Selected Works  

Y2.2.1 Portfolio | Selected Works  

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