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hroughout the course of the week students encounter and debate the same issues: Who’s going to cook dinner? What should I drink tonight? How are we getting to town? Who’s buying the next bag of Illusion? But despite the answers to these questions having a significant bearing on the enjoyment of your night, student issues get much more long-term than if you should or shouldn’t have Domino’s Cheaper Tuesday tomorrow. Last week on Kingitanga Day, Nexus was fortunate enough to interview New Zealand Labour Party leader David Shearer and hear his views on the new student loan legislation, as well as gain some insight into the life of the largely-unknown political personality. Although relative firsttimers, we Nexus editors gained some valuable experience interviewing our country’s main left-wing political voice, and it was interesting to hear his views on the issues facing the students in today’s era. Is it fair that students are entitled to a maximum of four years student allowance while they study? He doesn’t think so. A contentious issue for everyone involved and it is also one of the many changes Mr. Shearer opposes as he bids to get students on his side for the next general election in 2014. Make sure you read the Feature on David Shearer in the middle of the magazine to find out more. For those who have been too busy studying to keep up with the state of the nation, changes to the student loan scheme in 2013 involve the following: the repayment rate for loans will be increased from 10 per cent to 12 per cent for any annual earnings over $19,084; the parental income threshold for

student allowance eligibility will be frozen for four years; and four years will become the maximum amount of time one can receive the allowance. These changes will impact upon the student body across the board, and many have alluded to the fact that the new rules will discourage people getting into tertiary education altogether. Should New Zealand be discouraging its people from furthering themselves at university? Or are students in tertiary education already too reliant on the government for financial support, and has it come time to stop discriminating against students because their parents earn over the income threshold? No easy solution. Maybe students are already getting a fair deal with interest-free student loans. Possibly because Aotearoa is always compared to the bigger economic - powerhouse of Australia that we feel we are getting a raw deal. Nexus wants to hear how you guys will be affected by these changes. Send your responses to sean@nexusmag.co.nz. One point I think all students can agree upon is that Studylink for students is like what the Blues are for Auckland - an embarrassment. Don’t have a phone number if you are just going to play us Nature’s Best

Album and not answer! And when we log on we are trying to see the details of our student loan, not gain access to our Swiss bank account. Isn’t the purpose of a passphrase to be a backup in case you forget your password, not to act as a complicated second password no one can recall. Maybe Studylink should incorporate itself into Facebook so we don’t waste so much time on the Studylink website. Ironic sure, but in some crazy way it would probably work. This brings us to another lessobvious student issue - Facebook. If you are really serious about reducing your procrastination levels during the business end of A semester, it is recommended that you deactivate your Facebook account. Facebook is kind of like a recreational drug, if you don’t have it you don’t miss it, but if it’s available you spend way too much time on it. Additionally, if you haven’t joined the IPhone/Android clique yet, stay that way. Otherwise your phone will become like your laptop another means of checking Facebook and 1-day. Go hard or go home students! Kind Regards, Sean

Editorial

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Nexus Issue 11  

Nexus Magazine - Student Issues

Nexus Issue 11  

Nexus Magazine - Student Issues