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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


MAY 2009

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Welcome Vol. 5, Issue 5

May 2009 17 Bridge Square Northfield, MN 55057

507/663-7937 neg@northfieldguide.com Publisher: Rob Schanilec By All Means Graphics Advertising: Abby Erickson abby@northfieldguide.com or 507/663-7937

to the NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE™ Your No. 1 Guide to what’s going on in and around Northfield – music, food fun.

Contents

Local Galleries ............................................................... 6

Local Focus: Jay Hansen............................... 7 Theater ........................................................................ 8-9 Happenings – Up Close ........................ 8-25, 34-36 A Month at a Glance..........................................26-29 Historic Happenings: Susan Hvistendahl .... 37-38 Sports ............................................................................ 43

Contributors: Susan Hvistendahl Locallygrownnorthfield.org Northfield.org Breanna Zarbinski

Clubs, Classes and More ......................................... 44

Online: at northfieldguide.com! A flippin’ cool digital edition, downloadable PDF, archives and content submission form.

On the Cover: Jason Paulson of the band, Grayson (full

Dining ........................................................................... 45 Just Curious: Jim and Joan Spaulding ...46-47 band in bottom right inset – Matt Gray, Mike Gleason, Paulson, Pete Berven and Brian Chelminiak) and in the bottom left inset, Chad Johnson. Johnson will be opening for Grayson May 23 at the Grand.

GET IN THE GUIDE Here’s how it works – we list happenings for free. I know – that’s cool and a great service to the community – but we want our publication to be a great resource for our readers to get out and take it in. Of course, we love our advertisers – and we’ll love you, too, if you get us your happenings information AND advertise. Our rates are affordable and you get a FULL MONTH OF COOL EXPOSURE! But whether you advertise or not – you need to get information our way: title, time, place, cost, description, photo(s). We’re easy to work with so don’t be shy. There’s a form online at northfieldguide.com, give us a call, 507/663-7937, or e-mail to neg@northfieldguide.com – we’re nice people. And to advertise – ask for Abby. She’s cheerful, too, mostly.

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Support Our Advertisers A Bag Lady ................................................................ 32 Anna’s Closet ............................................................ 32 a. renee salon........................................................... 33 Barefoot Studio ........................................................ 30 Bridge Square Barbers ........................................... 24 By All Means Graphics .......................................... 43 Cannon Valley Regional Orchestra....................17 Carleton College .................................... Inside Front Chapati ................................................................25, 45 College City Beverage ........................................... 34 The Contented Cow ........................................24, 45 Creating a Ruckus ....................................................10 Culver’s ................................................................23, 45 digs............................................................................... 30 Eastman Music ......................................................... 25 El Tequila .................................................................... 45 First National Bank ................................ Back Cover Froggy Bottoms River Pub ............................ 21, 45 Pam Gillespie, Realtor® ......................................... 22 Grand Event Center .................................................19 The HideAway ................................................... 31, 45 James Gang Coffeehouse .............................. 7, 45 Jesse James Lanes ...................................................19 Just Food Co-op ....................................................... 43 KYMN 1080 Radio.................................................. 35 Dianne Kyte, Realtor®.............................................10 Landscape Artisans of Rochester .........................4 Maltby Nature Preserve .........................................11 Marguerite’s Salon ...................................................17 Monkey See Monkey Read ..................................31 Northfield Arts School .................................................5 Northfield Chamber of Commerce................Cover Northfield Dance Academy ....................................16 Northfield Downtown Development Corp......11 Northfield Garden Club ..........................................21 Northfield Golf Club ........................................ 18, 45 Northfield Kitchen Concepts ............................... 26 Northfield Liquor Store...........................................14 Northfield Public Schools Community Services... 15 Northfield Retirement Community............... 39-42 Ole Café ...............................................................30, 45 Oolala.......................................................................... 32 Paper Petulum...........................................................31 Paradise Center for the Arts .................................15 PJ’s Fabrics and Crafts ..............................................9 Present Perfect ......................................................... 32 Quarterback Club ............................................... 9, 45 Quality Bakery .................................................... 9, 45 Ragstock..................................................................... 32 Rare Pair ..................................................................... 32 Rice County Humane Society ............................. 20 Rueb ‘N’ Stein ...................................................... 9, 45 The Secret Attic ........................................................ 30 The Sketchy Artist ....................................................31 St. Olaf College....................................... Inside Front Schmidt Homes.........................................................18 Sisters Ugly .................................................................31 Jan Stevens, Realtor® ..............................................14 swag ............................................................................ 30 Sweet Pea’s Loft & Toys & Treats ..........................7 The Tavern ................................................................ 45 Three Links .................................................................10 Tiny’s Dogs All Day ........................................... 6, 45 Women and Kids on Division ............................ 32 Willingers Golf Club........................................... 3, 45

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A vision for a visual arts market/destination within our ‘arts town’ By Dean Kjerland, ArtOnWater Gallery After hosting 35 exhibitions at my ArtOnWater Gallery, I am convinced that deliberate “art-market-action” in support of visual artists is needed and doable. Visual artists have invested in skills development, acquired supplies and equipment, advanced their mastery of their media, and made framing decisions to create both a work of art and a product. But they must also make an additional investment in market making.

We have, as a community, explored our arts town dreams and have concluded that such a designation would be good for economic development. We need to build on our various assets to make it happen. This grand vision – a big dream presently being subjected to trial by committee – is moving toward a set of ideas needing plans, funding and champions; and ultimately, the application of hard work by tireless doers, exploitation of diverse assets, and the need for funding (presently scarce).

Last July, a small independent group of visual artists and arts services providers got caught Our community has perhaps “…build a viable arts, eats and entertainment up in an idea and agreed to more than the average (for a take a look at existing assets town our size) job opportueconomy downtown, ultimately contributing including built space (undenities to support some of its rutilized riverwalk), invested substantially to the economic development artists (public, private and facilities (studios, classrooms, institutional). Though local potential of our arts town.” –Dean Kjerland galleries) and available real estate has generally been resources (artists, designers, expensive, many artists have teachers, equipment, suppliers) found affordable alternatives to ideal, personal, studio space and plus food and hospitality venues in the center of our historic housing. We as a nation have yet to come up with affordable downtown. Why not, right now, create a neighborhood associahealth care for artists. It appears the marketplace may be the tion, organize a visual arts market destination entity, harness best, or merely likeliest means of providing support for artists our existing resources, build a non-profit, for-business effort, – whether its through benefactors, private or commercial comand light a small fire in support of the greater, perhaps longermissions, collectors, or direct (or on-line) patron purchases. term realizable arts town economic development dream?

“Art is found not only in the painter’s studio or in the halls of a museum, it also has it place in the store, the shop, the factory, and the home.“

Art & Soul Enriching the Community Through the Arts Presented by:

Gwen & Greg Smith Northfield Art School (507) 645-6008

As we got started, we found an opportunity to partner with the Southern Minnesota Initiative Foundation in their Town Meeting Initiative program to train us to do what we envisioned, with the potential of a grant to get us focused and to fund specific project ideas. SMIF has helped us to look carefully at our assets, identify doers and leaders, bring in community-wide resources, etc., to build a strong sustainable plan. We are now focusing on several realities: a specific asset-rich neighborhood, a concentration of relevant resources, the need for a vital market to support and encourage visual artists, and a manageable approach to creating a destination which, if we meet their expectations, will attract more patrons (buyers) who will contribute (in visual arts purchases and in consuming other products and services in the neighborhood, and throughout the greater community) toward helping build a viable arts, eats and entertainment economy downtown, ultimately contributing substantially to the economic development potential of our arts town. The greater community must imagine and begin work on other arts sectors, build on other assets, earn other grants, and support more artists and those who provide related services. We look forward to collaborations in support of those efforts. Right now, we need your help with our Riverwalk Arts Quarter market destination idea.

Original Art by:

Jay Hansen http://patient-247.deviantart.com

For more information, or to get involved, contact Dean Kjerland and dean@artonwater.com or 507/786-9700. “Having banished art to the museum, we fail to give it a place in ordinary life.” Quotes from “Care of the Soul” - Thomas Moore. 1992. (Page 285)’

MAY 2009

Opinions and content wanted! Submit your happenings-related editorial to info@northfieldguide.com or visit us at 17 Bridge Square.

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swag

ArtOnWater

The Flaten Art Museum

217 S. Water St. • 786-9700 artonwater.com American Opal Glass – “Art at 2400 Degrees” – One-of-a-kind works of decorative art conceived, designed and presented on site.

Dittmann Center 1520 St. Olaf Ave. • 646-3556 stolaf.edu/depts/art/ Senior Show 2, May 3-11. Opening reception, May 3, 2-4 p.m. with senior introductions at 2:30 p.m.

ArtOrg

All Senior Show, May 18-24 – Reception commencement, May 24, 11 a.m.-noon

Moving Walls Gallery 200 Division St. • 645-2555 artorg.info

Carleton College Art Gallery One N. College St. • 646-4469 carleton.edu/campus/gallery Natural Resourcery: Studio Faculty Go Outdoors through May 10 Western culture romanticizes nature and exploits its resources. Natural Resourcery presents drawings, paintings, photographs, sculpture and other works by Carleton faculty that confront our paradoxical relationship to the natural world. Carleton College Senior Show 2009

May 15-June 12 Studio Arts Major’s Integrative Exercise (comps). Opening reception in the Art Gallery Friday, May 15, 7 p.m. Gould Library through August:

Photographers & Authors – highlighting Gisele Freund (1909-2001), who created portraits of some of the 20th century’s most interesting literary figures. That Marvelous Legend: The Canals of Mars – late 19th-century astronomical maps that led scientists to believe that canal-like structures existed on the surface of Mars. Vispoeologee: An Anthology of Visual Literature – collaborative works by local writers, artists and bibliophiles presented by Minnesota Center for Book Arts. Pulp Fiction and Fact – work of students in paper arts, a course on hand papermaking taught by Jeff Rathermel of Minnesota Center for Book Arts through June 15.

Grezzo Gallery 16 Bridge Square • 581-2161 grezzogallery.com

Northfield Arts Guild 304 Division St. • 645-8877 www.northfieldartsguild.org Articulations – Emerging Artists’ Exhibit through May 16 – the annual St. Olaf apprentice/Carleton intern exhibit. Mixed media. Northfield High School Honors Exhibit: Where the Wild Things are Created, May 20-June 13 Opening reception May 23, 7-9 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts

423 Division St. • 663-8870 Elegant ceramic works of the female form by Minnesota sculptor, Jude Ryan Reiling. Reiling is known for her of oneof-a-kind sculptures with themes such as beauty, loss, anticipation and inspiration. One of the delicate pieces featured is a collaboration with Minnesota jewelry artist, Katerina Pflipsen Olivova. It combines the strength of clay with the subtle movement of sterling silver.

Art Studios with open hours Barefoot Studio Carla Thompson, artist 418 Division St. • 612/309-6084 www.barefootstudio.net Jewelry of Marisa Martinez, Amanda Stremcha and Leanne Stremcha through May 22. Eight artists – one night only exhibit, May 8, 5-9 p.m. Heather Lawrenz, Dawn Makarios, Marisa Martinex, Shona Murphy, Amanda Stremcha, Leanne Stremcha, Carla Thompson and Rachel Vogel. Right Brain Ventures Art Barb Matz, artist 305 So. Water St. • 507/581-0425 www.rbv-Art.com

Carlander Family Gallery Got a studio with open hours? 321 Central Ave., Faribault • 332-7372 Get listed – neg@northfieldguide.com paradisecenterforthearts.org Beyond Landscapes through May 16. Judy Saye-Willis, Theresa Harsma and Lynn Davidson – creative women that collaborate to create a landscape-style environment using cast offs of our society – layering, stitching, wrapping and building an other-worldly scene. Dumpster divas and savers, they show us French Fries the possibilities of unusual and diverse Soft Serve Ice Cream materials.

Coming soon to Tiny’s Frozen Yogurt

Specialty tobacco, T-shirts, quality cigars, postcards, convenience items and more!

The Garage 18 Bridge Square • www.artfuel.com the art of fuel Grand opening May 2, 6-9 p.m. Meet the owners/artists and enjoy a new edition to the Northfield art scene.

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(507) 645-6862 Downtown Northfield 321 Division Street

SAVE AMERICAEAT AT TINY’S © NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


“A

n uncharted realm where beauty and the plague collide, imagination is a creation without cause. Chaos is not feared, only fed upon. And the impossibility of transformation is only the beginning of a future yet to be born.

Jaybird’s mirepoix combo meal: watercolor-pen ink-markers

more at: http://patient-247.deviantart.com

• Home Accessories & Decor • Furniture • Nostalgic Toys • Stuffed Animals

Girls Nite Out! Register to win a piece of custom furniture and enjoy refreshments.

220 Division St. • 507-645-6555 www.sweetpeasloft.com MAY 2009

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Theater

Help Wanted

The Very Short Play Festival 4

Family friendly/ mostly by kids plays – May 1, 8 p.m. and May 2, 2 p.m. Winning and not quite as family friendly plays by adults – May 2, 8 p.m. Northfield Arts Guild Theater This festival entertains with short comedic blasts, punchy character portraits, diminutive dramatic explosions and sometimes undefinable theatrical sketches, all clocking in at ten minutes or shorter. What will this year’s VSPF IV hold? Plenty of fun, plenty of laughs, plenty of refreshingly quick and interesting bubbles of theater floating about the Arts Guild stage. Tickets: $8. Proceeds benefit the Northfield Arts Guild. Student-written One Acts

May 1-2, 8 p.m. Nourse Little Theater, Carleton The Experimental Theater Board presents these annual productions including “Vesuvius” by Morgan Holmes, “The Blank Slate Experiment” by Audrey Carlsen and “The True Tale of Cupid and Psyche” by Jennifer Bigelow. Dial M for Murder

May 1-2, 7-9, 7:30 p.m.; May 3, 2 p.m. Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Frederick Knott’s famous thriller about a man who married for money and now plans to murder for the same reason. This “perfect” crime doesn’t quite come off as planned. Tickets: $11/adult; $7/ children 12 and under. For information, email merlinmn@charter.net. Winsome Women: One Woman, Five Characters

May 4, 8:15 p.m. Speech-Theater Building, Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf Camryn Reynolds will assume five of the most beloved female musical theater characters of all time: Eliza Doolittle from “My Fair Lady,” Clara Johnson from “The Light in the Piazza,” Liza Elliot from “Lady in the Dark,” Miss Lovett from “Sweeney Todd” and Ilse from “Spring Awakening.”

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May 8, 8 p.m. Severance Great Hall, Carleton St. Paul-based Latino theater company Teatro del Pueblo presents this short play depicting a landmark case involving human rights of undocumented workers – followed by discussion with cast members. In English with some Spanish. In/Bed/Dead

May 8-9, 15-16, 8 p.m. Arena Theater, Carleton An original play written and produced especially for Carleton by acclaimed Twin Cities playwright Barbra Berlovitz. For reservations, call 507/222-4471. Promicide

May 8-9, 7:30 p.m. Northfield High School World premiere of Northfielder Brendon Etter’s first full-length play. Everything’s perfect at Cylla’s school as she leads her “interesting” committee in planning the ultimate prom. But the principal and school board loom ominously, reminding her that failure is not an option. Pressure mounts, weirdness vexes and the boy of Cylla’s dreams gets a little out of hand. What’s a girl to do? Whom should she trust? What should she wear? Tickets: $6 adults, $4 students. Opera: Utopia Limited

May 10-11, 8 p.m. Christiansen Hall, Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf The hilarious, rarely seen, Gilbert & Sullivan operetta, “Utopia Limited,” or “The Flowers of Progress,” is a ridiculous farce depicting a failed attempt at anglicizing a Utopian island. The Pillowman

May 15-16, 8 p.m. Nourse Little Theater, Carleton Presented by The Experimental Theater Board and Martin McDonagh, writer of the film “In Bruges.”

Hampstead Players – “Learning Through Theater” Series

Bahl Family Auditorium, Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Geared for grades K-8. $5/person, $3/person for groups of 10 or more. Call 507/332-7372 for information. Pinocchio, May 18, 1:30 p.m. Carlo Collodi’s Pinocchio is the timeless tale of an Italian woodcarver, Geppetto, who carves a son out of a block of pine. Join the wooden marionette on his journey to become a real boy! Through Pinocchio’s mischievous adventures, he discovers that to truly be human is to be good-hearted and brave. This is a story of self-discovery, transformation and redemption. Through this play, we hope to teach students the importance of honesty, education and gratitude. Greek Myths, May 19, 1:30 p.m. Epictitus, the mask-maker, and Ovid, a poet, will take you on a journey of the imagination as you explore the heroes and gods of ancient Greece! Follow Greece’s greatest hero, Hercules, on his many adventures, as he battles mythological creatures and warriors. Through mask work, poetry and swordplay, students will discover the early stories of Greece. This play is designed to bring students closer to early civilizations through an appreciation of the similarities that all people share. Greek Mythology for Kids 2 stands alone and is the second in our series. Don’t Dress for Dinner

May 22-23, 8 p.m., Nourse Little Theater, Carleton Presented by the Experimental Theater Board and Marc Camoletti. As You Like It

May 29-30, 8 p.m., Mudd Hall Amphitheater, Carleton The Experimental Theater Board presents this comic masterpiece by William Shakespeare. Liberal Arts: The Musical

May 29-30, 8 p.m., Nourse Theater, Carleton The Student Musical Theater group presents this original evening of song and dance.

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Auditions: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

May 3, 3-5:30 p.m., May 4, 6:30-9 p.m. Performances Aug. 7-9, 13-15 The Northfield Arts Guild Theater A happy tangle of plots and subplots about the loves and adventures of mortals and mystical beings. This timeless classic features the mischievous Puck, Titania and Oberon, assorted fairies, magic potions and mistaken identities. Directed by Susan Carlson. Roles available for ages 15 and up. It’s recommended that actors prepare a short comic monologue, preferably Shakespeare, and come prepared to read from the script and to move. Call 507/645-8877 to schedule an audition.

Celebrate any occasion with a beautiful Quality Bakery cake decorated to your specifications! First Communion • Confirmation Mother’s Day • Graduation Memorial Day Weekend • Father’s Day

pies • cookies • buns • dinner rolls

Since 1949 • 410 Division Street • Northfield, MN • 507-645-8392

South Pacific

May 21, 7-9 p.m.; May 23, 9-11 a.m. Performances July 9-12. Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault A deeply felt Rodgers & Hammerstein drama with songs including “Some Enchanted Evening,” “Younger Than Springtime,” “Bali Ha’i,” “There is Nothin’ like a Dame” and “A Wonderful Guy.” It portrays Americans stationed in an alien culture in wartime – as relevant today as when it first thrilled audiences in 1949.

Need Printing? Call By All Means Graphics for small to large-run projects – 507/663-7937 or stop in at 17 Bridge Square, Northfield

Teaming up to Help Your Team!

Your Two Favorite Restaurants have Joined the Team! Eat at J. Grundy’s Rueb-n-Stein or The Quarterback Club Monday-Friday, 5-9 p.m. and 5% percent of your food receipt will be donated to the Northfield Booster Club. Simply drop your dining receipt in the Booster Club Box at either restaurant. MAY 2009

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HAPPE N I NG S FRIDAY, MAY 1 Goods for Goods: The Great Northfield Rummage Raid for Charity

This is the first of a three-day event. Get great deals and find treasures at rummage/refreshment/plant sale sites. Proceeds benefit charities or causes selected by each site. For information, visit www.5thbridge.org or contact Candy Taylor at 507/5813017 for a map of sites. 10th Annual Science Symposium: New Technologies, New Decisions

Buntrock Commons and Regents Hall, St. Olaf Recent developments in robotics and genetics raise questions about what it means to be human and what is the appropriate use of new technologies. The 2009 Science Symposium speakers will explore some of these ethical issues through the lenses of science and theology. Three lectures by distinguished scholars and student poster sessions. All events free and open to the public. Go to Stolaf.edu/events/sciencesymposium for a complete schedule.

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The Great Northfield Minnesota Book Raid • 9 a.m.-9 p.m.

Northfield Ice Arena This is the fourth of a five-day annual book fair to benefit Northfield Hospital’s Breast Cancer Care Center. Convocation: Kip Fulbeck • 10:50-11:50 a.m.

Skinner Chapel, Carleton This award-winning artist, slam poet and filmmaker is the author of “Permanence: Tattoo Portraits,” “Part Asian, 100% Hapa,” and “Paper Bullets: A Fictional Autobiography,” as well as the director of a dozen short films including “Banana Split” and “Lilo & Me.” Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV and PBS, and has performed and exhibited in more than 20 countries. He speaks nationwide on identity, multiraciality and pop culture, mixing together spoken word, stand-up comedy, political activism and personal stories. Fulbeck is a professor of art at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an avid surfer, guitar player, motorcycle rider, ocean lifeguard and pug enthusiast. A complete overachiever despite being only half Chinese, Kip is also a nationally ranked Masters swimmer. The title of his presentation is “What Are You? The Changing Face of America.”

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Occasional Jazz • 5-7 p.m.

Karaoke • 9 p.m.

The Contented Cow

Rueb ‘N’ Stein Goodsell Observatory Open House • 9-11 p.m.

Arts Ala Carte • 6 p.m.

Northfield High School Companydance Spring Concert 7:30 p.m.

Speech-Theater Building, Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf An eclectic evening of dance featuring high athletic and emotionally charged works by guest artists Robin Stiehm and Peggy Paver of Dancing People Company and Eddie Oroyan along with faculty works by Janice Roberts and Heather Klopchin. Tickets: $8. Call 507/786-8987. Occasional Jazz

Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

Goodsell Observatory, Carleton Visitors can use the observatory to view stars, nebulas and planets. Carleton physics and astronomy professors are available to answer questions. Dress appropriately for the weather! Cancelled if skies are cloudy. Joe Meyer

The Tavern Lounge

Paradise Center for the Arts See page 8.

SATURDAY, MAY 2

Theater: Student-written One Acts • 8 p.m.

This is the second of a three-day event. See May 1 description.

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton See page 8.

Bagels and Birds • 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Theater: The Very Short Play Festival • 8 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 8. Jazz 1 Concert • 8:15 p.m.

The Lion’s Pause, St. Olaf Foreman Band • 8:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow Classic rock and reggae.

Goods for Goods: The Great Northfield Rummage Raid

River Bend Nature Center Sit back inside with coffee and a bagel to watch wild habitat activity through the window with a naturalist. Free. The Great Northfield Minnesota Book Raid • 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Northfield Ice Arena This is the last of a five-day event. See May 1 description.

The Twin Cities Muzzle Loading Club In Association with the Science Center at Maltby Nature Preserve Proudly Presents the 7th Annual

Cannon River Rendezvous Memorial Day Weekend: May 23-25, 2009 Saturday & Sunday: 10am-5pm, Monday: 10am-2pm Admission: FREE Donations Accepted ($10 Fee for Parking) The Science Center at Maltby Nature Preserve 789 Sciota Trail, Randolph, MN 55065 Phone: 507-664-0770 email: info@the sciencecentermnp.org Map and directions at: www.thesciencecentermnp.org

MAY 2009

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SATURDAY, MAY 2 continued

SUNDAY, MAY 3

Healthy Kids Day • 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Goods for Goods: The Great Northfield Rummage Raid.

Northfield High School A free, fun-filled morning of interactive games, family activity, health give-aways and more! Fire truck, ambulance, police and sheriff cars, National Guard inflatable obstacle coarse, youth sport galore and more. Call 507/635-0088 for details.

Curbside free day! This is the last of a three-day event. See May 1 description. Pancake Breakfast • 8 a.m.-Noon

Theater: The Very Short Play Festival 4 • 2 and 8 p.m.

St. Olaf Handbell Choir Spring Concert • 2 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 8.

Boe Chapel, St. Olaf Conducted by Jill Mahr.

The Garage Grand Opening • 6-9 p.m.

Theater: Dial M for Murder • 2 p.m.

18 Bridge Square Northfield arts maveric Nick Sinclair is back at 18 Bridge Square (he worked for the Entertainment Guide when we were in that space) with another artistic venture – this one is a multiartist-owner veture focusing on the art of fuel. Check it out.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 8.

Companydance Spring Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Speech-Theater Building, Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf See May 1 description. Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

Dittmann Center, Flaten Museum and Groot Gallery, St. Olaf See page 6. Jazz 2 and Jazz 3 Concert • 4:30 p.m.

Lion’s Pause, St. Olaf Conducted by David Hagedorn. Boe Memorial Chapel, St. Olaf Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

Theater: Student-written One Acts • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Join discussions on local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For topics, go to www.contentedcow.com.

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton See page 8.

Roger Anderson Trio

Roger Anderson Trio

Northern Roots Session • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow

The Contented Cow Acoustic music with roots in the north, particularly the Nordic countries.

Jon Manners

Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

Jon Manners

The Contented Cow Stop in anytime to sign up. Foursomes compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug” the week following their triumph!

Northern Roots Session

MONDAY, MAY 4 Man Cave Monday: Movie Night • 7 p.m.

Bohemian Duo

The Bohemian Duo

Rueb ‘N’ Stein Chad Johnson and Russell Franek, former front men of “Communication Breakdown” playing originals and covers including the likes of Lynyrd Skynyrd, Van Morrison, CCR and Johnny Cash.

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Art Opening Reception: Senior Show 2 • 2-4 p.m.

Northfield Youth Choirs Spring Concert • 6 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts See page 8.

The Tavern Lounge Voted Northfield’s Best Male Musician 2009! Playing guitar since 1957, Manners has been in bands including: The Stingrays, The Fabulous Intruders, The Critters, The Sticky Wickets, Yellow Fish, The Glass Eye, The Windjammers, No Dice, Rockaday Jonny, Diesel Goose, Zebra, Berceuse, Shriek, Neoneon, The Kitty Younger Band, Flight Time, The Great? Imposters. In the early ’70s, he associated with Andrew Loog Oldham, one-time producer for The Rolling Stones. Now playing solo, he says “it’s easier to call a rehearsal and it gives me complete control over the songlist.”

Northfield Ballroom Sponsored by the Northfield Lions Club.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault “Man Cave Monday” will feature movies that ONLY men can stand to watch! From “Slap Shot” to “Starship Troopers” this will be YOUR time. The first Monday of each month. Refreshments available. Tickets: $5. Poker • 7 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Play Texas Hold ’em for points and prizes. Free! High School Band Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Middle School Auditorium Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow This weekly open acoustic jam session plays from the Nordic countries and their immigrant communities in North America.

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Winsome Women: One Women, Five Characters • 8:15 p.m.

Speech-Theater Building, Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf See page 8. TUESDAY, MAY 5 Bluegrass and Old Time Jam Session • 7:30-10 p.m.

The Contented Cow Bluegrass and old-time musicians of all levels gather to jam.

Lecture: Lasers Used in the Study and Treatment of Pigment Degradation on Artwork • 3:15 p.m.

Regents Hall 390, St. Olaf Renowned art conservation scientist, Gregory Smith, addresses the use of lasers as a tool for materials characterization and for the cleaning of artwork. Recent studies by Smith and his collaborators explore the potential application of lasers to the treatment of blackened lead white pigments. Lecture: European Identity – Reality, Fiction, or Both? 4:30 p.m.

Book Reading: Mike Perry • 7:30 p.m.

Gould Library Athenaeum, Carleton Acclaimed Spanish writer and Headley House Distinguished Visitor-in-Residence José Ovejero presents this lecture.

Northfield Arts Guild Perry’s book, “Coop: A Year of Poultry, Pigs and Parenting,” will be on sale at the event and is bargain-priced at Monkey See Monkey Read.

One Night Only Art Show • 5-9 p.m. José Ovejero

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 Lecture/Booksigning: Lawrence Weschler • 7:30-9 p.m.

Boliou Hall Auditorium, Carleton Lawrence Weschler’s talk will focus on two giants of contemporary art – Robert Irwin and David Hockney. A long-time writer for The New Yorker, Weschler was awarded the 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism for his collection, “Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences.” Copies will be available for purchase at the event. THURSDAY, MAY 7 Lecture: What’s Wrong with this Picture? The Technical Analysis of a Known Forgery • 7:30 p.m.

Regents Hall 150, St. Olaf Renowned art conservation scientist, Gregory Smith, explores the role of the conservator and conservation scientist in authenticity studies that straddle the arts-science interface. Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

Barefoot Studio See page 6.

Open Stage/Distinction • 7 p.m.

Dittmann Center, Wagner/Bundgaar Studio One, St. Olaf An eclectic dance concert and work that seniors have done to apply for distinction. Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts See page 8. Theater: Promicide • 7:30 p.m.

High School Auditorium See page 8. Girls Nite Out • 4:30 p.m.-1 a.m.

Downtown Northfield A wildly popular annual affair with shopping and special events culminating at the Grand with live entertainment, desserts and dancing. Tickets available at Sisters Ugly, Rare Pair and Women & Kids on Division. See specials and schedules on pages 30-32.

Paradise Center for the Arts See page 8. Todd Thompson Trio

Wake-Robin • 7:30-9 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms

Bittersweet A local duo on strings playing Celtic and Civil War period tunes.

Todd Thompson Trio

Theater: Help Wanted • 8 p.m.

Karaoke • 9 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge Local acoustic music.

Wake-Robin

Theater: In/Bed/Dead • 8 p.m.

FRIDAY, MAY 8 Convocation: Edmund Pellegrino • 10:50-11:50 a.m.

Skinner Chapel, Carleton Edmund Pellegrino has played a central role in shaping the fields of bioethics and the philosophy of medicine. He has authored or co-authored 20 books and is the founding editor of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy. Pellegrino is Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Medical Ethics at the Center for Clinical Bioethics at Georgetown University Medical Center. He has been named to the International Bioethics Committee of the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization and serves as chairman of the President’s Council on Bioethics. The title of his presentation is “The Moral Foundation of Medical Practice.”

MAY 2009

Severance Great Hall, Carleton See page 8.

Arena Theater, Carleton See page 8. Full Moon Night Hike • 8:30-9:30 p.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Join a naturalist to explore RBNC at night during the full moon! You will be on and off-trail during the hike. Moderate hills may be included. Dress for the weather and be prepared to be outside the whole time. Leave your flashlights at home – you’ll use your night vision! Free and open to all ages. Karaoke • 9 p.m.

Rueb ‘N’ Stein

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13


FRIDAY, MAY 8 continued Northwoods Eclectic

The Contented Cow Joe Carey

The Tavern Lounge SATURDAY, MAY 9 International Migratory Bird Day Joe Care Photo by Rob Meyer

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Go to www.rbnc.org for details.

Take Mom to the Movie • 1 p.m.

Guest Artist Concert: John Milbauer, piano • 7-8:30 p.m.

Concert Hall, Carleton Works by George Crumb, Mario Davidovsky, Claude Debussy, Ludwig van Beethoven and Béla Bartók. Renowned pianist John Milbauer has been a frequent guest at major music festivals. Concerts in 2009 will take him across the United States as well as to Europe, Asia and South America. He has performed as soloist with orchestras across North America and has collaborated with members of the Metropolitan Opera, National Symphony, L.A. Philharmonic, and the Royal Philharmonic in London. He is currently on the faculty of The University of Arizona School of Music, he also teaches and performs at the Chautauqua Festival in New York each summer.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Part of Mother’s Day Market (featuring affordable, fun and creative wares by local artisans, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) – get together with your grandmother, granddaughter, mom and the kids – anyone that gets “left behind” on the fishing opener (Mother’s Day weekend). We can’t mention the title, but, mama mia it’s a good one! Free.

Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

International Festival • 2-4 p.m.

Theater: In/Bed/Dead • 8 p.m.

Sayles-Hill Great Space/Great Space Balcony, Carleton A Carleton tradition that grows stronger and bigger each year. This year’s festival will feature a spectacular range of international cuisine, music, performances, activities and information tables.

SOUTH METRO

Now is a great time to buy your first home Phone: 507-663-1234 ext. 19 Cell: 507-244-0500 janstevens@realtor.com

Paradise Center for the Arts See page 8. Theater: Promicide • 7:30 p.m.

High School Auditorium See page 8. Arena Theater, Carleton See page 8. Bonnie & the Clydes 8-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge Take a step back and resurrect songs of love, peace and flower power from the late ’60s and early ’70s. The Bonnie is Bonnie Jean Flom. The Clydes are Bill McGrath and Scott McMillan. Karaoke • 9 p.m.

L&M Bar and Grill, Dundas

Realtor & Certified Residential Specialist

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


DJ Music • 9 p.m.

MONDAY, MAY 11

The Rueb ‘N’ Stein

Poker • 7 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Play Texas Hold ’em for points and prizes. Free!

Jasper Lepak and Art Vandalay

The Contented Cow SUNDAY, MAY 10

Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

St. Olaf Orchestra Concert • 3:30 p.m.

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf With senior soloists. Nordic Jam

Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow Join in on discussions concerning local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For information on topics, go to www.contentedcow.com. Northern Roots Session • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow Acoustic music with roots in the north, particularly the Nordic countries. Listen, jam, enjoy. Opera: Utopia Limited • 8 p.m.

Christiansen Hall, Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf See page 8. Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Stop in anytime to sign up. Foursomes will complete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug” the week following their triumph!

MAY 2009

The Contented Cow This weekly open acoustic jam session plays from the Nordic countries and their immigrant communities in North America.

Opera: Utopia Limited • 8 p.m.

Christiansen Hall, Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf See page 8. TUESDAY, MAY 12 Lecture: Why All the Song and Dance? Taking Bollywood Seriously • 4 p.m.

Gould Library Athenaeum, Carleton Carleton professor of English Arnab Chakladar will trace the history of this popular form of Hindi cinema. Bluegrass and Old Time Jam Session • 7:30-10 p.m.

The Contented Cow This ongoing event is for bluegrass and old-time musicians of all levels, cultivating an inclusive atmosphere of musicians and an evening of entertainment for the audience.

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

15


FRIDAY, MAY 15

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13

Convocation: Susannah Morgan • 10:50-11:50 a.m.

Wake-Robin • 1-2 p.m.

Bittersweet A local duo on strings playing Celtic and Civil War period tunes. THURSDAY, MAY 14 High School Orchestra Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Middle School Auditorium Karaoke • 9 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Study Hall with Peter & Terry

The Contented Cow

Back to the ’50s Spring Party • 6 p.m.

Ian Alexy

The Tavern Lounge Singer/songwriter/guitarist Ian Alexy offers deft finger-picking, jazzy melodies and heartwarming tales of a well-traveled 20-something-year-old.

Ian Alexy

Skinner Chapel, Carleton Carleton alumn Susannah Morgan is executive director of Food Bank of Alaska where she has doubled its annual food distribution and founded numerous innovative projects, such as Alaska’s first Mobile Food Pantry. She is known for her leadership in collaborative anti-hunger projects and participates actively in the national anti-hunger movement. Her presentation, “Fighting Hunger in America,” will investigate the faces and facts of hunger in America based on the most current research, delving into what we know and don’t know about why so many people are hungry in the richest country in the world. Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Social hour starts at 6, music and dancing at 7. Fun ’50s-style food and music, a raffle and live and silent auctions. Admission: $15.

Mini Theme Camps (Ages 3-12: June 22-25, Mon-Thurs) 4:00-5:15 (Ages 6-8) • 5:15-6:30 (Ages 3-5) • 6:30-7:45 (Ages 9-12) For $75 you receive: 6 hours of dance instruction with Faith Mitchell (Masters in Dance Performance), crafts, snacks and lots of FUN!

Summer Classes (All ages: July 13-24, Two weeks) Monday/Wednesday Kicks/Jumps/Turns (Int/Adv)...............3:30-4:30pm w/Miss Carisa Tap/Jazz/Hip-Hop (Ages 5-7)................4:30-5:30pm w/Miss Faith Open Ballet (All Ages/All Levels) ........4:30-5:30pm w/Miss Carisa Creative Movement (Ages 3-4) .............5:30-6:15pm w/Miss Faith Pre Pointe ....................................5:30-6:15pm w/Miss Carisa Fairytale Ballet (Ages 5-6) ..................6:15-7:00pm w/Miss Faith Kicks/Jumps/Turns (Beg/Int)...............6:15-7:15pm w/Miss Carisa Tap/Jazz/Hip-Hop (Ages 8 and up) .........7:00-8:00pm w/Miss Faith Hip-Hop (All Ages/All Levels) .............7:15-8:00pm w/Miss Carisa

Tuesday/Thursday Ballet V ....................................3:30-4:45pm w/Miss Carisa Baton Twirling ..............................4:00-4:45pm w/Miss Nora Ballet II ....................................4:45-5:45pm w/Miss Carisa Ballet III-IV ................................5:45-7:00pm w/Miss Carisa Lyrical ......................................7:00-7:45pm w/Miss Carisa

Hot Summer DEAL!!! 1st class full price. Addt’l classes half off!!!

Class Pricing: 45 min = $50, 1 hr = $55, 1 hr 15 min = $60

Ph oto s Ph by H oto em gra min ph gw y. ay

Competition Team Info. Meeting (July 27 at 6pm) • Competition Camp & Auditions (August 3-14) Visit our website for details, schedules and registration forms! Register via phone, mail, fax or stop-in!

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640 Water St. So. (River Park Mall) Northfield, MN 55057 507-645-4068 651-330-8346 (fax) www.northfielddance.com © NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Art Opening Reception: Senior Show 2009 • 7 p.m.

Carleton Art Gallery See page 6. Symphony Band Concert 8-9:30 p.m.

Concert Hall, Carleton Bruce Gleason, director. Featuring works by Skeat, Panella, Chabrier, Mendelssohn and Wood. Theater: The Pillowman • 8 p.m.

Jeff Ray

The Tavern Lounge Mighty fine guitar and harp. Ray walks a thin line between blues and folk, one minute strutting a slide-guitar ballad on the resonator guitar, the next minute blasting off into a oneman-band train ride. “Ray has a quality that could only come by blending the birthplaces of Bob Dylan and the blues.” (Des Moines Register). SATURDAY, MAY 16 Annual Arboretum Bird Count • 6 a.m.

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton See page 8. Arena Theater, Carleton See page 8.

Lower Arboretum parking lot, Carleton Join other birdwatchers on this four-mile trek through the major habitat types in the Lower Arb. All ages welcome (no dogs please)! Stay for coffee and other refreshments at the Arboretum Office after the count.

Karaoke • 9 p.m.

Northfield Garden Club Plant Sale • 8 a.m.-noon

Rueb ‘N’ Stein

Bridge Square A great variety of sun and shade, annual and perennial plants from the gardens of Northfield Garden Club members.

Theater: In/Bed/Dead • 8 p.m.

Eggmen

The Contented Cow A Beatlesque trio. Goo go g’joob g’goo goo g’joob. Goo goo g’joob g’goo goo g’joob g’goo.

MAY 2009

Rice County Humane Society Walk for the Animals 8:30 a.m.-noon

Shager Park, Faribault Take your four-legged friend on a walk for a good cause! Register with your pet on the morning of the event. For details, contact the Rice County Humane Society at 507/334-7117 or 507/334-8546 or visit www.ricecountyhumane.org.

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17


Advertorial

On the Job with Greg Schmidt

Window of Opportunity Taxes are on everyone’s minds lately. Will they be raised? When will I get my refund? How am I going to pay them? The biggest question that I have received is, “How can I take advantage of the Energy Tax Credit for next year’s taxes?”

HVAC and Water Heaters • Qualified product (visit energystar.gov) • Installed between 1/1/09 and 12/31/10 • Installed at the taxpayers’ primary residence

Simply stated, all you have to do is make an energy-saving improvement in your home in 2009 to qualify for the credit on your 2009 taxes. But it’s not always that simple. You can receive credit for installing windows, doors, roofing, insulation, HVAC and water heaters.

For all of these products you can receive 30% of the product cost up to $1500. Installation costs are not included in the tax credit.

Here are requirements the products have to meet to qualify: Windows and Doors • Qualified product (visit energystar.gov) • Installed between 1/1/09 and 12/31/10 • Installed at the taxpayers’ primary residence

Be sure to: • Save your sales receipt and the manufacture’s certification statement, you can typically find that on their website • 2009 improvements to your home can be claimed in 2009 Call Schmidt Homes Remodeling for a free consultation about energy improvements and remember, we are Northfield’s only Energy Star Builder.

Roofing and Insulation • Energy Star qualified (visit energystar.gov) • Installed between 1/1/09 and 12/31/10 • Installed at the taxpayers’ primary residence • Must be expected to last 5 years or have a 2-year warranty

18-hole championship course is a beautiful combination of old and new.

We feature a full dining menu and bar. “New American Club Cuisine” is how executive chef, Rafael Perez, describes the menu.

Northfield Golf Club is a semiprivate course; come to golf and dine with us. Stop in or call about becoming a member!

Great time to join! Memberships available. Initiation fee has been waived!

707 Prairie St. Northfield 507-645-4026

507-663-0482 • www.schmidthomes.com A division of Steven Schmidt Construction, Inc.

A Division of Steven Schmidt Construction, Inc.

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


High School Choir Concert • 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, MAY 16 continued

Middle School Auditorium

Northfield Arts Guild 2009 Spring Dance Concert • 3 p.m.

Northfield Middle School Performances from all classes, including creative dance, ballet, modern, tap, jazz and Mexican folkloric. Tickets are at the door: $8 adults, $5 students, children 5 and under are free. Call 507/645-8877 or visit www.northfieldartsguild.org for more information.

Theater: The Pillowman • 8 p.m.

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton See page 8. Theater: In/Bed/Dead • 8 p.m.

Arena Theater, Carleton See page 8.

Orchestra Concert • 7 p.m.

Karaoke • 9 p.m.

Sheldon, Red Wing The Cannon Valley Regional Orchestra celebrates musical roots in Poland. Tickets: 1-800/899-5759 or sheldontheater.org.

L&M Bar and Grill, Dundas DJ Music • 9 p.m.

The Rueb ‘N’ Stein

Wine Tasting and Sweet Jazz 7-10 p.m.

The HideAway $25/person for wine tasting, appetizers and music by Sweet Jazz. Reservations required. Proceeds benefit St. Dominic School.

Fish Frye

Fish Frye

The Contented Cow Mankato-based duo featuring a Neil Young-sounding Joe Tougas and the georgeous-voiced Ann Fee. Eclectic pop from Etta James to KISS – five decades of music delivered so you can hear the band and the person next to you.

Relativity

Forcefield Cabaret • 7:30 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild Theater A wide open chance to take the stage for singers, poets, dancers, mimes or whatever! Call 507/645-8877 to participate. Tickets: $7 at the door.

The Tavern Lounge Current and classic light rock as well as great original music. Toby Jensen on acoustic guitar and vocals, Sandy Jensen on vocals, guitar and strumstick and Linda Grimm on vocals, percussion and harmonica.

Grayson

Northfield’s Chad Johnson opening

Saturday, May 23

Doors open at 7pm. Music at 8pm.

$5 cover

Grayson has played the Basilica Block Party and will be playing Moondance Jam and Country Fest. Find out more at

graysonmusic.com 316 Washington St • 663-1773 thegrandnorthfield.com MAY 2009

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19


Saturday, May 16, 2009 8:30 am-Noon Shager Park, Hwy. 60 W Take your four-legged friend on a walk for a good cause! Register with your pet at Shager Park on morning of event. For more details or to donate online, go to: www.ricecountyhumane.org Phone: 507-334-7117

Walk on the Sakatah Trail to help support homeless animals in Rice County! Join the fun! Exercise • Face Painting • T-shirts • Prizes • Pet Treat Bags • Lunch for Pet Owners

Rice County Humane Society mascot, Lena, passed away in August 2008. She had been with us for only 8 months, but will remain in our hearts forever. Lena was surrendered when her owners lost their farm to foreclosure. She was a beautiful black lab, too old to expect anyone to adopt her. Her gentle spirit impressed us immediately, and the decision to keep her as a mascot was an easy one. Many of you saw Lena sleeping in her bed behind the front desk. She spent a lot of time sleeping! But she also served as a

baby sitter to rowdy or lonely puppies, and she helped us learn which cats were afraid of dogs. She loved meeting with kids (when she was awake), and if you ate lunch in the office, Lena always strolled in to see what you were willing to share. She loved water – a true Lab. She didn’t mind going out in the rain, and she liked to play in puddles. She also liked to interrupt us by nosing us under the arm with that long, strong nose.

We will remember Lena because of her dignity and her good heart. We are so glad we had the opportunity to know her! She reminded us of the good we strive to do.

Rest in peace, Lena – the embodiment of the Good Dog. Help us help other wonderful animals like Lena Give now to Lena’s Legacy at the Rice County Humane Society 20 NEG@northfieldguide.com

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

SUNDAY, MAY 17 Syttende Mai Breakfast • 7 a.m.

Buntrock Commons, Kings’ Room, St. Olaf Celebrate Norway’s Constitution Day by attending a traditional Norwegian breakfast. The breakfast will feature a variety of Norwegian breads and cheeses, meats and fish, waffles and pastries, and fruit. Entertainment will be provided by students and faculty in the Norwegian Department and by members of the Lars Skjervheim Spelemannslag, a Hardanger fiddle group. $10.50 per person ($3.60 for students who are on a St. Olaf meal plan). Open to all. Reserve tickets by calling 507/786-3230 or purchase at the door. Three Links Open House • 2-4 p.m.

Three Links Campus Celebrate Three Links’ 110-year heritage with tours, music, children’s activities and pie and ice cream. For information, call 507/664-8867. Guest Artist Concert: Antero Winds • 3-4:30 p.m.

Concert Hall, Carleton Known for their artistic sensitivity and exuberant stage presence, Coloradobased Antero Winds have been attracting attention worldwide as a talented and exciting young international woodwind quintet. Antero Winds

The Contented Cow Join in on discussions concerning local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For information on topics, go to www.contentedcow.com. Northern Roots Session • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow Acoustic music with roots in the north, particularly the Nordic countries. Listen, jam, enjoy. Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Stop in anytime to sign up. Foursomes will compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug” the week following their triumph! Northern Roots Session

MONDAY, MAY 18 Theater: Hampstead Players Pinocchio • 1:30 p.m.

Bahl Family Auditorium, Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 8. Poker • 7 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Play Texas Hold ’em for points and prizes. Free! Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow This weekly open acoustic jam session plays from the Nordic countries and their immigrant communities in North America.

305 Water St. S. • 664-0260 www.froggybottoms.com MAY 2009

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21


TUESDAY, MAY 19 Theater: Hampstead Players Greek Myths • 1:30 p.m.

Bahl Family Auditorium, Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 8. Bluegrass and Old Time Jam Session • 7:30-10 p.m.

The Contented Cow Bluegrass and old-time musicians of all levels gather to jam. THURSDAY, MAY 21 Lecture: Crusade and Aftermath, Living with a Holy War, 1095-1125 • 5-7 p.m.

Leighton 304, Carleton Jay Rubenstein is an Associate Professor of History and Carleton’s Headley Distinguished Visitor-in-Residence. Refreshments will be served! Northfield Wine Club “Summer Slippers” • 7-9 p.m.

The Grand Event Center Free and open to the public. Karaoke • 9 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Chris Herriges

The Tavern Lounge Critically acclaimed singer, guitarist and songwriter based in the Twin Cities. Chris Herriges

FRIDAY, MAY 22

Belle Madre Music Festival

Harmony Park in Clarks Grove, Minnesota (near Geneva) Sixty bands on three stages all weekend with a plethora of extras such as dance troupes, live art, silent disco and more! Tickets and details at www.bellamusicfest.com. Performers include Bassnectar, Del the Funky Homosapien, Tea Leaf Green, Bill Kreutzmann with Papa Mali, The Big Wu, Roster McCabe and Mr. Sticky. Mayfly Mini Fest • 5 p.m. into the night

Pam Gillespie

REALTOR

®

507-645-1181 pamgillespie@edinarealty.com

The Contented Cow This is the first of a two-night precursor to next month’s JuneBug – so get downtown and, weather permitting, enjoy some outdoor music on the riverside deck! Occasional Jazz • 5-7 p.m. Marty Anderson and the Goods The “Goods” music is a blend of Americana and country alternative sound with lots of Marty Anderson Bob Dylan. They do some glam-era adaptations that really rock, as well as new music like Wilco and Ryan Adams. The 2008 “Goods” include: Gavin Bady, Scott Barvir, Paul Delong, Aaron Hagenson, Kate Johnson and Pete Jones. St. Olaf Band Concert • 8 p.m.

Skoglund Center Auditorium, St. Olaf Spring Dance Performance • 8 p.m.

Arena Theater, Carleton The Semaphore Repertory Dance Company.

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


®

Culver’s Happy Hour! Monday–Friday from 2–5 p.m. enjoy

Buy One, Get One FREE Medium Concrete Mixers, Shakes and Malts! ite d L im ffe r! eO Tim

Build Your Own! Butterscotch • Chocolate Syrup • Hot Caramel • Hot Fudge • Marshmallow Cream • Mint Topping Peanut Butter • Candy Sprinkles • Brownie Pieces • Banana • Blackberries • Blueberries Cherries • Peaches • Pineapple • Raspberries • Strawberries ®

Culver’s of Northfield 960 Hwy. 3 South Northfield, MN 55057 507-645-7700 getculverized.com

Free Medium Concrete Mixer, Shake or Malt of equal or lesser value of purchase. Please no substitutions. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid for value basket upgrade purchases. Valid at Culver’s of Northfield, MN for a limited time only.

MAY 2009

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23


FRIDAY, MAY 22 continued Theater: Don’t Dress for Dinner • 8 p.m.

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton See page 8. Karaoke • 9 p.m.

Rueb ‘N’ Stein Key West Rejects • 9:30 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Being kicked out of the Keys in August 2004 didn’t get these musicians down. They just packed up their guitars and headed north for a change. Playing favorites from Jonny Cash, Tom Petty, Neil Diamond, Neil Young, Foo Fighters, Lit, Buck Cherry and many more surprises. They have all the bases covered. The Rejects also play a wide repertoire of originals from all of the revolving musician’s catalogs. Carey Langer

The Tavern Lounge A solo artist covering six decades and seven styles of music. From The Everly Brothers and Frank Sinatra, and to Rick Springfield, Dave Matthews and Jimmy Eat World and original music. SATURDAY, MAY 23 Belle Madre Music Festival

Harmony Park in Clarks Grove, Minnesota (near Geneva) All-weekend event. See May 22 description. Swap Meet & Flea Market • 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Showgrounds, Dundas This is the first day of the two-day 10th Annual Rice County Steam and Gas Engines event. Held rain or shine. Free admission. For information, go to www.ricecountysteamandgas.com. Consignment auction at 10 a.m.

GOOD BEER GOOD FOOD GOOD COMPANY

Patio Now Open! Fri & Sat, May 22 & 23 Mayfly Mini Fest Sat, May 30 Farewell Performance The Last Known Whereabouts

Sundays • Politics & A Pint 6pm • Northern Roots Jam Session 7:30pm • Quiz Night 8pm

Mondays Nordic Jam

Tuesdays Blue Grass & Old Time Jam Open 3 pm 24 NEG@northfieldguide.com

www.contentedcow.com

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


7th Annual Cannon River Rendezvous 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Maltby Nature Preserve, Randolph This is the first of a three-day event. French fur trappers, traders and early settlers come to life through storytelling, crafts, demonstrations and characters in period costumes. Gain new perspectives on history, culture, literature and natural resource use – and leave with a new perspective on your own daily lives. Map and directions at www.thesciencecentermnp.org. Proceeds support Maltby. Admission free, donations accepted. $10 fee for parking. Concert for Corey/Art Fair • 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault 10 a.m.-4 p.m. art fair, 4 p.m.-10 p.m. music from Aurora, My My Misfire, Jamestown Story, Wrestling with Wolves, The Fast Track, Skies Alive, Novus Sanus. $3 students, $5 adults. St. Olaf Orchestra Concert • 3:30 p.m.

Skoglund Center Auditorium, St. Olaf Mayfly Mini Fest • 5 p.m. into the night

The Contented Cow This is the second of a two-night precursor to next month’s JuneBug – so get downtown and, weather permitting, enjoy some outdoor music on the riverside deck! New Moon Trio • 6 p.m. Here’s a taste of 100 years New Moon Trio of popular tunes, random requests and spontaneous harmonies featuring Ross Currier on bass, Lance Heisler on drums and Justin London on guitar. RCAs • 9 p.m. Happenings Continued on page 34

MAY 2009

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25


We’ve DOUBLED our space! CHECK OUT OUR MAY PROMOTIONS • 20% OFF top knobs hardware • UPGRADE your sink or get one FREE • SAVE on solid surfaces and premium wood • FREE culinary products with purchase Lots of ways to save with Dupont Corian®, Hanstone® and DuraSupreme®! For detailed information on promotions, go to our blog spot

http://kitchenconcepts-abc.blogspot.com

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

3

4

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Pancake Breakfast • 8 a.m. -Noon, Nfld Ballroom St. Olaf Handbell Choir Spring Concert • 2 p.m.

Man Cave Monday: Movie Night • 7 p.m., Paradise

Bluegrass and Old Time Jam Session • 7:30-10 p.m.

Center for Arts, Faribault

The Contented Cow

Lecture/Booksigning: Lawrence Weschler 7:30-9 p.m., Boliou Hall

Poker • 7 p.m.

Boe Chapel, St. Olaf

Froggy Bottoms

Book Reading: Mike Perry 7:30 p.m.

Theater: Dial M for Murder 2 p.m., Paradise Center for

High School Band Concert 7:30 p.m., Middle School Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

the Arts, Faribault Art Opening Reception: Senior Show 2 • 2-4 p.m.

Flaten Museum and Groot Gallery, St. Olaf Jazz 2 and Jazz 3 Concert 4:30 p.m.

Auditorium, Carleton

Northfield Arts Guild

The Contented Cow Winsome Women: One Women, Five Characters 8:15 p.m.

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf

Lion’s Pause, St. Olaf Northfield Youth Choirs Spring Concert • 6 p.m.

Boe Chapel, St. Olaf Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow Northern Roots Session 7:30 p.m., Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow

26 NEG@northfieldguide.com

WANTED The Northfield Entertainment Guide is looking for a sales representative – someone sales-savvy, creative, self-motivated and friendly. 30-35 fun hours/week (well – mostly fun) Primarily working with existing and potential advertisers. Send resume and cover letter to abby@northfieldguide.com or drop off at 17 Bridge Square, Northfield

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


y a M THURSDAY

May 1-3 Goods for Goods: The Great Northfield Rummage Raid for Charity

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1

2

10th Annual Science Symposium: New Technologies, New Decisions

Bagels and Birds • 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Buntrock/Regents Hall, St. Olaf

The Great Northfield Minnesota Book Raid • 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Ice Arena Healthy Kids Day • 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

The Great Northfield Minnesota Book Raid • 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Ice Arena Convocation: Kip Fulbeck 10:50-11:50 a.m.

Skinner Chapel, Carleton Occasional Jazz • 5-7 p.m., The Cow Arts Ala Carte • 6 p.m., High School Companydance Spring Concert 7:30 p.m., Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault

Northfield High School Theater: The Very Short Play Festival 2 and 8 p.m., NAG Theater The Garage Grand Opening • 6-9 p.m.

18 Bridge Square Companydance Spring Concert 7:30 p.m., Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for Arts, Faribault

Paradise Center for the Arts

Theater: Student-written One Acts 8 p.m., Nourse Little Theater, Carleton Theater: The Very Short Play Festival 8 p.m., Northfield Arts Guild Theater Jazz 1 Concert • 8:15 p.m.

Theater: Student-written One Acts 8 p.m., Nourse Little Theater, Carleton Roger Anderson Trio, Contented Cow Jon Manners, The Tavern Lounge The Bohemian Duo, Rueb ‘N’ Stein

The Lion’s Pause, St. Olaf Foreman Band • 8:30 p.m., The Cow Karaoke • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein Goodsell Observatory Open House 9-11 p.m., Carleton Joe Meyer, The Tavern Lounge

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Lecture: What’s Wrong with this Picture? The Technical Analysis of a Known Forgery • 7:30 p.m.

Convocation: Edmund Pellegrino 10:50-11:50 a.m., Carleton Lecture: Lasers Used on Artwork 3:15 p.m., Regents Hall 390, St. Olaf Lecture: European Identity – Reality, Fiction, or Both? • 4:30 p.m.

International Migratory Bird Day

Gould Library Athenaeum, Carleton One Night Only Art Show • 5-9 p.m.

Guest Artist Concert: John Milbauer, piano • 7-8:30 p.m.

Barefoot Studio

Concert Hall, Carleton

Open Stage/Distinction • 7 p.m.

Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

Dittmann Center, St. Olaf

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

Theater: Promicide • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

High School Auditorium

Theater: Promicide • 7:30 p.m.

Theater: In/Bed/Dead • 8 p.m.

High School Auditorium

Arena Theater, Carleton

Girls Nite Out • 4:30 p.m.-1 a.m.

Bonnie & the Clydes • 8-11 p.m.

Downtown Northfield

The Tavern Lounge

Wake-Robin • 7:30-9 p.m., Bittersweet Theater: Help Wanted • 8 p.m.

Karaoke • 9 p.m.

Regents Hall 150, St. Olaf Theater: Dial M for Murder • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Karaoke • 9 p.m., Froggy Bottoms Todd Thompson Trio, Tavern Lounge

Get in the Guide! Send us your event information! Online at www.northfieldguide.com or email to info@northfieldguide.com

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Take Mom to the Movie • 1 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault International Festival • 2-4 p.m.

Sayles-Hill, Carleton

Severance Great Hall, Carleton

L&M Bar and Grill, Dundas DJ Music • 9 p.m., The Rueb ‘N’ Stein

Theater: In/Bed/Dead • 8 p.m.

Jasper Lepak and Art Vandalay

Arena Theater, Carleton

The Contented Cow

Full Moon Night Hike • 8:30-9:30 p.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Karaoke • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein Northwoods Eclectic, Contented Cow Joe Carey, The Tavern Lounge


SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

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St. Olaf Orchestra Concert 3:30 p.m.

Poker • 7 p.m.

Wake-Robin • 1-2 p.m.

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf

Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

Lecture: Why All the Song and Dance? Taking Bollywood Seriously • 4 p.m.

Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow

Gould Library, Carleton

The Contented Cow

Opera: Utopia Limited 8 p.m., Christiansen Hall,

Bluegrass and Old Time Jam Session • 7:30-10 p.m.

Northern Roots Session 7:30 p.m., Contented Cow Opera: Utopia Limited 8 p.m., Christiansen Hall,

Froggy Bottoms

Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf

The Contented Cow

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Syttende Mai Breakfast 7 a.m., Buntrock Commons,

Theater: Hampstead Players Pinocchio 1:30 p.m., Paradise Center

Theater: Hampstead Players Greek Myths 1:30 p.m., Paradise Center

Three Links Open House 2-4 p.m., Three Links Guest Artist Concert: Antero Winds • 3-4:30 p.m.

for the Arts, Faribault

for the Arts, Faribault

Poker • 7 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms

Bluegrass and Old Time Jam Session • 7:30-10 p.m.

Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow

Concert Hall, Carleton

The Contented Cow

Bittersweet

Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow

Kings’ Room, St. Olaf

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Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow Northern Roots Session 7:30 p.m., Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow

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Pancake Breakfast • 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., VFW Reception Commencement: All Senior Show 11 a.m.-noon, Flaten Art

Poker • 7 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms

Bluegrass and Old Time Jam Session • 7:30-10 p.m.

Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow

Museum, St. Olaf Chinese Music Ensemble Recital • 3-4:30 p.m.

Concert Hall, Carleton Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow Northern Roots Session 7:30 p.m, Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow

31 Jazz Ensemble Concert 3-4:30 p.m.

Concert Hall, Carleton Lecture: Zen Meditation and Teaching 5 p.m.

Skinner Chapel, Carleton

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The Contented Cow

Who’s Playing at a Glance Ian Alexy ................................. May 14 – Tavern Beguine Brothers .......................May 29 – Cow Bellered Yellers ....................... May 23 – Tavern Bluegrass Jam Session ............ Tuesdays – Cow The Bohemian Duo ....................May 2 – Rueb Bonnie & The Clydes............... May 9 – Tavern Joe Carey ................................... May 8 – Tavern Eggmen .......................................May 15 – Cow Fish Frye......................................May 16 – Cow Foreman Band..............................May 1 – Cow Grayson May ................................... 23 – Grand Chris Herriges ........................ May 21 – Tavern Key West Rejects .... May 22 – Froggy Bottoms Carey Langer .......................... May 22 – Tavern Last Known Whereabouts ........May 30 – Cow

Jasper Lepak and Art Vandalay ..May 9 – Cow Chad Johnson..........................May 23 – Grand Jon Manners ............................. May 2 – Tavern Mark Mraz ............ May 28 – Tavern; 29 – Frog Joe Meyer ............................ May 1, 29 – Tavern Nordic Jam...............................Mondays – Cow Northern Roots Session .......... Sundays – Cow Northwoods Eclectic ...................May 8 – Cow Occasional Jazz.............................May 1 – Cow Jeff Ray .................................... May 15 – Tavern Relativity ................................. May 16 – Tavern Roger Anderson Trio ...................May 2 – Cow Study Hall w/Peter and Terry ...........................May 14, 28 – Cow Todd Thompson Trio .............. May 7 – Tavern Wake-Robin ................. May 8, 13 – Bittersweet Annita Walsh .......................... May 30 – Tavern


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

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High School Orchestra Concert 7:30 p.m., Middle School Auditorium Karaoke • 9 p.m., Froggy Bottoms Study Hall with Peter & Terry

Convocation: Susannah Morgan 10:50-11:50 a.m.

Rice County Humane Society Walk for the Animals • 8:30 a.m.-noon

Skinner Chapel, Carleton

Shager Park, Faribault

Back to the ’50s Spring Party • 6 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild 2009 Spring Dance Concert • 3 p.m., Middle School CVRO Orchestra Concert • 7 p.m.

The Contented Cow Ian Alexy, The Tavern Lounge

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Art Opening Reception: Senior Show 2009 • 7 p.m., Carleton Art Gallery Symphony Band Concert • 8-9:30 p.m.

Sheldon Theater, Red Wing

Theater: The Pillowman • 8 p.m.

Wine Tasting and Sweet Jazz 7-10 p.m., The HideAway Forcefield Cabaret • 7:30 p.m.

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton

Northfield Arts Guild Theater

Theater: In/Bed/Dead • 8 p.m.

High School Choir Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Arena Theater, Carleton Karaoke • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein Eggmen, The Contented Cow Jeff Ray, The Tavern Lounge

Middle School Auditorium

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Lecture: Crusade and Aftermath, Living with a Holy War, 1095-1125 5-7 p.m., Leighton 304, Carleton Northfield Wine Club “Summer Slippers” • 7-9 p.m., The Grand Karaoke • 9 p.m., Froggy Bottoms Chris Herriges, The Tavern Lounge

St. Olaf Band Concert • 8 p.m.

St. Olaf Orchestra Concert • 3:30 p.m.

Skoglund Center Auditorium, St. Olaf

Skoglund Center Auditorium, St. Olaf

Spring Dance Performance • 8 p.m.

Exhibit Opening Reception: Where the Wild Things are Created • 7-9 p.m.

Annual Arboretum Bird Count May 16, 6 a.m.

Lower Arboretum, Carleton Northfield Garden Club Plant Sale May 16, 8 a.m.-noon

Bridge Square

7th Annual Cannon River Rendezvous May 23-24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m May 25, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Maltby Nature Preserve, Randolph Belle Madre Music Festival May 22-24, Harmony Park,

Clarks Grove

Concert Hall, Carleton

Arena Theater, Carleton Theater: Don’t Dress for Dinner 8 p.m., Nourse Little Theater, Carleton Karaoke • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein Key West Rejects • 9:30 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Carey Langer, The Tavern Lounge Mayfly Mini Fest • MAY 22-23 The Contented Cow May 22, Occasional Jazz • 5-7 p.m. Marty Anderson and the Goods May 23

New Moon Trio at 6, RCAs at 9

Theater: The Pillowman • 8 p.m.

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton Theater: In/Bed/Dead • 8 p.m.

Arena Theater, Carleton Karaoke • 9 p.m., L&M Bar and Grill DJ Music • 9 p.m., The Rueb ‘N’ Stein Fish Frye, Contented Cow Relativity, Tavern Lounge

Northfield Arts Guild St. Olaf Choir Concert • 8 p.m.

Skoglund Center Auditorium, St. Olaf Spring Dance Performance • 8 p.m.

Arena Theater, Carleton Theater: Don’t Dress for Dinner 8 p.m., Nourse Little Theater, Carleton Grayson Concert • Doors open 7 p.m., music at 8, The Grand Event Center Concert • 8-9:30 p.m., Carleton Prom at the Frog • 9 p.m. Karaoke • 9 p.m., L&M Bar and Grill DJ Music • 9 p.m., The Rueb ‘N’ Stein Bellered Yellers, The Tavern Lounge

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Karaoke • 9 p.m., Froggy Bottoms Study Hall with Peter & Terry

Open Mic at Tiny’s • 7 p.m., Tiny’s Theater: Liberal Arts – The Musical 8 p.m., Nourse Little Theater, Carleton Theater: As You Like It • 8 p.m.

Theater: As You Like It • 8 p.m.

Mudd Hall Amphitheater, Carleton

Last Known Whereabouts Farewell Performance, The Contented Cow

The Contented Cow Mark Mraz, The Tavern Lounge

Orchestra Concert • 8-9:30 p.m.

Concert Hall, Carleton Mark Mraz • 9 p.m., Froggy Bottoms Beguine Brothers, Contented Cow Joe Meyer, The Tavern Lounge

Mudd Hall Amphitheater, Carleton Theater: Liberal Arts – The Musical 8 p.m., Nourse Little Theater, Carleton

Annita Walsh, The Tavern Lounge


May 8 • 5 pm-1 am

Register to win a $1,000 shopping spree and other fabulous prizes! Tickets $10

and available at The Rare Pair, Sisters Ugly and Women & Kids on Division (a portion of the proceeds will go to the WINGS organization). Last year’s Girls Nite Out was a huge hit, and this year’s looks to be the same! Northfield’s streets will be filled with ladies looking for a good time! Join them for following fun-filled events:

ONE NIGHT ONLY ART SHOW During Girls Nite Out! May 8, 5-9 pm

• Carla Thompson • Shona Murphy • Dawn Makarios • Leanne Stremcha • Amanda Stremcha • Marisa Matinez • Heather Lawrenz • Rachel Vogel

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


4:30-8:30 p.m.

9:30 p.m.-12 a.m.

Bring your tickets to Bridge Square for registration

Live entertainment at The Grand, dancing and desserts.

5-9 p.m.

12-1 a.m.

Shopping and special events at participating businesses

Continue downtown to participating restaurants and bars for more Girls Nite Out specials!!!

9:30 p.m. GRAND PRIZE DRAWING including $1,000 shopping spree and many other fabulous prizes (must be over 18 and present to win)

See You Downtown!

Stop by the HideAway for a glass of wine or cup of coffee.

MAY 2009

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Special Sale Free Tarot card reading! 314 Division St S. ★ Northfield, MN ★507-645-2539★

Join us for an evening of fun and shopping! * Special discounts and giveaways for customers participating in Girls Nite Out * Register for fabulous in-store drawings Tickets on sale at The Rare Pair 401 Division Street, Northfield•645-4257•rarepair.com

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MAY 2009

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33


SATURDAY, MAY 23 continued

Pancake Breakfast • 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Exhibit Opening Reception: Where the Wild Things are Created • 7-9 p.m.

7th Annual Cannon River Rendezvous 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild See page 6 for details. St. Olaf Choir Concert • 8 p.m.

Skoglund Center Auditorium, St. Olaf Spring Dance Performance • 8 p.m.

Arena Theater, Carleton The Semaphore Repertory Dance Company. Theater: Don’t Dress for Dinner • 8 p.m.

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton See page 8.

VFW

Maltby Nature Preserve See May 23 description. Reception Commencement: All Senior Show • 11 a.m.-Noon

Flaten Art Museum, St. Olaf

Grayson Concert • Doors open 7 p.m., music at 8

Chinese Music Ensemble Recital • 3-4:30 p.m.

The Grand Entertainment Center Grayson comes from the Twin Cities and has opened for bands like The Bodeans, Gin Blossoms, Gear Daddy’s, GB Leighton, Tom Mahoney and Gavin Rossdale. They have played the Basilica Block Party and will be playing Moondance Jam and Country Fest. Northfield native Chad Johnson is the opening act. $5 cover.

Concert Hall, Carleton Gao Hong, director. Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow Join in on discussions concerning local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For information on topics, go to www.contentedcow.com. Northern Roots Session • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow Acoustic music with roots in the north, particularly the Nordic countries. Listen, jam, enjoy.

Concert • 8-9:30 p.m.

Concert Hall, Carleton Lawrence Burnett directs the Carleton College Choir with Handel’s “Dettingen Te Deum” and Haydn’s “Te Deum (for Countess Maria Theresa)” with soloists and full orchestra. Prom at the Frog • 9 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Specials for everyone dressed in prom attire. Karaoke • 9 p.m.

L&M Bar and Grill, Dundas DJ Music • 9 p.m.

The Rueb ‘N’ Stein Bellered Yellers

The Tavern Lounge SUNDAY, MAY 24 Belle Madre Music Festival

Harmony Park in Clarks Grove, Minnesota (near Geneva) All-weekend event. See May 22 description. Swap Meet & Flea Market • 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Showgrounds, Dundas This is the second of this two-day 10th Annual Rice County Steam and Gas Engine event. Held rain or shine. Free admission. Tractor pull at 9 a.m. For more information, go to www.ricecountysteamandgas.com.

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MAY 2009

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35


SUNDAY, MAY 24 continued Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Stop in anytime to sign up. Foursomes compete for prizes. MONDAY, MAY 25 7th Annual Cannon River Rendezvous • 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Maltby Nature Preserve See May 23 description. Poker • 7 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Play Texas Hold ’em for points and prizes. Free! Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

Nordic Jam

The Contented Cow This weekly open acoustic jam session plays from the Nordic countries and their immigrant communities in North America.

TUESDAY, MAY 26

Theater: Liberal Arts – The Musical • 8 p.m.

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton See page 8. Theater: As You Like It • 8 p.m.

Mudd Hall Amphitheater, Carleton See page 8. Orchestra Concert • 8-9:30 p.m.

Concert Hall, Carleton Hector Valdivia directs this performance featuring winners of the Senor Concerto Competition, including works by Vaughan Williams, Camille Saint-Saens, Mozart and Wagner. Mark Mraz • 9 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Forget about life for awhile with the piano man. From Billy Joel to Kermit the Frog – Mraz tickles the ivories and entertains requests from the audience. Beguine Brothers

The Contented Cow Old-time country and western revue. Joe Meyer

Bluegrass and Old Time Jam Session • 7:30-10 p.m.

The Contented Cow This ongoing event is for bluegrass and old-time musicians of all levels, cultivating an inclusive atmosphere of musicians and an evening of entertainment for the audience.

The Tavern Lounge SATURDAY, MAY 30 High School Commencement • 5:30 p.m.

Northfield High School Theater: As You Like It • 8 p.m.

THURSDAY, MAY 28

Mudd Hall Amphitheater, Carleton See page 8.

Karaoke • 9 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms

Theater: Liberal Arts – The Musical • 8 p.m.

Study Hall with Peter & Terry

The Contented Cow

Nourse Little Theater, Carleton See page 8.

Mark Mraz

Last Known Whereabouts Farewell Performance

The Tavern Lounge Forget about life for awhile with the piano man. From Billy Joel to Kermit the Frog – Mraz tickles the ivories and entertains requests from the audience.

The Contented Cow Voted Northfield’s Best Band 2009! Exciting, high-energy contemporary blue-grass music, blending traditional string band music with rock, folk, country and blues influences. Band includes: Jake Stroup, mandolin and vocals; Aaron Hagenson, guitar and vocals; Carl Haskins, bass; and, Aaron Cross, fiddle.

FRIDAY, MAY 29 Honors Convocation: Anne E. Patrick • 3-4:15 p.m.

Skinner Chapel, Carleton The Honors Convocation is held each year to recognize faculty and students for their accomplishments and their service to the community. This year’s address will be delivered by Anne E. Patrick, William H. Laird Professor of Religion and the Liberal Arts. Patrick’s special interests are in the areas of religion and literature, and Christian feminist theology and ethics. She is author of numerous articles and reviews, and the book “Liberating Conscience: Feminist Explorations in Catholic Moral Theology.” She is now completing another volume, “Conscience in Context: Vocation, Virtue and History.” Open Mic at Tiny’s • 7 p.m.

Tiny’s Hotdog Emporium This Northfield Arts Guild event is open to everyone. Read original writing or writing you love by someone else.

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Annita Walsh

The Tavern Lounge Harp. SUNDAY, MAY 31 Jazz Ensemble Concert • 3-4:30 p.m.

Concert Hall, Carleton David Singley, director. Lecture: Zen Meditation and Teaching • 5 p.m.

Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton Featuring guest speaker Joen Snyder O’Neal.

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


HISTORIC

HAPPENINGS NORTHFIELD STYLE By Susan Hvistendahl

Northfield’s Oldest Building: The Lyceum (Est. 1857) In 1855, at the age of 40, John Wesley North was ready for new challenges. A New Yorker by birth, he had moved to St. Anthony in 1849, established a law office and was an active member of the Minnesota territorial legislature. But he found himself captivated by the Cannon River Valley, finding it “beautiful and very fertile,” with seasons two weeks earlier than St. Anthony. “The crab-apple and wild plum grow there in abundance and furnish fruit to the settlers,” he wrote. North considered prospects at Faribault, but a site 15 miles further north on the Cannon River attracted his attention as a mill site, which could provide economic stability. Soon a local resident named Mr. Alexander, at the behest of North, was calling a meeting of the neighbors at which “each was requested to state what he could do or would do, and in a short time a plan of operations was agreed on for building the saw mill, a grist mill, and a bridge – the two mills are to be on opposite sides of the stream,” according to Merlin Stonehouse’s biography, “John Wesley North and the Reform Frontier” (1965). The town was platted and the sawmill completed in December of 1855. The next month, in 44-below weather, North brought his wife Ann and three children to the town in a sleigh drawn by a four-horse team, a journey that took a day and a half from St. Anthony. They settled in an 18' x 30' house with a 10' x 30' lean-to, heated by three stoves, and on Jan. 6, North wrote in his first letter of the new year, “We are here comfortably settled in our new home, which you may have heard before this bears the euphonious cognomen of Northfield.” North soon held a public meeting at which 20 men contributed almost $300 for a schoolhouse suitable also for religious services. By springtime, Northfield had a 40-foot store, shops for two wheelwrights, a cabinetmaker, joiner and a blacksmith. John and Ann North wrote frequent “puffing letters” to friends in New England, extolling the town’s virtues and attracting immigrants. As Stonehouse wrote, these new residents were “mostly Republican, committed to temperance, abolition and education.” There was plenty of physical stimulation provided by the pioneer environment, but stimulation for the mind had to be created. And North wasted no time in putting together the Northfield Lyceum for this purpose. (The word “lyceum” comes from the name of the grove at Athens where Aristotle taught and is defined as a place or organization for public lectures or discussions.) The first meeting was held in the schoolhouse on Oct. 1, 1856, and a constitution was written thereafter, starting with

MAY 2009

The Lyceum Building in 1996.

the words: “Believing in the utility of societies for intellectual improvement, we, citizens of Northfield, agree to unite ourselves into an association for the purpose of establishing a reading room, circulating library and debating society.” John W. North was the first president and on April 1, 1857, he appointed a committee to receive proposals for constructing the Lyceum’s own building. On April 15, North himself provided the site for an 18' x 28' structure, offering to contribute the balance toward the $580 erection price if the town could raise $400. The fund-raising was successful, and the first meeting of the Lyceum in this modest frame building at 109 East 4th St. was held on Nov. 4, 1857. (At times, the building was also used for church meetings.) Each Wednesday evening, two people debated a topic, which was then discussed by all. Stonehouse wrote that at times it was “hard to organize a true debate; the situation became humorous when North was delegated to defend slavery.” Carl Weicht, long-time Northfield News editor, wrote that at a time when “Northfield was little more than a name and a few scattered dwellings,” this was to be not to be “just another club,” but “a community center, chamber of commerce and public forum all in one. And during the formative years of Northfield’s life, it was all of these things.” One of the early debate topics was: “Resolved, that woman is entitled to all the rights, social and political, to which man is entitled.” The minutes recorded an affirmative decision, “the ladies assisting in voting.” Lyceum treasurer Hiram Scriver, the leading merchant in town who became the first mayor and a trustee of Carleton College, said in a speech in 1876, “Thus early did this great question agitate the minds and hearts of the community. It was difficult to find anybody to take the negative, for the male sex especially felt that the great necessity of the house was for the immigration of the fairer sex. Young men and bachelors, therefore, were spoiling to have women vote, and every inducement was offered to get them here.” Other topics: Resolved, “that war is never under any circumstances justifiable” (passed by a large majority); “that lawyers and statesmen have achieved greater triumphs of eloquence than preachers;” “that dancing is a proper amusement of young people” (carried 20 to 3, “after its discussion socially and politically from Adam to our progenitors”); “that capital punishment should be abolished;” “that the cause of temperance is not promoted otherwise than by moral suasion;” “that religious creeds Historic Happenings continued on next page

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Historic Happenings continued from previous page

have been productive of more evil than good” (“carried in the affirmative by a crowded house, but decided in the negative by the members of the society”); “that the pulpit has done more for civilization than the press” (“decided in the negative, but upon further consideration, and a fuller vote, it was decided in the affirmative, the ladies voting unanimously that way”); and “that it is morally wrong for the members of the Lyceum to neglect to speak at its meetings.” Parliamentary rules were observed. North suggested that a critic be chosen to “point out and correct such errors of language and manner as he may have noticed during the meeting.” There were lectures from time to time and music to open and close meetings (“Our choir reflects great credit on the musical ability of Northfield,” said one entry in the minutes). There were also readings from the Lyceum newspaper, the Portfolio. Northfield’s first library was housed in the Lyceum and, by the end of 1858, more than 300 books had been contributed, many of them donated by the town’s founder. (A set of North’s books is still owned by the Northfield Public Library.) From the beginning, $50 had been allocated for periodicals such as Harper’s, the Atlantic Monthly, the Edinburgh and London Reviews, the Home Journal, Punch and the New York Times to bring news of the outside world to the town. The exigencies of the Civil War and the creation of more social opportunities through churches and other organizations led to the gradual demise of the Lyceum. There were various attempts to reorganize it, with emphasis on its utility as a reading room and place for lectures. News items in the Rice County Journal trace a decline in membership from 100 in 1874 to only 27 in 1877. On Sept. 27, 1877, the headline was “A Bankrupt Institution” and the writer said, “Complaints are already made that the Reading Room is continually begging, and some of our people seem to be bored by the frequent visits of committees soliciting in its behalf.” A plan was devised for 50 “responsible citizens” to subscribe $5 each annually, with “one of Northfield’s attractive and popular young ladies” volunteering to collect signatures. But the attempt failed. In 1878, the ownership of the building, including the library, was transferred to the city. The library was said to be in “disorderly confusion” and no record had been kept of books taken out for two years. One minor but continual annoyance: boys had been stealing the rubber bands from the newspapers and “running wild with sling-shot made of rubber.” In 1884, the building was rotated 90 degrees to face Fourth Street rather than the Cannon River. Dr. William Greaves had his medical offices in the Lyceum building and, in 1885, rented out part of it for a photograph gallery for E.N. James. The building also has been used as a private residence. In 1933, it was front page news when the Lyceum building was the scene of a liquor raid by the sheriff and local police. The Northfield News article of Jan. 20 proclaimed that the Lyceum building has “come upon evil days.” Martin Ackman, who had been occupying the house for only a short time, was arrested for selling liquor to students. Ackman was sentenced to 90 days in county jail, in lieu of a fine of $100 and costs. The article

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(l to r): Current Lyceum building owners James H. Johnson and Mary Kathleen Fransen and past owners (1964-1997) Corrine and Elvin Heiberg.

recalled that North had written into every deed for property in the original town that “no intoxicating drinks be sold or in any manner furnished as a beverage on said premises.” The building was occupied by Wood’s Hatchery for six years 1934-1940. In 1937, Northfield plumbing and heating engineer C.M. Grastvedt purchased the building from the estate of Clarence Carpenter. And in 1943, the Lyceum Building began its over half a century history as a dental office when Dr. Leonard Amodt purchased the building. Drs. Frederick and Elvin F. Heiberg brought their own dental practices to the Lyceum when they bought it from the Amodt estate in 1964. The elder Heiberg retired in 1966 and his son carried on his own practice until 1997. Elvin Heiberg conferred with architectural designer and historian Robert Warn in 1973 and restored the Lyceum closer to its original appearance, including removing a log cabin siding. Agu and Mary Lukk used the building for their investment firm and remodeled it further when they purchased it from Elvin and Corrine Heiberg in 1997. They painted the building yellow with a white frame and blue cornices. Since 2002, the Lyceum building has provided office space for attorney James H. Johnson and his wife Mary Kathleen Fransen who runs the Jasper Retreat Center. They have kept historic paint combinations and are happy to be curators of a building with such a rich local history. The Heibergs say they also feel privileged to have been the owners of this historic building. Their 33 years of ownership were the longest in the more than 150 years of the Lyceum Building’s existence and they hope that the Lyceum will continue to be part of Northfield’s history for many years to come. Thanks to the Northfield Historical Society archives, the Northfield Public Library for newspaper microfilms and James Johnson, Mary Fransen and Elvin and Corrine Heiberg for their cooperation and dedication to the history of the Lyceum. Microfilms of the minutes of the early years of the Lyceum from the Minnesota State Historical Society are now available at the Northfield Public Library. These minutes were donated to the Rice County Historical Society by Carl Weicht in 1942.

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


– Advertorial –

Northfield Retirement Community Innovation. Choice. Tradition. It is the mission of Northfield Retirement Community to offer a continuum of care and living services in a caring Christian environment to help older adults realize their maximum physical, spiritual, psychological and social potential.

Spring 2009

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Technology Enhances Quality of Life

Over the past few months the Northfield Retirement Community has made a commitment to enhance technology and quality of life for our residents.

T

echnology already plays an integral role in caring for senior and older adults and will do even more in the future. To that end, NRC has undertaken a range of campus innovations and new partnerships that will help residents live independently longer, enhance communication and improve security.

Healthsense eNeighbor NRC partnered just last month with Healthsense, a market leader in technology solutions for aging services, to install eNeighborÂŽ technology in

Parkview East and Parkview West. This technology involves the installation of wireless sensors in resident apartments that are designed to look for specific behaviors and alert staff or family to intervene when necessary. For example, motion detectors on walls can detect movement within rooms; contact sensors on kitchen cupboards and refrigerator doors can monitor whether the resident is eating regularly; and pressure sensors on beds are used to detect when a resident gets in or out of

Our Mission

A Christian Community of Senior Housing with Services

bed. The sensors are non-intrusive, maintaining the resident’s privacy and integrity. With this technology in place, residents will be able to get help quickly and will be empowered to live independently longer. Family members and loved ones can have peace of mind that those they care for are able to obtain help automatically if needed. “We’re proud to partner with a far-sighted, innovative provider like Northfield Retirement Community,� said Brian Bischoff, Healthsense’s President and CEO. “Technology can never take the place of skilled and compassionate care by a human caregiver, but it can help healthcare professionals – like the staff at Northfield Retirement Community – improve the quality of care they provide to residents.� continued on page 2

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MAY 2009

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39


– Advertorial –

Celebrating 40 Years of Service Join us to celebrate 40 years of Northfield Retirement Community’s service to Northfield.

W

e have planned special events to commemorate our milestone year.

3rd Annual NRC Golf Classic Enjoy a Minnesota spring and meet your friends and colleagues for golf on June 1 at our 3rd Annual NRC Golf Classic at the Northfield Golf Club. The fun begins with lunch and registration at 11:00 am, a shotgun start at 12:30 pm and dinner and awards ceremony 5:30 pm. For golfers, there are four holein-one opportunities, a chance to

win a new car and three chances for major cash prizes. Win drawing and hole prizes, and compete in the skins game. The entry fee includes: t "SPVOEPGHPMGXJUIDBSU t -VODIBOEEJOOFS t (JGUJUFNT t $IBODFTUPXJOQSJ[FT t $BTIQBZPVUGPSXJOOJOHUFBNT Hole sponsorships are still available and prize donations are needed. To ensure your spot in the tournament, register by May 22. For more information, contact Tom Nielsen

Security Cameras A second major innovation at NRC comes in the form of added security. Several years ago NRC installed several security cameras from VTI Security Integrators, which were placed in strategic, public locations

at (507) 664-3474, or visit our website: northfieldretirement.org. Your participation in our 3rd Annual NRC Golf Classic demoncontinued on page 3

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For more information and research about the eNeighbor by Healthsense, visit their website at www.healthsense.com.

All lined up for last year’s Classic.

around the campus. We are able to view these cameras live from monitors or computers and view historical recordings from all cameras for up to three months. With additional foot traffic from YMCA members and shoppers at Emelda’s Market Place and Gift Shoppe, we felt it necessary to proactively install additional cameras. Now, we are able to monitor and record traffic in our most heavily-

Video security is essential for NRC’s growing campus.

travelled hallways as well as at main entrances to the campus.

Television Channels Finally, we’ve added six separate cable television channels to enhance overall campus communication. This addition allows us to broadcast information, education, and entertainment campus-wide. Three channels are currently in use; three are reserved for future use. Channel 118 is run by computer and operates a program from Touchtown TV+. In-house television systems have been in use for decades in retirement homes, hotels and resorts. Touchtown TV+ lets us easily create professional, quality content, which is deliverable via both the web and TV. With the system, we can provide consistent and up-to-date information on weather continued on page 3

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


– Advertorial –

strates your belief in our important mission, to offer excellence in health care and living services, empowering older adults to reach their maximum physical, spiritual, psychological and social potential. Because of your generosity, NRC continues to offer a living community dedicated to the special needs of its residents, and to uphold its traditions, innovation and choice in all the services it provides the valued persons it serves.

Tonic Sol-fa Concert Mark your calendar for Saturday, October 24. Tonic Sol-fa, the Midwest’s breakout acapella group will be in concert at the Northfield Middle School at 7:30 pm. From gospel to rock, country to contemporary, Tonic Sol-fa features a range

alerts, campus activities and dining room and cafĂŠ menus. We can even use the system to inform residents when the mail is here. Off-campus individuals can view Channel 118 information and announcements by going to www. northfieldretirement.org and clicking on the “NRC TV Channelâ€? box in the lower left hand corner of the screen. Operating on a different computer, Channel 119 can be used to view information available on the internet. With this capability, we can rebroadcast video archives or live web camera feeds from St. Olaf concerts, sporting events or educational programs. Channel 120 was added as another level of enhanced campus security. At present, we are broadcasting live video of the main entrances

of music genres. The concert will pay tribute to NRC’s 40 years of service and is a fundraiser to ensure we continue to offer health care and living services for years to come. A winner of multiple awards, Tonic Sol-fa has appeared on stage XJUI+BZ-FOPBOE+Fê'PYXPSUIZ  on the Today Show and the Prairie Home Companion 30th Anniversary Show. In addition, their Christmas Concert Special has run on PBS stations for years. Our Tonic Sol-fa Concert will be a high point of our year of 40th Anniversary celebration. You won’t want to miss the fun. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact Ingrid Anderson Sampo at (507) 664-3471, or Joan Stoesz at (507) 664-3480. t

NRC TODAY $3&%*54 NRC Today, a publication of the NRC Foundation, is published four times a year. Spring 2009 7PMVNF /VNCFS President and CEO: ,ZMF/PSEJOF -/)" Editor: *OHSJE"OEFSTPO4BNQP 7JDF1SFTJEFOU 'VOE%FWFMPQNFOU Contributing Photographers: 1BVM,SBVTF .JMPTIB.BMFDIB  *OHSJE"OEFSTPO4BNQP

at Parkview East and Parkview West. This will allow residents to view visitors before allowing them access into our buildings.

The Future Adding and utilizing available technology at NRC is an important and evolving way in which we can care for our senior population efficiently and safely, while enhancing every resident’s quality of life. By 2050 the number of people age 85 and older will nearly quadruple. In the same timeframe, the number of people available to care for an aging population will shrink dramatically. New and innovative technologies are a pivotal resource in addressing this challenge. At NRC, we’re excited to be at the forefront of these technologies – both for today and tomorrow. t

Northfield Retirement Community Innovation. Choice. Tradition.

A Christian Community of Senior Housing with Services

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MAY 2009

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– Advertorial –

Nordine Receives Honor and Governor Reappointment The Dietary Managers Association awarded Kyle Nordine the honor of Employer of the Year.

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iane Valentyn, Dietary Manager at Northfield Retirement Community, nominated Nordine. According to Valentyn, Kyle Nordine is a visionary who supports the NRC campus in every way possible. He also encourages staff to “think outside the box� and envision ideas that will benefit the older adults NRC serves. Valentyn notes, “He is always asking the question, ‘What are people going to be looking for in three to five years, and how can we give it to them?’ I’ve worked with Kyle for six years, and he has taken our facility from a long term care center to a continuum of care campus.�

“Kyle is a resident advocate and wants only the best for our clients,� Valentyn states. “He also wants the best for staff, supporting us in ongoing learning opportunities, such as involvement in Aging Services of Minnesota seminars and training sessions, and my attendance at all district and state DMA meetings.� Nordine was also reappointed by Governor Tim Pawlenty to the Board of Examiners for Nursing Home Administrators. Nordine has served four years and will serve for

Diane Valentyn and Kyle Nordine

another four-year term. Kyle has been the Chairman of the Board for the past two years. Nordine states it is a tremendous honor to be a part of this special state board. t

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We gratefully acknowledge the following gifts received between January 1, 2009 and February 28, 2009. Sponsor: $250 - $999 LeRoy and Marvel Dreier Highview Christiania Church, Farmington Brett and Michele Reese Friend: $1 - $249 "SUIVSBOE.BSJBO#BHBBTPO #FUUF#BTT %BWJEBOE%FCCZ#FDLFS ,BSJ#FSJU1SFTFOUT *OD 3POBMEBOE4BOEZ#FVNFS %BWJE$IBQNBO +PIOBOE+VOF$IFTUFS 3JDIBSEBOE+PBOOF%BIMJO +PIOBOE'SBODFT&WFOTPO +FOOJOHTBOE&MBJOF'FSPF ,BUISZO'JMCSBOEU &VHFOFBOE$MBJSF'PY 3PCFSUBOE#FUUZ)BOTFO QBHF

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,FJUIBOE#FMJOEB1FUFSTPO (FPSHFBOE+VEJUI1JOD -PJT3BOE %FBOF3JDIBSETPO 3PCFSUBOE,BUIMFFO3PSUWFEU &MUPOBOE$POOJF3ZCFSH /PSNBO4IFMTUB 4ZMWJB4PMCFSH 4U0MBG$PMMFHF $ISJTUJOF4UJNF +PBO4UPFT[ -MPZE4XBSUXPVEU 0SWJMMF4XFOTPO +FOOJF4XJHHVN #SVDFBOE"MJDF5IPNBT %F8BZOFBOE5IFP8FF )B[FMMF8JMMJBNT "SOPMEBOE$FMFOB8JUU

Gifts Given in Memory of: )FSC#FDLFS -PJT#FOEJDLTPO /BPNJ#MVNBOUIBM "MJDF&SJDLTPO 1FSDZ1BSPEJT 4JHWFE4BNQTPO (MBEZT5IPNBT In-Kind Gifts: 'BNJMZPG)FSC#FDLFS 'BNJMZPG-PJT#FOEJDLTPO #JMMBOE-JOEB,VIOT ,FOOFUIBOE#BSCBSB8FBWFS If we have inadvertently omitted your name, please contact our Foundation office at (507) 664-3480. t

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Š NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


S P O R T S Here are the home games Friday, May 1

TRACK AND FIELD – Men’s and Women’s MIAC Multi-Events at Carleton BASEBALL – Raiders Boys’ vs. Shakopee, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, May 2

TRACK AND FIELD – Men’s MIAC Decathalon at Carleton BASEBALL – Raiders Boys’ Tournament vs. Lakeville South, 11 a.m. at Dundas Memorial Baseball Park St. Olaf vs. Carleton, 1 p.m. SOFTBALL – Raiders Girls’ vs. Waseca, 11 a.m. Raiders Girls’ vs. Owatonna, 1:30 p.m.

Friday, May 8

TRACK AND FIELD – Men’s and Women’s MIAC Championships at Carleton Saturday, May 9

TRACK AND FIELD – Men’s and Women’s MIAC Championships at Carleton BASEBALL – Raiders Boys’ vs. Little Falls, 11 a.m. TENNIS – St. Olaf Men’s vs. alumni, 2 p.m. Monday, May 11

SOFTBALL – Raiders Girls’ vs. Farmington, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 12

BASEBALL – Raiders Boys’ vs. New Prague, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, May 14

Monday, May 4

TENNIS – Raiders Boys’ vs. Hastings, 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, May 5

BASEBALL – Raiders Boys’ vs. Hutchinson, 3:30 and 5:30 p.m. TENNIS – Raiders Boys’ vs. Hutchinson, 4:15 p.m.

TRACK AND FIELD – Raiders Boys’ and Girls’ Invitational, 4:15 p.m. at Carleton BASEBALL – Raiders Boys’ vs. Academy of Holy Angels, 4:30 p.m. Monday, May 18

BASEBALL – Raiders Boys’ vs. Waseca, 3:30 p.m.

Thursday, May 7

BASEBALL – Raiders Boys’ vs. Prior Lake, 4:30 p.m.

Get Exposed – in the Northfield Entertainment Guide. The place to Advertise for a full month of very cool exposure. And the rates are very reasonable – really, they are. Email Abby at abby@northfieldguide.com for information. I think we should get our wedding invites printed at By All Means Graphics. I hear they do great work!

That’s a great idea! You could also get some more business cards printed while we’re at it!

Follow Pete & Alice’s lead:

Look us up for your printing and design needs! Layo

tin g ut • De sign • Pr o duction • P ri n

Logos • Business Cards • Posters Postcards • Fliers • Ads • And More!

17 Bridge Square • 507-663-7937 MAY 2009

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

43


Clubs, Classes and More… Glass Garden Beads Beading Class – 507/645-0301 First and third Mondays Northfield Public Library – 507/645-6606

Adventure Girls, 7 p.m. – Book club for girls ages 9+. First Steps Early Literary Center, Mon and Fri, 10 a.m.-noon and Sat, 10-11 a.m. (for children 6 months-4 years) Infant Lapsit, Tuesdays, 10 a.m. Toddler Rhyme Time, Wednesdays, 10 a.m. Preschool Stories and Crafts, Thursdays, 10 a.m. Carleton ACT Story Hour, Saturdays, 11 a.m. Just Food Co-op – 507/650-0106

Tuesdays: Knitting Night, 7-9 p.m., 507/645-6331 – knit, chat, share ideas and get help. Gluten-free Sample Day, May 2, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. – sample gluten-free products and take in a gluten-free tour. World Fair Trade Day, May 9, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. – Celebrate World Fair Trade Day at Just Food with free samples of Peace Coffee, Alaffia fair-trade body care products and desserts from the Just Food Deli! Wellness Wednesday: Allergy Remedies, May 13, 4-6 p.m. This weekly second Wednesday of each month will focus on a different topic with samples and information. Taste: Asparagus and Ramps, May 16, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. – Try inseason vegetables and get cooking suggestions from produce experts! Sweet Pea’s Toys and Treats Game Night – 507/645-6555,

Thursdays, 5-7 p.m. – Fun, prizes and family time! The Key

Mondays: Book Club, 5-6 p.m. Tuesdays: Photo Club, 5-6:30 p.m. Art Project Night, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays: Skate Park meeting, 5-6 p.m. College Prep, 7-8:30 p.m. – Learn about the ACT, financial aid, how to write a college essay, etc. The Key will pay for college applications for those not able. Most who show up are paired with a caring and knowledgeable adult. Fridays: Movie Night, 7-9 p.m. Sundays: Writing Workshop, 3-5 p.m. – For details, call 507/663-0715.

WANTED The Northfield Entertainment Guide is looking for a sales representative – someone sales-savvy, creative, self-motivated and friendly. 30-35 fun hours/week (well – mostly fun) Primarily working with existing and potential advertisers. Send resume and cover letter to abby@northfieldguide.com or drop off at 17 Bridge Square, Northfield 44 NEG@northfieldguide.com

Paradise Center for the Arts – 612/216-1206

Beginning Basic and Intermediate Acrylic Painting, Thursdays in May, 1-3 p.m. – Gary Hoganson will help students paint from photographs or develop paintings that they have been working on. Supplies not included. $50 members/$60 non-member for a five-week session. Adult Stained Glass, Thursdays in May, 6:30-9 p.m. – Personal instruction and help makes this class perfect for all abilities. All materials can be purchased from the instructor. Cost for supplies varies, depending on desired project. $120 member/$130 non-member. Open Textile Lab (ages 15+), May 11 (meets the second Monday of each month), 6:30-8:30 p.m. – Get acquainted with the textile lab and do a small project planned by instructors. Registration encouraged. $10 members/$15 non-members. Instructors: Deb Johnson and Arlene Rolf. Batik Workshop, May 16 and 17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. – Focused on wax and dye, students will create a variety of images and textures on cloth to produce a piece of art to be framed or used as a hanging. Experiment with brushes, the tjanting tool, stamps, stencils and brayers. Perfect for beginners and experienced batikers. $120 member/$130 non-member, plus supply fee of $20/person, payable to instructors Deb Johnson and Arlene Rolf. Dumpster Diva Day, May 16, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. – Create fun art with the Mona Moore! Using recycled items we’ll make haute couture and hand-bound books. $20/session or $35 for both. Literary Arts, “Creatures of Habit,” May 16, 6:30 p.m. – In celebration of Hug Your Cat Day (and um, National Mole Day), write about your relationships with animals – as pets, as food, as partners in work and, weather permitting, take your dog for a walk! PJ’s Fabric and Crafts, 507/332-7151 – Classes include

crocheting, knitting, sewing, quilting and more! For a full calendar schedule visit, 111.emailcontact.com/calendar/ view/5132 River Bend Nature Center, 332-7151 – Classes and activi-

ties at www.rbnc.org.

need printing? Check out the shop that produces the Northfield Entertainment Guide! We can take care of your business cards, brochures, flyers, invitations, copying… Check us out – you know we’re fun – We put out this great publication! I know – too good to be true – but it is! 663-7937 or stop in at 17 Bridge Square. © NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Northfield Golf Club

DINING

Support the restaurants that support the Northfield Entertainment Guide.

Chapati

See page 25

214 Division St. • 645-2462 (office 645-1665) www.chapati.us Closed Mondays – Cuisine of India. Variety of curry and Tandoor entrees including a large selection of vegetarian items. Wine and beer. Contented Cow

See page 24

302 Division St. S. • 645-1665 • www.contentedcow.com 3 p.m.-close – British-style pub with authentic British specialties as well as a variety of soups, salads and sandwiches. Extensive patio overlooking the Cannon River. Great selection of imported and domestic draft beer as well as a full selection of wine and spirits. Culvers

See page 23

960 Hwy. 3 So. • 645-7700 • getculverized.com – ButterBurgers and frozen custard. El Tequila – 1010 Hwy. 3 S. • 664-9139 • 11 a.m.-10 p.m. – Family restaurant offering authentic Mexican cuisine as well as wonderful margaritas and much more. Froggy Bottoms River Pub

See page 21

305 S. Water St. • 664-0260 • www.froggybottoms.com • Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-close – New menu! Steaks, salads, pasta and much more. Wide selection of beers and wines. Non-smoking restaurant with cozy atmosphere, thousands of frogs and a beautiful outdoor patio overlooking the Cannon River. The HideAway

See page 31

421 Division St. • 645-0400 • Mon-Wed • 6 a.m.-9 p.m., ThSat 6 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 7 a.m.-5 p.m. – Cozy bistro atmosphere serving unique appetizers and sandwiches. Coffee drinks, wine and beer specialties. James Gang Coffeehouse and Eatery

See page 7

2018 Jefferson Rd. • 663-6060 • Mon-Fri 6 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat- Sun 7 a.m.-5 p.m. – Voted Best Coffeehouse in southern Minnesota. Fresh daily roasted coffee. Wraps, soup, sandwiches, salads, desserts, ice cream and non-espresso drinks. Free wireless internet and business catering available. J. Grundy’s Rueb ‘N’ Stein

See page 9

503 Division St. • 645-6691 • www.ruebnstein.com 11 a.m.-close – Great burgers and famous Ruebens. Casual relaxing atmosphere. Huge selection of imported and domestic beers, fine spirits and wines. Game room, happy hour 3:30-6 p.m., Karaoke on Fridays at 9 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS 50¢/word – 30-word minimum. Payment due before publication. Fax or e-mail text or inquiries to 507663-0772 or neg@northfieldguide.com.

MAY 2009

See page 18

707 Prairie St. • 645-4026 • northfieldgolfclub.com • Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-9 p.m., dinner menu available starting at 5 p.m.; Sun and Mon 11 a.m.-8 p.m., luncheon menu available – The upper level of the clubhouse, with a breathtaking view of the historic Northfield course, offers a complete restaurant/lounge area. An exquisite array of entrees is professionally prepared by Executive Chef Rafael Perez and staff. Ole Café

See page 30

151011 St. Olaf Ave • 645-2500 • Mon-Fri 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun 9 a.m.-2 p.m. – A coffee shop and cafeteria-style eatery with soups, salads, build-your-own sandwiches, panninis, and during dinner hours – build-you-own-pasta bar. A retail bakery with cakes, cheesecakes, cupcakes, cookies, bars and breakfast pastries. A pizza bar and fine beers and wines. Quality Bakery and Coffee Shop

See page 5

410 Division St. • 645-8392 • Opens 6 a.m. Tuesday-Saturday – Owned and operated by the Klinkhammer family since 1949. Quality baking from scratch using delicious family recipes with no preservatives. Custom cakes, homemade breads, donuts, pies, cookies, espresso, lunch and more. Quarterback Club

See page 9

116 3rd St. W. • 645-7886 • Mon-Sat • 6 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m. – Family friendly dining in Northfield for 37 years. House specialties include broasted chicken, BBQ ribs and flame-broiled hamburgers. The Tavern of Northfield – 212 Division St. • 663-0342

Sun-Thu 6:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri-Sat 6:30 a.m.-11 p.m., lounge open daily 3 p.m.-midnight – Located in the historic Archer House since 1984, The Tavern hosts casual dining with a wide variety of homemade menu items and specials daily featuring fresh fish on Fridays and prime rib on Saturdays. The Tavern Lounge sports a deck overlooking the Cannon River, appetizers and a full bar with live music Thur-Sat. Tiny’s Dogs All Day

See page 6

321 Division St. S. • 645-6862 • Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-2 p.m. – Historic former pool hall, Tiny’s continues to delight patrons with great hot dogs, sandwiches, non-alcoholic beverages and snacks. Features include New York-style coneys, Chicago-style Vienna Beef, as well as Tiny’s own classic dog. Since 1947 Tiny’s has offered Northfield’s largest selection of specialty tobaccos and quality cigars. Willingers Bar & Restaurant

See page 3

6900 Canby Trail, Northfield • 952/652-2500 • Sun-Thurs 11 a.m. -9 p.m.; Fri-Sat 11 a.m.-10 p.m. – High above the course, with views of Willingers Golf Club’s fairways, greens, lakes, wetlands, ponds and trees, this venue offers dining with casual, upscale cuisine. Enjoy dinner or simply a beverage at the bar. Also available for wedding receptions, banquets, meetings

Get your venue listed here or with a display ad in the next Guide – very cool exposure at a very affordable price. Contact Abby – 507/663-7937 or abby@northfieldguide.com

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45


Just Curious…

And so a few quick questions and answers. By Breanna Zarbinski Before meeting Jim and Joan Spaulding, I have to admit I was slightly intimidated. Both pursue their own business, jointly own the HideAway downtown, and somehow schedule time for their six kids. After meeting the Spauldings, however, I was calmed by their genuine friendliness and wonderful sense of humor. Jim and Joan may be the Renaissance man and woman of the 21st century, but their true talent lies in their ability to find balance in their lives and work with each other. BZ: When did you open the HideAway? Jim: In May of 2006. Joan: We bought the space in January and then built the kitchen and opened a few months later. BZ: What made you decide to do a coffee shop? Jim: In 2003, I was the victim of corporate downsizing. Both of us had worked in careers that demanded a lot of traveling, so we decided we wanted to do something in Northfield that allowed us to stay in one place for a longer period of time. We asked people what type of business they thought Northfield needed, and we heard that they needed a coffee shop on the south side of town. BZ: How did the process continue? Jim: We opened the James Gang on the south side of town in the spring of 2004. Two years later we opened the HideAway and quickly learned that it was just too much. So in January 2008 we sold the James Gang. We were running two businesses, Joan had her own business, we have six kids, and everything became a little too much to manage.

date. Supposedly, Jesse James hid there before he robbed the bank. So when we had the opportunity to buy part of Jacobson’s we thought HideAway would be a great name. BZ: How did you know how to run a coffee shop? Joan: Fake it until you make it! Jim: My sister-in-law was a barista in college, and she took us on a tour of about six coffee shops in St. Paul so that we could learn what an espresso machine was. Then we traveled on our own all over Minnesota and western Wisconsin to research the business. We also got books over the Internet on how to run a coffee shop. Joan: When we opened the HideAway, we began selling wine and beer, and we thought we should learn something about wine and beer, so we went out to Napa Valley. Jim: We also did some beer tasting in Minnesota. In order to maintain quality, this type of research must continue. BZ: You seem to keep pretty busy. How do you manage it all? Joan: It’s just a matter of how well we work together. We get along great and we really do work well together. We both do whatever work needs to be done. Jim: I do more of the behind-the-scenes work at the coffee shop. I fix equipment and go to purchase the supplies. Joan greets the customers, does the ordering, hires employees and works on the PR of the business. We compliment each other well. It really

Spaulding

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BZ: How did you pick the names for both of the coffee shops? Jim: Well, I’m “James,” and our six kids represent the “gang.” Joan: When we opened The James Gang, Bob Jacobson who owned Jacobson’s Department store gave us a barn board from the livery stable behind his store. On it, Jesse James inscribed his initials and birth

Coffeehouse and Winebar

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


just comes down to filling in slots. The beauty of owning your own business is that you can create your own schedule. Joan: Also, neither of us is afraid to do anything that needs to be done. If there are dishes that need to be done or if someone needs to tuck the kids into bed, either one of us will jump in and do it. We don’t really have your traditional roles. We really both try to make sure we spend time with the family, I am usually done with my work at the coffeehouse by 2:30 and then it’s pick up the kids and 100 percent “mom time.” Last night, for example, we ordered Chinese and pizza and had a movie marathon with the kids.

a spa and skincare company. We teach people how to relax and de-stress. The whole idea of the business is to teach people how to do things on their own at a fraction of the cost. I go to businesses and work with their employees or I go into people’s homes and hold spa parties or individual instant face lifts at no cost to my clients.

BZ: When did you become involved in the spa business? Joan: In 1988. I had been in publishing before that, but Jim and I were talking about having kids and I wanted something with more flexibility. Since this is my own business, it has given me the opportunity to BZ: How long have you lived in Northstay home with the kids and be a part Joan Spaulding in action at the HideAway. field? of other endeavors, like the coffee Joan: We have lived here for 14 years. shop. I love what I do. I love teaching women how to relax, When we decided to move here, I was pregnant with our because I don’t think we always know how to. My spa busithird child, and we really just wanted to get out of the Cities. ness is actually my way to relax. We loved the family feel of Northfield and decided it was the place for us. BZ: Jim, I know you’re starting a new business. Can you explain it? Jim: Last year I turned 50, and I was looking for a new chalBZ: Do you try to incorporate your kids into work at the coflenge. The new business, called Just Trikes, is taking large fee shop? motorcycles and converting them into trikes. I am starting with Joan: Yes! During the summer and on breaks, they are obviGold Wings and then adding Harley Davidson, Yamaha and ously able to work more, but they really enjoy being a part of BMW. I am going to school in Kentucky for a week for training this. Their tasks vary depending on their age, but everyone and then I will be a certified dealer of Hannigan Trikes. gets to get a little involved. For example, our 7-year-old can bus all of the tables, do the dishes and deliver food. As they BZ: Do you have any experience with motorcycles? grow up, they can get more responsibilities. Our 9-year-old Jim: No! I’ve never ridden actually! I’m a big car fan, but I runs the cash register, and our 13-year-old can run the store. had never worked on motorcycles before. I have an acquainShe has been the most consistent worker of all of the kids. All tance that has done this, and I became pretty interested in the kids also have to help and pick up the slack at home with the idea. I went to Sturgis last year and talked with all of the chores and watching the other kids. distributors there, and when I got back, I went around Minnesota and talked with distributors here. BZ: What makes the HideAway different from other coffee shops in town? BZ: What are the advantages of trikes? Joan: The atmosphere is very clean and comfortable. It Jim: Another good acquaintance of mine, Wayne Eddy, is on almost creates an uptown feeling in a small downtown area. my bowling team. He lost a leg to diabetes a few years ago. He Jim: We’ve had a number of people tell us we have the friend- was an avid motorcycle rider, and now he cannot physically ride liest staff, and that is something we really stress. a motorcycle, but he could ride a trike. A trike can be steered Joan: We are constantly doing things to improve as well. much more easily. There should be a large customer base that Jim: We are trying to create our own niche. We make soups, could ride a trike and would be interested in an alternative to salads and sandwiches, and we offer beer, wine and appetizers a normal motorcycle. One of my friends even mentioned that as well. We aren’t trying to take anyone’s business, but we’re there are a fair number of war veterans that have lost limbs and trying to create another reason to come downtown. can’t ride motorcycles anymore, but would enjoy trike riding. Joan: We also know a lot of people who do not feel comfortBZ: Like you said, you are known for your friendly employees. able on a bike but would feel comfortable on a trike. How do you ensure you have such a good group of people? Joan: I usually decide if I’m going to hire someone right when BZ: What have you come to love about Northfield in the last I meet them. To me, a friendly attitude is more important than 14 years? experience. Also, we are pretty easy to get along with, so we Joan: The sense of family, the safety and the energy of downestablish an atmosphere of respect between the employees and town all add to this town. ourselves. Our employees are really responsible. We teach them Jim: The community participation of this town is also amazthat they have the power to make or break someone’s day with ing. There are a lot of people that are actively involved in this their smile and friendly conversation. town. Joan: It’s more the people than the town that makes NorthBZ: Joan, what is your individual business? field the place that it is. Joan: I am an executive director with BeautiControl, and we are

MAY 2009

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Does your bank have seven local ATMs? 1. First National – Downtown 329 Division Street (24 hours)

2. First National – Motor Bank 3

529 Division Street (24 hours)

6

3. First National – South 1611 Honey Locust Drive (24 hours)

4. St. Olaf College Buntrock Commons

5. Carleton College Sayles-Hill Campus Center

6. Econofoods 601 Division Street

1

2

4

7. Northfield Retirement Community/YMCA 900 Cannon Valley Drive

7

We do.

5

With more local ATMs than any other banking institution around, we offer convenient access to your cash when and where you need it.

At the heart of Northfield since 1872. Downtown

329 Division Street 507-645-5656

South

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Motor Bank

1611 Honey Locust Drive 507-664-0820

529 Division Street 507-645-5673

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May 2009 Northfield Entertainment Guide