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OPPORTUNITY & CHOICE

NORWICH FREE ACADEMY

2017 - 2018 CATALOG


Since 1854, the mission of Norwich Free Academy has been to “return to our hamlets and our homes its priceless freight of youthful minds, enriched by learning, developed by a liberal culture, refined by a study of all that is beautiful in nature and art, and prepared for the highest usefulness and the purest happiness.”

– Founder, John P. Gulliver Dedication Ceremony – 1856

Incorporated in 1854, Norwich Free Academy has always operated as a privately endowed secondary school governed by its appointed board of trustees. The campuslike atmosphere, with its unique architectural spaces, accommodates the community and helps develop creativity and exploration for students. Our independent status safeguards our traditions and has fostered innovative responses to the needs of our student population. Our rich history, distinctive traditions and independence encourage generous financial support and active participation from trustees and alumni. Our large, culturally diverse population supports rich, broad course offerings, outstanding athletic programs and numerous clubs and activities, all designed to develop the intellect, engage and employ the interest and instill a passion for learning. Academy students become productive and responsible adults. Norwich Free Academy draws strength from its independence. We balance a commitment to excellence and care for each student.

ONE YOU

ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES

A long-standing tradition at the Academy follows English grade-level terminology: ninth graders are Juniors; tenth graders are Lowers, eleventh graders are Uppers, and twelfth graders are Seniors.

For more information about NFA’s Opportunities & Choices, visit www.nfaschool.org.

Norwich Free Academy reserves the right to cancel courses with insufficient class registration. Norwich Free Academy complies with all the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Norwich Free Academy is fully accredited by the Department of Education of The State of Connecticut and the New England Association of Schools and Colleges

Front cover artwork by: Adriana Robbins, 12, Norwich, Watercolor, FA Comp. Back cover artwork by: David Fontaine, 12, Voluntown, Watercolor, FA Comp.

Together with your family and faculty, build an NFA experience that is uniquely yours – and turn your passions into a lifetime of opportunities.


OPPORTUNITY & CHOICE To fulfill NFA’s mission to provide a liberal education, the curriculum offers students many options enabling them to direct their academic program toward areas of specialization while exploring diverse areas of study and interest.

THE CORE CURRICULUM The Core Curriculum provides a rich educational experience. The opportunity to select numerous electives allows students to explore a number of fields or to concentrate on one according to interest and ability. For example, a student may plan a concentration in art or in music. Students planning to pursue post-secondary education may plan to study advanced mathematics, world language, chemistry, and/or physics; or students may choose one of a career-oriented cluster or sequence of courses. To receive an NFA diploma, all students must earn one credit in world language. All lowers choose English 2, a math course, global studies/civics, biology, physical education, and two electives. All uppers choose English 3, U.S. History, a math course, a science course, and one or more electives. All seniors choose a 12th all other requirements for met, students complete least four other courses to their background.

grade English course; if graduation have been their schedule with at concentrate or broaden

The Special Education Department provides academic support and instruction as specified in a student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP). The planning and placement team (PPT) makes decisions about special education courses and services.

Olivia Fowler, 9, Lisbon, Photo, Digital Photography I

COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS Requirements for college admissions vary widely. To be competitive, students are advised to take a rigorous academic program for all four years. Colleges seek students who take a challenging academic load. Many colleges require four units in English, three or more units in a laboratory science, three or more units in history, and three or more units in one world language. Some college programs like Physical Therapy, Nursing, Engineering, and Business Administration may require stronger preparation or specific prerequisite course work. A few colleges have open admissions to certain programs. Open admission requires a high school diploma or equivalent. It is important that students work closely with their counselors to plan their fouryear program. Colleges differ in world language requirements. Students should check college catalogs carefully to meet the specific requirements of the colleges to which they plan to apply. Students should include elective courses in their programs in areas like art, business, computers, family and consumer sciences, technology and music.

Miduo Liu, 10, China, Drawing, Fine Arts Drawing Foundations

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DUAL OR CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT COURSES

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM

Students may earn college credit for select courses taken at Norwich Free Academy through NFA’s concurrent or dual enrollment partnerships with the University of Connecticut’s Early College Experience program, Eastern Connecticut State University’s Dual Enrollment program, and Three Rivers Community College’s College Career Pathways program. Instructors are Academy teachers certified as adjunct professors by the colleges.

The College Board’s Advanced Placement (AP) Program is another opportunity for students to pursue college-level study in high school. College admissions personnel view AP experiences as an indicator of college success. Participation in AP courses is, therefore, a great advantage to a student planning to attend a selective or highly selective college. Students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses prepare to take the respective AP exams in the spring. There is a fee for an Advanced Placement exam, and financial assistance is available. NFA offers the following AP courses:

The Early College Experience (ECE) program at UConn and the Dual Enrollment Program at Eastern (ECSU) provide academically motivated students opportunities to take university courses while still in high school. In these courses students experience challenging college work, build their college readiness confidence, and earn college credit, providing both an academic and financial head start on a college degree. These courses foster independent learning, creativity and critical thinking — all pivotal for success in college. To support rigorous learning, all enrolled students have access to college library resources. Three Rivers Community College’s College Career Pathways program provides NFA students opportunities to earn credit toward an associate degree at TRCC or to transfer those credits to another college. In addition to meeting any prerequisites for enrollment, students must submit a specific registration form for UConn, ECSU, and/or TRCC if they wish to receive credit. These forms are available in June before the fall in which the class is taken. Students enrolled must complete the course with a grade of C or above to receive college credit. Credit is earned at the particular college, and is usually transferable to many other colleges and universities. UConn and Eastern charge high school students a nominal fee per credit, but students realize a substantial savings in comparison to the per credit tuition charged to college students. TRCC does not charge a fee.

AP Biology AP Calculus AB / BC AP Chinese Language and Culture AP Computer Science A AP Economics (Micro & Macro) AP English Language & Composition AP English Literature & Composition AP Environmental Science AP European History AP History of Art AP Latin AP Music Theory AP Physics 1 AP Physics 2 AP Physics 1&2 AP Psychology AP Spanish Language AP Statistics AP Studio Art

After graduation seniors should request that their dual enrollment college send a transcript for transfer credit to the college in which they enroll.

Mia Sisco, 12, Norwich, Mixed Media, AP Studio Art

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS SUBJECT

CREDITS

English

4

Mathematics

3

Social Studies 1 credit must be in US History & .5 credit must be in Civics

3

Science

3

World Language

1

Physical Education

1

Arts or Vocational Education

1

Electives

7

Total Credits Required for Graduation

23

All 9th grade students participate in and receive a grade for Health.

GRADING & CREDIT POLICY Norwich Free Academy’s Grade Scale is as follows:

A = Superior Achievement

B = Above-Average Achievement

C = Average Achievement

D = Below-Average Achievement

F = Failure (no credit)

I = Incomplete (student will be allowed to make up work for credit)

W = Withdrawn from Class

S = Satisfactory

U = Unsatisfactory

P = Pass

Minus (-) and plus (+) symbols are used to distinguish quality; however, there are no A+, F+ or F- grades. All courses grant credit by semester. One-credit courses award one-half credit each semester. At Norwich Free Academy, classroom teachers are in the best position to assess a student’s progress and achievement. The teacher-student relationship makes possible an accurate appraisal of a student’s progress. Teacher assessment may be based upon student achievement, effort, classroom participation, satisfaction of course requirements, and attendance. Teachers distribute a grading policy at the beginning of each course. A semester grade of D- or better is required to earn course credit.

Anissa Baral, 12, Norwich, Oil Painting, Fine Arts Color Theory, Painting I No credit will be granted for a repeated course if credit was previously earned unless otherwise stated in the course description. Students with excessive absences or class cuts do not earn course credit. To participate in NFA’s graduation, in their senior year, students must earn a minimum of four credits, pass the equivalent of two full credits (typically four classes) for the second semester, and carry a minimum of five classes each semester.

GRADING SYSTEM Grades on transcripts and report cards are by letter, based upon a 4.0 GPA (Grade-point average) system. A = 4.0000

B- = 2.6667

D+ = 1.3333

A- = 3.6667

C+ = 2.3333

D = 1.0000

B+ = 3.3333

C = 2.0000

D- = 0.6667

B

C- = 1.6667

F

= 3.0000

= 0.0000

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DUAL OR CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT COURSES Courses at Eastern Connecticut State University and the University of Connecticut require a fee based upon the number of credits pursued. Financial assistance is available.

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT

NFA COURSE #

NFA COURSE TITLE

UCONN COURSE #

UCONN COURSE TITLE

COLLEGE CREDITS

ACP875

Honors FA Drawing

ART1030

Drawing I

3

ADR865

Advanced Drawing

ART1030

Drawing I

3

EEN956

AP English 4 (Literature)

ENGL1011

Seminar in Writing through Literature

4

HIST1501

United States History to 1877

3

HUS806

UConn United States History HIST1502

United States History since 1877

3

Art

English

Social Studies

HWC806

AP European History

HIST1400

Modern Western Traditions

3

HWT806

Ancient Western Civilizations

HIST1300

Western Traditions before 1500

3

HEC956

AP Economics

ECON1201

Principles of Microeconomics

3

ECON1202

Principles of Macroeconomics

3

LCH856

Chinese 4/UConn

CHIN1114

Intermediate Chinese II

3

LFR956

French Global Culture/UConn

FREN3250

Global Culture French 1

3

LIT856

Honors Italian 4

ILCS3239

Italian Composition and Conversation I

3

LIT956

Honors Italian 5

ILCS3240

Italian Composition and Conversation II

3

LLA956

AP Latin

CAMS3102

Topics in Advanced Latin

3

LSC956

AP Spanish Language

SPAN3178

Intermediate Spanish Composition

3

MSA806

AP Statistics

STAT1100Q

Elementary Concepts of Statistics

4

SES756

AP/UConn Environmental Science

NRE1000

Environmental Science

3

CHEM1127Q

General Chemistry I

4

SCH876

UConn Chemistry CHEM1128Q

General Chemistry II

4

World Language

Math

SMS786

UConn Oceanography

MARN1003

Intro to Oceanography with lab

4

SPY 956

AP/UConn Physics 1

PHYS1201Q

General Physics I

4

SPY 966

AP/UConn Physics 2

PHYS1202Q

General Physics II

4

PHYS1201Q

General Physics I

4

SPY976

AP/UConn Physics 1 & 2 PHYS1202Q

General Physics II

4

Science

4


EASTERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT

NFA COURSE #

NFA COURSE TITLE

ECSU (E) COURSE #

EASTERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY COURSE TITLE

COLLEGE CREDITS

English

ESP904

Public Speaking

COM230

Basic Speech

3

Social Studies

HEC905

Honors Economics

ECO100

Political Economy of Social Issues

3

Math

MCA956

AP Calculus AB

MAT243

Calculus I

4

SAY685

Honors Astronomy

AST214

Descriptive Astronomy w/Lab

4

SHB805

Honors Anatomy & Physiology

BIO 202,203

Human Biology, Lecture & Lab

4

Science

THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY COLLEGE DEPARTMENT

NFA COURSE #

NFA COURSE TITLE

ECSU (E) COURSE #

EASTERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY COURSE TITLE

COLLEGE CREDITS

Child Development

FIS 861

Early Childhood Education

ECE*K101

Introduction to Early Childhood Education

3

Technology Education

VDR611

Intermediate Engineering Graphics

CAD*K106/107

Computer Aided Drafting

3

Ashley Aydt, 12, Preston, Watercolor, FA Comp


HONOR ROLL Honor Roll is based upon the same GPA as diploma designations.

Honors = 3.3333 – 3.4999 GPA

High Honors = 3.5000 – 3.6665 GPA

Highest Honors = 3.6666 & higher GPA

Honor Roll, based upon semester grades, is calculated twice yearly. To be eligible for the honor roll, students must carry a minimum of 5 credits and have no grade lower than a C-. The GPA calculation considers all courses taken for credit that receive a letter grade.

DIPLOMAS Norwich Free Academy awards a Standard Diploma and three Honors Diplomas based upon total earned credits and cumulative grade-point average (GPA), grades 9 through 12.

Anna Hungerford 12 Lisbon Photo, Digital Photography I

Standard Diploma - Below 3.3332 GPA

Honors (Cum Laude) Diploma - 3.3333 – 3.4999 GPA High Honors (Magna Cum Laude) Diploma - 3.5000 – 3.6665 GPA Highest Honors (Summa Cum Laude) Diploma - 3.6666 & higher GPA

EXPECTED YEARLY CREDITS EARNED To be on track to graduate, students should earn the following credits each year. Students who fail a course should discuss opportunities for credit recovery with their school counselor as soon as possible. Recommended Minimum Credits Earned 9th to 10th Grade (Lower) 6 credits 10th to 11th Grade (Upper) 12 credits 11th to 12th Grade (Senior) 18 credits Regardless of credit status, all 12th-grade students are required to take 5 credits (minimum 2.5 credits each semester)

RANK IN CLASS

Max Wawrzynowicz, 11, Lisbon, Wire, Fine Arts Three-Dimensional Design

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Rank in class is based on a weighted grade-point average (GPA) system. Advanced/Honors courses with numbers ending in 5 increase GPA by a weighted multiplier of 1.1; courses with numbers ending in 6 increase GPA by a weighted multiplier of 1.2.


C0-CURRICULAR & ATHLETICS

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES At Norwich Free Academy student participation in co-curricular activities is a vital element of the high school experience. Active students are more likely to enjoy their high school years, and not only perform better academically during periods of co-curricular membership, but also enhance self-knowledge and social development. NFA encourages all students to explore the many activities available to them, to make new friends, to have new experiences, and to fully appreciate their high school years. Students should balance commitment to non-credit and after-school activities with academic demands. Some colleges and the National Honor Society consider extra-curricular activities as part of their total admissions evaluation. Further information about clubs and activities is available in the Student Affairs Office and in NFA’s Co-Curricular Guide.

CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES Ambassadors Amnesty International Anime Club Announcers Club Aquarium Club Arabic Club Art Honor Society Asian Cultures Club Band Beatles Club Book Club Bowling Club Business Club Cape Verdean Student Group Chinese Honor Society Christian Fellowship Class of 2017 Class of 2018 Class of 2019 Class of 2020 Classic Movie Club Color Guard Computer Club Comedy Club Comic Book Club Concert Band Cranston House Council Dance Team Debate Team Equestrian Club

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Melody Walenda, 9, Norwich, Graphic Design I

Fashion Club FCCLA (Family, Career & Community Leaders of America, Inc.) FEMALES Finance Club Fishing Club French Club Gaming Club Gay/Straight Alliance Geography Club Global Events Gospel Singers Haitian Support Group Ham Radio Club High School Bowl Ice Skating Club Intramural Sports Italian Club Jazz Ensemble Junior Classical League Knitting Club Law Enforcement Club Martial Arts Club Math Club Mirror Mosaic Project Musicians Club National Honor Society Nexus for Black Achievement

NFA Cares NFA Ultimate Frisbee Federation Oceanology Club Orchestra Outdoors Club Performing Arts/Playshop Philosophy Club Photography Club Project Outreach Red and White Student Advisory Board (SAB) Science/Environmental Club Science Honor Society Sign Language Club SOS Club Spanish Club Spanish Honor Society Student Art Association Successful Hispanics Alliance Tri-M Honor Society TSA (Technology Student Association) Unified Social Club Varsity “N” Club Walking Club Wildcat Marching Band Writers Club Young Educators Society Young Voters Society Youth Peace


ATHLETICS Athletics at Norwich Free Academy include the following interscholastic teams subject to school and CIAC regulations. FALL SPORTS

WINTER SPORTS

SPRING SPORTS

Cheerleading (coed) Cross Country (boys) Cross Country (girls) Field Hockey (girls) Football (boys) Soccer (boys) Soccer (girls) Swimming (girls) Unified Bowling Unified Soccer Volleyball (girls)

Basketball (boys) Basketball (girls) Cheerleading (coed) Fencing (boys) Fencing (girls) Gymnastics (girls) Ice Hockey (boys) Indoor Track (boys) Indoor Track (girls) Special Olympics – Speed Skating Swimming (boys) Unified Basketball Wrestling (boys)

Baseball (boys) Golf (boys) Golf (girls) Lacrosse (boys) Lacrosse (girls) Softball (girls) Special Olympics Track Tennis (boys) Tennis (girls) Track (boys) Track (girls) Unified Track Volleyball (boys)

ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY Norwich Free Academy follows the rules of Eligibility and Control for Boys and Girls in High School Athletics in Connecticut as set by the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC). Generally, to be eligible for participation in interscholastic athletics at NFA, a student must: • Carry five classes and be considered a full-time student • Not have reached his/her 20th birthday (Student-athletes will not be allowed to start a season in which their 20th birthday falls.) • (For fall sports) have earned four credits the previous school year (including summer school) • (For winter and spring sports) have passed the equivalent of four, full-credit classes in the most recent marking period • Transfer students must meet additional guidelines established by the CIAC

NCAA ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS Students planning to participate in any Division I or II sport in college must be certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center. The Center analyzes academic information to determine if a student meets NCAA Initial Eligibility requirements. To be certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center, students must (1) graduate from high school; (2) earn a GPA of at least 2.3 in 16 core courses (10 of the 16 core courses must be completed before senior year); and (3) meet SAT or ACT criteria. The NCAA uses only the SAT evidence-based reading, writing, and mathematics scores. The ACT score is the composite of English, mathematics, reading and science scores. Division I uses a sliding scale to match test scores with GPA from core courses. Students should review NCAA approved courses at www.ncaa.com or www. eligibilitycenter.org. For further information contact your school counselor. Student athletes bear the responsibility to begin early in high school to verify that their courses fulfill NCAA requirements.

These criteria are minimum standards. Individual coaches may choose to add other conditions including behavior, training, grades, etc. Team coaches or the Director of Athletics can answer any questions about eligibility.

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NINTH GRADE EXPERIENCE VISION: The Ninth Grade Experience establishes an educational environment in which all students can achieve academic and social success, begin the path to obtain a high school diploma, and leave ninth grade with the knowledge, skill, and experience to succeed in high school. GOALS: • Provide smooth transition into the Academy • Promote pride in academic achievement, emphasizing high expectations • Help students establish good work habits • Promote class and school pride • Encourage communication between parents and teachers • Provide opportunities for parents and teachers to discuss, seek help for and support students • Provide faculty opportunities to make curriculum and student placement recommendations • Encourage teachers to employ a variety of classroom activities, methods and ideas and share them with one another • Provide a variety of interdisciplinary learning experiences

Students who enter NFA as 9th-graders come from a variety of different schools, districts and towns. To ease this transition, 9th-graders spend most of their school day in Cranston House.

Katherine Westcott, 9, Norwich, Drawing, Fine Arts Drawing Foundations To make the ninth grade experience even more personal, the program is divided into units of about 100 students. Each unit has four teachers, one from each of the major content areas (English, science, mathematics and social studies). A school counselor, school psychologist, social worker and a special educator, and the faculty in elective subjects support each unit. Unit personnel meet regularly to assess student progress, develop strategies, seek specialized help, and communicate with parents about each student. During the year, ninth graders participate in a number of special programs and activities. Committees of teachers develop and implement programs to assist students with orientation to high school and to recognize student achievement. All ninth graders participate in PSAT 8/9 Testing. Ninth grade students are placed in classes based upon demonstrated ability, transcript, standardized testing data, NFA’s honors placement test and eighth grade teacher recommendation.

Makayla Jones, 12, Norwich, Monotype, Fine Arts Printmaking

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Every ninth grader must take one credit of English, mathematics, science and social studies, along with physical education and health. In addition, students take at least one full credit of elective courses, as listed in the chart on page 13.


REQUIRED NINTH GRADE COURSES NINTH GRADE PROGRAM (See course descriptions below) English

(full year – 1 credit)

World History

(full year – 1 credit)

Mathematics

(full year – 1 credit)

Science

(full year – 1 credit)

Physical Education (full year – ½ credit) Health Education (one semester – ¼ credit) Elective

(1credit required)

Optional Electives (up to 1 credit) Ninth grade course placement is based upon performance and teacher recommendation. Students interested in taking one or more honors courses in ninth grade must take NFA’s placement test to qualify. NFA course placement is fluid. Teachers and school counselors review student performance continuously and make adjustments so that all students have the opportunity to perform at high levels and maximize their potential. NFA offers opportunities for students to take honors courses in all grade levels. NINTH GRADE HONORS COURSES Depending upon interest and qualifications, high achieving, motivated ninth-graders have the opportunity to take Honors Courses in the four core academic areas. Honors English 9 Honors Algebra 1 or Honors Geometry Honors Integrated Science Honors World History Honors courses are weighted for grade-point average (GPA) as described on page 6.

Bryant Muratore 12, Norwich, Metals & Jewelry 2

EEN001 ENGLISH 1 Students develop their ability to recognize and write well-constructed English sentences and paragraphs and to speak effectively. Additionally, vocabulary study and reading literary classics encourage growth of reading fluency and comprehension. Students learn the basics of the research paper (full year – 1 credit). EEN005 HONORS ENGLISH 1 At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students develop their ability to recognize and write wellconstructed English sentences and paragraphs and to speak effectively. Additionally, vocabulary study and reading literary classics encourage growth of reading fluency and comprehension. Students learn the basics of the research paper. Recommended for highly motivated students whose score on NFA’s placement test indicates a level of proficiency in critical reading and writing skills to be successful in grade 9 honors level coursework (full year – 1 credit). HWH001 MODERN WORLD HISTORY Students learn about the development of civilizations from ancient times and those political, economic, and social concepts most applicable to life today. Students develop the academic skills for a successful high school career (full year – 1 credit). HWH005 HONORS MODERN WORLD HISTORY At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students learn about the development of civilizations from ancient times and those political, economic, and social concepts most applicable to life today. Recommended for highly motivated students whose score on NFA’s placement test indicates a level of proficiency in critical reading and writing skills to be successful in grade 9 honors level coursework (full year – 1 credit). SIS004 INTEGRATED SCIENCE Through scientific experimentation, research and discussion, students explore a wide range of topics from the origins of the universe to present day conditions that support the diversity of life on Earth (full year – 1 credit). SIS005 HONORS INTEGRATED SCIENCE Through scientific experimentation, research and discussion, students explore a wide range of topics from the origins of the universe to present day conditions that support the diversity of life on Earth. Recommended for highly motivated students whose score on NFA’s placement test indicates a level of proficiency in computing and reasoning skills to be successful in grade 9 honors level coursework (full year – 1 credit).

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION Students select two (2) of the following physical education courses (one taken each semester). Course descriptions are on page 40.

Colette Carlos, 9, Norwich, Drawing, Fine Arts Drawing Foundations All ninth grade mathematics courses require a scientific calculator (TI-30XIIS preferred). MIT003 INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 1 Students begin study of an integration of traditional Algebra1 and Geometry in this first of a two year sequence to learn about mathematical operations, algebraic equations and inequalities relating to the foundational topics of geometry, including lines, angle pairs, area, congruent figures and similar figures (full year – 1 credit). MAL004 ALGEBRA 1 Students develop skills in basic and beginning algebraic functions, solving and graphing equations, inequalities and systems of equations, and apply these skills to solve real world problems. This course is recommended for 9th-graders who have taken 8th-grade mathematics and who intend to follow a college preparatory mathematics sequence including Plane Geometry and Algebra 2 (full year – 1 credit).

PEB602 BASKETBALL 2 PEC601 RECREATIONAL GAMES PED601 PE DANCE PEF601 FOOTBALL/BASKETBALL PEF 602 FOOTBALL 2 PEG601 GOLF/FITNESS PEK601 TRAIL WALKING/CARDIO PEL601 FOOTBALL/WEIGHT TRAINING PEN601 SOCCER, BADMINTON, PING PONG PEO601 ORIENTEERING/CARDIO FITNESS PEP601 SPORTS PERFORMANCE PER611 NET SPORTS/ARCHERY PES601 DIAMOND SPORTS PET601 BASIC GYMNASTICS/TUMBLING PEW601 WEIGHT TRAINING/BODY TRANSFORMATION PEY601 BASIC YOGA, PILATES & MINDFULNESS PPE011 GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION PHE001 HEALTH EDUCATION Students learn about human growth and development; nutrition; first aid; disease prevention (including STDs and AIDS); community and consumer health; physical, mental and emotional health (including suicide prevention); substance abuse and prevention; and safety and accident prevention (½ year – ¼ credit).

MAL005 HONORS ALGEBRA 1 At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students develop skills in working with exponents and solving and graphing equations, inequalities and functions, systems of equations and quadratics, and apply these skills to solve real world problems. This course is recommended for highly motivated students who have been introduced to beginning algebraic concepts, and it is the first in a college preparatory sequence including Honors Plane Geometry and Advanced or Honors Algebra 2 (full year – 1 credit). MGE005 HONORS PLANE GEOMETRY Students study lines, planes, angles, triangles, circles, and polygons and learn about coordinates, threedimensional geometry, probability, statistics and data analysis. Prerequisite: Completion of a full year of eighth grade algebra 1(equivalent to MAL005) demonstrated by proficiency on the diagnostic test and teacher recommendation (full year - 1 credit)

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Shannon Stewart, 12, Norwich, Oil Painting, Fine Arts Color Theory, Painting I


NINTH GRADE ELECTIVE COURSES Find course descriptions listed by department beginning on page 25. All 1/2 credit courses meet by semester. WORLD LANGUAGE

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS — VISUAL ARTS

1 credit in a World Language is required for graduation Number

Course

LAR304

ARABIC 1

Number

Course

1

ACL661

INTRO TO CLAY CLAY 1

Credit

Credit 1/2

LAS304

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1

1

ACY661

1

LCH304

CHINESE 1

1

ADE771

SCULPTURE

1/2

INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING

1/2

LFR304

FRENCH 1

1

ADR601

LFR375

HONORS FRENCH 1-2

1

ADR664

FINE ARTS DRAWING FOUNDATIONS INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN

1/2

1

LGK304

ANCIENT GREEK 1

1

ADE761

LIT304

ITALIAN 1

1

AGA201

GRAPHIC DESIGN 1

1/2

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 1

1/2

LLA304

LATIN 1

1

AGP201

LSP304

SPANISH 1

1

AMJ671

METAL & JEWELRY 1

1

AMY671

INTRO TO METAL & JEWELRY

1/2

APA001

PRINCIPLES OF ART 1

1/2

APC401

INTRO TO TRADITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY

1/2

APC701

TRADITIONAL PHOTOGRAPY

ACC601

CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS

LSP375

HONORS SPANISH 1-2

MATH & SCIENCE ELECTIVES MCC551

COMPUTER SCIENCE 1 (must be enrolled in Geometry)

1

SES485

INTRO TO AP/UConn ENVIRO SCIENCE

1/2

SGG001

GOING GREEN

1/2

SIR385

HONORS INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (Science)

SPE001

PREHISTORIC EARTH & PALEONTOLOGY

1/2

SAQ601

AQUARIUM SCIENCE 1

1/2

SAQ621

AQUARIUM SCIENCE 2

1/2

1

CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

1

1 1/2

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS — DANCE DDA301

INTRODUCTION TO DANCE

1/2

DBA301

BALLET 1

1/2

DBA321

BALLET 2

1/2

DHH301

HIP-HOP 1

1/2

DHH321

HIP-HOP 2

1/2

DJZ301

JAZZ 1

1/2

DJZ321

JAZZ 2

1/2

BMO301

KEYBOARDING/MICROSOFT WORD

1/2

DPT301

TAP 1

1/2

FFB301

INTRODUCTION TO BAKESHOP

1/2

DPT321

TAP 2

1/2

FFD201

INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY

1/2

FHD201

LIFE STAGES/DEVELOPMENT

1/2

VDR211

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING GRAPHICS

1/2

VPC201

INVENTIONS & INNOVATORS

1/2

VWW201

INTRODUCTION TO WOOD TECHNOLOGY

1/2

INTERDISCIPLINARY 1

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS — MUSIC TAA00

ACADEMY WOMEN’S CHORUS

1/2

TAC001

CONCERT CHOIR

1/2

TVT001

FUNDAMENTALS OF VOCAL TECHNIQUE

1/2

TAB341

CONCERT BAND

TAB361

PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE

TMB371

WILDCAT MARCHING BAND AND COLOR GUARD (AFTER SCHOOL)

1 1 1/2

EJN301

JOURNALISM

TCG371

COLOR GUARD

IRB311

RECREATIONAL BOATING

1/4

TJZ651

JAZZ ENSEMBLE (AFTER SCHOOL)

IYO301

YOGA (does not fulfill PE credit)

1/4

TOR361

ORCHESTRA

IVP501

VIDEO PRODUCTION

1/2

TBP301

BEGINNING PIANO

1/2

TBP401

INTERMEDIATE PIANO

1/2

TBP501

ADVANCED PIANO

1/2

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS — THEATER

1 1/2 1

DIT301

INTRODUCTION TO THEATER

1/2

TGB301

BEGINNING GUITAR

1/2

DDR311

ACTING

1/2

TGI401

INTERMEDIATE GUITAR

1/2

DDR411

ACTING 2-ACTOR’S WORKSHOP

1/2

TMT201

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY 1

1/2

DOF301

INTRODUCTION TO FILM

1/2

TMT301

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY 2

1/2

13


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CAREER CLUSTERS Education is future oriented. At Norwich Free Academy, we wish to help you have a meaningful four-year experience. Although you are choosing classes for next year, think of each year as one part of a multi-year plan, both to graduate and to move beyond high school. To graduate from NFA you will need to fulfill the following core requirements as also listed on page 3.

The second half of this Catalog, organized by area, department and subject, describes all coursework and subjects in the charts. A core of common skills relates to all career clusters. These include the following: Active Listening Communicating Critical Thinking Decision Making

SUBJECT

CREDITS

English

4

Mathematics

3

Social Studies 1 credit must be in US History & .5 credit must be in Civics

3

Science

3

World Language

1

Physical Education

1

Arts or Vocational Education

1

Electives

7

Total Credits Required for Graduation

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The State of Connecticut has defined Career Clusters to show how various courses, knowledge, and skills relate to different career pathways. When you choose to take required courses and electives at NFA, consider how those choices will prepare you for the future. Career Clusters demonstrate how today‘s choices lead to tomorrow’s meaningful and profitable career opportunities. This section of the Catalog relates NFA’s courses and co-curricular activities to the state’s career clusters, occupations, college majors and career specific skills. This view of high school education provides a broad perspective – not as a collection of separate subjects, but as a combination of subjects to form a pathway to the future. For each career cluster, we recommend a rigorous academic schedule that challenges you to work at your highest level. In collaboration your parents/ guardians, your teachers and your counselor choose the course level that best fits your abilities, strengths, needs and plans. These charts are general guides. Enroll in elective courses that interest you. You will not be excluded from a career if you choose an elective other than one recommended in the charts.

Flexibility Interpersonal Skills Problem-solving Public Speaking Resourcefulness Time Management Writing Note: The ability to speak a World Language is applicable to all career clusters. The ability to speak another language is a desirable and beneficial skill to prepare for the global job market, community service jobs and beyond. Other skills are more career-specific. Look for opportunities to match your interests and strengths with these specific skills. Naviance, an online college and career planning tool NFA makes available to you, provides a great deal of information to connect your personality, interests, and goals with possible careers and postsecondary plans. And, of course, if you have questions, talk to your counselor, teachers, House Principal, and the many adults at NFA who are here to help you succeed. Guide to Abbreviations: OJT

On-the-job training

Certificate Up to two years of post-secondary training resulting in a diploma, certificate, or license 2 years

Two years of college resulting in an associate degree

4 years

Four or more years of college resulting in a bachelor’s degree

4+ or 4++ years

One or two years of college beyond the bachelor’s level resulting in a master’s degree

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AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES The Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Career Cluster prepares students for careers in production, processing, marketing, distribution, financing, and the development of agricultural commodities and resources. These careers closely align with the careers in Connecticut’s Agricultural Industry Cluster. RELATED CAREERS Animal Scientists (4 years) Animal Trainers (2/4 years) Biochemists & Biophysicists (4++ years) Biological Science Teacher (4+ years) Farm Equipment Mechanics & Service Technicians (OJT/certificate) Fish & Game Wardens (OJT) Food Batchmakers (OJT/certificate) Landscaping & Groundskeeping Workers (OJT) Mechanical Engineering Technicians (OJT/2 years) Retail Salespersons (OJT) Zoologists & Wildlife Biologists (4+ years)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Agriculture Biology Dietician/Nutrition Environmental Science RELATED SKILLS Analyzing Data or Information Communication Computer Technology Multi-tasking Oral Comprehension Training and Teaching Others

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Algebra 2 American Regional Cuisines Aquarium Science Biology Business Explorations Chemistry Coastal Studies Environmental Science Going Green International Cuisines Introduction to Culinary Introduction to Marketing Oceanography Pre-Calculus Statistics Veterinary Science

RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Aquarium Club Fishing Club Oceanography Club Outdoor Club Science & Environmental Club

ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster prepares students for careers in designing, planning, managing, building and maintaining structures. People in this field may work on highways, bridges, houses, and other buildings while others create the designs or plans for new structures. Some architecture and construction workers are in skilled trades such as carpentry, painting or plumbing. RELATED CAREERS Architectural and Engineering Managers (4++ years) Architectural Drafters (4 years) Brickmasons and Blockmasons (certificate) Carpenters (OJT/certificate/ apprenticeship) Civil Engineering Technicians (OJT/certificate) Construction and Related Workers (OJT) Construction Carpenters (OJT/certificate) Crane and Tower Operators (OJT/certificate) Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers (OJT) Electricians (certificate/OJT/ apprenticeship) Engineers (4+ years) Glaziers (certificate/OJT) Heating, Air Conditioning Mechanics Installers (certificate/OJT/ apprenticeship) Painters, Construction and Maintenance (OJT) Plumbers (certificate/OJT/ apprenticeship) Stonemasons (OJT/apprenticeship) Surveyors (OJT/certificate)

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RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Architectural Engineering City, Community Planning Civil Engineering Construction Management Construction Technology Design & Applied Arts Engineering Engineering Technology Environmental Design Historic Preservation Industrial & Product Design Industrial Engineering Interior Architecture Landscape Architecture Mechanical Engineering Studio Arts Surveying RELATED SKILLS Analysis Coordination Critical Reading Comprehension Multitasking Numeracy Teamwork

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Accounting Algebra 2 Ancient Western Civilization Architectural Design Calculus Chemistry Coastal Studies Community Design & Project Management Computer Science Engineering Engineering Drafting Fine Arts 3D Fine Arts Color Paint Fine Arts Composition Fine Arts Figure Graphic Arts Manufacturing Modern Europe Ocean Science Technology Oceanography Parts & Crafts Photography Physics Plane Geometry Pre-Calculus Public Speaking Statistics Wood Technology

RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Business Club Computer Club Debate Team Geography Club Ham Radio Club Math Team Photography Club Playshop Science & Environmental Club Student Art Association Technical Student Association (TSA) Writers Ink


ARTS, A-V TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS The Arts, A-V Technology, and Communications Career Cluster prepares students for careers in designing, producing, exhibiting, performing, writing, and publishing multimedia content including visual and performing arts and design, journalism and entertainment services. RELATED CAREERS Broadcast News Analysts (4 years) Curators (4 years) Data Entry Keyers (OJT) Fashion Designers (2/4 years) Graphic Designers (2/4 years) Photographers (2/4 years) Prepress Technicians & Workers (OJT) Public Relations Specialists (4 years) Radio & Television Announcers (2/4 years) Technical Directors/Managers (4 years)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Communications Dance English Fine Arts History Human Relations International Relations Journalism Music Production & Engineering Psychology Sociology Theater World Language Writing RELATED SKILLS Collaboration Creativity Cultural Appreciation/Sensitivity Statistical Analysis

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Acting & Theater Algebra 2 Community Design Creative Writing Dance Design Digital Photography Fine Arts Graphic Design Intro. to Marketing Journalism Music Ensembles (Concert Band, Percussion, etc.) Music Technology Psychology Public Speaking Statistics Sports Literature Theater Video Production

Vocal Ensembles (Treble Choir, Concert Choir, etc.) Yearbook Production RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Ambassadors Announcers Club Band/Marching Band Color Guard Computer Club Culture & World Language Clubs Dance Team Debate Team High School Bowl Playshop Student Art Association The Red and White Writer’s Ink Young Educators’ Society Young Voters Society

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Business Management and Administration careers encompass planning, organizing, directing and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive business operations. Business Management and Administration career opportunities are available in every sector of the economy. RELATED CAREERS Accountants (2/4 years) Bookkeeping, Accounting, & Auditing Clerks (2/certificate) Computer Programmers (2/4+ years) Court Clerks (certificate) Customer Service Representatives (OJT) File Clerks (OJT) Financial Analysts (4+ years) Human Resources Specialists (4+ years) Market Research Analysts & Marketing Specialists (4+ years) Payroll & Timekeeping Clerks (OJT/certificate) Postal Service Clerks/Mail Carriers (OJT) Receptionists & Information Clerks (OJT/certificate) Sales Managers (OJT/2/4 years) Secretaries & Administrative Assistants (OJT/2/4 years) Statisticians (4+ years)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Accounting Business Administration Communication Economics Entrepreneurship Fashion Merchandising Finance Hospitality Management Human Resource Management Insurance & Risk Management International Business Management Marketing Operations Management Project Management Psychology Public Policy Analysis Public Relations Real Estate Retail Supply Chain Management RELATED SKILLS Computer Technology Creativity Detail-orientation

Goal-setting Initiative Leadership Negotiation Objectivity Organization Persuasion Social Networking Teamwork

Modern Middle East Personal Finance Psychology Public Speaking Restaurant Management Sports Literature Statistics Video Production Yearbook Production

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Accounting Algebra 2 Business Communications Business Explorations Business Operations & Management Economics European History Graphic Design HerStory: Intro. to Women’s Studies Intro. to Marketing Intro. to Politics Investment & Financial Leadership

RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Announcers Club Book Club Business Club Cat Shack Debate Team Family, Career & Community Leaders of America Geography Club Math Team Mirror NFA Cares Student Advisory Board Successful Hispanic Alliance Young Voters Society

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING The Education and Training Career Cluster prepares students for careers in planning, managing and providing education and training services, and related learning support services. RELATED CAREERS Career/Technical Education Teachers (4+ years) Coaches and Scouts (OJT/2/4 years) Dieticians and Nutritionists (4 years) Education Administrators (4+ years) Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors (certifications) Interpreters and Translators (certification/2/4/years) School Counselors (4+ years) Special Education Teachers: All Levels (4++ years) Teacher Assistants (OJT) Teachers: Preschool, Elementary, Middle, High (4+ years)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Agricultural Public Service Behavioral Sciences Communication Disorders or Services Counseling Cultural Studies Education, General Health and Physical Education Historic Preservation and Conservation Human Development and Family Studies International Studies Languages or Literature Library Science Mental and Social Health Parks and Recreation Public Health Religious Studies Rhetoric and Writing Special Education Sustainability Studies

RELATED SKILLS Collaboration Data Collection and Analysis Mathematical Reasoning & Computation Supervision & Oversight RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Algebra 2 Calculus Child Growth/Development Early Child Education Enviro Science Going Green Herstory: Intro. to Women’s Studies History/Foundations of Mathematics Human Concerns Literature Intro. to Law Intro. to Politics Intro. to Teaching Life Stages & Development Microsoft Office/Keyboarding Pre-Calculus Psychology

Public Speaking Sociology Statistics Unified Courses Yoga RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Ambassadors Amnesty International Announcers Club Book Club Computer Club Debate Team Gay/Straight Alliance Global Events Club High School Bowl Law Enforcement Club Math Team NFA Prevention Council NFA R2 Ambassadors Playshop Project Outreach Science National Honor Society Student Advisory Board Unified Social Club Young Educators Society Youth Peace

FINANCE The Finance Career Cluster prepares students for careers in planning, services for financial and investment planning, banking, insurance and business financial management. RELATED CAREERS Actuaries (4 years) Budget Analysts Claims Adjusters, Examiners and Investigators (OJT/2/4 years) Credit Counselors (2/4 years) Financial Analysts (2/4 years) Insurance Adjusters, Examiners, Investigators (OJT/2/4 years) Loan Officers (4 years) Personal Finance Advisors (4 years) Sales Agents, Financial Services (OJT/2/4 years) Sales Representatives: Wholesale & Manufacturing (OJT/2/4 years) Tellers (OJT)

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RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Accounting Actuarial Science Behavioral Economics Business Administration Economics Finance Insurance & Risk Management Real Estate Statistics RELATED SKILLS Ambition Analysis Assertiveness Logic Organization

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Accounting Algebra 2 Business Communications Business Explorations Business Operations & Management Economics European History HerStory: Intro. to Women’s Studies Intro. to Marketing Intro. to Politics Investment & Financial Leadership Modern Middle East Personal Finance

Public Speaking Pre-Calculus Psychology Statistics RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Amnesty International Book Club Business Club Computer Club Debate Team Geography Club Global Events Club Math Team NFA Cares Student Advisory Board Successful Hispanics Alliance


GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION The Government and Public Administration Career Cluster prepares students for careers in executing governmental functions such as: governance, national security, foreign service, planning, revenue and taxation, regulation, and management and administration at the local, state and federal levels. RELATED CAREERS Accountants and Auditors (2/4 years) Emergency Management Directors (4 years) General and Operations Managers (4 years) Political Scientists (4+ years) Public Relations Specialists (4 years) Reporters and Correspondents (4 years) Social and Community Service Managers (2-4 years) Surveying Technicians (OJT/certificate) Tax Preparers (2-4 years) Transportation Managers (OJT/2/4 years)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Criminal Justice Economics Geography History International Studies Liberal Arts Political Science Pre-law Public Health Public History Sociology Urban Planning RELATED SKILLS Argumentation Critical Reading Comprehension Research and Analysis

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Algebra 2 Business Communications Counter Culture Economics Economics Environmental Science European History Forensics Herstory: Intro. to Women’s Studies Intro. to AP Environmental Science Intro. to Fire Science Intro. to Law Intro. to Politics Microbes and Disease Modern History Modern Middle East Modern Writers

Natural Resources Oceanography Pre-Calculus (H) Psychology Public Speaking Recreational Boating Sociology Statistics RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Amnesty International Cranston House Council Debate Team Geography Club High School Bowl Law Enforcement Club Project Outreach SOS Club Student Advisory Board Young Voters Society

HEALTH SCIENCES The Health Science Career Cluster prepares students for careers in therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development. These careers closely align with careers in Connecticut’s BioScience Industry Cluster. RELATED CAREERS Athletic Trainers (4 years) Audiologists (4+ years) Dental Assistants (4 years) Dental Hygienists (2 years) Dentists (4+ Years) Emergency Medical Technicians & Paramedics (Certificate) Family & General Practitioners (4+ years) Home Health Aides (OJT/ Certificate) Massage Therapists (certificates) Medical Assistants (Certificate) Nursing Assistants (certificate) Orthodontists (4+ years) Pharmacists (4+ Years) Pharmacy Aides/Techs (Certificates) Physical Therapists (4+ years) Physician Assistants (4+ years) Radiological Tech (2/4 years) Respiratory Therapist (2 years) Surgeons (4+ years) Vet. Techs (Certificates) Veterinarians (4+ Years)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Animal Science Bio Technology Biology Chemistry Computer Science Kinesiology Microbiology Nutrition Pharmacy Physical Therapy Pre-Dental Pre-Medical Psychology Social Work

RELATED SKILLS Assisting and Caring for Others Deductive/Inductive Reasoning Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others Processing/Documenting/ Recording/Interpreting Information Reading Comprehension Service Orientation Social Perceptiveness Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Algebra 2 Allied Health Anatomy & Physiology Biology Calculus Certified Nursing Assistant Chemistry

DNA Science Kinesiology Microbes and Disease Physics 1&2 Pre-Calculus Psychology Sociology Sports Literature Sports Science Statistics Veterinary Assistant Cert. Veterinary Science & Technology Yoga RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Unified Clubs Philosophy Club Walking Club

19


HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM The Hospitality and Tourism Career Cluster encompasses the management, marketing and operations of restaurants and other foodservices, lodging, attractions, recreation events and travel related services. RELATED CAREERS Bakers (certificate/2 years) Butchers & Meat Cutters (certificate/2 years) Chefs & Head Cooks (2 years) Combined Food Preparation, Serving Workers, Including Fast Food (OJT) Dishwashers (OJT) Food Preparation Workers (OJT) Hosts & Hostesses, Restaurant, Lounge, Coffee Shop Lodging Managers (2/4 Years)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Baking & Pastry Arts Culinary Arts Entrepreneurship Event Planning Food & Beverage Management Food Science Hospitality Law Hospitality Management Hotel & Motel Management Nutrition Science Public Relations Travel & Tourism RELATED SKILLS Attention to Detail Creativity Decisiveness Multi-tasking Organization

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Accounting Algebra 2 Ancient Western & Medieval Civilization Business Communications Business Explorations Business Operations & Management Chemistry Consumer Math Digital Photography Economics Gourmet Cooking Health Science Life Stages & Development International Cuisines Intro. to Bakeshop Intro. to Culinary Intro. to Marketing

Investment & Financial Leadership Modern History Personal Finance Psychology Public Speaking Recreational Boating Regional Cuisines Restaurant Management Sociology Statistics Traditional Photography Unified Courses RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES All Culture & World Language Clubs Business Club Culture Club FCCLA

HUMAN SERVICES

The Human Services Career Cluster prepares students for careers in planning, managing, and providing human services including social and related community services. RELATED CAREERS Barbers (Certificate) Child, Family and School Social Workers (4++ years) Childcare Workers (OJT/certificate) Clinical, Counseling and School Psychologists (4+ years) Hairdressers, Hairstylists and Cosmetologists (Certificate) Interpreters and Translators (certificate/2/4 years) Marriage and Family Therapists (4+ years) Mental Health Counselors (4++ years) Physicians and Surgeons (4++ years) Recreation Workers (OJT) RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Agricultural Public Service Behavioral Sciences Communication Disorders or Services Counseling Cultural Studies Education, General

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Health and Physical Education Historic Preservation and Conservation Human Development and Family Studies International Studies Languages or Literature Library Science Mental and Social Health Parks and Recreation Public Health Religious Studies Rhetoric and Writing Special Education Urban Studies RELATED SKILLS Collaboration Critical Reading Comprehension Data Collection and Analysis Mathematical Reasoning Patience Social Awareness & Understanding

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Algebra 2 Child Growth and Development Early Childhood Education Environmental Science Genocide Going Green Her Story: Intro. to Women’s Studies History and Foundations of Mathematics Human Concern Literature Intro. to Politics Intro. to Fire Science Intro. to Law Intro. to Teaching Investment & Financial Leadership Life Stages & Development Modern Writers Physics Pre-Calculus Psychology

Public Speaking Sociology Statistics Unified Courses Yoga RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Ambassadors Amnesty International Announcers Club Book Club Computer Club Cultural & World Language Clubs Debate Team Gay/Straight Alliance Global Events Club High School Bowl Math Team Playshop Project Outreach Student Advisory Board Young Educators Society Youth Peace Club


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The Information Technology Career Cluster prepares students for careers in designing, developing, managing and supporting hardware, software, multimedia and systems integration services. These careers align with careers found in all Connecticut’s Industry Clusters or Industry Sectors. RELATED CAREERS Computer & Information Systems Managers (4 years) Computer Hardware Engineers (4 Years) Computer Programmers (2-4 years) Database Administrators (4 years) Graphic Designers (2-4 years) Software Developers, Applications (4 years) Software Developers, Systems Software (4years)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Information Support and Services Interactive Media Network Systems Programming and Software Development

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Algebra 2 Computer Science Pre-Calculus Physics Psychology Statistics

RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Business Club Computer Club Ham Radio Club Math Team Science & Environmental Club

RELATED SKILLS Analyzing Data or Information Computer Technology Deductive/ Inductive Reasoning Initiative Mathematical Reasoning Systems Evaluation

LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS AND SECURITY The Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security Career Cluster prepares students for careers in planning, managing and providing legal, public safety, protective services and homeland security services. RELATED CAREERS Correctional Officers & Jailers (OJT/2 year) Detectives & Criminal Investigators (4+ years) Firefighters (certificate/4 years) Lawyers (4+ years) Municipal Firefighters (certificate) Paralegals & Legal Assistants (OJT/Certificate) Police Patrol Officers (2-4 years) Security Guards (OJT)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Computer and Information Systems Criminal Justice Criminology Forensic Science History Homeland Security International Relations Law National Security Studies Paralegal Studies Political Science Psychology Security Sociology World Language RELATED SKILLS Argumentation Critical Reading Comprehension Research and Analysis

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Algebra 2 Ancient and Medieval Western Civilization Counterculture Economics Environmental Science Forensics Herstory: Intro. to Women’s Studies Intro. to Fire Science Intro. to Law Intro. to Politics Microbes and Disease Modern History Modern Middle East Modern Writers Oceanography Physics Pre-Calculus

Psychology Sociology Statistics RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Amnesty International Computer Club Cranston House Council Cultural & World Language Clubs Debate Team Gay/Straight Alliance Geography Club Ham Radio Club Law Enforcement Club Project Outreach Student Advisory Board Young Voters Society

Emma Mandeville, 12, Voluntown, Book Cover Design, Graphics 2

21


MANUFACTURING The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses upon planning, managing and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance and manufacturing/process engineering. People in this field work on cars, computers, appliances, airplanes, electronics and many other devices. RELATED CAREERS Automotive Specialty Techs (Certificate) Boiler Maker (OJT/2 Years) Electrical & Electronic Equipment Assemblers (OJT/Certificate) Environmental Engineering Tech (4 Years) Machinists (OJT/Certificate/2 Years) Milling & Planing Matching Setters, Operators, Tenders, Metal & Plastic (OJT/Certificate) Nuclear Techs (OJT/Certificate/ 2 Years-Three Rivers) Occupational Health & Safety Specialist (4 Years) Robotics Tech (OJT/2 Years) Sheet Metal Workers (OJT) Tool & Die Makers (OJT/Certificate) Welders, Cutters, Solderers, Brazers (OJT/Certificate)

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Apparel & Textiles Architectural Engineer Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Tech Construction Engineering Electrical Engineering HVAC Industrial Engineering Manufacturing Engineering Operations Management Operations Research RELATED SKILLS Analysis Coordination Creativity Detail-oriented Digital & Computer Technology Leadership Numeracy Reading Comprehension Reliability

Safety- orientation Strategic Teamwork RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Accounting Algebra 2 Ancient and Medieval Civilization Architectural Design Calculus Chemistry Coastal Studies Community Design & Project Management Computer Science Engineering Engineering Drafting Graphic Design Manufacturing Oceanography

Parts & Crafts Physics Plane Geometry Pre-Calculus Public Speaking Statistics Wood Technology RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Announcers Club Business Club Computer Club Fashion Club FCCLA Ham Radio Club Math Team Photography Club Project Outreach Science & Environmental Club

MARKETING, SALES & SERVICE The Marketing, Sales & Service Career Cluster focuses upon planning, managing, and performing marketing activities to reach organizational objectives. RELATED CAREERS Account Executive (4 Years) Advertising Specialist (2-4 Years) Arts/Graphics Director (2-4 Years) Brand Manager (OJT/ 2-4 Years) Cashiers (OJT) Consumer Behavior Analyst (2-4 Years) Customer Service Rep. Database Analyst (4 Years) Hotel, Motel Resort Desk Clerk (OJT) Interactive Media Specialist (2-4 Years) Lodging Managers (2-4 Years) Promotions Manager (OJT) Public Relations Manager (OJT/2-4 years) Real Estate Sales Agent (Certificate) Research Assistant (4 Years/4 Years+) Retail Marketing Coordinator (4 years) Retail Merchandiser (OJT) Sales Manager (OJT) Social Media Coordinator (2-4 Years) Stock clerk (OJT) Trade Show Manager (OJT)

22

RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Advertising Business Administration Communication Consumer Behavior Economics Entrepreneurship Fashion Merchandising Management Marketing Research Psychology Public Relations Sales & Distribution Supply Chain Management RELATED SKILLS Competitiveness Computer Technology Creativity Initiative Leadership Organization Persuasion Social Media Networking Teamwork

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Algebra 2 Intro. to Politics Psychology Modern Middle East Personal Finance Pre-Calculus Public Speaking Restaurant Management Sociology Sports Literature Statistics Video Production Write it Right Yearbook Production

RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Announcers Club Book Club Business Club Cat Shack Debate Team Geography Club Math Team Mirror NFA Cares NFA R2 Ambassadors Project Outreach Student Advisory Board Successful Hispanic Alliance Young Voters Society


SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY. ENGINEERING, MATHEMATICS (STEM) The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Career Cluster prepares students for careers in planning, managing, as well as providing scientific research, and professional and technical services (e.g., physical science, social science and engineering). These careers align closely with careers in the following Connecticut Industry Clusters or Industry Sectors: Aerospace, Agriculture, Bioscience, Hydrogen-Fuel Cell, Maritime, Metal Manufacturing, Plastics and Software/Information Technology. RELATED CAREERS Aerospace Engineers (4+ years) Agricultural Engineers (4+ years) Biochemists and Biophysicists (4+ years) Biomedical Engineers (4+ years) Chemical Engineers (4+ years) Civil Engineers (4+ years) Computer Programmers (2/4 years) Computer User Support Specialists (OJT) Dietetic Technicians (OJT) Dieticians and Nutritionists (4+ years) Electrical Engineers (4+ years) Environmental Engineers (4+ years) Family and General Practitioners (4++ years) Marine Engineers (4+ years) Mechanical Engineers (4+ years) Nuclear Engineers (2/4+ years) Nuclear Technicians (OJT/certificate) RELATED COLLEGE MAJORS Astronomy Chemistry Computer Science Engineering Environmental Science Geosciences Life Sciences Mathematics Physics

RELATED SKILLS Active Learning Analyzing Data or Information Category Flexibility Computer technology Critical Reading Comprehension Deductive/Inductive Reasoning Developing Objectives and Strategies Documenting/Recording Information Gathering, Processing & Researching Information Idea Fluency Mathematical Reasoning Near Vision Operations Analysis Organization Originality Problem Sensitivity Programming Reasoning Science Systems Analysis Systems Evaluation Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

RELATED NFA COURSEWORK & SUBJECTS Algebra 2 Anatomy & Physiology Astronomy Biology Calculus Chemistry Coastal Studies Digital Illustration DNA Science Environmental Science Forensics Going Green Integrated Science Intro. to Drawing Kinesiology Marine Biology Microbes and Disease Oceanography Physics Plane Geometry Precalculus Prehistoric Earth /Paleontology Sports Science Statistics Veterinary Assistant Certification Veterinary Science Zoology

RELATED NFA CLUBS & ACTIVITIES Computer Club Debate Team Ham Radio Club Math Team Outdoor Club Science & Environmental Club Student Art Association

Lillian Pappas, 11, Preston, Photo, Traditional & Digital Photography

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Please be aware that course selections made now are commitments. Course changes in September will not be allowed easily because elective sections are limited, and teacher and class assignments are based upon the decisions you make now. Advanced Placement indicates college-level courses for high school students. Students have the opportunity to earn college credit through the Advanced Placement Examination Program of the College Board (fee required). Each Advanced Placement course increases grade-point average by a multiplier of 1.2. Honors or Advanced indicates rigorous and academically challenging college preparatory courses. The pace is accelerated and the depth of study is comprehensive. Students become disciplined scholars, displaying initiative and independence. Honors or advanced courses increase grade-point average by a weighted multiplier of 1.1. Unified indicates courses which students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a cooperative learning environment. Students develop interpersonal skills and friendships. Courses with an A, E, and/or U in the course description offer college credit. Some classes require purchase of textbooks, workbooks, calculators or other materials. All art classes require a studio fee ($4 – $160 typical range, depending upon class, materials, and scope of projects.) Financial assistance is available.


CAREER & TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION BUSINESS & COMPUTER EDUCATION BMO301 KEYBOARDING/MICROSOFT WORD Students develop technology literacy skills, including proper keyboarding skills and efficiency. Students learn to apply essential Microsoft Word tools for academic and workplace success creating resumes, cover letters and other business documents (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. BBC301 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS Students learn the value of clear and concise communication in their personal and professional life. Students create and edit business documents using Microsoft Office Suite and examine the appropriate use of social media platforms, and email in post-secondary and workplace environments. Local business professionals meet with students to help them develop a more comprehensive understanding of workplace expectations (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. BBE101 BUSINESS EXPLORATIONS Students explore the major activities associated with owning a business and the impact of small business on the economy. Students take an entrepreneurial journey creating business plans to learn how types of business ownership, ethics, legal issues, management, finances and globalization impact success (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. BUS501 BUSINESS OPERATIONS & MANAGEMENT Students apply prior learning and critical thinking to a variety of campus & community business problems to develop leadership skills and an understanding of business and workplace issues. Students develop small business operations and managerial skills in the Cat Shack including financials, operations and inventory. Students create and present solutions for real business problems to local business owners. Prerequisite: BBE101, BSE401 or BMK401 (full year - 1 credit) 11 & 12. BPF501 PERSONAL FINANCE Students develop a foundational understanding of the importance of making informed financial decisions leading to financial independence by exploring the essentials of budgeting, banking, credit, identity theft, insurance and taxes. Students complete a post-high school budget to align spending habits with expected income (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

BPF701 INVESTMENTS & FINANCIAL LEADERSHIP Students expand understanding of personal finance with emphasis upon investments, long-term planning and financial career pathways, and students participate in online stock market competition and job shadowing at local financial institutions. Prerequisite: BPF501 or instructor permission (½ year - ½ credit) 11 & 12. BMK401 INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING Students learn marketing foundations and apply principles of marketing mix, research and branding in this hands-on course. On-campus and community challenges provide authentic experiences for students to apply their knowledge. Students develop an awareness of career opportunities and current trends in the industry (½ year – ½ credit)10, 11 & 12. BSE401 SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT MANAGEMENT Students study the management functions of the sports and entertainment industries. Using a sports management simulation, students explore the issues of the industry and formulate strategies to address them. Students participate in class presentations and projects and work with local sports and entertainment organizations to apply and extend classroom content and to develop employability skills (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. BAC601 ACCOUNTING 1 Students learn about bookkeeping practices, including systemically computing, classifying, recording, verifying, and maintaining numerical data involved in financial practices. Students study simple budgets and financial report preparation, cash control, payroll, the accounting cycle, and career opportunities in the field. Students use an internet-based electronic workbook, and home internet access is recommended. Fee: Cost of online access (full year – 1 credit – math or vocational credit) 10, 11 & 12. BAC851 ACCOUNTING 2 Students learn about keeping a set of books on a cash or accrual basis, partnership and corporation books, depreciation, inventory valuation, taxes and computerized accounting practices. The Cat Shack is the practical learning lab for a variety of accounting practices. Students use an internet-based electronic workbook, and home internet access is highly recommended. Fee: Cost of online access. Prerequisite: C in BAC601 (full year – 1 credit/math or vocational) 11 & 12. BAC655 HONORS ACCOUNTING Students learn the principles of Accounting 1 and 2 in this fast-paced, honors course. Students use an internet- based electronic workbook, and home internet access is highly recommended. Fee: Cost of online access. Prerequisite: B- in MAL654, and math or accounting teacher approval (full year – 1 credit/math or vocational) 10, 11 & 12.

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CHILD DEVELOPMENT

CULINARY ARTS

FIT601 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING Students interested in exploring the field of education learn about the responsibilities of a teacher in elementary, middle and high school. Students learn about learning styles, planning lessons and managing a classroom. Students learn about the role of education in the United States and how to become a certified teacher. Students job shadow teachers and practice lesson planning in a range of subject areas (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

FFD201 INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY In this introduction to the world of cooking, students learn to prepare basic foods including quick breads, dairy, cookies, meats and salads. In cooking labs, students learn about kitchen safety, sanitation, measuring, reading recipes, nutrition, and proper use of kitchen equipment. Students explore culinary related careers (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

FHD201 LIFE STAGES & DEVELOPMENT Students explore their personal growth and development, future life decisions, lifestyle and relationships. Students improve communication skills and gain a general overview of human development through team building activities and group discussions, debates and projects (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. FGD601 CHILD GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT Students develop an understanding of developmental stages from infancy to school age, plan activities, stories, music and snacks for young children, and visit local elementary schools for the Reading & Writing Buddies program. Students also explore parenting concepts and career opportunities in early childhood education or human services (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. FIS861 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (T) In this college level class, students considering a career in early childhood education (to age 8) explore “whole child” education, including the value of play, creating a positive learning environment, educational theory, the needs of diverse learners, and connecting school with a child’s culture with. Students take field trips, create nature-based projects, and observe early childhood programs (full year – 1 credit) 11 &12.

Cassidy Kendall, 12, Preston, Monotype, Fine Arts Printmaking

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Nanxi Ai, 12, China, Graphite Drawing, AP Studio Art FFB301 INTRODUCTION TO BAKESHOP Students with an interest in baking and pastries learn basic baking principles and techniques including measurement, ingredient function and baking procedures. Students prepare a variety of baked goods and pastries including quick breads, cakes, and fruit desserts while practicing safe and proper use of kitchen equipment (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. FFD401 UNIFIED FOODS Students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a cooperative learning environment to learn essential culinary skills and prepare Brickview Lite meals. Students focus upon proper use of equipment, safety and sanitation, and learn preparation techniques for a variety of foods. Students learn to make informed decisions about nutrition, food selection, menu planning and purchasing (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. FWF611 INTERNATIONAL CUISINES Students interested in pursuing a career in culinary arts or exploring various cultural groups learn about cooking techniques and food traditions from around the globe. Students immerse themselves in the tradition and folklore of different cultures by preparing dishes from Mexico, France, Italy, India and more. Prerequisite FFD201 or FFB301 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.


FRC601 AMERICAN REGIONAL CUISINES Students learn about the history and styles of North American and Caribbean cuisines. Students enhance culinary skills and gain appreciation of great tasting food while applying sound cooking methodologies. Prerequisite: FFD301 or FFB301 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. FGC861 GOURMET COOKING Food enthusiasts, students continuing in the Culinary Arts, explore advanced culinary techniques and the use of specialty ingredients to make a variety of gourmet dishes, including entrees and desserts. Students have the opportunity to become ServSafe certified. Prerequisite: B- in FFD 201 or FFB301 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. FRM871 RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT In this advanced, hands-on course, students gain culinary, management and entrepreneurial skills while operating the Brickview Restaurant. Students develop leadership skills in a commercial kitchen and rotate through various jobs in restaurant management and operations. Students enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to become ServSafe certified, tour a local restaurant, and participate in a food critic dining experience. Prerequisite: 1.5 credits in any culinary courses (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION VDR211 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING GRAPHICS Students learn the fundamentals of making and using technical drawings using AutoCAD. Students learn about geometric construction, orthographic representation, isometric drawing, dimensions and tolerances. Students also learn how to create 3D objects using 3D printers. (½ year – ½ Credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. VDR611 INTERMEDIATE ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (T) Students expand upon technical drawing concepts using AutoCAD for two-dimensional and 3D solid modeling applications. Students explore additional software tools used in the industry including Solidworks and Chief Architect. Students engage in real-life projects and develop teamwork, design and problemsolving skills. Prerequisite: VDR201 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. VDR754 ADVANCED ENGINEERING GRAPHICS & ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN Students simulate the occupations of an architect, interior designer and landscape engineer by creating a set of blue prints. Using AutoCAD and Chief Architect software, students conduct a virtual walk-through to incorporate interior details (kitchens, bathrooms, etc.) Students develop drafting techniques and skills for employment in the manufacturing, engineering or architectural fields. Prerequisite: VDR611 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. VEN704 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING Students delve into the engineering design process and explore different engineering fields. Using industry standard 3D modeling software, students create, problem solve and investigate engineering principles. Hands-on projects including solar race cars and a bridge design and build simulation reinforce engineering concepts (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. VIM651 INTRODUCTION TO MANUFACTURING Students explore the changing high-tech, innovative nature of advanced manufacturing with emphasis upon manufacturing systems & processes, safety, materials, production and career paths. Students create everyday products and prototypes with CNC machines, 3D printers and a variety of materials (metals, woods, plastic). Project fee may be required (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

Adriana Robbins, 12, Norwich, Oil Painting, Fine Arts Color Theory, Painting I Courses with an A, E and/or U in the course description offer college credit.

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VPC201 INVENTIONS & INNOVATORS (Previously Parts & Crafts) Students examine a variety of famous inventions to discover how they impact their lives. Using the engineering design process, students brainstorm, problem solve, and construct new innovations using a variety of tools and materials. Students learn the basics of engineering, woodworking and robotics. Minimal project fee may be required (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10. VRE511 ROBOTICS ENGINEERING Students explore one of the fastest growing industries in the world in a course that blends programming and engineering (mechanical, electrical) in hands-on activities and teamwork. Students enhance problemsolving skills by designing, building, and programming VEX robots to meet challenges and compete. Students also explore SeaPerch robots to learn about the role of robotics in transportation. Prerequisite: VDR211 or VEN704 or VP211 or MCC551 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. VWW201 INTRODUCTION TO WOOD TECHNOLOGY In this introductory woodworking course students learn techniques and procedures, and build foundational skills with hand and limited power tools. Students learn about safety, measurements/mathematic application, proper tool use, and careers in woodworking and related fields. Minimal project fee may be required (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. VWW651 INTERMEDIATE WOOD TECHNOLOGY Students further develop woodworking knowledge and skills in individual and team-based projects using power tools and different wood species. Students continue to learn about the foundations of safety, measurements/ mathematic application, and proper tool use. Students visit with experts in the field and develop further insight into career paths. Project fee may be required. Prerequisite: VWW201 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. VWW754 COMMUNITY DESIGN & PROJECT MANAGEMENT Students work in teams to research, design, construct and present solutions to real-world problems on campus or in the community using woodworking skills and engineering and drafting principles. Students may take this course more than once. Prerequisite: VWW651 and VDR211, VEN704 or VIM651 (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

ENGLISH Students may be asked to purchase a paperback book/s for class.

EEN404 ENGLISH 2 Students learn good paragraph and essay development in oral and written work and enrich their vocabulary. Students read and respond to American Literature and further develop research techniques (full year – 1 credit) 10. EEN485 HONORS ENGLISH 2 Students cover the EEN404 curriculum at a more advanced pace and depth. Prerequisite: 9th grade teacher recommendation, consideration of class rank, and strong independent reading ability, and/or verbal scores (full year – 1 credit) 10. EEN704 ENGLISH 3 Students become more sophisticated in paragraph and essay development in oral and written work and continue to enrich their vocabulary. Students read and respond to British Literature, continue to develop research skills, and write essays for the college application process. Prerequisite: EEN404 (full year – 1 credit) grade 11. EEN785 HONORS ENGLISH 3 At a more advanced pace and depth, students become more sophisticated in paragraph and essay development in oral and written work and continue to enrich their vocabulary. Students read and respond to British Literature, continue to develop research skills, and write essays for the college application process. Prerequisite: 10th grade teacher recommendation, consideration of class rank, and strong independent reading ability, and/or verbal scores (full year –1 credit) grade 11. EEN786 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION (A) Students study both British Literature and rhetoric at an advanced pace, breadth and depth. Students demonstrate initiative, complete a great deal of individual work, and participate in demanding instruction. Students prepare to take the AP Language and Composition Examination. Prerequisite: Honors English 2 strongly recommended; exceptionally strong students may take the class with teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11.

Uppers registering for senior English courses must consider their options carefully. Students are generally not allowed to change senior elective courses once the school year begins.

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Nanxi Ai, 12, China, Metals & Jewelry 4


EMC904 MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE Students read, write about, and discuss contemporary works forming the quilt of our ever-increasing diversity. Students study African-American and African; Hispanic-American and Latino; Asian-American; and Native-American literatures in the four major literary forms: novel, short story, drama and poetry and in nonfiction (full year – 1 credit) 12. ESP904 PUBLIC SPEAKING (E) Students learn the fundamentals of speech communication. They listen to, deliver, discuss, write about and respond to informative, persuasive, interview and impromptu speeches. Speeches are videotaped and critiqued. Literature, grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, and critical thinking are central to the course (full year – 1 credit) 12.

Danni Huang, 11, China, Collage, Design I EEN956 AP ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION (A, U) Students study works in World Literature at an advanced pace, breadth, and depth at the college level. Students demonstrate initiative, complete a great deal of individual work, and participate in demanding instruction. Students take the AP Literature and Composition Exam. Prerequisite: EEN786 (full year – 1 credit) 12. ECB904 CONTEMPORARY BESTSELLERS Students read, write about, and study popular works of the past ten years. In addition to fiction, students may study biographies, comic essays, and works of history or social science. Students have input into some works studied as a class (full year – 1 credit) 12. EHC904 HUMAN CONCERNS IN LITERATURE Students read, write about, and discuss works in a variety of genres and explore humanistic themes including identity, relationships, death and dying, and success (full year – 1 credit) 12.

ESF904 SCIENCE FICTION Students read, write about, and discuss science fiction literature from the 19th century to the present with some consideration of science-fiction themes in film and popular culture (full year – 1 credit) 12. ESH904 SHAKESPEARE & MODERN DRAMA Students explore plays as a form of literature through Shakespeare and 20th/21st century playwrights who followed in his footsteps, including O’Neill, Albee, Mamet, Miller, and McDonagh. Students bring these works to life actively through staged readings and acting, expository and creative writing, and short films (full year – 1 credit) 12. ESL904 SPORTS LITERATURE Through the analysis and discussion of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, sports media and film, students study the literary and sociological roles that sports play in American society. Students read substantial literature, focus upon the topics of values, racism and women in sports, fraud and corruption, and complete required papers and assignments (full year – 1 credit) 12.

EJN904 JOURNALISM Students with experience in NFA Journalism continue their work by applying principles learned in Journalism 301 and filling an editorial position on the school newspaper or a producer position on NFA TV News. In addition to classwork, students work independently and after school. Prerequisite: EJN301 and instructor permission (full year – 1credit) 12. EMW904 MODERN WRITERS Students read, write about, and discuss works of 20th century writers and focus upon thematic strands including the individual and society, crime and criminals, the American Dream, and male and female roles in society (full year – 1 credit) 12.

Makayla Jones, 12, Norwich, Oil Painting, Fine Arts Color Theory, Painting I

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The following electives DO NOT FULFILL the English credit requirement for graduation in any grade.

ECW691 CREATIVE WRITING Students study the principles of effective imaginative writing, the problems inherent in such writing, and concepts such as unity, coherence and emphasis. Students are encouraged to take Creative Book Design (ABD671) to combine their writing with the visual image into works of art. Students may take the course for one or two semesters for credit (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. EJN301 JOURNALISM Students gain a strong understanding of the techniques that make a good print, digital or video journalist. In a hands-on format, students learn the basics of good writing, story construction, style and editing. Students determine newsworthiness and develop the technology skills to produce the school newspaper and TV news program. Students may take the course more than once for credit. Course fulfills vocational credit (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. ELM892 MYTH AND THE MOVIES Students explore the heroic quest in movies, view films as a contemporary form of mythmaking, and identify the heroic journey in several film genres including thrillers, science fiction, adventure, romance, western, comedy and horror (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12. EWR301 WRITE IT RIGHT Students learn grammar to speak and write effectively, beginning with the basic parts of speech and continuing with sentence structure, mechanics, expression and style. Students learn to identify faulty usage that typically appears on the SAT and ACT and how to correct and avoid those errors in their own work (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. ECP301 NAVIGATING THE COLLEGE APPLICATION PROCESS Students make informed and confident decisions about the college application process and work to ensure that their written and verbal interactions with colleges are of the highest quality. Students fill out the college application, write a resume, draft college essays, prepare to take standardized tests, and practice interviewing (½ year - ½ credit) 11 & 12. ICC704 COUNTERCULTURE See full description in the Interdisciplinary Studies section.

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS NEW ARRIVAL CENTER ELL students who have been in the country for less than one year, and who demonstrate no English literacy or fluency on a placement test, receive bilingual instruction/support in the New Arrival Center before they enroll in sheltered instruction ELL courses. Students in the New Arrival Center take the following courses at the teacher or counselor’s recommendation:

• • • •

English Grammar Instruction (1 credit) English Language Instruction (1 credit) American Cultural Study (1 credit) Academic and Career Readiness (1 credit)

GRP401 ELL READING ELL students, who have just arrived in this country and who have not yet fully developed their English skills (reading, phonemic awareness, decoding, comprehension, fluency and vocabulary), learn to read sentences, paragraphs, and then novels of increasing difficulty. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. GLS301/GLS302 ELL ENGLISH BEGINNER ELL students and those with limited English skills study elementary vocabulary, grammar, speaking, and beginning reading and writing to provide a platform for development of their new language. Students participate in activities to adjust to cultural differences and nuances of life in the United States. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 2 credits – English and World Language) 9, 10, 11 & 12. GLS311 ELL ENGLISH INTERMEDIATE ELL students continue to focus upon mastery of English grammar, including thorough verb study and development of all language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening). Students read and analyze a combination of short stories, novels and poetry. Prerequisite: GLS301 and teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. GLS321 ELL ENGLISH ADVANCED ELL students read texts of multicultural stories, nonfiction, novels, and excerpts of classic works and participate in grammar lessons to reinforce reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Prerequisite: GLS311 and teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. GMP503 ELL PRE-ALGEBRA I ELL students review and strengthen arithmetic skills, learn introductory algebra concepts, including working with signed numbers and variables, and solve simple equations. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.


GMI603 ELL INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 1 Students begin study of an integration of traditional Algebra 1 and Geometry in this first of a two year sequence to learn about mathematical operations, algebraic equations and inequalities relating to the foundational topics of geometry, including lines, angle pairs, area, congruent figures and similar figures (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. GMI613 ELL INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 2 Students continue to study an integration of traditional Algebra 1 and Geometry with emphasis upon functions and their relationship to linear and exponential functions. Students review algebraic equations as they relate to polygons, surface area and volume, and probability, statistics and data analysis. Prerequisite GMI603 (full year – 1 credit) ) 9, 10, 11 & 12. GMA523 ELL ALGEBRA 2 Students reinforce Algebra 1 skills through the study of linear equations and inequalities, graphs, polynomials, radical expressions, quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, exponents/powers, and systems of equations. Prerequisite: GMI603 and GMI613 (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. GHW301 ELL MODERN WORLD HISTORY BEGINNER GHW311 ELL MODERN WOLD HISTORY INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED Ninth grade ELL students explore modern world history from the Renaissance through the twentieth century and those political, economic, geographic, and social concepts most applicable to life today. Students develop the inquiry skills to become engaged students and active community members. Students learn and reinforce language skills through reading, writing, and speaking. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9.

GHC501 ELL CIVICS BEGINNER GHC511 ELL CIVICS INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ELL students explore the meaning of American citizenship, rights, and responsibilities and learn and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. GHU601 ELL U.S. HISTORY BEGINNER GHU611 ELL U.S. HISTORY INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ELL students learn about the founding of the United States of America and its government and learn and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. GSL201 ELL LIFE SCIENCE Beginner-level ELL students learn basic life science terminology (parts of the body, of food webs, and of ecosystems including plants and animals) and follow an integrated science curriculum focusing on Earth as a living system (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. GSI301 ELL INTEGRATED SCIENCE Intermediate/advanced ELL students focus upon scientific experimentation, research and discussion, exploring a wide range of topics from the origins of the universe to present-day conditions that support the diversity of life on Earth (full year – 1 credit) 9. GSB401 ELL BIOLOGY Intermediate/advanced ELL students learn about principles and concepts that apply to life at all levels of organization, no matter how simple or complex. Students examine those general characteristics shared by all living things, including chemical makeup, energy use, reproduction and community involvement. Students participate in laboratory work emphasizing the scientific method (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. GPS501 ELL PHYSICAL SCIENCE Intermediate/advanced ELL students study a blend of the physical sciences (chemistry and physics) in a problem-based course (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. GLS401/GLS402 ELL ACADEMIC LITERACY Intermediate and advanced ELL students develop academic literacy to prepare for the rigor of mainstream and college coursework. Students think critically as they build academic vocabulary, increase reading comprehension, improve writing fluency and hone research skills. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation or LAS Links score of 3 (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Jacob Betz, 12, Norwich, Oil Paint Still Life, Honors Painting II

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HISTORY & SOCIAL STUDIES HGS424 GLOBAL STUDIES AND CITIZENSHIP Students study the major regional issues shaping today’s world, explore the foundation of U.S. democracy, and examine the role of the United States in the world (full year – 1 credit – meets Civics requirement) 10. HGS425 HONORS GLOBAL STUDIES AND CITIZENSHIP Students study the major regional issues shaping today’s world, explore the foundation of U.S. democracy, examine the role of the United States in the world, develop advanced writing skills, and complete major research projects (full year – 1 credit – meets Civics requirement) 10. HUS804 UNITED STATES HISTORY Students explore the development of the United States from the Revolutionary Period to the 21st century to understand fundamental historical concepts and develop academic and communication skills (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. HUS806 UCONN UNITED STATES HISTORY (U) Students develop the skills and factual knowledge to critically analyze events in U.S. history. Students prepare to meet the writing and research requirements of intermediate and advanced college courses. Students assess historical materials and weigh evidence and interpretations in historical scholarship (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. HCA802 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ISSUES Students examine the issues, events, and people that shape our country today and develop skills necessary for critical analysis of the news and active participation in a democratic society. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12. HEC905 HONORS ECONOMICS (E) Students learn about microeconomics by studying the relationship among scarcity, opportunity, cost, and supply and demand, and individual consumer and firm behavior. Students learn about macroeconomics by studying the economy as a whole, and by examining unemployment, productivity, inflation, trade and development (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

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Jermiah Raymond, 12, Norwich, Photo, Traditional & Digital Photography

HEC956 AP ECONOMICS (A, U) Students learn about microeconomics by developing a thorough understanding of the economic principles that apply to consumers and producers within an economic system and of the nature of markets and the government’s role in the economy. Students learn about macroeconomics by studying the economic system as a whole including economic performance measures, the financial sector and international economics (full year – 1 credit) 12. HME904 MODERN MIDDLE EAST Students engage in the study of the modern Middle East and explore its connections to a wide variety of disciplines, including history, language, politics, geography, literature, art, anthropology, religion and economics. Through these lenses, students learn about the historic and contemporary factors that have shaped and continue to influence the region (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. HMH804 MODERN HISTORY Students examine American political, economic and social history and America’s role in the development of the modern world from 1960 to the present day with particular emphasis upon the Civil Rights Movement, political polarization, modern economic theory, the Counterculture, Vietnam, the Cold War, the Middle East, and the War on Terror (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. HMR811 UNIFIED MULTI-RACIAL, MULTI-CULTURAL HISTORY Students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a cooperative learning environment to examine African-American, Asian-American, Latino and Native-American contributions to American society and culture, and learn about the Holocaust (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. HPO804/HPO805 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS Students have a hands-on introduction to the theory and practice of the American political system and take part in simulations of electioneering and governing. May be taken for honors credit (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. HPS804 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY To prepare for college-level psychology courses, students study human thought processes and behaviors, noted psychologists and psychiatrists, research methods, brain studies, motivation, states of consciousness, intelligence and creativity, stages of human development, personality theories, gender issues and relationships, psychological disorders and therapies (full year – 1 credit) 12.


HPS806 AP PSYCHOLOGY (A) Students examine in depth the core concepts and theories of psychology to understand psychology as the study of the mind and human behavior. Students learn about important psychologists past and present, research methods, experiments and terminology, and students prepare for the AP Psychology examination (full year – 1 credit) 12. HPT904 P3: PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND POP CULTURE Students examine questions about the intersection of philosophy, psychology, and pop culture and enrich their knowledge and appreciation of all three: What if Socrates ruled Hogwarts? Can anyone resist the Sauron’s Ring of Power? Does free will or determinism dominate The Walking Dead? Students explore these and other questions, and share their ideas, books and resources (full year - 1 credit) 11& 12. HSO804 SOCIOLOGY Students learn about human social behavior by focusing upon human development, cultural diversity, social class, gender and the role of institutions such as family, education and religion. In this hands-on class, students explore careers in the field of sociology and learn how sociologists conduct research to understand and explain societal issues like criminal behavior (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. HWC806 AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (A, U) Students examine European events and movements from the Renaissance to the present day to understand the forces and ideas that have shaped our culture. Because the study of history goes beyond content, students study topics in a variety of ways and approaches, including analysis of primary source documents, classroom discussions, simulations and historical writing tasks (full year - 1 credit) 12. HWT806 ANCIENT & MEDIEVAL WESTERN CIVILIZATION (U) Students study the major developments of Western Civilization from ancient times through the early Renaissance (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Early Christianity, Crusades), and examine evidence surviving from the Ancient and Medieval Periods and the historian’s challenge to interpret these materials. Students develop research skills and participate in a project using Slater Museum’s collections (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. HGE804 GENOCIDE Students examine genocide in modern history, including the Nazi Holocaust, to understand the causes, resistance, results, survival and healing. Students research, discuss, role play, conduct oral history projects, participate in simulations, and listen to speakers to develop a deeper understanding of humanity and inhumanity (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

Samangie Aristilde, 11, Norwich, Clay, Clay 2 HSL824 INTRODUCTION TO LAW Students learn about the basic structure and procedures of the United States’ legal system, with a special focus on Connecticut. Students examine the rule of law and explore constitutional, family, civil and criminal law through reading, analysis, role play and interaction with legal professionals. Prerequisite: HGS424, HGS 425 (Global Studies & Citizenship or HOD permission) (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. HWS804 HERSTORY: INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S STUDIES Students examine modern and historical women’s issues, including religion, love, marriage, family, beauty and body image; explore the impact of individuals and events on women’s lives; and analyze media, periodicals and primary source documents, including advertisements, art and women’s writings (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12. HPH704 DISCOVERIES OF THE MIND Through direct contact with selected works of philosophy and the ideas they contain, students begin to formulate their own answers to the great questions of the human experience. (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. ICC704 COUNTERCULTURE See full description in the Interdisciplinary Studies section.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES ICC704 COUNTERCULTURE Students study the literature, music, and film of the innovative and revolutionary minds of the 20th century to develop an understanding of counter and subculture and their dynamic relationship to the mainstream. Students explore and critique the lasting effects of the Beats, jazz, hippy culture, new journalism, the fight for equality, NOW, the Black Panthers, the search for peace and Zen, punk rock, the angst of Generation X, and the rage of urban communities. Students create their own works including spontaneous prose and poetry, rap and outlandish, but culturally relevant, social scripture (full year – 1 elective credit) 11 & 12. HPH704 DISCOVERIES OF THE MIND Through direct contact with selected works of philosophy and the ideas they contain, students begin to formulate their own answers to the great questions of the human experience. Class counts for social studies credit (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. IAL701 ALLIED HEALTH Students learn core knowledge and competencies for entry into a variety of health care fields, and students explore health care careers through reading, writing, interviewing, job shadowing, and listening to presentations by health care professionals (½ year – ½ vocational credit) 11 & 12. ICN801 CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT TRAINING PROGRAM In this rigorous and challenging course, serious students gain the classroom and hands-on training to offer high-quality care to patients while working alongside other qualified health care professionals. Students must perform successfully on the state examination to be certified. Students register for the state examination and pay the fee on their own. Students are required to have a flu shot. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 (full year – 1½ credits: ½ science credit and 1 vocational credit) 12. IFS704 INTRODUCTION TO FIRE SERVICE In this 13-week course students learn about the rigorous training required of a modern firefighter interested in serving his/her community as a volunteer or career firefighter. Students learn about fire behavior, firefighter safety, personal protective equipment, incident management, communications, fire prevention, small tools, forcible entry, ropes and knots, salvage and overhaul, extinguishers, building construction, sprinkler systems and hose work. This course takes place Saturdays, December through April, at various fire departments in Norwich (½ elective credit) 11 & 12.

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IVP501 VIDEO PRODUCTION 1 Students interested in video production develop fundamental techniques in the television studio and in the field, learn basic terminology, communication, and camera skills in effective television production, and learn and practice the skills of production work, including shooting, lighting, editing and set design. Students participate in occasional, required, afterschool work. Course may be repeated for credit and may count as vocational credit (½ year – ½ vocational credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. IVP601 VIDEO PRODUCTION 2 Students increase their knowledge in the field of television by learning advanced shooting, editing and interviewing techniques, serving in required leadership positions, and producing regular programming for the NFA channel (both on campus and in the community). Prerequisite: IVP501 (full year – 1 vocational credit) 10, 11 & 12. IYP501 YEARBOOK PRODUCTION Students produce the yearbook by working in an integrated program of print journalism, photography, layout and design, and marketing and sales in a full year course, meeting twice per week. This course may be taken more than once and counts for art/ vocational credit for graduation. To enroll, students fill out an application and obtain instructor permission (full year – 1 elective credit) 10, 11 & 12. IYO301 YOGA Students engage in the study and practice of yoga, a widely practiced system of concentration upon breathing, physical posture, meditation and deep relaxation. While yoga stretches and strengthens the body, the aim is to unite the mind, body and self. Students become more attentive and focused, relieve stress, create life balance and enhance academic experience. Can be taken more than once for credit (½ year – ¼ elective credit, does not fulfill PE credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. IRB311 RECREATIONAL BOATING With multiple hands-on learning opportunities, students study recreational boating including nautical navigation, recreational water activities, weather effects upon boating, and safe boating techniques. Students have the opportunity to take the CT DEEP Safe Boating examination and become eligible for a CT Safe Boating Certificate (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Gabrielle Perrone, 12, Bozrah, Watercolor, FA Comp


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MATHEMATICS MIT613 INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 2 Students continue to study an integration of traditional Algebra 1 and Geometry with emphasis upon functions and their relationship to linear and exponential functions. Students review algebraic equations as they relate to polygons, surface area and volume, and probability, statistics and data analysis. Prerequisite: MIT003 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. MGE653 GEOMETRY Students focus upon learning the foundational topics of geometry, including lines, planes, angle pairs, congruent figures, similar figures and polygons. Students learn about coordinates, three-dimensional geometry, probability, statistics and data analysis. Prerequisite: MAL004 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. MGE554 PLANE GEOMETRY Students study lines, planes, angles, triangles, circles and polygons and work with coordinates, threedimensional geometry, probability, statistics and data analysis. Prerequisite: B or higher in MAL004 or C or higher in MAL005 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. MGE555 HONORS PLANE GEOMETRY At an in-depth level and accelerated pace, students study lines, planes, angles, triangles, circles and polygons and learn about coordinates, threedimensional geometry, probability, statistics and data analysis. Prerequisite: B in MAL005 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11, 15. All mathematics courses beyond MGE555/MGE554 require a graphing calculator (TI 83/84PLUS recommended). A scientific calculator is required for all other courses (TI 30X IIS recommended). MAL873 ALGEBRA 2 Students reinforce their Algebra 1 skills through the study of linear equations and inequalities, graphs, polynomials, radical expressions, quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, exponents/powers, and systems of equations. Prerequisite: MGE653 and MAL004 or MIT613 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. MAL654 ADVANCED ALGEBRA 2 Students review and extend Algebra 1 skills and concepts through study of linear equations and inequalities, graphs, polynomials, radical expressions, quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, exponents/powers, logarithms and systems of equations. Prerequisite: MGE005, MGE555 or MGE554 and B in MAL004 or MAL005 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

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Evan Kotomski, 10, Lebanon, Photo MAL585 HONORS ALGEBRA 2 & TRIGONOMETRY At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students prepare for Honors Pre-Calculus (MCA855) by studying the principal topics of Algebra 2 and some trigonometry concepts. Prerequisite: B+ in MAL005 and/or MGE005 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. MFT953 FUNCTIONS & TRIGONOMETRY Students review and extend Algebra 2 concepts and learn about trigonometry, sequences, series and probability. Prerequisites: C in MAL654 or MAL873 (full – year 1credit) 12. MFS854 PRECALCULUS Students prepare for the study of calculus and strengthen their conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems by studying a combination of trigonometric, geometric and algebraic techniques. Prerequisite: C+ in MAL585 or B- in MAL654 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. MSA804 STATISTICS Students learn about the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data with an emphasis on experiments and applications. Prerequisite: C+ in MAL654 or MAL585 and A- in MAL873 (full year – 1 credit) 12.


MIC955 HONORS INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS At an in-depth and accelerated pace, student prepare for Calculus by reinforcing pre-calculus concepts with an introduction to Calculus topics such as limits, continuity, derivatives, anti-derivatives and integrals. Prerequisite: B in MFS854 or MCA855 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12. MCA855 HONORS PRECALCULUS At an in-depth and accelerated pace students prepare for Calculus by covering Algebra topics ranging from polynomials, systems of equations, sequences, Trigonometry concepts and inverse, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: B in MAL585 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. MCA956 AP CALCULUS AB (A, E) Students study topics of limits, derivatives, and integrals and their applications. Prerequisite: B+ in MCA855 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12. MCA976 AP CALCULUS BC (A, E) Students extend the study of calculus through study of series and parametric, vector and polar functions. Students may take this course as an independent study. Fee: Cost of textbook. Prerequisite: A- in MCA855 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12. MSA806 AP STATISTICS (A, U) Students learn methods of summarizing data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, linear regression, confidence testing and basic probability. Fee: Cost of textbook. Prerequisite: MFS854 (may be taken concurrently) and C+ in MAL654 or MAL585 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

COMPUTER SCIENCE MCC551 COMPUTER SCIENCE 1 Students develop skills in problem-solving and writing object-oriented computer programs using Visual Basic programming language. Students develop an understanding of language syntax, problem analysis and problem-solving techniques through individualized programming assignments, and study topics including the history of computers, basic computer architecture and social issues involving computers. (Does not meet mathematics graduation requirement.) Prerequisite: B+ in MAL004 (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. MCC875 HONORS COMPUTER SCIENCE 2 Students continue to develop problem-solving abilities with JAVA (object-oriented programming language). Prerequisite: MCC551 and teacher recommendation. (Does not meet mathematics graduation requirement.) (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. MCC976 AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A (A) In this class, comparable to a first-semester college level class, students design, implement, and analyze programs and basic data structures, standard algorithms, and general computer systems knowledge with JAVA programming language. Prerequisite: Superior achievement in MCC551 and MCC875 and teacher recommendation. (Does not meet mathematics graduation requirement.) (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

MCR671 CONSUMER MATH Students reinforce mathematical skills through an extensive review of fundamental mathematical concepts, including order of operations, real numbers, percent and formulas, and apply these skills to consumer problems such as earning, spending, taxes, housing, insurance, transportation and budgeting. Prerequisite: MGE653 (full year – 1 credit) 12. MHM804 HISTORY AND FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS Students learn that numbers run the world by tracing the history of mathematics from the first number systems, through the creation of Algebra and the discovery of Calculus. Merely comparing our base 10 monetary system with that of other cultures that have used a Babylonian base 60 system since around 2500 B.C., students learn about the exponential development of mathematics. Prerequisite: C in MAL585 or MAL654 strongly recommended (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

Yingqi Li, 10, China, Acrylic Painting, Explorations in Painting

Courses with an A, E and/or U in the course description offer college credit.

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NFA MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM FLOWCHART Students follow one of the following suggested programs based upon teacher recommendations and fulfillment of prerequisites:

9th Grade

Honors Plane Geometry

i 10th Grade

Advanced Algebra 2 Or Honors Algebra 2 w/Trig

i 11th Grade

Precalculus Or Honors Precalculus

i

12th Grade

Honors Introduction to Calculus Or AP Statistics Or AP Calculus

Honors Algebra 1 Or Algebra 1

Integrated Math 1

i

i Honors Plane Geometry Or Plane Geometry Or Geometry

Integrated Math 2

i

i Honors Algebra 2 w/Trig Or Advanced Algebra 2

Algebra 2

i

i Honors Precalculus Or Precalculus Or Statistics

Functions & Trigonometry Or Consumer Math

Students should discuss these options with their mathematics teacher.

COMPUTER SCIENCE: Students with an interest in computer programming may select from the following courses: NOTE: COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES DO NOT COUNT AS ANY OF THE THREE (3) MATH CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION. Computer Science 1 Honors Computer Science 2 AP Computer Science

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION Ninth-grade students select two (2) of the following physical education courses (one taken each semester). Tenth-grade students take PPE202 10th Grade Fitness and select one additional course. Eleventh and twelfth-grade students may select any of the electives below. All students change into appropriate athletic clothing: tee shirt with sleeves, shorts or sweatpants, and sneakers. Key or combination lock required.

PPE202 TENTH GRADE FITNESS Students use a variety of lead-up exercises to prepare for the Connecticut 10th Grade Fitness Test. After testing, students focus upon the fundamentals of physical fitness, including use of weight, cardio and multipurpose rooms. In addition to learning to use traditional lifting machines, students use free weights, physio balls, Keiser equipment, medicine balls, kettle bells, TRX straps and more. Mandatory for all 10th-graders (½ year – ¼ credit) 10. PPE011 GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION Students learn a combination of individual and team activities, sports, and games with emphasis upon developing basic skills and knowledge (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PEP601 SPORTS PERFORMANCE Students learn and practice the core lifts, drills, and fundamentals to prepare the body and mind for participation in any sport in high school or college – to run faster, jump higher and grow stronger. In addition to participating in activities in the weight room, in the gym and on the field, students also discuss collegiate athletics, recruiting and NCAA regulations. Sports Performance is open to and will benefit everyone, not just current athletes (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PEF601 FOOTBALL/BASKETBALL Students learn the fundamentals of both sports by creating teams and playing in a league-formatted season. Students have opportunities to officiate, coach, and use videography during game play (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

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PEB602 BASKETBALL 2 Students develop advanced basketball skills and knowledge to play the game at a competitive level by focusing on conditioning, advanced skill development, coaching philosophies, offensive and defensive schemes, and rule interpretation. Students prepare to play or coach competitive team basketball. Prerequisite: PEF601 (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PED601 P.E. DANCE Students dance as a form of aerobic exercise and learn how dance can be part of a healthy, active lifestyle by participating in a Zumba Dance Class. Students wear proper attire to master basic aerobic, kick-boxing and Latin steps, create aerobic dance routines, and learn other complementary skills like yoga, Pilates, stretching and strength training. No dance experience necessary (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PEG601 GOLF/FITNESS Students learn the fundamentals of golf and the rules of the game, and concentrate upon developing the fitness and overall health to play the game. Students participate in one class at the local driving range (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PER611 NET SPORTS/ARCHERY Students participate in many sports involving a net, including volleyball, badminton and pickleball. Students of all levels and abilities work on fundamentals and progress to improve individual and team skills. Archery is for beginners as well as advanced archers (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PEO601 ORIENTEERING/CARDIO FITNESS Students develop and maintain cardio fitness and learn basic orienteering skills such as compass use, pace counting and map reading while taking part in an adventure sport. Students begin by following on-campus courses and end with an off-campus field trip. Students also work out on cardio equipment (full year - ½ credit) (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PES601 DIAMOND SPORTS Students participate in the various diamond sports such as softball, wiffle ball and kickball, and learn basic and any specific rules for each diamond sport. Students develop throwing, catching, and hitting skills and improve teamwork and cooperation (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Courses with an A, E and/or U in the course description offer college credit.


PEW601 WEIGHT TRAINING/BODY TRANSFORMATION Students reach personal fitness goals – building muscle, enhancing definition, burning fat, improving health and more – by focusing upon developing their body, keeping a fitness log, developing a diet plan, and formulating other means of continuing life-long exercise and health (½ year - ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PEK601 TRAIL WALKING/CARDIO Students explore the runner/walker and adventurer in all of us. Students develop aerobic endurance and set goals such as completing a 5K. Classes include various cardiovascular works in the cardio room, weight room, outdoor track, and trails in Mohegan Park (½ year - ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PEF602 FOOTBALL 2 Students develop the skills, knowledge, understanding, and performance to participate in football as players or coaches. Students learn techniques for all positions and offensive and defensive strategies and train with weights to become stronger football players (½ year - ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PEN601 SOCCER, BADMINTON, PING PONG Students spend a half semester developing soccer skills, including dribbling, trapping, passing, shooting and defense. Students also learn offensive and defensive rules and compete in games. During the second half of the semester students learn the rules and skills to play badminton and ping pong. Students compete in both singles and doubles tournaments (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PEY601 BASIC YOGA, PILATES & MINDFULNESS Students work on both body and mind by strengthening and stretching with a variety of low impact yoga and Pilates exercises and by becoming aware of breathing and movement. Students end each class with a mindfulness exercise (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PEC601 RECREATIONAL GAMES Students have fun developing their skill and knowledge of games for lifetime outdoor recreation, personal challenge and social interaction. Students learn about and participate in games like Corn Hole, Kan-Jam, and Badminton and lesser-known games like Spikeball and Disc Golf (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. PET601 BASIC GYMNASTICS/TUMBLING Students improve kinesthetic awareness by learning and executing basic tumbling skills like forward rolls, cartwheels and walkovers and progressing to aerials, round offs and handsprings. Students improve flexibility (splits, backbends, stretching), strength and balance (headstands, handstands). Considerable emphasis is placed on safety (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

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SCIENCE SBY004 BIOLOGY Students learn about principles and concepts that apply to life at all levels of organization, no matter how simple or complex. Students examine those general characteristics shared by all living things, including chemical makeup, energy use, reproduction and community involvement. Students participate in laboratory work emphasizing the scientific method (full year – 1 credit) 10. SBY075 HONORS BIOLOGY Students undertake a more rigorous study of biological concepts at various levels of organization (molecule, cell, gene, organism and population), and participate in extensive laboratory work emphasizing the scientific method. Prerequisites: 9th grade teacher approval (full year – 1 credit) 10. SBY656 AP BIOLOGY (A) In this rigorous and rewarding course, motivated, enthusiastic and interested students study all of the concepts and unifying themes in biology and meet the expectations of college freshmen in an introductory biology course. Students are expected to be self-motivated learners who complete assignments in a timely manner and participate actively in class. Class attendance for lecture and laboratory is critical, and students work independently and think critically. Inquiry based labs require cooperation with partners/groups. Students complete summer course work. Fee: Cost of textbook. Prerequisite: Biology (full year – 1.5 credits) 11 & 12.

SCH485 INTRODUCTION TO UCONN CHEMISTRY Students prepare for UConn Chemistry (SCH876) by emphasizing problem-solving and application of basic chemistry principles in this honors level class. Students seriously considering taking UConn Chemistry should take this class. Prerequisites: A grade of B in Algebra 1 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

SCH803 CHEMISTRY Students investigate the nature and interactions of matter and energy and study topics including atomic structure, matter and energy, chemical formulas and bonding, chemical reactions and equations, the mole and stoichiometry. This course is less math intensive than SCH804. Students planning a career in a science or health-related field should take SCH804 or higher (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. SCH804 CHEMISTRY Students investigate the nature and interactions of matter and energy and study topics including atomic structure, matter and energy, chemical formulas and bonding, chemical reactions and equations, the mole and stoichiometry, gas laws and solutions. Prerequisite: B in Algebra I strongly recommended (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. SCH876 UCONN CHEMISTRY (U) Students study general chemistry in depth at the college level and perform required after school lab work and tests. Students who do not meet the prerequisites must complete independent work and demonstrate mastery of basic chemistry concepts by June 1. Prerequisite: SCH485 or SCH804 and instructor permission (full year – 1.25 credits) 11 & 12. SPY904 PHYSICS Students study the mechanics and theory behind the interactions of solids, liquids and gases, including motion, vector analysis, dynamics, momentum, work, energy, simple machines, sound, light, mirrors and lenses, and electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: B in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. SPY956 AP/UCONN PHYSICS 1 (U, A) Students prepare for the Physics 1 AP test in a course equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebrabased physics. Students study Newtonian mechanics, work, energy, power, heat, mechanical waves and sound, and learn about electric circuits. Prerequisite: B in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. SPY966 AP/UCONN PHYSICS 2 (U, A) Students prepare for the AP Physics 2 test in a course equivalent to a second semester college course in algebra-based physics. Students study heat, electricity, magnetism and optics and learn about modern physics. In order to be eligible for UCONN/ECE credit, students must first successfully complete AP Physics 1. Prerequisite: B in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

Lily McGee, 12, Norwich, Drawing, Figure and Portrait Drawing

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SPY976 AP/UCONN PHYSICS 1 & 2 (U, A) Students cover material equivalent to two semesters of algebra-based college physics. Students study mechanics (Newton’s Laws of Motion), electricity, magnetism and modern physics and perform required after-school lab work. Fee: Cost of textbook. Prerequisite: B in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1.25 credits) 11 & 12. SGG001 GOING GREEN Students increase awareness of their daily impact on the environment and learn basic “green” strategies to decrease their environmental footprint upon Earth (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10 & 11. SES485 INTRODUCTION TO AP/UCONN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Students prepare for AP Environmental Science by studying human populations, ecosystem ecology, soil/ water quality, and the atmosphere and by participating in required hands-on laboratory investigation and fieldwork. Students have opportunities to conduct scientific research for analysis by the Connecticut State Department of Environmental Protection and to participate in field studies with Project Oceanology. Fee: Cost of textbook (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10 & 11. SES756 AP/UCONN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (A, U) Students investigate the Earth’s biotic and abiotic systems and how humans influence and depend upon them. With sustainability as a central theme, specific course topics include ecology, natural resources management, energy, pollution, human population dynamics and climate change. Students have opportunities for field study, engage in required after school labs, and complete summer course work (full year – 1.25 credit) 10, 11 & 12. SMB651 MARINE BIOLOGY Students learn about the marine environment and marine species, including plankton, marine algae, invertebrates and vertebrates, and man’s impact on the marine environment and marine species. Students have opportunities for field studies with Project Oceanology (½ year - ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. SMB675 HONORS MARINE BIOLOGY Students interested in marine, environmental, or natural sciences focus on all major marine phyla and marine ecosystems with emphasis on organisms from Long Island Sound and the New England coast. Students learn how organisms interact with their environment and study man’s environmental impact, including fisheries and aquaculture (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

Kyria Sylvain, 11, Taftville, Clay, Clay 2 SAQ601 AQUARIUM SCIENCE I Students explore the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in the aquarium environment and learn about the variety of applications, techniques, equipment, and fish to successfully establish and maintain a fresh water tropical aquarium. Using group aquaria, students feed, test water quality, identify and control disease and parasites, and learn husbandry techniques. Students have opportunities for field studies with Project Outreach, public aquaria, and/or zoos (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. SAQ621 AQUARIUM SCIENCE II Students explore the more complicated levels of the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in the saltwater aquarium environment and learn about the variety of applications, techniques, equipment and fish identification to successfully establish and maintain a group saltwater aquarium. Students explore saltwater identification of fish, invertebrates (jellyfish, cephalopods, etc.,) and corals. Students have opportunities for field studies with Project Oceanology, public aquariums and or public zoos (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. SCS601 COASTAL STUDIES Students study the biology, chemistry, physics, and geology on Long Island Sound in this hands-on marine science class. This is an activities based class with laboratory experiments, in-class projects, and study of live marine organisms (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. SMS786 UCONN INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (U) In this college-level course, students learn about the processes governing the geology, circulation, chemistry and biological productivity of the world’s oceans. Students focus on the interactions and interrelationships contributing to the stability and the variability of the marine environment. Students participate in required laboratory work after school hours. Students have opportunities for field studies with Project Oceanology (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

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SOC631 UNIFIED ZOOLOGY Students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a cooperative learning environment to study a general overview of the animal kingdoms, including evolution, classification, morphology and ecology (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12. SSV601 VETERINARY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Students study the underlying principles of animal medicine, including basic anatomy and physiology, and learn medical practices and procedures, including pet first aid (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

Ashley Aydt, 12, Preston, Oil Painting, Fine Arts Color Theory, Painting I SAY601 ASTRONOMY Students investigate the wonders of the night sky and the history of the universe, including its evolution and composition, the solar system, the life cycle of stars and galaxies, the search for life elsewhere, and the role of technology in the exploration of space (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. SAY685 HONORS ASTRONOMY (E) In this rigorous college-level course, students study the ever-changing universe while exploring galactic, stellar and planetary formation; investigate the relationships among math, physics and astronomy; and study the history of astronomy. Students have opportunities to work in the planetarium and observatory (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. SPE001 PREHISTORIC EARTH AND PALEONTOLOGY Students undertake an in-depth analysis of geological processes that shaped earth and led to the fossilization of organisms during the Mesozoic Era. Students study plate tectonics, evolution, geology and paleontology through independent assignments, laboratory activities and research projects (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. SOC601 ZOOLOGY Students learn about the animal kingdom throughout the world with emphasis upon local species and their interactions with the environment. Topics include evolution, classification, genetics and ecology. Many hands-on activities support learning throughout the course (½ year - ½ credit) 11 & 12.

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SSV604 CERTIFIED VETERINARY ASSISTANT TRAINING PROGRAM In this independent-study course, students prepare to become Certified Veterinary Assistants by following an online curriculum, including online readings, instructional videos and assessments. Prerequisite: Successful completion of SSV601 and Science Department Head approval (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12. SHB803 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Students explore the structure and function of the human body, with an emphasis on tissue organization and organ systems. Students complete laboratory exercises involving participatory research, group investigations, and dissection of Felis domesticus (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. SHB805 HONORS ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (E) In this rigorous college-level course, students engage in a more thorough study of the regions, structure, and function of the human body with an emphasis on tissue organization and organ systems. Students complete laboratory exercises involving microscopy of tissues, dissection of Felis domesticus, and investigations of contemporary science research (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. SSS601 SPORTS SCIENCE Students learn about basic exercise physiology, biomechanics, sports psychology and nutrition through hands-on, problem-based learning, performing exercise tests using fitness equipment, writing exercise “prescriptions” and training plans, and analyzing the mechanics of different sports skills (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12. SKS804 KINESIOLOGY Students study human movement to prepare for college-level study in a range of health and human movement fields including exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor development and sports medicine/ athletic training. Using problem-based learning, students integrate knowledge of biological, physical, and chemical factors to analyze the human body’s response to exercise (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

Courses with an A, E and/or U in the course description offer college credit.


SMD601 MICROBES AND DISEASE Students gain in-depth knowledge of basic biological and clinical aspects of viral and bacterial pathogens and the diseases they cause by studying principles of epidemiology, disease detection and prevention, chain of infection and human immunology. Students learn laboratory procedures and principles vital for entry into various health care fields (½ year - ½ credit) 11 & 12. SBT604 DNA SCIENCE In this hands-on, laboratory-centered course, students explore the different techniques and equipment used in forensic science, disease detection, agriculture, bioinformatics, anthropology and the pharmaceutical industry, with special emphasis upon DNA and genetics (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12. SFS651 FORENSIC SCIENCE Students apply physical and life science concepts learned in previous science courses in modern-day criminology and laboratory techniques to solve hypothetical criminal scenarios (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12. SIR385 HONORS INDEPENDENT RESEARCH Prior to enrollment, students submit a written plan of study for independent research for Science Department Head approval and gain approval of a science faculty member to serve as a mentor. Students enter the Connecticut Science Fair and comply with all regulations. Prerequisite: Science Department Head approval (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. IAL701 ALLIED HEALTH Students learn core knowledge and competencies for entry into a variety of health care fields, and students explore health care careers through reading, writing, interviewing, job shadowing, and listening to presentations by health care professionals (½ year - ½ vocational credit) 11 & 12. ICN801 CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT TRAINING PROGRAM In this rigorous and challenging course, students gain the classroom and hands-on training to offer highquality care to patients while working alongside qualified health care professionals. Students must perform successfully on the state examination to be certified. Students register for the state examination and pay the fee on their own. Students are required to have a flu shot Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 (full year – 1½ credits: ½ science credit and 1 vocational credit) 12.

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VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS All art classes require a Studio Fee ($4 - $160 typical range, depending upon class, materials and scope of projects.) Financial assistance is available.

GENERAL ART CLASSES APA001 PRINCIPLES OF ART 1 Students learn introductory elements of drawing, painting, two and three-dimensional design, composition and art appreciation. Students begin to explore a variety of media and techniques. No art experience required. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9 & 10. APA601 EXPLORATIONS IN ART Students explore drawing, painting and two and threedimensional design, and a wide variety of media and techniques. No art experience required. Studio Fee (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. ACC601 CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS In this hands-on course, students discover and explore the world of crafts as they create a variety of projects using different art media and form. Students delve into the history of each craft as they learn to construct it. Projects may include dream catchers, collage, mosaics and more. No art experience required. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 &12. APA501 UNIFIED ART Students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a cooperative learning environment to gain valuable experience while creating personal works of art. No art experience necessary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Studio Fee (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. ADR601 INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING Students learn the basic steps and techniques of drawing from observation, explore a variety of tools and materials, and develop confidence and skill to express visual facts. No drawing experience necessary. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. ADR661 DRAWING 1 Students learn the basic steps and techniques of drawing from direct observation, explore a variety of tools and materials, and develop confidence in drawing skills to express visual facts. No drawing experience necessary. Studio Fee (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

Emily James, 12, Preston, Graphite Drawing, Fine Arts Figure, Portrait Drawing

ADR865 ADVANCED DRAWING (U) Students continue to develop observational drawing skills and enhance their knowledge of drawing methods and tools as they work from nature, the figure, still life and their imagination. Students demonstrate problem-solving and idea development in required sketchbooks. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: ADR661 or ADR601 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. ADR701 DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION Students explore digital art making through a variety of techniques, including digital painting and drawing, digital collage through scanning and photography, and manipulation of text. Students use Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator to create art and narrate; students explore character development and digital aesthetics in graphic novels and comics. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: (one of the following) ADR601, ADR661 or ADR664. (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11, & 12 AWC871 EXPLORATIONS IN PAINTING Students learn about a variety of painting materials (tempera, water-color, acrylics) and techniques in this beginning painting course. Students work from observation to develop personal artistic approaches. No painting experience required. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: ADR601, ADR661, ADR865, APA501 or APA001 (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12. ADE761 INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN Students learn the basic elements and principles of design (using line, color, value, shape, form and texture) to create art and explore a variety of tools and materials (including painting, collage and sculpture). Students develop creativity, problemsolving, and technical skills. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

All art classes require a studio fee.

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ADE671 DESIGN 1 Students learn the basic elements and principles of design using line, color, value, shape, form, and texture to create art and explore a variety of tools and materials. Students develop creativity, problemsolving, and technical skills. Studio Fee (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. ABD671 CREATIVE BOOK DESIGN Students learn about the history of books, and the various processes and techniques of bookbinding to produce structurally sound books in a variety of formats. Students are encouraged to take Creative Writing (ECW691) to combine their writing with the visual image into works of art. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. ACD661 COMMUNITY DESIGN Students use creative skills to produce visual projects such as posters, fliers, logos, murals, etc., for various school and community clients with specific artrelated needs. Students generate work manually and digitally. They develop interpersonal, social, and verbal communication skills as they work with clients for specific outcomes. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: ADR661, APA001, APA601, AGA201, AGA651, AGA631 or AGA351 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. AGA201 GRAPHIC DESIGN 1 Students learn basic design development using computers and various traditional art materials. Students prepare for the demands of the graphic designer using Photoshop and Illustrator and develop the skills of the visual communicator as they begin to build a portfolio. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. AGA651 GRAPHIC DESIGN 2 Students continue to develop skills using basic design principles and color theory as they create projects like posters, photographic imaging, invitations and text, etc., using PowerPoint, Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Students develop and present a portfolio at the end of the year. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: AGA201 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. AGA875 ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN & DIGITAL IMAGING Students continue to develop skills using Adobe programs (Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign) and strengthen creative skills while producing individual thesis projects and class assignments in this advancedlevel course. Students choose to further their studies in Graphic Design, Digital Imaging or a combination of both. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: AGA651 and/or AGA631, or AGA351 with instructor approval (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

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All art classes require a studio fee.

Katie Humphreys, 10, Brooklyn, Collage, Design I AGP201 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 1 Students explore fine art digital photography by learning about composition, camera control, light and subject matter. Students gain experience using point-and-shoot cameras, DSLR cameras, and image manipulation in the digital darkroom using Adobe Photoshop, and students build a digital and print portfolio. Studio Fee (½ year – ½credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12 AGP301 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 2 Students begin to develop a style and voice as they strengthen and expand their skill and knowledge of the process of producing fine art digital photographs. Students further explore camera and lighting control and develop topics, passions, and independent ideas to create artwork. Students learn Photoshop and other digital presentation formats as they continue to build their digital and print portfolios. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: AGP201 (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. AGA501 UNIFIED GRAPHICS Students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a technology-rich cooperative learning environment to gain valuable experience while creating personal works of art and building technology skills. No art experience necessary. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. APC401 INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY Students learn the foundations and basic elements of using a traditional camera and of composing, developing, and producing images using photographic media Images will be black and white and created using the darkroom. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.


APC701 TRADITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY 1 Students learn the basic elements of composing, developing, and producing a body of work using photographic media, and explore in-depth a variety of materials and techniques to refine their skills. Students explore darkroom techniques and processes to develop technical and creative skills. Studio Fee (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. APC771 TRADITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY 2 Students continue to develop creative and technical aspects of black and white photography, including a more sophisticated grasp of exposure, the processing of film, alternative photography, and discussion of fine print making. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: Completion of APC801 or APC701 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. AMY671 INTRODUCTION TO JEWELRY & METALSMITHING Students learn basics of contemporary jewelry and metalsmithing, including sawing, piercing, solding, and cold connection with an emphasis upon design and craftsmanship. Students leave the course with several finished jewelry and metalsmithing artworks. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12 AMJ671 JEWELRY & METALSMITHING 1 In this full year course, students explore the medium, and develop strong skills in metalworking metalsmithing in three-dimensional form with a strong emphasis upon design and craftsmanship. Students develop a working knowledge of contemporary jewelry design, construction skills and techniques including sawing, piercing, soldering, shaping, cold connecting and stone setting. Studio Fee and purchase of additional materials (full year – 1 credit) 9,10, 11 & 12. AMJ771 JEWELRY & METALSMITHING 2 Students delve deeper into the art of advanced threedimensional jewelry and metalsmithing and learn more complex skills including hollow form, advanced stone setting, and enameling with increased focus upon complexity of design, construction and craftsmanship. Students begin to explore creating utilitarian and sculptural artwork in pewter. The student art journal plays an important role in this course. Studio Fee and purchase of additional materials, Prerequisite: Successful completion of AMJ671or AMY674 and instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. AMJ871 JEWELRY & METALSMITHING 3 Students continue to explore and refine jewelry and metalsmithing skills and techniques and learn more challenging techniques including cloisonné enameling and advanced stone setting. Students increase the complexity of production, research and craftsmanship. Studio Fee and purchase of additional materials, Prerequisite: Successful completion of AMJ771 and instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

AMJ971 JEWELRY & METALSMITHING 4 Under faculty guidance, students participate in individual research and design to continue to build strong design skills and craftsmanship in metal and/or to prepare a portfolio of work. Students produce work of increasing complexity, research and craftsmanship. Students have the opportunity to work as studio assistants. Studio Fee and purchase of additional materials, Prerequisite: Successful completion of AMJ871 and instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 12. ACL661 INTRODUCTION TO CLAY Students make both functional and sculptural forms using a variety of hand-building techniques. Students develop ideas and craftsmanship, design and build work, and learn three-dimensional design concepts. Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. ACY661 CLAY 1 Students make both functional and sculptural forms using a variety of hand-building techniques and the pottery wheel. Students develop ideas and craftsmanship as they design and build work and learn three-dimensional design concepts. Studio Fee (full year – 1 credit) 9,10, 11 & 12. ACY761 CLAY 2 Students continue to develop skills creating sculptural and functional forms on and off the wheel, explore idea development and higher standards of craftsmanship, and conduct required historical and contemporary research. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: Successful completion of ACY661 and instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. ACY961 CLAY 3 Students focus on independent idea development, proficiency in technical skills, and research into contemporary and historical ceramic work. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: Successful completion of ACY761 and instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 11 &12.

Katrina Konow, 11, Norwich, Mixed Media, Principles of Art

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FINE ARTS PROGRAM

Abimelech Caraball, 10, Norwich, Photo, Digital Photography I ADE771 SCULPTURE Students explore three-dimensional design elements and principles of visual art through projects of original design using a variety of techniques and materials (including paper, clay, wire and found objects). Studio Fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. ADE871 ADVANCED DIGITAL SCULPTURE In this advanced course, students continue to explore three-dimensional design elements and principles of visual art through projects of original design. Designs are brought to life in ZBrush, digital sculpting software. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: Successful completion of APA001, APA601, ADR601, ADR661 or ADE771 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. AHA886 AP HISTORY OF ART (A) Students learn about the development of both European and Non-European civilizations from prehistoric to contemporary times through architecture, painting and sculpture in this slide-lecture course recommended for all Fine Arts students. Studio Fee (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. ASA956 AP STUDIO ART (A) Students seriously committed to studying visual art and developing a portfolio of individualized artwork for college preparation develop aesthetic understanding through studio projects that stimulate the imagination, encourage creative problem-solving, and refine skills. Students maintain a required sketchbook and submit a required portfolio to the College Board. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: Successful completion of two or more advanced art electives, parental consent and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

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Shannon Stewart, 12, Norwich, Drawing, Fine Arts Figure, Portrait Drawing

Students interested in continuing their art education after high school at a college or university art department may follow the Fine Arts Program. The Art Department Head and the student’s counselor must approve the program. Beginning the program in either ninth or tenth grade, students take four academic and one art course each year, and, normally, carry three academic and three art courses in both eleventh and twelfth grade. If a student’s schedule permits, the Art Department recommends that Fine Arts students take more art classes. The following sequence of courses is recommended for Fine Arts majors. Students maintain a B average in studio art courses to continue in the program. Students who do not follow the entire sequence have the opportunity to become Portfolio Students. Non-Fine Arts Students may sign up for any of these courses if space is available and with Department Head approval.

9TH & 10TH-GRADE • Fine Arts Drawing Foundations 11TH-GRADE • Honors Fine Arts Drawing & Composition • Fine Arts Color Theory & Painting I • Fine Arts Three Dimensional Design 12TH-GRADE • Honors Fine Arts Figure & Portrait Drawing • Honors Fine Arts Painting II • Honors Senior Fine Arts Printmaking • 1 full credit of any art elective


Program information is available in the Art Department office. The Department maintains an art supply store for the convenience of art students, who should expect to pay for supplies. ADR664 FINE ARTS DRAWING FOUNDATIONS Fine Arts students learn the basic steps and techniques of drawing from direct observation, explore a variety of tools and materials, and develop confidence in drawing skills to express visual facts. Students maintain required sketchbooks for personal exploration and idea development. Studio Fee (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. ACP875 HONORS FINE ARTS DRAWING & COMPOSITION (U) Fine Arts students further develop observational drawing skills, enhance knowledge of basic drawing tools and techniques, and explore the conceptual ideas of image making by emphasizing concepts in composition and organization and creation of volumetric space. Students maintain required sketchbooks for personal exploration and idea development. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: ADR664 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

ASD875 HONORS FINE ARTS PRINTMAKING Fine Arts students explore various printmaking processes and techniques. Students refine their drawing skills as they learn the basics of creating multiple images through relief, intaglio, serigraphs, silk-screening on fabric, lithography and contemporary, non-toxic printmaking techniques. Students also explore basic papermaking and book making. Students maintain required sketchbooks for idea development and for visual and verbal responses to artwork. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: Successful completion of ADR664 or ACP875 (full year – 1 credit) 12. APT975 HONORS FINE ARTS PAINTING 2 Fine Arts students continue to explore color as a means of expressing form and concepts with emphasis on the figure as subject matter. Students study the contributions of painters, past and present, and maintain required sketchbooks for resolving compositions. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: B in APT874 (full year – 1 credit) 12.

ADE874 FINE ARTS THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN Fine Arts students explore three-dimensional design elements and principles through projects of original design. Students use a variety of techniques including carving, casting, construction and modeling and students work in metal, clay, wood, wire, paper, plaster, stone and found objects. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: B in one of the following courses: ADR664, ADR601, ADE671, AMJ671, ACY661 or ADE771 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. APT874 FINE ARTS COLOR THEORY & PAINTING 1 Fine Arts students learn a problem-solving approach to color theory, both practical and historical, and develop painting skills to describe form and structure through painting materials, color and techniques. Studio Fee - students purchase all personal painting supplies. Prerequisite: ADR664 or ACP875 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. AFP875 HONORS FINE ARTS FIGURE & PORTRAIT DRAWING Fine Arts students continue to refine their drawing skills, arrange compositional elements and develop technical expertise using a variety of media. Students focus on observational drawing of the human figure and its relationship to its environment. Students maintain required sketchbooks. Studio Fee, Prerequisite: B in ADR664 or ACP875 (full year –1credit) 11 & 12.

Katie Landry, 12, Franklin, Digital Photo, Traditional & Digital Photography

All art classes require a studio fee.

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PERFORMING ARTS DANCE DDA301 INTRODUCTION TO DANCE Students learn the beginning vocabulary, principles and elements of dance, and improve technique, poise, self-confidence and creative ability. Students learn about various dance forms, including jazz, ballet, modern, hip-hop, and ballroom in historical and cultural context, and wear proper attire to choreograph and perform in class. No dance experience necessary (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DBA301 BALLET 1 Students build ballet vocabulary and technique through a barre warmup, center floor exercises and combinations. Students wear proper attire to choreograph and perform in class. Some dance experience preferred (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DBA321 BALLET 2 Ballet 2 students build on the technique learned in Ballet 1 through a variety of more advanced warmups, exercises and combinations. Students wear proper attire to choreograph and perform in class. Prerequisite: DBA301 or teacher recommendation (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DHH301 HIP-HOP 1 Students learn basic hip-hop skills through a variety of warmups, exercises and combinations. Students wear proper attire to choreograph and perform in class. Some dance experience preferred (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

David Fontaine, 12, Voluntown, Drawing, Fine Arts Figure, Portrait Drawing

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DHH321 HIP-HOP 2 Students build Hip-Hop 1 skills through a variety of more advanced warmups, exercises and combinations. Students wear proper attire to choreograph and perform in class. Prerequisite: DHH301 or teacher recommendation (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DJZ301 JAZZ 1 Students learn about the many styles of jazz dance and develop jazz technique through a variety of daily warmups, exercises and combinations. Students wear proper attire to choreograph and perform in class. Some dance experience preferred (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DJZ321 JAZZ 2 Students build on Jazz 1 technique through a variety of more advanced daily warmups, exercises and combinations. Students wear proper attire to choreograph and perform in class. Prerequisite: DJZ301 or teacher recommendation (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DTP301 TAP 1 Students build tap vocabulary and technique through a variety of daily warmups, exercises and combinations. Students wear tap shoes to choreograph and perform in class (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DTP321 TAP 2 Students build on Tap 1 vocabulary and techniques through a variety of more advanced warmups, exercises and combinations. Students wear tap shoes to choreograph and perform in class. Prerequisite: DTP301 or teacher recommendation (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DDC401 DANCE COMPANY Students serious about the art of dance join this advanced dance company. Students choreograph in a variety of styles including jazz, lyrical, contemporary, modern, tap and hip-hop and perform in annual shows, festivals and community performances. Students dress in proper attire and attend all required performances and rehearsals. Prerequisite: Completion of a levelone dance course and audition (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. PED601 P.E. DANCE Students dance as a form of aerobic exercise and learn how dance can be part of a healthy, active lifestyle by participating in a Zumba Dance Class. Students wear proper attire to master basic aerobic, kick-boxing and Latin steps, create aerobic dance routines, and learn other complementary skills like yoga, Pilates, stretching and strength training. No dance experience necessary (½ year – ¼ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.


CHORAL MUSIC TVT001 FUNDAMENTALS OF VOCAL TECHNIQUE Students learn the basics of how to prepare for any type of vocal audition. Students create vocal demos for auditions, recording music they have written, build confidence signing in front of others, and participate in and end of semester performance (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TAA001 ACADEMY WOMEN’S CHORUS Female students experience positive musical performance by developing individual and ensemble skills through multiple-part vocal and sight-singing pieces. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances. No audition required. Can be repeated (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TAC001 CONCERT CHOIR Students experience positive musical performance in a large mixed-choral ensemble that explores literature including selections from all periods, styles and cultures. Students develop individual and ensembleskills in vocal performance with an emphasis on part and sight-singing. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances. No audition required. Can be repeated (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TNA671 NFA AMBASSADORS Students demonstrate excellent music reading skills in this most advanced after-school singing ensemble. Primarily an acapella vocal group, members sing four to eight part music in a repertoire including compositions from the Renaissance through contemporary music. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances, and audition for at least one music festival. Prerequisite: Chamber Choir and audition (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. TCH651 CHAMBER CHOIR Students sight-sing proficiently and adhere to the highest standard of musical excellence in this advanced singing course for four to eight part mixed voices. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances. Prerequisite: Audition (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

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INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC TAB341 CONCERT BAND Students participate in a performance-based ensemble open to wind, brass, and percussion musicians with at least one year of playing experience. Students with limited ensemble experience are admitted to the class with director approval. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances, including annual concerts, festivals and community performances (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TAB361 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE Students with experience performing percussion instruments enroll in this ensemble for mixed- level percussionists to perform strictly percussion ensemble literature. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances, including annual concerts, festivals and community performances (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

TBP301 BEGINNING PIANO Students with no prior knowledge of piano learn the basic playing techniques and develop skills using scales, music theory and piano performance repertoire (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TBP401 INTERMEDIATE PIANO Students refine piano technique through an indepth study of standard piano repertoire and scales and recital performance. Prerequisite: TBP301 and teacher’s approval (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TBP501 ADVANCED PIANO Students learn, practice, and play a more advanced repertoire, and perform in recital. Prerequisite: TPB301 or audition (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TGB301 BEGINNING GUITAR Students with no knowledge or experience playing the guitar learn to play in a variety of styles using a variety of techniques, and learn about tuning, music notation, chords and accompaniment (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TGI401 INTERMEDIATE GUITAR Guitarists with experience reading sheet music and standard musical notation pursue advanced techniques to refine and improve their performance. Prerequisite: Successful completion of TGB301 or teacher approval (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TOR361 ORCHESTRA Students improve their skills in this performance ensemble for mixed-level string musicians, and students attend all required rehearsals and performances (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Lily McGee, 12, Norwich, Watercolor, FA Comp TMB371 WILDCAT MARCHING BAND Students participate in a competitive marching band program that performs at USBands competitions, community events, football games, parades and concerts. All students attend a 7-day band camp at NFA and a 3-day overnight preseason camp in Rhode Island. These required, preseason events take place during the first few weeks of August. In addition, members attend a midsummer rehearsal in July. Instrumental experience is preferred, no experience necessary for color guard members. New musicians admitted with director permission. All firstyear brass, woodwind, and percussion marchers are required to enroll in a full year of concert band or percussion ensemble (after school – ½ year - ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

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TJZ651 JAZZ ENSEMBLE Students who play a jazz instrument refine their performance in this advanced instrumental music ensemble. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances, including annual concerts, festivals and community performances. Prerequisite: Instrumental music experience preferred; audition required; at director’s discretion, prerequisite waived (second semester, after school - ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TCG371 COLOR GUARD Students learn the fundamentals of both indoor and outdoor color guard technique, including body movement, spins, tosses, hand and foot placement, and choreography. Advanced students may learn rifle and sabre techniques. Students perform, both as members of the marching band program in the fall and as an indoor guard in the winter and spring (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Courses with an A, E and/or U in the course description offer college credit.


GENERAL MUSIC TMT201 MUSIC TECHNOLOGY 1 Students learn the basics of digital recording, music notation software and MIDI sequencing software. No musical or technology experience needed (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TMT301 MUSIC TECHNOLOGY 2 Students continue to study digital recording, music notation software and MIDI sequencing software. Prerequisite: TMT201 or instructor approval (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. TMT401 MUSIC TECHNOLOGY 3 Students learn more advanced techniques using digital recording, music notation software and MIDI sequencing software. Students use the Logic X and ProTools software. Prerequisite: TMT301 or instructor approval (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. TMT601 MUSIC THEORY 1 Students learn music notation, basic musical components (melody, harmony and rhythm), and aural skills. Students not currently enrolled in performing groups gain exposure to components of music theory as a subject area, and performing arts students gain additional music knowledge and awareness, and prepare for further instrument or voice study. Prerequisite: Experience in performing ensemble or instructor approval (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. THT656 AP MUSIC THEORY (A) Advanced music students learn about the harmonic structure of music. Students familiar with standard notation expand their knowledge and understanding. Prerequisite: TMT601 (full year – 1 credit) 12.

Nevaeh Ortiz, 10, Norwich, Introduction to Metals & Jewelry

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THEATER DIT301 INTRODUCTION TO THEATER Students explore the diverse world of theater, including artistic and business areas. Students develop an understanding of how each person involved in a theatrical production contributes to the audience’s experience (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DDR311 ACTING 1 Students explore the fundamental skills and methods of the actor’s art and learn various techniques, theories and skills involved in character development and stage presence. Students read, interpret, develop and perform improvisations, scenes from plays and contemporary monologues (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DDR411 ACTING 2 - ACTORS’ WORKSHOP Students advance acting skills and methods and explore various techniques, theories, and skills involved in different acting styles, character development and stage presence. Students read, interpret, develop and perform realistic and nonrealistic scenes from various dramatic periods: Ancient, Elizabethan, Baroque, Modern, Postmodern and Contemporary. Prerequisite: DDR311 (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Elizabeth Joyal, 10, Norwich, Drawing, Fine Arts Drawing Foundations DDR501 UNIFIED DRAMA Students partner with peers with special needs in an active and fun theater based cooperative learning environment. Students gain valuable experience exploring the fundamental skills and methods of the actor’s process through improve and scripted acting activities, culminating in the production of an in-class play (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. DDR511 ACTING 2, PART 2 – SCENE STUDY Students continue to develop their acting skills through a focus upon scene work, emphasizing active listening, connecting, character creation and development, text analysis and revealing emotional truth. Students have the opportunity to work on several scenes and present them at a high level of preparedness. Students become familiar with the audition process, including cold reading. Prerequisite: DDR411 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. DIT331 MUSICAL THEATER SCENE STUDY Students explore the unique theatrical challenges and expressive possibilities of the singer/actor performing a scene set to music. Students further refine interpretation and musical and acting skills by working in-depth on classic scenes from the American musical theater repertoire. Prerequisite: DDR311 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. DIF301 INTRODUCTION TO FILM Students explore the history of film and the various genres, styles and techniques in theater. Students view important works of cinema through the lens of the director, screenwriter, cinematographer, designer and editor – all positions that contribute to the success of a film and production. (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

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Adriana Robbins, 12, Nowich, Drawing, Fine Arts Figure and Portrait Drawing


WORLD LANGUAGE Students purchase a workbook (ranging in cost from $9 to $30) for most world language classes. LAS304 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1 Students develop a basic understanding of fundamentals in visual, receptive and expressive skills for grammar, facial markers, classifiers, fingerspelling and vocabulary building. Students also study Deaf culture and history to develop the conversational/cultural behaviors for beginning-level conversations in ASL (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. LAS354 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2 Students build and expand upon their visual, receptive and expressive skills for grammar, facial markers, classifiers, fingerspelling and vocabulary. Students practice facial grammar and non-manual markers; students also practice conversational skills with more emphasis upon building vocabulary and pragmatics. Students learn more about Deaf culture and history. Prerequisite: LAS304 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. LAS654 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3 Students expand their language skills and increase fluency. Students continue to develop proficiency in receptive and expressive signing, interactive communication, and culture and language concepts. Students also expand their understanding of Deaf culture and history through discussion and study of ASL literature. Prerequisite: LAS354 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

SLATER MEMORIAL MUSEUM Learn, discover, and explore the richness and diversity of the human experience through art and history. Open 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., Tuesday – Friday, and 1 – 4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday.

LAS855 HONORS AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 4 Students continue to develop proficiency in receptive, presentational and interactive signing, interactive communication, and culture and language concepts. Students expand their understanding of deaf culture and history through discussion, ASL literature and interaction with members/organizations of the local Deaf community. Students complete written assignments, read and analyze literature, conduct a videotaped interview, and complete an expressive presentation. Prerequisite: LAS654 (full year – 1 credit) 12. LAR304 ARABIC 1 Students develop the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills to be functional in everyday, modern, standard Arabic. Students also develop awareness of the rich and diverse culture of the Arab world. For non-native speakers of Arabic (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

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LCH654 CHINESE 3 Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese. They also acquire appreciation of the cultural, artistic and intellectual accomplishments of Chinese-speaking countries/ regions. Prerequisite: LCH354 or equivalent with teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. LCH855 CHINESE 4/UCONN (U) Students focus upon intensive development and use of grammar and vocabulary, develop fluency in oral communication, reading and writing, and upon exploring and researching aspects of Chinese culture, history and literature. Prerequisite: Successful completion of LCH654 or permission of teacher (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

Emily Brewster,9, Montville, Photo, Digital Photography I LAR354 ARABIC 2 Students continue to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills to be functional in everyday, modern, standard Arabic. Students also continue to develop awareness of the rich and diverse culture of the Arab world. Prerequisite: LAR304 or instructor permission (full year –1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. LAR654 ARABIC 3 Students continue to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills with greater emphasis on reading comprehension and intermediate conversation. Students further their knowledge of Arabic culture. Prerequisite: LAR354 or instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LAR855 HONORS ARABIC 4 Students further enhance their communication skills by reading excerpts from literary works of Arabic writers and poets and discussing history and culture. Prerequisite: LAR654 or instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LCH304 CHINESE 1 Students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Chinese to meet every day needs. Students also develop an awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Chinese culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LCH956 AP CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (A) Students further develop language proficiencies in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese while learning about the culture. Students use and study materials and participate in activities adapted from authentic sources to support linguistic and cultural goals. Prerequisite: LCH654 and/or permission of teacher (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LFR304 FRENCH 1 Students, in all grade levels with or without experience, develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in French to meet every day needs. Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and French culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. LFR375 HONORS FRENCH 1-2 Motivated students who have demonstrated strong academic ability in other subject areas develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in French and develop their cultural understanding. Students in this more intensive, accelerated level of French 1 prepare to take Advanced Placement (LFC956 AP French Language) and earn college credit. No French experience necessary (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11, & 12.

LCH354 CHINESE 2 Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese. Students also develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LCH304 or equivalent with teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Gillian Taylor, 11, Norwich, Billboard Design, Advanced Graphics

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Courses with an A, E and/or U in the course description offer college credit.


LFR855 HONORS FRENCH 4 Students develop fluency in oral communication by focusing upon intensive study of grammar and vocabulary, and by exploring and researching aspects of French culture, history and literature. Prerequisite: LFR654 or LFR655 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LFR956 FRENCH GLOBAL CULTURE/UCONN (U) Within the context of weekly conversational topics about various Francophone cultures, students participate in intense, rigorous, and active study and practice oral French in dialogues, interviews, round tables and oral reports. Prerequisite: LFR855 (full year – 1 credit) 12. LGK304 ANCIENT GREEK 1 Students master the Greek alphabet, elementary grammar, literacy, and cultural concepts for future reading of Attic Greek, and study a general introduction to the literature and civilization of Ancient Greece (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Cassidy Boenig, 12, Norwich, Drawing, Fine Arts Figure, Portrait Drawing LFR354 FRENCH 2 Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French, and develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LFR304 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. LFR655 HONORS FRENCH 2-3 Students who have successfully completed Honors French 1-2 or the summer French “Bridge” broaden and deepen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French at an accelerated pace to prepare to take Advanced Placement (LFC956 AP French Language). Students also deepen cultural understanding. Prerequisite: LFR375 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. LFR654 FRENCH 3 Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French and acquire an appreciation of the cultural, artistic and intellectual accomplishments of French-speaking countries. Prerequisite: LFR354 or equivalent; not intended for students who have completed LFR655 with C- or above (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. LFR854 FRENCH 4 Students deepen reading, writing, speaking, and especially listening skills in French by exploring culture, history, and everyday life through classic and modern cinema of France and other French-speaking cultures. Students study vocabulary and grammar as an integral component of the course. Prerequisite: LFR654 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LGK354 ANCIENT GREEK 2 Students continue to develop skills to read and understand Ancient Greek language and culture and develop understanding of the cultural heritage of Ancient Greece through readings in Greek and in translation. Prerequisite: LGK304 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. NOT OFFERED 2017-18 SCHOOL YEAR. LGK654 ANCIENT GREEK 3 Students acquire the vocabulary and reading strategies to understand, analyze, interpret, and enjoy Ancient Greek language and literature. Prerequisite: LGR354 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. NOT OFFERED 2017-18 SCHOOL YEAR. LGK855 HONORS ANCIENT GREEK 4 (U) Students read works of Homer, Herodotus, Euripides and other classical authors, and with the teacher’s direction, develop individual goals and complete tasks. Prerequisite: LGK654 (full year – 1 credit) 12. NOT OFFERED 2017-18 SCHOOL YEAR. LIT304 ITALIAN 1 In this beginning course designed for all grade levels with or without experience, students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Italian to meet every day needs. Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Italian culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. LIT354 ITALIAN 2 Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Italian, and develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LIT304 (full year - 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

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LIT654 ITALIAN 3 Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and acquire an appreciation of cultural, artistic, and intellectual accomplishments within the Italian culture. Prerequisite: LIT354 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. LIT856 HONORS ITALIAN 4 (U) Students attain proficiency to understand, speak, read, and write Italian at a college level and to develop and refine skills acquired over several years of study. Prerequisite: LIT654 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LIT956 HONORS ITALIAN 5 (U) Students attain proficiency to understand, speak, read, and write Italian at a college level and to develop and refine skills acquired over several years of study. Prerequisite: LIT856 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LLA304 LATIN 1 Students start to build a foundation of Latin vocabulary to support them through higher levels. Students read Latin sentences and short stories, begin to use phrases and sentences, and write in Latin. Students develop cultural understanding through readings and discussion. Students will develop novice level language skills learn about Ancient Roman culture. (full year –1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

David Fontaine, 12, Voluntown, Drawing, Fine Arts Figure and Portrait Drawing LLA354 LATIN 2 Students build upon the skills and standards of Latin I by learning to interact in more complex situations, reading more complicated materials and writing more extended passages. Students increase their understanding of Ancient Roman culture through reading and discussion. Students continue to develop language skills and to acquire an understanding of Latin. Prerequisite: LLA304 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. LLA655 HONORS LATIN 3 Students acquire the vocabulary and reading strategies to understand, analyze, interpret, and enjoy the language and literature of the late Roman Republic and early Empire. Prerequisite: LLA354 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LLA855 HONORS LATIN 4 Students expand lexical and reading skills to understand, analyze, interpret, and enjoy the literature of late Roman Republic and early Empire. Students complete required summer and outside readings in English and Latin to develop analytical skills and a background in literary criticism. Prerequisite: LLA655 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 12. LLA956 AP LATIN (A, U) Students expand their lexical and reading skills to understand, analyze, interpret, and enjoy the literature of late Roman Republic and early Empire. Students complete required summer and outside readings in English and Latin to develop analytical skills and a background in literary criticism. Prerequisite: LLA655 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 12.

Jacob Betz, 12, Norwich, Oil Painting, Fine Arts Color Theory, Painting I

60


LSP304 SPANISH 1 Students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish to meet every day needs. Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Spanish culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. LSP375 HONORS SPANISH 1-2 Students, highly successful in Spanish in eighth grade or previously, take this more intensive, accelerated, advanced course to prepare for Advanced Placement. Students broaden and deepen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and their cultural understanding (full year – 1 credit) 9. LSP354 SPANISH 2 Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish and develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LSP304(full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. LSP655 HONORS SPANISH 2-3 In this accelerated course, students prepare for Advanced Placement by continuing to deepen and broaden their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish and their cultural understanding. Prerequisite: LSP375 (full year - 1 credit) 10. LSP654 SPANISH 3 Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish and acquire an appreciation of the cultural, artistic and intellectual accomplishments of Spanish-speaking countries. Prerequisite: LSP354 or equivalent; not intended for students who have completed LSP655 with C- or above (full year - 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LSP854 SPANISH 4 Students deepen reading, writing, speaking, and especially listening skills in Spanish by exploring Spanish culture, history and literature. Students study vocabulary and grammar as an integral component of the course. Prerequisite: LSP654 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LSC855 HONORS SPANISH CONVERSATION 4 Students prepare for AP Spanish Language by furthering their oral fluency and synthesizing their acquired skills and experiences in role play and interaction in Spanish. Students study grammar as appropriate. Prerequisite: LSP654, LSP655, LSL855 or equivalent; not intended for native speakers (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LSL855 HONORS SPANISH LITERATURE 4 Students deepen comprehension and interpretive skills by studying poetry, music, essays, and short stories reflecting the culture and history of Spanishspeaking countries. Students develop writing style, refine grammar and extend vocabulary. Prerequisite: LSP654, LSP655, LSC855 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12. LSC956 AP SPANISH LANGUAGE (A, U) Students attain proficiency to understand, speak, read, and write Spanish at a college level and to develop and refine skills acquired over several years of study. Students focus upon mastery of language skills, rather than upon content of specific texts. Fee: Cost of textbook. Prerequisite: LSC855, LSL855 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 12. LSP361 SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 1 Fluent native speakers of Spanish refine and further develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills with emphasis on spelling and grammatical structure. Students read Spanish newspapers, magazines, short stories, plays, etc. Some 9th-grade students may be more successful in a more structured language class. Prerequisite: Special recommendation required (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. LSP461 SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 2 In this second course of a two-year sequence, fluent native speakers of Spanish refine and further develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills with emphasis on spelling and grammatical structure (full year –1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.    

Jingsong Ru, 12, China, Drawing, Fine Arts Drawing Foundations

61


Anissa Baral, 12, Bozrah, Drawing, Fine Arts Figure, Portrait Drawing


INDEX Academy Women’s Chorus.......................... 53 Accounting 1 & 2, Honors.............................. 25 Acting 1 & 2..................................................... 56 Advanced Algebra 2..................................... 36 Advanced Digital Sculpture.......................... 50 Advanced Drawing........................................ 47 Advanced Engineering Graphics & Architectural Design.................................... 27 Advanced Graphic Design & Digital Imaging......................................... 48 Advanced Piano............................................ 54 Algebra 1......................................................... 12 Algebra 2 ........................................................ 36 Algebra 2 & Trigonometry, Honors................ 36 Algebra 2, Advanced.................................... 36 Allied Health.............................................. 34, 45 American Regional Cuisines.......................... 27 American Sign Language 1, 2, 3, & 4........... 57 Anatomy & Physiology..................................... 4 Anatomy & Physiology, Honors....................... 4 Ancient & Medieval Western Civilization..... 33 Ancient Greek 1, 2, 3, & 4.............................. 59 AP Biology....................................................... 42 AP Calculus AB, BC......................................... 37 AP Chinese Language & Culture.................. 58 AP Computer Science A................................ 37 AP Economics................................................. 32 AP English Language...................................... 28 AP English Literature........................................ 29 AP European History....................................... 33 AP History of Art............................................... 50 AP Latin............................................................ 60 AP Music Theory.............................................. 55 AP Psychology................................................. 33 AP/UConn Physics 1, 2.................................... 42 AP Spanish Language.................................... 61 AP Statistics...................................................... 37 AP Studio Art.................................................... 50 Arabic 1, 2, 3, 4.......................................... 57, 58 Art, Unified........................................................ 47 Astronomy........................................................ 44 Astronomy, Honors.......................................... 44 Aquarium Science 1 & 2................................ 43 Bakeshop, Intro to........................................... 26 Ballet 1 & 2....................................................... 52 Band, Concert................................................. 54 Beginning Guitar............................................. 54 Beginning Piano.............................................. 54 Biology.............................................................. 42 Biology, AP....................................................... 42 Biology, Honors................................................ 42 Biology, Marine................................................ 43 Biology, Marine, Honors.................................. 43 Business Communications.............................. 25 Business Explorations....................................... 25 Business Operations & Management........... 25 Calculus AB, AP............................................... 37 Calculus BC, AP............................................... 37 Calculus, Honors Intro to................................ 37 Certified Nursing Assistant Training Program.................................... 34, 45 Chamber Choir............................................... 53 Chemistry......................................................... 42 Chemistry, UConn........................................... 42 Chemistry, Intro to UConn.............................. 42 Child Growth & Development...................... 26 Chinese 1, 2, 3, 4............................................. 58 Chinese, UCONN............................................ 58 Choir, Chamber............................................... 53 Choir, Concert................................................. 53 Clay Intro to, & 1, 2, 3..................................... 49 Coastal Studies................................................ 43 College Application Process, Navigation.... 30

Tyler Riddle, 12, Norwich, Word Art, Graphic Design 2 Color Guard..................................................... 54 Community Design......................................... 48 Community Design, Project Management............................................... 28 Computer Science 1...................................... 37 Computer Science 2, Honors........................ 37 Computer Science A, AP............................... 37 Concert Band.................................................. 54 Concert Choir.................................................. 53 Consumer Math.............................................. 37 Contemporary American Issues.................... 32 Contemporary Bestsellers.............................. 29 Contemporary Crafts..................................... 47 Cooking, Gourmet.......................................... 27 Counterculture.......................................... 30, 34 Creative Book Design..................................... 48 Creative Writing.............................................. 30 Culinary, Intro to.............................................. 26 Dance Company............................................ 52 Dance, Intro to................................................ 52 Dance, PE........................................................ 52 Design 1............................................................ 48 Design, Creative Book ................................... 48 Design, Intro to................................................ 47 Digital Illustration............................................. 47 Digital Photography 1 & 2 ............................. 48 Discoveries of the Mind............................ 33, 34 DNA Science................................................... 45 Drawing & Composition, Honors Fine Arts............................................ 51 Drawing 1......................................................... 47 Drawing, Advanced....................................... 47 Drawing, Figure & Portrait, Honors Fine Arts............................................51 Drawing Foundations, Fine Arts..................... 51 Drawing, Intro to.............................................. 47 Early Childhood Education............................ 26 Economics, AP................................................ 32 Economics, Honors......................................... 32 ELL, Academic Literacy................................. 31 ELL, Algebra 2.................................................. 31 ELL, Biology....................................................... 31 ELL, Civics......................................................... 31 ELL, English, Advanced.................................. 30 ELL, English, Beginner...................................... 30 ELL, English, Intermediate............................... 30 ELL, Integrated Mathematics 1 & 2.............. 31 ELL, Integrated Science................................. 31 ELL, Life Science.............................................. 31 ELL, Modern World History.............................. 31 ELL, Physical Science...................................... 31 ELL, Pre-Algebra 1........................................... 30 ELL, Reading.................................................... 30

ELL, United States History................................ 31 Engineering, Intro to....................................... 27 Engineering Graphics, Intro, Intermediate, Advanced.................................................... 27 English 1............................................................ 11 English 1 Honors............................................... 11 English 2 & 3..................................................... 28 English 2 & 3, Honors....................................... 28 English Language, AP..................................... 28 English Literature, AP....................................... 29 Environmental Science, AP/UConn.............. 43 Environmental Science, Intro to AP/UConn........................................ 43 European History, AP...................................... 33 Explorations in Art............................................ 47 Explorations in Painting................................... 47 Fine Arts Color Theory & Painting 1............... 51 Fine Arts Drawing Foundations...................... 51 Fine Arts, 3-Dimensional Design..................... 51 Fire Service, Intro to......................................... 34 Foods, Unified.................................................. 26 Forensic Science............................................. 45 French 1, 2, 3, 4......................................... 58, 59 French 2-3, Honors.......................................... 59 French 4, Honors.............................................. 59 French Global Culture, UConn ECE.............. 59 Functions & Trigonometry............................... 36 Fundamentals of Vocal Technique............... 53 Genocide........................................................ 33 Geometry......................................................... 36 Geometry, Plane............................................. 36 Global Studies & Citizenship.......................... 32 Global Studies & Citizenship, Honors............ 32 Going Green................................................... 43 Gourmet Cooking........................................... 27 Graphics, Unified............................................. 48 Graphic Design 1 & 2..................................... 48 Greek, Ancient 1, 2, 3..................................... 59 Greek, Ancient, 4 Honors............................... 59 Guitar, Beginning & Intermediate................. 54 Health Education............................................ 12

Brieonna Gagnon, 12, Norwich, Newspaper and Masking Tape, Sculpture

63


INDEX CONTINUED

Lauryn Bellinger, 12, Taftville, Linocut, Fine Arts Printmaking

64

Herstory: Intro to Women’s Studies................ 33 Hip-Hop 1 & 2.................................................. 52 History & Foundations of Mathematics........ 37 Honors Accounting......................................... 25 Honors Algebra 1........................................... 12 Honors Algebra 2 & Trigonometry................. 36 Honors American Sign Language 4.............. 57 Honors Anatomy & Physiology...................... 44 Honors Ancient Greek 4................................. 59 Honors Arabic 4............................................... 58 Honors Astronomy........................................... 44 Honors Biology................................................. 42 Honors Computer Science 2......................... 37 Honors Economics.......................................... 32 Honors English 1............................................... 11 Honors English 2 & 3........................................ 28 Honors Fine Arts Drawing & Composition.... 51 Honors Fine Arts Figure & Portrait Drawing........................................... 51 Honors Fine Arts Painting 2............................. 51 Honors Fine Arts Printmaking.......................... 51 Honors French 1 & 2........................................ 58 Honors French 2, 3, 4....................................... 59 Honors Global Studies & Citizenship............. 32 Honors Integrated Science............................ 11 Honors Independent Research..................... 45 Honors Intro to Calculus................................. 37 Honors Italian 4 & 5......................................... 60 Honors Latin 3 & 4........................................... 60 Honors Marine Biology.................................... 43 Honors Modern World History........................ 11 Honors Plane Geometry................................. 11 Honors Precalculus.......................................... 37 Honors Spanish 1, 2, 3, 4................................. 61 Honors Spanish Conversation 4..................... 61 Honors Spanish Literature 4............................ 61 Human Concerns in Literature...................... 29 Integrated Math 1........................................... 12 Integrated Math 2........................................... 36 Integrated Science......................................... 11 Intermediate Engineering Graphics............. 27 Intermediate Guitar........................................ 54 Intermediate Piano......................................... 54 Intermediate Wood Technology................... 28 International Cuisines..................................... 26 Intro to Bakeshop............................................ 26 Intro to UConn Chemistry............................... 42 Intro to Clay..................................................... 49 Intro to Culinary............................................... 26

Intro to Dance................................................. 52 Intro to Design................................................. 47 Intro to Drawing............................................... 47 Intro to Engineering........................................ 27 Intro to Engineering Graphics........................ 27 Intro to AP/UConn Environmental Science......................................................... 43 Intro to Film....................................................... 56 Intro to Fire Service.......................................... 34 Intro to Law...................................................... 33 Intro to Manufacturing................................... 27 Intro to Marketing........................................... 25 Intro to Oceanography, UConn................... 43 Intro to Politics.................................................. 32 Intro to Psychology......................................... 32 Intro to Teaching............................................. 26 Intro to Theater................................................ 56 Intro to Traditional Photography................... 48 Intro to Wood Technology............................. 28 Inventions & Innovators.................................. 28 Investments & Financial Leadership............. 25 Italian 1, 2, 3............................................... 59, 60 Italian 4, 5, Honors........................................... 60 Jazz 1 & 2......................................................... 52 Jazz Ensemble................................................. 54 Jewelry & Metalsmithing, Intro to, 1, 2, 3, 4... 49 Journalism.................................................. 29, 30 Keyboarding/Microsoft Word........................ 25 Kinesiology....................................................... 44 Latin 1 & 2........................................................ 60 Latin, AP........................................................... 60 Latin, Honors 3 & 4.......................................... 60 Law, Intro to..................................................... 33 Life Stages & Development........................... 26 Manufacturing, Intro to.................................. 27 Marching Band & Color Guard..................... 54 Marine Biology................................................. 43 Marine Biology, Honors................................... 43 Marketing, Intro to.......................................... 25 Mathematics, History & Foundations of....... 37 Microbes & Disease........................................ 45 Microsoft Word/Keyboarding........................ 25 Modern History................................................ 32 Modern Middle East....................................... 32 Modern World History..................................... 11 Modern Writers................................................ 29 Multicultural Literature.................................... 29 Multi-racial, Multi-cultural History, Unified..... 32 Music Technology 1, 2, 3................................ 55 Music Theory 1, AP.......................................... 55 Musical Theater Scene Study........................ 56 Myth & the Movies.......................................... 30 Navigating College Application Process..... 30 New Arrival Center......................................... 30 NFA Ambassadors........................................... 53 Oceanography, Intro to, UConn.................. 43 Orchestra......................................................... 54 P3: Philosophy, Psychology & Pop Culture............................................... 33 Painting 1 & Color Theory, Fine Arts.............. 51 Painting 2, Honors Fine Arts............................ 51 Painting, Explorations in.................................. 47 Paleontology, Prehistoric Earth..................... 44 PE Dance......................................................... 52 Percussion Ensemble...................................... 54 Personal Finance............................................. 25 Photography, Traditional & Digital................ 48 Photography, Traditional 1 & 2...................... 49 Physical Education................................... 40, 41 Physics.............................................................. 42 Physics, AP 1, 2, UConn.................................. 42 Piano, Beginning, Intermediate, & Advanced................................................. 54 Plane Geometry.............................................. 36

Politics, Intro to................................................. 32 Precalculus, Honors......................................... 37 Prehistoric Earth & Paleontology................... 44 Principles of Art................................................ 47 Printmaking, Honors Fine Arts......................... 51 Psychology, AP................................................ 33 Psychology, Intro to........................................ 32 Public Speaking............................................... 29 Recreational Boating..................................... 34 Restaurant Management.............................. 27 Robotics Engineering...................................... 28 Science Fiction................................................ 29 Sculpture.......................................................... 50 Sculpture, Advanced Digital......................... 50 Shakespeare & Modern Drama.................... 29 Sign Language 1, 2, 3, 4, American.............. 57 Sociology......................................................... 33 Spanish 1, 2, 3, 4.............................................. 61 Spanish, Honors 1, 2, 3, 4................................ 61 Spanish, Honors Conversation 4.................... 61 Spanish for Native Speakers 1 & 2................ 61 Spanish Language, AP................................... 61 Spanish, Honors Literature 4........................... 61 Sports & Entertainment Management......... 25 Sports Literature............................................... 29 Sports Science................................................. 44 Statistics............................................................ 36 Statistics, AP..................................................... 37 Tap 1 & 2.......................................................... 52 Theater, Intro to............................................... 56 Traditional Photography 1 & 2....................... 49 UConn Chemistry, Intro to.............................. 42 UConn Intro to Oceanology.......................... 43 UConn United States History.......................... 32 Unified Art......................................................... 47 Unified Drama................................................. 56 Unified Foods................................................... 26 Unified Graphics.............................................. 48 Unified Multi-racial, Multi-cultural History...... 32 Unified Zoology................................................ 44 United States History....................................... 32 United States History, UConn......................... 32 Veterinary Assistant Program......................... 44 Veterinary Science & Technology................. 44 Video Production 1 & 2.................................. 34 Wildcat Marching Band & Color Guard...... 54 Women’s Studies, Intro to: Herstory............... 33 Wood Technology, Intro, Intermediate........ 28 World History, Modern.................................... 11 Write it Right..................................................... 30 Yearbook Production..................................... 34 Yoga................................................................. 34 Zoology............................................................. 44 Zoology, Unified............................................... 44

Stephany Codner, 12, Taftville, Clay, Clay 2


Since 1854, the mission of Norwich Free Academy has been to “return to our hamlets and our homes its priceless freight of youthful minds, enriched by learning, developed by a liberal culture, refined by a study of all that is beautiful in nature and art, and prepared for the highest usefulness and the purest happiness.”

– Founder, John P. Gulliver Dedication Ceremony – 1856

Incorporated in 1854, Norwich Free Academy has always operated as a privately endowed secondary school governed by its appointed board of trustees. The campuslike atmosphere, with its unique architectural spaces, accommodates the community and helps develop creativity and exploration for students. Our independent status safeguards our traditions and has fostered innovative responses to the needs of our student population. Our rich history, distinctive traditions and independence encourage generous financial support and active participation from trustees and alumni. Our large, culturally diverse population supports rich, broad course offerings, outstanding athletic programs and numerous clubs and activities, all designed to develop the intellect, engage and employ the interest and instill a passion for learning. Academy students become productive and responsible adults. Norwich Free Academy draws strength from its independence. We balance a commitment to excellence and care for each student.

ONE YOU

ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES

A long-standing tradition at the Academy follows English grade-level terminology: ninth graders are Juniors; tenth graders are Lowers, eleventh graders are Uppers, and twelfth graders are Seniors.

For more information about NFA’s Opportunities & Choices, visit www.nfaschool.org.

Norwich Free Academy reserves the right to cancel courses with insufficient class registration. Norwich Free Academy complies with all the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Norwich Free Academy is fully accredited by the Department of Education of The State of Connecticut and the New England Association of Schools and Colleges

Front cover artwork by: Adriana Robbins, 12, Norwich, Watercolor, FA Comp. Back cover artwork by: David Fontaine, 12, Voluntown, Watercolor, FA Comp.

Together with your family and faculty, build an NFA experience that is uniquely yours – and turn your passions into a lifetime of opportunities.


OPPORTUNITY & CHOICE

NORWICH FREE ACADEMY

2017 - 2018 CATALOG

2017-18 NFA Course Catalog  

2017-18 NFA Course Catalog

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