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THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY (ASOPRS)

Fiftieth Anniversary Book


CONTRIBUTORS

KATHLEEN F. ARCHER, MD Archer Aesthetics Houston, Texas Past President, ASOPRS (2015)

ROGER A. DAILEY, MD, FACS Professor and Lester Jones Endowed Chair, Oregon Health Sciences University Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Division, Casey Eye Institute Portland, Oregon Past President, ASOPRS (2006)

RICHARD K. DORTZBACH, MD Professor Emeritus, University of Wisconsin Medical School Madison, Wisconsin Past President, ASOPRS (1995)

JAMES C. FLEMING, MD Chairman Emeritus, Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Eye Institute College of Medicine, University of Tennessee Memphis, Tennessee Past President, ASOPRS (2005)

JILL A. FOSTER, MD, FACS Medical Director, Plastic Surgery Ohio, Ophthalmic Surgeons and Consultants, Inc. Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology, The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio Past President, ASOPRS (2012)

TAMARA R. FOUNTAIN, MD Ophthalmology Partners, Ltd. Professor and Oculoplastics Section Chair Emeritus, Rush University Medical Center Deerfield, Illinois and Chicago, Illinois Past President, ASOPRS (2018)

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PERRY F. GARBER, MD Emeritus Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Emeritus Chief, Oculoplastic and Orbital Service, Department of Ophthalmology Long Island Jewish Medical Center Bronx, New York and New Hyde Park, New York Past President, ASOPRS (1999)

ROBERT A. GOLDBERG, MD, FACS Professor of Ophthalmology, University of California Los Angeles Chief of Orbital and Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery, Jules Stein Eye Institute Los Angeles, California Past President, ASOPRS (2016)

RUSSELL S. GONNERING, MD, MMM, FACS Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology The Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Wisconsin Past Secretary of Education, ASOPRS (1998–1999)

JOHN N. HARRINGTON, MD Co-founder, Texas Ophthalmic Plastic, Reconstructive and Orbital Surgery Associates Emeritus Clinical Professor, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, Texas Past President, ASOPRS (1996)

GERALD J. HARRIS, MD, FACS Professor of Ophthalmology, Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Wisconsin Past President, ASOPRS (2017)

MICHAEL J. HAWES, MD Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Fante Eye and Face Center Denver, Colorado Past President, ASOPRS (1998) and Past Chair, ASOPRS Foundation (1999–2004)

JAMES W. KARESH, MD, FACS Emeritus Chairman, Krieger Eye Institute, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore Subject Matter Expert, Vision Center of Excellence, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Baltimore, Maryland and Bethesda, Maryland Past President, ASOPRS (2007–2008)

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JAMES A. KATOWITZ, MD Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Director of Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and The Edwin and Fannie Gray Hall Center for Human Appearance Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Past President, ASOPRS (1997)

TISHA A. KEHN American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery St. Paul, Minnesota Executive Director, ASOPRS (2007–present)

DON O. KIKKAWA, MD, FACS Professor of Ophthalmology and Vice Chair, University of California San Diego Chief, Division of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shiley Eye Institute La Jolla, California Past President, ASOPRS (2014)

JAN W. KRONISH, MD, FACS Delray Eye Associates Clinical Associate Professor, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute Delray Beach, Florida and Miami, Florida Past President, ASOPRS (2011) and Chair, ASOPRS Foundation

SIMEON A. LAUER, MD New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai Associate Clinical Professor, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, New York Past Secretary of Education, ASOPRS (2010–2011)

BRADLEY N. LEMKE, MD Lemke Facial Surgery Clinical Professor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine Madison, Wisconsin Past President, ASOPRS (2000)

MICHAEL E. MIGLIORI, MD, FACS Professor of Surgery, Clinician Educator Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University Providence, Rhode Island Past President, ASOPRS (2013) v


KENNETH E. MORGENSTERN, MD, FACS, FAACS Morgenstern Center for Orbital and Facial Plastic Surgery, Inc. Clinical Associate Professor, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University Wayne, Pennsylvania and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Secretary of Education, ASOPRS (2018–2019)

JEFFREY A. NERAD, MD, FACS Cincinnati Eye Institute Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, Ohio Past President, ASOPRS (2010)

WILLIAM R. NUNERY, MD, FACS Oculofacial Plastic and Orbital Surgery, LLC Professor of Ophthalmology, Indiana University and University of Louisville School of Medicine Indianapolis, Indiana and Louisville, Kentucky Past President, ASOPRS (2002)

GEORGE L. PARIS, MD Emeritus Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology, Stanford University Palo Alto, California Past President, ASOPRS (1994)

DAVID M. REIFLER, MD, FACS Honorary Staff, Mercy Health St. Mary’s Hospital On-call Professor, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine Grand Rapids, Michigan Past President, ASOPRS (2004)

DANIEL P. SCHAEFER, MD, FACS Daniel P. Schaefer, M.D., P.C. Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology Assistant Clinical Professor of ENT & Head and Neck Surgery Director of Oculofacial, Orbital, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo, New York President, ASOPRS

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STUART R. SEIFF, MD, FACS Pacific Center for Oculofacial and Aesthetic Plastic Surgery California Pacific Medical Center and UCSF Medical Center Professor of Ophthalmology, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine San Francisco, California Past President, ASOPRS (2009)

JOHN W. SHORE, MD, FACS Texas Oculoplastic Consultants, Emeritus Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Dell Medical School/Wong Eye Institute Austin, Texas Past President, ASOPRS (2003)

JEREMIAH P. TAO, MD, FACS Professor of Ophthalmology, Gavin Herbert Eye Institute University of California, Irvine Irvine, California Program Chair and 50th Anniversary Task Force Chair, ASOPRS (2019)

RALPH E. WESLEY, MD Wesley & Klippenstein, PC Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Founding Director Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Vanderbilt University Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Tennessee Health Center Nashville, Tennessee and Memphis Tennessee Past President, ASOPRS (2001) and Past Chair, ASOPRS Foundation (2005–2016)

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THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY (ASOPRS) Fiftieth Anniversary Book Edited by

DAV I D M . R EI FL ER , M D, FAC S Honorary Staff, Mercy Health St. Mary’s Hospital On-call Professor, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine Grand Rapids, Michigan With forewords by

George F. Buerger Jr., MD, FACS* *Deceased Including a postscript by David G. Buerger, MD and Daniel E. Buerger, MD and

Orkan George Stasior, MD, FACS Emeritus Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology Albany College of Union University

American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. St. Paul, Minnesota 2019


Š The American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2019 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written approval of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles and reviews. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

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Dedicated to the memory of our friend, colleague, and ASOPRS leader, Dr. Robert H. Kennedy.

Fig. 1. An iconic and symbolic image from the 2007 ASOPRS spring meeting at the Coral Reef Club in Key Largo. The venue was chosen by Robert H. Kennedy who presided over and tragically passed away at this meeting.

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PREFACE The countdown to the publication of this ASOPRS fiftieth anniversary festschrift began ten years ago at an annual dinner of the Society’s advisory board. The venue was a trendy restaurant in San Francisco where modern décor and neon lights surrounded our reception space for cocktails that preceded dinner. When all of us were seated and dining that evening, the 2009 ASOPRS president, Stuart Seiff, addressed the guests and commented about the Society’s history, its fortieth-anniversary-year milestone, and the manner in which we had celebrated the Society’s twenty-fifth anniversary. Stu turned to me and announced that he was looking forward to my editorship of a fiftieth anniversary book in 2019, a role I had fulfilled in 1994 for the Society’s twenty-fifth anniversary. That earlier project was initiated by Richard Carroll who passed it along to me at the suggestion of the 1993 ASOPRS president, Albert Hornblass. Bernice Brown served as the co-chair of our ad hoc book committee. At that time, I had just begun a two-year term as ASOPRS treasurer, and so I was responsible for collecting a member-approved assessment for the publication. Among over three hundred ASOPRS fellows, the only member who very courteously declined to pay the assessment (in an aerogram) was John Mustardé of Scotland, an ASOPRS honorary fellow and the first president of ESOPRS. The book contained reproductions of John’s photograph and figures of his surgical innovations, and so a personal, complimentary copy was sent to him. Although each of the ASOPRS presidents who immediately followed Stu indicated their general support for a fiftieth anniversary book under my editorship, no specific form or funding source was identified. General interest from the membership was uncertain and an assessment seemed unlikely. My full commitment and attention to the development and editorship of a book was temporarily delayed by life-threatening heart problems throughout 2011 from which I fully recovered. During Michael Migliori’s term as ASOPRS president in 2013, the idea for another ASOPRS book was finally presented to the Society’s membership at the annual spring meeting in Newport, Rhode Island. It was proposed that the format for the ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book would be similar to the Society’s previous publication of 1994. Later that summer, I visited the ASOPRS executive office in Minneapolis where the ASOPRS executive director, Tisha Kehn, and our administrative assistant, Amanda (Rosenberger) Macrina, helped me scan and digitize older files, and cull redundant materials from storage (“the archive”). The Society’s minutes, correspondences, and program books were put in somewhat better order, and expendable duplicates of hardcopy meeting syllabi were shipped to my office. Some time passed before the Society’s executive committee took up the matter of a fiftieth anniversary book and I moved onto to another writing project, a biography entitled, Days of Ticho (Gefen Publishing, Jerusalem, 2015). The book development agreement for the 50th Anniversary xiii


Book (signed in February 2014) contained no provisions for funding and the project was left unattended. As work finished up on the biography, I considered passing the fiftieth anniversary project along to a younger society member, much as Richard Carroll had turned the twenty-fifth anniversary project over to me years before. Even so, I continued to speak with the Society’s leaders to explore budgets, possible funding sources, and to solicit other ideas and materials. In January 2015, ASOPRS president Kathleen Archer wrote to the membership in her “President’s Newsletter” indicating that I was collecting materials for the anniversary book. Richard Dortzbach, longtime fellowship preceptor, former OPRS editor, and ASOPRS president in 1995, was among those who immediately responded with materials from a 2011 publication arising out of his fellowship training program in Madison, Wisconsin. Ralph Wesley, ASOPRS president in 2001 and chair of the ASOPRS Foundation also wrote to me and suggested that the ASOPRS Foundation would likely be interested in supporting the project. At the time, my thoughts were aimed toward a print edition with a budget of forty to fifty thousand dollars, perhaps even more. At the meeting of the ASOPRS Foundation board of trustees in November 2015, an initial request for a grant was turned down. Kathleen Archer wrote to me and described the deliberations of the ASOPRS executive committee on the matter. She noted the prevailing opinion was that many members, both old and young, would “likely be more interested in an e-book version than a hard copy.” Robert Goldberg followed Kathleen as ASOPRS president in 2016 and was likewise very supportive. Robert shared historically important correspondences with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, membership surveys about practice patterns, and important correspondence with the former executive director of the American Board of Ophthalmology. Through the sharing of these and other materials, I was kept updated on proposals regarding a certificate of focused expertise in oculofacial plastic surgery. The historical backdrop for this particular odyssey is described in Chapter 1, indeed a long and still developing story. A major step forward for both format and funding issues for this publication occurred in 2017, when John Nguyen was appointed to the archives committee by ASOPRS president Gerald Harris. John had very good technological insights and, together with Tisha Kehn, we explored a costsaving digital flipbook format for the book which might be more appealing to the membership. With this format and a revised budget, we again turned to the ASOPRS Foundation with a presentation at the 2017 spring meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia. The Foundation, now chaired by Roberta Gausus and with Barbara Beatty as its new executive director, informed us of the approval of funding. At the request of the Foundation and as part of the funding grant, digitization of the previous 25th Anniversary Book was also undertaken, and this was posted on the web with a link to the Society’s website. With the transfer and tracking of funds secured, attention returned to preparing content with oversight by the Society and the ASOPRS Foundation. My decision to fully retire from my practice (on my sixty-sixth birthday) freed up time to devote to the project. Three reviewers were approved: Jeremiah Tao (current ASOPRS program chair); Jan Kronish (ASOPRS past president and current ASOPRS Foundation chair); and Tisha Kehn (the Society’s executive director). Concepts and xiv


terms for web-based design work were secured, and a copy editor was recruited. Design proposals included provisions to create an index for the book which can hopefully be accomplished. Back in 1994, in the Society’s 25th Anniversary Book, an attempt was made to plumb the very origins of oculoplastic surgery. The book was co-published by the Society and the noted medical historian and bookdealer, Jeremy Norman. Although the 50th Anniversary Book is being self-published by the Society, its preparation has had the advantages of up-to-date technology with easier communications and file-sharing. Whether via the internet, by telephone, or in person, I was privileged to interact with the many past and present ASOPRS leaders and fellowship program directors whose significant contributions are detailed in the chapters and appendices of this book. I will long remember moving personal conversations: with past presidents Orkan Stasior, George Buerger, George Paris, Richard Dortzbach, John Harrington, Perry Garber, and Brad Lemke; a long telephone chat with Henry Baylis shortly before his passing; and several touching conversations with surviving families of departed Society members. There were opportunities to personally reconnect with friends and colleagues while updating my knowledge of the Society’s history. These opportunities served to offset my lessening involvement in the Society’s continuing programs and publications. This jubilee year of celebration—marked by meetings, gala events, and publications—provides wonderful forums for homecomings and reunions. Between 1985 and 2018, I had the privilege of being an active fellow of ASOPRS, ultimately serving as president in 2004. The specific timespan of my involvement in the Society somehow placed me in a position to help bring two milestone anniversary books to publication. My experience with the first book ignited a lifelong interest in medical history in general and ophthalmic history in particular. This led to several enjoyable travels connected with historical research and writings. Other life-changing opportunities presented themselves. I joined the Cogan Ophthalmic History Society making regular presentations at its meetings. I hope to discuss the historical research methods and published contents of this book at the next Cogan Society meeting, to be held in London in June 2020. A preview will be offered in a scheduled talk on these subjects during the jubilee ASOPRS meeting this October in San Francisco. My involvement with the Society’s 25th anniversary and my expanding interests in ophthalmic history led me to maintain involvement with the ASOPRS archive committee throughout most of my professional career. I will soon be stepping away from work on this committee, but new committee members and chairpersons will not be hard to find. I am very encouraged by the activities of younger members who are currently editing interviews of ASOPRS fellows recorded with high quality videography, particularly Andrea Kossler, Nicholas Mahoney, David Samimi, and Kian Eftekhari. They join more senior members who comprise the Society’s 50th anniversary task force: Jeremiah Tao (program chair and task force chair); Thomas Johnson (fall meeting cochair); Cathy Hwang (spring meeting chair); Daniel Schaefer (president), and Tamara R. Fountain (immediate past president). The results of their work will be on full display at the forthcoming symposia and planned social events this spring at the Atlantis on Paradise Island, and in the fall at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco. As chair of the archives committee, it has been a xv


pleasure to share archived information and images with all of my ASOPRS colleagues and see the heightened interest in the documentation of the Society’s history. I sincerely hope that members of ASOPRS in the future will continue to improve upon the sometimes-disorganized efforts of preserving the Society’s archives. This would be of great benefit to the Society and might help to perpetuate the Society’s tradition of published histories, perhaps every quarter- or half-century. I recently read my preface to the 25th Anniversary Book which I completed on June 15, 1994. That preface closed with the following words which still hold true: “It is my sincere hope that the histories and remembrances in this volume will be a source of enjoyment and enlightenment for the members of our Society and other interested readers... Throughout the following pages, an attempt has been made to emphasize the chain of tradition, the cumulative nature of scientific knowledge, and the collegial spirit that has characterized this professional organization since its inception. By placing the current status of our subspecialty into a historical perspective, we will hopefully gain a greater appreciation of our current and future scientific and organizational endeavors.” I am pleased that two major contributors to our Society and major contributors to that book have agreed to write the companion forewords to this book. As this preface is being completed at the beginning of Memorial Day weekend, I would like to close with remembrances of two “Alberts” of blessed memory who shaped my life, my father, Albert Reifler, and my mentor, Albert Hornblass. In these pages, one can trace the lineage of professional mentorship for just about all of the members of our Society. In each of our lives, our mentors have helped us achieve our potential and overcome our deficiencies. In the continuing chain of medical education, the members of our Society are in a position to pay this debt forward to the next generation of oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgeons. We are very lucky that we have the legacy and the continuing strength of ASOPRS to help us complete this mission. David M. Reifler, MD May 24, 2019

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to thank our Society’s presidents and executive committee members of the past several years who have supported and nurtured the idea of this ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book. Reflecting on comments which were made in the preface, I gratefully acknowledge four ASOPRS presidents in particular who guided the project’s overall development toward an electronic publication: Don Kikkawa; Kathleen Archer; Robert Goldberg; and Gerald Harris. Each of them conveyed deliberations and decisions of their executive committees in a very kind and constructive fashion. Those behind-the-scenes deliberations have hopefully made this project more appealing, accessible, and educationally valuable to our members and other interested readers. I am pleased to gratefully acknowledge archive committee member John Nguyen and ASOPRS executive director Tisha Kehn who researched matters regarding digital publication and who participated in conference calls with prospective production partners and designers. Jason Stones advised us on design issues from the earliest stages of the project through to its successful completion. I am very grateful to two past chairs of the ASOPRS Foundation—Ralph Wesley and Roberta Gausas—for revisiting requests for this project’s underwriting, even as plans for the publication format and budget continued to evolve. It is important to gratefully recognize the coordinating management efforts of Tisha Kehn and ASOPRS Foundation executive director Barbara Beatty who tracked and disbursed all of the funds which were allocated to the project. We are extremely privileged to include companion forewords in this book, one from George Buerger (deceased) and one from Orkan Stasior. David Buerger and Daniel Buerger graciously added a postscript to their father’s words while Bradley Lemke assisted in the the editing of Orkan’s comments. I gratefully acknowledge the other many contributors to this book: Jeremiah Tao for his insightful opening words (Introduction); Aaron Fay who reviewed material about the web-based ASOPRS Forum; Suzanne Freitag who provided an update on the journal, Orbit; Pete Setabutr and Brad Lemke who contributed materials about their respective fellowship programs (Chapter 1); Russell Gonnering, Simeon Lauer, and Kenneth Morgenstern who described the ongoing activities of the Society’s education committee (Chapter 2); Michael Hawes, Ralph Wesley, and Jan Kronish who contributed essays on the ASOPRS Foundation (Chapter 3); each of the ASOPRS presidents over the past quarter-century who contributed remembrances of their presidencies (Chapter 4); and the inspiring “State of Our Society and Its Future” (Chapter 5) contributed by our current ASOPRS president, Daniel Schaefer. I am grateful to surviving family members who shared memorabilia, documents, and other information which helped me to compose biographies (Chapter 6): Marylou Boynton; Marion Kazdan; Margaret Kennedy; Richard Lisman; Claudia Small; Lori Meltzer Starer; and Megan Wheeler.

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The compilation of the appendices would not have been possible without the much-appreciated assistance of Tisha Kehn and Amanda Macrina who helped me assemble, digitize, and organize many files that comprised the raw material for research and documentation: minutes; membership rosters in various forms; lists of the Society’s leaders, advisors, mentors, trainees, and award recipients; and Society bylaws. I wish to also acknowledge the kind assistance of Jenny Benjamin of the American Academy of Ophthalmology who helped me to access data from syllabi of joint programs of ASOPRS and the Academy. My secretary of twenty-three years, Wanda Bunting, handled the transcription of my personal correspondence and several fall meeting programs. I would especially like to thank Molly O’Donnell, PhD who worked so collaboratively and professionally as our copy editor, and Jason Stones, founding director of Stones Creative, who expertly developed compatible designs and layouts for this electronic publication that would be more easily applied to a follow-up print edition. I am most grateful to my wife, Karen Reifler, who reflected upon many ideas about this project and the prose in several of its sections. Together, we look forward to meetings and social events this year where we will celebrate together with many of the ASOPRS members and their families who have contributed so much to fifty years of growth and success for the Society.

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And you shall hallow the fiftieth year... It shall be a jubilee for you: each person shall return to their holding and to their family. Leviticus 25:12–13

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CONTENTS Contributors

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Preface

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Acknowledgments

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Forewords

George F. Buerger Jr. (Deceased)

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Orkan George Stasior

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Introduction

Jeremiah P. Tao

Chapter 1. The Second Quarter-Century

David M. Reifler

Chapter 2. The Education Committee

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Russell S. Gonnering, Simeon A. Lauer, and Kenneth E. Morgenstern

Chapter 3. The ASOPRS Foundation

5

59

Michael J. Hawes, Ralph E. Wesley, and Jan W. Kronish

Chapter 4. Personal Remembrances of Past Presidents

67

George L. Paris

70

Roger A. Dailey

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Richard K. Dortzbach

72

James W. Karesh

97

John N. Harrington

73

Stuart R. Seiff

101

James A. Katowitz

75

Jeffrey A. Nerad

107

Michael J. Hawes

76

Jan W. Kronish

109

Perry F. Garber

77

Jill A. Foster

112

Bradley N. Lemke

80

Michael E. Migliori

114

Ralph E. Wesley

83

Don O. Kikkawa

116

William R. Nunery

86

Kathleen F. Archer

117

John W. Shore

89

Robert A. Goldberg

120

David M. Reifler

91

Gerald J. Harris

122

James C. Fleming

94

Tamara R. Fountain

124

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Chapter 5. ASOPRS: The State of Our Society and Its Future

Daniel P. Schaefer

Chapter 6. In Memoriam

139

David M. Reifler

Appendix 1. Membership Roster and Chronology of Membership Transitions

279

David M. Reifler

Appendix 5. Annual Spring Meetings

263

David M. Reifler and Tisha A. Kehn

Appendix 4. Annual Fall Meetings

419

David M. Reifler

Appendix 6. ASOPRS–AAO Joint Symposia and Cosponsored Courses

David M. Reifler

Appendix 7. ASOPRS and ASOPRS Foundation Awards

551

ASOPRS Members and Officers

Appendix 9. Society Milestones of ASOPRS Members Deceased between 1995 and 2019

523

David M. Reifler

Appendix 8. ASOPRS Bylaws and Rules and Regulations

255

David M. Reifler and Tisha A. Kehn

Appendix 3. Fellowship Program Directors and Fellows

207

David M. Reifler and Tisha A. Kehn

Appendix 2. Officers, Senior Appointees, and Standing Committee Chairs

127

David M. Reifler

Index of Personal Names

611

Index of Subjects

631

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607

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FOREWORD FIFTY YEARS OF ASOPRS I would like to begin by reprising my applause of twenty-five years ago for the efforts of David Reifler and his collection of contributors for the publication of the ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book. I was privileged to be one of those contributors. It was an outstanding work which managed to capture the essence of our beginnings as a medical specialty and recognize the great clinicians who had the ability to devise and perfect the procedural methods that we all use every day. I am honored to be asked to write a foreword for this book which celebrates the Society’s fiftieth anniversary. In 1968–1969, I witnessed firsthand the brilliance of Byron Smith, MD during my fellowship at Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital in New York City. This is where the notion of an oculoplastics organization was first considered as the fellows would frequently gather at the end of the week to discuss the cases from the preceding week. The knowledge I obtained with Byron enabled me to devote my practice solely to the field of oculoplastic surgery for almost forty years in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ASOPRS meetings allowed the spread of information and specific types of procedures to all parts of the country. Medicine and oculoplastic surgery have changed dramatically since I first started, and I am extremely proud of the ongoing development of what we now call oculofacial plastic surgery. Despite all these changes in the landscape of medicine, the one constant that always motivated me was our ability to help patients restore and maintain their vision. This is a great thing that will never change. George F. Buerger Jr., MD

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A posthumous postscript from two loving sons: Unfortunately, our father was unable to complete this foreword before his sudden passing. His enthusiasm and devotion to oculoplastics and to all his patients was deeply infectious. Many residents who trained with him at the Eye & Ear Hospital of Pittsburgh were inspired to go on to training in ASOPRS fellowships. We remember hearing stories about the beginning of ASOPRS and going to the meetings as kids. We were present at the first official Spring meeting at Tan-Tara in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri. The entire group at these meetings always seemed like family to us.

Fig. 2. Original ASOPRS logo, a cryptic fish.

ASOPRS originated with dad and a group of friends getting together to share interesting cases. According to ASOPRS folklore, the original members gathered at Trader Vic’s in the basement of the Palmer House in Chicago during the first organized meeting to draft our bylaws. The original ASOPRS logo, a cryptic fish, was supposedly chosen when they admired a fish hanging on the wall during one of their “meetings.” The scale of the meetings has changed, but the goal of sharing oculoplastic cases and knowledge across the world, should never change. George F. Buerger, Jr., MD was certainly an inspiration to us, and we hope he will continue to be an inspiration through the fabulous Society that he and his friends managed to organize. Fig. 3. Some of the attendees at the 1974 ASOPRS fall meeting in Dallas, Texas including two founding fellows: Executive Secretary George Buerger (top row, 4th from left) and Robert Wilkins (middle row, 3rd from left)

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David G. Buerger, MD Daniel E. Buerger, MD


FOREWORD FIFTY MAGNIFICIENT YEARS Congratulations to the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery upon the occasion of our fiftieth anniversary! To have participated in the evolution from a few ophthalmologists performing eye plastic surgery to our current national and global specialty has been a great privilege. A standing ovation to our past, present, and future membership for their continuous hard work and dedication. After graduating from University of Toronto, interning at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Greenwich Village, and three years of general surgical training at nearby Bellevue Hospital, I participated in three years of ophthalmology residency training at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary where I was fortunate to assist Dr. Wendell Hughes with many of his meticulous surgical procedures. Following residency and a fellowship with Dr. Byron Smith at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in 1960, I did additional fellowship training with Dr. Hughes in ophthalmic plastic surgery at the Hempstead Hospital in Long Island. I then opened the first ophthalmic plastic surgery clinic in Upstate New York at the Albany Medical College. This practice grew to support the training of many ASOPRS fellows. When Dr. Hughes was president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology (AAOO) in 1967, it was a time of uncertainty. Otolaryngologists had recently formed a facial plastic surgery society (through a merger of two groups) that had become known as the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) and invited ophthalmologists to join them. However, Dr. Hughes agreed with those who advocated for the formation of an independent society of ophthalmologists who further specialized in performing plastic surgery. A real, unmet need was indeed proven to exist for ophthalmic plastic surgical knowledge and education. It was suggested that ASOPRS should not limit itself to the eyelids and orbit, but also be knowledgeable with head and neck anatomy and surgery. ASOPRS was thus born in 1969 and Dr. Hughes served as its first president in 1969 and 1970.

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Fig. 4. Orkan George Stasior, right, receiving a medal from Wendell Hughes for service as program chair of the first ASOPRS scientific symposium, October 2, 1970.

The first ASOPRS meeting was held at the Palmer House in Chicago in 1969, and was organizational in nature. Sixty ophthalmologists became charter members of ASOPRS at that first meeting. The second meeting of ASOPRS was a scientific meeting, and was held in 1970 at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas where I served as the first scientific program chair. I was elected to serve as the second ASOPRS president for 1971. Dr. Hughes asked me to represent ASOPRS at the AAOO, and to assume his management of the ophthalmic plastic surgery courses given at the AAOO meetings. Dr. Hughes also asked me to serve as an ASOPRS emissary to newly-forming, like-minded groups internationally. ASOPRS members actively encouraged the future organization of these groups by attending and presenting topics at their meetings. One or two internationally known oculoplastic surgeons were invited as our guests at our fall meetings. I had the privilege of traveling to fifteen countries to give invited lectures in eye plastic surgery. Within our new society, we continued discussions about the best educational methods that should be employed within ASOPRS fellowship programs for the next generation of oculoplastic surgeons. We wanted the fellows to learn all that we were capable of teaching and proceed even further to expand the frontiers of knowledge and practice. Through their professional and compassionate application of new discoveries and techniques, they would become “like us but better than us� and thus advance our new field. Guiding principles were:

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1. We are a photographic society, and the importance of before and after photographs cannot be over-emphasized. 2. The transfer of current knowledge, and the inspiration of future creativity could best be accomplished through one-on-one clinical and surgical teaching. When appropriate, the preceptor should serve as the first surgical assistant to the fellow. 3. There should be facilities available for cadaver anatomy and surgical training. 4. Each ASOPRS fellow should complete a scientific, publishable thesis as a condition for membership. Research study topics were to be discussed, encouraged, and supported. During these past fifty years, our members have worked countless hours on many working committees, to improve patient care and to expand the frontiers of oculofacial plastic surgery. We actively encouraged ocularists to develop orbital implants and prosthetics. ASOPRS took the lead in advocating for our benign essential blepharospasm patients, encouraging the development of botulinum toxin (originally called Oculinum and subsequently Botox) and providing a voice for the Benign Essential Blepharospasm Society. ASOPRS developed and supported the highlyregarded journal Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, which currently serves as a global forum on the subject. The formal expansion of the Society’s annual fall meeting to two days occurred in 2000 and allowed the program to better encompass aesthetic subjects. I offer congratulations and gratitude to David Reifler for his monumental effort involved in the organization and collection of the information for the 25th Anniversary Book and now for this ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book. I offer special thanks to my excellent fellow Bradley Lemke for assistance with these words. And again, I offer heartfelt congratulations to the continuously evolving ASOPRS. Our magical future is unlimited! Orkan George Stasior, MD, FACS, FRCO

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INTRODUCTION Jeremiah P. Tao As the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) celebrates the golden jubilee of its founding, it is appropriate to reflect upon the history of the Society and the subspecialty it represents. Ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery (OPRS) is among the most highly subspecialized surgical fields. One might assume that the field is narrow in scope and that it is a newcomer in the house of medicine. In fact, OPRS has one of the widest spectrums of conditions and treatments. While the subspecialty includes some of the most modern advances— targeted molecular therapies, laser surgery, and high-resolution 3-D neuroimaging, to name a few—some of the surgeries in this field are among the oldest. The first operation in the history of all surgery may have been trepanation, with archeological evidence dating from prehistoric times. While these procedures, in which holes were drilled or scraped into the skull to expose dura, may be viewed as sordid and primeval, they could also be viewed as precursors of some of today’s orbital surgeries. After all, orbital decompression puts a hole in the skull and could arguably be a type of trepanation. Lacrimal surgery, a core area in OPRS, finds its place on the list of the first recorded surgeries. The Code of Hammurabi of ancient Mesopotamia, one of the oldest deciphered writings, provides evidence of tear drainage surgeries performed almost four thousand years ago. Almost two thousand years ago, the work De Medicina, by encyclopedist Aulus Cornelius Celsus, included a description of opening the tear sac from an endonasal approach using a hot wire, an early version of endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy. Celsus also described skin flaps and other eyelid tightening surgeries and even procedures recognizable today as blepharoplasty. In sum, many of our procedures were in existence long before there was an ASOPRS organization. We actually have a longer history than the Society’s 50th Anniversary would suggest. We stand on the shoulders of our forebearers. Of course, we should take pride in our recent history as well. The formation and activity of ASOPRS has greatly furthered our surgical specialization and has helped to advance surgery and medicine generally. For example, in the course of refining their techniques, ASOPRS members devised fundamental surgeries for eyelid ptosis, eyelid malposition, orbitofacial reconstruction, and facial aesthetics that today are used around the world by surgeons across many specialties. Also, ASOPRS members were early adopters of neurotoxin injections. From these beginnings in managing blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm, an ever-growing list of indications has emerged, including migraines, bladder incontinence, sweaty feet, and even depression, not to mention the

1


Karen Revere Christiana Munroe Jason Lewis Aida Bounama

Sarah Jacobs

Harsha Reddy

Michael Chappell

Solomon Shaftel

Jane Olver

Denise Garcia

Sterling Baker

William Katowitz

Ronald Dei Cas

Lawrence Handler

Elsa Raskin

Michael Johnson

Steven Covici

Emily Li Jeffrey Goldstein

Kenneth Cahill

Scott Goldstein

Femida Kherani

Christopher Chambers

Jack Rootman

Wade Erb

David Kamin

Alan Lessner

Julie Woodward

Daniel Straka

Van Ann Tran

R

Lance Bodily

James Katowitz

Jennifer Sivak-Calcott

Robert Hill

Montague Rubin

Kevin Michels

Chad Bingham

Laura Gadzala

Jon Berlie

Adam Scheiner

Kyle Godfrey

Thomas Kropp

Murray Meltzer

Richard Chavis

Katherine Lane

Jeremy Tan

Ashley Campbell

Kenneth Piest

Robert Goldberg

Maryam Nazemzadeh

Carisa Petris

Michael Welsh

William Stewart Janet Neigel

Yasmin Shayesteh Chambers

Sandy Zhang-Nunes

Donald Hollsten

James Orcutt

Jean-Paul Abboud

Joanne Low

Peter Fries

Geoffrey Rose

Jamie Schaefer

Katrinka Heher Michael Kazim

Susan Tucker

Manoj Thakker Arash Ahmadi

Jill Foster

Jordan Hollsten

John Wright

Vivian Schiedler

Marsha Kavanagh

Moorfields

Paul Proffer Kenneth Morgenstern

John Kennerdell Edsel Ing Erik Happ Sriram Sonty

James Rush

Kurt Guelzow

Thomas Spoor

Howard Krauss Walter Hartel

Stephen Byars

Bradley Schwartz

Patrick Sibony

Roger Turbin

Tariq Bhatti

Savannah Baril

Mohamed El Hoshy

Kenya Gentle

Thomas Gardner

J. Scott Kortvelesy

Chris Haggerty

Louis Mark Sang Hong

Nicholas Schmitt

Carl Rosen

Nicholas Monsul

Floyd Warren

Joel Leibsohn

Charlotte Thompson

Edward Baron Frank Meronk

Charles Beyer-Machule

Mark Malton

Angela Kim

Patrick Tiedeken Arthur Perry

Charles Iliff

James Garrity

Rattehalli Sudesh

Jorge Kattah

Kimberley Cockerham

Russell Edwards Todd Goodglick

Brett Kotlus Mikel Lo

W. Jackson Iliff

Jeffrey Popp Nicholas Iliff

James Adams Mahsa Sohrab

Man Kim

Sarah DeParis

Kasra Eliasieh

Michael Grant

Peter Wong Albert York

Nicholas Mahoney

Mami Iwamoto

Allan Wulc

John Koo

Forrest Ellis

Emily McCartney

John Chang

Jeffrey Edelstein

Shannath Merbs S. Tonya Stefko

George Paris

Todd Beyer Nick Ranson

Dan Garibaldi

John Snead

Thomas Mather Joseph Ross

Man Kim

Jay Older David Kahanic

George Salloum

Alan Oester, Jr

Carrie Morris

Marcus Marcet

Mark Nicholas Uzcategui

Frank Baloh

Margaret E. Phillips

Maziar Bidar

L. Neal Freeman

James Ahn

Perry Waggoner

Brian Fowler

Scott C

Eva Hewes James Fleming

Tara Goecks

Harry Marshak

Byron Chong Joel Meyers

Helena Frank

Eugene Smith, Jr

Andrew Meador

S Brett Davies

John Stabel Bernice Brown

Todd Engen

Eric Hink

T. David Wilkes

H. Jane Kim

Emily Bratton

Donald Hudak

Charles Rice

Glen Brindley

Steven Mellul Marco Gallon

Mithra Gonzalez

Brenda Edmondson Richard Whitten

Marcos Doxanas

Paul Brannan

Natalie Homer Adolfo Morales

David Ashraf

Viraj Mehta

Richard Collin

Vikram Durairaj

Fabrice Serra Evan Kalin-Hajdu Drew Dillman

Caroline Halbach Thomas Hoyle III

Christopher Debacker

Talmage Broadbent

Craig Davis

Thomas Copperman Ron Pelton

Robi Maamari

Francis Grumbine

Elizabeth Bradley

Daniel Lin

Robert Dryden

Krishna Kalyam

Chris Thiagarajah

Michael Neimkin

Brooks Crawford

Yasaman Mohadjer

Kathy Flanagan

James Patrinely Patrick Flaharty

Priya Sahu

Bhupendra Patel

Rodney Rue

Kevin Kalwerisky

David Jordan

David EE Holck

John Burroughs

Preeti Thyparampil

John Holds

Joseph Giacommeti

James Gigantelli

Stuart Goldberg Reza Vagefi

Robert Scharf

Nancy Tucker

William Gillum

Adam Sweeney

William Lipham

Steven Dresner

Dan Georgescu

Adam Weber

George Escaravage,. Jr

John Bullock

Jeffrey Nerad

Seong Lee

Dan Sines

Michael Worley

Jed Poll

Angela Dolmetsch

Kian Eftekhari

Grant Moore

Howard Beale

Martin Hatt

Richard Conlon

Hatem Tawfik

John McCann

Caroline Vargason

Peter Levin

Ilya Leyngold

John Harrington Jim Edwards

Robert Peralta

Francois Codere

Thaddeus Nowinski

Jill Melicher-Larson

Gregg Gayre

Jonathan Pargament

Lynette Watkins

Lyndon Lee

Samuel Baharestani

Bryce Radmall

Elsa Palkovacs

Brittany Simmons

Meredith Baker

James MacNeill

Richard Anderson

Guillermo Salcedo

Kira Segal

John McVey

David Tse

John Sullivan

Brian Lee

Cassandra B. Onofrey Daniel Rubinstein

Richard Muchnik

Adam Hassan

Melissa Meldrum-Aaberg

Richard Allen

Harinderpal Chahal

John Harvey

Maria Choudhary

Adam de la Garza Blake Fausett

Rachel Sobel

Conley Call

David Magnante

Robert Waller

Bettina Meekins Holly Barbour

W. Jordan Piluek Emma McDonnel

Carol Knight

Donald Faucett

Emily Charlson

Jenny Hong

Nickisa Hodgson Jessica Chang

Timothy McCulley

Christine Bokman

William Bearden

Michael K. Yoon

Ronald Warwar

J. Earl Rathbun Robert Waler

Margaret Pfeiffer

Michael Yen

Christopher Debacker

Katie Topping

Helen Merritt

Valerie Vick

David Pratt

Jeffrey Zuravleff

Wesley Brundridge

Victor Liou

Thomas Hwang Daniel Jenkins

Harry Marshak Steven Couch

John Hunts

Amy Fowler

George Bartley

David Samimi

Paul Langer

Dimitrios Sismanis

Larissa Habib Laura Phan

Srinivas Iyengar

Gabriella Espinoza Jonathan Dutton

Jeffrey White Trey Pegram

Barry Fuller

Lewis Lauring

Alan McInnes

Adam Buchanan

Robert Kersten

Hans Heymann

Karen Chapman

Robert Pashby Melanie Erb

Tiffany Kent William McLeish

Lisa Mihora

Jonathan Lowry

James Langham

Richard Divine Gary Weinstein

Marie Somogyi

Seyda Ugurlu

Molly Fuller

Dustin Heringer

Ray Dixon

Sophi Liao

Leslie Neems

Elizabeth Echalier

John Merriam

David Remigio

Juan Ayala

Zakeya Al-Sadah

Keith Carter

Lowell Schoengarth

Catherine Choi Wendy Lee

Junhee Lee

Randy Karger

Richard Bensinger César Briseño

Kevin Scott

Mark Alford

Devron Char

Steve Gilberg

Michael Murphy

Shannon Joseph

Sophie Liao

John Linberg

Timothy Malone

Alice Song

Hakan Demirci Andrea Kossler Marcus Ko

Chad Zatezalo

Benjamin Erickson

Nathan Blessing

Dane Slentz Carl Minatoya

Monica Dweck

Kenneth Krantz

Chrisfouad Alabiad

Joseph Noreika

Dale Meyer Stephen Laquis

Kambiz Parsa

Andrew Rong

Christine Nelson

Matheson Harris

Thomas Johnson

John Langford Michelle Latting

Edward Yavitz

Albert Dalcanto

Warren Chang

Joe Arterberry

Sarit Patel David Frehlich

Sara Wester

Kenneth Vestal

David Leventer

Delyse Buus

Andrew Markovitz

Natan Kahn

Jennifer Hui

Ira Vidor

Erin Shriver

Arthur Grove, Jr

Brian Tse Ann Neff

William White

Charles Stephenson

Marlon Maus

Eric Stillman

Francis Shotton

Charles Jones

Bernice Brown

Christopher Stephenson

Jose Zubero

Rand Rodgers Howard Reitman

R. Bruce Ramsey Charles Leone, Jr

Richard Palu Craig Geist

Grace Lee

Monte Holland

Dylan Yu

Daniel Lefebvre

Robert Wilkins

Arthur Glover

Lora Dagi Glass

Steven Leibowitz

Fay Millet

Victoria Starks Samuel Strickland

Jemshed Khan John Mandeville

Natalie Wolkow

Crow Bea

Lisa Mansueto

Roger Kohn Stuart Farris

Bartley Frueh

Clifton Slade

Andrew Goldbaum Morris Hartstein

Suzanne Freitag

Kevin Beadles

Martti Liesmaa Donald Jansen Douglas Felt

Milorad Milic

Ross Benger

Saebert Chamikles Edwin Augustat

James Kapustiak

Robert Deitch, Jr Michael Callahan

Thomas Bersani

Paul Dubbs Earl Nelson

Scott Hobson Michel Belliveau

Sonul Mehta

Albert Wu

Kim Jebodhsingh

Ahsen Hussain

Jack Pincus Thomas Naugle, Jr

Kamel Itani

Noelene Pang

Bentley Skibell

Howard Beale Frederick Mausolf

James Oestreicher

David Bishop Mont Cartwright

Thomas Campbell David Callister

Angela Perry

Joseph Amdur Luis Perez

Asa Morton III

Richard Dortzbach Angel Terrero

Robert Fante

Robert Beckoven

Amjad Ahmad

Edward Wladis

Francis Sutula Christina Choe

Randy Mauffrey Valerie Chen

Charles Su

Michael Hawes

Lauren Eckstein

Michael Rothschild

Russell Gonnering

Nicole Langelier

Frank McGehee

Joseph Shovlin Kurt Hahn

Donald McKerricher Rene Altarirano

Donald Chisolm Thomas McKenzie

Roberta Gausas

William Grant George Speakman

M. Subrahmanyam

Robert Copeland Karl Aijian

David Segrest Garrison Wier

Phillip Radke

Tal Rubinstein

Daniel Repp

John McGetrick Henry Lee

Audrey Ahuero

Bryan Winn

Sang Oh Karim Punja

Bobby Korn

Katherine Whipple

Daniel Ozzello

Christine Annunziata

Bradford Lee

David Lyon

Michael McCracken

Deborah Sherman Joseph Shovlin Courtney Kauh

Leslie Wei

Nir Seider

Nicholas Ramey

Joseph Wahl Sara Kaltreider

Anais Carniciu Alon Kahana

Carl Schmidt Gregory Griepentrog

Hanho Shin Suzanne van Landingham

Marcos Cunha Mark Lucarelli

G. Chandra Sekhar Steen Peterson Gregory Vaughn

Renzo Zaldivar Dong Jun Park

Larry Calkins

Jorma Castren

Jan Kronish

Lilangi Ediriwickrema

Ramzi Alameddine

Don Kikkawa

Nancy Kim

John Bond

Victor Elner

George Stasior

Jaclyn Gurwin

James Robinson, Jr

Bryan Sires Audrey Ko

Patrick Yang Zvi Gur

Richard Angrist

Nursen Ariturk

John Woog

Fig. 5. ASOPRS fellowship-training genealogy tree from Nabavi C., Tao J. “The American Oculoplastic Surgery Family Tree,” to be presented at the ASOPRS 50th Fall Scientific Symposium, San Francisco, CA, October 10‒11, 2019.

2

Alls Calla


Warren Stout

Herbert Glatt Don Ellis

Zachary Klett

Eric Cole

Howard Conn

William Stewart

John Pak David Tenzel Fred Bodker

Roshni Ranjit-Reeves

William Stiles

Anna Ginter Krishna Patel

Marc Shields

Nicole Langelier

Michael Richard

William Nevins Kiran Sajja Chau Pham

Randall Pham

Ted Wojno

Ameet Goyal Jenny Hunnewell

Vinay Aakalu

Raf Ghabrial Erin Holloman

Vincente Alcarez

Pete Setabutr

Peter Sneed Michael Landa

David Singer Noel Saks John Yassin

James Milite

Philip Custer

Albert Cytryn Gerald Cullen

John Koh

Earl Kidwell

Scott Jones

William Fein Peter Rogers

David Buerger

Leslie Sims

John Schietroma

Kenneth Feldman

Arthur Schaefer

Rayna Piskova Jacqueline Carrasco

Mark Weiner

Eric Hamill

James Boynton Orkan Stasior

Mark Hatton

Eli Chang

Gideon Schneck

Howard Bruckner

Patrick Boulos Michael Burnstine

David Saunders

Parag Gandhi

Aaron Fay

Samuel Gallo

Mark Brown

Alison Huggins

Daniel Elizondo

Murray Christianson

Ivan Vrcek

Eva Chou

Natalie Stanciu

Sean Blaydon

Edward Liva John Martin Alex On

David Jones Robert Penne

Stephen Conway Robert Mondshine

Malena Amato

Sara Reggie

Andrea Hass

Roderick Hargrove

Dennis Galbraith

Omar Ozgur

Narieman Nik

well ard

ston ahan

William Offutt, IV

Aimee Lam

Joshua Ford

David Gay

Steven Winkler

Jim Putnam

Tamara Fountain

Douglas Rampona

Evan Black

Javier Servat

Eric Baylin

Timothy Ekhlassi

Francisco Castillo

Austin Pharo

Francesca Nesi-Eloff

Chet Reistad

Jackson Lever

Anne Barmettler

Kathryn Winkler

Cesar Sierra

John Siddens

Steven Chen

Robert Beaulieu Dianne Schlachter

Allen Putterman

Ryan Scruggs

Donald Bergin

Harvey Cole, III

Edward Bedrossian, Jr

Christopher Compton

Andrew Eiseman

Steven Gilbard Roxana Fu

Ralph Wesley

Charles Campbell, III Bita Esmaeli

Nadia Kazim

Stephen Bosniak

Matthew Hammons

John Finlay

Brian Bazzo

Thomas Naugle

Peter Timoney

Yasir Al Sadhan

Marc Hirschbein

David Nelson

Federico Serrano Elizabeth Maher

Michael Mercandetti

Kimberly Klippenstein

Rutheva Moore

Mustapha Shayegan

Robert Small

Lawrence Katzen

Seanna Grob Sanja Cypen

Yunxiang (Catherine) Liu

Hala Ali Nassim

Matthew Sniegowski

Alfred Marrone

Steven Fagien

James Karesh

Frank Nesi

Mark Ruchman

LeRoy Gray

Ted Rosenstock

Mark Prendes

Fred Schwarsze

Marc Yonkers

Richard Burgett

Jeremiah Tao Stephen Laquis

John Simonton

James Sanderson

Kevin Tomasko

Kelly Everman

Sukjit Johl Robert Weiss

William Bigham

Terry Ryan

Donald Cerise

Thomas Kandl

Kullheshtra

James Moses

Maria Kirzhner John Negrey, Jr Carolee Cutler-Peck Bryan Arthurs

J. Wynn Jacobs

Stephen Soll

Richard Petrelli

Ignatius Hneleski, III

Peter Ballen

Edward Bedrossian

Elliot Korn

William Vickers

Paul Johnson

Donald MacDonald Kenneth Kesty

Tarek El-Sawy

David Soll Elaine Shulman

Jane Olson

Mark Cepela

Kendra Clemons Hui Bae Harold Lee

Steven Conway Ronald Kristan

Vladimir Kratky

Richard Weise

Sumit Sitole

Ronald Martin

John Shore

Stephen Bosniak

Steve Mishkin

Mark Weiner Michael Migliori

Bradley Lemke

k Berkowitz

Toan Truong

M. Cristina Moyer

Brent Murphy

Jean-Claude Pilet

Geva Mannor

Arthur Grove, Jr

Gil Epstein

Ioannnis Glavas Cat Burkat

Richard Tenzel Lauren Gavaris

Grant Heinz Sheri Demartelaere

Patrick Tiedeken

Philip Silverstone

John Rose, Jr

Simeon Lauer

John Ng

John Lee

Daniel McLachlan

Robert White, Jr

Paul Rosenberg

Darrell Wolfley

Perry Garber

Ana Victoria

Arthur Millman

Christopher Westfall

John Fezza Steven Gilbard

Briggs Cook, Jr

Eugene Wiggs

Rakesh Patel

Todd Sheppler

Danny Kim

Perry Garber

Richard Lisman

Corin

Thomas Cherubini

Jack Chalfin

Daniel Schaefer

John Bortz

Bruce Becker

J. Timothy Heffernan

David Fett

Kenneth Hyde

Guy Kezirian

Lawrence Quist

Jan Berlin

Jurij Bilyk Gordon MIller

Bryan Arthurs

Kristin Tarbet

Pierre Guibor

Frank Buffam

James Chelnis Peter McIntosh

Kathleen Duerksen

Bernd Silver

Rob Bernardino

Peter Rubin

Dawn De Castro

Robert Della Rocca

John Van Gemert

John Burns Frank Christensen

Mica Bergman Michael Connor

John Nguyen Cari Lyle Gary Aguilar

Joseph Mauriello John Nassif

Janet Roen

Charles Leone, Jr

Robert Rubenzik

Nariman Boyle

John Choi James Kirszrot Omaya Youssef

Nicholas Barna

Elizabeth Maher William Mokracek

Abraham Gomez Hernandez

Geoffrey Gladstone

Calliope Allen

Lopa Gupta

William Mack

Glenn Jelks

Nattapol Pokawattana Lily Koo-Lin

David Turock

Mark Levine

Roger Bassin Kristine Lo

George Alter

David Nelson

Donald MacDonald

Eyrup Yilsnaz

Hassan Shah

Philip Silverstone

David Larned

Timothy Doucet John Huneke Don Liu

Gary Raflo

Gerald Harris Bryan Arthurs

Ernst Nicolitz

Herbert Greenwald, Jr

Robert Mazzoli

Virgina Lubkin

James Dickson

Orkan Stasior

Clinton McCord, Jr

Beth Brinker

Paul Gavaris

Robert Wilkins

Stephen Sameshima Daniel Coden

Barry Smith

Irina Koreen Joseph Eviatar Brian Biesman Kip Dolphin John Nassif

Marc Werner Beth Maher

Guy Massry

Richard Carroll

Mark Duffy

Nicholas Barna William Byrd

Daniel Ebroon

Mark Weiner Dennis Tibble

Mitchel Lautenberg

Leslie Sims Dwight Kulwin

Eric Nelson

John Koh James Merritt

Stacia Goldey

Reynaldo Javate James Milite

Michael Glassman Raf Ghabrial

R. Jeffrey Hofmann James Pressly

Daniel Rootman

Rona Silkiss

Mike Landa Paul Garland

David Bishop Mark Garbutt

Stuart Seiff

Brian Willoughby Paul Stallman

John Chang

Martin Kazdan

Jennifer Scruggs

Chris Zoumalan

Joseph Campbell

Gerald Hunter

Jonathan Kim

Richard Bryant

Edward Bedrossian, Jr

Jon Caster

Martin Fallor

Catherine Hwang

Dan DeAngelis Laryssa Dragan

Katherine Gold

William Hancock

Jonathan Christenbury

Hiroo Yabe

Alvin Brackup

Hampson Sisler

Gary Lelli Craig Berris

Mary Mckinstry

Susan Carter Philip Choo

Andrea Tooley Alison Callahan

Michael Patipa David Weinberg

Joel Kopelman

Orin Zwick Talat Algun

Galin Spicer Rex Yannis

Laurie McCall

Sathyadeepak Ramesh

Prashanth Vallabhanath

Boaz Lissauer

Joe Campbell

Michael Groth

Angele Veloudios

Payal Patel Brian Wong

Bryan Seiff

Kevin Perman

Troy Woodman

Kurt Guelzow

N. Branson Call

Robert Goldberg

Kristen Dunbar Steven Laukaitis

Eve Moscato Harmeet Gill

Amyia Prasad John Tong

Phillip Tenzel

Louis Savar

Amiram Shapiro

Andrew Ting

Polly Purgason

Kenneth Hyde

Norman Shorr

David Isaacs

Kathleen Archer

Roger Kohn

Elysa McClintic Michael Loeffler

Bryan Arthurs

Martha Wilson

Byron Smith

Michael Ashenhurst

Jerry Lai

Miriam Dougherty Michael Gingold

Weldon Havins

Ray Noble

Peter Dolman

R. Patrick Yeatts Neil Gross

Scott Lance

Sam Goldberger

Grant Su

Rodney McCarthy Lawrence Kass

Alan Baum

George Charonis

Robert Della Rocca

Roger Newsom

Randall Beatty

Tony Tyers David Reifler

Steve Gilbard

Richard Urso

Mark Levine

Mounir Bashour

Rosalie Bair

Smith Ann Chisholm

Carl Hanig

Richard Lisman

Phil Silverstone

Carmen Guberina

Conrad Kavalec

Jan Iwata

Thomas Clark

Amin Nasr

Donald MacDonald

Henry Baylis

Regina Gilroy

Timothy Wells

Bruce Cassidy

Lowell Wilder

Gerald Hecker

Margaret Obear

Evan Sachs

Peter Odell

Joseph Flanagan

Peter Sakol

Thomas Berard

Brian Herschorn

S. Joseph Weinstock James Carty, Jr

P. Emmett Hurley

Susan Hughes Steven Pratt

John Griffiths

Christine Zolli

J. Gordon Cole

Herman Elwyn

James Hargiss

David Cowen

Sean Paul

Joshua Frankel

Albert Hornblass

Sajeev Katchuia

Stephen Baker

Linda Vu

Daniel Townsend

Leslie Sims John Yassin

David Rodrique

Alicia Carroll

David Freilich

Harry Kolodner

George Buerger, Jr

M. Douglas Gossman

Richard Apt

Neda Esmaili

Mary Bathrick

Cary Leggett

Navdeep Nijhawan

Jasmina Bajric

Raymond Reich

Nicholas Barna Daniel Barr

Imran Jivraj Catherine Durboraw

Sangeeta Logani

Chad Jackson

James Langham

William Chen

Walter Bethel

Janice Eggert

Charles Beyer-Machule Michael Rabinowitz

Mary Stefanyszyn-Woldin Charles Maris Larry Stewart

Patric Daigle

Robin Deans

John Nassif

Maximilian Padilla

Joseph Hill

Richard Apt

Norman Ahl

George Garcia

Kenneth Hyde William Nunery

Hal Maxwell

David Savar

Y. Dayall

Noberto Mancera

Benjamin Campbell Matthew Zhang Craig Vroman

Claude Warren III

Austin Gerber

Myron Tanenbaum

Charles Kim

Robert Kennedy Marvin Quickert

Gary Lissner

W. John Murrell

Todd Cook

Wendell Hughes

David Russell Robert Schwarcz

Lilly Wagner Isaiah Giese

Chaim Edelstein

Tanuj Nakra

William Meecham

Robert Axelrod

Jonathan Hoenig

Mehyar Taban

Mark Boerner

Justin Karlin Glenville March, Jr

Ron Mancini

Shu-Hong Chang

Jose Luis Tovilla

Timothy Carey

R. Toby Sutcliffe

Erin Lessner

Conrad Hamako

Jeffrey Green

Joseph Lin

John Long

Kenneth Steinsapir

Payam Morgan

Russell Neuhaus

Cynthia Boxrud

Yoash Enzer

Christopher Lo

W. Andrew Cies

Thomas Tann III

Julian Perry

Wenjing Liu

Nachum Rosen

Cameron Nabavi

Alexander Blandford Herbert Bowden, Jr

Vernon Ho Yuen Milap Mehta

Raymond Douglas

Bryan Costin

Carl Shibata

Shannon Cox

Jeffrey Jacobs

Liza Cohen

Kyle Balch

Joseph Armenia

Matthew Vicinanzo

Shivani Gupta Fatemeh Rajaii

Michael Boyle

Pimkwan Jaruampornpan

Marc Cohen

Rao Chundury

Amy Patel Yao Wang

Joan McFarland

Jordan Spindle

Craig Lewis Alan Lessner Brian Chon

Bryant Carruth

Balaji Perumal

Keshini Parbhu

Wade Brock

Tina Li

Paul Phelps Katherine Orman

Mohit Dewan Rhonda Barrett David Mills Douglas Casady Ari Abel John Wobig

David Wirta

Matthew Wilson

The American Oculoplastic Surgery Family Tree

Dale Meyer Howard Loff Roger Dailey P. Lloyd Hildebrand Grant Gilliland

Lester Jones

Rohan Verma

Scott Sigler

Diana Habrich

Jennifer Murdock

Michael Migliori

Andrew Harrison

Daniel Dale

Clifton Perry Eric Ahn

Christopher Hwang

Eric Steele Knut Eichorn-Mulligan

Douglas Marx

Behin Barahimi

Mauricio Chavez

Krista Stewart

Matthew Hauck

Edward Lee Robert Tower Stanley Saulny Scot Sullivan

Cameron B. Nabavi, MD, FACS and Jeremiah Tao, MD, FACS Names in BOLD are ASOPRS members

3


cosmetic uses. Following initial applications in ophthalmic plastic surgery, today neurotoxin use spans medical specialties from head to toe, quite literally. The ASOPRS member should also be proud to be among the most meticulous and proficient surgeons. This level of excellence comes from an ophthalmology parent specialty and microsurgical training experience, as well as the field’s approach to skills transfer. Over one hundred years ago, ophthalmologists led the call for high standards in the practice of medicine and established the very first medical specialty board. Also, in a modern era of graduate medical education focused on institutions, OPRS is one of the very few surgical specialties to preserve the time-honored apprenticeship model. This attention and recognition of mentors has led to elaborate training linkages and pedigrees within the field. This heritage was documented in a family tree format first in 2009 and again this year (Figure 1) as part of the 2019 50th Anniversary celebration. This training genealogy tree celebrates the fact that ASOPRS has never lost sight of its individual surgeons, who are the essence of this great organization. In the ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book, David Reifler focuses on people in order to capture the rich history of the Society from its founding in 1969 to the present. What follows is a comprehensive remembrance of early events and key figures that led to one of the most significant ophthalmic surgical specialty organizations in the world. While the surgical procedures are diverse and span the very old and the very new, this book is indeed an account of people—hundreds of skilled surgeons, several talented and dedicated administrative staff, and even one altruistic glassblower.

4


Chapter 1

The Second Quarter-Century David M. Reifler “The purpose of ASOPRS is to advance education, research, and the quality of clinical practice in the fields of aesthetic, plastic and reconstructive surgery specializing in the face, orbits, eyelids, and lacrimal system.” ASOPRS Mission Statement The mission statement of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) may be viewed from several historical perspectives. These include the emergence and evolution of medical specialization, scientific discoveries and technological advances, socioeconomic aspects of healthcare delivery, and a commitment to excellence and compassion in patient care. ASOPRS (hereafter also referred to as “the Society”) has reached its half-century milestone, and it is an appropriate time for Society members to celebrate accomplishments which have served to support the mission, the subspecialty, and common bonds of fellowship. As the origins of the subspecialty and the Society’s first twenty-five years were chronicled in a ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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25th Anniversary Book, this companion volume aims to document the continued growth and maturation of the Society during its second quarter-century. From historical and contemporary perspectives, the field of oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery and ophthalmology is the exemplar of medical specialization and subspecialization. The case for this extraordinary statement begins with the first academic recognition of specialization in medicine which occurred in 1812 with the appointment of an oculist-physician as Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Vienna.1 But there is more to this story, as throughout the nineteenth century clinical and pathological research became directed to specific anatomic regions and physiologic systems of the body. Freed from the shackles of classical Greek teachings, medical specialization naturally derived from a conception of disease which permitted “an intensive application to certain circumscribed problem areas.”2 This process involved more than just an accumulation of specialized factual knowledge, but also an approach to patients who were suffering from disease. The complexities of facial anatomy and the key reconstructive elements they held awaited discovery and rediscovery within modern paradigms. In the mid-nineteenth century, ophthalmologists now stood squarely at the forefront of the emerging field of plastic surgery. Scientific discoveries were reducing infections, improving diagnoses, and allowing more effective and safer medical and surgical treatments.

Fig. 6. Wendell L. Hughes, first ASOPRS president (1969-1970).

Fig. 7. Oculoplastic fellowship preceptors at the time of the founding of ASOPRS (clockwise, top to bottom. Byron C. Smith, Alston Callahan, Lester T. Jones, and Crowell Beard.

In the United States during the early twentieth century, ophthalmologists John Wheeler and Edmund Spaeth were among the founders of the American Board of Plastic Surgery. However, this was 1

 Georg Josef Beer (1763‒1821) was appointed as Professor of Ophthalmology by Emperor Francis II.

2

 Rosen G. The Specialization of Medicine with Particular Reference to Ophthalmology. New York. Froben Press, 1944 [reprint edition Arno Press, 1972], p 16.

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already several years after the establishment of the first American specialty board—the American Board of Ophthalmic Examinations, later known as the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO).3 Though ophthalmology had a separate, well-established American board, it had been closely tied to otolaryngology as a single combined specialty throughout the nineteenth century. The formal separation of the representative academies for ophthalmology and otolaryngology in 1978 confirmed an already decades-long trend toward specialization. For many decades prior to this formal separation, the combined American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology (the AAOO, established in 1896) was the shared pedagogical home for a cadre of highly talented and skilled ophthalmologists, including Wendell Hughes, Byron Smith, Crowell Beard, Alston Callahan, and Lester Jones, who taught some of the first didactic courses in ophthalmic plastic surgery. Later, along with both former students and new colleagues, they continued to teach and host symposia in various venues around the country and the world. Perhaps the most notable of these symposia were annually sponsored by the ophthalmology section of the AAOO. Yet, there seemed to be a need for an even more concentrated forum for scientific interchange.

Fig. 8. The five ASOPRS founders and the original ASOPRS logo. Top row (left to right): Margaret Obear, Robert Wilkins, and Thomas Cherubini. Bottom row (left to right): Charles Beyer-Machule, George Buerger, and logo.

Fig. 9. Report on the Palmer House Hotel approved by the Chicago Commission on Landmarks, 2005, a report which overlooked any mention of ASOPRS.

George Buerger, one of the founders of ASOPRS, traces the Society beginnings to a dinner in December 1968 at the El Cid restaurant in New York City. He would remark jokingly, “The site isn’t even marked with a plaque stating that the restaurant was the birthplace of the ASOPRS.” According to Richard Lisman, many conversations had preceded this dinner which were often held in one particular Irish pub, Donohue’s Steak House, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in close proximity to the Manhattan 3

 Shaffer RN. The History of the American Board of Ophthalmology, 1916–1991. Rochester, MN: American Board of Ophthalmology/ Johnson Printing Company, 1991. Founded in 1916, the American Board for Ophthalmic Examinations was founded in 1916; it was renamed the American Board of Ophthalmology in 1935. The American Board of Plastic Surgery was founded in 1939.

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Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital.4 Lisman shares the following anecdote, “There is no doubt Byron and his crew gathered here often as that’s what he told me about Donohue’s as the birthplace of ASOPRS over many drinks! Byron was pretty sharp discussing pubs and libations so I had no reason to doubt it, and we make it a point to point it out to applicants during interview dinners!”5

Fig. 10. Happy New Yorkers in front of Donohue’s Steak House which Byron Smith considered the “Birthplace of ASOPRS.” Richard Lisman, ASOPRS emeritus fellowship program director (left). Photo courtesy of Richard Lisman.

In Chapter 4 of the 25th Anniversary Book, Buerger describes the organizational and political landscapes for ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery which framed discussions among Byron Smith’s fellows. Buerger particularly noted how “the young whipper-snappers in New York” perceived the political stances of several senior leaders and potentially competing professional organizations. After three of Byron Smith’s fellows—three of the future founders of ASOPRS— departed Manhattan for further training experiences, organizing activities continued between them from afar. In 1969, George Buerger—along with Margaret Obear, Robert Wilkins, Thomas Cherubini, and Charles Beyer-Machule—founded ASOPRS. These founding five individuals (whom Byron Smith and others affectionately dubbed “the gang of five”) all had prior fellowship training under Byron Smith at the Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital. 4

 Rick Kogan. “Donohue’s in New York is One of the Last of Its Kind, with a Night of Steak and Cocktails and Plenty of Stories.” Chicago Tribune. November 21, 2018. https://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/ct-ae-donohues-new-york-kogan-sidewalks1125-story.html. Accessed May 24, 2019. The author of this article included historically important background information and quotes from the restaurant’s current owner, Maureen Donohue-Peters, daughter of the previous owner, Michael Donohue, and granddaughter of the tavern’s founder, Martin Donohue. The location and ambience of the restaurant are mentioned in the following excerpt: “‘I have been in this place since I was a tiny girl and started waiting tables here in 1980,’ she said. ‘My father [who died in 2000] and I worked side by side for 20 years. Every day I wake up just dying to get here.’ The place has no website but in gold letters on the front window are the words, in traditional Irish bar fashion, ‘Dining Room in Rear.’ Donohue’s is a small place at 845 Lexington Ave., between 64th and 65th Streets. It has wood-paneled walls, checkerboard tile floor, red tablecloths and black leather-like booths, only 10 of them. The bar is long and lovely, sort of in an Art Deco style. The lights are low. Authenticity abounds. In the back of the restaurant there hangs on the wall a framed menu from 1950[...].” 5

  Richard Lisman. Personal communication, May 23, 2019.

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The first official organizing meeting of ASOPRS took place the following year at the Palmer House Hotel in Chicago, Illinois, in conjunction with the annual fall meeting of the AAOO.6 Approximately sixty persons attended the ASOPRS organizing meeting, where Society bylaws were adopted, and where Wendell Hughes, former president of the AAOO, was elected ASOPRS president. Hughes continued as ASOPRS president through the following year and on October 2, 1970, he presided over the ASOPRS First Annual Scientific Symposium held at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. Orkan Stasior was the program chair for that meeting, and he describes his memories of the event in the foreword to this book. George Paris also describes his remembrances of this meeting in Chapter 4. At the Society’s business meeting that followed the scientific sessions that day, a full slate of officers was elected. The Society’s initial membership roster was comprised of a total of fifty-one ASOPRS founding and charter fellows. Certificates were distributed the following year. The annual ASOPRS scientific symposia have steadily grown, reaching registrations of around one thousand attendees in recent years.

Fig. 11. ASOPRS certificate of membership for charter fellow Jack V. Lisman. Courtesy of Richard Lisman.

6

 Bryan SA. Pioneering Specialists: A History of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. Chapter 30, “Outgrowing Meeting Facilities.” https://www.aao.org/about/history, accessed August 9, 2018. The Palmer House was a long-time favorite convention location for the AAOO Annual Meeting, but the 1969 meeting attended by 8,569 persons was the last Annual Meeting held primarily at any hotel, giving way to rotating venues such as the Las Vegas or Dallas Convention Centers.

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Fig. 12. Attendees at an early ASOPRS annual fall scientific meeting, early 1970s. Courtesy of Ira Eliasoph.

The annual symposium remains core to the Society’s figurative identity. The literal insignia and descriptors for the Society evolved over the years. ASOPRS used three successive logos during its first quarter-century which may be found in the Society’s 25th Anniversary Book.7 The advanced scope of training and practice among Society members led to a consensus among them to include the word “face” in the ASOPRS bylaws and mission statement. Many were reluctant to lengthen or even change the name of the Society, so modifications appeared in the ASOPRS bylaws, mission statement, and logo. In 1998, the ASOPRS bylaws were amended to state that ASOPRS members were specializing in the “face, orbits, eyelids, and lacrimal system.” Reflecting the revised mission statement, the term “oculofacial plastic surgery” was adopted and used in the Society’s representation of the subspecialty with institutions in the house of organized medicine, governing agencies, and the public. In 2009 the ASOPRS executive committee approved the incorporation of “OCULOFACIAL PLASTIC

SURGERY®” into the Society’s new logo.

Fig. 13. The current logo of ASOPRS adopted in 2009.

7

 Published in 1994, the ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book has recently been republished in an online format and includes membership data from the Society’s first quarter-century with multi-authored chapters and appendices.

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MEMBERSHIP GROWTH ASOPRS grew during its first quarter-century. In 1994, the Society’s 25th anniversary year, ASOPRS had a total of 330 members including twenty-two life fellows and four honorary fellows recorded in a second biennial edition of the ASOPRS membership directory. The first directory had been compiled by Chris Fleming and John Van Gemert in 1989, and it would be later updated by John Woog. In 2004, the ASOPRS membership information was first posted online in an organized fashion, although printed editions of a directory continued through 2011.

Fig. 14. Front cover of the ASOPRS 1994 membership directory.

As of May 31, 2019, the ASOPRS membership roster has grown to 869 members distributed in the following categories: 627 active fellows; 129 life fellows; 7 honorary fellows; 103 international associates (a category established in 1998); and 3 life international associates. As an indication of future growth, there are 90 candidates who are currently engaged in, or have recently graduated from, a two-year ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship or who have met criteria to have been invited to submit an ASOPRS thesis (Appendices 1 and 3).

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EDUCATION Perry Garber and John Burns described the organization of the Society’s early educational activities in the Society’s 25th Anniversary Book. Russell Gonnering, Simeon Lauer, and Kenneth Morgenstern have continued the narrative of the ASOPRS education committee in Chapter 2 of this book. Since 1992, the chair of this committee has been a member of the executive committee in the position of secretary of education. The current responsibilities of the secretary of education include: overseeing the thesis committee and several education subcommittees; written exam; oral exam; fellowship evaluation; fellowship oversight; digital image and video; faculty development; internet surgical log and coding resources; in-service exam; fellowship application review; and continuing medical education (CME), which maintains ASOPRS as a provider of CME credits for its meetings. The CME subcommittee chair, Michael Yen, oversaw the successful full ACCME accreditation of ASOPRS in 2017, which will next be subject to another review in 2019. Because of the recognized importance of continuity throughout the many branches of the education committee, a planned succession for secretary of education was established. For example, the incoming secretary of education, Reza Vagefi, is slated to succeed the current secretary of education, Kenneth Morgenstern. In the Society’s early years, fellowship matching was not connected to a matching service. For many years, ASOPRS participated with the National Residency Match Program (NRMP). Since 2013, the Society has participated with the SF Match service. Per SF Match, “the goal of The Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (OPRS) Fellowship Match is to coordinate fellowship appointments, thus relieving the pressure of uncoordinated appointments and forced early choices. The participating programs will not make any appointments until the match has been completed.” Since July 2016, fellows have reported on their training progress using a program called ASOPRS Coder that compiles data within twenty-four categories, including comparison data from multiple cohorts. ASOPRS FOUNDATION ASOPRS was founded as a non-profit educational organization in the state of Washington with a 501(c)(3) IRS designation. In 2002, soon after the establishment of the ASOPRS Foundation, the IRS approved the Society’s request to change its designation to 501(c)(6). ASOPRS’s educational mission continued, but the new designation removed certain restrictions from ASOPRS in the area of its public relations, promotion, and marketing of the membership. Finalization of this new designation was followed by a transfer of the original 501(c)3 designation to the ASOPRS Foundation (hereafter, simply “the Foundation”). The early years of the Foundation are described in Chapter 3 by the founding chair, Michael Hawes, and its subsequent growth and expanded activities under the succession of subsequent chairs—Ralph Wesley, Roberta Gausas, and Jan Kronish—are further described in that same chapter.

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OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES In its first quarter-century, the size of the executive committee expanded from five members in 1970 to its current size of nine members in 1993. It has not expanded or contracted since. The advisory board, comprised of the ten most recent past presidents, is chaired by the immediate past president who also chairs the nominating committee, one of several ASOPRS standing committees outlined in the Society bylaws. Senior appointees include the editor-in-chief of the Society’s journal, Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (hereafter referred to as “the Journal”), the American Medical Association (AMA) delegate, and the American Academy of Ophthalmology councilor. Executive committee rosters and these appointed positions are listed in Appendix 2. The ASOPRS executive committee is also responsible for the approval of fellowship program directors as described below. FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS AND DIRECTORS At the time of the founding of ASOPRS in 1969, there were only a few nationally recognized teachers who offered oculoplastics and orbital surgery fellowships, most prominently, Crowell Beard, Alston Callahan, and Byron Smith. In 1974, ASOPRS established sponsored fellowships under the supervision of the education committee, which standardized fellowship evaluations and developed examinations for graduating fellows, while each fellowship preceptor participated in the ASOPRS fellowship preceptor committee. In 1992, the education committee chair was added to the executive committee through a revision of the Society bylaws (establishing a nine-member executive committee roster that remains to this time). In 1995, ASOPRS approved one- or twoyear fellowships for foreign ophthalmologists who intended to practice abroad after the training. In the year 2008, in anticipation of future accreditation of programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the term “program director” was substituted for “preceptor,” and the term “faculty” was henceforth used in place of “associate preceptor.”8

8

 In June 2008, the ASOPRS executive committee changed the terms in the Society’s Rules and Regulations. The same changes were subsequently implemented with amendments to the Society’s bylaws.

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At the Society’s 25th anniversary milestone in 1994, there were twenty-eight ASOPRSsponsored fellowship preceptors and training programs, eighteen consisting of a one-year training experience and nine two-year programs. Twenty-two of these preceptors/program directors retired and another nine began and ended their terms during this past quarter-century. Their names are listed in Table 1. TABLE 1. E  MERITUS ASOPRS FELLOWSHIP PRECEPTORS RETIREMENTS BETWEEN 1994 AND 2018. Richard Anderson

Bartley Frueh*

Dale Meyer

George Bartley

Arthur Grove

Allen Putterman

Henry Baylis*

Albert Hornblass*

John Shore

Bernice Brown*

James Katowitz

Norman Shorr

John Bullock

Martin Kazdan*

David Soll

Robert Della Rocca

Bradley Lemke

Orkan Stasior

Richard Dortzbach

John Linberg

Robert Wilkins

Robert Dryden

Richard D. Lisman

John Wobig

Jonathan Dutton

Don Liu

John Woog

Aaron Fay

Shannath Merbs

Patrick Yeatts

Joseph Flanagan (Deceased denoted by asterisk*)

As the field of oculofacial plastic surgery grew in scope and complexity, and to further encourage meaningful research and theses, several ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship programs expanded fellowships from a one-year to a two-year training experience. On April 13, 1997, the ASOPRS executive committee decided that all ASOPRS-sponsored fellowships (with the exception of foreign fellowship programs) should be of two-years duration with a two-year phase-in to allow balancing of the even- and odd-year programs. As of July 1, 2000, all fellowships (except some foreign fellowships) had been converted to two years in duration. In 2008, the executive committee lifted restrictions on program directors participating in more than one fellowship. At the present time, four ASOPRS fellowship programs are accredited through ACGME Accreditation under the following program directors: Evan Black; Bita Esmaeli; Hui Bae Harold Lee; and Jennifer Sivak-Callcott (see the section below on “Accreditation and Certification”). Seven ASOPRS fellowship preceptors in 1994 continue as ASOPRS fellowship program directors in 2019: Richard Anderson; Gerald Harris; Jeffrey Nerad; William Nunery; Stuart Seiff; David Tse; and Ralph Wesley. These individuals are included among the list of fifty-nine domestic fellowship program directors whose names are divided between twenty-nine even-year fellowships and and thirty odd-year fellowships in Table 2.

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TABLE 2. 2019 ASOPRS DOMESTIC FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM DIRECTORS. EVEN YEARS

ODD YEARS

Evan Black, Detroit, MI

Sean Blaydon, Austin TX

Michael Burnstine, Los Angeles, CA

Elizabeth Bradley, Rochester, MN

Kenneth Cahill, Columbus, OH

Keith Carter, Iowa City, IA

Vikram Durairaj, Austin, TX

Christopher Chambers, Seattle, WA

Bita Esmaeli, Houston, TX

Roger Dailey, Portland, OR

Suzanne Freitag, Boston, MA

Raymond Douglas, Los Angeles, CA

Eric Hink, Aurora, CO

Steven Dresner, Santa Monica, CA

Marc Hirschbein, Baltimore, MD

James C. Fleming, Memphis, TN

Jonathan Hoenig, Los Angeles, CA

Robert Goldberg, Los Angeles, CA

John Holds, St. Louis, MO

Gerald Harris, Milwaukee, WI

Donald Hollsten, San Antonio, TX

Andrew Harrison, Minneapolis, MN

Thomas Johnson, Miami, FL

David Holck, San Antonio, TX

Hui Bae Harold Lee, Indianapolis, IN

Alon Kahana, Ann Arbor, MI

Gary P. Lelli, Jr., New York, NY

William Katowitz, Philadelphia, PA

Peter Levin, Palo Alto, CA

Michael Kazim, New York, NY

John Long, Birmingham, AL

Robert Kersten, San Francisco, CA

Louise Mawn, Nashville, TN

Don Kikkawa, La Jolla, CA

Christine Nelson, Ann Arbor, MI

Mark Lucarelli, Madison, WI

Jeffrey Nerad, Cincinnati, OH

Ronald Mancini, Dallas TX

Frank Nesi, Southfield, MI

Guy Massry, Los Angeles, CA

Julian Perry, Cleveland, OH

John McCann, Sandy, UT

Stuart Seiff, San Francisco, CA

Timothy McCulley, Baltimore, MD

Pete Setabutr, Chicago, IL

Navdeep Nijhawan, Toronto, Ontario

Mary Stefanyszyn-Woldin, Philadelphia, PA

William Nunery, Indianapolis, IN

David Tse, Miami, FL

Bryan Sires, Kirkland, WA

Timothy Wells, Milwaukee, WI

Jennifer Sivak-Callcott, Morgantown, WV

Ralph Wesley, Nashville, TN

Jeremiah Tao, Irvine, CA

Ted Wojno, Atlanta, GA

Edward J. Wladis, Slingerlands, NY

Michael Yen, Houston, TX

Julie Woodward, Durham, NC Michael Yoon, Boston, MA

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Fig. 15. ASOPRS-sponsored international fellowship preceptor Don Liu (second from right) and his fellow-in-training Hala Nassim (fifth from right), King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Saudi Arabia, circa 2001. Photo courtesy of Don Liu.

In 1995, ASOPRS approved the sponsorship of fellowships in oculoplastic and orbital surgery for foreign ophthalmologists who intended to practice abroad after the training. The first officially sponsored ASOPRS international fellowship program preceptor was Michael Kazim at Columbia University in New York, NY, and others followed (Table 3 and Appendix 3). Don Liu brought his ASOPRS-sponsored international fellowship program to foreign shores during his tenure at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia where he trained one of the few female oculoplastic specialists in that country. TABLE 3. ASOPRS INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM DIRECTORS. CURRENT (2019)

EMERITUS

Geoffrey Gladstone, Southfield, MI

David Holck, San Antonio, TX

Bobby Korn, San Diego, CA

Sara Kaltreider, Charlottesville, VA

Wendy Lee, Miami, FL

Michael Kazim, New York, NY Don Liu, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Stuart Seiff, San Francisco, CA John Woog, Boston, MA and Rochester, MN

In 2009, a “family tree” graphic was created representing the interconnections between generations of preceptors and fellows. This was presented as a poster at the ASOPRS 40th annual fall scientific symposium.9 At that time, there were forty active ASOPRS fellowship training programs. 9

 Nabavi C, Kotlus B, Tao J. “An American Oculoplastic Surgery Family Tree,” presented at the ASOPRS 40th Fall Scientific Symposium, San Francisco, CA, October 21‒22, 2009, program syllabus, p. 186. The authors reported on a collected database of surgeons who “had completed training (or were currently ‘in training’) in oculoplastic surgery or whose ophthalmic practices included(d) advanced oculofacial surgery and who practice(d) in the United States.” Prior to the meeting, they had identified “seventy ‘preceptors’ and 792 ‘fellowship trainees”’ who met those criteria; after receiving feedback from meeting-attendees, the cumulative totals rose to “ninety chief preceptors and 869 fellowship-trained surgeons...807 (92.8%) of whom [were] linked [by ‘training-lineage’] to three American oculoplastic surgeons: Crowell Beard, Wendell Hughes [thus including Byron Smith protégés], and Alston Callahan.”

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Interestingly, the vast majority had “genealogies” tracing to Wendell Hughes who offered the sole formal fellowship in 1940. There are currently fifty-nine two-year approved domestic ASOPRS fellowship programs and three two-year international ASOPRS fellowship programs. July 1st starting dates for these programs are divided between odd and even years (Table 1). All ASOPRS fellowship program directors and their fellows-in-training from 1994 to 2019 are listed in Appendix 3 including emeritus program directors. The tabulation of the ASOPRS-sponsored training activities for the period from 1994 to 2019 reveals a total of ninety-seven ASOPRS program directors who were active during the past quarter-century and who trained approximately 565 post-graduate ophthalmologists in oculofacial plastic and orbital surgery. In several cases when program directors have relocated, retired, or passed away, and when ASOPRS standards and criteria have been fulfilled, associate faculty have succeeded as new program directors based upon their own merit but with a continuous transition or only a brief hiatus. Appendix 3 also lists the many transitions within these “legacy” programs. Former archives committee chair Paul Gavaris fêted and memorialized emeritus program directors through video presentations that he produced and showed at the Society’s fall scientific symposia. Other tributes have appeared as live presentations, and some of these as introductory dedications to named lectures.10 Retirements of distinguished ASOPRS program directors also have been occasions for local celebrations. In 2017, for example, the Ophthalmology Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) hosted the inaugural Allen M. Putterman Oculoplastic Symposium wherein his “former fellows gathered to share their experience, knowledge, and contributions.”11

10

 Subjects of video tributes include: Crowell Beard [1994:73]; Byron Smith [1996:44]; Wendell Hughes [1999:51]; and Charles Beyer-Machule [2000:74]. The subjects of other presentations, including dedications to the Michael J. Hawes Lecture Series of the ASOPRS Foundation: Richard Tenzel [1998:60 & 2011:81]; Orkan George Stasior [2000:41]; Bernice Brown [2004:67]; Richard Dortzbach [2005:69 & 2012:110]; and Bradley Lemke [2016:33]. [Bracketed numbers indicate the presentation’s year and location in the annual fall program as listed in Appendix 4.] 11

 Pete Setabutr. “History of the Allen M. Putterman OPRS fellowship.” Personal communication, April 30, 2017.

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Fig. 16. A “White Coat Society” event. This photograph depicts the current faculty of the ASOPRS fellowship program faculty in Madison, Wisconsin, (left to right) former program director Bradley Lemke, emeritus program director Richard Dortzbach, Cat Burkat, John Rose Jr., and current fellowship program director Mark Lucarelli.

Several fellowship programs have established their own traditions. One of the most notable was the Byron Smith Study Club that included many former Byron Smith fellows and who convened annually during the AAO fall meetings during most of the first quarter-century of ASOPRS. Fellows of Alston Callahan and Crowell Beard had their own regular reunions, and these activities have certainly continued in subsequent generations. In addition to reunions and other social events, these relationships commonly formed academic collaborations and rich traditions. This is well represented in a published history of the Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service at the University of Wisconsin, which describes that institution’s “White Coat Society.”12 The founder of that program, Richard Dortzbach wrote, “Even though one graduates from the program, one is always a part of the ‘Fellowship Family’.” Like other top programs in oculoplastic surgery, Richard Dortzbach emphasized systematic anatomic studies of the ocular adnexae and the face. Bradley Lemke had been a University of Wisconsin ophthalmology resident and subsequently pursued fellowship training in Albany, New York with Orkan George Stasior, the second president of the ASOPRS. Lemke returned to Madison and, with Dortzbach, began an oculoplastic dissection course at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. In Madison, the ophthalmology department provided space and support for an orbital-facial anatomy laboratory where multiple anatomic prosections were created and stored, and where many award-winning ASOPRS fellowship theses and published

12

 Dortzbach RK. University of Wisconsin White Coat Society: A History and Honored Tradition. CN Burkat, editor. Madison, WI: self-published, 2010, 75 pages, 98 illustrations. As an added note, the transition in physician/surgeon apparel from formal black garb to white coats and smocks coincided with wide acceptance of Lister’s concepts of antisepsis. This progression was documented in Thomas Eakin’s 1889 masterpiece entitled “The Agnew Clinic” which depicted the operating theater at the University of Pennsylvania. Similarly, an 1889 photograph from the Massachusetts General Hospital archives shows surgeons in short-sleeved white coats over their street clothes. (See, Hochberg MS. “The Doctor’s White Coat: An Historical Perspective.” Virtual Mentor. 2007 Apr 1;9(4):310-4. doi: 10.1001/virtualmentor.2007.9.4.mhst1-0704, accessed July 21, 2018.)

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works were produced.13 Their annual anatomy course at the AAO later alternated with a practical course on surgical technique described as “the oldest Skills Transfer Course at the AAO” (see also below under “Joint Symposia and Courses”). Norman Shorr directed a fellowship program which produced multiple alumni-recipients of ASOPRS awards, particularly the Henry Baylis Cosmetic Surgery Award. Norman Shorr and Bradley Lemke were the first two recipients of this award in 2000 and 2001, respectively.14 John Woog was a protégé of the Madison program in Madison who became a fellowship program director, first in Boston and subsequently in Rochester, Minnesota. Woog later recalled, “Our preceptor Dick Dortzbach constantly reminded us as fellows to ‘carpe diem’. I’m not sure that we appreciated as fellows the privilege which we had of receiving a truly ‘classical’ fellowship education (which also included hours of operating-room Italian opera for which Dortz had a penchant).”15

Fig. 17. Fiftieth birthday celebrations for ASOPRS fellowship program director Vikram Durairaj at his suburban Austin, Texas home, July 2019. Durairaj (seated right and holding the ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book) was born in 1969, the year that ASOPRS was founded. Others pictured in the photograph are ASOPRS fellowship program director Sean Blaydon (seated left), and standing (left to right) Brett Davies, fellow-in-training Aliza Epstein, Emily Bratton, and fellow-in-training Natalie Homer.

13

 Bradley Lemke received the Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award in 1980. Since returning to Madison that year, sixteen academically-oriented ASOPRS awards were received by alumni of the University of Wisconsin-Madison fellowship program. These awards [and their recipients] include the following: Lester T. Jones Anatomy Award [Deborah Sherman (1994), David Lyon (1997), Don Kikkawa (2002), and Roberta Gausas (2007)]; Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award [Michael Hawes (1981), Russell Gonnering (1982), John McGetrick (1984), Jan Kronish (1989), David Lyon (1990), Don Kikkawa (1992), Mark Lucarelli (1998), and Alon Kahana (2006)]; Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [George Stasior (1991) and Deborah Sherman (1992)]; and the ASOPRS Research Award [John Woog (1986) and Victor Elner (1989)]. 14

 Alumni of the fellowship program of Norman Shorr who have received the Henry Baylis Cosmetic Surgery Award are Robert Goldberg (2003), Jonathan Hoenig (2007), and Kenneth Steinsapir (2018). In addition, former fellows of this program have received the Lester T. Jones Anatomy Award [Robert Goldberg (1995) and Julian Perry (2015)], and the Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award [Julian Perry (2000)]. 15

 John Woog. Personal communication, February 20, 2017. John whimsically concluded his email with the Latin phrase, “Tempus fugit!” (Time flies!).

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It is not uncommon for two ASOPRS fellowship program directors to concurrently work and teach in a coordinated fashion, particularly when they are located in fairly close geographic proximity, and sometimes working within a common practice or institution. The list of ASOPRS fellowship program directors and faculty over this past quarter-century (Appendix 3) reveals a reciprocal faculty relationship between several pairs of past and present fellowship program directors. Examples of such current pairings include the following: Sean Blaydon and Vikram Durairaj in Austin; Steven Dresner and Michael Burnstine in the greater Los Angeles area; Robert Goldberg and Jonathan Hoenig in the greater Los Angeles area; Gerald Harris and Timothy Wells in Milwaukee; Andrew Harrison and Elizabeth Bradley in Minneapolis and Rochester; Michael Kazim and Gary Lelli in New York City; Christine Nelson and Alon Kahana in Ann Arbor; Frank Nesi and Even Black in the greater Detroit area; William Nunery and Hui Bae Harold Lee in Indianapolis and Louisville; Stuart Seiff and Robert Kersten in San Francisco; Bryan Sires and Christopher Chambers in the greater Seattle area; David Tse and Thomas Johnson in Miami; Ralph Wesley and James C. Fleming in Nashville and Memphis; and Michael Yoon and Suzanne Freitag in Boston.

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Fig. 18. YASOPRS reception, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, October 2016

YASOPRS In 2009, an ad hoc task force to consider special needs of young ASOPRS members was organized and named the Young Physicians Task Force. ASOPRS executive secretary Tamara Fountain was named as the chair, and incoming ASOPRS member Bryan Seiff was appointed as co-chair. A reception for young members was held at the 2009 ASOPRS annual spring meeting in Laguna Nigel, California. The group became known as YASOPRS (Young ASOPRS) and the executive committee liaison and YASOPRS chair was transferred to the secretary of meetings. YASOPRS chairs or co-chairs who followed were Jasmine Mohadjer, Carrie Morris, and Catherine Hwang. In 2009, YASOPRS members and ASOPRS fellows-in-training presented a symposia of short case presentations which preceded both the Wednesday and Thursday programs at the annual fall scientific symposium. Fellows-in-training or YASOPRS members moderated these events. These symposia were named “YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases.” In 2010, the YASOPRS Eye Openers preceded only the second day of the fall symposium, but since 2011, both days have been preceded by these sessions. In 2012, the Foundation instituted the Bartley Frueh Award, awarded annually to two YASOPRS presenters (one from each morning’s session). In 2012, YASOPRS also inaugurated annual lunchtime seminars at the annual fall meetings beginning with one entitled, “How to Succeed in an Academic Environment.” In 2013, the ASOPRS executive committee revised the definition of the YASOPRS Section to be “comprised of voting members of ASOPRS who are 40 years of age or younger and/or in their first five years of membership.” ASOPRS also sponsored the attendance of YASOPRS members at the AAO Mid-Year Forum. Srinivas Iyengar was the YASOPRS representative there in 2015 when YASOPRS committee chair Catherine Hwang was invited to sit in on the ASOPRS fall executive committee meeting. In 2016, an ASOPRS bylaws amendment elevated the YASOPRS committee to a standing committee. The invitation has been continued for the YASOPRS chairs who have followed, namely Chris Chambers (2016–2017), and currently Andrea Kossler (2018–present). ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Fig. 19. Women in ASOPRS with 2016 ASOPRS president Robert Goldberg. 2016 ASOPRS 2016 annual spring meeting, Ojai, California.

WOMEN IN ASOPRS Embracing diversity and taking a lead from the organization Women in Ophthalmology (WIO), Women in ASOPRS emerged. In 1970, only two of the fifty-one members were women: founding fellow and 1972 ASOPRS president Margaret Obear and charter fellow Virginia Lubkin. The second female ASOPRS president was Bernice Brown (1990), who was also a leader in WIO.16 In 1994, eighteen members (5.5 percent) of the Society were female. Three more women have served as ASOPRS president: Jill Foster; Kathleen Archer; and Tamara Fountain, all serving recently. As of January 1, 2019, 154 (18.6 percent) of the Society’s members are female, though the percentage is higher among younger members, candidate members, and fellows-in-training. ANNUAL FALL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIA Printed programs in the ASOPRS archives might suggest that there was no specific program chair for the first annual ASOPRS fall scientific symposium in 1970, but a foreword to this book has testimonial and photographic proof (Fig. 4) that the program chair at that inaugural meeting was Orkan Stasior. As mentioned above, Wendell Hughes presided over the one-day symposium which had thirty scientific presentations and two discussion panels. A standing program committee was soon organized. According to the program, a featured guest lecture (on the afferent lacrimal system, including a projected movie) was a part of that first program. In 1974, following a bylaws amendment, the first ASOPRS program chair to take a seat on the expanded ASOPRS executive committee was Robert Dryden. Under successive chairpersons, the number of presentations at each fall scientific symposium gradually increased. For three years (1979–1982) the Society expanded this meeting to a two-day format which allowed an even greater number of 16

 Since 2004, the Bernice Z. Brown Memorial Lecture Award has been awarded to a WIO member for contributions to the profession of ophthalmology and the advancement of women in the profession.

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presentations. Various logistical factors forced the reversion to a one-day symposium (1983–1995) usually held on a Friday or Saturday.

Fig. 20. 1996 annual fall scientific meeting program book cover designed by 1996 ASOPRS program chair, David Reifler.

Fig. 21. 2017 annual fall meeting program book cover designed by Jason Stones, Sexton Printing, Inc.

At the Society’s 25th annual fall scientific symposium in 1994, the double-projection of color slides with text and photos and/or a video presentation was still the norm, and even considered “cutting edge.” In 1996, the cover art on the ASOPRS Fall Symposium Program was entitled “Spotlight on Aesthetics,” and abstractly featured a 2 x 2-inch slide illuminated in a spotlight. In the year 2000, ASOPRS returned to a two-day format for the fall symposium (Friday/Saturday). Program chair Sara Kaltreider, with the help of Robert Goldberg and Sterling Baker, emphasized aesthetics on the first day of the symposium. This manner of segregating the two days into “aesthetic” and “functional” topics carried over into subsequent years although with some variations. As published in the last twenty-five years of annual program books (1994–2018), the dates, locations, and themes of each of the ASOPRS annual scientific symposia have been listed in Appendix 4 with presentations numbered for reference. Each year, a team plans the annual fall scientific symposium. The secretary of meetings who also chairs the industry relations committee (IRC) secures a meeting venue, and coordinates exhibitors and sponsors of non-CME opportunities. The secretary of education and the education committee oversee medical education compliance. The program chair and the program committee select guest and member speakers. The thesis committee selects presentations of the very best ASOPRS theses. The awards committee selects honorees who are recognized during the program by the committee’s chair. In 1994, named awards consisted of the ASOPRS Research Award and ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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the Merrill Reeh Pathology Award. Since 1994, additional named lectures and awards have been added, including the ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award, the Henry Baylis Cosmetic Surgery Award, the ASOPRS Foundation Lecture Award (renamed as the ASOPRS Foundation Michael J. Hawes Award), the Orkan Stasior Leadership Award, the Bartley Frueh Award for Best YASOPRS Presentation, the James Katowitz Pediatric Award, and the Richard K. Dortzbach Teaching Award. Descriptions of these awards and their awardees are found in Appendix 7 and on the websites of ASOPRS and the Foundation. ANNUAL SPRING MEETINGS The ASOPRS First Annual Spring Meeting was held in Houston, Texas in May of 1973, hosted by ASOPRS presidentelect Robert Wilkins. In 1976, under president Bartley Frueh, the spring meeting included an open scientific session for the general membership. Since those early days, the ASOPRS president-elect has chosen the venue for the forthcoming annual spring meeting based upon conference facilities and idyllic surroundings for social interactions and recreational activities. A list of those venues and historical photos can be found in the 25th Anniversary Book. A list of venues and programmatic details for meetings since 1994 appears in Appendix 5. Years ago, the annual spring meeting venues and dates were first announced publicly by the president-elect at the preceding fall business meeting. This announcement is now less suspenseful; the information is made available further in advance. Postal mailings of registration materials have become obsolete in lieu of email announcements and online registrations. As with the fall scientific symposia, published registration materials for the spring meetings include program details to conform with CME guidelines. Prospective registrants can assess the educational value of their attendance along with the ancillary attractions of the venue and social programs. Fig. 22. Materials promoting spring meetings: (above) cover of the 1994 spring meeting mailing; (left) web-based image promoting the golden jubilee 2019 spring meeting.

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Initially, presentations at the annual spring meeting and their subsequent discussion periods most often focused on clinical and surgical complications. The annual spring program expanded to feature scientific presentations, practice management sessions, workshops, and speaker presentations from within and from outside the Society. A regular succession was created wherein the ASOPRS assistant program chair would organize the annual spring meeting program, and the following year (the third year), he or she would serve as ASOPRS program chair, responsible for the annual fall scientific symposium. In 2006, the executive committee further expanded registration eligibility for the spring meeting to individuals within three years after completing an ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship, but who had not yet achieved induction as an ASOPRS fellow. THE SOCIETY’S JOURNAL, OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY (OPRS) Founded in 1984 by Henry Baylis, Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (or simply, “the Journal”), has grown in prominence under a series of co-editors-in-chief Bernice Brown and Richard Dortzbach, and editors-in-chief George Bartley, Gerald Harris, and Jonathan Dutton. The tenures of each of the above individuals are summarized in Appendix 2 which contains historical lists of the Society’s officers and senior appointees. In addition to outstanding editorial leadership, the Journal’s financial success can also be ascribed to the development of an ASOPRS journal committee chaired in succession by Robert Kennedy, Neal Freeman, John Woog, Malena Amato, Joseph Mauriello, and Jennifer Sivak-Callcott.

Fig. 23. Covers of three issues of OPRS: (left) a 1994 issue still featuring the Journal’s original design and colors; (center) January 1999 issue featuring a new design, new color, and the ASOPRS logo; (right) May/June 2018 issue featuring the fully revised ASOPRS logo.

At the time of the Society’s 25th anniversary in 1994, the Journal was in its tenth year of publication with co-editors-in-chief Bernice Brown and Richard Dortzbach. Wolters Kluwer, the parent company of the Journal’s publisher Raven Press, was embarking upon a period of growth in its medical publication business, with new acquisitions reflected in the masthead and cover ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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of OPRS.17 At that time, the Journal had 1,099 paid subscriptions. The co-editors’ report to the ASOPRS executive committee reported satisfaction with the high quality of submitted articles, a low rejection rate, and an average time from receipt of manuscript to editor, then to publisher, of fifty-four days. However, over time, the number of submitted articles continued to grow, resulting in the accrual of a relatively large backlog of unpublished papers. This began to place a strain on the traditional quarterly schedule of publishing. Negotiations for a new contract with Lippincott-Raven in 1997 stalled as the publisher insisted upon additional Society financing if the number of published pages were to increase. ASOPRS president James Katowitz and president-elect Michael Hawes recognized the problems but also the opportunities. On behalf of the Society, they negotiated a new contract with the OPRS publisher which was soon to be renamed Lippincott-Williams & Wilkins (LWW). In the process, a competing presentation and bid had been received from Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. The new contract with LWW provided for a joint proprietary relationship between ASOPRS and the publisher with an equal division of the profits, an annual payment in support of the editor’s staff in addition to office expenses, and the publication of six issues per year rather than four. George Bartley was appointed as the sole editor-in-chief of OPRS in July 1998 and assisted in the office of the Mayo Clinic with managing editor Marlene (Spencer) Messinger. His first issue at the helm was published in January 1999. The cover of OPRS sported a bold new look with white lettering on a solid, forest green background, a color that has identified the Journal to this day. ASOPRS president Perry Garber introduced the transition by writing about the Journal’s history and its ownership (not just sponsorship) of OPRS by the Society.18 LWW would continue as publisher, while the editor, with his newly appointed editorial board, would retain autonomous responsibility for the Journal’s content. In accordance with the previously signed 1998 ASOPRS/ LWW agreement, the new editor instituted staggered terms of two to four years for the OPRS editorial board members. Robert Kennedy had been appointed as the chair of the ASOPRS journal committee and brought considerable expertise to the execution of business plans and the evaluation of financial performance, while maximizing advertisers and the contractual obligations of the publisher to the Society. An increased number of editorials appeared. The reader was often reminded of the virtues of remaining a student of medicine long after completing medical school and postgraduate training.19 As previously negotiated, ASOPRS received its usual fifty percent share of the Journal’s profits for that calendar year. One change in policy which was instituted for submitted manuscripts involved accepted ASOPRS theses. The Journal retained its commitment to publish ASOPRS theses in OPRS, but, beginning in 1999 the Society returned these theses to their authors rather than turning them over to the Journal. The authors were then responsible for submission to OPRS with appropriate copyright release. Shortly after George Bartley was appointed to the Mayo Clinic 17

 Reflecting publisher Wolters Kluwer’s series of acquisitions and reorganizations, OPRS has been published under a succession of imprints: Raven Press (1985‒1995); Lippincott-Raven Publishers (1995‒1998); Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (1998‒2006); Wolters Kluwer Health‒Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (2007‒2016); and Wolters Kluwer (2017–present). 18

 Garber PF. A message from the President. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 1999;15:1.

19

 Bartley GB. So far, so fun: Reflections after two years of editing OPRS (Editorial). Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2001;17:1‒3.

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board of governors, he resigned as OPRS editor; he would later assume many other leadership roles within ophthalmology.20 In a farewell editorial he opined about the challenges of adapting to the boardroom.21 Gerald Harris became the OPRS editor-in-chief in November 2001 and his first published issue at the helm was in May 2002.22 Hollis Brunner was the new managing editor and her position evolved into a full-time position. Neal Freeman was chair of the ASOPRS journal committee with John Woog and Robert Kennedy as co-chairs. A twenty-seven-member editorial board and a large number of ad hoc reviewers assisted the editor. An increased use of color images with a nominal charge to the authors enhanced the quality of information presented and was made a requirement for histopathologic images. Other innovations included the publication of a fulltext online journal commencing in December 2001 at the Journal’s website, www.op-rs.com for subscribers, and through Ovid for institutions. A new online submission and review process of papers was instituted. More efficient electronic communications and the timely responses of ad hoc reviewers contributed to a contraction of the “submission-to-initial disposition interval.” Beginning in 2004, some materials (such as tables, graphs and other data) were available only online through an ArticlePlus link in the online table of contents. This allowed print publication of more articles within the allotted pages. Annual royalties to ASOPRS increased steadily from 2000 through 2005. In 2007, a new contract between ASOPRS and Wolters Kluwer reflected the financial success and maturity of the Journal. Jonathan Dutton succeeded as OPRS editor-in-chief in 2010 with Diane Rothrock as managing editor. Several advances reflected the further impact of the internet. In the spring of 2010, the Journal instituted ‘published ahead of print’ (PAP) access, including the publication of a considerable backlog at a rate of ten papers per week. In 2011, OPRS had 792 reviewers in thirty-three countries for 1,743 review invitations. The online platform further streamlined the assignments of submissions to editors and reviewers and shortened the time of processing submissions. Page capacity increased about thirty percent, from 503 to 650 pages. A new position of associate editor on the OPRS editorial staff appeared on the title page of the Journal in its November/December 2015 issue. Bobby Korn was listed as associate editor for the OPRS website and OPRS Images. At the end of 2017, a seven-year contract was negotiated between ASOPRS and Wolters Kluwer by Jennifer Sivak-Callcott and legal counsel. Provisions included an increase in electronic pages, higher royalty revenue, and six open access articles per year free of charge. The substantial signing bonus of $70,000 more than covered legal fees. Although a new logo for ASOPRS had been adopted in 2009, the full form of the logo with the words “OCULOFACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY®” appeared for the first time on the cover of OPRS with the May/June 2018 issue. Another innovation appeared with the following issue. OPRS published two issues in July/August 2018—Nos. 4 and 4S. The latter was the Journal’s first separate 20

 Dr. Bartley’s subsequent positions include: Editor of the AAO scientific journal, Ophthalmology (2013‒2017); president of the American Ophthalmological Society (2017); and executive director of the ABO (2018‒present). 21

 Bartley GB. So you want to be a suit (Editorial). Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2002;18:91–92.

22

 Harris GJ. Past as prologue (Editorial). Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2002;18:167‒9.

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supplement issue; it contained proceedings of the Fourth International Thyroid Eye Disease Symposium (London) held on June 24–25, 2016. Members of ASOPRS have every reason to be very proud of OPRS, its dedicated and talented past and present editors, and of its ongoing contributions to the medical literature and the subspecialty. All metrics—growth in circulation, literature citations, state-of-the-art editorial operations, financial stability and profitability, a dedicated and invested Society—demonstrate that the Journal is an overwhelming success. ANOTHER JOURNAL WITH AN ASOPRS CONNECTION: ORBIT Orbit was founded as a quarterly journal in 1980 when Gabe Bleeker, chair of the provisional board of the International Society for Orbital Disorders (ISOD), came to a publishing agreement with Aeolus Press. Bleeker became the journal’s first editor-in-chief, and ISOD secretary Jan P.A. Gillissen served as managing editor. The first issue of Orbit appeared in 1982, becoming the first truly refereed periodical entirely devoted to ophthalmic plastic reconstructive and orbital surgery, three years before OPRS.23 Since its inception, Orbit moved to Informa/Taylor and Francis Publishing Company and has been the official journal of several organizations including the European Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ESOPRS), the British Oculoplastic Surgery Society (BOPSS), and the Italian Society of Oculoplastic Surgery (SICOP).24 Over the years, editors of this journal have included renowned professors Leo Koornneef, Maarten Mourits, Dion Paridaens, and David Verity. The journal’s leadership moved across the Atlantic in January 2018 when ASOPRS fellow and fellowship program director Suzanne K. Freitag became the editor-in-chief. The masthead of Orbit once included the phrase “facial plastic surgery.” Now in its thirty-ninth year of publication, the subheading on the journal’s masthead currently reads, “The International Journal on Orbital Disorders, Oculoplastic and Lacrimal Surgery.” On behalf of ASOPRS and Taylor and Francis, the journal’s editor-in-chief has recently announced discounted rates for print and online subscriptions for ASOPRS members and fellows-in-training, for the first time making a personal subscription to Orbit an affordable option. As advertized on the ASOPRS website, email notifications of publications ahead-of-print are also offered to subscribers.

23

 Reifler DM. ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book, 134–135.

24

 Susanne K. Freitag. Personal communication, July 14, 2019.

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ASOPRS & AAO As aforementioned, the founding of ASOPRS was closely connected to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), an established and much larger organization. From the outset, the ASOPRS bylaws stipulated that every ASOPRS fellow must be a fellow of the AAO (or equivalent national organization) and a diplomat of the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO). ASOPRS has continued to maintain a close educational, organizational, social, and political relationships with the AAO which globally represents 32,000 member-ophthalmologists. Including ASOPRS international associates, the ASOPRS roster of 827 members represents a mere 2.6 percent of the Academy’s membership. In a reciprocal fashion, the AAO and the remaining 97 percent of its membership benefit from the leadership and advice of ASOPRS and its members in many ways: publication of educational materials; participation in live learning opportunities, such as co-sponsorship of Joint Scientific Symposia, Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Subspecialty Days, Instructional and Skills Transfer Courses, and Breakfast with the Experts Roundtables; financial and manpower support of AAO advocacy initiatives; participation in governance through the AAO Council; preparing AAO leaders particularly through the Leadership Development Program (LDP); and supporting and often leading the Academy-supported Ophthalmic Mutual Insurance Company (OMIC). Further comments and details about these areas of participation are organized below in several subsections. Publications. The AAO has traditionally provided practical educational materials for post-graduate, comprehensive ophthalmologists, and essential resources for ophthalmology residents, medical students, and even the general public. Fifty years ago, these were limited to print publications such as the multi-authored 1961 publication Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery, by Wendell Hughes et al., in which the faculty panel consisted of future ASOPRS charter fellows.25 In this electronic age, the cooperative publishing of educational materials is transitioning to online resources as described below in the section on the Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Education Center. Since its founding in 1969, ASOPRS members have participated in a wide array of educational publications of the AAO, such as the orbit/oculoplastics section of the familiar “Basic and Clinical Science Course” (BCSC) established in the 1970s with Arthur Grove as one of the early chairs. Jill Foster chaired the 2018–2019 revision of the BCSC Orbit, Eyelids, and Lacrimal System.26 The AAO publication series, “Focal Points Clinical Modules,” was established in the early 1990s, and ASOPRS members have been the senior authors for almost one hundred issues of this series over that time in the area of oculofacial and orbital surgery.27 Other past Academy-sponsored offerings have included a CD-ROM-based Clinical Update Course on Orbit and Ophthalmic Plastic 25

 Wendell Hughes (1961 and 1964), Bernd Silver (1977), William Stewart (1984), and Michael Yen (2012).

26

 The current AAO educational subcommittee for the 2019–2020 BCBS edition of Section 7 has finally been given the green light to retitle the section as Oculofacial Plastic and Orbital Surgery [added emphasis in bold]. Members of this committee are Bobby Korn (chair), Cat Burkat, Keith Carter, Julian Perry, Pete Setabutr, Eric Steele, and Reza Vagefi. Publication of this edition is scheduled for June 2019. Recent and present ASOPRS members on the AAO BCBS self-assessment committee include Jurij Bilyk, Renzo Zaldivar, and Stephen Klapper. 27

 Representative recent Focal Point Modules include Surgical Management of Ptosis and Brow Ptosis (2017) by Richard Allen et al and Malignant Eyelid Tumors and Their Management (2018) by Richard Burgett et al.

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Surgery (2003) by Jeffrey Nerad, Keith Carter, and Robert Kersten, several monographs, and video-based CME topics. The two editions of the basic manual Surgical Anatomy of the Ocular Adnexa: A Clinical Approach were published in 1996 and 2012, respectively, by David Jordan and Richard Anderson, with Louise Mawn joining in co-authoring the latest edition. As noted above, the basic, multi-authored textbook “Surgery of the Eyelids, Lacrimal System, and Orbit” edited by Michael Yen (2012) followed a familiar format and ASOPRS-dominated contributor list, patterns which were established as the subspecialty of oculofacial plastic surgery was first emerging. ASOPRS and AAO often have a shared interest in establishing so-called Ophthalmic Technology Assessments (OTA) in the area of oculofacial, orbital, plastic, and reconstructive surgery. ASOPRS members have been involved in these assessments at all stages, from comprehensive background reviews and document drafting, to draft reviews and AAO board of trustee approvals. One of the first instances of an OTA came about in the development of defining the functional indications for, and efficacy of, upper and lower blepharoplasty.28 This published assessment was an early step in creating clearer definitions of, and distinctions between, upper blepharoplasty and ptosis repair. This subject has been addressed in subsequent iterations, and many other subjects have been added to a growing list of AAO OTAs which systematically review the best available evidence for clinical efficacy and safety of a technology and/or intervention. Areas in which emerging medical literature can identify optimal practice patterns include diverse problems such as orbital lymphoma, blepharospasm, enucleation, and orbital fractures. The current Oculoplastics and Orbital Panel of the AAO OTA Committee is comprised entirely of ASOPRS members.29 The Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Education Center. A link to this ASOPRS-AAO educational collaboration has been placed on the ASOPRS website. In an online format, the center is “a compendium of current reference outlines, to provide readily available information for the active practitioner or student of oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery. It is not meant to be an exhaustive reference source but to stimulate further study in each subject. Members of ASOPRS have produced all sections of this center.” The content is also accessible to all AAO members online through the Academy’s ONE Network. Simeon Lauer and Robert Fante started this curriculum project, and they currently continue as the editors-in-chief.

28

 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmic procedures assessment. Functional indications for upper and lower eyelid blepharoplasty. Ophthalmology 1991;98:1461-3. This document was drafted, reviewed, and revised by ASOPRS members George Bartley, John Bullock, and David Reifler. 29

 The following are the current members of the Oculoplastics and Orbit Panel of the AAO Ophthalmic Technology Assessment Committee: Louise A. Mawn, chair; Jill Foster; Suzanne Freitag; Rachel Sobel; Jeremiah Tao; Edward Wladis; Vinay Aakalu, methodologist; and ex-officio members Jurij Bilyk, Elizabeth Bradley, and Michael Yen. The panel has presented courses at the AAO Fall Meeting, including “Oculoplastics Evidence That Will Change Your Practice.”

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Joint Symposia and Courses. Until the split of the AAOO into separate ophthalmology and otolaryngology academies in 1978, educational activities for oculofacial plastic surgery, including publications, symposia, and courses, were assigned to its reconstructive surgery committee. Wendell Hughes became the first chair of this committee shortly after World War II. After the founding of ASOPRS, one of the first liaison initiatives of the ASOPRS was to coordinate the oculoplastics symposium within the AAO meeting and inaugurate the Wendell Hughes Lecture as described in Appendix 7. In addition to the Wendell Hughes Lecture committee, ASOPRS appoints the chair of a separate standing committee, the AAO-ASOPRS joint program Fig. 24. Program book cover for the first AAO-ASOPRS Subspecialty Day committee, tasked with recruiting organizers of jointly collaboration in 2010. sponsored educational offerings at the AAO fall meetings: symposia; courses; morning roundtables called “Breakfast with the Experts”; and Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Subspecialty Day. 30 During the past thirty-five years, a succession of individuals have chaired this committee: Jan Berlin (1983‒1988), John Shore (1989‒1994), Jonathan Dutton (1994‒1997), Philip Custer (1998‒2003), Dale Meyer (2004‒2009), and Eric Steele (2016‒present). Further details about these programs appear in Appendix 6. It is important to recognize that there have been a far greater number of excellent courses in oculofacial plastic surgery at the AAO fall meetings which have not been cosponsored by ASOPRS and the AAO. In these latter courses, leading ASOPRS members have been the organizers and senior instructors, and they have recruited rosters of participating instructors which are almost exclusively comprised of ASOPRS members. From an archival standpoint, a tremendously valuable supplement to the aforementioned Appendix 6 is the AAO online archive which, with some practiced navigation, can help locate most all of the past oculofacial presentations. Access to this navigable online archive is currently found as a link on the AAO website. The number of cosponsored courses shared between ASOPRS and the AAO has grown over the past quarter-century. In 1994, the only such cosponsored course at the annual meeting was entitled, “Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Update: The Orbit” presented by Gerald Harris with five colleagues: Kenneth Cahill, John Holds, Sara Kaltreider, James Orcutt, and John Woog. Other singletopic “updates” comprised the yearly cosponsored offering with topics such as “The Eyelid,” and “Enucleation and Evisceration.” More recently, an average of four or five courses are cosponsored each year aimed at comprehensive ophthalmologists. Several popular titles have been repeated for 30

 ASOPRS has cosponsored “Breakfast with the Experts” every year at the AAO Fall Meeting since its inception in 1997. Typical AAO advertising has usually included a statement such as “Roundtable discussions are limited to 9 attendees who are encouraged to bring individual questions and cases to the moderator for discussion. Fee includes a continental breakfast.” ASOPRS has cosponsored an Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Subspecialty Day at the AAO Annual Meeting in the following years: 2010, 2012‒2014, 2016‒present.

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some years by their respective senior instructors: “Complete Guide to … Ptosis” by John Holds and then Morris Hartstein; “Periocular Tumors…and Reconstruction” by Jeffrey Nerad; “Lotions, Potions, Botulinum Toxin…” by David Holck, Jill Foster, and Christopher DeBacker, and most recently, Femida Kherani; and “Orbital Tumors” by Bita Esmaeli. Sometime between 2007 and 2010, ASOPRS began to formally cosponsor an annual facelifting skills transfer course at the AAO fall meetings in cosponsorship with the AAO skills transfer committee. AAO archives show cosponsorship of the lecture portion of the course, “Fundamental Facelifting Techniques,” beginning in 2007; formal cosponsorship of the lab portion first appears in the AAO archive in 2010. The course actually predates official ASOPRS cosponsorship by several years, having existed (under almost identical titles) with course directors Henry Baylis, Alan Brackup, and Joel Kopelman, among others. The ASOPRS cosponsorship imprimatur did not substantially alter the course’s content, nor did it abruptly change the core roster of its instructors. David Holck (course director 2006‒2010, 2012) and Joel Kopelman (course director and/or senior instructor 2001‒2010) were involved in managing the course prior to and through the “transition” year. Since then, the course directors have been Brett Kotlus (2011‒2015) and Julian De Silva (2016‒2018), an ASOPRS international associate member from London, England who has added an international perspective. Instructors listed for the lecture portion of the 2018 skills-transfer course were Mikel Lo, Kristen Tarbet, and David Isaacs; another eleven ASOPRS members comprised the roster of lab instructors.31 More complete lists of instructors for most if not all of the ASOPRS‒AAO cosponsored courses over the past quarter-century appear in Appendix 6. The facelifting course at the AAO meeting is just one of numerous such oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery courses presented annually by ASOPRS members, whether the particular courses happen to have ASOPRS sponsorship or not. However, the cosponsorship of this facelifting course reflects the strong position of ASOPRS as the oculofacial educational resource within ophthalmology while it underscores the growing reciprocal recognition of ASOPRS and oculofacial surgery by organized ophthalmology.

31

 Instructors for the lab portion of the 2018 skills transfer facelifting course were Christopher DeBacker, Kathleen Duerksen, Scott Goldstein, Adam Hassan, Dustin Heringer, Mikel Lo, Geva Mannor, Asa Morton, John Ng, Stuart Seiff, and Kristin Tarbet.

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Fig. 25. ASOPRS members at the 2018 AAO Mid-Year Forum: (Left to right) Daniel Schaefer, Stuart Seiff, Kathleen Duerksen, Tamara Fountain, Jeffrey Edelstein, and Steven Couch. Photo courtesy of Tamara Fountain.

Advocacy. ASOPRS has been a strong supporter of many advocacy activities of the AAO centered in Washington DC, where the Academy maintains the offices of its government affairs division. It is the site of the Academy’s Mid-Year Forum (MYF), where leaders and younger “ambassadors” of constituent societies gather to address sociopolitical issues. Throughout the year and during this yearly forum, ASOPRS works with the AAO in areas such as federal healthcare policies, practice mandates, and guidelines for coding and billing practices. The current Society liaison with the AAO in many of these activities is Stuart Seiff, chair of the ASOPRS intersociety and government affairs committee. As described below, the ASOPRS website is an efficient forum for important updates about healthcare policy and other issues for ASOPRS members. In the area of coding, other ASOPRS members have worked with the AAO since the 1980s in advocating for sensible policies in the creation or revision of CPT codes, defining procedures and codes in published white paper technical assessments, and advising and reacting to policies on how these codes should be bundled together or unbundled at the time a service is rendered. ASOPRS members such as J. Justin Older, David Reifler, Daniel Townsend, Charles Slonim, Jeffrey Edelstein, and Neal Freeman have served on various coding committees of ASOPRS, AAO, and various state ophthalmological societies. Over the years, these individuals have presented several coding seminars at ASOPRS annual spring meetings; the latter three just mentioned were featured at the 2013 ASOPRS annual symposium’s lunchtime seminar (YASOPRS event) entitled, “Coding Lessons from ASOPRS Masters.” Since 2000, Neal Freeman has served as the chair of the ASOPRS coding committee that has been an ASOPRS standing committee now for several years. Advocacy further translated to advice and general education for the ASOPRS membership, including prompt and cogent responses to coding questions on the ASOPRS Forum (see below). “Happy Coding!” is a memorable recurring sign-off following comments and advice given by Charles Slonim.

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Past instances of ASOPRS-AAO collaboration include lobbying efforts to remove a proposed provision for a cosmetic surgery tax from a Senate bill in 2010. Another example of support and collaboration has been a substantial yearly donation by ASOPRS ($25,000 per year) to the AAO Surgical Scope Fund which has helped lobbying efforts in several states to preserve the standards and principles of surgeons performing surgery. In 2017, collaborative efforts between ASOPRS, the AAO, and other societies resulted in CMS retracting its 2009 determination that prohibited billing for a cosmetic upper blepharoplasty at the time of ptosis repair. Through its representation by the AAO, the subspecialty of oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery has achieved recognition from CMS and commercial healthcare insurers. ASOPRS gave valuable input on the description of the taxonomy code for subspecialists in oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery.32 It is an ever-changing landscape, but these distinctions will likely impact CMS evaluation of physicians’ performance based on four weighted categories that are scheduled to result in pay adjustments beginning in January 2019.33 AAO Council. ASOPRS has been represented on the AAO Council since approximately 1982. A full term of an AAO councilor is three years, and that individual is eligible to serve for one additional full term. AAO councilors who have represented ASOPRS and the dates of their terms are listed in Appendix 2. Since 1994, the Society’s AAO councilors have each served two three-year terms, usually with an alternate who might or might not eventually assume the lead position. The AAO councilor for ASOPRS in 1994 was J. Justin Older, and he has been followed by James (Chris) Fleming, Rona Silkiss, Louise Mawn, and current AAO councilor Kathleen Duerksen who began her first term in 2018. ASOPRS presidents have also represented the Society in the AAO Council Section of Subspecialty and Specialized Interest Organizations. In October 1995, Richard Dortzbach first brought up accreditation, certification, and subspecialty training issues at this meeting. This led to additional meetings among the ophthalmic subspecialties the following year. As described above, one of two annual meetings which AAO councilors attend is held in conjunction with the AAO Mid-Year Forum. (The other meeting is held in conjunction with the fall annual meeting.) Since 2002, the ASOPRS executive committee has held an “interim” meeting in Washington DC in conjunction with the AAO Mid-Year Forum. It has served as an excellent opportunity to meet with councilors and AAO decision-makers, and to do routine ASOPRS business without the pressures associated with the spring or fall meetings. ASOPRS-sponsored attendance of other individuals at the Mid-Year Forum has proved to be mutually beneficial for the AAO and ASOPRS through AAO programs: the AAO Leadership Development Program (LDP) described below, and the AAO “Ambassador Advocacy Program,”

32

 https://npidb.org/taxonomy/207WX0200X/, accessed September 3, 2018. Taxonomy code 207WX0200X, a “level III” area of specialization, is defined as, “A physician who specializes in oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery. This subspecialty combines orbital and periocular surgery with facial plastic surgery, and includes aesthetic and reconstructive surgery of the face, orbit, eyelid, and lacrimal system. Practitioners evaluate, diagnose and treat conditions involving the eyelids, brows, midface, orbits, lacrimal systems and surrounding and supporting structures of the face and neck.” 33

 https://www.aao.org/medicare/cost-taxonomy/, accessed September 3, 2018.

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which ASOPRS fellows-in-training have attended, e.g., Eric Steele in 2007, Christopher Zoumalan in 2009, and Erin Lessner in 2016. Among the other subspecialty societies and the even larger numbers of state societies represented on the AAO Council, ASOPRS has occasionally initiated consideration of a Council Advisory Recommendation (CAR) which has been sent to the AAO board of trustees. In November 2003, one such ASOPRS initiative was largely unsuccessful. In that same year, councilor Chris Fleming and ASOPRS president John Shore appealed to the AAO Council when they presented the Society’s request for AAO support in ASOPRS’ efforts to achieve oculofacial subspecialty certification through the American Board of Ophthalmology. In May 2006, with support of the executive committee, AAO councilor Rona Silkiss introduced a proposed CAR requesting a new definition of oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery that was successfully passed by the Council and forwarded to the AAO board of trustees. LDP. The AAO Leadership Development Program (LDP) has been an important experience for several ASOPRS members with benefits to organized ophthalmology in general, as well as the oculofacial plastic surgery community. Established by the AAO with its first class graduating in 1999, this program selects only about twenty individuals per year from a much larger group of individuals nominated by state societies, specialty societies, and special interest organizations who have a seat on the AAO Council. Sponsored by these organizations, the selected individuals attend several meetings and seminars, and they complete a project of significance to their sponsoring organization. The annual classes of AAO LDP are designated with Roman numerals. Since 1999, five ASOPRS nominees have graduated from from the LDP: John Shore (LDP III, 2001); Roger Dailey (LDP VII, 2005); Philip Custer (LDP X, 2008); Don Kikkawa (LDP XIV, 2012); and Catherine Hwang (LDP XIX, 2017). An additional seven ASOPRS members have graduated from the LDP after nomination by a state or special interest organization.34 ASOPRS fellowship program director Keith Carter, a 2003 LDP nominee of the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology (AUPO), served as the 122nd president of the AAO in 2018, the first oculofacial plastic surgery subspecialist to hold this office since Wendell Hughes was president of the combined AAOO in 1967. Tamara Fountain, a 1999 nominee of the Illinois Society of Eye Physicians & Surgeons (ISEPS) and former president of that society (2002–2004), was nominated in June 2019 to be president-elect of the AAO in 2020. She would be in line to be the 125th president of the AAO in 2021. OMIC. The Ophthalmic Mutual Insurance Company (OMIC) https://www.omic.com/ was formed in 1987 by ophthalmologists to serve the needs of members of the AAO in medical liability insurance and services. The board of directors has been led by both comprehensive and subspecializing ophthalmologists including oculofacial plastic surgeons. In this past decade, two successive chairs of the OMIC board of directors have been former ASOPRS president John Shore (2011–2014) and ASOPRS immediate past president Tamara Fountain (2014–2016). 34

 Tamara Fountain (Illinois, LDP I, 1999); Keith Carter (AUPO, LDP V, 2003); Kimberly Cockerham (California, LDP IX, 2007); Ron Pelton (Colorado, LDP XI, 2009), Evan Black (Michigan, LDP XIII, 2011); Erin Shriver (Women in Ophthalmology, LDP XIX, 2017); and Robert Fante (OMIC, LDP XIX, 2017). Past AAO LDP Graduates and project abstracts are currently listed and archived on webpages linked to the AAO website.

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Current ASOPRS vice president Robert Fante, whose LDP participation was sponsored by OMIC, completed an interesting project in which he reviewed closed claims among OMIC-insured oculofacial plastic surgeons.35 Dr. Fante is on track to be ASOPRS president in 2021. Ron Pelton is an ASOPRS member who currently sits on the OMIC board of directors. IRIS registry. During the past several years, the AAO Intelligent Research in Sight (IRIS) registry has identified keywords and other data to the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). CMS has used these submissions for the Physician’s Quality Reporting System (PQRS) and the Medicare Electronic Health Records (EHR) “meaningful use” incentive program. Eligible physicians who sign up and meet the reporting requirements can use the IRIS registry to report clinical quality data to the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). The IRIS registry can automatically extract and submit data for MIPS quality measures to CMS on behalf of practices integrated with their EHR. ASOPRS liaisons to the AAO have included Kim Cockerham and Roberta Gausas. Working with the AAO, ASOPRS has helped to establish criteria for reporting such “meaningful use” among those whose practice is completely confined to oculofacial plastic surgery. ASOPRS & ABO Many organizations have played a role in the advocacy of ASOPRS for subspecialty certification in oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery. As noted above, the ASOPRS bylaws stipulates that ASOPRS fellows must be diplomats of the American Board of Ophthalmology (or equivalent certifying board). Founded in 1916, the ABO is the oldest specialty board in the United States.36 The ABO is part of the several specialty boards which comprise the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS); decisions of the ABO on certification of subspecialists in one specialty is subject to review by the ABMS as a whole. The ABO also seeks consensus within ophthalmology itself and has routinely turned to the AAO on such issues. In addition, accreditation of training programs within ophthalmology is the responsibility of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the residency review committee (RRC) for Ophthalmology. ASOPRS has interacted with each of these organizations while advocating for subspecialty certification in oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery. Accreditation and certification. During the past quarter-century, ASOPRS emerged as a voice for the establishment of the certification of subspecialists in oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery. A 1995 presentation by ASOPRS leaders within a section of the AAO Council has already been mentioned. Internally, the Society has long viewed the goal of subspecialty certification as a high priority, but achieving progress toward implementation has proved difficult. The creation of an 35

 The LDP project of Robert Fante titled, “Malpractice Experience Among Oculofacial Plastic Surgeons: Closed Claims Analysis 2006-2016” studied 185 closed claims related to oculofacial plastic surgery out of a total 2,456 closed claims that were analyzed. Briefly, the study concluded that the likelihood of an indemnity payment for a malpractice claim related to oculofacial plastic surgery in this cohort was much lower for claims limited to cosmetic issues than for claims related to medical error, diagnostic error, or failure to obtain proper informed consent. 36

 Since the founding of ASOPRS in 1969, several ASOPRS members have served as directors of the ABO such as Frank Newell, Robert Waller, George Bartley, David Tse, and James Orcutt. Several others including this author have often served as ABO associate examiners. The current executive director of the ABO is George Bartley.

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independent board of oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery through the sole initiative and funding of ASOPRS was considered impractical and cost-prohibitive. Although the independent American Board of Cosmetic Surgery (ABCS) met some of the needs of many ASOPRS members, it did not specifically credential the full gamut of the subspecialty the Society represents. The following summarizes the Society’s efforts to achieve subspecialty certification recognized within ophthalmology and across other specialties. These efforts have involved internal deliberations and preparations, as well as many interactions with organized medicine within and outside of ophthalmology, and with existing certifying boards and accreditation councils. In 1996, the Society’s legal counsel, Scott Makar of Holland & Knight, reviewed the legal implications of specialty board certification for the ASOPRS executive committee, drawing attention to published opinions on the subject.37 The following year, a facial plastic surgeon, William Silver was invited to present the experience and perspective of otolaryngology in forming a board. In 1998, consultant Thomas Haladyna, a professor of educational psychology, proposed revisions and expansions of the ASOPRS testing program to make it suitable for certification. In the spring of 1999, Dr. Haladyna gave a workshop on the construction of multiple-choice examinations, and he assisted in the further development of an “item bank” for examination questions. Society leaders such as William Nunery favored an independent board; under his term as ASOPRS president, the name “American Board of Ophthalmic Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc.,” gained some traction within the executive committee. In July 2002, the president of the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc., Wayne Larrabee, Jr., complained to Dr. Nunery that ASOPRS’s “use of ‘Facial’ to identify a board certifying surgeon to perform Facial Plastic Surgery would create confusion with the name of our organization.” Meanwhile, a second track toward certification was being pursued by John Harrington who chaired the ASOPRS ad hoc accreditation and certification committee. The ABO had responded to requests for subspecialty certification from oculofacial plastic surgeons and also vitreoretinal surgeons. Between 1998 and 2003, the ABO established fellowship accreditation committee (FAC) subcommittees. The FAC subcommittees developed “Ophthalmic Program Accreditation Guidelines for Ophthalmic Subspecialties” which were submitted to the RRC for Ophthalmology.38 Toward the end of this process, the ABO identified oculofacial plastic surgery as one of seven disciplines in ophthalmology suitable for recognition as a subspecialty and invited ASOPRS to seek the support of the general ophthalmologic community, namely the AAO. In 2003, ASOPRS president John Shore appealed to the AAO Council for their support. Meanwhile, the ASOPRS membership had overwhelmingly voted in favor of assessing $500 per member to create a fund to be used for facilitating the pursuit of accreditation and certification. Approximately two-thirds of AAO Council and two-thirds of respondents to a general membership survey opposed an ASOPRS petition which sought the formal support of the AAO.39 37

 Smith JJ. Legal implications of specialty board certification. J Legal Med 1996;17:73–111.

38

 ASOPRS representatives were John Harrington, Bradley Lemke, David Reifler, Ralph Wesley, and John Woog.

39

 Reifler DM. Certification and accreditation in oculofacial plastic surgery: Where do we go from here? Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2004;20(6):413–417.

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In 2004, ASOPRS began to look at accreditation of fellowship training programs as a route which might help achieve subspecialty certification. The executive director of the RRCs for Allergy and Immunology, Otolaryngology, and Ophthalmology, Patricia Levenburg, was invited to speak to the ASOPRS membership at the ASOPRS spring meeting. Bryan Sires chaired the ad hoc accreditation and certification committee which surveyed all thirty-two ASOPRS fellowship preceptors to the sources and amounts of salaries and benefits.40 The committee estimated that nearly three million dollars per year would be required to fund the training of thirty-two fellows (or twice that amount for the two-year training of one fellow). The committee investigated many other issues: FTE definitions of post-residency trainees; fixed amount of GME support; and federal regulations of billing through CMS. A conference call between ASOPRS leaders and accrediting administrators was held in August.41 After much deliberation, ASOPRS promoted a pilot program which pursued accreditation of some fellowship programs by the ACGME managed through the RRC for Ophthalmology. Subsequent interactions between ASOPRS, fellowship programs, and the ACGME may be further summarized.42 Between 2005 and 2007, an ASOPRS subcommittee developed an ACGME program description in oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery which culminated with ASOPRS representatives Robert Kennedy and Bryan Sires meeting with the RRC of Ophthalmology director Louis Cantor in Chicago to finalize details. In 2009, the ACGME accepted the program description and began accepting applications for ACGME fellowships in oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery. Five programs pursued this pathway: University of Louisville (William Nunery); University of West Virginia (Jennifer Sivak-Callcott); Wayne State University (Evan Black); Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary (Aaron Fay); and Anderson Cancer Institute (Bita Esmaeli).43 In 2009, the posted ACGME program description was found to be unsatisfactory in the categories of rhytidectomy, orbital trauma, and nasal endoscopy; ASOPRS began to press for corrections which were made only after some years and much effort. In 2010, ASOPRS presented rationale to the ABO for subspecialty certification with ACGME accreditation in place; the ABO agreed but required a greater number of ACGME fellowship programs to fulfill their business model. In 2013, ASOPRS hired a consultant knowledgeable with the ACGME re-accreditation process to chaperone the five programs though the process, and all five programs successfully reaccredited for maximum duration. In 2014, Patricia Levenburg retired from the ACGME and was replaced by Jenny Campbell as associate executive director of the RRC for Ophthalmology, which was now separated from the RRC for Otolaryngology. That year, the RRC for Ophthalmology submitted edits to the ACGME Oculofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery program 40

 Bryan Sires. (Report) 2004 ASOPRS Accreditation and Certification Ad Hoc Committee, October 21, 2004.

41

 ASOPRS leaders on the conference call were Bryan Sires, Stuart Seiff, Daniel Schaefer, and David Reifler. Guests: Patricia Levenburg; Jeanne Heard (Director of Residency Review Committee Activities for the ACGME), and Karen Fisher (Senior Associate vice president for the Division of Health Care Affairs at the Association of American Medical Colleges). 42 43

 Bryan Sires. Personal communication, February 23, 2017.

 Dr. Black’s program was accepted in May 2010, the first ASOPRS fellowship to successfully apply for ACGME accreditation.

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description on behalf of ASOPRS. Stuart Seiff, chair of the ASOPRS intersociety and government affairs committee worked with the ACGME, and in 2016 the edits were approved in each of the three categories. In early 2017, Seiff reported that ASOPRS had established “a program curriculum under the ACGME that matches [ASOPRS] requirements.” While it is uncertain whether there will be future growth in the number of ACGME-accredited fellowship programs in oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery, ASOPRS has sought and continues to seek recognition by the ABO of oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery as demonstrated by subspecialty certification. Recent developments have returned attention to the goal of achieving subspecialty certification of oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery. In March 2017, the ABMS approved a process for a Focused Practice Designation (otherwise known as Area of Focused Practice). This new process provides an opportunity for member boards (such as the ABO) to “set standards for, assess, and recognize areas of additional expertise that physicians acquire through their practice in a particular area of a specialty and/or subspecialty. The designation serves as an additional indication of a physician’s commitment to providing high-quality care for patients’ specific health needs. The focused practice designation recognizes the value that physicians who devote a substantial portion of their practice to a specific area of a specialty and/or subspecialty can bring to improving patient care.”44 ASOPRS has accepted the invitation of ABO executive director George Bartley to apply for the new Focused Practice Designation. Jeremiah Tao has served as the Society’s ABO liaison. No final decisions have been made by ASOPRS or the ABO; the Society’s executive committee is reviewing possible revisions to the application which were suggested by the ABO.

44

 https://www.abms.org/board-certification/focused-practice-designation/, accessed August 21, 2018.

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RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS The ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book described close relationships between ASOPRS and other societies including the European Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ESOPRS) which had been founded along the principles of ASOPRS but with multinational representation. A reciprocal relationship had already emerged between ASOPRS and ESOPRS which facilitated attendance at each other’s meetings, including the ASOPRS annual spring meeting. Among other organizations with which ASOPRS has significant relationships, reciprocal societies will be considered first. Reciprocal societies. In addition to ESOPRS, ASOPRS Reciprocal Societies has now recognized certain international societies of oculofacial plastic surgery as “reciprocal societies” of ASOPRS when the societies meet specific requirements related to the practice of oculofacial plastic surgery for membership and conduct an annual meeting with primary emphasis on oculofacial plastic surgery to which ASOPRS members are invited to attend. Becoming a reciprocal society also allows members of that society to apply as international associate members of ASOPRS. The following societies45 currently share this reciprocal relationship with ASOPRS: Asia Pacific Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (APSOPRS, 2012); Asociación Colombiana de Cirugia Plástica Oculár (ACPO, 2011); Fig. 26. ASOPRS reciprocal societies as listed in the 2017 annual fall scientific Australian and New Zealand Society of Ophthalmic Plastic symposium program book. Surgeons (ANZSOPS, 2013); Belgian Society of Oculoplastic and Reconstructive Surgery (BSOPRS, 2016); British Oculoplastic Surgery Society (BOPSS); European Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ESOPRS); Iranian Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (IrSOPRS, 2010); Mexican Society of Oculoplastics (SMO, 2013); Oculoplastics Society of India (OPAI, 2013); and Sociedade Brasileira de Cirurgia Plástica Ocular (SBCPO, 2012). AMA. ASOPRS began its path to formal representation in the American Medical Association (AMA) around 1995 with representation analogous to United Nations observer status as a “Specialty and Service Society.” After three successive terms of this representation and with thirty-five percent of membership (at least 250 people) maintaining AMA membership, ASOPRS was granted admission to the AMA House of Delegates (HOD) in 1998. Confirmation of the membership criteria are reviewed by the AMA every five years. The Society’s efforts for reaching and maintaining these criteria have been spearheaded by John Harrington with the assistance of a succession of alternate delegates, including David T. Wilkes and George Stasior. According ASOPRS recognizes international societies of oculofacial plastic surgery as Reciprocal Societies of ASOPRS when the societies have specific requirements related to the practice of oculofacial plastic surgery for membership and conduct an annual meeting with primary emphasis on oculofacial plastic surgery to which ASOPRS members are invited to attend. Becoming a Reciprocal Society also allows members of that society to apply as International Associate Members of ASOPRS on Pathway A of the ASOPRS international associate membership process. ASOPRS is pleased to share a Reciprocal Society relationship with the following societies:

Asia Pacific Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (APSOPRS)

Asociación Colombiana de Cirugía Plastica Ocular (ACPO)

Australian and New Zealand Society of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgeons (ANZSOPS)

Belgian Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (BSOPRS)

British Oculoplastic Surgery Society (BOPSS)

European Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ESOPRS)

Iranian Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (IrSOPRS)

Mexican Society of Oculoplastics

Oculoplastics Society of India (OPAI)

Sociedade Brasileira de Cirurgia Plástica Ocular (SBCPO)

SOCIEDADE BRASILEIRA DE CIRURGIA PLÁSTICA OCULAR

ASOPRS 2017 FALL SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM BOOK 67

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 Reciprocal societies are listed alphabetically followed by the year reciprocity was established. Reciprocity for ESOPRS was described in the 25th Anniversary Book, p. 136.

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to executive committee minutes, Erin Shriver has accepted a scheduled appointment as the new AMA delegate for ASOPRS in 2020. Complementing the representation of ASOPRS on the AAO Council, participation in the even larger AMA has led to broader involvements within organized medicine which aim to influence national policies. In 2003, John Harrington was asked by the AAO to represent both the AAO and ASOPRS at a joint meeting of the AMA and the American College of Surgeons (ACS) to review Core Principles of Office-Based Surgery recommended by the ACS. Another benefit of ASOPRS representation in the AMA HOD is the opportunity to make nominations for the AMA’s Young Physicians Forum. It also may nominate members to sit as AMA representatives on the ACGME review committee for ophthalmology and the RVS update committee (RUC). Even though nominations by ASOPRS to these committees may be unsuccessful, it raises the profile of ASOPRS and its issues among the AMA’s chosen representatives. FSPSS. The Federation of Specialty Plastic Surgery Societies (FSPSS) is a consortium of three organizations which are represented in the AMA House of Delegates: ASOPRS; the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS); and the American Society of Dermatologic Surgeons. The FSPSS formed when ASOPRS was admitted to the AMA House of Delegates. Representatives of these societies, including John Harrington, had the occasion to meet during the AMA annual meeting each spring. The representatives also established other annual meetings which were hosted by each society on a rotating, two-year cycle through 2010. Through the first decade of the new millennium, the three societies of the FSPSS collaborated on an annual winter Fig. 27. Program Book cover of 2004 Winter Symposium of the FSPSS, organized and symposium, with responsibilities for organizing and for sponsored by ASOPRS. CME approval rotating among them. This meeting had been established by the AAFPRS in 1994. Edward Bedrossian, Jr. organized and chaired the 11th Annual Winter Symposium on the Latest Advances in Facial Plastic Surgery which convened February 14–18, 2004 at the Snowmass Conference Center. ASOPRS member William Mack was a co-organizer of the program with several ASOPRS members attending and making presentations. The winter symposium would rotate to other venues such as Telluride and Vail, but by 2010 the meeting was no longer associated with ASOPRS. ITEDS. The International Thyroid Eye Disease Society (ITEDS) was originally founded in a meeting convened at the Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA, in Los Angeles in November 2006. The stated goal of ITEDS is to promote and facilitate collaborative interactions to define clinical disease parameters, understand pathogenesis, and develop tools for assessment and treatment of thyroid eye disease (TED). As well as symposia, ITEDS regularly runs teaching courses at the AAO, at the annual meeting of ASOPRS, and in other international forums. ITEDS updates have ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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been presented at several ASOPRS annual fall scientific symposia.46 As described above, ITEDS sponsored a stand-alone supplement issue of OPRS which was based on its 4th International Symposium held in London in June 2016, co-directed by Jimmy Uddin and Jennifer Sivak-Callcott. The supplement featured an introduction by Uddin, a summary of the three-day program, and print publication of eleven new articles.47 PCIS and PAC. In 2006, Michael Migliori brought the attention of the ASOPRS executive committee to an initiative of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) in forming a coalition with another organization, the Physician Coalition for Injectable Safety (PCIS). Soon after the 2007 AAO Mid-Year Forum, a media conference for the PCIS was held in New York City and was attended by ASOPRS president Robert Kennedy. He reported to the executive committee at the spring meeting that there was a positive media response and initial funding by industry for $150,000. As a stepping stone toward other collaborative efforts, ASOPRS joined the PCIS as a founding member along with the ASAPS, American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS), and the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS). In addition to bringing attention to patient safety, the entering of ASOPRS into this coalition highlighted the importance for the Society to continually update and upgrade its website (see below). In September 2010, the above societies (ASOPRS, ASAPS, AAFPRS, and ASDS) formed the “Core 4” of the Physicians Aesthetic Coalition (PAC) whose stated mission is to advance and promote patient safety and both public and physician education in the fields of cosmetic medicine and aesthetic surgery through increased inter-specialty cooperative efforts and dialogue.

46 47

 Appendix 4. Presentations in 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2014.

 Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2018;18(4S): S1–S109.

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EMAIL LISTSERV & ASOPRS FORUM During the Society’s first quarter-century, the sharing of challenging and interesting cases became a valued aspect of the ASOPRS fall and spring scientific symposia. In the 1990s, ASOPRS fellows increasingly took advantage of advances in electronic communications. Through evolving technologies of the internet—from shared group emails to the establishment of an online forum— the Society sponsored remote consultations which often had a real-time impact upon the diagnosis and management of shared clinical cases. In 1995, the ASOPRS communications committee, chaired by David Wilkes, formally proposed a Society-sponsored email communications network which was approved by the executive committee. This ASOPRS email “chat-line” or “listserv” was restricted to members and eligible members. In a variety of email strings, many issues were discussed such as billing, CPT coding, the differential diagnosis and management of difficult cases, as well as specific surgical procedures and their complications. Gary Weinstein was selected to host the ASOPRS email chatline through servers at the University of Pittsburgh, and he stepped up to co-chair the ASOPRS electronic communications committee in 1997, while co-chair Don Kikkawa concentrated on developing the ASOPRS website (see below). The ASOPRS listserv was later transferred to the University of Oklahoma under the direction of Lloyd Hildebrand where participation grew to the point of straining many email capacities. In 2008, the executive committee approved transitioning from the original email listserv to an internet forum providing a way to access archived information while easing congestion in members’ email inboxes. Aaron Fay chaired this effort along with John Nguyen, and the members-only www.ASOPRSForum.org went live in 2009. Some members expressed concerns about the extra step of signing on to the forum website. However, members’ concerns were rapidly addressed with incremental improvements including an instant email option, and the engagement of a new mobile app, Tapatalk, that allowed viewing and posting directly from all mobile devices. By the fall of 2010, the forum had become more accepted by members. Improvements included hosting the forum on a dedicated virtual server, rather than renting space on a group server. At that time, there were about 650 members signed up for the forum, over 600 of whom received individual comments to their email and an average of about 100 hits per day. The predominant subjects were clinical cases and coding questions with almost 2,000 views annually.

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Fig. 28. Images excerpted from the 2000 ASOPRS cosmetic surgery patient brochure produced by Jane Olson. Top row, left to right—brochure front cover and first page; bottom row, left to right— last page and back cover.

PUBLIC INFORMATION As the Society began its second quarter-century, the executive committee recognized the importance of direct communication with patients. In 1994, public information committee cochair David Wilkes oversaw the distribution of the Society logo to each member as “cameraready” graphic art. Technology was just on the cusp of full electronic transfers. His co-chair, Michael Patipa, developed new brochures such as “Acquired Ptosis” and “Congenital Ptosis” and also solicited proposals from public relations firms for a two-year contract. The executive committee reviewed the bids and various methods of paying for the estimated cost of $120,000 per year. About half of the money was allocated from the Society’s general funds and, with approval of the membership, supplemented by a $200 assessment from each member to seed the project. The ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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firm, Hill & Knowlton, was awarded the contract, and a media kit was prepared. Two thousand copies of the media kit were prepared and a media tour was arranged in New York City with Albert Hornblass and Michael Patipa. The contract was not renewed for a third year when the Society decided to concentrate on in-house public relations efforts. In 1998, public information committee co-chairs Robert Goldberg and Jane Olson led an effort to create a high-quality brochure on aesthetic surgery. Using an escrow account and prior paid commitments from numerous ASOPRS members, this initiative proceeded further as Kenneth Steinsapir was designated to be the liaison with graphic design firms. In 2000, committee chair Jane Olson reported that legal counsel review of the drafts had identified a roadblock—the Society’s incorporation at that time as a 501(c)(3) organization—which restricted activities regarding public relations, promotion, and marketing of membership.48 That same year, Crystal Atkins of the law firm of Holland and Knight reviewed this issue in a broader context before the executive committee. As described elsewhere, the founding of the Foundation and the reincorporation of ASOPRS as a 501(c)(6) organization would soon resolve these problems (Chapter 3).

Fig. 29. 2004 ASOPRS patient educational brochure, “Blepharoplasty and Brow Lift.”

In the years that followed, the public information committee under Michael Migliori continued to develop excellent brochures. New titles included “DCR,” “Blepharospasm and Hemifacial Spasm,” and “Botox and Facial Fillers.” In 2008, samples of four new “tear off” pads were distributed with ordering information at the ASOPRS annual fall meeting. In 2018, all patient education brochures were updated with new graphics and new titles including “Adult Tearing,” “Skin Rejuvenation,” and “Rhinoplasty.” 48

 Jane Olson further commented on the project, “We wanted to develop a brochure that was an ‘image piece’ for aesthetic treatments and surgery that would work for all practices and be relatively timeless... and not look so clinical.” Personal communication, June 3, 2019.

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More recently, public information activities of the Society and its members have increasingly moved to the internet. As described in the next section, brochure design and content was coordinated with website design. ASOPRS WEBSITE Through the ASOPRS communications committee mentioned above, ASOPRS concurrently began to develop its first website. In 1995, the Society appointed Don Kikkawa to lead this effort with an initial allocation of $3,000. By the following year, it had become apparent that a greater annual budget would be required to develop and maintain the ASOPRS website. By 1997, the combined ASOPRS electronic communications committee noted that website was of value in attracting outside interest and generating surgical referrals. The website’s members-only section conveniently included the posting of the Society’s bylaws and meeting abstracts. The Society’s early webhost was a company called Viteknet, which handled sometimes challenging software and hardware coordination issues with the Society’s administrative offices. Members learned the benefits of a hyperlink between their individual websites and that of ASOPRS. Recognizing the financial and educational benefits to the Society, its membership, and the public, the ASOPRS executive committee characterized the ASOPRS website, www.asoprs.org, as a “high priority.” In 1999, the now renamed “information technology committee” undertook a redesign of the webpage. The number of hits was reported to be between 200 to 300 per day. The membersonly section included postings and listings of Society meetings, sponsored training programs, committees, thesis abstracts and the Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Bibliography by Michael Hawes and Richard Dortzbach. In 2004, the chair of the information technology committee, Russell Gonnering, reported that the Society had engaged a new professional webmaster, Julie Greenfield, who was charged with updating the website and keeping it current. A quarterly electronic publication was posted to the website entitled, “ASOPRS—Online Focus.” That year, the Society also chose a vendor for the electronic submission of abstracts for the fall meeting. Four years later, in 2008, the executive committee again reviewed the website resulting in recommendations for website redesign and revision with better search engine optimization. The recommendations were implemented by the website committee chaired by Scott Goldstein. In 2016, ASOPRS president-elect Tamara Fountain reported on a new website redesign with MemberClicks chosen as the vendor. The website’s homepage was designed to be patient-centered, and the Find-a-Surgeon function was strengthened.

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Fig. 30. ASOPRS executive directors: (left) Barbara Beatty (1993–2006); and (right) Tisha Kehn (2007–present).

MANAGEMENT In 1994, ASOPRS was still transitioning from running operations through executive committee members and their offices, to contracting with a professional management company with an assigned executive director. In 1991, ASOPRS past president J. Justin Older had chaired an ad hoc ASOPRS long-range planning committee (comprised of several other past presidents on the advisory committee) which reported to president John Burns, noting that ASOPRS had “become so large that it was impossible for the officers to effectively administrate all of the requirements on a day-to-day basis.” In December 1992, ASOPRS hired the Crow-Segal Management firm of Winter Park, Florida, operated by Margorie Steele. Barbara Beatty of Crow-Segal was assigned as the ASOPRS executive director, and she successfully guided this transition while holding the position of executive director through 2006, a tenure of fourteen years. Ms. Beatty and the CrowSegal management company worked closely with the executive committee members assuming many of the responsibilities that had previously fallen solely upon the Society’s officers and their personal office staff. Professional management assistance touched upon almost every aspect of ASOPRS activities: maintaining membership and candidate lists; the storing and processing of Society brochures and membership directories; the processing of dues, assessments and journal subscriptions; planning the spring and fall meetings; facilitation of budget planning, financial reports, and audits; and preparing checks for review and signature. ASOPRS treasurer David Reifler closed the checking account which had been transferred to him from his predecessor, Gerald Harris, though the processing and shipping of the 25th Anniversary Book was handled out of his private office.

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Fig. 31. Gathering to plan the ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book, Edina, MN, September 30, 2018. Tisha Kehn, ASOPRS executive director (left), David Reifler, book editor (center), Amanda Macrina, ASOPRS meetings and administration coordinator (right). Photo credit: Jason Stones, book designer.

ASOPRS contracted with two different management companies in succession. The Society’s second management company was Kautter Management Group of Altamonte Springs, Florida (2004‒2006), the contract negotiated in large part by then ASOPRS treasurer Robert H. Kennedy and approved with the stipulation that Barbara Beatty was to be maintained as ASOPRS executive director. The Society’s third and final outside management company was L&L Management Services Inc. (LLMSI or more simply L&L) of Minneapolis, Minnesota (2007‒April 2017) with Tisha Kehn serving as the ASOPRS executive director. With the expiration of the Society’s contract with L&L on April 13, 2017, ASOPRS made another significant transition: in-house, professional management with the direct employment of two individuals who came over from that company and who continued in similar capacities, (continuing) executive director Tisha Kehn, and meetings and administration coordinator Amanda Macrina. The official address of ASOPRS is now located in St. Paul, Minnesota.

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Fig. 32. Top portion of the ASOPRS website home page (above) and the ASOPRS mission statement from the home page (below).

From the humble beginnings of New York City gatherings in a convivial uptown Irish pub, a subsequent downtown dinner party for five ASOPRS founders with their mentor, Byron Smith, and others, ASOPRS has emerged to be the premier oculofacial plastic surgery organization with educational and service impact reaching all over the world. As immediate past president Tamara Fountain noted, a simple ASOPRS Forum post led to the creation of the international global outreach (“I GO�) committee devoted to facilitating humanitarian service opportunities abroad for ASOPRS members. The role of the Foundation cannot be underestimated, nor can the importance of other organizations and foundations. For example, the Goutami Eye Institute in Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India deserves acknowledgement for providing a home for service and teaching abroad on several occasions for this author. Importantly, hundreds of my ASOPRS colleagues have also participated in these types of activities elsewhere throughout the

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world. While the methods and outlets continue to evolve, the fellows of ASOPRS remain dedicated to fulfilling the Society’s mission. From time to time, it is good to pause and reflect upon the history and accomplishments of the Society while recognizing that there is much work to be done. There are many reasons to look forward to even greater accomplishments in the next half-century and beyond.

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Chapter 2

ASOPRS Education Committee Russell S. Gonnering, Simeon A. Lauer, and Kenneth E. Morgenstern

THE EARLY YEARS Russell S. Gonnering The journey of the education committee in the last quarter century has mirrored the journey of ASOPRS itself. Twenty-five years have seen the growth and maturity of an organization that grew out of the passion of a few North American ophthalmologists in 1969 with visions for what “could be� into an international organization on the forefront of innovation in care, education, and research. This is my perspective on the beginning of the last twenty-five years as both a member of the education committee as well as its secretary in 1998-1999. Under the early leadership of Michael Hawes and Bradley Lemke, a drive towards intellectual rigor was undertaken with the forethought that at some point in the future, we should provide the

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basis for a standardized curriculum in our fellowship training programs, as well as an objective way to verify the success in our goal of training and mentoring individuals who could unquestionably provide innovative care for the present and build a method for sustaining that innovation into the future. In the early 1990s, discussions centered on four main concerns: • Providing the means to accurately test our graduating fellows; • Offering quality continuing medical education credits for our scientific meeting; • Bringing all of the fellowship programs to two-year length; • Developing a standardized method of evaluating existing programs, and giving a roadmap for what would be required to certify new programs. Of these concerns, the first two were by far the easiest! Through the diligent work of such members as Kathleen Archer, Jan Kronish, Dan Schaefer, and their numerous subcommittee members, educational rigor was insured in our written and oral examinations, and the tedious but necessary documentation provided to allow the certification of our meetings for continuing medical educational credit. Much of this work went on behind the scenes. It was carried out by individuals whose only concern was dedication to the collegiality and academic excellence in our society. The second two objectives were, for lack of a better word, “interesting.” In close cooperation with the chairs of the preceptor committee, and after much listening and explaining, we finally arrived at a consensus to move the fellowships to a uniform two-year duration. Although I would only learn to appreciate it later, I had been exposed firsthand (and headfirst) into the workings of a complex adaptive system. I learned through trial and error (by far the latter made more of an impression) that our Society works best when positive attractors are augmented, negative attractors dampened, and emergent order utilized, as opposed to attempting the imposition of external order. In order to accomplish the final objective, the fellowship evaluation subcommittee of the education committee (Russell Gonnering, Dan Schaefer, Russell Neuhaus, Jemshed Khan, and Bryan Sires) proposed a scoring report be issued each year at the fall preceptors’ meeting. While an abbreviated report had been made in previous years, in 1998 the complete report was ready and was presented to the executive committee. A copy of this report is appended. An evaluation of the normal probability plot for the nineteen programs in that report showed, in graphic terms, the spread of the score of the programs. It was given in an anonymous format, with only the individual preceptors given the key to where their program fell on the scoring grid. This allowed a number of improvements in evaluation of the training programs: • Preceptors could see where their programs fell in relationship to all of the other programs. Both strengths and weaknesses were clearly seen in an objective fashion rather than relying on opinion.

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• Programs at the bottom of the plot either made the commitment to improve, or else made the decision to voluntarily discontinue their fellowship program. This self-policing was encouraging, and it spared us the need to move towards a more unpleasant confrontation. • When new programs wished to apply, they had a roadmap of what would be required and an objective view of how existing programs fared in the evaluation process. We made the conscious effort to downplay the element of competition in this scoring grid. We realized that it was impossible to measure all of the intangibles involved in graduate medical training. Our goal was not to perfectly standardize every training program, but to give a means by which objective evaluation could be possible and each preceptor could utilize this as an improvement tool rather than a report card. In 2000, with the turn of the millennium, I handed the leadership on to Dan Schaefer and the saga continued. THE MIDDLE YEARS: THE WINDS OF CHANGE Simeon A. Lauer Powerful forces of change were brewing in the world of education when Russ Gonnering passed the baton as chair of the education committee to Dan Schaefer in the year 2000. Medical schools themselves were changing. Self-directed learning and problem-based education began to replace the basic tenet of education— that a teacher should stand in front of a classroom and teach. Graduate medical education at all levels tried to keep up. Surgical videos became readily available. Fellows came to the operating room ready to “do one” having already “seen one” online. Healthcare itself evolved in ways that affected medical education, including the Affordable Care Act of 2010. As originally conceived, ASOPRS fellowships were primarily based in officebased practices. A surgeon with a well-developed referral base and large surgical volume, who volunteered within the Society and regularly presented at our meetings defined the leaders who gained the prestigious title of Program Director. This was supposed to be a dynamic process. As established mentors neared retirement, new mentors were to be selected. The education committee was supposed to oversee this orderly cycle of development among program directors. However, the world of medicine changed. Mentors began aligning themselves with universities, assuming full time academic positions. This essentially eliminated the natural ebb and flow of surgical practices. Referral patterns were increasingly driven by the dynamics of large healthcare networks. Fellowship programs now continued uninterrupted, with young mentors promoted from within the practice. Large medical centers helped surgeons develop busy and academically productive practices. Suddenly, a plethora of qualified mentors emerged within our society. Fortunately, we were able to expand the number of fellowship programs through the change from one- to two-year fellowships. A Rand Institute study was commissioned by ASOPRS to estimate the market’s annual demand for newly graduated oculofacial surgeons. (Their best guess ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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was twenty-five). Russ Gonnering mentioned that there were nineteen fellowship programs during his tenure. As of this writing there are sixty sponsored two-year programs. Two-year fellowships also meant more time for the trainees to spend on non-core disciplines like radiology, pathology, and dermatology, and team surgeries with otolaryngology, neurosurgery, and general plastic surgery. The scope of the examinations was expanded to include these disciplines. A system was put in place to assure compliance with requirements for CME accreditation of the spring and fall meetings. This no longer required active input from the education committee. The program directors committee more directly assumed responsibility for education during fellowships. The scoring reports proved helpful in objectively maintaining consistency among programs. After completing an ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship or maintaining a practice in the field for five years, candidates were invited to submit a thesis, and sit for the written and oral entrance examinations, as conditions for acceptance into the society. None of these were meant to be rigorous hurdles. The thesis did not have to present a groundbreaking scientific contribution. The thesis was meant to teach appreciation for the rigors of scientific study and an appreciation for scientific knowledge. Completion of a reasonably structured research protocol sufficed. The oral examination was also not meant to be a rigorous hurdle. Cases were presented to candidates and discussed as part of the examination. Many senior members of the education committee contributed a great deal of time volunteering as oral examiners, and this rite of passage was a source of pride for the Society. The written examination proved to be the most challenging and most beneficial task. Dr. Thomas M. Haladyna, an expert on multiple-choice testing, was consulted by the Society to make sure the test was objective, standardized, and fair. The Haladyna recommendations helped elevate and maintain the standards of the exam, but content remained a critical issue. There is variability in our field in the way problems are handled. If we limited the written exam to basic elements, it was not a true measure of competence. If we made it too broad, it became difficult to define competence. We created a core curriculum of data-based knowledge, essentially an online textbook, with information gleaned from peer-reviewed publications. We then drew questions for the written examination from this material. Essentially, we presented facts and then tested on them, rather than administering an exam that asked, did you learn these facts during fellowship? Although “The Knowledge Base” is still a work in progress, the system has been very successful to date. “The Knowledge Base” is available online through the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s ONE Learning Network, hosted in partnership with ASOPRS. The education committee directs cognitive learning, while the program directors impart judgment, skills, and experience. The obvious next question is, why teach this material as part of the post-fellowship written examination? Shouldn’t the process of studying “The Knowledge Base” occur during fellowship,

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as a self-directed learning program under the tutelage of program directors? So, an in-service exam was recently created, and the education committee’s responsibilities continue to evolve. The good news is that the education committee has grown to enormous proportions as it has tackled these various problems. Because the full committee has become so large, only subcommittee chairs will attend the spring education committee meeting in 2019, the first time that attendance has been restricted. In fact, there is a long waiting list of members who wish to volunteer on our committee. Even the truncated group of subcommittee chairs will include leaders responsible for the following: fellowship evaluation; new fellowship application reviews; fellowship oversight; oral examination; written examination; online knowledge center; in-service examination; video education; and a task force to explore funding opportunities for educational initiatives. To meet the challenges ahead, the baton has been passed to Ken Morgenstern, our current chair of the education committee and Reza Vagefi, his assistant secretary. THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE: OUR PAST, OUR PRESENT, AND OUR FUTURE Kenneth E. Morgenstern The American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery is rooted around education. Our hunger to learn is what got us started. Our craving to teach is what made us what we are today. Our desire to improve will carry us forward and shape our future. Our annual meeting has matured as well. In the past, we discussed ptosis, ectropion and tumors of the orbit. Now we discuss medications that fight disease on the cellular level and new facelifting techniques and facial implants that help our patients with their aesthetic goals. The growth and diversity of such presentations directly reflect our present-day education process. The ASOPRS fellowship community is now sixty-four programs strong. There are new fellowship guidelines to follow. There is a fellowship evaluation committee that reviews each program every two years for consistency and handles modern day issues. New surgical minimums have been set that meet today’s standards for oculofacial training. Thesis guidelines have been honed and exam questions have been modernized. The education committee itself has term limits to allow for younger members to participate and contribute new ideas and fresh energy. The fellowship programs have morphed form private practice programs to a mix of academic powerhouses and community experiences. These fellowships, these committees and our diversity, are what have molded our present-day personality and will also determine who we will become in the future. As we look into the future, we continue to try to find new ways to improve. We have spent many years asking how we can educate ourselves better. Now we are asking how we can take our teachings further. Our newest venture is our social media committee. If used correctly, this platform can open the world to the amazingness of ASOPRS and our educational process and skills. We hope to reach a community that we might not otherwise get to and educate them on the wonders of the art and science of oculofacial plastic surgery. As with any new technology or medication we will need to approach this rabbit hole carefully. That is not to say that we should ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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not explore new opportunities or take chances because sometimes that is what it takes to initiate great change. As I tell my patients, I am not a wizard or a magician and I do not possess a crystal ball. I cannot predict the future. What I do know is that the ASOPRS was, is, and will always be rooted in education. If it was not for such dedicated work or our past educational leaders we would not be as strong a society as we are today. If not for the dedicated teaching of our past and present program directors, we would not be the amazing society of the future. I would like to thank Russell Gonnering and Simeon Lauer for updating the history of the Society’s education committee. Russ and Simmy each served with distinction during their respective terms as chair of this important committee, and the Society continues to derive benefits from their leadership. As described by Perry Garber and John Burns in the ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book, the ASOPRS education committee was established in 1974 with James Hargiss serving as chair and John Wobig as assistant chair.1 The Society’s bylaws were amended in the early 1990s when the chair of the education committee was the title of secretary of education and given a seat on the ASOPRS executive committee. Beginning with first secretary of education, Perry Garber, the full list of individuals who have served in this position is shown in Table 4. TABLE 4. ASOPRS SECRETARIES OF EDUCATION

1

1992

Perry F. Garber

2006

Kathleen F. Archer

1993

Perry F. Garber

2007

David B. Lyon

1994

Michael J. Hawes

2008

David B. Lyon

1995

Michael J. Hawes

2009

David B. Lyon

1996

Bradley N. Lemke

2010

Simeon A. Lauer

1997

Bradley N. Lemke

2011

Simeon A. Lauer

1998

Russell S. Gonnering

2012

Peter J. Sneed

1999

Russell S. Gonnering

2013

Peter J. Sneed

2000

Daniel P. Schaefer

2014

Peter J. Sneed

2001

Daniel P. Schaefer

2015

Robert G. Fante

2002

Jan W. Kronish

2016

Robert G. Fante

2003

Jan W. Kronish

2017

Robert G. Fante

2004

Kathleen F. Archer

2018

Kenneth E. Morgenstern

2005

Kathleen F. Archer

2019

Kenneth E. Morgenstern

 Reifler DM. ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book. 201–205.

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As Simeon Lauer described, the education committee has established several subcommittees in order to manage its wide range of activities. In addition, other ASOPRS standing and ad hoc committees interact closely with the education committee, with chairs of those committees serving as members and likewise considered to be part of the subcommittee schema. In this current jubilee year of the Society, the education committee oversees seven subcommittees and liaises closely with three additional external committees. The organizational structure is represented in Table 5. TABLE 5. 2019 ASOPRS EDUCATION COMMITTEE LEADERS Secretary of Education Kenneth E. Morgenstern Assistant Secretary of Education M. Reza Vagefi Subcommittees of the Education Committee Fellowship Evaluation Subcommittee Fellowship Oversight Subcommittee Social Media Subcommittee Oral Exam Subcommittee Chair Written Exam Subcommittee Chair In-Service Exam Subcommittee Chair ASOPRS Coder Subcommittee Chair

Kenneth E. Morgenstern Kenneth E. Morgenstern M. Reza Vagefi Edward J. Wladis Mark A. Alford Kenneth V. Cahill Nicholas Mahoney

Liaisons Serving as De Facto Members of the Education Committee Thesis Committee Chair Alon Kahana Program Directors Committee Chair Evan H. Black Interim Ad Hoc Scientific Advisory Committee Chair Elizabeth A. Bradley It is unfortunately not practical to list the names of scores of selfless volunteers who cannot be adequately appreciated in a brief table, but it is appropriate to thank them collectively for their contributions. Some of these volunteers are more senior members of ASOPRS who return frequently to contribute their time and talents. Others are younger members who are new to ASOPRS. For this latter group, subcommittee work within the education committee is an excellent entrée for collegial networking and volunteer work within the Society. At the beginning of this chapter, Russell Gonnering opined, “The journey of the education committee in the last quarter century has mirrored the journey of ASOPRS itself.” One may further add that the continued involvement of ASOPRS members in the education committee will assure a bright future for the Society.

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Chapter 3

The ASOPRS Foundation Michael J. Hawes, Ralph E. Wesley, and Jan W. Kronish We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak. Epictetus

[Editor’s note: Founded in 1999, the ASOPRS Foundation has assumed an ever-increasing global role in supporting education, humanitarian projects, and research in orbital, oculofacial, plastic and reconstructive surgery. This chapter presents a brief history of the Foundation. More information about the Foundation—its grants and giving opportunities, its past and present leadership and benefactors— may be readily found among the pages of the following website: www.asoprsfoundation.org]

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ORIGIN AND EARLY YEARS Michael J. Hawes Toward the end of my presidency in 1998, I was approached by Dr. James Moses at the fall meeting in New Orleans. Jim asked me whether ASOPRS had a foundation that could accept taxdeductible donations. I said no, but I would look into it. This was the seed that planted the start of the ASOPRS Foundation. I drafted a letter to all ASOPRS members dated October 10, 1999. It read as follows: As the ASOPRS celebrates its 30th birthday, we the members need to look to the future of our Society. Although we are small in terms of numbers, we do have special skills and strengths that are recognized by organized ophthalmology and by our colleagues in other specialties. It is with these thoughts in mind that the Executive Committee has voted to establish an ASOPRS Foundation. The IRS recognizes ASOPRS as a tax-exempt charitable organization or 501c3 organization. This means that an individual who wishes to donate funds to the ASOPRS Foundation can deduct up to 50% of adjusted gross income as a charitable contribution. Any member considering a contribution should check with their tax advisor. The Foundation will have Trustees, senior members of the Society, acting independently from the Executive Committee. Donations will be held in a special account and will not be used for everyday operating expenses of the Society. The donors and trustees will have influence in directing the use of these funds within the legal limitations that apply to our Foundation. Since the mission of our Society is “to advance education, research, and the quality of clinical practice,� the funds will be used in such a way as to support this mission. There were still lots of issues to be resolved. It turns out that starting a foundation is complicated in a number of ways. ASOPRS needed some legal advice. Our attorney, Scott Makar of Holland & Knight, pointed out that according to the Internal Revenue Service code, there is a difference between a 501(c)(3) organization, operated exclusively for charitable, scientific, or educational purposes, as opposed to the 501(c)(6) professional organization status. Certain political activities, such as lobbying for board certification status, are permissible for a 501(c)(6) professional organization, but forbidden for a foundation exclusively for charitable, scientific, or educational purposes. With ASOPRS primed for a battle for board certification, it was clear that the foundation needed to be a separate legal entity focused on charitable, scientific, and educational purposes. Concern was also raised that the primary ASOPRS organization might need to switch to the ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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501(c)(6) professional organization status. Drs. Brad Lemke, Ralph Wesley, and Bill Nunery would address this during their presidencies from 2000-2002. ASOPRS eventually changed its status to 501(c)(6) professional. The year 2000 was spent planning and preparing for the foundation. What would be its mission statement? Were there specific projects that the foundation could sponsor? What would be the relationship of the foundation to ASOPRS? How could funds be raised to support it? Who would be in charge of it? By July 2001, the ASOPRS Foundation (hereafter, simply the “Foundation”) was able to agree upon the following mission statement: The mission of the ASOPRS Foundation is to foster ASOPRS’ educational, research, and humanitarian programs both nationally and internationally. As of November 2001, the fledgling Foundation had already raised $50,000 in contributions. There were ongoing biannual discussions with the ASOPRS executive committee about the legal status of this Foundation and its relation to ASOPRS. Extensive discussions were held regarding the legal entity structure most suitable for the Foundation. Clair Topp of Dorsey & Whitney led the discussion of possible alternatives. The board of the Foundation endorsed a plan wherein the Foundation would retain ASOPRS’ current 501(c)(3) entity and current EIN number. It was always the intention of the Foundation to be under the control of ASOPRS. The Foundation trustees accepted the concept that all Foundation actions will be subject to review and approval by the ASOPRS executive committee. The original trustees of the Foundation were Dr. Richard Dortzbach, Dr. John Wobig, and Dr. Michael Hawes. At Dr. Wobig’s urging, we did contact all of the living past presidents of ASOPRS (and living spouses of deceased past presidents) in 2001 and asked them to consider making a donation to our new Foundation. Dr. Mark Levine and Dr. Richard Carroll became trustees of the Foundation and served in that capacity for many years. Each of the original trustees made a significant personal financial commitment to the Foundation. The drive to raise funds from the past presidents of ASOPRS was very successful. By the end of 2001, $102,000 had been contributed with additional pledges for another $97,000. Nearly all of the past presidents did make a financial contribution. This set a great example for the Society and showed a commitment to the concept of having a Foundation. Encouraged by our early success, the Foundation trustees reached out to the ASOPRS membership and asked for contributions. Common questions asked by potential donors expressed concern with the purpose of the Foundation, as well as information about specific projects that the Foundation would fund. One of the first projects funded was sponsored by Dr. Bill Nunery, who was both a major donor to the Foundation and the principle ASOPRS member involved with training and encouraging development of oculofacial surgery in South Africa. Dr. Nunery made multiple trips to South Africa for teaching purposes, some of which were partially reimbursed and sponsored by the Foundation. Dr. Nunery’s work was also featured in the Foundation webpage that was developed in 2003.

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Another use of Foundation funds was to support an ASOPRS Foundation lecture series. Starting with the 2000 ASOPRS fall meeting, it has become standard practice to invite a guest lecturer, with the lecture being dedicated to an ASOPRS member chosen by the Foundation trustees. The initial honorees included the following: 2000 – Dr. Orkan Stasior 2001 – Dr. Art Schaefer 2002 – Dr. Charles Beyer-Machule 2003 – Dr. Crowell Beard 2004 – Dr. Bernice Brown The Foundation added a new trustee in 2003, Dr. Ralph Wesley. Ralph was extremely energetic and helpful. Like all of the other trustees, he made a personal financial contribution to the Foundation. Beginning in 2005, Dr. Wesley became chair of the Foundation and held that post with distinction until 2016. The trustees continually thought about ways to honor donors. Various categories were developed based upon the amount given. A personal note was sent to each donor, signed and written by Dr. Hawes. The names of donors were published in the spring and fall programs. The most generous donors were invited to the ASOPRS advisory board dinner held at the annual fall meeting, starting in 2003. By the end of 2004, more than 100 individuals had contributed to the Foundation. The Foundation assets exceeded $300,000. It was time for others to take charge of the Foundation and build it to even greater heights in the future. SERVING THE MISSION, BUILDING THE CORPUS Ralph E. Wesley When I became president of the board of trustees of the ASOPRS Foundation, I had already served on the board. It was awesome to be in such close association with Dick Dortzbach, John Wobig, Mike Hawes, Mark Levine, and Richard Carroll. My main concern went beyond just obtaining finances and support, and sought to truly make the Foundation a relevant and deserving part of ASOPRS. When it was first established, I knew some very respected members who did not think the Foundation was needed or would be useful. Consequently, the number one goal was not “collecting” money for the Foundation, but to find worthwhile projects which would be vital to demonstrating its importance and obtaining support from the membership. Hard work had been done by the board raising the first corpus of money, as they personally called to obtain $25,000 in contributions from each of the past presidents of ASOPRS. During the chairship of Mike Hawes, the Foundation had obtained $300,000 in the span of a very few years.

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Over the next decade, this rose through contributions and money management by Mike Hawes and Richard Carroll, guiding the board to nearly $900,000. The board of the Foundation faced taking several years to fund some of our ambitious projects. Normally, the corpus of donated funds would be preserved by spending only the dividends. Dr. Robert Kennedy, who was serving as ASOPRS executive treasurer (before later becoming president) recommended that the Foundation board take a bold, aggressive approach in supporting major, significant projects using the endowment early on. The Foundation would be the “Yes” people. We would say “yes” to the projects, and provide momentum to bring credence to the Foundation goals. The Foundation board recognized that getting a rocket ship off the ground took more energy than keeping it flying. In that spirit, the addition of Chris Fleming to the board was a major shot in the arm. Many times during the years, Chris obtained support, offered sound advice, and single-handedly raised money from surgical product manufacturers to support two- and three-day workshops that included cadavers, airplane flights, meals and lodgings for fellows in sponsored fellowships. Chris was the “can do” person that greased the wheels for many of our endeavors. The first major undertaking was supporting Bill Nunery’s project in South Africa, the major oculoplastic referral center for the entire southern subcontinent. The country had no trained oculoplastic surgeons. Bill Nunery made multiple trips to South Africa, teaching, lecturing, and assisting with surgery, supported by the board. The board originally offered to fund a two-year fellowship for a South African ophthalmologist to train in the United States in a formal two-year ASOPRS fellowship. As we worked with South African ophthalmologists, we saw they were most comfortable with actually starting a fellowship program there, which brought their community together, and moved forward with the structure they felt most appropriate. That seed, planted by Bill Nunery with Foundation support, provided a base of patient care and oculoplastic surgical training to benefit an entire subcontinent of Africa. The Foundation also supported two ASOPRS foreign fellowships to train surgeons returning to their home countries. It then sponsored a yearly guest speaker at the fall ASOPRS meetings. After Mike Hawes had rotated off the board, the Foundation contacted Hawes to dedicate that year’s lecture to him. He adamantly rejected this. Dr. Dortzbach shrewdly suggested that we abide by Dr. Hawes’s wishes, but we would honor his work and name the lecture series for Mike, over his objections. We also dedicated a special service award to Dr. James Moses of Columbus, Ohio, who first came forward and unselfishly offered money through myself and Hawes for worthwhile projects that ASOPRS might want to pursue. Upon the untimely death of Dr. Bartley Frueh, a long-term member of ASOPRS and Director of Oculoplastics at the University of Michigan, the Foundation developed the Bartley Frueh Research Award to recognize the outstanding papers of young members presented to the YASOPRS early AM sessions.

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The Foundation covered fees at the spring meeting for new members who were being inducted into membership. The goal was to expose them to the camaraderie and educational networking benefits of meeting people in a relaxed nature at the spring meeting. The Foundation was the early cardinal supporter of the ITEDS research project. Other grants supported projects to objectively document the importance of ptosis and blepharoplasty surgery in the safety of elderly individuals. One of these projects was carried out by Dr. Bobby Korn. The spring meeting and the annual “Fun Run” was sponsored by the Foundation. The Foundation also became involved in estate planning. When I assumed the position of chair of the board of the Foundation, I was working with pillars of the ASOPRS Society who provided great insight, advice, and support. When I left as president, the torch was passed to a younger generation of board members, full of energy, insight, commitment, generosity, and great planning skills. TODAY AND TOMORROW Jan W. Kronish Dr. David Reifler has asked me to follow two excellent essays with an update on the activities of the ASOPRS Foundation. He suggested that the update begin with the transition of the Foundation’s board of trustees in July 2018 and include information highlighted in the Foundation’s quarterly newsletters through spring 2019. In July 2018, the Foundation’s board of trustees elected me as the new chair of the ASOPRS Foundation. I had the privilege of following Dr. Roberta E. Gausas who had completed two years as chair of the Foundation. Under Dr. Gausas’ leadership, the Foundation’s IRS charitable organization status was clarified through revisions of its bylaws, and it registered as a charitable organization in all states in the US as required. The Foundation reached a one-million-dollar corpus in its investments. At that time, Dr. Kathleen Archer also completed an eight-year tenure as a dedicated trustee, and the Foundation’s treasurer, Dr. Jemshed Khan announced his resignation effective December 2018 after a two-year term. We are grateful for their contributions which included funding a grant to produce this ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book. During the past year, the Foundation played a key role in the educational programming at the ASOPRS fall scientific symposium by supporting the Michael J. Hawes Lecture. The lecture, given by Dr. Malin Malmsjö, was in honor of Dr. Mark R. Levine and was entitled, “Novel Imaging Techniques in Oculoplastic Surgery.” At the 2019 ASOPRS spring meeting, the Foundation was proud to continue sponsorship of the Spring Rising Star Award for Best YASOPRS Presentation. This second annual presentation was awarded to Dr. Emily Charlson, a fellow-in-training in Palo Alto, California. As advertised, the Foundation inaugurated the sponsorship of a new annual lecture at the 2019 ASOPRS spring meeting named the ASOPRS Foundation Ralph E. Wesley Lecture. I had the honor of introducing Dr. Ralph Wesley, describing his amazing life and career, and lauding his unwavering years of leadership of the Foundation.

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The website of the ASOPRS Foundation lists many projects supported by grants from the Foundation. One of the Foundation’s newest grants will assist the Hamilton Eye Institute and Kellogg Eye Center in developing oculofacial surgical care in Ethiopia and other countries underserved in our specialty. Some of the funds will be applied to the purchase of supplies and equipment for clinics and operating rooms, and to train selected international ophthalmology residents at these US institutions with the aim of creating a country-based oculofacial fellowship system. In response to requests by members to include the Foundation in wills or trusts, we have established the ASOPRS Foundation Legacy Society. The Legacy Society consists of ASOPRS members who include the Foundation in their will, trust, or as a beneficiary designation in their estates. As 2019 marks the fiftieth anniversary of ASOPRS, the ASOPRS Foundation established the “50-for-50 Initiative” requesting a donation of fifty dollars (or more) to the Foundation from every ASOPRS member. The ASOPRS Foundation provides over $50,000 in grant funding on an annual basis and plans to increase its granting in coming years. The board of trustees’ goal is to continue to grow the Foundation’s assets so that it can expand its funding to support more projects. To date, over 365 physicians, patients, and companies have contributed to the ASOPRS Foundation, and we are very thankful for the investment and commitment of our supporters to help fulfill its mission.

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Chapter 4

Personal Remembrances of Past Presidents, 1994–2018 George L. Paris Richard K. Dortzbach John N. Harrington James A. Katowitz Michael J. Hawes Perry F. Garber Bradley N. Lemke Ralph E. Wesley William R. Nunery John W. Shore David M. Reifler James C. Fleming

ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

Roger A. Dailey James W. Karesh Stuart R. Seiff Jeffrey A. Nerad Jan W. Kronish Jill A. Foster Michael E. Migliori Don O. Kikkawa Kathleen F. Archer Robert A. Goldberg Gerald J. Harris Tamara R. Fountain

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Editor’s note: The remembrances and comments of twenty-four ASOPRS past presidents were published in Chapter 12 of the 25th Anniversary ASOPRS Book. Fig. 33 (below) is a composite of the black and white portrait photographs that appeared alongside their essays.

Fig. 33. Past presidents of ASOPRS, 1969–1993. Left to right, top row – Wendell L. Hughes*– 1969–70, Orkan George Stasior–1971, and Margaret F. Obear*–1972; second row –Charles K. Beyer-Machule– 1973, Robert B. Wilkins–1974, and Richard R. Tenzel*–1975; third row – Bartley R. Frueh*–1976, George F. Buerger, Jr.* –1977, and David B. Soll–1978; fourth row – Robert M. Dryden–1979, John L. Wobig–1980, and Allen M. Putterman–1981. ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Left to right, top row – A. Jan Berlin–1982; J. Earl Rathbun–1983, and Richard P. Carroll–1984; second row – Joseph C. Flanagan–1985, Mark R. Levine–1986, and J. Justin Older–1987; third row – Arthur J. Schaefer*–1988, Clinton D. McCord Jr.–1989, and Bernice Z. Brown*–1990; fourth row – Arthur S. Grove Jr.–1991, John A. Burns–1992, and Albert Hornblass*–1993 (* deceased). ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Fig. 34. George L. Paris, MD, President, 1994.

GEORGE L. PARIS, MD – PRESIDENT, 1994 When I was a fellow with Crowell Beard, the Society was in only its second year. I was fortunate to get a very personal in-depth introduction to its origins. Crowell invited me to join him in his hotel suite at an AAO meeting where Jack Mustardé entertained with a bottle of Glenfiddich scotch, and Wendell Hughes and Byron Smith were present. They reflected on their individual experiences in WWII. Each was an ophthalmologist caring for war casualties and didn’t know one another then. Because they independently had to deal with various severe oculofacial injuries, they attempted to understand the anatomy of the eyelids and orbit and be innovative in correcting defects surgically. After the war ended, they each began to publish regarding their findings and experiences, and through reading the literature they got to know and admire one another as well as keep in contact regarding their future oculoplastic experiences. In the late 1960s they all approached retirement and recognized the need to pass their knowledge on to younger surgeons—hence the beginning of preceptorships and the founding of ASOPRS in 1969. I was the audio-visual projector at our modest second meeting in a small Las Vegas hotel conference room, and about thirty were present. Little did we know what would evolve twenty-five years later when I was fortunate to have been elected president, and we had twenty-two approved preceptorships with over a thousand national and international ophthalmologists attending our meeting in the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco. I was honored to give the twenty-fiveyear commemoration speech and predominantly used David Reifler’s first book—the ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book—for describing the evolution of our Society. I believe that ASOPRS-sponsored fellowships were the most revered fellowships within ophthalmology. Candidates had to take a one-year (soon to be two-year) fellowship with an approved preceptor and write a thesis regarding new and innovative treatments and surgical procedures dealing with oculoplastic diseases. We had strict quality control of the preceptorships. Fellowships were so competitive that a matching program was instituted for applicants. Drs. Hughes and Smith had passed away but Drs. Beard and Alston Callahan were present and recognized at that function.

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Going forward, our challenge was education, education, education. The goal was to spread our knowledge in the ophthalmology community and to get the message out to patients that we were the most qualified to carry out reconstructive and cosmetic surgery—not only on the lids and orbit—but also the forehead and other facial areas where our discipline had evolved. Somewhat dramatic evidence of this occurred in our twenty-fifth year. It was apparent that reimbursements from functional procedures were decreasing, and the opportunity to expand one’s practice was to emphasize cosmetic surgery. The group from Jules Stein at UCLA including Henry Baylis, Rona Silkiss, and Bob Goldberg led this charge, and younger oculoplastic surgeons followed. This resulted in the one political battle of our twenty-fifth year. A motion was made to spend a significant amount of our resources to hire a public relations firm that could bring more national recognition to our Society. Many of the “senior” members opposed it because they were aware of the time and efforts that had been required to achieve a modest bank account in our treasury. After some strong, often polarizing discussions, it was decided that we would spend the resources only if 75 percent of members voting agreed to do so. Since I was president, I purposely stayed neutral and did not voice an opinion. The vote was taken, and ironically 74.8 percent of those voting voted for it. I had not voted, but I felt that if there was that strong of a feeling to have a PR firm, then I ought to cast the positive vote that made the difference, and so I did. To this day, I’m not sure that the PR firm was that important, because I always felt that one’s abilities and recognition in his or her community was by far the most important factor in how a patient chose a physician-surgeon. It’s difficult to realize that another twenty-five years will have passed in 2019, that it will have been fifty years since Crowell Beard accepted me as a fellow, and that I eventually became president of our treasured Society. This has been a highlight in my personal and professional life.

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Fig. 35. Richard K. Dortzbach, MD, President, 1995.

RICHARD K. DORTZBACH, MD – PRESIDENT, 1995 The spring meeting of ASOPRS, attended by ninety-one physicians and their families, was held in Williamsburg, Virginia, where everyone enjoyed the history of the American Revolution and the spirit of that time. One of the highlights was marching down Duke of Gloucester Street led by the Fife and Drum Corps, to historic inns where we enjoyed historic dinners. Families enjoyed reliving Revolutionary times with residents dressed in period costumes, having their photos taken in the stocks, and taking carriage rides. The fall meeting, attended by 437 registrants and 23 exhibitors, was held at the Inforum, Atlanta Market Center in Atlanta, Georgia. The membership in ASOPRS had grown to 350 physicians. The education committee reported seventeen two-year fellowships and twelve oneyear fellowships in the transition to all two-year fellowships in the future. Twenty-three theses were submitted and fifteen accepted. ASOPRS had representation by Dr. John N. Harrington in the AMA but was still pursuing admission to the AMA House of Delegates. ASOPRS members were very interested that the public relations committee was preparing a media kit to better educate the public about ASOPRS, its members’ qualifications, and oculoplastic surgeons and procedures. At that time, the public knew very little about what surgeon they should choose for an oculoplastic procedure. The fall scientific symposium, chaired by Dr. Robert A. Goldberg, was entitled “Challenging the Future,” and the featured speaker was Dr. Zein E. Obagi who discussed “Skin Conditioning and Eyelid Peel.” The AAO/ASOPRS joint symposium, chaired by Dr. Philip L. Custer, was entitled “Modern Approaches to Cosmetic Oculoplastic Surgery,” with the Wendell Hughes Lecture entitled “Myectomy Surgery for Blepharospasm—Past, Present and Future” and given by Dr. Richard L. Anderson. It is interesting to note that the new communications committee was working on an email line and a World-Wide-Network site for ASOPRS. We were just entering the modern era!

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Fig. 36. John N. Harrington, MD, President, 1996.

JOHN N. HARRINGTON, MD – PRESIDENT, 1996 Memories, 1996. It was a year in which I had the honor and privilege of serving as president of our amazing organization, and it was in many ways a year of transition between the early years of ASOPRS and what it is today. It was the last year before an executive director was on board for the entire year, so the planning and work was the full responsibility of the executive committee and other committee members. There were 281-member fellows of ASOPRS, consisting of 265 regular fellows, two founding fellows, fourteen charter fellows plus thirty-one life fellows and six honorary fellows for a total of 318 with twenty-nine new members added at the fall meeting. Two memberships were revoked due to two years of non-payment of dues by the annual meeting. The first meeting of the year was the spring meeting which was held at the Hyatt Hill Country Resort in the Texas hill country near San Antonio. The resort, which had just opened a couple of years earlier had been booked and the meeting planned well in advance. However, about three months prior to the meeting I discovered that the person on the resort staff who had been the main contact had left the organization and had failed to make or leave any record of the meeting reservation. While bemoaning about it in a panic to a friend, it turned out that he had a business connection with one of the owners of the property. After a quick call to the owner, the meeting, which my wife Beth Harrington and I had so much fun planning, was not only salvaged but very successful. The sporting events included golf and tennis tournaments as well as skeet shooting. The lazy river running through the property was a big hit with families. The major social event was a barbecue and a rodeo at the John Connally ranch near San Antonio, with line dancing completing the evening. Attendees were given western hats as souvenirs. At the educational session, there were still no formal talks given. Instead, members contributed by presenting cases from their personal experience that were failures, or presented some very difficult or challenging problem which was then discussed by the audience; it served as an excellent means of continuing education. Single projected 35-mm slides shown by the presenter of each case comprised the audio-visual presentations. The two-day fall scientific program, with the assistant program chair responsible for the second day, was held at Chicago Hilton and Towers with Barbara Beatty on board as executive ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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director. A new Sunday session was included. There was no registration fee for the second day, and the meeting was open only to ASOPRS members and membership candidates eligible or invited to write a thesis. Progress was made in the audio-visual presentations with side-by-side dual projection of Kodachrome slides which program chair David Reifler featured on the cover of the printed program with a picture of a spotlight and an image referencing double projection. The video recording of the fall scientific meeting was made available for purchase, and work was done to promote and staff an ASOPRS exhibit at the AAO meeting. A taped interview with Rocko Fasanella, MD, was presented as part of the program. Dwight Kulwin gave the Wendell Hughes Lecture. The email listserv was now operational, and work was begun on creating a webpage for the Society through the communications committee. The key business discussed at both the spring and fall business meetings and executive committee meetings was the start of discussion and planning for the pursuit of certification and accreditation for ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgeons, a process which is still continuing as of this writing. ASOPRS played a major role in a joint task force with the AAO and ABO and representatives of other ophthalmic subspecialties, which resulted in the AAO and the ABO seriously discussing the possibility of subspecialty accreditation and certification for the first time. After returning from that meeting, I appointed a committee on accreditation and certification to serve as a think tank and to implement specific plans if it became possible; it met for the first time at the spring meeting. In an effort to help with this, the process of attaining membership in the AMA House of Delegates was begun as an avenue to improve relationships within the house of medicine, especially with plastic surgery and facial plastic surgery. The ENT facial plastic surgeons were also beginning to pursue certification, and together with them and eventually the dermatologic plastic surgeons, we created the Federation of Specialty Plastic Surgery Societies (FSPSS) for discussion of similar shared problems and cooperation within the AMA House of Delegates. There were twelve one-year fellowships and fifteen two-year fellowships. No new application for regular fellowships were received. This was the first year of the three-year cycle of fellowship reviews, and six fellowship programs were selected for review. The number of fellowships was discussed as were term limits for preceptorships.

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Fig. 37. James A. Katowitz, MD, President, 1997.

JAMES A. KATOWITZ, MD – PRESIDENT, 1997 It was an extraordinary privilege to serve as ASOPRS president in 1997. The Society faced many challenges, but fortunately, through the diligence and creative efforts of the executive committee, we were to accomplish a great deal toward fulfilling the mission of ASOPRS. In fact, one of the accomplishments was specifically focused on redefining our mission statement to include facial surgery with the following wording: “The purpose of this Society is to advance education, research, and the quality of clinical practice in the fields of aesthetic, plastic and reconstructive surgery involving the face, orbits, and lacrimal system.” Recognition of the increasing importance of cosmetic surgery to the future of ASOPRS fellowship training led to the decision this year to move to a two-year format for our approved fellowships. This was to be instituted over a two-year phase-in period to permit fourteen odd-, and fourteen even-year programs. It is also now recommended that all programs offer a reasonable minimum stipend for fellowship support. Among the other accomplishments this past year was taking more control of publication for our Society’s journal, Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (hereafter referred to as the “Journal”), as there had been a two-year backlog of articles for publication. In seeking a solution to this problem, I learned that AAPOS had recently assumed ownership of their journal and discussed how this was accomplished with their president, Burton Kushner. Review of our current contract with Lippincott-Raven revealed that we really had no restriction to moving in a similar direction. Toward this end, the executive committee recommended that we assume ownership of OPRS and see if we could work out a suitable arrangement with Lippincott-Raven or move to another publisher. President-elect Michael Hawes and I instituted discussions with LippincottRaven with plans to change from quarterly publications to six times per year, which would help to reduce the backlog and also provide ASOPRS with a potential source of income. The executive committee approved George Bartley to assume the role of editor at the end of Bernice Brown’s term of office. Because of increasing costs in running the Society, including the annual fall and spring meetings, a modest increase in dues was also approved which included a subscription to OPRS and registration fees for the annual meetings.

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We had a very successful spring meeting at Kiawah Island and a wonderful cruise dinner meeting in San Francisco for our fall event. President-elect Michael Hawes was already planning an exciting spring meeting in Vail, Colorado at the Sonnenalp Resort, June 28–July 1. On the education front, a jointly sponsored AAO-ASOPRS instruction course is to be developed by Ken Cahill covering basic oculoplastic subjects presented by five speakers. We were also contacted by the AAO to implement a new morning program for the fall scientific symposium. Early Monday and Tuesday mornings, before the start of the regular AAO meeting, attendees could attend a number of “table talks” with speakers on various topics, with ten ASOPRS topics covered each day. These efforts essentially made ASOPRS a part of the AAO program. I would like to thank the executive committee officers Michael Hawes—president-elect, Perry Garber—vice president, Edwin Augustat—executive secretary, and James Karesh— treasurer, as well as all of our superb committee chairs. I would also like to thank executive director Barbara Beatty and her management team for their excellent support during my presidential year.

Fig. 38. Michael J. Hawes, MD, President, 1998.

MICHAEL J. HAWES, MD – PRESIDENT, 1998 During my year as president of ASOPRS in 1998, there were several significant developments in our Society. Major themes were the growing expansion of oculoplastics into facial surgery and the desire for board certification in oculoplastic surgery. There were some new ideas introduced that have subsequently blossomed into advancements for ASOPRS. The executive committee met at the Sonnenalp Resort in Vail, Colorado. A new idea that had started with Dr. Jim Katowitz’s presidency in 1997 was the concept of sharing profits with Lippincott-Raven publishers for publication of the Society’s journal. ASOPRS would receive 50 percent of the annual profits starting in 1998. As the OPRS journal has subsequently gone on to be hugely successful, income for the Society has amounted to several-hundred-thousand dollars since 1998. ASOPRS made $60,000 in profit from the relationship in 2016 and has enjoyed the prestige of having the premier journal in our specialty. One topic that was discussed at considerable length in the spring executive committee meeting was the ASOPRS mission statement. There was a consensus to include the word “face” when describing the purview of the oculoplastic or “oculofacial” surgeon. A proposed change ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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in the bylaws stated that ASOPRS members were specializing in the “face, orbits, eyelids, and lacrimal system.” This change in the bylaws was accepted by the membership at the fall meeting in New Orleans. Another subject of discussion at the Vail meeting was expansion of ASOPRS membership. It was noted that the ASOPRS membership was slightly over 400 in number, whereas over 1000 American Academy of Ophthalmology members identified themselves as oculoplastic surgeons. The executive committee discussed ways that ASOPRS membership could be expanded. There was concern that bringing in new non-ASOPRS members who were actively practicing in the USA or Canada could undermine the extensive training and testing currently required for ASOPRS membership. Therefore, the idea of a new membership class was discussed and ultimately agreed upon—the International Associate Membership category. This would allow individuals who practiced in a country other than the United States or Canada to become International Associate Members of ASOPRS. This has proven to be an important and popular membership category, with eighty-five International Associate members as of 2016. A decision was also made to add a new award category, the Orkan G. Stasior Leadership Award in Oculoplastic Surgery. Dr. George Bartley assumed editorship of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery toward the end of 1998, succeeding Dr. Bernice Brown. The concept of an ASOPRS Foundation was initially suggested to me by an ASOPRS member, Dr. James Moses, at the New Orleans fall meeting. A separate chapter [Chapter 3] will describe and detail the formation of the Foundation.

Fig. 39. Perry F. Garber, MD, President, 1999.

PERRY F. GARBER, MD – PRESIDENT, 1999 ASOPRS is an organization wherein our members have always taken a very active role in managing our activities and our growth. The year of my presidency, 1999, was the culmination of a decade of working on multiple projects as a committee member and an officer, which I enjoyed immensely. The most enjoyable part was working closely with so many of my colleagues from around the country. I was honored to have had the opportunity to serve over the course of that decade.

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As ASOPRS was growing in the 1980s, there was no composite list of our membership with information about each fellows’ training and practice. Drs. Chris Fleming and John Van Gemert coordinated the gathering of this information which was computerized and eventually became the official ASOPRS Directory, first published in 1989, and updated yearly to become our current online directory. The education committee was always an active committee, involved in administering the written and oral examinations to candidates seeking admission to the Society, and monitoring the fellowships. As chair and the first secretary of education in 1992, we started expanding the written examination with short essays—which were eventually to become short answer questions— and standardizing the oral examination with a bank of questions that all the examiners would use. The fellowship questionnaire and the review were also expanded. The Society’s “Rules and Regulations” were developed at this time as an expansion of the Society bylaws. This formalization of the examinations and fellowship reviews were preliminaries for the hope of eventually achieving subspecialty certification and fellowship accreditation. The officers in 1999 were: President-elect, Bradley N. Lemke, MD Vice president, Ralph E. Wesley, MD Executive secretary – T. David Wilkes, MD Treasurer – Keith Carter, MD Secretary of meetings - Edwin C. Augustat, MD Secretary of education – Russell Gonnering, MD Program chair – Kenneth V. Cahill, MD The 1999 annual spring meeting was held at the Hyatt Regency at Gainey Ranch in Scottsdale, Arizona, May 16–19. Over 100 members attended, many with their families. Dr. Sara Kaltreider coordinated the case presentations and symposia. The social activities included a tour and dinner at Taliesin West, Frank Lloyd Wright’s summer home, and a desert barbecue with western dancing. The fall scientific symposium, “Three Decades of Oculoplastic Surgery” was held at the Renaissance Orlando Hotel in Orlando, Florida. The featured speaker was Dr. Nicanor G. Isse, a pioneer in endoscopic cosmetic facial surgery, discussing “Endoscopic Anatomy and Techniques of the Forehead, Periorbital Area, and Midface.” During the meeting, a video was shown by the archives committee highlighting the career of Dr. Wendell Hughes, a founder of the specialty of ophthalmic plastic surgery, and the first president of ASOPRS. Dr. Hughes was born in 1900, so it was quite appropriate that a tribute commemorating his life be shown at the close of the century. The annual banquet was held on the set of “Raiders of the Lost Ark” at Universal Studios. At the Society business meeting following the scientific session, fourteen new members were inducted into the Society, bringing the total membership to 432. Of special note was that our membership already had two pairs of father-son members, but with the induction of Dr. Daniel Buerger, there was now a father with two sons as members. Dr. Keith Carter, treasurer, reported that the scientific session appeared to exceed budget projections for registration and sponsorship. ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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At the Academy meeting, the combined AAO/ASOPRS symposium was chaired by Dr. Jeffrey Nerad. The Wendell Hughes Lecture was given by Dr. William Stewart. Several initiatives that were started in the previous two years came to fruition in 1999. The charitable, non-profit ASOPRS Foundation that had been proposed by Dr. Michael Hawes, president in 1998, was established with Dr. Hawes, Dr. Richard Dortzbach and Dr. John Wobig serving as trustees. The International Outreach Program whose purpose was to foster oculoplastic surgery and education, as well as interaction between ASOPRS and similar organizations worldwide as proposed by Drs. James Katowitz and Geva Mannor, was established. There were significant changes to the Journal. Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was now owned by the Society in equal partnership with the publisher, so ASOPRS shared a larger portion of the profits. Dr. George Bartley assumed the editorship and initiated numerous changes, including bringing accepted articles to print sooner. Dr. Robert Kennedy, MBA, the appointed chair of the journal committee, proceeded with the help of committee members to increase the subscriptions and advertising of the Journal, thereby increasing its profitability. ASOPRS was recognized by other ophthalmologic organizations as the leader in subspecialty fellowship training and rigorous educational requirements for membership. Dr. Russell Gonnering, as chair of the education committee, brought the examination process and fellowship reviews to an even higher level. At the spring meeting, a full day seminar was held for the examiners on the education committee with a consultant, Dr. Tom Haladyna, to upgrade and standardize the quality of the examination questions. The goal was to better position Society members for possible certification or its equivalency in the future. Dr. Gonnering also developed a grid for a more indepth and consistent review of the fellowships. Four new fellowship program directors were approved by the executive committee in 1999: Dr. James Orcutt in Seattle, WA; Dr. John Long in Birmingham, AL; Dr. Ken Cahill in Columbus, OH; and Dr. Robert Goldberg was approved to assume the fellowship program of Dr. Henry Baylis in Los Angeles, CA. It was becoming apparent by 1999 that there was increasing interest in cosmetic oculoplastic surgery by the membership, although classic oculoplastic surgery was still an important part of members’ practices. It was therefore agreed that our spring and fall meetings should emphasize both aspects of ophthalmic plastic surgery. The executive committee also decided to authorize the production of a new, comprehensive, full-color cosmetic aesthetic brochure. The public relations committee under the leadership of Drs. Robert Goldberg and Jane Olson proceeded with this project, and by the fall meeting it was nearing completion. At the executive committee meeting considerable discussion took place regarding accreditation of fellowships and subspecialty certification of ASOPRS fellows. The general consensus was that accreditation and certification must occur simultaneously. As indicated at the beginning of this summary, the progress of our Society and our subspecialty has always been due to the involvement of our members. During these years, however, one person had been predominantly responsible for managing the Society throughout the year and at our

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meetings. That person was our executive director, Barbara Beatty, whose involvement and dedication to our Society was unmatched and appreciated by everyone that worked with her.

Fig. 40. Bradley N. Lemke, MD, President, 2000.

BRADLEY N. LEMKE, MD, FACS ‒ PRESIDENT, 2000 In 2000 ASOPRS was comprised of 433 members, of which 390 were active fellows, thirty-seven were life fellows, and six were honorary fellows. The 2000 spring meeting was held at the Homestead Resort in Hot Springs, Virginia, and the fall meeting was conducted at the Mark Hopkins Hotel in Dallas, Texas. The spring meeting at that time had a smaller attendance, with 80 to 100 members, and much of the Society’s business was conducted in this smaller, more informal setting. The fall ASOPRS meeting had traditionally been held on the Saturday immediately preceding the Sunday which began the annual American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting. In 2000, the internet was coming of age. It was a time of accelerating communications through email, chat groups, social media, and other platforms. I consider myself the first ASOPRS “email president,” as the lengthy Sunday evening telephone conference calls of the past were replaced by the efficiency of email communications. Communication between ASOPRS and its members was advanced by the enhancement of the Society’s webpage under the direction of Don O. Kikkawa. We established an internet chat group for the discussion of clinical, socioeconomic, and Society issues by interested members. In 2000, the ASOPRS fall meeting was expanded to two days, beginning on Friday. The impetus for the expansion was the strategic addition of facial cosmetic papers, reflecting the expanding scope of our Society to include surgery of the face. At the time we referred to ourselves as “oculoplastic” or “eye plastic” surgeons. Discussions were underway to revise our selfdesignation to reflect the expanding practice and scope of our ophthalmology subspecialty. It was into this expansion that I was elected to lead our group. I personally had obtained certification in facial cosmetic surgery by the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery, as had a number of others of our group. Our ASOPRS fellowship training program at the UW-Madison, among others, offered a concurrent AACS Facial Cosmetic Surgery fellowship. ASOPRS sought to develop beneficial reciprocal relationships with other groups. One of my functions as president of ASOPRS was ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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to develop areas of cooperation with the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery and with the American Academy of Otolaryngology/Facial Plastic Surgery. I served as the ASOPRS representative to the American Academy of Ophthalmology Subspecialty Society Relations Taskforce, as the AAO was reinforcing bonds to its expanding subspecialty base. The evolution of medical science accompanied by increasingly complex diagnostic and surgical technology led to plastic surgery sub-specialization. ASOPRS surgeons in 2000 were being denied privileges to do eyebrow-, forehead-, and face-lifting by hospital privileging boards, which were chaired or influenced by prominent general plastic surgery members. It was in this evolving, competitive, socioeconomic environment that our Society in 2000 sought board certification for our members to allow public recognition of our special expertise. The American Board of Cosmetic Surgery was comprised of board-certified surgeons of all disciplines who developed expertise in cosmetic surgery through additional training. They had developed an American Board of Medical Specialties-equivalent testing process that required an additional eight hours of testing. This was equivalent to the standard set by the American Board of Medical Specialties for their specialty board diplomats. Our Society sought subspecialty certification for our training programs and members under the American Board of Ophthalmology, the first of the American Board of Medical Specialties. As an alternative, we initiated the process of developing an ASOPRS-equivalent certifying board. At the time, our Society had thirty-one ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship training programs. The ASOPRS education committee, chaired by Daniel Schaefer and Kathy Archer, was expanding the ASOPRS testing from four hours to six hours, with plans to expand it further to eight hours in order to arrive at American Board of Medical Specialties testing equivalency. During 2000, three additional programs were approved, and the resignation of one program was accepted. In the fall of 2000, the leadership of ASOPRS was summoned to the offices of the American Board of Ophthalmology in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, to discuss the AAO/ABO thrust to establish accreditation of all ophthalmology training programs. Our Society had not complied initially to an earlier request to submit our training programs to this process. Our reasoning for this was that we felt that our training programs, as supervised and coordinated by the ASOPRS education committee, were simply the best and were unique in their singular origin. The Society did not want to relinquish control and pay costs involved in complying to an external program of a separate national organization, unless the candidates were in turn certified. We firmly expressed our desire to have that effort linked with recognition as a subspecialty board under the American Board of Ophthalmology. The summary of those meeting notes stated, “The ABO representatives recognized the contradiction inherent in the general plastics media campaign and indicated that they would be willing to go to the full ABO board to see if they can join us in sending a letter to the American Board of Medical Specialties expressing deep concern with the actions of the plastic surgeons in claiming that they are unique in providing their services. This letter to the American Board of Ophthalmology has been drafted and is ready for mailing within days to request their support on our behalf.”

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The process toward subspecialty certification is long and political and involves differing socio-economic and political interests within organized American medicine. An accreditationcertification taskforce, co-chaired by Drs. David Reifler and John Harrington, was formed to work with the ABO/AAO Task Accreditation Force in seeking subspecialty certification for ophthalmic plastic surgery. The executive committee decided not to support accreditation of our fellowship programs without accompanying certification of the trainees. Tremendous behind-the-scenes activity is required to maintain, nurture, and grow a Society such as ours. At the time we were administrated by Crow Segal Management Company under the directorship of Barbara Beatty. In 2000, the ASOPRS Foundation was formed under the leadership of Dr. Michael J. Hawes. In conjunction with the charitable aspect of the foundation, there was a parallel study on changing the Society’s incorporation from a profit to a non-profit corporation. The manpower committee, chaired by Dr. Robert Penne, was formed at the spring meeting and made a report at the fall meeting regarding the manpower needs foreseen for the United States to provide enough oculoplastic subspecialty practitioners. At the time, 834 members of the American Academy of Ophthalmology had self-designated as practicing oculoplastic surgery. The report indicated that training seventeen members per year was required to provide for the attrition of retiring physicians, and that training twenty-two practitioners a year would account for the expanding practice-scope of facial cosmetic surgery and the aging of the patient population. It appears that those numbers seem small compared to the number of ASOPRS training programs participating today, the increased aging United States population, and the increased number of referrals to oculofacial plastic surgery practitioners in today’s increasingly sub-specialized medicine. In that year, the thesis committee, chaired by Jill A. Foster, received twenty-two papers as a condition of Society membership. Eighteen of the papers were sent back for revision, and overall thirteen of the papers were deemed acceptable as a condition for membership. As had been mentioned above, the fall meeting was expanded to two days, with the program committee chaired by Dr. Sara Kaltreider. At that meeting, the first Orkan George Stasior lecturer was Dr. Gary Monheit, discussing “The Use of Filler Substances for Esthetic Enhancement.” The first Henry Baylis lecturer was Dr. Norman Shorr. The Wendell L. Hughes lecture was given by Richard K. Dortzbach on the “Management of Severe Unilateral Ptosis: A Thirty-year Experience.” The ASOPRS Outstanding Contributions Leadership Award was given to Drs. George Bartley, Colum German and James Garrity. After having served our Society for twenty years on numerous committees, including as chair of the both the program and the education committees, the proudest moment of my professional life came with my election to the presidency of ASOPRS. I feel thankful and privileged to have been a part of the magnificent, selfless effort of our group. Voluntary participation in this Society continues with amazing energy and quality, and with a singularity of group focus. The combination of ophthalmology with plastic surgery gives our group an exciting, expanding perspective now and into the future. ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Fig. 41. Ralph E. Wesley, MD, President, 2001.

RALPH E. WESLEY, MD ‒ PRESIDENT, 2001 “If you ever use the terms ophthalmic and plastic surgery together, I will take you before the Judiciary Committee of the Nashville Academy of Medicine!” These were the words I heard as I faced Dr. J.B. Lynch who served as president of the American Society of Plastic Surgery and chair of the American Board of Plastic Surgery, and who was also a powerful chair of the Plastic Surgery Department at Vanderbilt University. I had finished an ASOPRS fellowship with Dr. Clinton McCord at Emory in Atlanta, and had qualified for membership and was admitted to membership at the fall meeting of the year 1979. I took a fulltime position at Vanderbilt University as Director of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive surgery and perhaps was the third oculoplastic surgeon to be fulltime at a university, since the preceptors at that time were in private practice running university programs. I had been called down to meet Dr. Lynch in his office. He sat behind his desk, and I was in a chair right across from him in a relatively small area. He quizzed me about where I had trained and then at the end of our discussion, he asked me where I had done my residency in plastic surgery. I explained that I was an ophthalmologist with additional training in oculoplastic surgery. Dr. Lynch was a very tall man with a deep voice and had on a white lab coat. He stood up from his desk, and as I looked up at him, he lit a cigarette, came around the desk, and stood looking down at me straight in eye. He took a draw off of the cigarette, dropped it on the tile floor and used his foot to stamp it out as he said, “If I ever hear you use the words ophthalmic and plastic surgery together, I will take you before the Judiciary Committee of the Nashville Academy of Medicine!” I was so scared and intimidated that I froze, not knowing what to say. He must have thought I was hard of hearing. Dr. Lynch went back around the desk again, lit another cigarette and came back around, dropped it on the floor, squashed it out again with his foot and repeated his warning. At that point I knew that he was a master intimidator and that I would seek the help of ASOPRS in my situation, but also I would do whatever was required so that the most highly-trained people in ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery would not be harassed, nor would there be failure to have recognition for the most competent in the field. I had help from ASOPRS president Richard Carroll, Byron Smith, and others in providing the documentation of all that was involved in training. However, there was no formal recognition ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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of oculoplastic surgery by the AMA, testing boards, or the ACGME. While I never had a problem obtaining privileges anywhere in the Vanderbilt or private hospital system, the Society recognized the need for documentation, recognition, and certification of our training. During the next decade, the American Academy of Ophthalmology had literally squelched any discussion on subspecialty certification for fear that the general ophthalmologists would take offense and this might be an attempt to intimidate them from doing the longstanding oculoplastic procedures which ophthalmologists had performed for years. Approximately twenty years from the time that I had first met Dr. Lynch, the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) summoned six subspecialty groups to San Francisco: oculoplastics; retina; pediatric ophthalmology; ocular pathology; glaucoma; and neuro-ophthalmology. The meeting was one dominated by the ABO with the intent to inform how a program would work without input from any of the organizations. This basically meant that there would not be board certification as a subspecialty, but rather that the ABO would set the standards for the training programs and the certification of programs, but not the board certification of the surgeon. There was considerable rebellion from the subspecialty groups over the next few months. With ASOPRS being the strongest, largest, and most highly organized subspecialty in ophthalmology, the executive committee was called during the year prior to my presidency to the offices of the ABO in Philadelphia. Most senior members of the American Board of Ophthalmology had not been to this office as it was for the executive committee. We met in a small room at a table with about three or four places on each side plus the ends. I sat next to our president, Brad Lemke, and faced the chair of the American Board of Ophthalmology. Clearly, we were their guests and in a situation which the ABO strongly controlled. With a stone face with absolutely no expression, Brad Lemke looked the chair of the ABO in the eye and said coldly, “We’ve been summoned here to meet with you, but we have absolutely no information on the purpose of this meeting.” This stare started the meeting off with the ABO on the defensive, but as discussions were carried out it was actually helpful. We were able to exchange ideas about where we might head with certification, and a cooperative dialogue was established. In November of 2000, as I prepared to begin my term as ASOPRS president, the Society was continuing with the consideration of establishing our own subspecialty board outside the American Board of Medical Specialties in oculoplastic and orbital surgery, perhaps to be called the American Board of Oculofacial Plastic Surgery. We had begun years before in getting metrics of the hours that we tested, both oral and written, and had an outside consultant who evaluated the questions and the results to obtain the appropriate metrics. We also established standards for the fellowship as to the amount of lectureship, preceptors, length of service, and association with the university to form a board outside the ABO. The facial plastic surgery group, which consisted mainly of otolaryngologists but also some of us oculoplastic surgeons, had succeeded in a two-million-dollar verdict against the general plastic surgeons which was used to form a board in California. Several states (not just California and Florida) had laws prohibiting formation of a medical specialty board unless it was under the American Board of Medical Specialties. In a lawsuit by the facial plastic surgeons in California, ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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the court ruled that a board which could show equivalent training and organization could in fact compete with the other boards. The facial plastic surgeons went through this, obtaining impressive data on how the number of facelifts done by facial plastic surgeons far exceeded the assumed training of general plastic surgeons, and when the board granted permission for the facial plastic board there were comments that the numbers of cases by the general plastic surgeons were in question. ASOPRS was looking at the cost and investment in forming our own board. This was discussed at meetings during that year. The membership was also surveyed during that time, revealing that they favored the option of an independent board. At the fall meeting in 2001, the group voted to authorize the executive board to proceed with forming our own oculoplastics board. In fact, Dan Schaefer had the test questions ready to begin. As Bill Nunery assumed the presidency, we felt we would delay this and work further with the ABO since there was a thawing in relations with the board. The board moved ahead with a two-day meeting, including a three-year program slot for the chair, who would have increasing responsibilities and experience over a two-year tract to the position of chair. During the year I was president, we had concerns brought to us by members who could not get privileges in certain hospitals where the most qualified people to carry out oculoplastic facial procedures were the ones having trouble getting procedures. We brought this to the American Academy of Ophthalmology for their input and help. The executive director of the ABO at that time was Dr. Denis O’Day, who was at Vanderbilt in Nashville. We were aware that he had made moves to oppose our advancing to board certification and, in fact, would not meet with us at the meeting in Philadelphia. There had been hostility that I had seen at Vanderbilt, and so I was well aware of that. When I presented in front of the board of trustees of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Denis O’Day was on my right. When I gave discussions of the problems we were having, I finished with the story about J.B. Lynch and his episode of attempted intimidation. When I completed the story, I stated that there was one person on the Vanderbilt faculty who backed me on that, and who was a strong advocate for oculoplastic surgery. I could tell Denis was a bit nervous sitting next to me. I then proceeded to say that this person was Dr. Denis O’Day who is sitting beside me here who gave me strong support when it was needed. I could tell the members of the AAO board knew of some of the tension between us; this story and the painting of Denis O’Day as a hero of ophthalmic plastic surgery helped obtain AAO efforts in mutual cooperation. At the spring meeting with ASOPRS president Albert Hornblass, my family and I drove to Canada, where I fell in love with Quebec City. When I was considering locations, I told Barbara Beatty that I wish we could have the meeting there. After I had looked at several different locations and remained unsatisfied, Barbara said, “You know the only passion you’ve had has been with Quebec City.” I found out that the Canadians there had an incredible support system for meetings, and they in fact termed Quebec City as “Europe without the jetlag.” The meeting was held there, and perhaps the highlight of the event was the Phantom of the Opera presentation ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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in a cathedral right across from the Frontenac Hotel, which was where Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill met to plan the D-Day invasion. Tourism was the lifeblood of Quebec City, and I found that in all the shops they were experts at understanding American high school French and commented to each and every one, “Oh, you speak such great French!” During my term as ASOPRS president, the Society admitted two outstanding persons as honorary members, Dr. Barrett Haik, a well-known ocular and orbital surgeon and oncologist, and Dr. Robert Goldwyn, editor of the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Resuming a tradition of granting honorary memberships eventually facilitated the induction of others including a non-physician, Gunther Weiss, who worked with Dr. Lester Jones in developing the Jones tube, and whose company produced the tubes and distributed them worldwide at affordable prices. The executive board recommended that the advisory board, consisting of the last ten presidents of ASOPRS, have on their agenda the consideration of recommendations for honorary membership. At the 2001 fall meeting, the major topic was moving toward a subspecialty board. At the membership meeting they voted “to endorse the American Board of Oculoplastic/Oculofacial Plastic Surgery and to form committees to provide details for implementation for presentation to the ASOPRS membership in 2002.” The 2001 fall meeting set forth the framework and the option to establish a credible independent board for ophthalmic plastic surgery.

Fig. 42. William R. Nunery, MD, President, 2002.

WILLIAM R. NUNERY, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2002 The year 2002 was an exciting one for ASOPRS and its leadership. It was a year brimming with optimism and enthusiasm. The spectacular strides of the organization since 1969 were evident in the quality of the spring and fall educational programs. The executive committee that year comprised excellent and thoughtful leaders, many of whom have since gone on to the presidency of the organization. That committee included William R. Nunery, president; John W. Shore, presidentelect; David M. Reifler, vice president; Jane J. Olson, executive secretary; Robert H. Kennedy, treasurer; Jan W. Kronish, secretary of education; James C. Fleming, secretary of meetings and AAO councilor; Jeffrey A. Nerad, program chair; and Ralph A. Wesley, MD, immediate past president and chair of the advisory board. Barbara FitzGerald Beatty was the executive director, ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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and guests of the executive committee included Roberta E. Gausas as the 2003 program chair, and Stuart Seiff, chair of the preceptor committee. The spring meeting was held on April 28, 2002, at the lovely La Quinta Resort in Palm Springs, California. La Quinta was the home of the PGA qualifying school and provided fabulous golf opportunities, as well as every family-oriented amenity one could imagine. The fall meeting was held in Orlando, Florida, on October 17, 2002. Much of the optimism and enthusiasm was founded upon the accomplishments of the past several years, the growth and financial stability of the current year, and the expectations of finally reaching the finish line in the pursuit of ACGME accreditation and ABMS board certification for our specialty. The census report at the spring meeting that year reached 455 members. Under the superb leadership of Bob Kennedy as treasurer, 2001 ended with a $55,875 profit, and the total assets grew to $341,449. Bob was instrumental in guiding the organization to change the educational arm to a 501(c)6 corporation, and the ASOPRS Foundation to a 501(c)3 corporation to protect the tax-exempt status of each. Bob’s legal and financial background made him a unique and highly important asset to our organization. His untimely death during his own presidency year was a shock to all of us, and we still experience a feeling of sadness, loss, and longing for his lost years with us, and for his family. On the educational front, the spring and fall meetings contained the usual outstanding educational programs, which have helped ASOPRS maintain its reputation as the foremost educational offering in the world. The fall meeting continues to attract visitors from all corners of the earth. The “Green Journal” in 2002 had achieved its goal of rising from an obscure journal without PubMed inclusion in the 1980s, to the top journal in our specialty world-wide. Journal advertising that year rose twenty-eight percent. Subscription readership rose another 13 percent over the 56 percent increase from the prior three years. Royalties to ASOPRS rose 72 percent to $70,023 per year, helping to keep members’ dues low. High quality submissions were continuing to come in from all over the world with 44 percent of submissions coming from nineteen other countries. It truly became more and more competitive to find space in the Journal, and the executive committee approved raising the support to the editorial staff to $40,000 per year. Written and oral testing of candidates to ASOPRS continued its purposeful evolution toward a true board exam, and more emphasis was placed on cosmetic surgery knowledge, as well as facial reconstruction information and orbital topics. We continued to look forward to board status with eagerness and diligent preparation. Input into ASOPRS awards is always a favorite duty of the president, and I was honored to submit James Karesh’s name to the AAO for the Outstanding Humanitarian Award. Jim had labored selflessly for the indigent population in Brunei, and for the royal family. What made Jim’s contributions especially noteworthy was the realization that he was a Jewish volunteer in a predominantly Muslim Arab country, and he took no concern for his own personal safety to do so.

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The year 2002 also saw the establishment of the Orkan Stasior Leadership Award, to be given periodically to persons who have shown unusual leadership over time in the organization. 2002 saw the award given to Richard Dortzbach, for his distinguished service and leadership. The awards committee, under the leadership of Jeffrey Nerad, also selected Don O. Kikkawa, for the Lester Jones Anatomy Award for his many contributions to the study of surgical anatomy. The ASOPRS research award went to Andrew Harrison for his paper, “Effect of Hyperthyroidism on the Orbicularis Oculi Muscle in Rabbits.” The Henry Baylis Award was presented to Robert Dryden, for his contributions in aesthetic surgery. The Merrill Reeh Pathology Award was presented to Kimberly Peele Cockerham for her article in OPRS entitled, “Clinicopathologic Evaluation of the Mueller Muscle in ThyroidAssociated Orbitopathy.” The Wendell L. Hughes Lecture Award was given to Jonathan J. Dutton, for his lecture, “The Human Orbit: 50 Million Years in the Making.” Finally, Ralph Wesley was given the Society’s Presidential Award for his excellent leadership in 2001. Much of the discussion of the leadership in 2003 centered around the final preparations for ACGME accreditation and board certification. The name to be given was discussed at length, finally arriving at, “The American Board of Ophthalmic Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc.” While I had hoped the culmination of a ten-year pursuit of board certification by multiple leaders would occur during my year as president, it was apparent that completion of the process would carry over into Dr. John Shore’s year as president, and even into the following year when Dr. David Reifler would succeed to this office. It was necessary to allow them to “carry the ball home.” During those years, we understood the importance of board certification to keeping ophthalmic-trained orbital and facial plastic surgeons at the forefront of patient care and advances in the field of orbitofacial surgery and allowing participation in all aspects of facial and orbital reconstructive surgery. It is clear now, in retrospect, that that vision was somehow lost and the goal was never quite realized. It is my hope that the next generation of surgeons in ASOPRS will not have cause to regret the lost opportunity and will continue to strive for ongoing opportunities to position ASOPRS-trained surgeons as the leaders in oculofacial plastic and orbital surgery, and thus be able to compete with other specialties who currently have board certification status.

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Fig. 43. John W. Shore, MD, President, 2003.

JOHN W. SHORE, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2003 It was my honor and pleasure to serve as the thirty-fourth president of ASOPRS from January– December, 2003. This was a pivotal year for ASOPRS. A number of sentinel events dominated. The first and most important was the executive committee’s decision to pursue subspecialty certification for oculofacial plastic surgeons under the auspices of the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO). For the previous decade, pressure had been mounting to address problems members were experiencing with denial of hospital privileges to perform procedures clearly within Society members’ training and expertise. The membership had on multiple occasions asked the executive committee to address the effort by competing specialists and hospital credentialing committees to limit the scope of practice for fellowship-trained ophthalmologists. The executive committee recognized that the first step was to convince the ABO and members of the AAO that the problem existed and was a threat not only to ASOPRS members, but to all ophthalmologists with oculofacial plastic surgical training and experience. Additionally, the executive committee recognized the need to educate the membership on various paths to recognition of expertise or possible subspecialty certification by the ABO. Much was accomplished to this end during 2003. The stage was set for the prolonged process of certification to follow over the next decade by future presidents and executive committee members. In conjunction with the subspecialty certification effort was an initiative continuing from future years to incorporate the descriptive identifier “oculofacial plastic surgery” in either the logo, the mission, or possibly the name of the Society. This was a continuation of an effort that had been under consideration by the executive committee in previous years. By vote of the membership and the executive committee, the term “oculofacial plastic surgery” was adopted but the name of the Society was not changed. Important work continued on the organization and structure of the ASOPRS Foundation. This was a continuation of the process initiated in prior years. Work on improving the written and oral examinations initiated by Jan Kronish, MD, continued, and oversight of the process by the education committee was strengthened. One accomplishment I was quite proud of was the approval by the executive committee and their ensuing invitation for the following members to seek second pathway membership ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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in ASOPRS. Some very productive future members of the Society received the invite, including: Robert Steven Baker, MD; John Collins, MD; Shannath Louise Merbs, MD; Julie Ann Woodward, MD; and Stephen Klapper, MD. Each has made important contributions to the Society in the years that followed, demonstrating the importance of the second pathway for those appropriately trained and devoted to the practice of oculofacial plastic surgery. Similarly, the following second pathway physicians were approved for induction as new members of ASOPRS: James W. Gigantelli, MD; Simeon A. Lauer, MD; Timothy J. Sullivan, MD; Susan Tucker, MD; and Nancy Audrey Tucker, MD. All have made important contributions to the Society since becoming members. International membership in the Society continued to expand with the addition of Kyung In Woo, MD of Soul Korea; Hiroo Yabe, MD of Tokyo, Japan; and Rudolf Guthoff, MD of Rostock, Germany. Dr. Guthoff had hosted a meeting of the European Society of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery in Rostock previously. Several members of ASOPRS had attended that meeting. Several members achieved recognition for their years of membership and devotion to the promotion of the specialty by moving to “life membership” status. Francis LaPiana, MD; George Paris, MD, a previous president of ASOPRS; Robert D. Deitch, MD; and Hampson A. Sisler, MD all achieved this distinction and were thanked for their years of membership and service to the Society. Several had been members since the inception of the Society. The highlight of my presidential year was the spring meeting held in Blaine, Washington, only miles from the Canadian border. Border crossing was onerous only two years after 9/11. That did not deter our members from exploring the shore, mountains, and beauty of Northwest Washington State. Being president of ASOPRS was the highlight of my professional life. I will forever be thankful for the hard work, friendship, and advice of the members of the executive committee, Barbara Beatty, the committee chairs, and the Society members who supported me during my tenure as president.

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Fig. 44. David M. Reifler, MD, President, 2004.

DAVID M. REIFLER, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2004 I had the honor and privilege of serving as ASOPRS president in 2004. Throughout that year, I had tremendous support from our members, our leaders, and our professional staff. I fondly recall the many talents, contributions, and selfless volunteer spirit of these amazing individuals. The many activities of the Society during my presidential year described below are only the highlights of issues and events of my term. I would like to particularly acknowledge the executive committee: president-elect James Christian “Chris” Fleming; vice president Roger A. Dailey; executive secretary Robert A. Goldberg; treasurer Robert H. Kennedy†; secretary of meetings Brian Biesman; secretary of education Kathleen Archer; program chair John V. Linberg; and immediate past president John W. Shore. Even as my term began that January, key committee appointments had been made, and the dates and venues of several meetings were already on the calendar. ASOPRS continued to participate in a February meeting, an “Annual Winter Symposium on the Latest Advances in Facial Plastic Surgery” at the Snowmass Village Resort, hosted by ASOPRS and chaired by Ned Bedrossian. I was proud of our ASOPRS presenters and the high level of interchange with facial plastic surgeons and dermatologic surgeons. The weather was spectacular for being outdoors and my daughter’s first experience skiing remains a pleasant personal memory. In April, an ASOPRS leadership meeting was held in Washington, DC in conjunction with the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) Mid-Year Forum. The issue of possible Academy support for subspecialty certification in oculofacial plastic surgery was quietly put to rest for the time being. Two-thirds of the AAO Council’s voting societies had opposed the ASOPRS petition the previous fall, and an AAO membership-wide opinion survey (January–February 2004) yielded similarly disappointing results. Only about one-third of the respondents to the survey had read or heard discussions about the ASOPRS petition, let alone read the ASOPRS final position paper on the subject which we had refined, internally adopted, and submitted to the AAO the previous month. The ASOPRS leadership decided not to endorse a proposal by the Association of University Professors in Ophthalmology (AUPO) to establish a “Fellowship Council,” which ultimately did not materialize.

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The Society turned its strategic attention to accreditation of fellowships, and I reflected on this at the spring meeting and in an op-ed in the Society’s journal, OPRS, which was published later that year (November 2004). I was very grateful to our 2004 spring program chair Susan Carter for her timely inclusion of a guest speaker for the ASOPRS spring meeting, Patricia Levenberg, PhD, executive director of the residency review committee (RRC) for Ophthalmology. Dr. Levenberg informed our members that, with ASOPRS support, the RRC was open to petitions for fellowship accreditation from individual subspecialties. As others can detail more fully, this came to pass within just a few years. Some of the highlights of the diverse morning scientific sessions so ably organized by Susan Carter included topics ranging from aesthetic surgical materials/techniques to trauma management. Sean Blaydon spoke about his recent experiences as Commander of the 286th Eye Surgical Team which had been deployed to Iraq. My choice for the site of the ASOPRS annual spring meeting was the Ponte Vedra Inn and Club Resort near Jacksonville, Florida. In addition to wonderful amenities, this property was chosen in deference to my wife Karen Reifler’s desire for an oceanfront venue. It had an added benefit of being fairly close to the location of the Society’s first management company, Crow-Segal of Winter Park, Florida (contracted from 1993–2003) and to the Society’s new management company, Kautter Management Group of Altamonte Springs, Florida. It was therefore convenient to invite Bill and Tina Kautter to meet the executive committee at our meeting. More importantly, the Kautters had agreed to retain Crow-Segal’s Barbara Beatty as the Society’s executive director, making the transition virtually seamless. Two of the ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship programs also faced transitions requiring the attention of the executive committee at the spring meeting, and I was grateful for guidance from the education committee chaired by secretary of education Kathleen Archer. The untimely death of Bernice Brown on December 24, 2003 left behind a fellow without an approved program. Fortunately, Steven Dresner had applied for a new fellowship in Los Angeles and, following education committee review and executive committee approval, he was able to provide a transition for the program and for this fellow. Bradley Lemke had announced his intention to step down from being a principal preceptor in Madison and, after education committee review, a new fellowship was approved under Mark Lucarelli. In addition to the scientific symposia, there was terrific golfing at the PGA’s Sawgrass TPC Course (Daniel Dale ably coordinated the golf pairings), an organized daytrip to St. Augustine, and as always, the allure of the ocean beach. Barbara Beatty cajoled Karen and I into wearing vintage 1920’s garb at the President’s Reception at the landmark Epping Forest Yacht Club, a former mansion built in 1926 by Alfred and Jesse Ball DuPont as their Florida residence. Back in Ponte Vedra the following morning, we had our annual ASOPRS Foundation 5K Fun Run, in which I experienced some difficulty breathing. This was coincidentally my first sign of pulmonary sarcoidosis which was only diagnosed two months later. Without thoughts about any particular health issues, I thoroughly enjoyed myself during the final evening, a casual Jimmy Buffet-themed banquet which topped off the social events. After a few missteps in the treatment of sarcoidosis,

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I was successfully switched to different medication, thankfully restoring my health and vigor by the end of the summer. In October, the two-day ASOPRS Annual Scientific Symposium was held at the Sheraton Hotel on Canal Street in New Orleans with the theme, “The Art and Science of Oculoplastic Surgery” and it was very well attended. John Linberg organized the outstanding scientific presentations and guest lectures, which included Stephen Perkins on facelifting techniques and Joseph Gruss on craniofacial plastic surgery. Distinguished PRS editor and Harvard professor Robert Goldwyn had been inducted as an ASOPRS honorary fellow in 2001 and presented the ASOPRS Foundation lecture given in memory of Bernice Brown, whose passing has been mentioned above. His very inciteful and eloquent lecture was entitled, “Effects of Cosmetic Surgery on a Specialty.” Secretary of meetings Brian Biesman had made the arrangements for the Friday night banquet featuring a private performance by Crystal Gayle which included her sister, Peggy Sue Wright. As usual, the hard-working thesis committee, chaired by Morris Hartstein selected three papers for presentation at the fall meeting, and one was chosen for the Marvin Quickert Thesis Award. The awards committee, chaired by Michael Kazim, oversaw the presentation of the awards to deserving recipients and, among these, I was honored to present the ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award to my mentor, Albert Hornblass. At that time, there were 486 ASOPRS members in the following categories: 407 active ASOPRS fellows; sixty-nine life, charter, and honorary fellows; and ten international associates. Seventeen new ASOPRS fellows and six international associates were inducted, and three Category II applicants were invited to submit a thesis as the next step in their membership applications. Dale Meyer chaired our ASOPRS-AAO committee for joint programming at the AAO meeting which followed. These included breakfast roundtables, sponsored instruction courses, and a joint symposium which was expanded by Peter Rubin to include the European Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ESOPRS). The symposium featured the Wendell Hughes Lecture which was given by John Linberg entitled, “Congenital Ptosis and Ocular Development.” The last item on the program at the Sheraton Hotel was the general business meeting which showcased a bright future. New members were inducted, and a slate of future officers was announced and voted upon. In addition to promoting a June 2005 ASOPRS spring meeting in Jackson Hole, the incoming president, Chris Fleming, announced that he had already scheduled a strategic planning meeting in Memphis in January. I began and ended my term as ASOPRS president in 2004 with a great sense of pride in our subspecialty and our Society. I will always be grateful to the Society, all of the committee members, and our many members for their support and their contributions which so greatly contributed to our success and growth.

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Fig. 45. James C. Fleming, MD, President, 2005.

JAMES C. FLEMING, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2005 As I began the year of 2005 as ASOPRS president, I felt that the Society needed to make an impact in Medicine far beyond our numbers. At that time, the number of practicing physicians in the United States was approximately 600,000 with ophthalmologists comprising about 15,000–18,000 (3–5%) of the total. ASOPRS had 510 members in 2005, and we represented approximately four percent of ophthalmologists and only .001 percent of practicing physicians in the United States. To continue to grow the organization’s reach, the executive committee initiated a strategic planning process starting with a retreat in January of 2005 that resulted in a future action agenda for the Society. Even today, we continue to address many of the items which were on that agenda with goals aimed at reflecting the position of the Society within the structure of health care, insuring our members’ abilities to practice the fullness of our specialty in any venue in which we choose to work, and to advance the scientific medical knowledge within our field. We also continued to develop a training process that insured the highest quality that could be achieved for our fellowships and maintained appropriate oversight over this process. In line with our strategic planning, ASOPRS maintained a high level of interactions with other organizations of importance to the Society. We continued to oversee our fellowship process, look at future possible directions on the horizon, and ensure that we were part of any process that evolved. The ACGME fellowships were in their exploratory phases, and we were at the table, placing members on the residency review committee to ensure we would have input. The Task Force on Accreditation and Certification was very active during 2005, looking at all of the alternatives and planning a presentation to the RRC at their fall meeting. In our strategic analysis we determined that a close and continued relationship with the American Academy of Ophthalmology and its leadership was necessary. We began a process of inviting Academy leaders to our spring meeting to cement this, starting with Bill Rich, MD, and multiple leaders to follow. The Society decided to donate to the Academy’s Surgical Scope Fund as one of the originating donors. To enlarge our footprint, we initiated contact with the American College of Surgeons and identified individuals to interact with that organization on our behalf. John Harrington continued to grow our representation at the AMA and also to the Specialty Society at the AMA. Roger Dailey continued his Leadership Development Program Section with ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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a grass roots program of advocacy that could use our relations with AAFPRS, ASDS, and the ASPS to address legislative and business actions such as opposition to a tax on cosmetic procedures. Oversight and development of fellowship training within the organization remained a high priority for the Society. We created a member-in-training category of membership to further bring our young members into the activities of the organization. Entrance examinations with written and oral examinations of prospective members underwent a continued review and upgrade. Preceptors and associated fellowships completed a cycle of review, and we added two new programs. Continued development of internal societal structure included the creation of a standing coding and reimbursement committee to keep up with the ever-changing landscape occurring in this area, and the addition of the Orkan Stasior Leadership Award. Both of these actions helped our members to further bond together and understand our common interests. As usual, meetings were the highlight of the Society’s calendar year. The strategic planning meeting held in Memphis in January set the course for the Society for the next few years. The spring meeting took place from June 17–20 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, in the Grand Teton National Park. Anne Fleming and I felt that it was our great honor to host an amazing group of people in an idyllic setting. This meeting in a national park was well attended and allowed the membership to learn the issues of the day, share scientific knowledge, and experience the wonders of one of the great places on earth. For years after this meeting we had members share their experiences from their time there. The fall meeting in Chicago was planned by Stuart Seiff, secretary of meetings, and the program was overseen by Susan Carter. At the annual fall meeting, it was reported that our journal, Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (OPRS), was showing significant increases in readership and subsequently revenue under the leadership of John J. Woog, chair of the journal committee, and editor Gerald J. Harris. The next slate of officers was reported to the executive committee by nominating committee chair David Reifler, and the slate was approved by the general membership. In summary, it was my pleasure to lead an amazing organization with committed individuals which started at the executive committee, continued through the entire committee structure, and included much of the membership. I and the members of 2005 felt that we were part of a continuum of past and future leaders that accomplished many things for the Society. These activities placed the Society on a path to significant recognition within healthcare in the United States and throughout the world.

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Fig. 46. Roger A. Dailey, MD, President 2006.

ROGER A. DAILEY, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2006 The year of my presidency was known to the executive committee (EC) as the “Year of the Contract.” Our management company services and the work of our beloved executive director, Ms. Barbara Beatty, had come under a new management group, Kautter Management Group (KMG). Over the course of late 2005 and early 2006, it became obvious to the EC that we would not be able to come to the terms of a new contract with the equity partners of this new entity. As such, Bob Kennedy (president-elect at that time) and I were charged by the EC in May of 2006 to research new firms and hire a new management company or go to an ASOPRS in-house executive director. After several months, we identified L&L Management in Minneapolis, Minnesota, negotiated a contract, and hired them starting in 2007. Despite significant efforts on the part of many at L&L, ASOPRS, and Barbara herself to keep her in the ASOPRS family, ultimately, she was unable to make the move from Florida to Minnesota, and Tisha Kehn was appointed our new executive director. Ms. Kehn still serves in that role today, albeit now, ten years later, under the umbrella of ASOPRS. She has done an excellent job and is a good friend to myself and our members in ASOPRS. At the AAO Mid-Year Forum, a successful and major lobbying effort was put forth by Rona Silkiss (AAO councilor), myself, Bob Kennedy, Jim Karesh, and Stu Seiff to get a new definition of oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery passed as a CAR (Councilor Advisory Recommendation). This was necessary to actually define the scope of our practice and was helpful in the long run to get accreditation from the ACGME. As I said at the time, “I gave my liver for the cause;” it was a long forty-eight hours. The AAO also developed a new “Ambassador Advocacy Program” and Dr. Eric Steele was the first representative from ASOPRS to the AAO Mid-Year Forum. Dr. Steele has since gone on to be actively involved in many aspects of ASOPRS and has made many contributions. At the suggestion of ASOPRS Foundation president Dr. Ralph Wesley, Gunther Weiss—the original maker of Jones tubes while developing the tubes with Dr. Lester Jones—was made an honorary ASOPRS member at the fall meeting in Las Vegas. Mr. Weiss only recently turned over the making of the tubes to his son-in-law Scott Wheeler, after overseeing their production for nearly fifty years! ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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We were able to negotiate a new contract with the OPRS publishers, LWW, as well as to allow ASOPRS to keep a significant percentage of the Journal profits. As president of ASOPRS, I was delighted to work with the president of ASAPS, Dr. Mark Jewell, the president of ASDS, Dr. Alastair Carruthers, and the president of AAFPRS, Dr. Ira Papel to form the “Core Four” of aesthetic surgery and the “Physician’s Coalition for Injectable Safety – PCIS.” This resulted in the formation of a PCIS website and many other cooperative educational opportunities. I believe the camaraderie between these four groups has improved dramatically over the last ten years and at this point has never been better. I want to thank Jack Wobig, Henry Baylis, Sonny McCord, Allen Putterman, John Shore, George Paris, Rick Anderson, Robert Kennedy, Stu Seiff, Art Perry, and Chip Cole for all they did for me in the formative years of my practice and involvement in ASOPRS. Their leadership, friendship, and astute council was invaluable to me and much appreciated. I would also like to extend my gratitude to you, the ASOPRS members, for the privilege of serving as your president. We have a great organization.

Fig. 47. James W. Karesh, MD, President, 2007–2008.

JAMES W. KARESH, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2007–2008 The 2007 ASOPRS spring meeting was held at the Ocean Reef Club in Key Largo, Florida on Thursday, June 21, 2007. Bob Kennedy was the president, and I was the president-elect. There was much to discuss on the meeting agenda. It was the first meeting under our then new association management company, LLMSI, and the first time the executive committee had a chance to meet Tisha Kehn, our new executive director. ASOPRS had just received initial approval for ACGME accreditation as an independent subspecialty. Bob Kennedy had recently developed a new ASOPRS investment strategy. Other important issues discussed included limitations imposed by the AAO on our ability to hold the fall meeting on Saturdays as we had done for many years, and a new contract with Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, the publishers of our Journal, which would provide the Society with a significant increase in revenues. In addition, we approved three new fellowship programs and voted to put a temporary hold on approving new fellowship programs until further consideration is given to ACGME approval as a requirement for new and existing fellowships, and we also voted whether there should be both ACGME- and ASOPRS-approved ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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fellowships. Other topics included enhancing our international relationships both in terms of international members and international societies similar to ours, as well as our participation in Physicians Coalition for Injectable Safety. Also discussed were various coding issues and reimbursement concerns, requirements for our representation on the Board of Governors of the American College of Surgeons, and the ASOPRS Foundation report. With the exception of our new management team, the items discussed were all within the realm of “business as usual.” I left Friday afternoon to spend the Jewish Sabbath in Miami. I was still in the mourning period for my mother who passed away several months before and needed a minyan to say kaddish for her. Saturday was the spring meeting 5K run. Saturday evening, as I was returning from Miami, I received a call from my wife who asked me to pull off to the side of the road. I don’t remember if there was such a thing as a “hands-free” phone at that time. After pulling over, my wife told me that Bob Kennedy had just died. I still remember being stunned by the news. How could this be the case? I had just seen him Friday and had a meeting with him on Thursday. He was young, a pilot, and seemingly in excellent health. After composing myself, I drove back to the meeting to find out what had happened. Bob had been on the 5K run when he had collapsed. Stu Seiff, Bill Nunery, and others had attempted CPR without success. Beyond that it wasn’t clear what had happened. While the meeting continued for the one day that remained, Bob’s death weighed heavily on everyone’s mind. I was now the president of ASOPRS six months early. I didn’t feel prepared. Bob was a hard act to follow. I was fortunate to have a great board to work with, and Tisha was a “gem,” making my transition to the role of president painless. I was in the process of transitioning down from my position of chair of my ophthalmology department, and I needed a little time before the upcoming fall meeting to settle a number of issues before focusing on ASOPRS business. The 2007 fall scientific symposium was to be in New Orleans in conjunction with the AAO annual meeting. The executive committee had adopted the policy of having a conference call prior to the “in person” meeting at the fall scientific symposium. Hopefully, this would shorten the often excessively long executive committee meetings that were quite common previously. At the conference call, issues discussed included an increase in the management fees we paid to our new association management company due to the increased workload generated during our transition from our previous association management company. Other items discussed were travel reimbursements for non-executive committee members who were asked to attend the executive committee meetings, routine reports regarding membership, various routine fellowship issues, Society finances, the state of the Society’s journal, and new patient brochures on the topics of blepharospasm/hemifacial spasm, Botox, and facial fillers. The two items that stood out were the development of a “white paper” that clearly outlined our education system and the training our fellows received. This was felt to be important as some of our members had had trouble being granted hospital privileges, and substantiating the training fellows received would ease the credentialing process. The other item that stood out was the best way to honor Bob Kennedy as well as the three other Society members, Drs. Albie Hornblass, Stephen Bosniak, and Kenneth Piest, who had prematurely died during the past year. At the executive committee meeting, the members held ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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a moment of silence for these members. Ultimately, the Robert H. Kennedy Presidential Award was established to honor the immediate past president for his/her hard work for and dedication to the Society. Over the eighteen months of my presidency, the most significant topics for discussion revolved around obtaining ACGME accreditation/certification for our fellowship programs. The uncertainty regarding ACGME requirements and whether or not the current requirements for ASOPRS-sponsored fellowships would be in sync with the ACGME requirements was one of the underlying reasons for putting a hold on new ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship programs. In this vein, there were discussions regarding the possibility that there might be two types of fellowship programs, ACGME-certified and ASOPRS-certified, or the possibility that ASOPRScertified programs be phased out. There were also discussions regarding our relationship with the American Board of Ophthalmology and the possibility that individuals who completed ACGMEcertified fellowships would then be able to obtain a certificate of added qualifications, also known as subspecialty board certification. We also discussed how this could be achieved, and what it might mean for individuals who had completed ASOPRS-sponsored fellowships and had been in practice for many years. These topics remained on the executive committee agenda long after I completed my term as Society president. At the 2007 fall meeting in New Orleans, in the executive committee meeting, we finally definitively addressed the issue of duplicate paper presentations at both the AAO and ASOPRS fall meetings. For years, individuals had submitted presentations to both meetings and then waited to see if they would be accepted by Ophthalmology before submitting them to the ASOPRS journal. The executive committee added a clause to the Rules and Regulations of the Society; Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery owned the copyright to all presentations given at the Society’s annual scientific symposium. Any author who violated this, would be banned from presenting at future meetings for a two-year period. During this same meeting, the executive committee established the website committee. This committee was given the task of upgrading the Society’s website. This turned out to be another multi-year project that went through multiple iterations. A decision was made at this fall meeting to make an attempt to trademark some of the names and acronyms used by the Society including various iterations that included the words “oculofacial,” “orbitofacial,” and “ophthalmofacial.” A discussion was also held to determine whether the Society should officially change its name to include one of these terms. Discussions regarding this issue continued over the course of several executive committee meetings. The executive committee meeting agenda in conjunction with the 2008 AAO mid-term meeting in Washington, DC, revolved around routine Society business including the Society’s participation in the Physician Coalition for Injectable Safety (the Society was one of the founding members), and support for various AAO initiatives, including the elimination of wrong-site surgery, approval for continued donations to the Surgical Scope Fund, and a recently inducted Society member as a delegate to the AMA Young Physicians Section.

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For me, the high point of my presidency was the 2008 spring meeting that was held in Washington, DC at the Mandarin Hotel. A new US president had just been elected, and my birthday was going to bookend the beginning of the meeting, with the Fourth of July bookending the end of the meeting. Kids would be off from school and ASOPRS’s members could bring their whole family to experience the nation’s capital. The Capitol Steps provided entertainment, a US Marine Corps Color Guard presented the National Colors, and the US Marine Corps Band played for the assembled ASOPRS members at the banquet. One of the activities for those attending the meeting was the opportunity to spend an afternoon kayaking on the Potomac river. It was a great way to see the city and its monuments from a different perspective. The important topics for the executive committee meeting included the company that had been selected to redesign the Society’s website, further development of the “Clinical Privileges White Paper” supporting the education and training of ASOPRS’s members as they seek hospital privileges, and the accreditation/certification process at the level of the ACGME which seemed to be moving in a positive direction. We moved to revise the ASOPRS exam to be consistent with the exams given by the ABO and revise the ASOPRS Rules and Regulations to reflect the fellowship terminology used by the ACGME (changing “fellowship preceptor” to program director, “ASOPRS sponsored fellowships” to ASOPRS-accredited fellowships, and “associate preceptors” to faculty). While new fellowship applications continued to be frozen pending the ACGME decision, it was noted that ACGME asked ASOPRS to continue business as usual. With that in mind, a decision was made to accept new fellowship applications as long as they complied with ACGME guidelines. Finally, the executive committee approved the formation of a Women in ASOPRS group to function as a social group. My final meeting as president was the fall meeting of 2008 which was held in Atlanta. A significant item on the agenda concerned a report from an ASOPRS fellow regarding a fellowship training program that did not meet the standards set by the Society. An investigation of this allegation supported the finding that the fellowship did not meet the criteria and expectations for an ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship. It was agreed that the program director would be given an opportunity to defend the fellowship, and if this defense was not successful the program director could voluntarily deactivate the fellowship, or the executive committee would rescind ASOPRS sponsorship of the fellowship. In this same vein, the executive committee discussed the membership of two individuals who had lost their licenses to practice medicine. It was determined that they no longer met the criteria for membership due to dishonorable conduct and the loss of their medical licenses, and thus their names should be removed from the membership rolls. The individuals were given an opportunity to appeal the decision. Both of these decisions were difficult as no one on the executive committee could remember any action of this sort taking place over the previous fifteen years. The executive committee was given the result of a strategic planning survey developed and sent to the membership by Phil Custer. Significant items on this survey included practice patterns, opinions regarding the subspecialty certification in ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery, the importance of ACGME accreditation, and whether or not ASOPRS should develop its own ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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board for the purposes of certification. What seemed surprising were the number of responses questioning the need for subspecialty certification and the need for ACGME accreditation. It was reported that the ACGME had not as yet approved accrediting ASOPRS fellowship as all of the involved residency review committees had not signed off on the application. It was anticipated that ACGME final approval would not be completed until the summer of 2010. Two important decisions were made regarding fellowship programs. The first of these was to reopen the fellowship program application process and to accept two new ASOPRS-accredited fellowships. The second of these, which was a complete “180” from previous executive committee policy, was to remove restrictions on program directors participating in more than one fellowship. The remainder of the meeting involved the usual business of approving financial reports, new member applications, report on website upgrades, and reports from other standing committees. At the end of 2008, I stepped down from what had turned out to be the second longest presidency (after Wendell Hughes) in ASOPRS history. I was grateful to my hard-working executive committee and to Tisha Kehn for helping me make it through an unusually long and difficult year. Stuart Seiff took over as the ASOPRS president in January 2009 when I became a past president and moved on to the advisory board.

Fig. 48. Stuart R. Seiff, MD, President, 2009.

STUART R. SEIFF, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2009 As I started my presidential track in 2007, ASOPRS was the model subspecialty society within ophthalmology. We have been responsible for the training, education, and “recognition” of ophthalmic plastic surgeons for almost fifty years. We had much to be proud of. My goal was to uphold this tradition. Management. Barbara Beatty was the first executive director of ASOPRS, moving day-to-day management of the Society out of our president’s medical office. In my view, this made us a “real” Society, and Barbara became a big part of our heart and soul. We all owe her a great debt of gratitude. However, in 2005–2006, differences arose between ASOPRS and Barbara’s management group. I suspect this will be better detailed in Roger Dailey’s chapter. Nonetheless, Roger and Bob Kennedy negotiated a contract with L&L Management in Minneapolis to take over ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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management of ASOPRS beginning in 2007. Our new executive director became Tisha Kehn, and she did a wonderful job picking up where Barbara left off. However, Tisha and the Society were dealt a major blow when our president, Bob Kennedy, died suddenly during the 5K run at his spring meeting at Ocean Reef Club on Key Largo. Jim Karesh did a great job of pulling things together and effectively beginning a two-year presidency. I did what I could to support him in my vice president role in areas where I had some working knowledge. I must also say that the executive committee stepped up, as did the membership at large. Bob Kennedy would be very proud of what ASOPRS has achieved standing on the shoulders he provided. One of the advantages I had during my term was that ASOPRS was beginning to build a strong financial reserve. Bob Kennedy used his business management skills to help establish an improved financial footing for ASOPRS while he was treasurer. Previously, I remember executive committee meetings where the Society was living financially from one fall meeting to the next. Bob took steps to develop a strategic financial plan. Things turned around fairly quickly under his leadership and he passed the treasurer torch to Bryan Sires, who continued our financial growth through 2008. Gary Weinstein volunteered to take on the treasurer role during my presidency and did a super job. In spite of the “recession” of 2008, ASOPRS survived in fine shape through the skill of our treasurers. We have since built on these successes and are now advised by a finance committee that has provided ASOPRS with good working capital and reserves. These reserves included an assessment of the membership of $500 to fund accreditation/certification efforts. Accreditation/Certification. Although our members realized the quality represented by completing an ASOPRS-accredited fellowship and becoming a fellow of the Society, the rest of medicine and the public had little understanding of this. This formed much of the basis for the Society’s work on accreditation and certification. Unfortunately, our scope of practice was unrecognized by other specialties in a time of increasing regulation. This led to difficulties for our members in obtaining hospital and other clinical privileges. It has been one of my ASOPRS leadership goals to help remedy this problem. One of my first efforts was to help assemble a “credentialing manual” that contains articles on facelifts, browlifts, midface surgery, and liposuction written by ASOPRS members. The goal was to demonstrate that these areas were a part of the academic program and scope of ASOPRS members. When I became chair of the preceptor committee (soon to become the program director committee), I worked to help programs incorporate these training opportunities into our fellowship curricula. Further, many of us were teaching classes in these areas at the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings each year. During my tenure as the oculoplastic representative to the AAO Skills Transfer Course (which overlapped my presidency), I worked to add additional courses to the skills transfer curriculum including facelift, rhinoplasty, botulinum toxin, dermal fillers, and endoscopic techniques. Our goal was to achieve either independent board recognition of our training in ophthalmic plastic surgery, or subspecialty recognition within ophthalmology. This was in response to a previous membership survey. An opportunity arose in the late 90’s when Denis O’Day, the executive director of the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO), said he would consider an application for subspecialty recognition if the “House of Ophthalmology” gave approval. We therefore set ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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out to get such approval from the AAO in 2005 and began working with Dunbar Hoskins and Richard Abbott to generate a consensus of the AAO Council. This effort generated a 30 percent show of support from the Council, which we were quite pleased with for a first effort. However, more importantly, we learned that the best way to achieve a path to certification was to first develop an ACGME fellowship curriculum and have them accredit ophthalmic plastic surgery fellowship programs. This was to be a bold step as it would mean loss of ASOPRS control of the fellowships, and some of our “heart.” Bob Kennedy and I met with Dunbar Hoskins, then executive vice president of the AAO, in Cancún to inform him of our plans. He understood our position and stated that AAO would not oppose our efforts, realizing we had some special needs in view of our overlap with other specialties. We needed to navigate this course carefully. Bryan Sires chaired the accreditation/certification committee. Jim Orcutt was on the ACGME resident review committee (RRC) for Ophthalmology, which would oversee the Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery division. We used a formalized and expanded version of the ASOPRS fellowship curriculum as the ACGME program requirement (PR) template. We further constructed the fellowships to be “ACGME institution independent” rather than “dependent.” This would allow us to maintain the private practice models that had worked so well over the prior thirty years. ASOPRS leadership, early in my presidency, signed off on the proposed PR and Jim Orcutt helped move it through the ACGME process. I recall two conference calls during the process that were difficult. We had wanted the ACGME fellowships to be identified as “Oculofacial Plastic Surgery.” The otorhinolaryngology (ENT) representatives were extremely concerned that this would “lead to confusion among their members.” Although we were unconvinced about this “confusion,” we decided to allow the process to move forward with “Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery,” which is in the name of our Society. We did not want to use up all of the good faith on this item. Subsequently, Jim Orcutt represented us at a consensus committee meeting with specialties that had specific concerns about the creation of these fellowships, specifically plastic surgery and ENT, who both had concerns about the inclusion of rhytidectomy (though ENT had concerns about our inclusion of sinus and nasal endoscopy). They felt this opened the door to functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Jim and I discussed this and offered language to allow rhytidectomy “related to periorbital processes” and a similar qualifier to sinus endoscopy. We felt comfortable with these compromise discussions, and the process allowed the PR to be formally published in September 2009. We had five fellowship programs successfully complete the ACGME accreditation process. They were under the direction of Evan Black (Wayne State), Bill Nunery (Louisville), Jennifer Sivak-Callcott (West Virginia), Bita Esmaeli (MD Anderson), and Aaron Fay (Mass Eye and Ear). The Society owes these pioneers a great debt of gratitude! Once the PR approval became known to the ABO, John Clarkson, the executive director at that time, appointed George Bartley as chair of a committee to explore the financial and practical realities of moving subspecialty certification forward. This was pretty exciting stuff! However, at the 2009 fall meeting in San Francisco, it was pointed out that the language we had agreed upon had not been published as such. There was language regarding rhytidectomy that “limited” it to “periorbital tissues” (which we felt meant blepharoplasty), and the endoscopy ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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descriptions were incomplete. Somehow, the agreed upon language had gotten changed at what seemed to be the staff level without our knowledge. Further, Bill Nunery felt strongly that orbital trauma was not adequately included in the skills section of the PR. This was a big problem as the document clearly seemed to limit, rather than support, our scope of practice. I immediately contacted the Ophthalmology RRC chair, both verbally and in writing, and pointed out the problem. They were very unsupportive of our concerns and did not respond to our communications. I consulted with the ASOPRS executive committee and advisory board. We agreed that a public document such as an incorrect ACGME PR represented a potentially serious problem for our members in terms of credentialing. We agreed to seek help higher up in the ACGME, and thus approached Dr. Thomas Nasca, the CEO. Communications there were fairly non-productive, so the decision was made to hire counsel. Ultimately, we did get a conference call with Dr. Nasca but ended up speaking with only their attorney, who stated that Dr. Nasca was unavailable, and told us that there was a multiyear process for changing PR’s and we should follow that, as they do not vary in the process. We considered further litigation but given the costs, decided to go with the process. However, we began systematic support of the existing ACGME and ASOPRS programs to assure they met our oculofacial plastic surgery fellowship standards that we were proposing to ACGME as PR changes. We further put a moratorium on additional ACGME fellowship applications and asked the ABO to suspend the process of developing a subspecialty certification. This was a very disappointing situation at the end of my presidency. I faulted myself for not checking and rechecking work products. It was an important lesson learned. Those of us on the accreditation/certification committee continued our efforts over the next few years, with the help of many friends. Tony Arnold became the chair of the Ophthalmology RRC and he shepherded our suggested changes through the process. This long ordeal culminated in February 2016 with the approval of ASOPRS suggested changes to the PR at a conference committee of the ACGME in Scottsdale AZ, where I had the pleasure of representing ASOPRS. I thank Bob Goldberg, then ASOPRS president, for allowing me the opportunity to close this loop. During this multiyear process, times changed in medicine. Finances in academic medicine became more difficult, and ACGME accreditation of ophthalmology fellowships would bring additional financial burdens to academic departments and to private practices. Other fellowship accrediting options, including those by the AUPO and ASOPRS, seemed to offer other possibilities. The ABO and American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) have begun exploring the recognition of other training accreditation options to make physicians eligible for subspecialty board recognition. As I write this chapter, I am quite positive about being able to achieve some form of board recognition for the work our members have put in. However, I do not regret the work in getting the ACGME PR “right” as it will serve as a model for future programs and official recognition of what our members have received training to do. The ACGME PR has likely helped smooth the path for credentialing for many of our members. Society Name. Our wonderful Society bears the name, “The American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.” The founding members thought long and hard in developing this name. It reflected the fact that much of our work was focused in the periorbital area. Our ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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subspecialty has also been referred to as “oculoplastic surgery.” However, over the years, we realized that we needed to work over the entire face to achieve our best outcomes. Executive committees struggled over the years with a potential name change to better reflect what our members offer patients in our practices. “Oculofacial Plastic Surgery” was agreed upon but no executive committee, including mine, was ever convinced we should change the name of the Society. Instead, my executive committee decided to incorporate “Oculofacial Plastic Surgery” into our logo, and we moved forward with trademarking the logo. We were advised that actually trademarking “oculofacial plastic surgery” might meet with some resistance and did not pursue this. However, we all agreed that including Oculofacial Plastic Surgery into our “product” was a worthwhile effort. We created lapel pins with the logo which were presented to the founding members and past presidents at our fall meeting in San Francisco in 2009. We have made additional progress in identifying our practices in the subspecialty of Oculofacial Plastic Surgery, while keeping our historic Society name. Conspicuous examples include the consistent use by the AAO of Oculofacial Plastic Surgery in program and topic titles, as well as in the naming of academic divisions. Intersociety Affairs and Advocacy. During the 1990’s there was a sense among some members that ASOPRS actually had more in common with other medical specialties than ophthalmology, and we should work more closely with them. Many members felt estranged from the AAO given restrictions on our fall meeting space and days. While I was secretary of meetings, Barbara Beatty and I had to work with suboptimal space in Chicago as well as no space assigned in Las Vegas. We thus began a policy of obtaining our own meeting space, apart from the AAO blocks, that continued though my presidency. Tisha Kehn and L&L Management did a good job of making this work, building on the preliminary sites Barbara Beatty had secured. These actions on our part clearly irritated the AAO meeting staff, and their general lack of cooperation with ASOPRS staff was quite frustrating for more than one administration, including mine. Our fall meeting was a recurring source of irritation for the AAO, and our lack of participation in an oculofacial plastics subspecialty day was an additional problem. Clearly ASOPRS had concerns that an AAO subspecialty day would compete with our own fall meeting. Thus, a meeting was set up between Jeff Nerad (president-elect), David Parke (EVP AAO), the AAO meeting staff, and myself in San Francisco. The outcome was that we would work with AAO and plan an oculoplastics subspecialty day, and we would adjust our meeting dates over time. In return, AAO would facilitate meeting space for our fall meeting including Thursday/Friday slots. This arrangement has continued to the date of this writing. Roger Dailey became involved with the Physicians Coalition for Injectable Safety which was supported by Allergan in an effort to make sure patients were not exposed to “counterfeit” products. The members of the group included ASOPRS, AAFPRS, ASAPS, and ASDS. The project was successful, and the group felt that we had many interests in common and that we should continue the relationship. On behalf of ASOPRS, Roger Dailey and I met with representatives of the other groups in Huntington Beach, CA in 2008. The result was the formation of the Physicians ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Aesthetic Coalition (PAC) with our first organized meeting in 2009. This group continues today and has been instrumental in helping successfully advocate in areas of mutual interest. In 2016, PAC members worked together with the AAO, ASPS, and AMA to reverse a CMS ruling that would have imposed restrictions on Medicare patients desiring blepharoplasty and ptosis repair. Journal. I remember Roger Dailey telling me that the one thing I did not want to do during my presidency was replace the OPRS journal editor. Well, sure enough, after years of incredible service, Jerry Harris decided to resign. This was a tough pill to swallow as Jerry had really done a great job both from academic and financial standpoints. However, I got lucky and Jonathan Dutton agreed to take on the role. He too, has been great, bringing the Journal to an even higher point of excellence. Thanks to both Jerry and Jonathan. Fellowship Match. Since we first started our fellowship match, we had been with the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). However, during my tenure, the NRMP decided that they would only administer matches for ACGME accredited programs. Given our work toward such accreditation, I was able to buy us a few years with NRMP. However, our years with them were limited, and the next couple administrations did a great job of making the transition to the SF Match program that administers the ophthalmology match and which is overseen by the AAO. The transition was smooth, and the match functions very nicely due to the efforts of recent ASOPRS leadership. Advisory Board. ASOPRS presidents serve for ten years on the advisory board. In general, this has been an honorary position. I found that consultation with advisory board members was extremely helpful in resolving difficult issues. Their cumulative experience and knowledge of the Society was invaluable. I strongly suggest that future presidents make good use of their advisory board members. Our Society’s Past. As many of you know, the roots of our Society go back to the later years of World War II when the combined skills of multiple specialties were needed in an effort to reconstruct defects cause by war injuries suffered by our troops. This is where many of our specialized periorbital techniques were developed. Unfortunately, in 2009, as we celebrated the Society’s 40th anniversary, our nation was again involved in military action, this time the War on Terror. Many of our members were actively involved in this war effort. I chose to open the 2009 spring meeting at Laguna Niguel with a tribute to those who were serving, and had served, in efforts to defend the rights and freedoms we enjoy in this country. At the conclusion of the program, Colonel Robert Mazzoli presented to ASOPRS several command medallions in recognition of the contributions ASOPRS members had made to military medicine. These included medallions from the Surgeon General of the Army, Commanding General Western Regional Medical Command, Commanding General Brooke Army Medical Center, and the United States Army Medical Command. I was proud to accept these on behalf of ASOPRS. Our Society’s Future. With outside accreditation of oculofacial plastic surgery fellowships and some form of board certification looming, we started planning for what our Society might look like in the future with a strategic planning meeting in 2009 in San Francisco. We concluded that such changes would mean that we might no longer oversee the fellowship programs, program ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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directors, or exams. We would likely take on a focused educational and advocacy role, much like the AAO. We further explored the idea that board-certified members, and existing members who had passed ASOPRS requirements, would be fellows of the Society, while those without such recognition would be members. This would allow us to substantially increase our financial, membership, and advocacy bases. As discussed above, new accreditation and board “recognition” options have appeared that may change this dynamic somewhat, however, this broad plan remains viable. In reviewing the above history, it seems like we accomplished much. I freely admit that this was only possible because I was blessed with a great executive director, executive committee, and advisory board, and a membership that is always eager to contribute. Such has been the tradition of ASOPRS, and I trust this shall continue.

Fig. 49. Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD, President, 2010.

JEFFREY A. NERAD, MD, FACS ‒ PRESIDENT, 2010 The 2010 ASOPRS year was great for the Society and for me. Thank you for allowing me to be your president. The major objective of ASOPRS is the education of our members and the advancement of science within our field. The highlights of the activity throughout the year are no doubt the annual meetings. The fall scientific symposium, under the theme ‘Oculofacial Plastic Surgery in the New Decade: Technology, Innovation, Inspiration,’ was held October 13–14 at the Fairmont Hotel in Chicago. The meeting was organized by Don O. Kikkawa. Guest speakers included Frank Trepsat, MD, Rod Rohrich, MD, and Mark Berman, MD, where the focus was on anatomic evaluation and clinical rejuvenation procedures of the face. The fourth guest speaker, Lelio Baldeschi, MD, described the EUGOGO approach to managing thyroid eye disease (TED). George B. Bartley delivered the ASOPRS Foundation Lecture dedicated to our colleague and beloved friend, the late Dr. Bart Frueh. A huge variety of functional and aesthetic papers were presented from the podium by member and guest surgeons. Abstracts, videos, YASOPRS “Eye Openers,” and four breakout sessions complemented the speaker presentations. Rob Fante organized the aesthetic day with Brian Biesman and Jean Carruthers as featured speakers. The annual banquet was held at Spiaggia, a James Beard nominee for outstanding restaurants. Porex ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Surgical was the major sponsor of the dinner. The fall meeting was a great success with just under 700 doctors attending. The spring meeting was held in one of my all-time favorite spots, Aspen, Colorado. The meeting took place in the St. Regis Hotel June 10–13. J.D. Perry did a tremendous job organizing the meeting where 110 members attended. Case presentations, as well as special presentations regarding successful strategies to manage office and personal business matters were presented. As always this was a time where members could enjoy the outdoors and get to know one another better. An emphasis was placed on getting to know the new inductees. Four major political topics were on the annual agenda: the ASOPRS relationship with the AAO; membership growth; relationships with the other related subspecialties, including dermatology, facial plastic surgery, and plastic surgery; and subspecialty credentialing. Discussion throughout the year with David Parke, EVP and CEO of the AAO, led to the addition of an oculoplastics subspecialty day at the annual AAO meeting. This was helpful for the comprehensive ophthalmologist and younger ASOPRS surgeons, and it cemented the mutual commitment of ASOPRS and the AAO to work together on important political issues. The membership continued to grow. An emphasis was placed on making international members and guests feel welcome to attend. The years around my presidency saw a period of growth in the scope of practice and the importance of our subspecialty in the care of medical and aesthetic issues of the face. Our organization reached out to the related subspecialties in the interest of patient care, education, and political unity. These efforts were led by many, but my special thanks go to Roger Dailey for his role in the development of what is now known as the Physicians Aesthetic Coalition (PAC). This work has continued since that time. The scope of clinical practice and the educational objectives of our fellowships demonstrated a high standard of care as set out by the education committee. During the year, many discussions were held regarding the importance of subspecialty board certification in Oculofacial Plastic Surgery. The majority of members were in favor of pursuing this, although there were many reasons to proceed cautiously. Through the work of past president Stuart Seiff, Bryan Sires, Jim Orcutt, and many others, ASOPRS went through the official channels of the American Board of Medical Specialties. At that time board certification was not obtained. Many members were disappointed; however, the talent and the essential role of the oculofacial plastic surgeon is now well recognized by our peers and the public. Essentially every member is able to practice freely without restriction. Our presence in the OR with our colleagues is often requested. Interestingly, many of our members are now being asked to join the faculty of our related subspecialties to teach residents safe and fundamental oculoplastic surgery techniques. The days of being refused privileges to do a browlift are long gone! The finances of the Society were in good shape with an additional increase in assets of over 10 percent despite significant expenses. My thanks go to the members of the executive committee for the hard work and important counsel offered throughout the year. These members included: Stuart Seiff (past president); Jan Kronish (president-elect); Jill A. Foster (vice president); Bryan Sires (treasurer); Tamara R. Fountain (executive secretary); John Ng (secretary of meetings); Simeon Lauer (secretary of education); and Don O. Kikkawa (program chair). ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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The important role of John Harrington (AMA delegate) and Rona Silkiss (AAO councilor) need to be acknowledged. Similarly, the brilliance and hard work of Jon Dutton, the editor of our Journal need to be noted. And of course, the organization would not function without the steady guidance of Tisha Kehn and her staff. Thank you all. To the members of ASOPRS, please accept my greatest appreciation for letting me serve you as ASOPRS president. The year was one of the highlights of my career. Like many of you, I consider ASOPRS as a part of my extended family. I am grateful for ASOPRS giving me the opportunity to have so many terrific colleagues and make so many lifetime friends.

Fig. 50. Jan W. Kronish, MD, President, 2011.

JAN W. KRONISH, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2011 As prepared as I felt to lead ASOPRS after serving on the executive committee in numerous positions over the prior decade, I was challenged in the first few weeks of my tenure as president to confront the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). In recent years, ASOPRS was following a pathway to achieve subspecialty board certification in ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery through the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) by establishing ACGME accredited fellowship training programs. ASOPRS leadership had worked diligently to guide the resident review committee (RRC) of the ACGME to establish the guidelines for such fellowships that reflected the high standards of training of our existing ASOPRS accredited training programs. Unfortunately, due to numerous edits made to the documents by the ACGME Ophthalmology RRC, the finalized and approved “Program Requirements” that were published by January 2011 contained language that implied limits to our scope of education and practice, omitted a number of surgical procedures deemed standard for our specialty, and contained technical errors and medical illiteracies. As president, under the guidance of Stuart Seiff and Bryan Sires, both of whom were deeply involved in authoring the program requirements for the ACGME accredited fellowship programs, I was charged to respond to these deficiencies by communicating with the CEO of the ACGME and the leadership of the Ophthalmology RRC. After months of deliberations, many of the mistakes were corrected; however, the ACGME refused to eliminate the language that implied limits to our scope of practice and training and informed us that no changes to the Program Requirements ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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would be considered until 2014 at its regularly scheduled five-year review. Regrettably, this resulted in the ABO decision to withdraw their application to the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) for a subspecialty board in ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery for the time being. With the input of our fellowship preceptors and membership, it was determined to continue to support the existing five ACGME accredited oculoplastics fellowship programs and create strategies to effectively change the existing program requirements (PR) in the future. We proactively posted on the ASOPRS website the “ASOPRS Program Requirements in Fellowship Education in Oculofacial Plastic Surgery.” The purpose was to provide a more comprehensive and accurate description of our curriculum that could be referenced by our members who were seeking hospital and ASC surgical privileges, as well as demonstrate to the public a more accurate reflection of our areas of expertise and scope of practice. The leadership also stayed in close contact with the ABO to explore our options to ultimately achieve subspecialty board certification. On the heels of a very successful inaugural Oculofacial Surgery Subspecialty Day program organized by ASOPRS at the 2010 American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) fall meeting, Dr. David Parke, the AAO executive vice president, met with our executive committee at the Mid-Year Forum to discuss his proposal to continue to have ASOPRS provide the educational content of this scientific program on an annual or biennial basis. This request opened the door to establish a better working relationship with the AAO so that we could consistently hold our fall meetings on the Thursday and Friday prior to the Academy meeting, have the AAO make our hotel arrangements—respectful of our meeting space requirements—and not block us out of convention hotels as they had done in the past, provide additional revenues for ASOPRS generated from the shared profits collected by the AAO for the subspecialty days, and partner with the Academy to build our collegial relationship with the organization and its leadership. These successful arrangements were the result of negotiations held between the AAO and the ASOPRS leadership, including my predecessors Jim Karesh, Stuart Seiff, and Jeff Nerad, as well as our executive director, Tisha Kehn. Advocacy on behalf of its membership had become an increasingly important priority for the executive committee beginning with the presidency of Roger Dailey. Roger would emphasize this effort by quoting, “If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu.” In recent years, ASOPRS recognized the need to represent its stance in dealing with proliferating governmental regulations, insurance carriers, the scope of practice challenges in hospitals and surgery centers, medical liability, and patient education and safety. In 2011, we continued our active involvement with the AAO and its Governmental Affairs Division, donated our annual generous contribution to its Surgical Scope Fund, and participated in the Academy’s Mid-Year Forum and Ophthalmic Advocacy Leadership Group annual meetings. Our Society also sponsored three ASOPRS fellowsin-training to attend the Mid-Year Forum and the AAO Advocacy Ambassador Program. We also maintained our collaboration with the “Core Four” in support of the Physicians Aesthetic Coalition and the Physician Coalition for Injectable Safety, for common legislative interests, to promote patient safety, and to provide public and physician education. ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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A very gratifying achievement in our advocacy efforts for me was the publication of a letter I authored that was addressed to the editor of USA Today regarding an article they had published. The article contained confusing and misleading information about the qualifications and board certifications of physicians performing cosmetic surgery. It stated that doctors who complete residencies in specialties other than plastic surgery, including “vision” doctors, lacked the training necessary to competently perform cosmetic surgery. Our letter in response rejected this premise by emphasizing the training and expertise of ASOPRS members in aesthetic surgery and was published a few days after the original article was issued. While there was an outpouring of responses from other subspecialty organizations contesting the proposition of this article, ASOPRS was the only one to have its letter to the editor published. One of my goals at the start of my presidency was to strengthen our use of technology to improve communication with the Society membership and advance our mission with the public. Under the direction of Scott Goldstein, the website was updated with an improved design interface and greater functionality. We also introduced Facebook and Twitter accounts for ASOPRS and YASOPRS to take advantage of the expanding role of social media. Lastly, the ASOPRS Forum website was upgraded by Aaron Fay and John Nguyen who also initiated a mobile platform through Tapatalk to provide seamless access to the forum with tablets and mobile phones. The spring meeting was held in my home state of Florida at the Ritz-Carlton in Amelia Island. An outstanding program organized by Rob Fante was presented including a focus on the “Surgeon as Patient” (including cervical and lumbar spine injury prevention and treatment for oculofacial surgeons), lectures on advances in imaging technology, and an update on immunomodulating agents. Other highlights included an impromptu presentation by Nan Hayworth, the only female ophthalmologist serving in Congress, and the induction of nine of our newest members. Our banquet dinner featured professional ballroom dancers who danced with our ASOPRS members. Our fall scientific symposium in Orlando, organized in the capable hands of J.D. Perry and David Lyon, had a record attendance of 777 registrants with forty-three countries represented amongst the attendees. A reactivation of the industry relations committee under the leadership of John Ng helped to maximize industry support of this meeting with a record number of exhibitors. Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery showed continued growth in numerous areas surpassing projected expectations in 2011. Under the superb guidance of our editor, Jonathan Dutton, the Journal grew in manuscript submissions, subscription revenues and royalty payments. Expansion of the Journal’s publishing included an increase in our contractual page allocation, online-only “Case Reports,” and “Publish Ahead of Print” via the OPRS website and the ASOPRS website’s e-journal link. In summary, my year as president was filled with controversies and challenges, but these were outnumbered by many accomplishments thanks to the dedication, intellect, judgment, and volunteerism of so many of our members. I was truly humbled to have had the honor to lead ASOPRS in this role, which I consider one of the highlights of my career and will always cherish.

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Fig. 51. Jill A. Foster, MD, President, 2012.

JILL A. FOSTER, MD, FACS ‒ PRESIDENT, 2012 Seven years and what seems like half a lifetime ago, I enjoyed the honor, joy, and occasional terror of serving as your ASOPRS president. The growth and progress of the Society is both linear and geometric, and we remember the geometric changes and report them, but need also to recognize that the events reported are all part of an intertwining meshwork built by all the presidents, the executive committees, the administrative staff, and the many volunteer committee members of ASOPRS. While I might remember 2012 as being the seminal year for these landmarks, past groundwork and future execution play important roles in the success of the year’s benchmarks. In April of 2012, we held a strategic planning committee meeting at the AAO Mid-Year Forum to formulate, strategize, and build a vision for the Society’s growth in size, impact, and educational influence. We defined goals for developing international outreach and the parameters for international membership, recognized ASOPRS’s vital and continuing role in supporting excellence in fellowship training (no matter what form certification or accreditation might take), debated the various possibilities for recognition of accreditation and certification, identified opportunities to better communicate with the members, committed to supporting the value of interactive face-to-face meetings for educational exchange and camaraderie, and prioritized making ASOPRS meeting attendance as attractive as possible for all members. These discussions were involved in: 1. Implementation of the ASOPRS category for international affiliates. 2. Genesis of the fellowship oversite committee. 3. Impetus for special programs to include new members, international affiliates and YASOPRS in the annual spring and fall meetings, industry workshops and foundation meeting fee support, special receptions, and opportunities to present scientific work. 4. Eliminating meeting fees for ASOPRS members for the fall meeting. 5. Introduction of the president’s email newsletter. The spring meeting was held at the Ritz Carlton Dove Mountain near Tucson, Arizona. It’s hard to believe, but there were no iconic resort locations to nominate in the flat soybean fields of central Ohio. The logistics didn’t work for Yosemite, and the amenities ruled out Pennsylvania, so Tisha made the excellent suggestion of Dove Mountain. It was hot, but it was a “dry heat.” I can still ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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hear the melody of Native American instruments playing at sunset while we watched the sun go down over the desert hills. The cadaver workshop helped create opportunities for the fellows and new members to attend the meeting. The first of the new international affiliates were present at the meeting. The editorial staff of OPRS published a study suggesting that plastic surgery residency training was experientially stronger for cosmetic surgery than ophthalmology or ENT facial plastics training. We were not amused. This lit off a firestorm of backlash from our members necessitating a response letter to the editor documenting that the plastic surgeons were comparing apples to oranges when in fact the ASOPRS fellows’ cosmetic surgical experience was vastly more extensive than the plastic surgery residents’. The article was formally retracted, but our letter with the surgical numbers was never published. Accreditation and certification were ongoing discussions for much of 2012. It wasn’t clear which alternative would be best for fellowship training or for the needs of the practicing physician. The leadership settled on a premise that we should keep all opportunities open and explore each before committing to a specific pathway for our fellowships and members, remaining facile in our capabilities to divert to any of the available pathways as the situation changed. The executive committee provided administrative assistance for the fellowships that were exploring the ACGME pathway, but continued discussions with the AAO and ABO about future options outside of ACGME. The charge was to keep all of the fellowships as strong as possible while searching for the best mechanism for recognition of ASOPRS’s special and meaningful training. The fall meeting was at the Swissôtel in Chicago. I treasure the fall meetings as compact infusions of new information and clinical pearls. My memories of the meetings and the educational information that has changed the way I take care of patients are often linked to the sights, sounds, and geography of the meeting room and hotel. When I try to remember specific, impactful presentations, the first thing that comes to mind is a speaker, a visual of the layout of the meeting room, and then I can usually connect to the city and from there derive the year. After thirty years in the trenches, there are so many practice-changing, patient-care pearls/controversies that I’ve gleaned from the ASOPRS meetings. In no particular order: 1. Vismodegib for BCC in poor surgical candidates. (This is something where we used to have nothing.) 2. Molecular diagnosis of orbital inflammatory disease. (I can hear the future calling in on this.) 3. Sclerotherapy for venolymphatic malformations. (I still call them lymphangiomas, like Kleenex and Botox, it’s hard to change old habits.) 4. Face transplants and the amazing immunologic discoveries in the research leading up to the event. (Can you still see the little mice on stage with the bodies one color and the faces another?) 5. The explosion of use for neurotoxins and then fillers, and the impact it has had on our practices. (How did we ever manage facial rejuvenation before neurotoxins and fillers?)

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6. Beta-blockers for infantile hemangiomas. (For those of you in my generation, I mean capillary hemangiomas.) 7. Orbital radiation for thyroid eye disease, (the often-entertaining controversy continues), and the active, ongoing search for immunomodulators to control thyroid eye disease. Each of you could fill in additional moments of illumination that you link with a specific seat in the meeting room and memories of how it changed your professional practices. We should all recognize and be proud of the educational platform that has been created by our Society. The ASOPRS presidency is one important cog in an increasingly relevant Society with national and global recognition. Our members are the leaders who innovate, guide, and teach periocular plastic surgery. Our fellowships serve as a benchmark for postgraduate medical training. Our members train residents of many specialties to perform oculofacial plastic surgery. Be proud of what you have accomplished, and carry on the traditions.

Fig. 52. Michael E. Migliori, MD, President, 2013.

MICHAEL E. MIGLIORI, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2013 The year 2013 started off quietly. In March, immediate past president Jill A. Foster and I went to San Francisco to meet with the American Academy of Ophthalmology EVP David Parke to discuss ASOPRS’ involvement in the AAO Annual Meeting Subspecialty Day and how we might come to a resolution of the conflict we had had with holding our annual meeting immediately before the AAO annual meeting. Dr. Parke was very gracious, and we easily came to an agreement where we would be not only be able to hold our annual meeting on the Thursday and Friday before the AAO, but the AAO would also help us find the hotel for the meeting. We agreed to provide the content for the AAO Oculoplastic Subspecialty Day meeting on Saturday. We agreed that this would remain in place for at least the next three years, and we would review the agreement after that to see if it was still mutually beneficial. We held a strategic planning meeting in April where we discussed among other things the status of ACGME accreditation. In 2013 we had five fellowship programs that were accredited by the ACGME. Early in the process of seeking ACGME accreditation, we were motivated by difficulty with obtaining hospital privileges and clearly certifying our unique expertise. As interdisciplinary collaboration has improved and more oculofacial plastic and reconstructive ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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surgeons are integrated into plastic surgery residencies, and as the options for alternative means of certification that do not require ACGME accreditation have become viable, we continued to assess the need to pursue accreditation. One thing that needed to be addressed was the ACGME program requirements for fellowship. Whether or not we decided to pursue accreditation, the public document that was on the ACGME website needed to be amended to adequately describe our curriculum, and we accomplished that. We also made it clear to the program directors that although we sought to amend the program requirements, we were evaluating alternatives to ACGME accreditation and had not committed to turning over the fellowships to the ACGME. Our spring meeting was held in Newport, Rhode Island in June. Attendees enjoyed visiting the historic mansions, sailing on Narragansett Bay, and exploring the history of colonial Newport, culminating with a lobster and clam bake. We installed nineteen Category I, three Category II, and two international members at this meeting. At this meeting, the executive committee also decided that we would change the format for the annual meeting in the fall to a two-day meeting without a separate registration for a cosmetic day, and that the entire meeting would be a benefit of membership so there would be no registration fee for members. One issue did concern the entire membership during this meeting. In May 2013, I was quoted in an article published by the Center for Public Integrity addressing whether blepharoplasty was ever medically necessary. The article cited the marked increase in Medicare billing for the procedure over the past few years. At the same time, Recovery Audit Contractors (RAC) started targeting blepharoplasty and ptosis surgery under Medicare’s Recovery Audit Program. Some contractors across the country aggressively went after oculoplastic surgeons and ophthalmologists, requesting scores of records from practices and demanded repayment for many surgeries despite appropriate documentation. Many physicians had to appeal these demands at several levels up to an Administrative Law Judge hearing. Fortunately, most were successful in their appeals, but the process was so onerous that the executive committee voted to create a white paper on what constituted medical necessity for blepharoplasty and ptosis repair. The fall meeting was held in New Orleans, LA in November. We introduced the meeting web app at this meeting which allowed attendees to view and download the syllabus directly to their computer or tablet. Information on RAC audits from the AAO and the AMA was made available on the members-only section of our website, and we adopted and posted the final version of the blepharoplasty white paper. We also signed a memo of understanding with the AAO to oversee the oculoplastic section of the joint curriculum on the AAO’s website. The bylaws were changed to create the position of assistant treasurer, making the treasurer’s term one year as assistant treasurer, and three years as treasurer. We also approved reciprocal Society status for the Mexican Society of Oculoplastics, the Australian and New Zealand Society of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgeons, and the Oculoplastics Association of India, and we inducted six international associate members. The year 2013 was an extremely busy one for ASOPRS. We grew as an organization not only in membership, but also in stature. We strengthened our relationship with the AAO, came together to protect our patients’ rights to receive medically necessary services, and increased the value of membership in the Society. It was an honor to serve as president, but none of this would have been ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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possible without the hard work of our executive committee, the many members who volunteered on committees and on the meetings, and of course our staff led by Tisha and Amanda.

Fig. 53. Don O. Kikkawa, MD, President, 2014.

DON O. KIKKAWA, MD, FACS ‒ PRESIDENT, 2014 ASOPRS is where our profession connects scientifically, educationally, socially, and in service. To lead such a vibrant and vital organization was one of the highlights of my professional career. The incredible strength of the Society today rests on the spirit of its membership, countless hours of volunteering by colleagues, and past visionary leaders. Serving as ASOPRS president in 2014 was a great honor. The ASOPRS executive committee made the year very easy and enjoyable. I’d like to thank the 2014 executive committee for their dedicated service: Michael Migliori, immediate past president; Kathleen Archer, president-elect; Bob Goldberg, vice president; Shannath Merbs, executive secretary; Jemshed Khan, treasurer; Mark Lucarelli, secretary of meetings; Michael Yen, program chair; and Peter Sneed, secretary of education. We ran very efficient and on-time meetings thanks to the help of executive director Tisha Kehn. We conducted a lot of business at our meetings but also had some fun in the process. Our Society grew in membership, our finances maintained an upward trajectory, and together we tackled some tough issues. The scientific programs in 2014 were works of art. The 2014 spring meeting was held at the Montage Deer Valley Retreat near Park City, Utah. One of the highlights of the meeting was the welcoming of twenty-five new ASOPRS members at the evening banquet in Deer Valley. The venue was located in a mountain setting with a spectacular view of the valley. The scientific program was outstanding, spearheaded by Andy Harrison. Vik Durairaj also organized a fracture and plating workshop open to YASOPRS and fellows that brought innovative and practical skills to attendees. Family activities at the spring meeting included a talent show and an ASOPRS Olympics, which featured an obstacle course and frisbee toss. The ASOPRS talent show provided entertainment at the welcome reception and featured our multi-talented ASOPRS members, including a string quartet and the John Ng family Taekwondo exhibition. The fall scientific symposium was held at the Sheraton in Chicago and program chairs Michael Yen and Vik Durairaj did an admirable job. The invited speakers were Drs. Mark Glasgold, ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Andrew Jacono, and Suresh Mukherji. The Foundation lecturer was Michael Kazim and the Foundation honoree was John Harrington. William Nunery was awarded the Stasior Leadership Award. The joint AAO-ASOPRS session was capped off with Phil Custer delivering the Wendell Hughes Lecture on Prostaglandin Orbitopathy. The Saturday AAO Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Subspecialty Day featured a global summit, bringing international leaders in the field for stimulating talks and discussion. In 2014, ASOPRS also hosted scientific sessions at several international meetings, including the WOC in Tokyo, Japan, and the APSOPRS in Delhi, India. International oculofacial plastic surgery is on such an upward trajectory globally that momentum and collegial relationships continue to grow. One of the presidential goals that I had was to help organize an international meeting for global oculofacial plastic surgery. We are fortunate that the world’s societies have agreed to host the first international ASOPRS meeting in March 2021 in Dubai, UAE. Thank you all for giving me the cherished opportunity to serve as ASOPRS president in 2014.

Fig. 54. Kathleen F. Archer, MD, President, 2015.

KATHLEEN F. ARCHER, MD, PRESIDENT 2015 I am very pleased to write about my memories of 2015, an exciting year of advocacy for ASOPRS and our profession. I have been an active volunteer from the time I was in grade school and throughout my life. In joining ASOPRS, I was immediately struck by the intensity and volume of involvement of ASOPRS members in our Society. As a new member and with my placement on the education committee, I focused my energy on assisting ASOPRS in its goal to be the best ophthalmic subspecialty Society. These goals are shared by many members and the enthusiasm within our Society continues to be contagious. Working closely with Don O. Kikkawa during his 2014 presidency was beneficial due to the knowledge he imparted from the Leadership Development Program of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO). There were a few projects that extended from his presidency into mine. Don asked me what the focus of my presidency would be, and I answered that I would see how the year guided me. Quickly, I determined that advocacy for both ASOPRS and our profession of medicine would have to be a primary focus.

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Attending the January Ophthalmic Advocacy Leadership Group (OALG) meeting in Washington, DC and interacting with the AAO leaders helped set the tone and afforded excellent contacts throughout my tenure as president. At the OALG, I asked the AAO for assistance with the six-month lag time between drug price increase for our botulinum toxin patients and adjustment to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) reimbursement. With government sequestration of two percent, reimbursements were below the actual cost of the drug for the full six months after the price increase. Additionally, CMS had adjusted their policy and considered any medication that the patient could administer themselves, if it was used in a surgical setting, to be non-covered and the patient’s responsibility. This affected our use of topical ointments at surgery. The white paper concerning blepharoplasty, lid, and brow ptosis was started under Don O. Kikkawa’s leadership, and I submitted the final revision with executive committee oversight to the AAO prior to the OALG. Cathy Cohen, chief lobbyist of the AAO, requested a one-page summary of our white paper and used it for discussions with Congress concerning help with RAC audits, the bundling of blepharoplasty and ptosis by CMS, along with possible Medicare pre-authorization for the procedures to minimize the abuse our members were encountering with the audits. Due to the lobbying efforts of the AAO, ASOPRS was the first subspecialty society to be asked to provide data to CMS for official recognition and creation of an ophthalmologic subspecialty taxonomy (identification) code. Use of this code for oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery (OFPRS) has helped ASOPRS members avoid improper insurance evaluations. ASOPRS also offered to work with AAO to provide input for the development of the International Classification of Disease ‒ Eleventh Revision (ICD-11). The AAO had recently begun IRIS® Registry (Intelligent Research in Sight) to assist AAO membership in meeting arbitrary and shifting Medicare criteria for performance with electronic health records. The problem for oculofacial plastic surgeons was that there were no applicable OFPRS measures. The AAO spoke with CMS on ASOPRS’s behalf and CMS agreed to allow ASOPRS to create two new measures for our members. These two measures documented improvement of both blepharoptosis and entropion. Thanks to our subcommittee of Roberta Gausas, Kim Cockerham, and Stuart Seiff, these were approved by CMS. Membership was encouraged to participate directly in advocacy during the AAO MidYear Forum. The ASOPRS executive committee met in the afternoon after our participation that morning in advocacy meetings with local lawmakers. The executive vice president for the AAO, David Parke, graciously met with our executive committee and engaged in a questionand-answer session. Our spring meeting was held in the Caribbean locale of Frenchman’s Reef in St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. The weather generally cooperated. Honoring feedback from our membership to moderate the meeting cost, the reception was held outdoors on the veranda overlooking the bay. Our banquet was held at Havana Blue, an excellent Caribbean fusion restaurant a short walk down the beach from our hotel. New members were inducted, and interested attendees partook of a dance lesson by my spouse, Alex Moore, a professional dance teacher. Our Women in ASOPRS and YASOPRS receptions allowed members and the executive committee to interface. ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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A veritable alphabet soup was presented to our membership concerning the bill repealing the Sustainable Growth Rate and the current Value Purchasing Programs under Medicare (PQRS, VBM, etc.) being replaced by a new program under fee for service Medicare, called Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). Although similar to PQRS and VBM, it appeared that the change would give direction to CMS to recognize specialties’ clinical data registries (like the AAO’s IRIS). The ad hoc long-term planning committee chaired by Jill A. Foster, MD, considered options for our future governance. This committee continued on in subsequent administrations. The British Oculoplastic Surgery Society invited me to represent ASOPRS at their June meeting in Belfast, Northern Ireland. I promoted our new bylaws requirements for International Associates and for affiliation of sister OFPRS societies with ASOPRS. I encouraged BOPSS and its members to join us. The ONE Network Fellowship Curriculum Program, led by Rob Fante and Simeon Lauer, became a reality with the AAO. Drs. Fante and Lauer oversaw a large committee of members contributing current data on a wide breadth of OFPRS topics. The AAO was excited for ASOPRS to provide this tremendous augmentation of their educational online offerings. Our fall meeting was held in Las Vegas and was tremendously successful due to the incredible efforts of Wendy Lee and Susan Carter in encouraging sponsor participation. The executive committee dealt with numerous issues including the Correct Coding Initiative which incorrectly bundled some OFPRS procedures. Additionally, discussion was held to update the white paper on blepharoplasty and ptosis once results were obtained from a driving simulation study supported by the ASOPRS Foundation and being conducted by Bobby Korn and Don O. Kikkawa at University of California, San Diego. Throughout the year, the executive committee and other ASOPRS committees continued to work toward the creation of a method for proper recognition of our members’ subspecialty training and status. We worked with ACGME to properly update our true scope of practice. Bryan Sires spearheaded this effort. At the fall meeting, we spoke with the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) about initiating recognition, and this carried over to subsequent administrations. My final interaction for 2015 with the AAO at a truncated OALG gathering at the fall meeting allowed me to reiterate ASOPRS’s concern focus areas. Although a busy and challenging year, it was an honor to represent and serve ASOPRS as president. The entire executive committee deserves recognition for its work as do all the committees.

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Fig. 55. Robert A. Goldberg, MD, President, 2016.

ROBERT A. GOLDBERG, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2016 I was delighted to serve as the president of ASOPRS in 2016. It was a busy and successful year for our organization. I remember previous presidents telling me that they were amazed by the spirit of volunteerism of our members. But until you are in that chair and find yourself surrounded by profoundly talented, enthusiastic, and energetic committee chairs and involved members, it is hard to understand how much we benefit from deep core values serving our missions of education, research, and patient care. The year started with a culmination of a project that started more than ten years ago, namely, the successful incorporation of edits to our program description. At the ACGME, we faced substantial objections from colleagues in facial plastic and general plastic surgery. However, we were able to document training and experience that supported our requested edits. Our accurate program description is now published on the ACGME website, and reflects the appropriate scope of our fellowship training, including endoscopic surgery, facial trauma, and rhytidectomies. This victory reflected the hard work of a decade of contributors including Bob Kennedy, Jan Kronish, Bryan Sires, and Stu Seiff. The education committee under the direction of Rob Fante made great progress in increasing the discipline and quality of fellowship training. Our fellowships continue to evolve from a model of diverse, highly individualistic apprenticeships, to a hybrid model that hopefully retains the apprenticeship tradition, and provides space for individuality, but at the same time brings a new rigor and new universal baseline requirements to fellowship training. The vetting of new fellowship applications is rigorous, evaluating multiple parameters to ensure that new programs are of the highest quality. Existing programs are continually evaluated as well. A program of fellowship milestones, based on the general ophthalmology milestones but hopefully even more cogent and efficient, is being developed. A new electronic reporting system developed by Nick Mahoney, ASOPRS coder, provides real-time feedback to fellows and fellowship program directors, helping us to ensure the compliance with the new fellowship minimum surgeries in various categories. On the continuing education front, the Society had a banner year. The ASOPRS curriculum, under the leadership of Rob Fante and Simeon Lauer, was published on the ONE Network of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, and includes authoritative chapters on a wide variety ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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of topics that, together, comprise the educational curriculum of our fellowship training. The spring meeting in Ojai California and the fall meeting in Chicago were both wildly successful, benefiting from the creativity of program chairs Wendy Lee, Vik Durairaj, and Rich Allen and their program committee, the enormous organizational skills of the secretary of meetings Susan Carter and her industry relations committee, and the expertise, effort, and attention to detail of our executive office. Our advocacy efforts were focused on several critical issues. CMS announced in February that the bundling of blepharoplasty and ptosis surgery would include cosmetic blepharoplasty. Working with the Academy’s legal team, a strategy to overturn the illogical bundling of blepharoplasty and ptosis was pursued. We held high-level meetings with CMS (attended by Stuart Seiff and Mark Mazow). Support from the Core 4 specialties in creating a consensus statement, and from the AMA (with John Harrington and Erin Shriver as our delegates), indicated to me how far we have come in recognition among the house of medicine, and how we can effectively work together to protect patient access. Other important advocacy activities were directed towards new compounding legislation (related to injections such as neurotoxins and fillers) that threatened to profoundly disrupt office practice. Medicare audits continued to be burdensome to our members, and by working with the AAO staff we became successful in achieving CMS agreement to refrain from repeat audits. I think my fondest memory of the presidential year is the induction of twenty-six new full members, and fifteen international associates. These physicians represent the cream of the crop of American and international medical training, and it is impossible to be pessimistic about the future when you speak to this group of passionate, talented, engaging new members. I personally take the greatest pride in watching our young members assimilate our cultural values of camaraderie, graciousness, and commitment to volunteerism as they prepare to take leadership roles in our Society.

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Fig. 56. Gerald J. Harris, MD, President, 2017.

GERALD J. HARRIS, MD, FACS – PRESIDENT, 2017 It was my honor to serve as 2017 ASOPRS president. In my inaugural newsletter that year, I noted how much our discipline’s challenges and opportunities had evolved since a handful of oculoplastic surgeons first joined together almost fifty years earlier. Among the “youngest” of ophthalmic subspecialties, oculoplastic surgery faced the early hurdle of recognition within its own house of ophthalmology. The group was also met with skepticism and resistance by nonophthalmic specialists with overlapping interests, and barriers to credentialing and practice were presented. These were slowly but decisively overcome—not by lobbying or litigation—but by collective example of the quality of care provided by every ASOPRS member in their local eye department, hospital, ASC, clinic, and community. Superior surgical skills and patient outcomes earned the respect and admiration of colleagues within and outside ophthalmology. As a telling example, residency accreditation requirements in general plastic surgery now include a rotation in oculoplastic surgery. ASOPRS members’ innovative contributions to the world’s literature, organization of the highest caliber scientific symposia, sponsorship of the premier scientific journal in the field, and rigorous fellowship training standards and membership criteria have all solidified the Society’s respected position within the international medical community. Challenges to our discipline now rarely come from within medicine. Rather, we share common cause with the rest of ophthalmology and non-ophthalmic specialties in confronting governmental regulation, third-party insurers, and the bureaucracies of our individual institutions. Directly or indirectly, these issues affect everyone in solo, group, or institutional practice. Although we are “ASOPRS-STRONG,” we represent 700 of 30,000 ophthalmologists and 800,000 physicians. As such, our voice is amplified by working with the AAO, the AMA, and affiliated specialty societies. In 2017, ASOPRS leadership took on many challenges and helped move the ball toward our shared goals.  We transitioned to self-management and were delighted to recruit Tisha Kehn as executive director and Amanda Macrina as meeting manager in the new model. With this change, ASOPRS benefitted financially, as well as from the focused attention not possible with an association management company committed to multiple groups. ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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The June 2017 meeting in Vancouver established a new record for spring meeting attendance, and agreeably balanced academic pursuit and social camaraderie in a beautiful, vibrant setting. Spring meeting program chair Rich Allen, MD, our management staff, meeting presenters, and all attendees contributed to the meeting’s success. The fall meeting program in New Orleans, chaired by Wendy Lee, MD, and Jeremiah Tao, MD, comprehensively represented the broad scope of our field. Recognizing the difficulty in capturing every offering as the richness of our meetings increases, the year’s video presentations were made available online. In 2017, we initiated discussion with the American Board of Ophthalmology regarding subspecialty recognition of Oculofacial Plastic and Orbital Surgery. This ABMS designation as an “Area of Focused Practice” within ophthalmology will acknowledge the post-residency fellowship training, practice experience, and focused expertise that distinguish our members. In our application to the ABO, we posited that access and quality of care will be enhanced if other physicians, patients, and administrative gatekeepers readily recognize specialists with the necessary training, that costs may diminish as early access to appropriately trained providers reduces intermediate referrals and consultations, and that initial definitive management by those with the necessary skill-set may reduce costly re-operations. In addition, a subspecialty focus to the ABO’s continuous certification process can better reflect ongoing competence in areas of actual practice. Ours is the first ophthalmic subspecialty to pursue such a designation, and it is anticipated that others will follow. ASOPRS continues to support global interaction. By 2017, we had established reciprocal relationships with ten foreign oculoplastic societies. Our longest-standing partner is the European Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. ASOPRS members were well represented at the 2017 ESOPRS 36th Annual Meeting in Stockholm. Of note, ESOPRS leaders and members were looking toward greater standardization of their fellowship training programs, and they cited ASOPRS’ highly organized accreditation process as a model for their future efforts. Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery is the premier journal in our subspecialty, and it represents ASOPRS to the world. Jonathan Dutton, MD, continues to do an excellent job at the editorial helm. The business aspects are under the purview of the journal committee. In 2017, Jennifer Sivak-Callcott, MD, served as journal committee chair and renegotiated a long-term publishing contract highly favorable to the Society. In 2017, CMS also reversed its decision to bundle cosmetic blepharoplasty and functional ptosis repair. Stuart Seiff, MD, and Mark Mazow, MD, of the intersociety and government affairs committee relentlessly collaborated with the AAO—both remotely and in person in DC—in contributing to that victory. ASOPRS’ growth continues to be robust. From five founding fellows almost fifty years ago, full members numbered over 600 in 2017, with another 100 at various stages in the membership pipeline. Almost 100 members of our affiliated international oculoplastic societies have sought and achieved International Associate status in ASOPRS. Our Society has been the role model for oculoplastic societies globally, and for other ophthalmic subspecialties domestically. All members of ASOPRS—adhering to the highest standards of quality care, ethical practice, and scientific ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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inquiry—share credit for the Society’s status and success. Our sixty-five ASOPRS fellowship program directors and their associate preceptors deserve special recognition for their daily commitment to the training of future generations of oculofacial plastic surgeons. I am grateful for the privilege to have served as ASOPRS president in 2017. ASOPRS volunteerism is truly remarkable, and I thank the many members who serve on our hard-working committees and contribute to our shared mission. ASOPRS staff are the backbone of the organization, and their value cannot be overstated.

Fig. 57. Tamara R. Fountain, MD, President, 2018.

TAMARA R. FOUNTAIN, MD – PRESIDENT, 2018 Thank you, David Reifler for inviting me to wax nostalgic on my year as ASOPRS president. I can’t begin to describe that improbable experience without first sharing how close I came to not being a member of ASOPRS at all. The year was 1993. Gas was $1.09 a gallon. We took pictures with cameras, listened to music on Walkmans, and talked on “mobile” telephones the size of bricks. ASOPRS was headquartered in Florida under the executive directorship of Barbara Beatty and boasted 332 members, including eighteen women and one African American. I had birthed two children as a resident and interviewed for ASOPRS fellowships while seven months pregnant. I did not match. After residency, I stepped out of medicine to be a full-time mom and to figure out how to get my career back on track. Days turned into weeks, weeks into months. One year into this pediatric house arrest, elbow deep in dirty diapers with a bad case of “Barney” theme-music earworm, I heard that USC-Doheny was interviewing outside the match for their first ASOPRS fellow. The preceptor would not be Don Liu but Bernice Brown, a past ASOPRS president and editor of the Journal, who was also a USC-Doheny faculty member and wanted a role in selecting the first fellow. I found a pre-maternity suit that still fit me and arranged to interview with her on the exhibit floor of the 1993 AAO meeting in Chicago, my adopted hometown. Dispensing with introductory pleasantries, Dr. Brown, whose towering frame and deep voice were intimidating enough, asked me point blank with a tone of incredulity, “So, let me get this straight. You propose to move to ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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L.A. with your two babies to be our fellow for two years, while your husband stays in Chicago?” When she said it like that, it actually did sound insane. What was I thinking? I looked down, fidgeting with my hands, sensing any hopes for a career in oculoplastics evaporating quickly. With some resignation, I returned my gaze to hers and replied, “Yes, Dr. Brown. I want it that much.” She paused for an eternity with an expression impossible to read, then broke into a smile and chuckled, “That’ a girl. You know I went back to medical school after I’d started my family, I wanted it that much too.” I will never forget that moment. Dr. Liu called me a few days later with the news: I would be the first Doheny-USC ASOPRS fellow. He and Dr. Brown took a big chance on this young mother who had stepped out of medicine for two years (I mean, who does that?), and would effectively be a single parent with two toddlers in tow. Looking back on it, I’m amazed they actually chose me. Even I don’t think I would have in their position. Quite literally, they gave me the chance of a lifetime. Fast forward to 2019. Gas is $3.25 a gallon. We take pictures, listen to music and do just about everything but talk on hand-held computers we quaintly still call “phones.” ASOPRS is headquartered in Minnesota under the administrative leadership of Tisha Kehn, executive director, and Amanda Macrina, meeting manager. There are 821 members, including 154 women and six African Americans. ASOPRS is celebrating its 50th birthday, and I have just completed a year as president. A few accomplishments during my term: • Launch of new website with improved patient education and public information sections. There is expanded fellowship and membership information for members-to-be and improved member-only functionality with one-click access to our directory, online forum, and the OPRS journal. • From a humble forum post came the creation of International Global Outreach, or, “I GO,” a committee devoted to facilitating humanitarian service opportunities abroad for ASOPRS members. The second-most attended spring meeting (232 registrants) was held in the hot, I mean heart, of Austin, Texas. We beat the heat to play golf, tennis, line dance, and take a turn on the mechanical bull. Oh, and we learned a few things too. • Our in-house advocacy team continued to chip away at the bleph-ptosis bundle. Having succeeded in carving out cosmetic bleph from the bundle, we seek further relief from posterior approach ptosis surgeries being bundled with blepharoplasty. In addition, we are working hard to preserve our ability to reconstitute botulinum and mix anesthetic agents in the office setting. • We updated all patient education brochures including new titles and graphics. Several new titles were added including “Adult Tearing,” “Skin Rejuvenation,” and “Rhinoplasty.” • We began exploring an opportunity for ASOPRS members to achieve subspecialty distinction through a new initiative of the American Board of Medical Specialties called Area of Focused Practice, or AFP. • We put on another successful fall meeting (two days of learning free to all members!) and an AAO Subspecialty Day meeting in “my kind of town,” Chicago.

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It Takes a Village. No president can govern effectively without the guidance and dedication of his or her executive committee. I am no exception. What a privilege to have served with these eight gifted leaders: Jerry Harris, Dan Schaefer, Mark Lucarelli, John Fezza, J.D. Perry, Elizabeth Bradley, Ken Morgenstern and Rich Allen. They served with grace and thoughtfulness as we balanced traditions of the past with evolution toward the future. Any successes I had are shared equally with my executive committee and the legions of committee volunteers who make our Society hum. Finally, it would be hard to overestimate the impact that an executive director has on a volunteer membership Society. We at ASOPRS are extraordinarily lucky to have the institutional memory and consummate professionalism of our director, Tisha Kehn. She has dedicated her professional life to our organization for the last twelve years, overseeing a period of staggering growth and maturation for ASOPRS. She and Amanda Macrina, the meetings manager since 2012, comprise our full-time management staff or as I like to call them, the other Minnesota Twins. They do the heavy lifting and are consistently finding ways to improve and move our organization forward. Thanks again to David Reifler who, by the way, re-upped to edit this 50th Anniversary Book after having done the 25th back in 1994. Is it too early to lock you down for our 75th? I’ll follow up with you on that, David. Becoming an ASOPRS member was a professional dream of mine. From rejected fellowship applicant to president—what an improbable yet exhilarating journey. Thanks to all who were with me on this crazy ride. I remain grateful for the friendships I’ve made along the way.

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Chapter 5

ASOPRS: The State of Our Society and Its Future Daniel P. Schaefer Thank you, Dr. David Reifler, for editing the book on the first twentyfive years of ASOPRS back in 1994, and for editing this 50th Anniversary Book. What a tremendous endeavor, time, and commitment that you devoted. You should be greatly commended for keeping the story of ASOPRS alive and documented. Thank you for inviting me to share my experiences of ASOPRS as I begin my term as president of ASOPRS for the year 2019, our fiftieth anniversary year. What a great honor and Fig. 58. Daniel P. Schaefer, The fiftieth and current absolute privilege. president of ASOPRS.

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1969 was truly a fantastic year for the advancement of the humanities, the arts, the sciences, and ASOPRS. The following is a list of some memorable dates and events from that year: January 12. The first Led Zeppelin album is released in the United States. January 30. The Beatles give their last public performance of several tracks on the roof of Apple Records, London, later featured in the film, Let It Be (1970). February 24. The Mariner-6 Mars probe is launched from the United States. March 17. Golda Meir becomes the first female prime minister of Israel. April 4. Dr. Denton Cooley implants the first temporary artificial heart. July 8. The very first US troop withdrawals are made from South Vietnam. August 15‒18. The Woodstock Festival is held near White Lake, New York, featuring some of the top rock musicians of the era. About a half-million people gather on a 600-acre farm near Woodstock, NY, to hear rock music for 4 days. July 16. Apollo 11, carrying Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins, lifts off en route to the moon. July 20. Apollo 11’s lunar module, The Eagle, lands on the lunar surface. An estimated 500 million people worldwide watch in awe as Neil Armstrong, the first human to walk on the moon, takes his historic first steps on the Moon at 10:56 PM (02:56 UTC July 21), the largest television audience for a live broadcast at that time. He said, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” Later in 1969, a milestone event occurred for our subspecialty which may be tagged with this appropriate paraphrase: “One small step for ophthalmology and a giant leap for oculoplastic, facial, orbital and reconstructive surgery.” This idea of the Society was conceived by five of Dr. Byron Smith’s former fellows—Drs. Charles Beyer, George Buerger, Thomas Cherubini, Margaret Obear and Robert Wilkins—with additional input from a colleague and fellow Smithtrainee, Dr. William Pidde. It was with their great foresight that the formulating and chartering of ASOPRS occurred. Seeing that knowledge, procedures, treatments and diagnosis were improving and growing more complex, our founders had the foresight in 1969 to recognize that there would be a need for ophthalmologists who were focused entirely on the treatment of oculoplastics. The goal of the founders and early leaders of the Society was to establish an organizational forum to present oculoplastic problems and discuss their solutions. During the fifty years of its existence, the Society has greatly contributed to dramatic improvements in our understanding of oculofacial, orbital, plastic and reconstructive surgery, including how to evaluate and understand the pathophysiology of the disease processes, and how to treat these diseases.

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ASOPRS is celebrating its fifty-year anniversary, a momentous occasion and opportunity to reflect on our journey and achievements. I wasn’t a pioneer but a settler, arriving in 1988. Within just a few decades, ASOPRS had quickly grown beyond its grassroots origins and spread, from community to community across the world. This remarkable growth occurred because there was, in fact, “so much to do, and to teach each other.” Fifty years is a short time in the life of an organization, and yet, for ASOPRS, this first half century is enough time to have made a profound impact within the world of oculofacial, orbital, plastic and reconstructive surgery. This special fiftieth anniversary issue looks back at the extraordinary vision of our founders, who instilled a culture of innovation that survives and thrives today, and who understood that the path to success begins with thoughtful risk-taking and the inclusion of diverse ideas and people. We also look at the brilliant members who are breaking barriers across science, medicine, government, the members who are creating the new research and clinical platforms, and the educators who continue to nurture and inspire the next generation of ASOPRS members to achieve the goals the founders set out to obtain; to teach, research, and to change and improve the treatment of our patients. It’s the founding members who dreamed this Society. ASOPRS members keep this going. In the fifty years since our visionary founders made the transformational decision to establish ASOPRS, the Society has transformed medical education, training, and research. These forwardthinking founders recognized the clinical importance of the new insights emerging from the revolution in imaging, medications, the understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease process, and new surgical procedures. They were determined to share these advancements with all and to enhance the understanding and treatment of oculoplastic conditions and diseases. ASOPRS was and continues to be a vibrant, passionate, and forward-looking organization, relentless in its efforts to innovate by creating new partnerships, programs, and settings in which to thrive. The overarching goals have always been to teach, to reach as many patients as possible, and to do so earlier in their disease. Towards this goal, ASOPRS has led the way nationally and internationally, with multiple unprecedented achievements. Little could our founders have imagined the enormous success that ASOPRS would achieve. At the first ASOPRS fall meeting, held at the Palmer House Hotel in Chicago in conjunction with the 1969 meeting of the AAO, there were approximately sixty persons in attendance. At the fall meeting of ASOPRS in 2017, there were 919 in attendance, and in 2018 there were 879 in attendance. At present, there are 733 voting members (fellows), ninety-three international associate members, and over 120 candidate members, (including sixty-three current fellows-intraining and fifty-six in the post-fellowship Category 1 track). There are also currently sixteen applicants in the Category II Track (“Pathway B” or “Pathway C”) to voting membership. ASOPRS accredits and oversees sixty-two domestic oculofacial plastic surgery two-year fellowship training programs (four of which are ACGME-accredited two-year fellowships nationally) and three international programs. These programs must adhere to guidelines outlined

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in the bylaws and Rules and Regulations. The fellowship match is conducted through SF Match. Our ASOPRS-endorsed fellowships are highly sought after. ASOPRS continues to invite members of international oculofacial plastic societies to join our Society as international associate members through invitation, or, via request from like international societies to become “reciprocal societies” of ASOPRS. This allows their members a more streamlined pathway to obtain International Association membership status. The societies which have been granted reciprocal status are: Asia Pacific Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (APSOPRS) Asociación Colombiana de Cirugía Plástica Ocular (ACPO) Australian and New Zealand Society of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgeons (ANZSOPS) Belgian Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (BSOPRS) British Oculoplastic Surgery Society (BOPSS) European Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ESOPRS) Iranian Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (IrSOPRS) Mexican Society of Oculoplastics Oculoplastic Society of Chile Oculoplastic Society of India (OPAI) Sociedade Brasileira de Cirurgia Plástica Ocular (SBCPO) While ASOPRS is evidently at the dawn of a new era of international partnership and influence, it has also remained a powerful presence at the personal level. My membership in ASOPRS is without question the most rewarding accomplishment of my career. I’ve had a chance to serve a cause I love, as part of an organization that I’ve supported for decades. Most of all, I have had the opportunity to work alongside the greatest bunch of people in the world. I have been very fortunate in that I have been associated with ASOPRS for the past forty-five years due to my attending the spring meeting with my father as a child. My father became a fellow in 1973, and later became a president of ASOPRS in 1988. The camaraderie, educational experiences, and social events with his ASOPRS colleagues were always the highlight of his life. I remember him preparing his presentations for these meetings. Back then, you had to type your presentation on paper and then take it to the photographer to produce the slides. Now of course, we have PowerPoint. But it was clear to me even then, that he always looked forward to the spring and fall ASOPRS meetings with great enthusiasm. My mother, Mrs. Elizabeth (Betty) Schaefer, was also very committed to ASOPRS. She and some of the other spouses would set up and run the registration desk for the spring and fall meetings and help run the meeting from 1974 to 1995. In 1993 ASOPRS hired a professional ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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management firm with Ms. Barbara FitzGerald-Beatty as our executive director, who gradually assumed these duties. I was also very honored that my father had the pleasure of inducting me into the Society and presenting the ASOPRS diploma to me at the business meeting in Las Vegas on October 7, 1988. I think that I will just miss that honor with my daughter during my presidency of ASOPRS in 2019. My daughter, Dr. Jamie Lea Schaefer, will be finishing her ASOPRS-approved fellowship with Dr. Jennifer A. Sivak-Callcott on June 30, 2019. This will hopefully be the first third-generation membership in ASOPRS, pending the acceptance of her thesis and her passing of the oral and written examinations. My father passed in 2000, and I am sure that he would be very honored that we are the first father-son presidents of ASOPRS and embarking on a third generation of ASOPRS membership. The mission statement of ASOPRS is to advance education, research, and the quality of clinical practice in the fields of aesthetic, plastic, and reconstructive surgery specializing in the face, orbits, eyelids and lacrimal system. This statement underscores ASOPRS’ enduring commitment to medical and surgical education, and quality improvement. It reflects the values of ASOPRS, its founders, its members, and of the surgeons who apply for fellowship. It is because of our mentors that we learn to think critically and to have the confidence to think independently. Our mentors generally know what is best for us, more than we do. They have our best interests at heart all the time. Mentoring is about helping students achieve their goals and be successful. They guide you to understand a subject, rather than memorize it, so you can see what’s really important and critical. I was very fortunate to have had Dr. Joseph C. Flanagan and the Wills Eye Hospital oculoplastic faculty as my mentors. I am very grateful to them for the knowledge, clinical and surgical skills, and analytic analysis that they instilled in me during my fellowship. The extensive range of our educational programs includes our spring and fall meetings, ASOPRS Forum 2.0, the newly formatted ASOPRS Discussion Group, the Online Educational Center, the ASOPRS webpage, the journal Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (OPRS), and the AAO Oculofacial Plastics Subspecialty Day. Through this wide range of educational programming, we continue to provide ASOPRS members with valuable resources that enhance and expand professional knowledge. The ASOPRS Forum 2.0, a newly formatted ASOPRS discussion group, allows members to share their difficult cases, ask for opinions, share photos, CT and MRI images, and solicit differential diagnoses and treatment recommendations. This forum is available “24/7, 365 days a year.” It is a robust resource for our members to connect with each other, and it is an efficient and valuable way to obtain help and advice from all over the US and the world. We look forward to welcoming you in joining us in learning, discussing, and sharing recommendations for the very best care for your patients; we look forward to your recommendations on the evaluation and treatment of your colleagues’ patients. The Society’s journal mentioned above, OPRS, is the premier journal in our subspecialty and it represents ASOPRS to the world. Dr. Jonathan Dutton continues to do an excellent and creative

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job as the editor. At present, OPRS is exploring the possibility of providing continuing medical education (CME) credits for our readers. The real measure of our achievements is the overwhelmingly positive feedback and support we receive from our colleagues. Our members are well integrated into their communities, partnering with local hospitals, physicians, other specialties and subspecialties, as well as educating and conducting research with local universities. Our future plans include continued growth and sustainability, particularly in the field of oculofacial, orbital, and reconstructive surgery. What started as “the right thing to do”—the support of individuals upstream of ASPORS—is now recognized as providing true value which is defined by improved clinical outcomes while reducing costs, since patients are now being referred directly to the oculofacial, orbital and reconstructive surgeon, rather than being referred to physicians who are inexperienced in the treatment of these diseases. The surgical and patient management skills that ASOPRS teaches are the things that patients need from us: appropriate and excellent clinical judgement and surgical technique with caring and compassionate post-operative care. This has all been achieved while maintaining the highest quality of clinical care. For the past fifty years, a key part of ensuring that ASOPRS members could provide quality care to all clinical and surgical patients has meant responding to our members’ concerns about fellowship education, reimbursement from Medicare and Medicaid services, medical liability, and administrative burdens. ASOPRS has always sought to be responsive to these challenges and continues to do so today. The objectives of our education committee are to advance education, research, and clinical practice in our field of practice, and the committee especially focuses on the Society’s fellowship education system. The education committee is comprised of our highly dedicated volunteer members. In the early stages of ASOPRS, most oculoplastic surgeons were self-taught; they might have spent a week or two with a distinguished member. ASOPRS instituted fellowship programs which, early on, functioned without a defined curriculum. ASOPRS soon realized the need for a standardized curriculum. Over the years, the education committee has developed standards for professionalism, ethics, health insurance, malpractice insurance, and moral requirements for every ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship training program. These activities of the education committee continue till this day. Over time, the fellowship-training curriculum has continued to evolve; the roster of ASOPRS fellowship program directors has been expanded and renewed; the Society’s oversight committees and the executive committee have changed in an orderly rotation. But our essential identity has remained unchanged—a Society built on volunteerism, the pursuit of academic excellence, the strength of personal relationships, and the recognition that we are ASOPRS. We believe that the commitment to the education of our fellows has enabled us to turn out top oculoplastic surgeons who will continue to advance the treatment of all patients suffering from the most complex oculoplastic conditions, and continue the legacy of ASOPRS. Our fellowship programs continue to attract motivated, brilliant candidates from an incredible range of backgrounds. ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Indeed, medicine has become so complicated, so fast moving, that individual physicians and researchers working in isolation cannot hope to keep pace. New discoveries, procedures, and techniques are coming at breakneck speed and with nearly unfathomable complexity, making it impossible for a single person to comprehend and keep abreast of it all. The education committee thus created the ASOPRS-AOO Online Knowledge Center, and has worked to develop surgical standards for fellowships, revisions of the written and oral qualifying examinations, reviews of existing fellowships, a “teach the teachers” seminar for program faculty, and a brainstorming group to consider future directions for ASOPRS training programs. The Center for Learning Resource is a place where all can go to learn about virtually anything in the field of oculoplastics, and share their expertise, insights, and ideas throughout the world. They have modernized our training to ensure that our fellows, ophthalmology residents, members and other specialties are prepared to provide the best care to their patients. Politics is obviously not a simple course to steer. Only so much is under our control, but ASOPRS will continue to push hard to control our own fate. ASOPRS has always been at the forefront of key legislative and regulatory accomplishments, and we have been effective. We must remain vigilant, and ASOPRS has our intergovernmental relations committee to continue this vigilance and keep our members informed. Thanks to Dr. Stuart R. Seiff, the chair of this committee, Dr. Mark L. Mazow, vice chair, and their committee. The future will be a critical time in health care and the practice of oculoplastic surgery. There will continue to be significant changes to Medicare rules and regulations and to Medicare reimbursement coming in the present and the future, which will affect patients and practices. ASOPRS has developed a page on our website to keep our members informed and up to date on these issues. The newly revised ASOPRS website was headed by Dr. Tamara Fountain. It has a members-only area that is updated frequently with timely information of interest to members, including Medicare changes and governmental issues. At present, in these first months of my presidency, we are battling with organized optometry in several states, as to what their scope of practice should include and who should determine this. We have been and will continue to work closely with the AAO on these issues. Again, our intergovernmental relations committee continues to be very vigilant, confronting these battles. I encourage all of our members to support their state ophthalmology society’s political action committee (PAC) and the AAO PAC. ASOPRS has always strived to balance newer forms of technology, learning, and communications with the age-old traditions of surgical training and education. ASOPRS takes great pride in our traditions. ASOPRS leaders and mentors formulated the professional ideals that we strive to meet, and they serve as examples by which we measure ourselves today. ASOPRS will continue to remain flexible and adaptable, as the development of new forms of surgical techniques, instruments, scopes, and high-fidelity imaging techniques allow us to perform extensive operations that were not possible before. It is a privilege to work amongst such dedicated and passionate members and volunteers, and it is an honor to be part of this remarkable organization. ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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The road to the present success of ASOPRS has not been smooth or easy. Our leaders have put their shoulders to the stone and pushed, sometimes getting movement, but often seeming to struggle in vain. The reason for this goes to one of the basic tenets of ASOPRS, to assure that the next generations of ASOPRS are optimally educated and trained. Whether you’re a researcher or clinician, your legacy is the next generation that you train. And if we did not have that, I don’t think you’d see ASOPRS develop into what it is today. ASOPRS has really been a group of individuals. Different people have stepped up at different times to make this happen. Rather than rest on our laurels, we are focused on extending our longstanding reputation of clinical excellence to that of innovation and development of exciting new treatments and approaches for complex oculoplastic diseases. We will be continuing the International Global Outreach or “I GO,” a committee devoted to facilitating humanitarian service opportunities abroad for ASOPRS members. We will continue to explore the various pathways for ASOPRS members to achieve subspecialty certification. ASOPRS will continue to manage the curriculum that highlights the latest advancing trends and technologies, and we are dedicated to developing new unique programs that allow you to learn and deliver the most current clinical care. ASOPRS-trained physicians have been the force that drives advances in oculoplastics from revolutionary inventions to innovative surgical techniques, and to new paradigms for patient care and medical education. Oculoplastics owes an enormous debt to the inquiring minds and investigative creativity of our ASOPRS members. We salute these ASOPRS members’ magnificent accomplishments, and will continue our focus towards ensuring a strong and sustainable future for ASOPRS. We take great pride of the astounding contributions of our unparalleled members and look forward with excitement to our future members as they stimulate the innovations that will continue to advance the ASOPRS vision. Our members think big and never are content with the status quo. Our national and international reputation is to a large extent based on what so many ASOPRS members are doing day in and day out all over the world. Our distinguished members are crucial to the success of our endeavors to address the challenges we face in oculoplastics. Many of our members are recipients of national awards for their contributions to research and education. They are also leaders of important state and national societies. Our accomplishments reflect the dedication, volunteerism, and perseverance of our members. Thanks so much for your remarkable commitment and success. We are deeply grateful to all our past presidents, executive committees, committee chairpersons, committee members, and our membership for all that they have done to further strengthen ASOPRS. I am very honored to try to build upon all these accomplishments. As we begin our second fifty years, we honor those who have made great strides in the advancement and growth of ASOPRS. We hope that it will continue to bring the opportunities and growth that we have achieved in the past fifty years. Thanks to all of those who have volunteered during our first half-century. We truly appreciate the hard work that each and every one has contributed to the creation and growth of ASOPRS in our core mission to advance education, research, and the quality of clinical practice in our fields. We will continue to be creative and ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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forward thinking, and thereby to ensure ASOPRS will continue a tradition of excellence for another fifty years. We are not only concerned with the present, but with the future and the new frontiers of discoveries. There is an unstoppable drive to push beyond the status quo. Progress is the norm, and ASOPRS is not stagnant intellectually. Indeed, to state that the evolution of ASOPRS is complete is a misrepresentation. On the contrary, continually rethinking and modifying the model is both needed and desired. In celebration of ASOPRS fiftieth anniversary, a toast: To the pioneers of our past, the innovators of our present, and the trailblazers of our future! At the time of this writing, we are planning the exciting commencement of celebrations for the Society’s fiftieth anniversary at our spring meeting, May 30‒June 2, 2019, at the Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island, Bahamas. The golden jubilee celebration for ASOPRS will be held October 10‒11, 2019, at the Hilton Union Square, San Francisco, California. I am thankful for each and every one of our members. Your support of ASOPRS has allowed us to continue to advance the interests of our patients, the public health of the all, the best practice of medicine, and stewardship of our profession. I am thankful for each of our ASOPRS committee members, and especially my committee chairs and executive committee. Their devotion to creating and crafting policy to improve care, and to promote the art of science and medicine, is critical to the lifespan and health of the Society. I am especially thankful for all the guidance, time, thoughts, and efforts of my colleagues on the ASOPRS executive committee: Drs. Tamara Fountain, Mark Lucarelli, Rob Fante, Elizabeth Bradley, John Fezza, John Martin, Ken Morgenstern, and Jeremiah Tao. They provide constant feedback and assistance to me as we represent ASOPRS across the states and throughout the world. All of us working together as a team will help to advance us to even more amazing progress and success. It is a privilege and honor to work amongst such dedicated and passionate colleagues. Finally, I’m most thankful for the professionalism and expertise of our executive director, Ms. Tisha Kehn. She has been very dedicated to her profession and our organization for the last fourteen years, overseeing the growth and maturation of ASOPRS. Ms. Kehn and Ms. Amanda Macrina, the meetings manager since 2012, comprise our full-time management staff. They are both very talented, and together they make a devoted team that supports and enhances all our efforts on behalf of our members. The future of ASOPRS looks very promising.

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Chapter 6

In Memoriam David M. Reifler The Society has mourned the loss of seventy-four members since it was established in 1969. As listed chronologically in Table 7, eighteen ASOPRS fellows passed during the Society’s first quarter century. The lives and many contributions of those early members of the Society can be found throughout the pages of the ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book (1994). The passing of four ASOPRS members—Victor R. Syracuse, Thomas E. Campbell, Martin Bodian, and Merrill J. Reeh— went unrecognized by the editor when that book was published twenty-five years ago. Fifty-six ASOPRS fellows have passed away since 1994. In Table 8, their names are also listed in the chronological order of their deaths. Table 9 lists these individuals in the alphabetical order that their biographies appear in the latter part of this appendix. Society milestones for seventyfour Society members who have died since the founding of ASOPRS are summarized separately in Appendix 9.

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TABLE 7. MEMBER DEATHS DURING THE SOCIETY’S FIRST QUARTER CENTURY 1971

Albert D. Ruedemann, Sr., MD (1897–1971)

1973

Deane C. Hartman, MD (1908–1973)

1974

Marvin H. Quickert, MD (1929–1974)

1976

Edmund B. Spaeth, MD (1890–1976)

1981

Gerard M. Shannon, MD (1924–1981)

1983

Sidney A. Fox (1898–1983) Lester T. Jones, MD (1894–1983)

1984

J. Gordon Cole, MD (1908–1984)

1986

Raynold N. Berke, MD (1901–1986) Victor R. Syracuse, MD (1895–1986)

1987

Sanford D. Hecht, MD (1932–1987)

1990

John S. Crawford, MD (1913–1990) Byron C. Smith, MD (1908–1990)

1992

Carroll W. Browning, MD (1916–1992)

1993

Thomas E. Campbell, MD (1929–1993)

1994

Wendell L. Hughes, MD, DSc (1900–1994) Martin Bodian, MD (1912–1994) Merrill J. Reeh, MD (1906–1994)

TABLE 8. MEMBER DEATHS DURING THE SOCIETY’S SECOND QUARTER CENTURY 1997

Charles E. Iliff III, MD (1911–1997) Hugh N. O’Donoghue, MCh (1927–1997)

1998

Jack V. Lisman, MD (1914–1998) Everett R. Veirs, MD (1908–1998) Frank W. Newell, MD (1916–1998)

1999

Morris Feldstein, MD (1912–1999)

2000

Carl Cordes Johnson, MD (1911–2000) R. Bruce Ramsey, MD (1925–2000) Bernd Silver, MD (1932–2000) Arthur J. Schaefer, MD (1933–2000)

2001 Burton M. Krimmer, MD (1925–2001) Margaret F. Obear, MD (1906–2001) 2003 Crowell Beard, MD (1912–2003) John T. Simonton, MD (1916–2003) Bernice Z. Brown, MD (1930–2003) 2004 Virginia Lubkin, MD (1913–2004)

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2005 James E. Bennett, MD (1919‒2005) Alston Callahan, MD (1911–2005) David Kahanic, MD (1961‒2005) 2006 Robert E. Kennedy, MD (1920–2006) Edward L. Liva, MD (1925 or 1926–2006) Robert D. Deitch Sr., MD, JD (1932–2007) 2007

Albert Hornblass, MD (1939–2007) Stephen L. Bosniak, MD (1947–2007) John R. Finlay, MD (1921–2007) Robert H. Kennedy, MD, PhD (1954–2007) Arthur G. DeVoe, MD (1909–2007) Kenneth L. Piest, MD (1954–2007)

2008 Lewis Lauring, MD (1939‒2008) 2009 Rocko M. Fasanella, MD (1916–2009) Ronald E. Dei Cas, MD (1963–2009) Joseph C. Hill, MD (1919–2009) 2010

Bartley R. Frueh, MD (1937–2010) Robert M. Goldwyn, MD (1930‒2010) John C. Mustardé, MD (1916–2010)

2011

Richard R. Tenzel, MD (1929–2011)

2012

Jack H. Pincus, MD (1936–2012) John W. Huneke, MD (1932‒2012) William J. Pidde, MD (1930–2012)

2013

Russell Neuhaus, MD (1950– 2013) Jorge G. Camara, MD (1950–2013)

2014

William L. “Bucky” Walter, MD (1928–2014) Martin Kazdan, MD, MSc (1930–2014)

2016

Donald J. Bergin, MD (1949‒2016) Barrett G. Haik, MD (1951–2016) Murray A. Meltzer, MD (1936–2016)

2017

Robert G. Small, MD (1929–2017) William Fein, MD (1933–2017) Thomas D. Cherubini, MD (1929–2017) Gunther Weiss (1935–2017) James R. Boynton, MD (1945–2017) Peter H. Ballen, MD (1925–2017) James L. Hargiss, MD (1921–2017) Henry I. Baylis, MD (1935–2017)

2018

Glen O. Brindley, MD (1949–2018)

2019

George F. Buerger Jr., MD (1935–2019)

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TABLE 9. ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF MEMBERS DECEASED AFTER 1994 Peter H. Ballen, MD Carl Cordes Johnson, MD Henry I. Baylis, MD David Kahanic, MD Crowell Beard, MD Martin Kazdan, MD, MSc James E. Bennett, MD Robert E. Kennedy, MD Donald J. Bergin, MD Robert H. Kennedy, MD, PhD Stephen L. Bosniak, MD Burton M. Krimmer, MD James R. Boynton, MD Lewis Lauring, MD Glen O. Brindley, MD Jack V. Lisman, MD Bernice Z. Brown, MD Edward L. Liva, MD George F. Buerger Jr., MD Virginia Lubkin, MD Alston Callahan, MD Murray A. Meltzer, MD Jorge G. Camara, MD John C. Mustardé, MD Thomas D. Cherubini, MD Russell Neuhaus, MD Ronald E. Dei Cas, MD Frank W. Newell, MD Robert D. Deitch Sr., MD, JD Margaret F. Obear, MD Arthur G. DeVoe, MD Hugh N. O’Donoghue, MD Rocko M. Fasanella, MD William J. Pidde, MD William Fein, MD Kenneth L. Piest, MD Morris Feldstein, MD Jack Pincus, MD John R. Finlay, MD R. Bruce Ramsey, MD Bartley R. Frueh, MD Arthur J. Schaefer, MD Robert M. Goldwyn, MD Bernd Silver, MD Barrett G. Haik, MD John T. Simonton, MD James L. Hargiss, MD Robert G. Small, MD Joseph C. Hill, MD Richard R. Tenzel, MD Albert Hornblass, MD Everett Veirs, MD John W. Huneke, MD William L. Walter, MD Charles E. Iliff III, MD Gunther Weiss

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BIOGRAPHIES

Fig. 59. Peter H. Ballen, MD (1925–2017).

PETER H. BALLEN, MD (1925–2017) Peter H. Ballen was born on August 26, 1925 to Dr. Herman and Jeanette (Rosenwasser) Ballen. His father had arrived in New York from a small village in Russia as a teenager and eventually pursued a career in medicine. Herman Ballen first specialized in internal medicine, but later studied and became board certified in ophthalmology. As the family story goes, Jeanette would copy textbooks by hand from which his father would study. Peter greatly admired his father and emulated his choice of a career in medicine and ophthalmology. He went to medical school at New York Medical College and took an internship at Morrisania in 1948, followed by an ophthalmology residency at Metropolitan Hospital (1949–1951). After completing his tour of duty as a captain in the United States Air Force, he spent three years as a fellow and in association with Dr. Wendell Hughes (1953–1956). He was professor and chair of the Ophthalmology Department at SUNY Downstate College of Medicine where he published many articles on ophthalmic surgery. In addition to oculoplastic surgery, his particular interest and research was in lye burns to the eye and cornea transplant surgery. In his private practice, he excelled in cataract surgery as well, and visited Dr. Cornelius Binkhorst in Holland to learn and master new techniques of intraocular lens implantation. In 1970, Dr. Ballen attended the first ASOPRS scientific symposium and became a charter fellow of the Society. Myron Tanenbaum noted, “his successful Lake Success Ophthalmology Associates practice on Long Island, NY meshed well with his volunteer work, teaching, and support of the young ASOPRS.”1 In 1964, Ballen described a full-thickness blepharotomy and lid margin rotation for the repair of cicatricial entropion. This was called the Ballen (or sometimes Ballen-Wies) procedure.2 Dr. Ballen established the International Eye Film Library which took him and his wife around the world, teaching and illustrating new techniques in ophthalmic surgery. At the invitation of Dr. Guillermo Pico, he taught a yearly course on ophthalmic plastic surgery in San Juan, Puerto Rico during the 1960s. For two decades, he 1

 Tanenbaum M. “Peter H. Ballen, MD.” www.asoprs.org/assets/docs/ASOPRS_2017_memorials_ads_WEB.pdf. Accessed June 3, 2019. 2

 Ballen PH. A simple procedure for the relief of trichiasis and entropion of the upper lid. Arch Ophthalmol 1964;72:239–240.

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volunteered to teach his skills and operate in hospitals throughout Israel. He developed a close friendship with Scottish émigré Dr. Isaac (Mike) Michaelson who had become director of the ophthalmology department at Hadassah University Hospital in Jerusalem, and Mike’s wife, Ora.3 In 1979, Peter and his wife Suzanne purchased a flat in the northern coastal city of Caesarea, and they maintained this as a part-time residence for over twenty-five years. Back in America, Ballen was a founding member and president of the Garden City Jewish Center. He would attend annual gatherings of the American Israeli Ophthalmological Society which were hosted by his friend, Albie Hornblass in various venues during the fall meetings of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Dr. Ballen became a life fellow of ASOPRS after his retirement in 1991. He settled in South Florida where his hobbies continued to evolve. As surviving family members noted, “He was an avid tennis player, then golfer, but most of all he loved fishing.”4 Peter Ballen died on August 15, 2017. He was predeceased by his wife Suzanne and is survived by his son Stephen (Kathleen), and daughter Dr. Ann Ballen and son-in-law Dr. Juan Aguilar, who have both practiced ophthalmology for over thirty years.

Fig. 60. Henry I. Baylis, MD (1935–2017).

HENRY I. BAYLIS, MD (1935–2017) Henry I. “Hank” Baylis was born in Pontiac, Michigan on October 8, 1935, the third child of Morgan (Myer) and Sadie Baylis. He was raised in Michigan and graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School in 1960. Dr. Baylis moved to California and completed a residency in ophthalmology at the University of California San Francisco where he was influenced by Dr. Crowell Beard. Attracted to oculoplastic surgery, he then went to New York City in 1967 to train with Dr. Byron Smith who, at that time, offered one of the few fellowships in this emerging subspecialty. One of his co-fellows was Dr. Clinton “Sonny” McCord with whom he developed a close lifetime friendship. Dr. Baylis was a charter fellow of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery; he served as the Society’s program chair in 1978, as vice president in 1983, and a presenting author of innovative ideas at nearly every early ASOPRS meeting. After Dr. Baylis 3

 Ann Ballen. Personal communications, July 24 and 29, 2019.

4

 “Peter H. Ballen, MD.” Miami Herald, August 18, 2017, Accessed June 3, 2019.

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completed his service in the United States Air Force, he moved to Los Angeles with his wife, Barbara. He opened a practice in the San Fernando Valley and, in 1974, joined the clinical faculty of the Jules Stein Eye Institute at UCLA as the founding Chief of the Orbital and Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Division. Concurrent with his appointment at UCLA, Dr. Baylis began training his first of many fellows in orbital and oculoplastic surgery. Under Dr. Baylis, and with the support of Ophthalmology Department Chair Bradley Straatsma, this division at UCLA emerged as one of the premier research and teaching programs in the subspecialty of oculofacial plastic surgery. Robert Goldberg, the successor as Division Chief and Fellowship Program Director, wrote to the members of ASOPRS soon after the passing of Dr. Baylis. Several career achievements were fondly summarized with these words: “Hank’s career was characterized by imagination and bold innovation. It was a combination of a creative mind, technical and anatomic mastery, and a certain amount of courage, that allowed him to advance the field. Operations would just occur to Hank as he was trying to solve surgical problems. I remember when he came up to me in 1988 and told me about some difficult medial wall fractures that he had done at Holy Cross Hospital, and to save time, he went through the caruncle directly to the medial wall. That revolutionary approach, the transcaruncular (it really should be called the Baylis) approach is now a standard medial orbital access for multiple specialties. He introduced many other ideas that have become cornerstones of our specialty, such as full thickness ptosis surgery, ear cartilage and fascia grafts for eyelid reconstruction, liposuction fat transfer, and transconjunctival blepharoplasty. Among his many awards, he was honored with the Wendell Hughes Lecture at the AAO. Importantly, Henry had a vision of a robust discipline of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery and was a leader in expanding the field beyond treatment of eyelid disorders. In the 1970s, when orbital decompression was performed almost exclusively by otolaryngologists, Hank took the initiative to learn and refine techniques of transantral orbital decompression. He used to enjoy telling the story that when he first presented this work at the AAO meeting in San Francisco, Crowell Beard, one of his mentors, commented that it was malpractice for an ophthalmologist to do orbital decompression. Henry was dismayed but not deterred. To today’s trainees, it seems obvious that orbital decompression is a core oculofacial procedure, but it was not always that way. Hank also imagined a vigorous discipline of Aesthetic Oculofacial Surgery. At a time when most academic programs disdained cosmetic surgery, Henry was writing about, teaching, and pioneering cosmetic surgical techniques. He suffered a lot of criticism when he started doing facelifts in the 1980s, but now rhytidectomy is part of the ACGME curriculum for oculofacial surgery, and ophthalmology trained surgeons have a tradition of elegant and innovative work in facial aesthetic surgery. The annual Baylis lecture at the ASOPRS meeting honors Hank’s leadership in Aesthetic Oculofacial Surgery. Those of us who had the privilege of knowing Hank will remember many things about his personality. He was brilliant, generous, kind, considerate of others, humble. He was an inspirational teacher. However, the overwhelming memory that most of us will keep is his sense of humor. Henry had a quick wit and charming, self-depreciating style that would have been worthy of a career as a comedian, had he taken that route. In fact, for many years a highlight of the ASOPRS program was his funny lecture towards the end of the day, typically peppered with homemade (in the pre-Photoshop era) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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photos of Hank as some monarch or other historical figure such as Christopher Colum-baylis. His lecture slides were hand-written, with funny one-liners interspersed. He was always quick to smile and laugh, particularly at his own jokes, and he brightened every room.”5 In 1984, ASOPRS supported the initiative of Dr. Baylis in founding the Society’s journal, Journal of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (or simply, “the Journal”). With Dr. Baylis as editor-in-chief, a quarterly publication of the Journal was arranged with Masson Publishing, and the first issue was published in the spring of 1985. The inaugural issue, with its opening editorial by Dr. Baylis, gave a convincing and prescient argument for the establishment of the first journal for the emerging subspecialty.6 The Journal has become the premier journal of orbital and oculofacial plastic surgery with six bimonthly print issues plus electronic and “publish ahead-of-print” access. Henry Baylis passed away on September 20, 2017, survived by his wife Barbara, children Pauli, Barbie, and Hank Jr., and two grandsons.

Fig. 61. Crowell Beard, MD (1912–2003).

CROWELL BEARD, MD (1912–2003) Born on May 23, 1912 in Napa, California, Crowell Beard exerted his tremendous influence upon the emerging subspecialty of oculoplastic surgery from his beloved Northern California. As described in the 1994 ASOPRS commemorative book, his career was initially forged during the Second World War. After the war he became one of the founders of the emerging subspecialty of oculoplastic surgery through landmark surgical contributions, publications, and the training of fellows. ASOPRS was honored to have Dr. Beard’s recollections, “As I Saw It,” in the 1994 festschrift that chronicled Beard’s many contributions and accomplishments, such as the multiple editions of his classic monograph on ptosis, his 1974 Wendell Hughes Lecture, and the formal preceptorship that he established in 1968. He was a charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969, vice president in 1972, and advisor from 1972 to 1982. A tribute to Crowell Beard written by Bernice Brown appeared in the inaugural volume of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. After Beard’s death on May 10, 2003, in his San Jose home at the age of ninety, the president emeritus of the Mayo Foundation, 5

 Goldberg RA. “Henry Baylis.” Email correspondence received September 29, 2017.

6

 Baylis HI. “What, Another Journal?” Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 1985;1:1.

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Robert Waller, another protégé, was quoted in an obituary that was published in the San Francisco Chronicle. It was therein noted that during the last year of his life, Dr. Beard was the recipient of the Lucien Howe Medal, the highest award of the American Ophthalmological Society.7

Fig. 62. James E. Bennett, MD (1919–2005).

JAMES E. BENNETT, MD (1919‒2005) James Bennett was born on September 29, 1919. He grew up in Freemont, Michigan and graduated from Freemont High School. He received his undergraduate degree from Western Michigan College of Education in Kalamazoo and his medical degree from the University of Michigan. He served in both the European and Pacific Theaters in World War II. After the war, he also studied or trained in Massachusetts at Harvard University and MIT. Dr. Bennett was also a veteran of the Korean War which apparently furthered his interest in ocular and facial trauma. A skilled ophthalmologist, Bennett and his wife Barbara settled in Cleveland, Ohio where together they raised three sons—Douglas, Bruce, and Mark—and a daughter, Cynthia (Swartz). Bennett practiced in that city for many years. In 1969, Dr. Bennett became a charter fellow of ASOPRS, and he became a life fellow upon his retirement in 1980. He died on February 2, 2005, survived by his wife, children, and six grandchildren.8

7

 Brown BZ. “Crowell Beard, M.D.” Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 1985;1:223–4. Rubenstein S. “Crowell Beard: Eye Surgeon and UCSF Teacher.” San Francisco Chronicle. May 15, 2003. www.sfgate.com. Accessed June 14, 2013. Flach AJ. “Crowell Beard, MD.” Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc. 2003;110: 3–4. 8

 “Bennett, James E.” The Plain Dealer. February 6, 2005.

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Fig. 63. Donald J. Bergin, MD (1949–2016).

DONALD J. BERGIN, MD (1949‒2016) Donald John “Don” Bergin was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1949. He attended college at the United States Military Academy at West Point where he graduated at the top of his class before attending medical school at Duke University. He took his internship and ophthalmology residency in Washington, DC at Walter Reed Hospital. His sub-specialty training included an orbital and lacrimal fellowship at Moorfield Eye Hospital in London, and an ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship in oculoplastic surgery at Emory University in Atlanta with Clinton “Sonny” McCord (1982– 1983). Dr. Bergin presented papers at several ASOPRS scientific symposia, published at least seventeen articles which he authored or co-authored (and which may be retrieved on PubMed), and he authored textbook chapters, such as “Anatomy of the Eyelids, Lacrimal System, and Orbit,” in McCord and Tanenbaum’s Oculoplastic Surgery, 2nd Edition. For several years, Bergin held an academic appointment as Clinical Assistant Professor at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and he gave of his time and professional talents in travels abroad even as he established a private practice (Carolina Eye Surgical & Laser Center) with offices in Greensboro, Lexington, and Thomasville. He thus spent his life serving the military, North Carolinians, and impoverished communities worldwide. Donald Bergin passed away on April 24, 2016, survived by his wife Nancy Bergin of Mint Hill, North Carolina, six children—Brittany (Clyne), Don (Larissa), Ashley (Jenkins), Katherine (Caruso), Bill (Joanie), Carol (Barth), and Tom— and three grandchildren.9

9

 “Bergin, Donald John ‘Don’,” http://www.greensboro.com/obituaries/bergin-donald-john-don/article_html. Accessed March 30, 2017.

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Fig. 64. Stephen L. Bosniak, MD (1947–2007).

STEPHEN L. BOSNIAK, MD (1947–2007) Stephen L. Bosniak was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 2, 1947 to Samuel and Thelma Bosniak. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and received his medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1973. He trained in ophthalmology at the Washington Hospital Center and completed an oculoplastics fellowship in 1979 in New York City under John T. Simonton with associate preceptors Byron Smith and Robert Della Rocca. Bosniak continued the serial publication of Advances in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in eight volumes and he authored or edited several subsequent textbooks including the two-volume Principles and Practice of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery (1996). His practice partnership with Marian Cantisano-Zilkha and his books increasingly emphasized cosmetic oculofacial plastic surgery, including his last work that was entitled, Beautifeye: State of the Art Methods to Enhance and Rejuvenate the Eyes, Brows and Face (2006). Bosniak trained several fellows, including Jeffrey Schiller, Ioannis Glavas, Timothy McDevitt, Lisa Zdinak, and, at the time of his death at the age of fifty-nine on February 8, 2007, he had begun training Baljeet Purewal who later completed her fellowship with Robert Della Rocca.10 He was survived by his brother Mark R. Bosniak and his sister Karen B. Patou.

10

 “Bosniak, Stephen.” New York Times. February 10, 2007. http://www.query.nytimes.com. Accessed June 16, 2013. Personal communication with Jeffrey Schiller, June 15, 2013.

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Fig. 65. James R. Boynton, MD (1945–2017).

JAMES R. BOYNTON, MD (1945–2017) James Rodgers Boynton was born on October 3, 1945. His parents, Phyllis Rodgers McCall and Hugh Whiteford McCall divorced when he was two years old. He was adopted by Thomas Whitney Boynton when his mother subsequently remarried. Jim met his future wife, Marylou Elgin, on a blind date when he was a freshman at Harvard and she was a freshman at Wellesley. They married in 1967, the year Jim graduated from Harvard and began his medical studies. James Boynton graduated from Tufts Medical School in 1971. He took his internship at the Newton-Wellesley Hospital. Dr. Boynton took his residency in ophthalmology at the Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland from 1972 to 1975. These years coincided with the establishment of oculoplastics at this institution under Mark Levine who was an alumnus of the fellowship program of Byron Smith. Dr. Boynton went on to complete a fellowship in ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute with Richard Tenzel who was another alumnus of Byron Smith’s program. Completing his fellowship in 1976, Dr. Boynton received the Marvin H. Quickert Award for his thesis and was inducted that year as a fellow of ASOPRS. The published version of this work was one of about thirty peer-reviewed publications as an author or coauthor.11 Boynton remained active in ASOPRS, serving on the Society’s bylaws committee among others. He practiced ophthalmology, first in Warsaw, New York and then in Rochester. He was clinical professor of ophthalmology at the University of Rochester and taught residents at the university’s Flaum Eye Institute. In a memorial tribute, James Boynton was lovingly remembered as “deeply committed to his family, sustaining all with his love humor and wisdom.” The tribute continued, “Jim had an adventurous soul. He traveled to underserved countries to teach and to treat eye disease. He loved fox hunting and aerobatic flying, and enjoyed teaching others to enjoy these sports. He loved the natural world. He loved poetry.”12 Jim was a visiting surgeon with Orbis in Costa Rica, Honduras, and Haiti. He tried to convince the pilots to let him fly the Orbis jet but, as expected, his request was not granted. Other service locations abroad included the Tenwek Hospital in Bomet, Kenya in 1991 and 1992 and the Christian Eye Center in Sunyani, Ghana 11

 Tenzel RR, Boynton JR, Miller GR, Buffam FV. “Surgical treatment of neurofibromas.” Arch Ophthalmol 1976;7(3):25–28.

12

 https://obits.democratandchronicle.com/. Accessed June 11, 2019.

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in 1994. A post-op photo of an elderly Maasai warrior from one of his trips to Kenya remains a cherished family heirloom.13 In the photo, the patient, who has just realized that his sight has been restored, is pointing at his surgeon with gratitude having just remarked, “You, you did this.” James Boynton died peacefully on June 29, 2017 at the age of seventy-one. He is survived by his wife of fifty years, Marylou Elgin Boynton, his daughter Juliea Boynton McCall, his son Nathan Elgin (Denise Lee) Boynton, and three grandchildren.

Fig. 66. Glen O. Brindley, MD (1949–2018).

GLEN O. BRINDLEY, MD (1949–2018) Glen Owens Brindley was born on September 3, 1949 in Memphis, Tennessee. His parents were Dr. Hanes Hanby Brindley, Sr. and Julia (Judy) Barton Brindley. The family moved to Temple, Texas in 1950 to continue a long legacy of physicians at Scott and White Hospital. In 1911, his grandfather, Dr. George V. Brindley, Sr., joined the staff of the Temple Sanitarium (later renamed the Scott and White Memorial Hospital) which was founded by Drs. Arthur C. Scott, Sr. and Raleigh R. White Jr. in 1904. Dr. Brindley attended public school in Temple, Texas graduating from Temple High School in 1967 and Temple Junior College in 1969. Dr. Brindley married his high school sweetheart and love of his life, Nell (Nelly) Fischer on May 31, 1969 in Temple, Texas. He went on to graduate with high honors from the University of Texas at Austin with a BA degree in 1971. From there he received his medical education at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, graduating in 1975. He completed an internal medicine internship at UTMB and then completed an ophthalmology residency in 1979 at the Duke Eye Center in Durham, North Carolina. Dr. Brindley received his fellowship training with Dr. Crowell Beard at the University of California at San Francisco. He became a fellow of ASOPRS in 1980. He subsequently received glaucoma fellowship training under the tutelage of his friend and mentor, Dr. M. Bruce Shields at the Duke Center and became a fellow of the American Glaucoma Society, the Chandler-Grant Glaucoma Society, and the Society of Heed Fellows. On July 1, 1980, Dr. Brindley began a long and distinguished career at Scott and White, serving for ten years as the ophthalmology residency program director, and then seventeen years as chair of the Department of Ophthalmology. 13

 Marylou Boynton, personal communications, July 3 and 4, 2019.

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Dr. Brindley was a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology, and a member of the Christian Ophthalmological Society from which he received the J. Lawton Smith Award. Recently named in his honor, the Glen Brindley Ethics Lecture has been presented at the annual Everett R. Veirs Lecture and Ophthalmology Conference. Dr. Glen Brindley was survived by his wife, Nell, two daughters (and their spouses), Amy Brindley Hendy and Ann Brindley Westmoreland, six grandchildren, and two physician-brothers (and their spouses), Drs. Hanes Hanby Brindley, Jr. and George West Brindley.14

Fig. 67. Bernice Z. Brown, MD (1930–2003).

BERNICE Z. BROWN, MD (1930–2003) Bernice Z. Brown was born in Altoona, Pennsylvania on February 24, 1930. She received her BA from the University of California Los Angeles. Married and with two children, she entered the University of Southern California Medical School in 1961, earning her MD degree there in 1965 with Alpha Omega Alpha honors. She took an ophthalmology residency at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, the first woman accepted into that program. She took oculoplastic fellowship training with Crowell Beard at the University of California San Francisco from 1972 to 1975, and then trained with Alston Callahan at the Eye Foundation Hospital in Birmingham in 1975. Bernice and her family made their home in Glendale, California for over forty-seven years. During that time, she was an inveterate world traveler, bicycling in France, traveling to Canada and Antarctica, and cruising the Amazon River, the Irish Sea, and the coasts of Alaska and Scandinavia. In Los Angeles, Dr. Brown advanced to become Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Fellowship Director of Ophthalmic Plastic, Orbital, and Reconstructive Surgery at the USC Doheny Eye Institute. Dr. Brown was elected ASOPRS fellow in 1976, executive secretary from 1984 to 1985, and president in 1990. Her term was filled with many accomplishments and is particularly memorable for the ASOPRS spring meeting that she held in Yosemite Valley. In 1987, Dr. Brown joined Henry Baylis as co-editor of the Society’s journal, OPRS. She served with Dr. Baylis and then Richard Dortzbach in this capacity for a total of twelve years, using her private 14

 “Glen Owen Brindley, MD.” http://www.scanioharperfuneralhome.com/obituary/glen-brindley-md. Accessed October 30, 2018.

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practice office as the Journal’s editorial headquarters. Bernice Brown was also a founding member of Women In Ophthalmology (WIO), serving as that organization’s third president and the first recipient of the WIO Suzanne Véronneau-Troutman Award. Bernice Brown died on December 24, 2003, in Glendale, California. She was survived by her husband, Donald Mullins, and her daughters, Trudy and Melanie. Lasting memorials have included the Doheny Eye Institute’s Bernice Z. Brown MD Fellowship in Oculoplastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and, in 2004, the establishment of the WIO Bernice Z. Brown Memorial Award, which is given to members of that society “who have contributed to the profession of ophthalmology and to the advancement of women in the profession. The honored guest is asked to speak at the annual WIO Summer Symposium about her life, accomplishments and how she has overcome obstacles in her profession. This lecture offers inspiring real-life stories of professional growth and success in the practice of ophthalmology.” That same year, at the 2004 ASOPRS Scientific Symposium in New Orleans, Stuart Seiff presented “A Tribute to Bernice Brown, MD” that was sponsored by the ASOPRS Foundation.15

Fig. 68. George F. Buerger Jr., MD (1935–2019).

GEORGE F. BUERGER JR., MD (1935–2019) George F. Buerger Jr. was born on January 22, 1935 and raised in Uniontown, Pennsylvania where he graduated from high school in 1953. He attended the University of Pittsburgh where he was a member of Delta Tau Delta, serving as the fraternity’s president in his senior year. He later became president of Pitt’s Delta Tau Delta Alumni Society and a member of the university’s Greek Hall of Fame.16 After graduating from college in 1958, George married Patricia Fike whom he first met in the first grade. The two had lived down the street from each other in Uniontown.17 George attended George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, DC, earning his MD degree in 1962. After completing a residency in ophthalmology at the 15

 Harris GJ. “In Memoriam: Bernice Z. Brown, MD.” Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 2004;20:91. “Bernice Z. Brown.” Glendale News-Press. January 13, 2004. http://articles.glendalenewspress.com. Accessed June 16, 2013. “Women in Ophthalmology: History,” and “Women in Ophthalmology: Awards.” http://www.wioonline.org. Accessed June 16, 2013. 16

 Stinelli M. “Chapter eternal: Pittsburgh’s Dr. George Buerger.” myfraternitylife.org. Accessed July 3, 2019.

17

 “Buerger, Jr. Dr. George F.” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, June 20–23, 2019. https://www.legacy.com/. Accessed July 3, 2019.

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Pittsburgh Eye and Ear Hospital in 1968, he did an oculoplastic fellowship with Byron Smith at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in New York City. Buerger returned to Pittsburgh in 1969 to establish a private practice, Pittsburgh Oculoplastic Associates, becoming the first ophthalmologist in that city to specialize in oculoplastic surgery. During his fellowship year, Buerger had worked with four other fellows of Dr. Smith to establish the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS), enlisting the support of prominent senior leaders in the subspecialty throughout the United States. At the Society’s organizing meeting on October 11, 1969, he became one of the Society’s five founding fellows, joined by approximately sixty charter fellows who had attended. Buerger held many offices during the early years of the Society, serving as president in 1977 and as an advisor for another decade thereafter. Fifty years later, ASOPRS has grown to 869 members in over thirty countries. George Buerger was a leader in other medical organizations serving as president of the Pittsburgh Ophthalmology Society (1987– 1989), the 125th president of the Allegheny County Medical Society (1990), and he was active in the Pennsylvania Medical Society. He was a mentor to generations of Pitt ophthalmology residents. His sons, David Buerger and Daniel Buerger, joined Pittsburgh Oculoplastic Associates in 1996 and 1998, respectively, and other associates also joined them in practice. George had the privilege of serving as the official ophthalmologist for the Pittsburgh Penguins for 31 years, from 1973 to 2005. He was called upon to treat an orbital fracture of Penguins defenseman, Dave Burrows, in 1974. When the Penguins won the Stanley Cup in 1992, he used his privileged “Day with the Cup” by visiting the Pittsburgh Blind Association and allowing the visually impaired to share in the experience of “seeing” the cup by feeling its grooves and etchings. Though he was busy with his practice and his various responsibilities, he made a point of making it home in time for dinner and spending weekends with family at their cabin at Youghiogheny Lake. George was married to his wife, Patricia, for over sixty years. They had an “old fashioned” relationship and did everything together. When he retired in 2007, he spent much of his time with his grandchildren, often taking them fishing, boating, and playing cards at the Youghiogheny Lake cabin. George Buerger Jr. died peacefully in his sleep on June 16, 2019, surrounded by family in his home in Churchill, Pennsylvania. He was eighty-four. He is survived by three sons David Buerger (Sonya) of Pittsburgh, Daniel Buerger (Laura) of Pittsburgh, Thomas Buerger of Washington, DC, and seven grandchildren.

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Fig. 69. Alston Callahan, MD (1911–2005).

ALSTON CALLAHAN, MD (1911–2005) Born in Mississippi on March 16, 1911, Alston Callahan earned his BA from Mississippi College, Clinton, and his medical degree from Tulane Medical School, New Orleans. After his internship at Charity Hospital, he completed his ophthalmology residency at Tulane Graduate School of Medicine in 1936. As described in the 1994 ASOPRS commemorative book, he was one of the founders of modern ophthalmic plastic surgery and, as described by George Buerger, a vital force in the establishment of ASOPRS, becoming a charter fellow in 1969 and serving as advisor during the formative years of 1970 to 1973. He was given the honor of delivering the inaugural Wendell L. Hughes Lecture in 1970 and was the recipient of an ASOPRS Special Award of Appreciation in 1993. He graciously contributed to the 1994 ASOPRS festschrift with a poignant personal remembrance entitled, “My Involvement with Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery.” Callahan’s leadership in the emerging subspecialty of ophthalmic plastic surgery began during World War II when he was Chief of the Eye Section of the US Army Northington General Hospital in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, performing ophthalmic reconstructive surgeries on hundreds of soldiers. After the war, his textbooks became an essential part of many ophthalmologists’ libraries, and his Academy courses and movies inspired, educated, and entertained thousands of ophthalmologists. Between 1951 and 1990, Callahan trained approximately forty-nine fellows. Several of these former fellows went on to become important preceptors of ophthalmic plastic surgery and/or leaders of ASOPRS including four future presidents: Richard Dortzbach, Robert Wilkins, Bartley Frueh, and Bernice Brown. After retiring in 1991 at the age of eighty, Alston Callahan worked to establish the International Retinal Research Foundation which continues to provide grants for macular degeneration research. During his career, one of his greatest passions was establishing the Eye Foundation Hospital of Birmingham that opened its doors in 1963, and which was renamed the Callahan Eye Foundation Hospital in his honor in 1999. Another passion was collecting fine art, and before his death he arranged to donate his entire collection of Asian art to the Birmingham Museum of Art. Alston Callahan died on October 28, 2005 at the age of ninety-four. As described in the 1994 ASOPRS festschrift, one of his sons, Michael A. Callahan (b. 1946), followed his father into ophthalmology, oculoplastic surgery, and service to the Society, likewise contributing many outstanding papers at ASOPRS symposia, and further perpetuating the Callahan legacy by ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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authoring Aesculapius Publishing’s “ultimate” editions of Ophthalmic Plastic and Orbital Surgery in 1979, and Beard’s Ptosis in 1990. In addition to Michael, Alston Callahan was survived by three other children, Kristina, Timothy, and Karin, and ten grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Eivor, and sons Kevin and Patrick.18

Fig. 70. Jorge G. Camara, MD (1950–2013).

JORGE G. CAMARA, MD (1950–2013) Jorge Camara was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan on May 21, 1950. His father, Dr. Augusto Oliva Camara was then pursuing post-graduate medical training. His father and his mother, Feliciana de Guzman Camara, returned with their first-born child, Jorge, to the Philippines where the couple raised a family that grew to twelve children. In Manila, Jorge attended La Salle Catholic schools and, like his father, went on to undergraduate and medical studies at the University of the Philippines Diliman in Quezon City. As an undergraduate, Camara was active in the student council leading to his involvement in anti-government demonstrations in early 1970s, the so-called First Quarter Storm. After enrolling in the University of the Philippines College of Medicine, he curbed his political activism and focused on his studies. He graduated from medical school in 1976 as class valedictorian, duplicating an honor that his father, Augusto Camara, had achieved years earlier. Following medical school and training in the Philippines, Dr. Jorge Camara returned to the country of his birth, taking a residency in ophthalmology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Following residency, he moved to Honolulu and worked at Straub Hospital. Later, he and his wife Virginia (Binky) Valdes, also a University of the Philippines College of Medicine graduate, opened the Camara Eye Clinic. Camara concentrated a good deal of his practice in the area of oculoplastics including the diagnosis and treatment of lacrimal problems. He was invited to write a thesis for ASOPRS membership and submitted a study of the micro-reflux of fluorescein from the lacrimal sac during digital massage as observed at the slit lamp.19 He was inducted as an ASOPRS fellow in 1997. Camara presented papers to the Society and published 18

 Angelucci D. “Tribute: Alston Callahan, MD.” EyeWorld, The Newsmagazine of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. http://www.eyeworld.org. Accessed June 16, 2013. 19

 Camara JG, Santiago MD, Rodriguez RE, et al. The micro-reflux test. A new test to evaluate nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Ophthalmology. 1999;106(12):2319–21.

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articles on laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy including the use of adjunctive mitomycin C in the procedure. In a further demonstration of technology, he engaged in live-mentoring of a group of physicians five thousand miles away in Manila from his operating room at St. Francis Hospital in Honolulu. In connection with his studies of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy, Camara was awarded the ASOPRS Research Award in 2000. The following year, he contributed to a technology assessment statement on endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.20 Among other contributions, Camara described a form of lateral entropion in Asians and his preferred method of surgical treatment. Camara merged his love of ophthalmic surgery, his love of classical music, and his virtuosity on the piano in playing music in the operating room. He recorded and produced a CD of his performances entitled “Live from the Operating Room” which included classical music from Chopin to Debussy. He reported a series of cases in the medical literature in which he played piano in the operating room, and was able to demonstrate that this had a calming effect and a beneficial lowering of the surgical patient’s pulse and blood pressure. Camara also performed piano for fundraising concerts on behalf of the Aloha Medical Mission which he helped establish in the 1980s, and he participated in several medical missions for that organization. Dr. Camara returned to Quezon City to receive an award on occasion of the university’s centennial celebrations in 2008. One of Dr. Camara’s last publications was on conjunctivitis and other ocular disease seen in patients exposed to the volcanic fog (“vog”) from Mount Kilauea, which has been erupting since 1983. Soon after Dr. Camara’s untimely death in Hawaii on August 28, 2013, an issue of the Hawaii Filipino Chronicle was dedicated to his memory. It was reported that more than one thousand people came to his memorial service in Honolulu to honor him and pay their respects.21

20

 Woog JJ, Kennedy RH, Custer PL, Kaltreider SA, Meyer DR, Camara JG. Endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy: a report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology. 2001;108(12):2369–77. 21

 “Thomas Cherubini, MD.” http://www.thefilipinochronicle.com/HFCRE_09072013.pdf. Accessed April 25, 2018.

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Fig. 71. Thomas D. Cherubini, MD (1929–2017).

THOMAS D. CHERUBINI, MD (1929–2017) Thomas Cherubini was born at home on March 30, 1929, the seventh child of Leon Cherubini of Brescia, Italy, and Agnes Gaumbach of Hazleton, Pennsylvania. He studied medicine at Hahnemann Medical College (now Drexel University College of Medicine). Dr. Cherubini took his internship at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby, Pennsylvania and completed a residency in ophthalmology at the University of Pennsylvania in 1968. Immediately following his residency, he completed a three-month fellowship in oculoplastic surgery with Dr. Byron Smith in New York City. During his fellowship, Cherubini was entrusted with co-authoring a now classic atlas and textbook of oculoplastic surgery with his mentor (published in 1970).22 Cherubini, together with a cadre of Dr. Smith’s oculoplastic fellows from 1968 to 1969—Robert Wilkins, George Buerger, Jr., Charles Beyer, and Margaret Obear (who had been one of Smith’s first fellows in 1960)— organized the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS). These important organizing efforts by Cherubini and his colleagues merited special distinction as founding fellows of ASOPRS.23 Dr. Cherubini maintained a broad interest in other aspects of ophthalmology without personally subspecializing in oculoplastics, and so he decided to resign from the Society in 1981, only twelve years after he had participated in its co-founding. His many hobbies included jazz (he played clarinet, alto saxophone, and guitar) and the writing of novels, a book of short stories (Money Back Short Stories), and a health guide on diabetes and diet. His novels included Up In Smoke (under the pen name Tom Deecy), The God Particle (published in under his own name), and the apparently unpublished The Broken Seal. Although ophthalmology was his professional calling, another major life-long pastime was sailing. In the 1950s and early 1960s, Tom Cherubini was involved with his father, Leon, and older brothers, John, Frit, Richard and Joe, in a family boat-building business in Burlington, New Jersey, building sailboats and a variety of dinghies. The business, known as Cherubini Yachts, remains with a nephew; the love of sailing was always pervasive in their close-knit, extended family. Thomas Cherubini died on April 17, 2017.

22

 Smith B, Cherubini TD. Oculoplastic Surgery: A Compendium of Principles and Techniques. St. Louis: CV Mosby; 1970.

23

 Reifler DM, ed. The American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS). Winter Park and San Francisco: ASOPRS and Norman Publishing; 1994. See especially pp. 106–107, 141–152.

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He was survived by his wife, Fabiola Veldorale Cherubini, his son Christopher T. Cherubini, and a large family of cousins, nephews, and nieces.

Fig. 72. Ronald E. Dei Cas, MD (1963–2010).

RONALD E. DEI CAS, MD (1963–2010) Ronald Dei Cas was born in North Charleroi, Pennsylvania on July 19, 1963, a son of C. Vance and Bonnie Dei Cas. He graduated from Charleroi High School in 1981 and attended Northwestern University in Chicago, graduating in 1985 with an undergraduate degree, and a medical degree in 1989. He took his ophthalmology residency at Georgetown University and fellowships in pediatric ophthalmology and oculoplastic surgery at the University of Pennsylvania and Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. He also obtained a master’s degree in public health from John Hopkins University. Dr. Dei Cas worked in Washington, DC for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), and he was subsequently employed by the Novartis Pharmaceutical Company. Ronald was an accomplished figure skater and worked on the development committee of the US Figure Skating Program. He was a National Figure Skating Judge and had judged a competition in Boston on June 20, 2009, just two days before his untimely death on June 22, 2009. He was survived by his mother, Bonnie Dei Cas, his brother Carl, and his partner, Brad Austin.24

24

 “Dr. Ronald Edward Dei Cas, July 19, 1963 – June 22, 2009.” Shrock-Hogan Funeral Home. http://obituaries.expressionstributes.com. Accessed 25, 2018.

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Fig. 73. Robert D. Deitch Sr., MD, JD (1932–2007).

ROBERT D. DEITCH SR., MD, JD (1932–2007) Robert D. Deitch Sr. was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on October 18, 1932. Deitch graduated from Shortridge High School. He was a graduate of both the Indiana University School of Medicine and the Indiana University School of Law. He served his country as a captain in the US Air Force. Following a residency in ophthalmology in 1963, he took a fellowship with Alston Callahan in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. Deitch was passionate about learning and exploring nature. He enjoyed traveling, genealogy, hiking, mathematics, Spanish, and history. Robert D. Deitch Sr. died on August 10, 2007, from complications of Parkinson’s disease. He was survived by two sons who also became physicians, ophthalmologist Robert D. Deitch Jr., MD and S. Douglas Deitch, MD, three daughters, Brenda Suris, Denise Bertagni, Elise Deitch, and their spouses, stepdaughter Paula Forsyth, and seven grandchildren.25

25

 “Robert D. Deitch (1932–2007).” The Independent Online. www.dailyindependent.com. Accessed June 30, 2013.

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Fig. 74. Arthur G. DeVoe, MD (1909–2007).

ARTHUR G. DEVOE, MD (1909–2007) Arthur Gerard DeVoe was born on March 24, 1909. As the only son of a career army physician, his younger years were spent on several army bases. He graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1927, then with a BS from Yale University, where he was captain of the track team, and subsequently from Cornell University Medical College in 1935. After completing an ophthalmology residency at Columbia Eye Institute in 1940, he rose through the ranks of academic medicine, serving as chair and Professor of Ophthalmology at New York University Medical Center and then as chair and Professor of the Department of Ophthalmology at Columbia University, and chair of the Edward Harkness Eye Institute from 1959 to 1974. One of his earliest papers after World War II reviewed his experiences extensively. He was elected to membership in the American Ophthalmological Society (AOS) in 1947; his thesis was titled “Fractures of the Orbital Floor.” He maintained a great interest in oculoplastic surgery, contributing to Wendell Hughes’ classic Academy manual in 1961. His expertise in corneal and cataract surgery was world-renowned, and his keen appreciation of the ocular surface and the ocular adnexae helped to him to pioneer the development of the keratoprosthesis with Hernando Cardona. DeVoe played major leadership roles in the American Board of Ophthalmology (chair, 1964–1966), AOS (president, 1973), and other professional organizations. Among many honors, he was the recipient of the AOS Lucien Howe Medal in 1984. DeVoe was elected as an ASOPRS fellow in 1973, and he became a life fellow in 1982 following his retirement. Arthur DeVoe passed away at the age of ninety-eight after a brief illness on September 19, 2007, in Gladwyne, Pennsylvania. He was survived by his children, Gerard, David, and Ralph, and five grandchildren. His first wife, Margaret, and his second wife, Nina, predeceased him.26

26

 DeVoe AG. Experiences with surgery of the anophthalmic orbit. Am J Ophthalmol. 1945;28:1346–51. DeVoe AG. Fractures of the orbital floor. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc. 1947;45:502–26. Srinivasin D, Farris RL, Arthur Gerard DeVoe, MD. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc. 2009;152:2–3. Chang S. “DeVoe, Arthur Gerard.” New York Times. September 26, 2007. http://www.query.nytimes.com. Accessed June 16, 2013.

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Fig. 75. Rocko M. Fasanella, MD (1916–2009).

ROCKO M. FASANELLA, MD (1916–2009) Rocko Michael Fasanella was born in Trenton, New Jersey on August 4, 1916. He assumed that he would attend nearby Princeton University, but a Yale representative visited his high school and lured him to Yale where he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1939 and a medical degree in 1943. During medical school, he was part of a team that successfully administered penicillin for the first time in the United States, to a woman with post-partum septicemia who happened to be the wife of the man who brought Dr. Fasanella to Yale. Fasanella interned at Grace-New Haven Hospital in New Haven, and then served in the medical corps of the US Army in France during World War II. He returned to New Haven where he completed a residency in ophthalmology in 1950. In 1951, at the age of thirty-five, he was appointed Chief of the Section of Ophthalmology, the youngest section chief at that time. Published in 1957, Fasanella’s Management of Complications in Eye Surgery (1957) included several fine chapters on eyelid and orbital surgery by Edmund Spaeth; the book was required reading for a generation of ophthalmology residents. In 1961, he received an appointment as Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science. That year Fasanella and one of his residents, a Peruvian by the name of Javier Servat, described a now classic technique of minimal ptosis repair by a posterior resection of tarsus; they also offered new descriptions of conjunctiva and Müller’s muscle resection. In 1969, Fasanella became a charter fellow of ASOPRS and after his retirement, a life fellow in 1990. Dr. Fasanella was fluent in several languages, and a great lover of opera and other cultural activities. He was an enthusiastic fisherman and took up golf after retirement. Rocko Fasanella died at his home in Orange, Connecticut, on February 11, 2009 at the age of ninety-two, survived by six children and four grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife Marion.27

27

 Shields MB. “Rocko Fasanella, MD (1916–2009).” Arch Ophthalmol. 2009:127:818. “Guide to the Rocko Michael Fasanella Collection.” Sterling Memorial Library, New Haven, CT. http://drs.library.yale.edu. Accessed June 16, 2013.

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Fig. 76. William Fein, MD (1933–1973).

WILLIAM FEIN, MD (1933–1973) William Fein was born in New York City on November 27, 1933 to Samuel and Beatrice Fein. He moved to California for medical school, earning his MD as a member of the University of California Irvine Medical School’s first graduating class. In 1967, after completing an internship and ophthalmology residency at the L.A. County General Hospital, Dr. Fein went back to New York City to observe Dr. Byron Smith in his clinics and in surgery, and then he went on to Oregon to study with Dr. Lester T. Jones. Following this additional post-graduate experience, Dr. Fein prepared a thesis which was submitted to ASOPRS, on the surgical repair of distichiasis, trichiasis, and entropion. The work was accepted and later published.28 He became an ASOPRS fellow in 1973. Returning to California, Dr. Fein continued his interest in oculoplastic and lacrimal surgery and established a practice in Beverly Hills. He maintained a teaching affiliation in clinical ophthalmology at the University of Southern California and the L.A. County Hospital. Dr. David Tse was among his residents who were first exposed there to grafting and other oculoplastic techniques. Dr. Fein and his wife, Bonnie, raised three children, Adam, Greg, and Stephanie, the latter following her father in attending UC Irvine Medical School though she specialized in internal medicine. The family’s matriarch, Bonnie, passed away in 2014 at the age of seventy-seven. Dr. William Fein succumbed to renal failure and died on April 14, 2017 after a fifty-year career devoted to healing others.29 In addition to his three children and their spouses, Dr. Fein was survived by two grandsons and a granddaughter.

28

 Fine W. Surgical repair for distichiasis, trichiasis and entropion. Arch Ophthalmol. 1976;94(5):809-810.

29

 “William Fein, MD.” Los Angeles Times. April 15, 2017. https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/latimes/obituary. Accessed July 19, 2018.

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Fig. 77. Morris Feldstein, MD (1912–1999).

MORRIS FELDSTEIN, MD (1912–1999) Morris (Murray) Feldstein was born on July 6, 1912. He was a graduate of New York University and trained in ophthalmology and joined the staff of Mount Sinai Hospital. In 1970, Dr. Feldstein and colleague Dr. Virginia Lubkin taught a course in ophthalmic plastic surgery at Mt. Sinai Hospital. The following year, together with Dr. Ira Eliasoph, they established an annual course entitled, “Cosmetic Surgery for the Aging Eye” under the auspices of the Ophthalmology Department and the Mount Sinai Post Graduate School. This two-day seminar consistently attracted a stellar guest faculty and was widely acclaimed and well attended.30 Feldstein became a charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969 and, after his retirement, a life fellow of the Society in 1991. One of his memorable contributions was a full-thickness lower eyelid suture technique for the repair of involutional entropion which was first published in 1960, the same year that Dr. Lester Jones and others described a similar technique.31 Over ten years, his technique evolved to often eliminate skin incisions altogether as was described by Dr. Marvin Quickert and others. Dr. Feldstein also described various techniques in blepharoplasty including the use of skin clamps and musculocutaneous flaps. Feldstein died on August 2, 1999 at the age of eighty-seven. He was predeceased by his wife, Lucille Dee Rubin.32

30

 Aufses AH Jr., Niss B. This House of Noble Deeds: The Mount Sinai Hospital, 1852 – 2002. New York: NYU Press; 2002.

31

 Feldstein M. A method of surgical correction of entropion in aged persons. Eye Ear Nose and Throat Monthly 1960;39:730–1; Feldstein M. Suture correction of senile entropion by inferior lid retractor tuck. Adv Ophthalmic Plastic Reconstr Surg. 1983;2:269–274; Eliasoph I. Re: Lateral tarsal strip and Quickert sutures for lower eyelid ectropion. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 2006; 22:237. 32

 “Deaths: Feldstein, Morris (Murray), MD.” New York Times. August 8, 1999. http://www.nytimes.com. Accessed June 16, 2013.

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Fig. 78. John R. Finlay, MD (1921–2007).

JOHN R. FINLAY, MD (1921–2007) John R. Finlay was born in New York City in 1921. He earned his undergraduate degree from City College of New York and his medical degree from Hahnemann Medical College in Philadelphia. He met his wife Vera, also a physician, at Hahnemann. Dr. Finlay completed an ophthalmology residency at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and later became a surgeon director there. He taught ophthalmic pathology at the New York University School of Medicine and was an early investigator of intraocular lenses. Finlay became a charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969, and he became a life fellow in 1994 after his retirement. Finlay was a skilled pilot, past president of the Flying Physicians Association, a member of the Explorers Club of Manhattan and of the International Order of Characters. He traveled extensively, often to remote areas of the world, and taught surgical techniques to ophthalmologists in the Philippines, Tunisia, China, Brazil, Russia, and Sri Lanka. He volunteered with the ship Hope, and with Orbis, an airplane-based eye hospital. He was also an avid windsurfer and sailor at his home of forty years in Byram, Connecticut, and he loved to ski near a farm he owned in Vermont. John Finlay died at his home in North Salem, New York on April 14, 2007. He was survived by his son John R. Finlay, daughter Alexis Finlay, and a granddaughter.33

33

 “Finlay, John R., MD.” New York Times. April 18, 2007. http://nytimes.com. Accessed July 19, 2013.

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Fig. 79. Bartley R. Frueh, MD (1937–2010).

BARTLEY R. FRUEH, MD (1937–2010) Bartley R. Frueh was born on September 1, 1937 in Lakewood, Ohio. He earned an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering from Cornell University and attended medical school at Columbia University. He served his internship at the North Carolina Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and then served as a flight medical officer in the US Air Force from 1965 to 1967. Frueh completed his ophthalmology residency and received an MS degree at the University of Michigan in 1970 and took a fellowship in oculoplastic surgery under Alston Callahan. He served as Director of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Missouri Medical Center from 1971 to 1979 and then on the faculty of the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center for over thirty years, where he established the Eye Plastics and Orbital Surgery Service and was promoted to full Professor in 1986. Frueh became a fellow of ASOPRS in 1972 and was almost immediately elected as an officer of the Society. He became president-elect of ASOPRS in 1975, and president in 1976, when the tragic death of president-elect Marvin Quickert changed the order of succession to the presidency. Frueh inaugurated the annual spring meeting as a scientific session for the membership, and his spring meeting was held at Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. During that year, ASOPRS increased the duration of Society-sponsored fellowships from six months to one full year. In 1978, Frueh represented ASOPRS at the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology in anticipation of its split between ophthalmology and otolaryngology. He later co-chaired the ASOPRS ethics committee. In 1978, Frueh chaired the first annual joint scientific session of ASOPRS and the American Academy of Ophthalmology. He also taught courses at the annual Academy meetings throughout his career. In 1983, Frueh began training oculofacial plastic surgery fellows at the University of Michigan. Over time he served as the primary preceptor for at least fourteen fellows, and he continued to participate in training fellows after his associate, Christine Nelson, assumed the primary preceptor role. In 1993, he gave his Wendell Hughes Lecture at the Academy entitled, “A Test to Supersede Levator Function in Evaluating Ptosis” and in 2003 he gave the F. Bruce Fralick lecture at the Kellogg Eye Center. Among many hobbies, Frueh enjoyed woodworking, rebuilding and driving antique cars, architecture and design, Egyptian and Roman archeology and numismatics, and Chinese calligraphy. A collection of his calligraphies is on permanent display at the U-M Kellogg Eye ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Center in Ann Arbor. Dr. Frueh retired from the active faculty of the University of Michigan in 2008 and was named Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. He became a life fellow of the ASOPRS in 2009. Bartley Frueh died suddenly in Ann Arbor, Michigan on February 16, 2010 from head injuries sustained in a fall. He was survived by his wife Cheryl, four sons, two daughters and six grandchildren. One son predeceased him. Following Bart’s death, the ASOPRS Foundation has sponsored awards to two recipients annually in his memory—The Bartley Frueh Award for Best YASOPRS Presentation—one from each morning’s scientific session given during the YASOPRS Eye Openers Rapid Fire Cases and Presentations.34

Fig. 80. Robert M. Goldwyn, MD (1930‒2010).

ROBERT M. GOLDWYN, MD (1930‒2010) Robert Malcom Goldwyn was born in Worcester, MA, in 1930. His extraordinary career was described in a Harvard University memorial tribute which cited his academic and professional connections to that institution, including a BA from Harvard College (1952, Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude), MD Harvard Medical School (1956), and a Harvey Cushing Surgery Fellowship (1956–1961). He returned to Boston and Harvard as Chief of Plastic Surgery at the Beth Israel Hospital from 1972–1996.35 Salient points about his career in writing and his relationship with the ASOPRS include that in 1997, in his eighteenth year as editor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (PRS), Dr. Goldwyn first presented an invited lecture at an ASOPRS scientific symposium entitled, “Who Does What and When.” In 2001, he was inducted into the Society as an honorary fellow. In his final year as editor of PRS, Dr. Goldwyn presented the ASOPRS Foundation Lecture appropriately given in memory of Dr. Bernice Z. Brown, the former editor of the Society’s journal, Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. The title of that lecture was “Effect of Cosmetic Surgery on a Specialty.” Dr. Goldwyn authored or co-authored more than 300 articles and several books, the last of which, “Retired Not Dead,” shed important and strong light on the continuing 34

 Nelson CC. “In Memoriam: Bart R. Frueh, MD.” Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 2010; 26:226–7; Lichter PR. “Bartley R. Frueh (1937–2010).” Arch Ophthalmol. 128 (2010) 914. “Frueh, Bartley R., MD, Ann Arbor, MI.” http://obits.mlive.com. Accessed June 17, 2013. “University of Michigan Faculty History Project.” http://um2017.org/faculty-history/faculty/bartley-r-frueh/memoir. Accessed June 17, 2013. 35

 Silen W, Slavin SA, Murray JE. “Robert M. Goldwyn, Harvard Medical School Memorial Minute.” Harvard Gazette. April 7, 2011. http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2011/04/robert-m-goldwyn/. Accessed April 20, 2011.

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role of a physician and surgeon after ceasing active practice. His longstanding interests in medical history and archives are reflected in his writings, in his founding of the National Archives of Plastic Surgery, housed at Harvard Medical School since 1972, and in his chairship of the archives committee of the Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation. Dr. Goldwyn was a founding member of Physicians for Social Responsibility. His articles on world peace, medical ethics, and opposition to biological and chemical warfare led to invitations to speak at institutions throughout the United States and the world. He traveled to Israel in 1973 to care for the wounded after the Yom Kippur War and to Pakistan in 1989 to care for Afghans wounded in their fight with the Soviets. In 1998, he co-founded an organization to care for victims of suicide bombings in the Middle East. His worldwide travels fanned his interest in linguistics, and he made acceptance speeches in the languages of the many countries that honored him. He was fluent in French, and never gave up learning new languages, especially in connection with his travels. Dr. Goldwyn was decorated by the governments of France, Germany, and Italy with their highest honors for his work. Yet, he remained a humble man who treated patients with the same deference he would pay a national leader, and he had a wonderful charm and sense of humor. Dr. Goldwyn’s honorary membership in ASOPRS was one among many such memberships in national and international societies of plastic surgery.

Fig. 81. Barrett G. Haik, MD (1951–2016).

BARRETT G. HAIK, MD (1951–2016) Barrett George Haik was born in New Orleans on September 8, 1951, the son of George M. Haik, MD, and Isabelle Saloom Haik. He graduated from Metairie Park Country Day High School and Centenary College where he earned a Bachelor of Science in biology. He earned his medical degree and PhD in anatomy from the Louisiana State University Medical School. After residency at New York’s Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Dr. Haik joined Cornell University and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In 1986, he joined Tulane University in New Orleans as a Professor of Ophthalmology. He was also made Program Director and Medical Director of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, where he trained residents from Tulane, LSU, and the Ochsner Foundation. In 1991, Dr. Haik was named the George M. Haik Sr., MD, St. Giles Foundation Professor of Pediatric and Adult Ophthalmic ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Oncology, Tulane’s first endowed chair in ophthalmology. In 1995, Dr. Haik was recruited to be chair of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center Department of Ophthalmology. He transformed the Department of Ophthalmology from a small office with four academic faculty members into the acclaimed Hamilton Eye Institute, a world-class eye center that is home to more than forty academic faculty members and lauded among the top-ten eye programs in the United States. As department chair, Dr. Haik developed the Hamilton Eye Institute and also the ophthalmic oncology service at St. Jude Children’s Hospital. He was a member of the American Ophthalmological Society. He served as president of the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology. He was also a member of the American Eye Study Club and the American Society of Ophthalmic Ultrasound. He served three consecutive terms on the Board of Regents for the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Haik authored or co-authored more than 160 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and abstracts. He was internationally renowned as an expert in the diagnosis and management of ophthalmic tumors and received numerous grants for his research. Semi-annually, Dr. Haik traveled to Panama to operate field clinics to help the poorest of poor. He felt that identifying retinoblastoma in children was paramount to saving their lives. He lectured around the world and traveled to the Middle East, Asia, and South America to teach physicians how to identify and treat pediatric ocular cancers. Dr. Haik served on the Board of the Eye Foundation of America, founded by his father and based in New Orleans. When not caring for patients or teaching others, Dr. Haik enjoyed the company of his friends and spent his spare time golfing, fishing in Venice or enjoying time with his bloodhound Maddie. Barrett Haik passed away unexpectedly but peacefully in his sleep at his boat house in New Orleans, Louisiana on July 22, 2016. He was survived by his son Christopher Barrett Haik (Sofia), daughter Claire Marie Haik (James Anthony Schakleford), brother George M. Haik, Jr., MD, brother Kenneth Haik, MD (Diana), sister Suzanne Terrell (Lee), and by his close companion, Blanca Phillips.36

36

 “Barrett George Haik MD, FACS (1951–2016).” http://TheNewOrleansAdvocate.com. Accessed March 30, 2017.

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Fig. 82. James L. Hargiss, MD (1921–2017).

JAMES L. HARGISS, MD (1921–2017) James Leonard Hargiss was born in Manhattan, Kansas on June 15, 1921. His parents, Meade Thomas Hargiss and Julia Baldwin (Wayland) Hargiss were “somewhat nomadic,” and so James spent his childhood in various places, including many campgrounds in Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, California, and Washington.37 Eventually the family settled in Seattle, Washington where James graduated from Roosevelt High School. He attended the University of Washington where he was a lightweight boxing champion and received his undergraduate degree from UW in 1942. He then studied medicine at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine, receiving his MD degree in 1945. This was followed by an internship at the United States Naval Hospital, PSNS Bremerton, Washington from 1945 to 1946 and service in the United States Naval Reserve through 1948, including active assignment in the Asia-Pacific.38 He married the love of his life, Helen Natalie Berglund, on July 19, 1947. Following his service in the Naval Reserve, Dr. Hargiss took a residency in ophthalmology at the Geisinger Hospital and Foss Clinic in Danville, Pennsylvania from 1949 to 1951. He trained with other luminaries in the field of oculoplastics including Drs. Lester Jones, Wendell Hughes, and Byron Smith. He returned to Seattle to open his office in 1951, and he subsequently received a master’s degree in medical science the following year from the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine. Dr. Hargiss was one of three founders and leaders of the Eye Clinic of Seattle from 1958 to 1994. Thereafter, his group merged with Eye Associates of Seattle to form Eye Associates Northwest. In 2001, soon after his retirement from private practice in the late 1990s, he endowed the University of Washington Medical Center’s Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Fellowship under Dr. Jim Orcutt’s directorship and was one of the preceptors. That program’s first fellow, Dr. A.J. Amadi, wrote a moving tribute to Dr. Hargiss which was posted in the UW Ophthalmology Bulletin and on the ASOPRS Forum.39 Here it was noted that Dr. Hargiss officially entered academic medicine “at the 37

 Daniel Schaefer. “Dedication of 2006 ASOPRS Foundation Lecture to James Hargiss, MD.” Presented at: The 37th ASOPRS Annual Scientific Symposium, Las Vegas, NV. November 15, 2006. 38

 http://prabook.com/web/person-view.html. Accessed November 8, 2017.

39

 A.J. Amadi. “Celebrating the Life of James L. Hargiss 1921–2017.” http://ophthalmology.washington.edu/news/ Posted August 17, 2017. “In Memoriam, James L. Hargiss, MD (1921–2017).” ASOPRS Forum, www.asoprsforum.org. Posted August 23, 2017. Accessed November 6, 2017.

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ripe age of eighty,” though in truth he had received his appointment as Clinical Professor at the “young” age of seventy-four. The memorial beautifully described the gentle soul and keen intellect of Dr. Hargiss: “He was wonderful with patients, staff, medical students, residents, and fellows. He was humble, he was funny, and he was a perfect gentleman. He was an artist who could think and spontaneously draw beautiful three-dimensional images while teaching me about a surgical procedure, and his manuscript is still used in the UWMC Orbital Dissection course to this day. I could ask Jim anything about any topic, and I would always learn something interesting. He completed the New York Times Crossword Puzzle without pause. He could complete the puzzle with just one set of clues.” Dr. Hargiss was a charter fellow of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, chair of the education committee from 1972 to 1978, recipient of the Lester T. Jones Award in 1979 (or 1980), and he was the 2006 Honoree of the ASOPRS Foundation. The James L. Hargiss Lectureship in Oculofacial Plastic Surgery was established by the University of Washington Department of Ophthalmology, and he was in attendance at the second annual lecture which was given by James Katowitz in February, 2017. Dr. Hargiss was a past president of the Lake City Lions Club and he was an active leader in local republican party politics. He was a much-admired, multi-talented person; he was a member of the Visual Arts Society, and his excellent medical illustrations were only part of a broader artistic oeuvre in graphite, oil, and acrylic. Other hobbies included golf and classic cars. His favorite “pre- and postop photos” were of a vintage red sportscar that he restored. James L. Hargiss died on August 17, 2017. He was survived by his wife of seventy years, Helen, three children, Craig, Reid, and Philip, and four grandchildren. An “icon of what an ASOPRS member should be,” his legacy will live through the many lives he touched.

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Fig. 83. Joseph C. Hill, MD (1919–2009).

JOSEPH C. HILL, MD (1919–2009) Joseph C. Hill was born in Toronto in 1919, the son of an ophthalmologist. He spent every summer of his life, except while overseas, in Port Carling. He received his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Toronto and interned at Toronto Western Hospital. He did his residency in ophthalmology at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and his plastic surgery fellowship under the tutelage of Dr. Wendell L. Hughes. He was on the staff at Bellevue Hospital in New York City until he returned to Canada to join the RCAMC During World War II. He served in hospitals in England and in Ghent, Belgium, where he did many ophthalmic plastic procedures to rehabilitate war casualties. Returning to Toronto he became a consultant at Sunnybrook Hospital and joined the staff of the Toronto General Hospital where he was head of the Department of Ophthalmology. Together with Martin Kazdan he established an oculoplastic fellowship training program in Toronto. He developed an operation for entropion that was often called “The Hill Procedure.” Joseph Hill became a charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969 and was a member of the original advisory board of the Society. At the annual meeting of the Canadian Ophthalmological Society in Montreal in June 1981, Hill was one of three founding members who were present—along with William Pidde of Edmonton and Murray Christianson of Toronto— at an organizational meeting of the Canadian Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Society. After his retirement, he became a life fellow of the ASOPRS in 1990. Joseph Hill died on October 11, 2009 at the age of ninety, survived by his wife Lisa, daughters Barbara and Cathy, and grandsons Nicholas and Samuel. 40

40

 Joseph Hill. Curriculum Vitae, (1993). “Hill, Joseph.” Toronto Star. October 13, 2009.

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Fig. 84. Albert Hornblass, MD (1939–2007).

ALBERT HORNBLASS, MD (1939–2007) Albert Hornblass was born and raised in New York City. He received a BA from Yeshiva University and a medical degree from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He was Chief Resident of Ophthalmology at the State University of New York. He served in the US Army Medical Corps as a major and was Chief of Ophthalmology at the 71st Evacuation Hospital in Pleiku, South Vietnam, earning there the Bronze Star and the Vietnam Medal of Honor, First Class. After his discharge from the army he received a Heed Fellowship and was a fellow of Byron C. Smith at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in 1972. He was Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology, State University of New York, Health Science Center at Brooklyn, New York and Director of Ophthalmic Plastic, Orbital and Reconstructive Surgery at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital. From 1983 to 2003 he trained nineteen fellows including the editor of this ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book. Hornblass was president of ASOPRS in 1993, and his spring meeting was held at the Sagamore Hotel on Lake George in Bolton’s Landing, New York. His awards and lectures include the 1986 ASOPRS Merrill J. Reeh Ophthalmic Pathology Award, the 1993 AAO Ruedemann Lecture Award, the 2004 ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award, and the first Byron C. Smith Award for Excellence from the American Society of Ocularists. Dr. Hornblass edited several books including the two-volume Oculoplastic, Orbital and Reconstructive Surgery (1988). Albert Hornblass was a leader of his synagogue in Englewood, New Jersey and a lifelong Zionist. He cofounded and for many years served as president of the American Israeli Ophthalmological Society hosting gatherings of American and Israeli ophthalmologists during the fall meetings of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Albert Hornblass died on January 17, 2007. He is survived by his wife, Bernice, three children, David, Moshe, and Elana, and four grandchildren.41

41

 “Hornblass, Albert, MD.” New York Times. January 18, 2007. http://query.nytimes.com. Accessed June 18, 2013.

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Fig. 85. John W. Huneke, MD (1932‒2012).

JOHN W. HUNEKE, MD (1932‒2012) John W. Huneke was born August 4, 1932, in Batesville, Indiana where he was raised. He graduated from Wabash College and then completed his medical degree at Indiana University. He met his future wife, Frances Thibodeaux, during his internship at Charity Hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana. They were married in Pensacola, Florida, where he was serving as a flight surgeon in the Navy. After their wedding, they moved to Mountain View, CA, while he continued as a flight surgeon for the Navy. Dr. Huneke returned to Charity Hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana where he completed his residency in ophthalmology. He then went on for further postgraduate training in ophthalmic plastic surgery with Dr. Wendell Hughes in Hempstead, Long Island. Dr. Huneke practiced as an ophthalmologist for thirty-two years in Ada, Oklahoma, where he was active in the community and well loved by his patients and staff. He loved playing golf, fishing, and spending time with his family. John Huneke passed away on August 30, 2012 at the age of eighty, survived by his wife, Frances T. Huneke, five children, Elizabeth H. Simpson of Tennessee, Susan R. H. Brown of Oklahoma, Ann H. Morris of Oklahoma, W. Cordt Huneke of Florida, and Frances H. Burr of Hawaii, and seven grandchildren.42

42

  “John Willard Huneke, MD, 1932-2012.” Criswell Funeral Home. http://www.criswellfh.com/home/index.cfm/obituaries. Accessed March 30, 2017.

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Fig. 86. Charles E. Iliff III, MD (1911–1997).

CHARLES E. ILIFF III, MD (1911–1997) Charles Edwin Iliff III, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on February 16, 1911. Both of his parents were physicians. His early education was in Cincinnati, and he received a BA from Williams College. Iliff studied medicine for two years at the Medical College of the University of Cincinnati. In 1934 he entered the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as a third-year student but developed tuberculosis and took a leave of absence to recuperate at Saranac Lake, New York. He returned to Hopkins Medical School and graduated in 1939. Transferring from general surgery, Dr. Iliff was intern and resident at the Wilmer Institute from 1941 to 1944 and then served as chief resident. Following his residency, he entered the practice of ophthalmology with Dr. Frank B. Walsh, but he continued his association with the Wilmer Institute and became full Professor of Ophthalmology. In 1957, his American Ophthalmological Society (AOS) thesis was entitled, “Tumors of the Orbit.” Iliff is remembered as having been an innovative eyelid, lacrimal, orbital, and corneal transplant surgeon. Two books that he authored were Tumors of the Eye and Adnexa in Infancy and Childhood with coauthor H. J. Ossofsky (1962), and Oculoplastic Surgery with his two sons, W. Jackson (Jack) and Nicholas T. (Nick) Iliff (1979). Charles Iliff III became a charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969, served as vice president of the Society in 1977, and he became a life fellow in 1983 after his retirement when he also became Professor Emeritus at the Wilmer Institute. In 1972, Iliff gave the third Wendell Hughes Lecture entitled, “Treatment of Frontal Sinusitis with a Combined External and Intranasal Approach.” In 1995, the Bendann-Iliff Professorship in Ophthalmology was established at Wilmer. Outside of ophthalmology, Dr. Iliff loved spending time on his farm near Annapolis on the Severn River where he and his first wife, Elizabeth, raised a family of six. After Elizabeth’s death he married Esther Marting Fabing, and after Esther’s death he married Helen Johns Ossofsky, who survived him. Charles Iliff III died of heart failure in Hilton Head, South Carolina on August 19, 1997 at the age of eighty-six years.43

43

 Welch RB. “Charles Edwin Iliff III, MD.” Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc. 1998; 96:5–7.

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Fig. 87. Carl Cordes Johnson, MD (1911–2000).

CARL CORDES JOHNSON, MD (1911–2000) Carl C. Johnson was born in 1911 in Schenectady, New York. He graduated from Union College in Schenectady in 1934 and from Harvard Medical School in 1938. He served an internship at Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut from 1938 to 1940 and completed his residency in ophthalmology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in 1942. From 1942 to 1962 he was associated with Dr. Paul Chandler in the private practice of ophthalmology in Boston. He then served as Associate Chief of Ophthalmology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary from 1962 to 1968 and was Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School from 1962 to 1968. Dr. Johnson’s special interest in ophthalmology was blepharoptosis, the subject of his American Ophthalmological Society thesis in 1961. Dr. Johnson became a charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969, served as vice president of the Society in 1976, and became a life fellow in 1987 after his retirement. Dr. Johnson gave the 1985 Wendell Hughes Lecture entitled, “Canthal Abnormalities” and, under the title “Developmental Abnormalities of the Eyelids,” the paper was the first Wendell Hughes Lecture to be published in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Carl C. Johnson died at the age of eighty-eight on February 5, 2000 at his residence in Weston, Massachusetts.44

44

 Johnson CC. Developmental abnormalities of the eyelids. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 1986;2;219–32; Raab RM. “Carl Cordes Johnson, MD.” Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc. 2001; 99:7.

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Fig. 88. David Kahanic, MD (1961‒2005).

DAVID KAHANIC, MD (1961‒2005) David Kahanic was born in Arlington Heights, Illinois on November 14, 1961. He graduated from Prospect High School and was a National Merit Scholarship recipient. He completed an accelerated medical degree program at Northwestern University Medical School and chose ophthalmology after exposure to research in that field. He completed a residency in ophthalmology at the University of Southern California and did an oculoplastic surgery fellowship with Dr. Robert Dryden in Tucson, Arizona (1990–1991). He married Susan Fiala in 1988 with whom he had two children, and the couple later divorced. Dr. Kahanic practiced for the last fifteen years of his life in Hoffman Estates and operated there at the St. Alexius Center as well as the Water Tower Surgical Center and Lake Shore Eye Clinic in Chicago. He was fluent in Spanish and connected especially well with his Spanish-speaking patients. In his spare time, Dr. Kahanic enjoyed taking long bike trips and traveling with his children. Dr. Kahanic died at age forty-three of a sudden illness on August 11, 2005. Many friends, colleagues, and patents were perplexed when Dr. Kahanic did not show up for a routine Thursday-morning surgery schedule. Following his unexpected death, his friend and fellow ASOPRS member, Dr. Douglas Van Putten stated, “He was an amazing surgeon who taught me a lot of things. He was one of the most meticulous persons I knew.” Dr. Kahanic is survived by his son Alexander, daughter, Emily, parents Francis and Lois Kahanic, brother Thomas Kahanic, and sister Ruth Mudrow. 45

45

 Dell’Aringa S. “Dr. David A. Kahanic, 1961‒2005: Eye surgeon’s specialty was reconstructive work.” Chicago Tribune. August 16, 2005. http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2005-08-16. Accessed March 30, 2017.

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Fig. 89. Martin S. Kazdan, MD, MSc (1930–2014).

MARTIN S. KAZDAN, MD, MSc (1930–2014) Martin Stephen Kazdan was born on August 11, 1930. His father, Dr. Louis Kazdan was an ophthalmologist in Toronto; both Martin and his younger brother, Jerome, eventually would join their father in practice. He fell in love with and married Norma Sherman (who predeceased him), and together they raised three sons and a daughter. Martin Kazdan again found love and married a second time to Marion. Dr. Martin Kazdan’s career track included matriculation at the University of Toronto Medical School, a residency in ophthalmology at the Mayo Clinic, a Master of Science from the University of Minnesota, and ultimately a fellowship in oculoplastic surgery with Dr. Wendell Hughes. Dr. Kazdan frequently collaborated with ophthalmologistcolleague Dr. Joe Hill, who was likewise the son of an ophthalmologist and fellowship-trained in oculoplastics by Dr. Hughes. Beginning in 1966, Dr. Kazdan and Dr. Hill began training fellows in oculoplastic surgery in Toronto. Kazdan became a fellow of the ASOPRS in 1973, and this program quickly became recognized as a prestigious ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship. The older Dr. Joe Hill retired in 1990, though others joined as teachers and faculty for the Toronto-based oculoplastics fellowship training program. Martin Kazdan continued to train oculoplastics fellows until his own retirement in 2012, though in 2004 he was succeeded in the role of program director by Dr. James Oestreicher. Even before 2004, Dr. Kazdan had already personally supervised the training of over thirty oculoplastics fellows during his career. Dr. Kazdan received recognition of dedicated service to Toronto medical institutions: forty years of service to the University of Toronto, forty-nine years of service to North York General Hospital, and fifty years of service to Mount Sinai Hospital. He was described by all of his colleagues as a very good surgeon and teacher and a kind and gentle man. During his life he had the blessings of a broad extended family. He enjoyed birds and nature and especially enjoyed the Credit River childhood cottage and Gooderham family cottage. Martin Kazdan died at his home on November 12, 2014 at the age of eighty-four, survived by his second wife, Marion Kazdan, children David (Debby), Jonathan (Ilana), Peter (Allison), and Devra (Edward) Hertzman, step-children, and many grandchildren and step-grandchildren.46 46

 Eye Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. http://www.epso.ca/our-members/in-memoriam/dr-martin-kazdan. Accessed February 20, 2017.

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Fig. 90. Robert E. Kennedy, MD (1920–2006).

ROBERT E. KENNEDY, MD (1920–2006) Robert E. Kennedy was born on December 2, 1920. His undergraduate education was at the University of Rochester where he received a BA in 1942. He graduated cum laude from the College of Medicine, Syracuse University in 1945. He served as an intern/resident at the Wilmer Institute of Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1945 to 1948. He was an instructor in ophthalmology at the University of Illinois (1948‒49) and was assistant chief of the ophthalmology section at Brooke Army Medical Center (1951‒53) with the rank of captain. Starting in 1949, he served on the faculty of the University of Rochester and was named clinical professor of ophthalmology in 1972. After a stint as a consultant at the Canandaigua Veteran’s Administration Hospital southeast of Rochester, he returned to Rochester and established a private practice along with his father, E.W. Kennedy. In his medical writings, Kennedy gave most of his attention to orbital diseases and surgery. His thesis for the American Ophthalmological Society (AOS) published in 1964 was entitled, “The effect of early enucleation on the orbit in animals and humans.” In 1979, he authored a paper entitled, “Indications and surgical techniques for orbital exenteration,” and in 1984 he wrote another article under the title, “An evaluation of 820 orbital cases.” He was elected as a fellow of ASOPRS in 1975 and became a life fellow in 1991 following his retirement. Just before his retirement, he was honored to serve as president of the AOS in 1990. Kennedy loved to share humorous stories and cartoons with his colleagues. Spanning five continents, Kennedy was involved with several international medical relief organizations including Care/Medico in Algeria and Afghanistan and the S.S. Hope in West Africa and Brazil. He was a member of the advisory council for ophthalmology of the American College of Surgeons (1977‒83) and chair (1981‒83). He was a long-time member of the Seneca Lodge. Robert E. Kennedy died on February 20, 2006 at the age of eighty-six, survived by his wife Naomi, daughters Sandra and Susan, his son Robert, and his granddaughter, Colby. 47

47

 Albert DM, and Atzen SL. The Sesquicentennial of the American Ophthalmological Society. San Francisco: American Ophthalmological Society; 2014. https://aosonline.org/assets/PDF-Docs/History-Docs/AOS-Sesquicentennial-Book.pdf. Accessed March 24, 2019.

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Fig. 91. Robert H. Kennedy, MD, PhD (1954–2007).

ROBERT H. KENNEDY, MD, PhD (1954–2007) Bob Kennedy was born in Mason City, Iowa on May 25, 1954. His father worked for the Farmers Home Administration and was also a flight instructor. Bob learned to fly his father’s Cessna and achieved instrument, commercial, and flight instructor ratings by the time he was twenty-one. When his high school burned down during his senior year, he enrolled for one semester at the University of Minnesota-Morris, then one semester at the Air Force Academy, but decided to complete his college degree from Macalester College in Saint Paul. He subsequently served in the US Naval Reserve as a commander and head of the Department of Ophthalmology, Fleet Hospital. He then attended Mayo Medical School and completed an MPH in epidemiology at the University of Minnesota. He completed a residency in ophthalmology at the Mayo Clinic and accepted a position with Alcon Laboratories and UT Southwestern Medical Center in Arlington Texas. He was awarded a Heed Fellowship and began fellowship training in ophthalmic plastic surgery in 1988 with Dr. Joseph Flanagan at the Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. In addition, he graduated as valedictorian of the executive MBA program at Southern Methodist University and held a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota. He was a faculty member at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas prior to co-founding the North Texas Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery with Dr. Mark Alford. Kennedy was elected as ASOPRS fellow in 1989 and served on the executive committee in many roles including treasurer and executive secretary. Bob’s keen understanding of business administration guided the Society in its contract with Wolters-Kluwer, the publisher of its journal, OPRS, and it also guided the engagement of a new contract with the L&L Management of Minneapolis, Minnesota. In January 2007, Bob began his term as president of ASOPRS, having chosen the Ocean Reef Club and Resort in Key Largo, Florida as the site of the Society’s annual spring meeting. Here, he personally conducted a seminar for attendees and looked forward to the weekend of continued scientific and social events. However, early on the morning of Saturday June 23, 2007, while participating in the ASOPRS Foundation Annual 5K Walk and Run, Robert Kennedy suffered a cardiac arrest and died at the age of fifty-three. He is survived by his wife Margaret, sons, Peter and David, daughters Beth, and Erin, six grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, parents, Harley and Mildred, and sisters, Jane and Barbara. ASOPRS named the Robert Kennedy Presidential Award in his memory, ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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giving the award to the immediate past president of the Society in recognition of their devotion, leadership, and ongoing service to the Society.48

BURTON M. KRIMMER, MD (1925–2001) (No photo available.) Burton Mark Krimmer was born on September 11, 1925. Born and raised in New York City, Burt served as a Japanese translator during World War II. He wooed his future wife, Elaine (Bebe) Brams Krimmer with a Japanese song which was later determined to be a children’s nursery rhyme. Following the war, he finished college and attended Chicago Medical School, and he enjoyed a career in both private practice and teaching in Chicago. He was a charter fellow and past president of the Illinois Association of Ophthalmology. He also became a charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969 and, after his retirement, a life fellow in 1982. Upon retirement Krimmer moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico and enjoyed golf, gardening and long hikes with his wife, Bebe and his chocolate Labrador, Cigar. Burton Krimmer went to the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona to receive treatment for chronic liver disease and eventually underwent a liver transplant. He was active in the New Mexico chapter of Transplant Recipients International Organization and was an advocate of organ donation. Burton Krimmer died on January 21, 2001 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and is survived by his wife Bebe who passed away in 2014, and by his children, Robert, Matthew, and Tina, and his grandchildren, Max, Tess, and Sam. He was predeceased by his parents, Abe and Doris Krimmer, and his son, Dan Krimmer, who died from a brain tumor in 1997. 49

48

 Flanagan J. “Robert H. Kennedy, MD.” Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc. 2008;106:8–9. “Robert H. Kennedy (1954–2007).” http://www.legacy.com. Accessed June 21, 2013. 49

 http://articles.chicagotribune.com. Accessed June 21, 2013.

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Fig. 92. Lewis Lauring, MD (1939‒2008).

LEWIS LAURING, MD (1939‒2008) Lewis Lauring was born in in 1939 in Brooklyn, New York, and spent his entire childhood there. He received both his undergraduate and medical degrees from New York University. In 1963, he married Beverly Ann Bernstein. Dr. Lauring served twelve years in the US Army Medical Corps. In 1972, he completed an oculoplastic fellowship with Dr. Crowell Beard. In 1974, he received the first ever Marvin Quickert Thesis Award by ASOPRS for his thesis entitled, “Silicone intubation of the lacrimal system: Pitfalls, problems, and complications.” He was inducted into the Society that same year. Dr. Lauring practiced ophthalmology at the Tampa Eye Clinic. His publications in the area of oculoplastic surgery included his results with the sutureless Fasanella-Servat operation. With his wife Beverly, he raised three sons, Brett, Josh, and Adam. A skilled craftsman, Lewis spent three years building a 28-foot cruising sailboat in his back yard. He enjoyed many afternoons sailing in Tampa Bay. After losing his wife, Beverly, to cancer in 1998, he found love again and married Diana Pugliese. Together, they traveled the world and explored local trails at their home away from home in Moab. Lewis found inspiration in the Western landscape and became an accomplished photographer in retirement. Lewis Lauring died at home on November 12, 2008 after a battle with cancer. 50

50

 “Dr. Lewis Lauring ‒ Obituary.” Tampa Bay Times. http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/tampabaytimes/obituary. Accessed March 22, 2019.

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Fig. 93. Jack V. Lisman, MD (1914–1998).

JACK V. LISMAN, MD (1914–1998) Jack Victor Lisman was born in New York City on December 5, 1914, to parents Reuben and Gussie Lisman. Jack attended George Washington High School in New York City, received his undergraduate education at City College of New York, and then attended New York University School of Medicine where he graduated with his MD in 1938. Jonas Salk—one year younger and a year behind Jack at both City College and NYU—was Jack’s roommate in medical school. Salk went on to focus his career on medical research and virology while Lisman pursued a clinical and surgical career.51 Lisman’s postgraduate training included an internship at the Morrisania Hospital in the South Bronx and later a residency in ophthalmology at Bellevue Hospital from 1942 to 1944.52 While a resident surgeon at Bellevue, Dr. Lisman performed the first corneal transplant ever undertaken at that hospital. His patient was a blind, sixty-year-old woman. Newspaper articles and photographs captured the unfolding drama of the convalescing woman from her hospital bed. It was reported that “an unidentified man donated the eye from the head of his father upon the latter’s death” and that her surgeon had predicted that “Mrs. Dwyer, blind for seven years, will be eventually be able to read again.”53 Following his ophthalmology residency, Dr. Lisman’s appointment at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary put him in close contact and friendship with two leading oculoplastics specialists of that era—Dr. Wendell Hughes and Dr. Byron Smith—the latter having been stationed in France during World War II as Chief of Ophthalmology and Plastic Surgery at the First General Army Hospital. Following WWII, Hughes and Smith established an ophthalmic plastic surgery clinic at NYU and Bellevue, the first such clinic in America. Dr. Lisman had constant contact with his mentors throughout the postwar era. In April 1958, when Byron Smith was appointed chair of ophthalmology at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital (MEETH), Lisman followed his mentor uptown and later succeeded Smith as Chief of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery at MEETH in 1978. He was most proud of his service as an ophthalmic plastic surgeon on the S.S. Hope as it traveled to various ports 51

 Richard Lisman. Personal communication, March 6, 2019.

52

 ASOPRS Membership Directory, 1983.

53

 “Eye [sic] Transplanted to Blind Widow.” Albany Times Union. February 26, 1944. Courtesy of Richard Lisman.

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of call, spending the entire year in 1968 in what was Ceylon.54 Lisman became a charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969. During his tenure at MEETH and with Dr. Smith, Lisman served as friend, colleague, and educator of many early future leaders of ASOPRS including Dick Tenzel, Mark Levine, Allen Putterman, Hank Baylis, Charles Beyer-Machule, and Joe Flanagan. Another future leader in the subspecialty and the Society was Jack’s son Richard Lisman who has served many years as chief of the Division of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery at NYU and as a fellowship program director. At the time of his passing in 1998, Jack Lisman was survived by his wife of fiftyseven years, Silvia (who is now 99 years of age), two children—Richard (mentioned above) and Jane—and four grandchildren.

Fig. 94. Edward L. Liva, MD (1926–2006).

EDWARD L. LIVA, MD (1926–2006) Edward L. Liva was born in New Jersey in 1926 and graduated Lyndhurst High School, New Jersey in 1943. He attended Harvard University and received his undergraduate degree there in 1947 and went on to graduate from Harvard Medical School in 1950. He served as a captain in the Air Force until being discharged in 1957 and thereafter practiced ophthalmology in Ridgewood, New Jersey for forty years until his retirement. He was a senior attending physician at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in the Hackensack Medical Center and Valley Hospital. He became a charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969 and a life fellow in 1992. Edward Liva died on March 3, 2006 at the age of eighty in Ridgewood, New Jersey. He was predeceased by his wife Dorothea and survived by a daughter, Elaine Plaut of Ridgewood, four sons—Edward Jr., Bradford, Douglas, and Jeffery— fifteen grandchildren, and a sister, Matilda Heins.55

54 55

 “Voyages of the S.S. Hope, 1960‒1974.” http://americanhistory.si.edu/hope/02hope.htm. Accessed March 6, 2019.

 www.legacy.com. Accessed June 21, 2013.

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Fig. 95. Virginia Lubkin, MD (1913–2004).

VIRGINIA LUBKIN, MD (1913–2004) Virginia Lubkin was born in New York City in 1913. She received her medical degree from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1937. She trained at Harlem and Montefiore Hospitals including work in pathology and then took an ophthalmology residency at Mt. Sinai Hospital, graduating in 1944 and thereby becoming one of the first American women to specialize in ophthalmology. After completing a residency, Dr. Lubkin trained as a fellow in oculoplastic surgery with Dr. Wendell Hughes. Other than ASOPRS founding fellow Margaret Obear, Virginia Lubkin was the only female charter fellow of ASOPRS in 1969. Lubkin became a life fellow of ASOPRS following her retirement from private practice in 1990. In the late 1970s, Dr. Lubkin established the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computer Science at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary with a grant from the Aborn Foundation, renamed the Aborn Center for Eye Research in 1988. She gave at least fifteen presentations to ASOPRS scientific symposia. Among other achievements in ophthalmology, Dr. Lubkin invented one of the first major corneal topography devices known commercially as TMS-1; her interests also focused on the piezoelectric behavior of the sclera and cornea. Virginia Lubkin died on May 3, 2004 at the age of ninety. She was predeceased by her husband, musicologist Martin Bernstein and survived by her children, Ellen, James, Roger, and John, twelve grandchildren, and ten great-grandchildren. Following her death, the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary renamed the Aborn Laboratory which she had directed to its current name, the Aborn-Lubkin Laboratory for Ophthalmic Research.56

56

 Garber PF, Simonton JT. “Where it all began,” in Bosniak SL, ed. Adv Ophthalmic Plastic Reconstr Surg. 1986;5: 292‒3. www.nytimes.com, accessed June 21, 2013. “Virginia Lubkin.” In the Columbia P&S Obituary Database. http://www.cumc.columbia.edu. Accessed June 21, 2013.

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Fig. 96. Murray A. Meltzer, MD (1936–2016).

MURRAY A. MELTZER, MD (1936–2016) Murray A. Meltzer was born in Brooklyn, New York on January 27, 1936, the youngest of three sons of Jacob and Rose Meltzer. He graduated from New Utrecht High School, and then received his undergraduate education at Cornell University, and his medical degree from SUNY Downstate Medical College. He then took both an internship and an ophthalmology residency in New York City. Dr. Meltzer subsequently completed a corneo-plastic fellowship at Moorfield Eye Hospital in London, England. During his career at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, Dr. Meltzer served as Professor of Ophthalmology and Director of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery giving an annual anatomy and cadaver dissection course and coordinating the hospital’s oculoplastics clinics as well as several lecture series. His teaching experiences led to his publication of a textbook in 1979—Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery for the General Ophthalmologist— which displays organizational insight and rational approaches.57 Among his most interesting publications was his transplantation of a composite eyelid graft from an upper eyelid to replace a lost canaliculus in a lower eyelid.58 In 1969 Dr. Meltzer became a charter fellow of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, serving for many years on the education committee as a senior examiner. For a quarter-century, he served as an associate preceptor for postgraduate oculoplastics fellowship training, participating in the training of many current Society members. On the morning of September 12, 2001, Dr. Meltzer led the Mount Sinai contingent for ophthalmology triage at the Stuyvesant High School across the street from the smoldering ruins of the World Trade Center. The residents of Mount Sinai Hospital frequently awarded Dr. Meltzer the annual award, Attending of Year, with much deserved laudatory remarks by outgoing chief ophthalmology residents. An excerpt from one such citation in 2006 reads, “He constantly goes far beyond what is expected of him and for that the residents owe him a debt of gratitude. Amazingly, he always says yes to the residents’ requests with a smile—never annoyed that he is, again, being asked to help…unless, perhaps, it is a Thursday night and a doubles game 57

 Meltzer MA. Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery for the General Ophthalmologist. Baltimore and London: Williams & Wilkins; 1979. 58

 Meltzer MA, Zatezalo C, Zoltan S. Lacrimal canalicular transplantation with composite eyelid graft. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. Jan-Feb 2010;26(1):23-5.

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is waiting in Tenafly (actually, even then he is happy to help). The greatest thing that Dr. Meltzer has given … is the model he has provided us through his actions … and each of us will strive to near the very high bar which he has set.” Dr. Meltzer was predeceased by one of his older brothers, Irwin, and his beloved wife of forty-seven years, Adrienne, with whom he raised three daughters. Dr. Meltzer died on August 4, 2016. He is survived by his daughters, Lori, Deanne, and Jennifer, his sons-in-law Peter and Vineet, four grandchildren, and his eldest brother Marty.

Fig. 97. John C. Mustardé, MD (1916–2010).

JOHN C. MUSTARDÉ, MD (1916–2010) John C. Mustardé was born in Glasgow, Scotland, on June 6, 1916. He attended Glasgow University, where he qualified as an ophthalmic surgeon in 1940, the year that he married his wife, Maisie. In the early years of World War II, he was a lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps, eventually working as an eye surgeon for allied troops in Cairo, Egypt. At the fall of Tobruk in 1942, he was taken prisoner by the Germans. He was repatriated to Britain in 1943 and worked as an ophthalmic surgeon during the war years. At the conclusion of the war, Dr. Mustardé pursued additional training in plastic surgery with Sir Harold Gillies and Sir Archibald McIndoe. After this training he received successive positions at Basingstoke, Benson in Oxfordshire, and then as head of the Plastic Surgery Department in Ayrshire at the Ballochmyle Hospital, Glasgow Royal Infirmary. His main interests were orbital and eyelid plastic surgery, pediatric plastic surgery, and burns. His book, Repair and Reconstruction in the Orbital Region, went through three editions and he wrote another book with Alston Callahan and Lester Jones in 1970 entitled, Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Up-To-Date. In 1979 he was elected honorary fellow of ASOPRS and that same year became the founding president of the European Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. After his “retirement” and even into his eighties, Mustardé worked tirelessly to establish a plastic surgery unit and then a free-standing hospital and burn center in Ghana, working there in alternate months until 2001. Jack Mustardé died at the age of ninety-four on October 16, 2010 in Tetbury, Gloucestershire, survived by sons David and Alan; daughter, Ruth; twelve grandchildren

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and eighteen great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Maisie who had died in 2006 and was also predeceased by one daughter.59

Fig. 98. Russell Neuhaus, MD (1950–2013).

RUSSELL NEUHAUS, MD (1950–2013) Russell Neuhaus was born on a farm on the outskirts of Omaha, Nebraska on November 27, 1950 where he spent the first eighteen years of his life. He graduated summa cum laude from Northwestern University in 1969 and then with honors from Baylor Medical School. He took his internship at the UCLA Medical Center and his ophthalmology residency at the Jules Stein Eye Institute, followed by an oculoplastics fellowship with Dr. Henry Baylis as his main preceptor. During his residency he met and married Cecilia, the love of his life. Following the completion of his fellowship in 1982, Russ moved to Austin and established an oculoplastics practice, became the father of his oldest daughter, Laura, and became an ASOPRS fellow. Neuhaus was very active in ASOPRS on several committees, especially the education committee, and also other societies such as the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the Travis County Medical Society, and the Outpatient Ophthalmology Surgery Society Board of Directors. He taught residents and medical students at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio. In 1997, Russ was joined in practice by John Shore to establish the Texas Oculoplastics Associates that further expanded in later years to include Sean Blaydon, Todd Shepler, Tanuj Nakra, and Malena Amato. Russell Neuhaus died of complications of leukemia in Austin, Texas on May 24, 2013. He is survived by his wife Cecilia, daughter Laura, son Eric, and brother, Lowell. 60

59

 Mustardé JC. The development of oculoplastic surgery: A view from the wings. Adv Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 1989; 5:359–76; Carraway JH. “John C. Mustardé, F.R.C.S., 1916 to 2010.” Plast and Reconstructive Surgery 2011;128:832-3. 60

 http://www.wcfish.tributes.com. Accessed June 28, 2013.

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Fig. 99. Frank W. Newell, MD (1916–1998).

FRANK W. NEWELL, MD (1916–1998) Frank William Newell was born on January 14, 1916 in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he grew up. He earned his BS (1938) and MD (1940) from Loyola University in Chicago and his MS in ophthalmology (1942) from the University of Minnesota. He completed his residency while in the United States Army, attaining the rank of major and serving as Chief of Ophthalmology at the 108th General Hospital in Paris. In 1946 he joined the faculty at Northwestern University and came to the University of Chicago in 1953 as Section Chief of Ophthalmology in the Department of Surgery. There he served as the first chair of the Department of Ophthalmology from 1970 to 1981 and became Professor Emeritus in 1986. Dr. Newell served as head of numerous organizations including as chair of the American Board of Ophthalmology (1967–1969), president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology (1975), and the president of the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology (1967–1968). Newell became an ASOPRS fellow in 1971 and, after his retirement, a life fellow in 1991. Newell was the recipient of many awards including the Lucien Howe Medal from the American Ophthalmological Society, the Lang Medal from the Royal Society of Medicine, and the Dunnington Medal from the National Society to Prevent Blindness. Frank Newell died at his home in Chicago of a brain tumor on November 18, 1998, survived by his wife, Marian, children Frank Newell Jr., Susan O’Connell, Elizabeth Murphy, and David Newell, and six grandchildren.61

61

 Frank W. Newell. Festschrift. Am J Ophthalmol. 1985;100:1–28. “Frank W. Newell, MD, 1916–1998.” http://www.uchospitals.edu/news/1998. Accessed June 28, 2013.

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Fig. 100. Margaret F. Obear, MD (1906–2001).

MARGARET F. OBEAR, MD (1906–2001) ASOPRS is one of the lasting legacies of Peg Obear and her fellow co-founders of this Society. As described by George Buerger in the Society’s commemorative 25th Anniversary Book, she was the most senior and well-connected of the five ASOPRS founding fellows. Obear received her medical degree from George Washington University in Washington, DC where she also took her internship. She trained in ophthalmology at Stanford University and trained in oculoplastic surgery with Byron Smith in New York City, becoming his associate after her training. On the eve of the founding of the Society, Peg Obear was married to plastic surgeon Donald Wood-Smith who practiced with John Converse. Published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in 1967, one of the seminal papers on the subject of orbital blowout fractures came out of the shared offices of Converse, Smith, Obear and Wood-Smith. Following the publication of that paper, Obear spent time again in California as her husband took the Surgery Chief Resident position at Stanford University’s Valley Medical Center in San Jose. Returning to New York City, Obear developed mentoring and collegial relationships with Byron Smith’s fellows who would join her in becoming the founding fellows of ASOPRS. Obear served as the first ASOPRS secretary, the third president of the Society, and remained on the advisory board for two years until she suffered a severe, debilitating illness. She retired from medicine in 1974 and became a life fellow of ASOPRS. She had sufficient recovery to be able to attend several ASOPRS spring and fall meetings. Margaret Obear lived the last years of her life in Southern Pines, North Carolina. She died in nearby Pinehurst, on June 13, 2001 at the age of ninety-four. All ASOPRS fellows hold a particularly great debt of gratitude to Dr. Obear, for as George Buerger wrote, “If it hadn’t been for Peg’s enthusiasm and hard work, the ASOPRS wouldn’t be.”62

62

 Converse JM, Smith B, Obear MF, Wood-Smith D. Orbital blowout fractures: A ten-year survey. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1967;39(1):20-36.

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Fig. 101. Hugh N. O’Donoghue, MCh, FRCOphth (1927–1997).

HUGH N. O’DONOGHUE, MCh, FRCOphth (1927–1997) Hugh Noel O’Donoghue was born in Dublin in 1927. He won the Irish Schoolboys Tennis Championship and went on to win the Irish Squash Rackets Championship three times. Both tennis and jazz were to remain passions for the rest of his life. He attended University College Dublin, National University of Ireland and graduated in 1951. After training in Liverpool and Croydon he was appointed as Consultant Ophthalmologist at Ashford, Ealing, and the West Middlesex Hospitals, returning to Dublin in 1977. In Dublin, he served as Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon at the Mater Misericordia Hospital until his retirement in 1993. O’Donoghue first presented a paper on DCR and intubation at the 1979 Annual ASOPRS Symposium. He was elected as an international fellow of ASOPRS in 1983, a fellow in 1991, and life fellow in 1995. Throughout his career in Dublin he taught courses in oculoplastics from his home with the help of his wife. His knowledge of optics was unique among ophthalmologists, and he was among the first examiners in this subject when the Royal College of Ophthalmologists was founded. Hugh O’Donoghue died of ischemic heart disease on December 6, 1997, survived by his wife, Miriam.63

63

 O’Riordan M. “Hugh Noel O’Donohue.” Br Med J. 1998;316:7143.

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Fig. 102. William J. Pidde, MD (1930–2012).

WILLIAM J. PIDDE, MD (1930–2012) William Jacob Pidde was born on June 3, 1930 in Saskatchewan, Canada, the son of Russian immigrants, Rudolph and Rosalie Pidde. He attended Regina College and completed medical school at the University of Manitoba. He interned at the Regina General Hospital and was a country doctor in Melville, Saskatchewan for almost nine years. As the doctor for the Melville Millionaires, a farm team of the Detroit Red Wings Hockey Club, he became a lifelong Red Wings fan. He returned to Winnipeg in 1964 for an ophthalmology residency and received a McLaughlin Traveling Fellowship award that allowed him to continue post-residency training at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London, England, with additional training in Essen, Germany, Glasgow, Scotland, and finally at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in New York City. After a brief return to Winnipeg, the family moved to Edmonton where he became Chief of Ophthalmology at the Royal Alexandra Hospital and served two terms as president of the Alberta Ophthalmological Society. He spent much of his retirement in Palm Desert, California. William Pidde died on October 23, 2012 at the age of eighty-two, survived by his wife of twenty-five years, Helen, four children, Gordon (Leanne), Richard (Patty), Glenda, and Paul (Leigha), six grandchildren, and two sisters.64

64

 http://www.womboldfuneralhomes.com. Accessed June 28, 2013.

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Fig. 103. Kenneth L. Piest, MD (1954–2007).

KENNETH L. PIEST, MD (1954–2007) Kenneth Piest was born in Laurium, Michigan on January 17, 1954. He was raised in Des Plaines, Illinois and attended Maine West High School. He graduated from the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago in 1984. He completed an internship in Chicago and an ophthalmology residency in San Antonio. Post-residency training included ophthalmic pathology and oncology at the University of Utah, as well as ophthalmic plastic surgery at the Scheie Eye Institute and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and craniofacial and pediatric ophthalmology at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia with Dr. James Katowitz. He became a fellow of ASOPRS in 1990. In 1991, he joined the full-time faculty of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio until starting a solo, private practice in 1995. He returned to San Antonio in 1991. He also maintained a satellite practice and clinic in Brownsville, Texas. For several years Piest volunteered his time to update the ASOPRS Membership Directory that was distributed in hard copy for the last time in 2007. His wife, Krystyna Srodulski, CMI, helped him coordinate the projects and design the cover art. Kenneth Piest died on October 5, 2007 in San Antonio, Texas.65 JACK H. PINCUS, MD (1936–2012) (No photo available.) Jack Harold Pincus was born on April 5, 1936 in Brooklyn, New York. He was a graduate of the Horace Mann School in Riverdale, New York. At age sixteen he entered Yale University as a Ford Foundation Scholar. After graduating from Yale, he attended medical school at Tufts University. He trained in ophthalmology at Yale University and then took a fellowship in oculoplastic surgery with Alston Callahan in 1964. Practicing in Springfield, Massachusetts for many years, he was elected as ASOPRS fellow in 1973. In the early 1990s, he began a second career as a medical director at PCA Health Plans of America in Tampa and as vice president of Foundation Health Care in Sunrise, Florida. During this transition, the Society lost contact with him. Jack Pincus

65

 http://boards.ancestry.com/authorposts. Accessed July 7, 2013.

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died on August 14, 2012 at age seventy-six, survived by his wife of fifty-five years, Judy, three children, George, David, and Mindy, and five grandchildren.66

Fig. 104. R. Bruce Ramsey, MD (1925–2000).

R. BRUCE RAMSEY, MD (1925–2000) Robert Bruce Ramsey was born in Canada in 1925. After service in the Royal Canadian Navy in World War II, Ramsey attended McGill University Medical School, receiving his medical degree in 1949. He took his ophthalmology residency at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital before serving as a naval officer during the Korean conflict. In 1955, Ramsey took a fellowship in ophthalmic plastic surgery with Alston Callahan in Birmingham, Alabama and thereafter returned to Montreal where he served as Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at McGill University and Director of the Ocular Plastic Clinic at Montreal General Hospital. Ramsey was active in the Canadian Society of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery serving as its president in 1985. Ramsey became an ASOPRS fellow in 1971 and a life fellow in 1995 following his retirement. He was an active and vigorous individual throughout his life until he died of a heart attack while skiing on March 31, 2000 at the age of seventy-five. He was survived by his wife, Norah, and three children. His obituary stated, “Gifted with outstanding manual dexterity which he put to good use in his profession and hobbies, he never lost his clinical zeal, empathy for patients and dedication to improving surgical techniques and instrument innovation.”67

66

 http://www.obits.masslive.com. Accessed June 28, 2013.

67

 “Deaths: Ramsey, R. Bruce.” Can Med Assoc J. 2000;163:483. Crawford JS. The history and development of ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery in Canada. Adv Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 1986;5:409–16.

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Fig. 105. Arthur J. Schaefer, MD (1933–2000).

ARTHUR J. SCHAEFER, MD (1933–2000) Arthur J. Schaefer was born in 1933 in Buffalo, New York. He graduated from St. Joseph’s Collegiate Institute and attended Canisius College. In the 1950s in postwar Korea, he worked as a captain in the Army Medical Corps and Chief of Ophthalmology at the 121st Evac Hospital. Around 1960, Arthur Schaefer came to New York City as one of Byron Smith’s first fellows, and he returned to Buffalo to establish the city’s first oculoplastic surgery clinic at the E. J. Meyer Memorial Hospital, now the Erie County Medical Center. He was elected ASOPRS fellow in 1973, first served on the ASOPRS executive board as secretary in 1979, and ultimately served as ASOPRS president in 1988. In 1995, Arthur Schaefer became the first Buffalonian to receive the University of Buffalo Lucien Howe Award for contributions to the field of ophthalmology. His son, ophthalmologist Daniel Schaefer, trained in oculoplastics in Philadelphia with Joseph Flanagan in 1986 and returned to practice in Buffalo. He was likewise elected ASOPRS fellow with many contributions to the education committee and executive board. Daniel is currently serving as the president of ASOPRS. In the preceding chapter of this book, Daniel proudly wrote that his daughter [Arthur’s granddaughter] Dr. Jamie Lea Schaefer, will be finishing her ASOPRS-approved fellowship with Dr. Jennifer A. Sivak-Callcott on June 30, 2019. There he noted, “This will hopefully be the first third-generation membership in ASOPRS, when her thesis is accepted and she passes the oral and written examinations.” Arthur Schaefer died after a brief illness in Amherst (suburban Buffalo), New York on October 4, 2000, at the age of seventy-seven. In 2001, the first ASOPRS Foundation Lecture given by George Bartley and Michael Kazim (on the topics of orbital irradiation and Graves’ Disease) was dedicated in memory of Arthur Schaefer.68

68

 “Arthur Schaefer: Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology.” University of Buffalo Reporter. Vol. 32: 8, October 12, 2000. http://www.buffalo.edu. Accessed July 7, 2013.

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Fig. 106. Bernd Silver, MD (1932–2000).

BERND SILVER, MD (1932–2000) Bernd Silver was born in Essen, Germany in on November 11, 1932. At age seven, he fled from the Nazis with his parents and came to America. He was an accomplished photographer and violinist. Silver earned both undergraduate and medical degrees at the University of Louisville and then completed his postgraduate training at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Florida. He took an oculoplastics fellowship with Byron Smith in 1962 at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in New York City. He became an ASOPRS charter fellow in 1969 and served as vice president in 1984. Bernd Silver died after a long illness in St. Louis on May 4, 2000 at age sixty-eight, survived by his wife, Sylvia, daughters, Sharon and Naomi, stepdaughter, Jennifer, stepson, Joshua, and six grandchildren.69

69

 “Obituary: Bernd Silver, MD.” http://www.wupa.wustl.edu. Accessed June 28, 2013.

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Fig. 107. John T. Simonton, MD (1916–2003).

JOHN T. SIMONTON, MD (1916–2003) John Thayer Simonton was born in New York City in 1916. He attended the Long Island College of Medicine (now part of State University of New York) graduating with a medical degree in 1941. He interned at Kings County Hospital and, during World War II, Simonton received general surgery training and experience in the US Navy. After the war he completed an ophthalmology residency at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City in 1951. His chief at Lenox Hill Hospital, Brittain Payne, brought him to the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, and he trained there in oculoplastic surgery with Wendell Hughes, Byron Smith, and Gordon Cole. Referencing his military background, Simonton was affectionately nicknamed “Sarge.” Beginning in 1955, he taught an orbital anatomy and surgery course at the annual meetings of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. Simonton became an ASOPRS fellow in 1973 After his retirement, he became an ASOPRS life fellow in 1992. When Gordon Cole retired in 1975, Simonton became Chief of Oculoplastic Surgery at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, establishing an ASOPRS-recognized oculoplastic training program, training at least nine fellows over the coming years in conjunction with associate preceptors Byron Smith and Robert Della Rocca. In 1977, Simonton gave the prestigious Wendell Hughes Lecture in 1977, entitled, “Practical Ptosis Surgery.” Simonton died on October 17, 2003, survived by daughter Linda, son John, three grandchildren, and a step-granddaughter. 70

70

 Garber PF, Simonton, JT. “Where it all began,” in Bosniak SL, ed. Adv Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 1986;5:291-3.

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Fig. 108. Robert G. Small, MD (1929–2017).

ROBERT G. SMALL, MD (1929–2017) Robert Glen Small was born in Rockville Centre, Long Island, New York on June 23, 1929 to Fred and Helen Small. He graduated with honors from Mount Hermon School for Boys in Mt. Hermon, Massachusetts. At the age of seventeen, he enlisted as a Navy V-12 premedical student at Princeton University for two years. After discharge from the Navy, he attended Yale University where he received his undergraduate and medical degrees followed by a residency in general surgery. He later completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Oklahoma in 1967. He served as Chief of the Ophthalmology Section at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Oklahoma City for more than sixteen years, senior staff at the Dean A. McGee Eye Institute for more than thirty years, where he founded the Oculoplastic Service, and on the faculty in the Oklahoma University Department of Ophthalmology where he rose to the rank of Full Professor (1981) and where he retired as Professor Emeritus (2002). He received the Dean McGee Eye Institute’s Edward and Thelma Gaylord Faculty Honor Award in 1995, and he was honored in 2012 for his forty-five years of service with the Robert G. Small, MD Resident Award for Medical Student Education. His training of dozens of ophthalmologists in this specialty included his annual orbital anatomy dissection course. In addition to ASOPRS, he was a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and the American Academy of Ophthalmology, and a member of the American Ophthalmological Society, the American Medical Association, and the Oklahoma County Medical Society. He was also published in dozens of ophthalmology journals and books. Dr. Small passed away peacefully at his home on Sunday, February 5, 2017 after an extended illness. He is survived by his brother Richard, his second wife of thirty-five years, Claudia, three sons—Gordon (Gloria), Bobby (Ellen), and Greg (Shirley)—nine grand-children, two step-children, and his first wife and mother of his three sons, Beverley Marks.71

71

 http://legacy.newsok.com/obituaries/oklahoman/obituary.

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Fig. 109. Richard R. Tenzel, MD (1929–2011).

RICHARD R. TENZEL, MD (1929–2011) Richard R. Tenzel was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on January 19, 1929. Raised in Nashville, Tennessee, he attended Vanderbilt University where he graduated in 1950. He then attended the University of Tennessee Medical School and received his medical degree in 1954. After an internship at the Jackson Memorial Hospital, he took his first residency in ophthalmology while in the US Navy and then repeated a residency at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital to work under Byron Smith. Tenzel became an ASOPRS charter fellow in 1970; the following year he began training fellows in Miami in his private practice and the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He served as ASOPRS treasurer in 1973 and 1974 and, following the death of president-elect Marvin Quickert in 1974, as ASOPRS president in 1975. During his presidency, the standards for ASOPRS fellowship training were established, and the format and scientific content of just the third annual ASOPRS spring meeting, held at the Doral Hotel in Miami, were further developed. In 1979, Tenzel was honored to give the Wendell Hughes Lecture, and his paper was entitled, “Surgical Treatment of Complications of Lid Reconstruction.” Over the course of his career, Tenzel trained at least nineteen fellows, including in 1989, his son David Tenzel. Richard Tenzel died in Sky Lake, Orange County, Florida on May 31, 2011 at the age of eighty-two. He is survived by his son, David Tenzel, MD, daughter Vicki, daughter-in-law Haydee, six grandsons, and sister Doris Fleischer; he was predeceased by his wife, Shirley, and son, Jack.72

72

 “Tenzel, Richard, MD.” The Tennessean. June 2, 2011.

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EVERETT R. VEIRS, MD (1908–1998) (Photo not available.) Everett Raymond Veirs was born on September 5, 1908. He practiced ophthalmology for many years at the Scott and White Clinic in Temple, Texas, which is now part of the Baylor University Medical System. Many of his literary contributions were listed in the 1994 ASOPRS 25th Anniversary Book, among them a monograph entitled The Lacrimal System, Clinical Application (1955), a clinical introduction of a malleable steel rod with a swaged-on silk suture for stenting a lacerated canaliculus after repair (1962), and a work on lacrimology for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology.73 In 1979, the Scott and White Clinic established the annual Everett R. Veirs Lecture and Ophthalmology Conference which has continued to this day. In 1980, ASOPRS conferred him with a lifetime honorary membership. Dr. Veirs’s wife of many years, Mary Stone Veirs, predeceased him in January 1997. Everett Veirs died the following year on August 22, 1998 at the age of eighty-nine.

Fig. 110. Lars M. Vistnes, MD (1927–2016).

LARS M. VISTNES, MD (1927–2016) Lars Vistnes was born on June 22, 1927 in Stavanger, Norway. His mother died when he was three and his father died shortly thereafter. Older siblings raised him in the family home, which they shared during the war years with German soldiers who arrived after an aerial bombing of the town in 1940. Bright and a good student, Vistnes was encouraged by his family to pursue higher education. After he graduated from high school, he went to Canada to live with an older sister and her husband in Saskatchewan so he could attend the university there. He earned a medical degree in 1957 from the University of Manitoba College of Medicine. He met his wife, Carol, while on summer break. “We were both working at the hotel at Lake Louise, near Banff, in the summers,” said Carol. “He worked there every summer, mostly as a bellboy— for the great tips— through medical school.” He also took advantage of the spectacular mountains that surround the hotel, 73

 Reifler DM. “History of ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery prior to the founding of the ASOPRS,” in The American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS). Winter Park and San Francisco: ASOPRS and Norman Publishing; 1994.

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she said, joining the Alpine Club of Canada and climbing the higher peaks, some of which top 10,000 feet. After his medical school graduation, Vistnes served for three years as a captain in the Canadian Armed Forces. He arrived at Stanford in 1971, shortly after finishing a six-year residency in general and plastic surgery. Vistnes was appointed Acting Assistant Professor of Surgery at the School of Medicine, and Chief of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at what was then called the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Palo Alto. By 1980, he had become Chief and Program Director of Plastic Surgery at Stanford; he later served as acting chair of the Department of Surgery. He was co-director of the faculty mentoring program from 1994 until his death.74 Vistnes was especially known for a treatment he first created for veterans of the Vietnam War. “He found a way to reconstruct eye orbits and eyelids so veterans who had lost an eye in combat could be fitted with an aesthetic prosthetic eye instead of a patch or other poor disguise,” Hentz said. Vistnes also created the VA’s first oculoplastic clinic, Hentz said, “a clinic that still exists.” Vistnes made other professional marks; he was the editor-in-chief of the Annals of Plastic Surgery from 1982 to 1992, and he wrote five books and twenty-four book chapters on aspects of plastic and reconstructive surgery. He also served on the boards of the Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation, the American Association of Plastic Surgeons, the California Society of Plastic Surgeons, and the American Board of Plastic Surgery. From 1993 to 2003, Vistnes was a board member of the Glaucoma Research Foundation. Vistnes was also a founding director of Interplast Inc., now known as  ReSurge International, the first group to bring advanced reconstructive surgery to children and adults in countries that lacked it. “It was hard work, but he was part of a great team that accomplished rewarding results,” said his son, Richard. “The trips were a central part of his life’s mission as a doctor.” Vistnes made many Interplast trips to Guatemala, Honduras, Peru, and Samoa. Most of the medical settings were basic; in Samoa, Vistnes operated in the open air. He also loved being a father and grandfather. “He liked to show people how to do things,” Richard said, “and he loved when the grandkids would come over. My wife remembers how when the kids were babies, if they were crying or fussing, he had this ability to pick one up, say a couple of words and they would just quiet down.” In addition to his wife and son Richard, Vistnes is survived by his sons Dean of Redwood City, California, and Greg of Rockville, Maryland, as well as seven grandchildren.

74

 https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/04/lars-vistnes-a-founding-director-of-interplast-dies-at-88.html. Accessed April 25, 2018

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Fig. 111. William L. “Bucky” Walter, MD (1928–2014).

WILLIAM L. “BUCKY” WALTER, MD (1928–2014) William “Bucky” Walter was born in 1928 in Miamisburg, Ohio. He was a rector scholar at De Pauw University where he graduated in 1950 Phi Beta Kappa. He entered the military medical service in 1955 and served as a physician on a Coast Guard Cutter in North Alberta and later received special training in eye, ear, nose, throat, and musculofacial surgery. After leaving military service in 1962, he came to St. Louis and became one of the founders of the St. Louis Eye Clinic. He was inducted as a fellow of ASOPRS in 1973, serving on several committees including a stint as chair of the thesis committee in 1990. He remained professionally active late into his life, becoming a life fellow of the Society in 2001, though he continued to see patients until shortly before his death. The 2013 ASOPRS Foundation Lecture (given that year by Philip Custer) was dedicated in Dr. Walter’s honor by his friend and colleague, Mark Levine. Bucky Walter passed away at the age of eighty-six on October 2, 2014, predeceased by his wife Marlene Mancini Walter, and survived by four children—Kelly (Gary) Graham, Kimberly (Henry) Boyer, Shannon (Scott) Simpson, and K.C. (Shannon) Walter—and seven grandchildren.75

75

 St. Louis Dispatch. October 5, 2014. http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/stltoday/obituary. Accessed March 30, 2017.

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Fig. 112. Gunther Weiss (1935–2017).

GUNTHER WEISS (1935–2017) Gunther Weiss was born on April 28, 1935 in Esslingen, Germany, the youngest of four children of Walter and Anna Weiss. Roger Dailey affectionately described many biographical details of his remarkable life: “After World War II, German glass blowers made their way to Gunther’s hometown, one of whom was Eddie Fichtmüeller, a master glassblower and teacher who took thirteen-yearold Gunther ‘under his wing.’ For three years Gunther spent his time studying his new trade and blowing glass as an apprentice. After finishing his master program in 1951, Gunther worked with the engineers at BMW to create new air and oil filters for his motorcycle so he could drive it to South Africa and back from Germany— which he did at age 16! Gunther moved to Oregon from Toronto in 1961. He was fortunate to get help from a couple of visionaries: Howard Vollum, founder and CEO of Tektronix, and then State Representative Bob Packwood (later Senator). They recognized Oregon’s potential to be a high-tech industry center, and they needed a master glassblower. Around 1963, Gunther began work at OHSU (Oregon Health and Science University) Medical School where he met the chair of the biochemistry department, Richard (Dick) Jones. Dick introduced him to his father, Lester T. Jones who was an EENT (eye, ear, nose and throat) physician and anatomist. At that time, Dr. Jones was trying to find a material for a bypass tube in patients with tearing; together they developed the Jones tube, and Weiss Scientific Glass has been producing these tubes for over fifty years. While at OHSU, Gunther volunteered to become the first person to get a colonoscopy using fiber optics. He insisted on being awake, because prior to the procedure he had slipped a ‘homemade’ glass prosthesis ‘up there’ and didn’t want to miss the look on the doctor’s faces when they put the endoscope in! By 1976 Weiss Scientific was growing when an Intel employee brought a piece of broken glassware in for Gunther to fix. That repair developed into a relationship that helped Intel become the leader of the semiconductor industry and helped Weiss Scientific grow beyond anyone’s dreams. Gunther had the highest security clearance at Intel. Gunther retired in 2009. His companies combined represented the 4th largest privately held company in Oregon. At his retirement, he received a plaque from one of Intel’s Founders, Andy Grove, recognizing his important role in the development and success of Intel. Gunther became an honorary member of ASOPRS in 2006.” Gunther Weiss fell very ill during the same time that ASOPRS members and exhibitors were gathering for an ASOPRS ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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spring meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia. He died soon thereafter in June 2017. He was predeceased by brother Carl Weiss and sister Elizabeth Laux. Gunther Weiss was survived by sister Martha Dauenhauer, son-in-law Scott Wheeler, and granddaughters Ericka, Monica, and Megan. As Roger Dailey said, “They broke the mold after Gunther and he will be greatly missed by all of us fortunate to know him well.”76

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 Dailey R. “Gunther Weiss.” www.asoprs.org/assets/docs/ASOPRS_2017_memorials_ads_WEB.pdf. Accessed June 3, 2019. Monica Wheeler, personal communication, June 6, 2019.

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Appendix 1

Membership Roster and Chronology of Membership Transitions David M. Reifler and Tisha A. Kehn As of June 17, 2019, the Society’s roster of 868 members consists of 627 dues-paying Fellows, three Honorary Fellows, 103 International Associates, 128 Life Fellows, and three Life International Associates. There are currently ninety active candidates for ASOPRS membership as defined by the Society’s bylaws. Sources of membership data in the following two lists were minutes, rosters, directories, and programs found in the Society’s archives along with recent annual spring meeting brochures that have introduced and welcomed new members. In the membership roster (Part I), specific member-transitions and terms of office are included in parentheses. When a specific year for a transition was not found, as in the case of twenty-six member-transitions from Fellow to Life Fellow, “year?” appears in parentheses. In those cases, the transition is also absent from the chronological listing of membership transitions (Part II).

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Part I. Membership Roster Vinay K. Aakalu, MD, MPH Fellow (2013) Mohammad A. Abdulhafez, MD, FRCS International Associate (2001) Ari Abel, MD Fellow (2004) James L. Adams, MD Fellow (2004), Life Fellow (2013) Jean-Paul Adenis, MD International Associate (2000), Life International Associate (2014) Gary L. Aguilar, MD Fellow (1980) Norman C. Ahl, MD Fellow (1979), Life Fellow (2015) Harpreet Ahluwalia, MBBS, MRCOphth, FRCS, MS International Associate (2015) Amjad Z. Ahmad, MD Fellow (2001) Eric Ahn, MD Fellow (2016) Audrey E. Ahuero, MD Fellow (2012) Chris R. Alabiad, MD Fellow (2013) Ramzi Alameddine, MD International Associate (2017) Mark A. Alford, MD Fellow (2000) Zainab Y. Alhabbab, MD International Associate (2010) Mohammad J. Ali, MD International Associate (2014) Richard C. Allen, MD, PhD, FACS Fellow (2007), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2017), Program Chair (2018) Adel Alsuhaibani, MD International Associate (2012) George J. Alter, MD Fellow (1996) Arash Jian Amadi, MD, FACS Fellow (2004) Malena M. Amato, MD Fellow (2003) Richard L. Anderson, MD Fellow (1976), Fellowship Program Director (1981–2018), Vice President (1988), Life Fellow (2019) Richard C. Angrist, MD Fellow (1986)

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Christine Annunziata, MD Fellow (2010) Rafael Arango Botero, MD International Associate (2012) Martha C. Arango Munoz, MD International Associate (2015) Yonca Ozkan Arat, MD International Associate (2016) Kathleen F. Archer, MD Fellow (1990), Secretary of Education (2004–2005), Vice President (2013), President Elect (2014), President (2015), Immediate Past President (2016), Advisor (2016–present, term runs through 2025) Joe F. Arterberry, MD Fellow (1988), Life Fellow (year?) Bryan Arthurs, MD International Associate (2006), Life International Associate (2018) Edwin C. Augustat, MD Fellow (1975), Executive Secretary (1996–1997), Secretary of Meetings (1999–2000), Life Fellow (2017) Samuel Baharestani, MD Fellow (2016) Rosalie L. Bair, MD Fellow (1996) Jasmina Bajric, MD Fellow (2018) Meredith Saylor Baker, MD Fellow (2017) Stephen M. Baker, MD, FRCSC Fellow (2003) Sterling S. Baker, MD Fellow (1997), Life Fellow (year?) Kyle Balch, MD Fellow (2000) Behin Barahimi, MD Fellow (2014) Lucieni Cristina Barbarini Ferraz, MD International Associate (2019) Anne Barmettler, MD Fellow (2017) Nicholas J. Barna, MD Fellow (1992) Rhonda V. Barrett, MD Fellow (2012) George B. Bartley, MD Fellow (1991), Fellowship Program Director (1993–2003), Spring Meeting Program Chair (1996), Program Chair (1997), Editor-in-Chief OPRS (1999‒2002), Life Fellow (2017) Mounir Bashour, MD Fellow (1999) Eric B. Baylin, MD Fellow (2007)

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Kevin A. Beadles, MD, FACS Fellow (1996) William H. Bearden, MD, FACS Fellow (2006) Randall L. Beatty, MD Fellow (1992) Bruce B. Becker, MD Fellow (1989) Edward H. Bedrossian Jr., MD, FACS Fellow (1985) Lorne Bellan, MD, FRCS International Associate (2006) Michel Belliveau, MD Fellow (2019) Ross S. Benger, MD International Associate (1988), Fellow (1991) Mark Berkowitz, MD Fellow (1996) A. Jan Berlin, MD Charter Fellow (1969), Secretary (1977–1978), President Elect (1981), President (1982), Immediate Past President (1983), Advisor (1983–1992), Life Fellow (2000) Francesco P. Bernardini, MD International Associate (2004) Carlo Roberto Bernardino, MD, FACS Fellow (2013) Craig E. Berris, MD Fellow (1979) F. Dean Berry, MD Fellow (1990), Life Fellow (1996) Thomas A. Bersani, MD Fellow (1989) Todd L. Beyer, DO Fellow (1989) Charles K. Beyer-Machule, MD Founding Fellow (1969), Fellowship Program Director (1971‒1987), President Elect (1972), President (1973), Immediate Past President (1974), Advisor (1974–1981), Life Fellow (1993) Maziar Bidar, MD Fellow (2006) Brian S. Biesman, MD Fellow (1993) William J. Bigham, MD Fellow (1996) Jurij R. Bilyk, MD Fellow (1996) Chad M. Bingham, MD Fellow (2014) David W. Bishop, MD Charter Fellow (1969), Life Fellow (year?)

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Evan H. Black, MD, FACS Fellow (2001), Fellowship Program Director (2010–present) Alexander D. Blandford, MD Fellow (2019) Sean M. Blaydon, MD, FACS Fellow (2001), Fellowship Program Director (2011–present) Fred S. Bodker, MD Fellow (1996) Andre Luis Borba da Silva, MD International Associate (2018) Milton Boniuk, MD Fellow (1972), Life Fellow (2005) Gary E. Borodic, MD Fellow (1992) Bert Bowden, MD Fellow (1992), Life Fellow (2018) Cynthia Boxrud, MD, FACS Fellow (2001) Michael H. Boyle, MD Fellow (2009) Nariman Boyle, MD Fellow (2018) Alan B. Brackup, MD, FACS Fellow (2002) Alvin H. Brackup, MD Charter Fellow (1970), Life Fellow (1998) Elizabeth A. Bradley, MD Fellow (2000), Fellowship Program Director (2013–present), Executive Secretary (2018–2019) Paul Brannan, MD Fellow (2006) Emily Marie Bratton, MD Fellow (2017) Brian G. Brazzo, MD Fellow (1999) R. Larry Brenner, MD Fellow (1974), Life Fellow (year?) César A. Briceño, MD Fellow (2014) Talmage Broadbent, MD Fellow (2018) Wade Brock, MD Fellow (2006) Mark S. Brown, MD Fellow (2001) Richard W. Bryant, MD Fellow (2008) Adam G. Buchanan, MD Fellow (2011)

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Daniel E. Buerger, MD Fellow (1999) David G. Buerger, MD Fellow (1996) Frank Buffam, MD, CM Fellow (1976), Life Fellow (2016) John D. Bullock, MD, MPH, MS Fellow (1975), Fellowship Program Director (1994–2002), Life Fellow (2002) Richard A. Burgett, MD, FACS Fellow (1999) Cat N. Burkat, MD, FACS Fellow (2008) John A. Burns, MD Fellow (1975), Program Chair (1986), Treasurer (1987–1988), Vice President (1990), President Elect (1991), President (1992), Immediate Past President (1993), Advisor (1993–2002), Life Fellow (2010) Michael A. Burnstine, MD Fellow (1998), Fellowship Program Director (2016–present) John R. Burroughs, MD Fellow (2007) Kenneth V. Cahill, MD Fellow (1987), Spring Meeting Program Chair (1998), Program Chair (1999), Fellowship Program Director (2002–present) Conley B. Call, MD Fellow (2013) Alison Callahan, MD Fellow (2017) Michael A. Callahan, MD Fellow (1979), Executive Secretary (1992–1993) Christopher J. Calvano, MD, PhD, FACS Fellow (2013) Ashley Campbell, MD Fellow (2018) Joseph P. Campbell, MD Fellow (2001) Tim Carey, MD Fellow (1991) Jacqueline R. Carrasco, MD, FACS Fellow (2007) Richard P. Carroll, MD, FACS Fellow (1975), Program Chair (1979), Executive Secretary (1980–1981), President Elect (1983), President (1984), Immediate Past President (1985), Advisor (1985–1994), Life Fellow (2011) Bryant P. Carruth, MD Fellow (2014) Jean D. Carruthers, MD, FRCSC Fellow (2002) Keith D. Carter, MD, FACS Fellow (1996), Treasurer (1999–2000), Fellowship Program Director (2009–present)

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Susan R. Carter, MD Fellow (1996), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2004), Program Chair (2005), Secretary of Meetings (2015‒2016) Mont J. Cartwright, MD Fellow (1993) Douglas R. Casady, MD Fellow (2006) Mark A. Cepela, MD Fellow (1991) Altug Cetinkaya, MD International Associate (2011) Harinderpal Singh Chahal, MD Fellow (2019) Jack Chalfin, MD, FACS Fellow (1979), Life Fellow (1998) Christopher B. Chambers, MD Fellow (2013), Fellowship Program Director (2017‒present) Yasmin Shayesteh Chambers, MD Fellow (2018) Eli L. Chang, MD Fellow (2009) Jessica Chang, MD Fellow (2018) John S. Chang Jr., MD International Associate (2004) Shu-Hong Holly Chang, MD Fellow (2013) Warren J. Chang, MD Fellow (1999) Karen L. Chapman, MD, FACS Fellow (1997) Michael C. Chappell, MD Fellow (2013) Devron H. Char, MD Fellow (1982) George C. Charonis, MD Fellow (1998) Imtiaz A. Chaudhry, MD, PhD, FACS Fellow (2015) Mauricio R. Chavez, MD Fellow (2011) Richard M. Chavis, MD Fellow (1985), Life Fellow (2010) Steven Chen, MD, FACS Fellow (2006) William P. Chen, MD Fellow (1981), Life Fellow (2017) Smith Ann Chisholm, MD Fellow (2019) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Raymond I. Cho, MD, FACS Fellow (2010) Catherine Choi, MD Fellow (2019) John C. Choi, MD Fellow (1996) Kelvin Kam-lung Chong, MD, FRCOphth International Associate (2016) Chai-Teck Choo, MD International Associate (2017) Phillip H. Choo, MD Fellow (1999) Eva Chou, MD Fellow (2016) Jonathan D. Christenbury, MD Fellow (1988) Frank H. Christensen, MD Fellow (1982), Life Fellow (2015) Murray D. Christianson, MD, FRCSC, FACS Fellow (1981), Life Fellow (2018) Rao Chundury, MD, MBA Fellow (2018) W. Andrew Cies, MD Fellow (1977), Life Fellow (2012) Kimberly P. Cockerham, MD, FACS Fellow (2002) Daniel J. Coden, MD Fellow (1992) Adam Cohen, MD Fellow (2010) Marc S. Cohen, MD, FACS Fellow (1991) Eric A. Cole, MD Fellow (2003) Harvey P. “Chip” Cole III, MD, FACS Fellow (1993) J. Richard O. Collin, MA, FRCS, DO Fellow (1977) Christopher Compton, MD Fellow (2018) Howard Conn, MD Fellow (1987), Life Fellow (2016) Michael A. Connor, MD Fellow (2012) Stephen T. Conway, MD Fellow (1980), Life Fellow (year) Scott Corin, MD Fellow (1989)

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Bryan Costin, MD Fellow (2016) Steven M. Couch, MD Fellow (2013) Steven J. Covici, MD Fellow (2000) David E. Cowen, MD, FACS Fellow (1995) Shannon Cox, MD Fellow (2016) Antonio Augusto Velasco Cruz, MD International Associate (2005) Carolee Cutler Peck, MD, MPH Fellow (2016) Philip L. Custer, MD Fellow (1985), Spring Meeting Program Chair (1997), Program Chair (1998) Albert S. Cytryn, MD Fellow (1994) Craig N. Czyz, DO, FACOS, FACS Fellow (2014) Roger A. Dailey, MD, FACS Fellow (1990), Fellowship Program Director (1999–present), Executive Secretary (2000–2001), Vice President (2004), President Elect (2005), President (2006), Immediate Past President (2007), Advisor (2007‒2016) Albert Dal Canto, MD, PhD Fellow (2008) Daniel L. Dale, MD Fellow (1994) Jennifer Danks, MBBS, FRANZCO Fellow (2014) Brett Davies, MD Fellow (2014) Rodger Davies, MD International Associate (2015) Dan DeAngelis, MD, FRCSC Fellow (2005) Christopher M. DeBacker, MD Fellow (1997) Carlo de Conciliis, MD International Associate (2004) Sarah DeParis, MD Fellow (2019) David Della Rocca, MD Fellow (2015) Robert Della Rocca, MD Fellow (1975), Fellowship Program Director (1986–1998), Life Fellow (year?) Sheri DeMartelaere, MD Fellow (2007)

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Hakan Demirci, MD Fellow (2012) Julian De Silva, MD, MBBS, FRCOphth International Associate (2012) Martin H. Devoto, MD International Associate (2001) Mohit A. Dewan, MD Fellow (2012) Alberto Luis Diaz, MD International Associate (2012) James B. Dickson, MD, FACS Fellow (1988) Peter J. Dolman, MD, FRCSC Fellow (1992) Angela Dolmetsch, MD International Associate (2002) Richard K. Dortzbach, MD Fellow (1973), Program Chair (1977), Fellowship Program Director (1978–1997), Secretary (1987–1988), Co-Editor-in-Chief OPRS (1988‒1997), Vice President (1993), President Elect (1994), President (1995), Immediate Past President (1996), Advisor (1996–2005), Life Fellow (2008) Timothy Doucet, MD Fellow (1981), Life Fellow (2019) Raymond S. Douglas, MD, PhD Fellow (2008), Fellowship Program Director (2011–present) Marcos T. Doxanas, MD Fellow (1982), Life Fellow (2016) Laryssa R. Dragan, MD Fellow (2006) Steven C. Dresner, MD Fellow (1990), Fellowship Program Director (2003–present) Robert M. Dryden, MD, FACS Charter Fellow (1969), Program Chair (1974), Fellowship Program Director (1974–2009), Treasurer (1975–1976), President Elect (1978), President (1979), Immediate Past President (1980), Advisor (1980– 1988), Life Fellow (year?) Kathleen M. Duerksen, MD, FACS Fellow (1993), AAO Councilor (2018‒present, term runs through 2023) Mark Duffy, MD, PhD Fellow (1998), Vikram D. Durairaj, MD, FACS Fellow (2004), Fellowship Program Director (2008–present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2015), Program Chair (2016) Jonathan J. Dutton, MD, PhD Fellow (1983), Fellowship Program Director (1993–2013), Editor-in-Chief OPRS (2009‒present) Habibullah Eatamadi, MD, FRCS(Ed) International Associate (2012) Daniel A. Ebroon, MD Fellow (1999) Lauren A. Eckstein, MD, PhD Fellow (2011) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Chaim Edelstein, MD Fellow (2003) Jeffrey P. Edelstein, MD Fellow (1987) Kian Eftekhari, MD Fellow (2017) Janice E. Eggert, MD Fellow (1989) Andrew Eiseman, MD Fellow (2000) Ebby Elahi, MD Fellow (2009) Kasra Eliasieh, MD Fellow (2014) Ira Eliasoph, MD Fellow (1976) Don S. Ellis, MD Fellow (1995) Victor M. Elner, MD, PhD Fellow (1989) Tarek El-Sawy, MD, PhD Fellow (2014) Todd B. Engen, MD Fellow (1999) Yoash R. Enzer, MD Fellow (1995) Gil A. Epstein, MD Fellow (1980) Melanie H. Erb, MD Fellow (2009) George K. Escaravage Jr., MD Fellow (2010) Bita Esmaeli, MD, FACS Fellow (1997), Fellowship Program Director (2010–present) Neda Esmaili, MD Fellow (2014) Gabriela M. Espinoza, MD Fellow (2008) Kelly R. Everman, MD Fellow (2012) Joseph A. Eviatar, MD, FACS Fellow (1997) Daniel G. Ezra, MD, FRCOphth International Associate (2013) Xian Qun Fan, MD, PhD International Associate (2013) Robert G. Fante, MD, FACS Fellow (1999), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2011), Program Chair (2012), Secretary of Education (2015‒2018), Vice President (2019) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Stuart Farris, MD Fellow (1993) Aaron Fay, MD Fellow (2005), Fellowship Program Director (2011–2017) Kenneth A. Feldman, MD Fellow (1991) Douglas P. Felt, MD Fellow (1986), Life Fellow (2018) John P. Fezza, MD Fellow (1999), Treasurer (2017‒2019) Patrick M. Flaharty, MD Fellow (1997) Joseph C. Flanagan, MD Charter Fellow (1969), Fellowship Program Director (1969–2011), Program Chair (1980), Secretary (1981– 1982), President Elect (1984), President (1985), Immediate Past President (1986), Advisor (1986–1995), Life Fellow (2011) James C. Fleming, MD, FACS Fellow (1980), Spring Meeting Program Chair (1993), Program Chair (1994), AAO Councilor (2000‒2005), Secretary of Meetings (2001–2002), Fellowship Program Director (2003–present), Vice President (2003), President Elect (2004), President (2005), Immediate Past President (2006), Advisor (2006–2015) Jill A. Foster, MD, FACS Fellow (1994), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2000), Program Chair (2001), Vice President (2010), President Elect (2011), President (2012), Immediate Past President (2012), Advisor (2013–present, term runs through 2022) Tamara Fountain, MD Fellow (1996), Executive Secretary (2008–2011), Vice President (2016), President Elect (2017), President (2018), Immediate Past President (2019), Advisor (2019, term runs through 2028) Amy M. Fowler, MD Fellow (2008) Ian C. Francis, MD, FRACS Fellow (1999) L. Neal Freeman, MD, MBA, FACS Fellow (1990) David Freilich, MD Fellow (2004) Suzanne Freitag, MD Fellow (2002), Fellowship Program Director (2010–present) Peter Fries, MD, FACS Fellow (1994) Constance Fry, MD Fellow (2016) Roxana Fu, MD Fellow (2018) Barry Fuller, MD Fellow (2002) Molly Fuller, MD Fellow (2017) Dennis Galbraith, MD Fellow (1985), Life Fellow (year?) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Marco A. Gallon, MD International Associate (2002) Parag Gandhi, MD Fellow (2008) Perry F. Garber, MD Fellow (1981), Secretary of Education (1992–1993), Executive Secretary (1994–1995), Vice President (1997), President Elect (1998), President (1999), Immediate Past President (2000), Advisor (2000–2009), Life Fellow (2008) Denise D. Garcia, MD Fellow (2010) George H. Garcia, MD Fellow (1999) James A. Garrity, MD Honorary Fellow (2013) Brent J. Gaskin, MD International Associate (2014) Roberta E. Gausas, MD Fellow (1996), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2002), Program Chair (2003), Fellowship Program Director (2006–2017) Lauren Z. Gavaris Fellow (2011) Paul T. Gavaris, MD Fellow (1977), Program Chair (1990) Gregg S. Gayre, MD Fellow (2002) Craig E. Geist, MD Fellow (1990) Dan Georgescu, MD, PhD Fellow (2011) Raf Ghabrial, MD Fellow (1999) Joseph N. Giacometti, MD Fellow (2016) James W. Gigantelli, MD Fellow (2003) Harmeet S. Gill, MD Fellow (2013) Grant Gilliland, MD Fellow (1995) Michael Gingold, MD Fellow (1993) Geoffrey J. Gladstone, MD Fellow (1992), International Fellowship Program Director (2013–present) Lora Glass, MD Fellow (2017) Michael L. Glassman, MD, FACS Fellow (2004) Herbert J. Glatt, MD Fellow (1990) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Arthur Tyrone Glover Sr., MD Fellow (1987), Life Fellow (2014) Tara M. Goecks, MD Fellow (2019) Katherine G. Gold, MD Fellow (2016) Andrew M. Goldbaum, MD Fellow (2003) Robert A. Goldberg, MD, FACS Fellow (1989), Spring Meeting Program Chair (1994), Program Chair (1995), Fellowship Program Director (2001–present), Executive Secretary (2004–2005), Vice President (2014), President Elect (2015), President (2016), Immediate Past President (2017), Advisor (2017–present, term runs through 2026) Stuart H. Goldberg, MD Fellow (1998), Life Fellow (2019) Sam H. Goldberger, MD Fellow (1992), Life Fellow (2016) Stacia Goldey, MD Fellow (1996) Jeffrey B. Goldstein, MD Fellow (2001) Scott M. Goldstein, MD Fellow (2004) Abraham I. Gomez Hernandez, MD International Associate (2015) Russell Gonnering, MD, MMM, FACS, CPHQ Fellow (1982), Secretary of Education (1998–1999), Life Fellow (2017) Cristina Gonzalez, MD International Associate (2012) Miguel Gonzalez-Candial, MD International Associate (2006) Mithra O. Gonzalez, MD Fellow (2016) M. Douglas Gossman, MD Fellow (1986) Ameet K. Goyal, MD Fellow (1999) Michael P. Grant, MD, PhD Fellow (2006) Gregory J. Griepentrog, MD Fellow (2013) John D. Griffiths, MD Fellow (1990), Life Fellow (2008) Neil D. Gross, MD Fellow (1991) Michael J. Groth, MD Fellow (1996)

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Arthur S. Grove Jr., MD Fellow (1973), Treasurer (1983–1984), Fellowship Program Director (1984–2003), Executive Secretary (1986–1987), President Elect (1990), President (1991), Immediate Past President (1992), Advisor (1992– 2001), Life Fellow (2016) Ashok Kumar Grover, MD International Associate (2016) F. Lawson Grumbine, MD Fellow (2017) Carmen Guberina, MD Fellow (1984), Life Fellow (2018) Kurt W.L. Guelzow, MD Fellow (1978), Life Fellow (2017) Gustavo Guerra, MD International Associate (2016) Pierre Guibor, MD, PA Fellow (1971), Life Fellow (year?) Shivani Gupta, MD Fellow (2013) Rudolf Guthoff, MD International Associate (2003), Life International Associate (2015) Conrad Hamako, MD Fellow (1977), Life Fellow (2016) Matthew Hammons, MD Fellow (2007) Lawrence Handler, MD Fellow (year?) Rosana Hannouche, MD International Associate (2016) Roderick N. Hargrove, MD Fellow (2005) John N. Harrington, MD Fellow (1975), Secretary (1991), AAO Councilor (1991–1993), Secretary of Meetings (1992), Vice President (1994), President Elect (1995), President (1996), Immediate Past President (1997), Advisor (1997–2006), AMA Delegate (1998‒2019) Gerald J. Harris, MD, FACS Fellow (1982), Fellowship Program Director (1987–present), Treasurer (1991–1992), Editor-in-Chief OPRS (2002‒2009), President Elect (2016), President (2017), Immediate Past President (2018), Advisor (2018‒present, term runs through 2027) Matheson A. Harris, MD Fellow (2012) Andrew Harrison, MD Fellow (2000), Fellowship Program Director (2007–present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2014), Program Chair (2015) Morris Hartstein, MD Fellow (1996) John T. Harvey, MD Fellow (1988) Andrea Hass, MD Fellow (2000) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Adam S. Hassan, MD Fellow (2006) Matthew J. Hauck, MD Fellow (2014) Weldon E. Havins, MD, FACS Fellow (1982) Michael J. Hawes, MD Fellow (1980), Program Chair (1993), Secretary of Education (1994–1995), Vice President (1996), President Elect (1997), President (1998), Immediate Past President (1999), Advisor (1999–2008), Life Fellow (2015) Brent R. Hayek, MD Fellow (2016) J. Timothy Heffernan, MD Fellow (1991), Life Fellow (2017) Katrinka Heher Fellow (1995) Grant W. Heinz, MD Fellow (1995) Dustin M. Heringer, MD Fellow (2012) Eva H. Hewes, MD Fellow (1976), Life Fellow (2013) P. Lloyd Hildebrand, MD Fellow (1997) Robert H. Hill III, MD Fellow (2013) Eric M. Hink, MD Fellow (2013), Fellowship Program Director (2016–present) Marc J. Hirschbein, MD, FACS Fellow (2002), Fellowship Program Director (2014–present) Ignatius S. Hneleski III, MD Fellow (2002) Scott R. Hobson, MD, FACS Fellow (1990) Jonathan Hoenig, MD Fellow (1995), Fellowship Program Director (2018–present) Robert Jeffrey Hofmann, MD Fellow (1992) David E.E. Holck, MD Fellow (1996), Fellowship Program Director (2007–present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2008), Program Chair (2009) John B. Holds, MD Fellow (1989), Fellowship Program Director (2002‒present) Donald Hollsten, MD Fellow (1988), Fellowship Program Director (2014–present) Susan M. Hughes, MD Fellow (1982) Jennifer I. Hui, MD Fellow (2016)

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John H. Hunts, MD, PhD Fellow (1997) Peter E. Hurley, MD, MS Fellow (2012) Ahsen Hussain, MD Fellow (2019) Catherine J. Hwang, MD Fellow (2011), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2019) Kenneth J. Hyde, MD Fellow (1992) Edsel Ing, MD, FRCSC Fellow (2010) David Khoramian Isaacs, MD Fellow (2017) Kamel Itani Fellow (1996) Srinivas Iyengar, MD, FACS Fellow (2013) Ian T. Jackson, MD Honorary Fellow (1990) Steven T. Jackson, MD Fellow (1982), Life Fellow (2011) Sarah Mireles Jacobs, MD Fellow (2018) Mauricio Jaramillo, MD International Associate (2011) Reynaldo M. Javate, MD International Associate (2000) Kim Jebodhsingh, MD Fellow (2011) Qian Jiang, MD International Associate (2017) Gabriel Jimenez Onofre, MD International Associate (2011) Sukhjit Johl, MD Fellow (2002) Thomas Johnson, MD Fellow (1996), Fellowship Program Director (2002–present) David F. Jones, MD Fellow (2013) Ira S. Jones, MD Charter Fellow (1969), Vice President (1978), Life Fellow (1994) Scott Jones, MD Fellow (2017) David R. Jordan, MD Fellow (1989) Shannon S. Joseph, MD Fellow (2017)

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Naresh Joshi, MBBS, DO, FRCOphth International Associate (2012) Alon Kahana, MD, PhD Fellow (2008), Fellowship Program Director (begins 2019) Evan Kalin-Hajdu, MD Fellow (2019) Sara A. Kaltreider, MD Fellow (1987), Spring Meeting Program Chair (1999), Program Chair (2000), International Fellowship Program Director (2002‒2003) Kevin Kalwerisky, MD Fellow (2012) David F. Kamin, MD Fellow (1979), Life Fellow (2005) Mitesh Kapadia, MD Fellow (2014) James F. Kapustiak, MD Fellow (1989) James W. Karesh, MD, FACS Fellow (1987), Treasurer (1997–1998), Fellowship Program Director (2004–2014), Vice President (2006), President Elect (2007), President (2007–2008), Immediate Past President (2009), Advisor (2009–2018) Mohsen B. Kashkouli, MD International Associate (2016) Lawrence G. Kass, MD Fellow (1987) Sajeev Kathuria, MD Fellow (1996) James A. Katowitz, MD Fellow (1978), Fellowship Program Director (1984‒2015), Program Chair (1984), Treasurer (1985–1986), Vice President (1987), President (1997), Immediate Past President (1998), Advisor (1998–2007) William Katowitz, MD Fellow (2008), Fellowship Program Director (2015‒present) Lawrence B. Katzen, MD Fellow (1980), Life Fellow (2015) Marsha Kavanagh Fellow (2009) Pelin Kaynak, MD International Associate (2016) Michael Kazim, MD Fellow (1991), Fellowship Program Director (2013‒present) Nadia A. Kazim, MD Fellow (2009) Tiffany L. Kent, MD Fellow (2016) Robert C. Kersten, MD Fellow (1985), Fellowship Program Director (2003‒present) Jemshed A. Khan, MD Fellow (1988), Treasurer (2011–2016) Femida Kherani, MD, FRCSC Fellow (2006) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Jwu Jin Khong, MD Fellow (2014) Sang In Khwarg, MD International Associate (2016) Don O. Kikkawa, MD, FACS Fellow (1993), Fellowship Program Director (2003‒present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2009), Program Chair (2010), Vice President (2012), President Elect (2013), President (2014), Immediate Past President (2015), Advisor (2015–present, term runs through 2024) Charles Kim, MD Fellow (2018) H. Jane Kim, MD Fellow (2016) H. Joon Kim, MD Fellow (2019) Jonathan W. Kim, MD Fellow (2001) Man K. Kim, MD Fellow (1988) Yoon-Duck Kim, MD, PhD International Associate (2002) Maria Kirzhner, MD Fellow (2011) Stephen Klapper, MD, FACS Fellow (2005) Zachary Klett, MD Fellow (1996) Kim Klippenstein, MD Fellow (1997) Marcus Ko, MD Fellow (2018) Jonathan Y. Koh, MD, FACS Fellow (1997) Roger Kohn, MD Fellow (1978), Life Fellow (2013) Hindola Konrad, MD, FACS Fellow (2005) John J. Koo, MD Fellow (2011) Joel Kopelman, MD Fellow (1996) Irina V. Koreen, MD, PhD Fellow (2013) Bobby S. Korn, MD, PhD, FACS Fellow (2008), International Fellowship Program Director (2014‒present) Andrea L. Kossler, MD Fellow (2014) Brett S. Kotlus, MD Fellow (2009)

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Vladimir Kratky, MD, FRCSC Fellow (1997) Ronald W. Kristan, MD Fellow (1987) Debra M. Kroll, MD Fellow (2014) Jan W. Kronish, MD, FACS Fellow (1989), Secretary of Education (2002–2003), Executive Secretary (2006–2007), Vice President (2009), President Elect (2010), President (2011), Immediate Past President (2012), Advisor (2012–present, term runs through 2021) Thomas M. Kropp, MD Fellow (1988) Dwight R. Kulwin, MD Fellow (1980), Life Fellow (2015) Scot E. Lance, MD Fellow (1990) Michael S. Landa Fellow (1999) Katherine Lane, MD Fellow (2010) Paul D. Langer, MD, FACS Fellow (1997) John Langford, MD, FACS Fellow (1997) Francis G. LaPiana, MD, FACS Fellow (1978), Life Fellow (2003) Nicole Langelier, MD Fellow (2018) Stephen Laquis, MD, FACS Fellow (2003) David C. Larned, MD Fellow (1990) Simeon Lauer, MD Fellow (2003), Secretary of Education (2010–2011) Bradford W. Lee, MD, MSc Fellow (2017) Brian J. Lee, MD Fellow (2012) Edward Lee, MD Fellow (2010) Hui Bae Harold Lee, MD Fellow (2010), Fellowship Program Director (2016‒present) Lyndon Lee, MD Fellow (2018) Sang Yeul Lee, MD Fellow (~1990), Life Fellow (2018) Seong Lee, MD Fellow (2017)

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Wendy W. Lee, MD Fellow (2011), International Fellowship Program Director (2014‒present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2016), Program Chair (2017) Daniel R. Lefebvre, MD, FACS Fellow (2013) Martin L. Leib, MD Fellow (1991) Steven Leibowitz, MD Fellow (1986) Joel M. Leibsohn, MD Fellow (1977), Life Fellow (2016) Gary J. Lelli Jr., MD Fellow (2009); Fellowship Program Director (2018–present) Bradley N. Lemke, MD Fellow (1980), Program Chair (1991), Secretary of Education (1996–1997), Fellowship Program Director (1998‒2005), Vice President (1998), President Elect (1999), President (2000), Immediate Past President (2001), Advisor (2001–2010), Life Fellow (year?) Charles R. Leone Jr., MD Charter Fellow (1970), Secretary (1975–1976), Vice President (1982), Life Fellow (1995) Alan M. Lessner, MD Fellow (1992) David B. Leventer, MD Fellow (2002) Flora Levin, MD Fellow (2017) Peter S. Levin, MD Fellow (1993), Fellowship Program Director (2016‒present) Mark R. Levine, MD Fellow (1974), Executive Secretary (1982–1983), AAO Councilor (1985–1987), President Elect (1985), President (1986), Immediate Past President (1987), Advisor (1987–1996), Life Fellow (year?) Robert E. Levine, MD Fellow (1980), Life Fellow (year?) Helen Lew, MD, PhD International Associate (2015) Craig Lewis, MD Fellow (2012) Kyle T. Lewis, MD, FACS Fellow (2018) Ilya M. Leyngold, MD Fellow (2013) Dongmei Li, MD International Associate (2012) Tina G. Li, MD Fellow (2003) Sophie Liao, MD Fellow (2019) Lee Hooi Lim, MD International Associate (2015)

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Roberto Limongi, MD International Associate (2013) Chun Cheng Lin Yang, MD International Associate (2014) John V. Linberg, MD Fellow (1986), Fellowship Program Director (1996‒2011), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2003), Program Chair (2004), Life Fellow (2012) William Lipham, MD, FACS Fellow (2001) Richard D. Lisman, MD, FACS Fellow (1984), Fellowship Program Director (1998‒2018) Boaz Lissauer, MD Fellow (2004) Gary Lissner, MD Fellow (1980) Catherine Y. Liu, MD Fellow (2019) Don Liu, MD Fellow (1981), Fellowship Program Director (1994‒1996), International Fellowship Program Director (1998‒2001) Honglei Liu, MD International Associate (2016) Wenjing Liu, MD Fellow (2019) Mikel W. Lo, MD Fellow (2001) Howard Loff, MD Fellow (1996), Life Fellow (2007) Sangeeta C. Logani, MD, FACS Fellow (1997) John A. Long, MD Fellow (1989), Fellowship Program Director (2000‒present) Joanne Low, MD Fellow (1996) Jonathan C. Lowry, MD Fellow (1995) Mark J. Lucarelli, MD, FACS Fellow (1998), Fellowship Program Director (2005‒present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2006), Program Chair (2007), Secretary of Meetings (2013–2014), Vice President (2018), President Elect (2019) Cari Lyle, MD Fellow (2009) David B. Lyon, MD, FACS Fellow (1990), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2012), Program Chair (2013) Peter MacIntosh, MD Fellow (2016) William Mack, MD Fellow (1997) Elizabeth Maher, MD Fellow (1992) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Nicholas Mahoney, MD Fellow (2013) Raman Malhotra, FRCOphth International Associate (2012) Ronald Mancini, MD, FACS Fellow (2009), Fellowship Program Director (2017–present) Geva Mannor, MD, MPH Fellow (1995) Tamer N. Mansour, MD Fellow (2016) Lisa Mansueto, MD Fellow (2004) Marcus M. Marcet, MD Fellow (2010) Charles S.G. Maris, MD Charter Fellow (1969), Life Fellow (2001) Alfred C. Marrone, MD Fellow (1977), Life Fellow (year?) Harry Marshak, MD Fellow (2008) John J. Martin, MD Fellow (1990), Secretary of Meetings (2019, term runs through 2020) Peter Martin, MD International Associate (2014) Ronald T. Martin, MD, FACS Fellow (1991) Douglas P. Marx, MD Fellow (2012) Bruce M. Massaro, MD Fellow (1997) Guy G. Massry, MD Fellow (1996), Fellowship Program Director (2017‒present) Suzana Matayoshi, MD International Associate (2018) Thomas R. Mather, MD Fellow (1989) Randy O. Mauffray, MD Fellow (2003) Joseph A. Mauriello, MD Fellow (1983), Life Fellow (2012) Marlon Maus, MD, MPH Fellow (1993), Life Fellow (year?) Frederick A. Mausolf, MD Fellow (1975), Life Fellow (2009) Ioannis Mavrikakis, MD, PhD International Associate (2008) Louise A. Mawn, MD Fellow (2004), AAO Councilor (2012‒2017), Fellowship Program Director (2018‒present)

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Mark L. Mazow, MD Fellow (2003) Robert A. Mazzoli, MD, FACS Fellow (1995) John D. McCann, MD, PhD Fellow (1997), Fellowship Program Director (2015‒present) Rodney W. McCarthy, MD Fellow (1980) Elysa McClintic, MD Fellow (2019) Clinton D. McCord Jr., MD Charter Fellow (1969), Fellowship Program Director (1977‒1988), Program Chair (1981), President Elect (1988), President (1989), Immediate Past President (1990), Advisor (1990–1999), Life Fellow (year?) Michael McCracken, MD Fellow (2005) Timothy J. McCulley, MD Fellow (2003), Fellowship Program Director (2009‒present) John J. McGetrick, MD Fellow (1984) Alan W. McInnes Jr., MD Fellow (2012) M. Polly McKinstry, MD Fellow (1998) Daniel L. McLachlan, MD Fellow (1979), Program Chair (1988), Executive Secretary (1990–1991), Life Fellow (2018) William M. McLeish, MD Fellow (1994) Alan A. McNab, MD, MBBS, DMedSc Fellow (1994) William J. Meecham, MD Fellow (1997), Life Fellow (2012) Milap P. Mehta, MD Fellow (2016) Sonul Mehta, MD Fellow (2016) Melissa Meldrum-Aaberg, MD Fellow (2001) Jill S. Melicher Larson, MD Fellow (2013) Luz Marina Melo, MD International Associate (2012) Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD, FACS Fellow (2004), Fellowship Program Director (2008‒2018), Executive Secretary (2012–2015) Michael Mercandetti, MD Fellow (1996) John Merriam, MD Fellow (1989), Life Fellow (2018) Helen Merritt, MD Fellow (2018) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Pradeep Mettu, MD Fellow (2018) Dale Meyer, MD, FACS Fellow (1990), Fellowship Program Director (2001‒2017) Kevin S. Michels, MD Fellow (2011) Michael E. Migliori, MD, FACS Fellow (1990), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2007), Program Chair (2008), Vice President (2011), President Elect (2012), President (2013), Immediate Past President (2014), Advisor (2014–present, term runs through 2023) Aline Pimentel De Miranda, MD International Associate (2016) Lisa D. Mihora, MD Fellow (2011) James Milite, MD Fellow (1999) Gordon R. Miller, MD Charter Fellow (1970), Life Fellow (2001) Fay E. Millett, MD Charter Fellow (1969), Life Fellow (year?) David M. Mills, MD, FACS Fellow (2008) Yasaman (Jasmine) Mohadjer, MD Fellow (2009) Ali Mokhtarzadeh, MD Fellow (2016) Robert B. Mondshine, MD Fellow (1981), Life Fellow (year?) Jose R. Montes, MD Fellow (2017) Annie Moreau, MD Fellow (2019) Payam V. Morgan, MD Fellow (2018) Kenneth E. Morgenstern, MD, FACS, FAACS Fellow (2006), Secretary of Education (2018–2019) Carrie L. Morris, MD Fellow (2010) Asa D. Morton III, MD Fellow (1997) Eve E. Moscato, MD Fellow (2013) James L. Moses, MD Fellow (1978) Richard S. Muchnick, MD Fellow (1978), Life Fellow (2015) Ann Murchison, MD Fellow (2017)

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Brent Murphy, MD Fellow (1996) Michael L. Murphy, MD Fellow (1997) W. John Murrell, MD Fellow (1992) Cameron Nabavi, MD Fellow (2013) Milind N. Naik, MD International Associate (2015) Ashkay G. Nair, MD, MBBS International Associate (2018) Maryam Nazemzadeh, MD Fellow (2019) Maria Antonieta Ginguerra Nascimento, MD International Associate (2018) Qasiem Nasser, MD International Associate (2018) Tanuj Nakra, MD Fellow (2010) John M. Nassif, MD Fellow (1989) Thomas C. Naugle Jr., MD Fellow (1981), Life Fellow (2019) Janet Neigel, MD, FACS Fellow (1994) Michael Neimkin, MD Fellow (2017) Christine C. Nelson, MD Fellow (1987), Secretary of Meetings (1995–1996), Fellowship Program Director (2002‒present) Eric R. Nelson, MD Fellow (1991) Jeffrey Nerad, MD, FACS Fellow (1989), Fellowship Program Director (1992‒present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2001), Program Chair (2002), Vice President (2008), President Elect (2009), President (2010), Immediate Past President (2011), Advisor (2011–present) Frank A. Nesi, MD, FACS Fellow (1991), Fellowship Program Director (1998‒present, term runs through 2020) Francesca D. Nesi-Eloff, MD Fellow (2013) John D. Ng, MD, MS, FACS Fellow (1997), Program Chair (2006), Secretary of Meetings (2009–2010) John Nguyen, MD Fellow (2016) Ernst Nicolitz, MD Fellow (1978), Life Fellow (2019) Jose Nieto-Enriquez, MD International Associate (2012)

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Navdeep Nijhawan, MD, FRCSC Fellow (2004), Fellowship Program Director (2017‒present) Narieman A. Nik, MD, FACS Fellow (1986) Thaddeus S. Nowinski, MD Fellow (1987) William R. Nunery, MD, FACS Fellow (1980), Fellowship Program Director (1987‒present), Treasurer (1995–1996), Vice President (2000), President Elect (2001), President (2002), Immediate Past President (2003), Advisor (2003–2012) Brett O’Donnell, MBBS, FRCOphth, FRANZCO, FRCS Fellow (2005) Alan Oester Jr., MD Fellow (2012) James Oestreicher, MD Fellow (1991), Fellowship Program Director (2003‒2017), Life Fellow (2018) William N. Offutt IV, MD Fellow (1992), Life Fellow (2011) Sang-Rog Oh, MD Fellow (2013) J. Justin Older, MD, FACS Fellow (1975), Secretary (1983–1984), President Elect (1986), President (1987), Immediate Past President (1988), Advisor (1988–1997), AAO Councilor (1988–1990,1994‒1999), Life Fellow (2013) Jane J. Olson, MD Fellow (1994), Executive Secretary (2002–2003) Jane Olver, MD, FRCOphth International Associate (2004) Cassandra B. Onofrey, MD Fellow (2005) James C. Orcutt, MD, PhD Fellow (1987), Fellowship Program Director (2001‒2017) Midori H. Osaki, MD International Associate (2014) Tammy Hentona Osaki, MD International Associate (2014) Omar Ozgur, MD Fellow (2019) John Pak, MD, PhD Fellow (2008) Farzad Pakdel, MD International Associate (2014) Noelene K. Pang, MD Fellow (2010) Costas Papageorgiou, MD International Associate (2013) Francis Papay, MD Honorary Fellow (2011) Keshini Parbhu, MD Fellow (2011)

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Jonathan M. Pargament, MD Fellow (2018) George L. Paris, MD Fellow (1974), Secretary (1985–1986), Treasurer (1989–1990), Vice President (1992), President Elect (1993), President (1994), Immediate Past President (1995), Advisor (1995–2004), Life Fellow (2003) Dong Jun Park, MD Fellow (2010) Robert C. Pashby, MD Fellow (1978), Life Fellow (2012) Bhupendra C.K. Patel, MD Fellow (1996) Payal J. Patel, MD Fellow (2016) Rakesh M. Patel, MD Fellow (2016) Sarit M. Patel, MD, MBA Fellow (2006) Michael Patipa, MD Fellow (1982), Life Fellow (2018) James R. Patrinely, MD, FACS Fellow (1987) Sean Paul, MD Fellow (2016) Trey Pegram, MD Fellow (2019) Philip Peirce, MBBCh, FCS, SA International Associate (2012) Ron W. Pelton, MD, PhD Fellow (2001) John David Pemberton, DO, MBA Fellow (2018) Robert B. Penne, MD Fellow (1991) Robert J. Peralta, MD Fellow (2014) Felipe J. Pereira, MD International Associate (2018) Noel Perez, MD Fellow (2006) Kevin I. Perman, MD Fellow (1986) Arthur C. Perry, MD Fellow (1978), Life Fellow (2017) Clifton Blake Perry, MD Fellow (2018) Julian D. Perry, MD Fellow (2001), Fellowship Program Director (2008‒present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2010), Program Chair (2011), Secretary of Meetings (2017–2018)

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Balaji Perumal, MD Fellow (2017) Carisa Petris, MD, PhD Fellow (2017) Randal T.H. Pham, MD, FACS Fellow (2008) Paul Phelps, MD Fellow (2018) Guillermo Pico Sr., MD Honorary Fellow (1977) Margaret E. Phillips, MD Fellow (2015) Allan C. Pieroni Goncalves, MD International Associate (2018) Gabriel Pignata, MD International Associate (2019) John F.A. Pitts, FRCP, FRCS, FRCOphth International Associate (2010) Sara Plazola, MD International Associate (2013) Jerry Popham, MD, FACS Fellow (2010) Jeffrey C. Popp, MD Fellow (1984) Amiya Prasad, MD Fellow (1996) David V. Pratt, MD Fellow (1999) Steven G. Pratt, MD Fellow (1982) Fernando Procianoy, MD, PhD International Associate (2018) Paul Proffer, MD Fellow (2007) Karim G. Punja, MD Fellow (2008) Polly A. Purgason, MD Fellow (1991), Life Fellow (2017) Allen M. Putterman, MD Fellow (1973), Fellowship Program Director (1977‒2018), Executive Secretary (1978–1979), President Elect (1980), President (1981), Immediate Past President (1982), Advisor (1982–1991) Francesco Quaranta-Leoni, MD International Associate (2014) Jiang Qian, MD International Associate (2017) Lawrence H. Quist, MD Fellow (1992), Life Fellow (2014) Michael Paul Rabinowitz, MD Fellow (2014) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Gary T. Raflo, MD Fellow (1981), Life Fellow (year?) Fatemeh Rajaii, MD, PhD Fellow (2016) Deepak Ramesh, MD Fellow (2019) Nicholas A. Ramey, MD Fellow (2013) Nicholas T. Ranson, MD Fellow (2013) J. Earl Rathbun, MD Fellow (1973), Treasurer (1979–1980), AAO Councilor (1982–1984), President Elect (1982), President (1983), Immediate Past President (1984), Advisor (1984–1993), Life Fellow (2006) Harsha S. Reddy, MD Fellow (2014) David M. Reifler, MD, FACS Fellow (1985), Treasurer (1993–1994), Spring Meeting Program Chair (1995), Program Chair (1996), Vice President (2002), President Elect (2003), President (2004), Immediate Past President (2005), Advisor (2005–2014), Life Fellow (2017) Chet E. Reistad, MD Fellow (2006) Howard S. Reitman, MD Fellow (1976), Life Fellow (year?) David J. Remigio, MD Fellow (2003) Daniel Repp, MD Fellow (2017) Karen Elizabeth Revere, MD Fellow (2018) Charles D. Rice Fellow (1992), Life Fellow (year?) Michael J. Richard, MD Fellow (2013) I. Rand Rodgers, MD Fellow (1991) Murilo A. Rodrigues, MD International Associate (2016) Silvia Rodrigues, MD International Associate (2016) Rene S. Rodriguez-Sains, MD, FACS Fellow (1992) Janet L. Roen, MD Fellow (1983), Life Fellow (2015) Peter A. Rogers, MD International Associate (1971), Fellow (1991), Life Fellow (1993) Jack Rootman, MD Honorary Fellow (2015) Daniel B. Rootman, MD Fellow (2017) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Appendix 1: Membership Roster and Chronology of Membership Transitions


Geoffrey E. Rose, DSc, MS, FRCS, FRCOphth Honorary Fellow (prior to 2006) John G. Rose Jr., MD Fellow (2006) Carl E. Rosen, MD Fellow (2012) William J. Rosen, MD Fellow (2005), Life Fellow (2016) Joseph J. Ross, MD Fellow (1990) Richard E. Roth, DO Fellow (2013) Robert Rubenzik, MD Fellow (1975), Life Fellow (2014) Peter A.D. Rubin, MD, FACS Fellow (1997) Tal Rubinstein, MD Fellow (2018) Mark C. Ruchman, MD Fellow (1982) David Russell, MD Fellow (2017) Ho-Seok Sa, MD, PhD International Associate (2018) Suresh Sagili, MD International Associate (2016) Priya D. Sahu, MD Fellow (2019) Peter J. Sakol, MD Fellow (1991) Noel D. Saks, MD Fellow (2003) Mario Guillermo Salcedo, MD Fellow (1992) David Samimi, MD Fellow (2014) Raghavan Sampath, DO, FRCS, FRCOphth International Associate (2015) James C. Sanderson, MD Fellow (1996) Melvin Santana Severino, MD International Associate (2017) David H. Saunders, MD Fellow (1977), Life Fellow (2015) Aaron Savar, MD Fellow (2017) David Savar, MD Fellow (1978), Life Fellow (2016)

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Louis Savar, MD Fellow (2017) Daniel P. Schaefer, MD, FACS Fellow (1988), Secretary of Education (2000–2001), Vice President (2017), President Elect (2018), President (2019) Ulrich Hugo Schaudig, MD International Associate (2019) Silvana Artioli Schellini, MD International Associate (2019) Vivian Schiedler, MD Fellow (2010) John J. Schietroma, MD, FACS Fellow (1988), Life Fellow (2015) Jeffrey Schiller, MD Fellow (2005) Robert Schimek, MD Charter Fellow (1969), Life Fellow (1991) Dianne M. Schlachter, MD Fellow (2013) Robert Schwarcz, MD Fellow (2006) Ryan T. Scruggs, MD Fellow (2017) Kira L. Segal, MD Fellow (2019) David Segrest, MD Fellow (1983) Bryan Seiff, MD Fellow (2010) Stuart R. Seiff, MD, FACS Fellow (1986), International Fellowship Program Director (1990‒1999), Fellowship Program Director (1991‒present), Secretary of Meetings (2005–2006), Vice President (2007), President Elect (2008), President (2009), Immediate Past President (2010), Advisor (2010–2019) Juan Javier Servat, MD Fellow (2014) Pete Setabutr, MD Fellow (2010), Fellowship Program Director (2018–present) Melvin Santana Severino, MD International Associate (2017) Solomon Shaftel, MD, PhD Fellow (2016) Hassan Shah, MD Fellow (2013) Pari N. Shams, MD International Associate (2015) Todd R. Shepler, MD Fellow (2006) Deborah D. Sherman, MD Fellow (1992) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Debra J. Shetlar, MD Fellow (2005) Carl S. Shibata, MD Fellow (1981), Life Fellow (2018) Jerry Shields, MD Fellow (1995) Marc D. Shields, MD Fellow (2006) Roman Shinder, MD Fellow (2017) John W. Shore, MD, FACS Fellow (1982), Program Chair (1992), Fellowship Program Director (1992‒2011), Secretary of Meetings (1996–1997), Vice President (2001), President Elect (2002), President (2003), Immediate Past President (2004), Advisor (2004– 2013), Life Fellow (2017) Norman Shorr, MD, FACS Fellow (1976), Fellowship Program Director (1983‒2018), Life Fellow (2018) Francis T. Shotton, MD, FACS Fellow (1981), Life Fellow (year?) Joseph Shovlin, MD Fellow (1994) Erin M. Shriver, MD Fellow (2012) Scott C. Sigler, MD Fellow (2004) Rona Z. Silkiss, MD, FACS Fellow (1988), AAO Councilor (2006–2011) Daniel Silva, MD Charter Fellow (1969), Vice President (1974), Life Fellow (1987) Guy Ben Simon, MD International Associate (2014) Daniel T. Sines, MD Fellow (2012) David J.B. Singer, MD, FACS Fellow (1973), Life Fellow (year?) Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD, FACS Fellow (1996), Treasurer (2005–2008), Fellowship Program Director (2007‒present) Hampson A. Sisler, MD Fellow (1971), Life Fellow (2003) Dimitrios Sismanis, MD Fellow (2017) Jennifer Sivak-Callcott, MD Fellow (2008), Fellowship Program Director (2011‒present), Executive Secretary (2016‒2017) Bentley C. Skibell, MD Fellow (2006) Brent Skippen, MD International Associate (2017) Charles Slonim, MD Fellow (1994)

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Barry R. Smith, MD Fellow (1992), Life Fellow (2012) Eugene M. Smith Jr., MD Fellow (1997) John W. Snead, MD, FACS Fellow (1979) Peter Sneed, MD Fellow (2001), Secretary of Education (2012–2014) Matthew Sniegowski, MD Fellow (2014) Rachel K. Sobel, MD, FACS Fellow (2014) Mahsa A. Sohrab, MD Fellow (2018) Jason A. Sokol, MD Fellow (2017) David B. Soll, MD Charter Fellow (1969), Program Chair (1975), Fellowship Program Director (1976‒1980), President Elect (1977), President (1978), Immediate Past President (1979), Advisor (1979–1988), Fellowship Program Director (1993‒1994), Life Fellow (1999) Stephen M. Soll, MD, FACS Fellow (1996) Marie Brenner Somogyi, MD Fellow (2019) Alice Song, MD Fellow (2006) Charles N.S. Soparkar, MD, PhD, FACS Fellow (2004) Galin J. Spicer, MD Fellow (2007) Jordan Spindle, MD Fellow (2017) Thomas C. Spoor, MD Fellow (1987) Paul T. Stallman, MD Fellow (2000) Natalie A. Stanciu, MD Fellow (2017) Victoria Starks, MD Fellow (2019) George Stasior, MD, FACS Fellow (1993) Orkan George Stasior, MD, FACS Charter Fellow (1969), President Elect (1970), President (1971), Immediate Past President (1072), Advisor (1972–1973), Fellowship Program Director (1972‒1999), Life Fellow (1987) Eric A. Steele, MD Fellow (2010) Mary A. Stefanyszyn-Woldin, MD Fellow (1988), Fellowship Program Director (2012‒present) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD Fellow (1994) Charles Stephenson, MD Fellow (1975), Vice President (1986), Life Fellow (2009) Christopher Stephenson, MD Fellow (1992) William B. Stewart, MD Fellow (1978), Program Chair (1983), Executive Secretary (1988–1989), Life Fellow (year?) Daniel Straka, MD Fellow (2017) Charles S. Su, MD International Associate (2016) Grant W. Su, MD Fellow (2008) John H. Sullivan, MD Fellow (1975), Life Fellow (2018) Scot A. Sullivan, MD Fellow (2002) Timothy J. Sullivan, MD, FRANZCO Fellow (2003) Gangadhara Sundar, DO, FRCSEd, FAMS International Associate (2015) Francis C. Sutula, MD Fellow (1979) Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD Fellow (2010) Jeremy Tan, MD Fellow (2019) Myron Tanenbaum, MD Fellow (1987) Thomas M. Tann III, MD Fellow (2004) Jeremiah Tao, MD, FACS Fellow (2009), Fellowship Program Director (2015‒present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2018), Program Chair (2019) Kristin J. Tarbet, MD Fellow (2003) Manoj M. Thakker, MD Fellow (2006) Christopher Thiagarajah, MD, FACS Fellow (2012) Dilip A. Thomas, MD Fellow (2006) Preeti Thyparampil, MD Fellow (2018) Peter Timoney, MD Fellow (2014) Andrew Ting, MD Fellow (2019) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Peter Bjerre Toft, MD International Associate (2013) John Tong, MD Fellow (1999) Robert N. Tower, MD Fellow (2006) Daniel J. Townsend, MD Fellow (1991) Brian C. Tse, MD Fellow (2019) David T. Tse, MD, FACS Fellow (1982), Fellowship Program Director (1991‒present) Angelo Tsirbas, MD Fellow (2012) Nancy Audrey Tucker, MD Fellow (2003) Susan Tucker, MD Fellow (2003) Nicolas Uzcategui, MD Fellow (2005) M. Reza Vagefi, MD Fellow (2009) Vibeke Vagle, MD International Associate (2011) Pablo E. Vanegas Plata, MD International Associate (2012) John V. Van Gemert, MD Fellow (1985), Life Fellow (2005) Douglas Van Putten, MD Fellow (2007) Gregory J. Vaughn, MD Fellow (1997), Life Fellow (year?) Angela Veloudious, MD, FACS Fellow (1992) Kenneth P. Vestal, MD Fellow (1991), Life Fellow (2018) Matthew G. Vicinanzo, MD Fellow (2008) Valerie L. Vick, MD Fellow (2006) Rob Vickers, MD Fellow (2018) Ana Carolina Victoria, MD Fellow (2019) Ira Vidor, MD Fellow (2010) Lars M. Vistnes, MD Honorary Fellow (1978)

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Eszter von Lovenberg-Proemper, MD International Associate (2015) Ivan M. Vrcek, MD Fellow (2019) Lilly Wagner, MD Fellow (2019) Robert R. Waller, MD Fellow (1977), Program Chair (1982), Life Fellow (year?) Ronald Warwar, MD Fellow (1999) Daniel Weil, MD International Associate (2014) David A. Weinberg, MD, FACS Fellow (2001) Mark H. Weiner, MD Fellow (1996) Gary S. Weinstein, MD, FACS Fellow (1989), Treasurer (2009–June, 2010), Life Fellow (2010) S. Joseph Weinstock, MD Fellow (1981), Life Fellow (2012) Timothy S. Wells, MD Fellow (2012), Fellowship Program Director (2016‒present) Michael G. Welsh, MD, FACS Fellow (1988) Marc S. Werner, MD Fellow (1996) Ralph E. Wesley, MD Fellow (1979), Program Chair (1989), Fellowship Program Director (1990‒present), Secretary of Meetings (1993–1994), Vice President (1999), President Elect (2000), President (2001), Immediate Past President (2002), Advisor (2002–2011) Sara Tullis Wester, MD Fellow (2013) Katherine M. Whipple, MD Fellow (2013) Linton A. Whitaker, MD Honorary Fellow (1984) William L. White, MD Fellow (1992) Eugene O. Wiggs, MD Fellow (1973), Treasurer (1981–1982), Life Fellow (year?) Geoffrey A. Wilcsek, MD International Associate (2014) T. David Wilkes, MD, FACS Fellow (1982), Executive Secretary (1998–1999), Life Fellow (2015) Robert B. Wilkins, MD Founding Fellow (1969), Treasurer (1970–1972), Fellowship Program Director (1972‒1996), President Elect (1973), President (1974), Immediate Past President (1975), Advisor (1975–1984), Life Fellow (year?) Brian Willoughby, MD Fellow (2005) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Martha C. Wilson, MD Fellow (1992), Life Fellow (2009) Matthew Wilson, MD, FACS Fellow (1998) Bryan J. Winn, MD Fellow (2010) David Wirta, MD Fellow (2000) Edward J. Wladis, MD Fellow (2011), Fellowship Program Director (2017‒present) John L. Wobig, MD, MBA, FACS Fellow (1974), Executive Secretary (1976–1977), President Elect (1979), President (1980), Immediate Past President (1981), Advisor (1975–1984), Fellowship Program Director (1988‒1999), Life Fellow (2001) Ted H. Wojno, MD Fellow (1983), Fellowship Program Director (2018–present) Darrell E. Wolfley, MD Fellow (1982), Life Fellow (2018) Kyung In Woo, MD International Associate (2003) Troy J. Woodman, MD Fellow (2001) Julie A. Woodward, MD Fellow (2005), Fellowship Program Director (2015‒present) John J. Woog, MD Fellow (1986), Fellowship Program Director, 1998‒2009), Life Fellow (2017) Michael Worley, MD Fellow (2017) John E. Wright, MD International Associate (1978), Fellow (1991), Life Fellow (year?) Albert Ya-Po Wu Fellow (2013) Allan E. Wulc, MD, FACS Fellow (1986) Hiroo Yabe, MD International Associate (2003) Patrick Yang, MD International Associate (2019) Suk-Woo Yang, MD Fellow (2010) Rex A. Yannis, MD Fellow (1993) John G. Yassin Fellow (1973), Life Fellow (2002) R. Patrick Yeatts, MD Fellow (1991), Fellowship Program Director (2010‒2018) Michael T. Yen, MD Fellow (2003), Fellowship Program Director (2020‒present), Spring Meeting Program Chair (2013), Program Chair (2014)

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Marc Yonkers, MD, PhD Fellow (2018) Jin Sook Yoon, MD, PhD International Associate (2016) Michael K. Yoon, MD Fellow (2012), Fellowship Program Director (2017–present) Omaya H. Youssef, MD Fellow (2010) Renzo A. Zaldivar, MD Fellow (2010) Chad Zatezalo, MD Fellow (2016) Sandy X. Zhang-Nunes, MD Fellow (2014) Huifang Zhou, MD International Associate (2014) Christine L. Zolli, MD Fellow (1978) Christopher I. Zoumalan, MD Fellow (2011) Orin M. Zwick, MD Fellow (2007)

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Part II. Chronology of Membership Transitions The following is a continuation of a list which appeared in the 25th Anniversary Book (Appendix 2, Part III, pages 238–244). Chapter 6 and Appendix 9 of this 50th Anniversary Book contain further details about ASOPRS members who have passed away. 1994

New Fellows: Albert S. Cytryn, MD; Daniel L. Dale, MD; Jill A. Foster, MD; Michael Loeffler, MD; William M. McLeish, MD; Alan A. McNab, MD; Janet M. Neigel, MD; Jane J. Olson, MD; Joseph P. Shovlin, MD; Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD Life Fellows: John R. Finlay, MD; Ira S. Jones, MD; Robert A. Silver, MD Died: Martin Bodian, MD; Wendell L. Hughes, MD; Merrill J. Reeh, MD

1995

New Fellows: David E. Cowen, MD; Don S. Ellis, MD; Yoash Enzer, MD; Grant Gilliland, MD; Katrinka Heher, MD; Jonathan Hoenig, MD; Jonathan Lowry, MD; Geva Mannor, MD; Robert Mazzoli, MD; Kevin Piest, MD; Jerry Shields, MD; Mark Werner, MD Life Fellows: Charles R. Leone Jr., MD; Hugh N. O’Donoghue, MD; R. Bruce Ramsey, MD

1996

New Fellows: George J. Alter, MD; Rosalie L. Bair, MD; Kevin A. Beadles, MD; William J. Bigham, MD; Jurij R. Bilyk, MD; Fred S. Bodker, MD; Keith D. Carter, MD; Susan R. Carter, MD; John C. Choi, MD; Ronald E. Dei Cas, MD; Tamara Fountain, MD; Peter Fries, MD; Roberta Gausas, MD; Stacia Goldey, MD; Michael J. Groth, MD; Morris Hartstein, MD; David E.E. Holck, MD; Kamel Itani, MD; Thomas Johnson, MD; Sajeev Kathuria, MD; Zachary Klett, MD; Joel Kopelman, MD; Howard Loff, MD; Joanne Low, MD; Guy Massry, MD; Michael Mercandetti, MD; Brent Murphy, MD; Bhupendra C.K. Patel, MD; Amiya Prasad, MD; James Sanderson, MD; Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD; Stephen Soll, MD Life Fellow: F. Dean Berry, MD

1997

New Fellows: Sterling S. Baker, MD; David Buerger, MD; Jorge Camara, MD; Karen Chapman, MD; Christopher M. DeBacker, MD; Bita Esmaeli, MD; Joseph Eviatar, MD; Patrick Flaharty, MD; P. Lloyd Hildebrand, MD; Kim Klippenstein, MD; Vladimir Kratky, MD; John D. Langford, MD; Paul D. Langer, MD; Sangeeta C. Logani, MD; William Mack, MD; Bruce Massaro, MD; William Meecham, MD; Asa Morton III, MD; Michael Murphy, MD; John Ng, MD; Peter A. D. Rubin, MD; Eugene Smith Jr., MD; Gregory J. Vaughn, MD Died: Charles E. Iliff III, MD; Hugh N. O’Donoghue, MCh, FRCOphth

1998

New Fellows: Brian G. Brazzo, MD; Michael Burnstine, MD; George Charonis, MD; Raf Ghabrial, MD; Stuart Goldberg, MD; Mark J. Lucarelli, MD; John McCann, MD, PhD; M. Polly McKinstry, MD Life Fellow: Alvin H. Brackup, MD Died: Jack V. Lisman, MD; Frank W. Newell, MD; Everett Veirs, MD

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1999

New Fellows: Mounir Bashour, MD; Daniel E. Buerger, MD; Richard Burgett, MD; Phillip Choo, MD; Daniel A. Ebroon, MD; Todd Engen, MD; Robert Fante, MD; John Fezza, MD; Ian C. Francis, MD; George Garcia, MD; Ameet K. Goyal, MD; Michael S. Landa, MD; James Milite, MD; David V. Pratt, MD; John Tong, MD; Ronald Warwar, MD Life Fellow: R. Larry Brenner, MD Died: Morris Feldstein, MD

2000

New Fellows: Mark A. Alford, MD; Kyle Balch, MD; Elizabeth A. Bradley, MD; Steven J. Covici, MD; Andrew S. Eiseman, MD; Andrea N. Hass, MD; Andrew R. Harrison, MD; Paul T. Stallman, MD; David Wirta, MD International Associates: Jean-Paul Adenis, MD; Reynaldo M. Javate, MD Life Fellow: A. Jan Berlin, MD; James R. Boynton, MD; John W. Huneke, MD Died: Carl Cordes Johnson, MD; R. Bruce Ramsey, MD; Arthur J. Schaefer, MD; Bernd Silver, MD

2001

New Fellows: Amjad Z. Ahmad, MD; Even H. Black, MD; Sean M. Blaydon, MD; Cynthia A. Boxrud, MD; Mark S. Brown, MD; Joseph P. Campbell, MD; Jeffrey B. Goldstein, MD; Jonathan W. Kim, MD; William J. Lipham, MD; Mikel W. Lo, MD; Melissa L. Meldrum, MD; Ron W. Pelton, MD, PhD; Julian D. Perry, MD; Peter J. Sneed, MD; David A. Weinberg, MD; Troy J. Woodman, MD Life Fellow: Lewis Lauring, MD; Charles S. G. Maris, MD; Gordon R. Miller, MD; William L. Walter, MD; John L. Wobig, MD International Associates: Mohammad Abdulhafez, MD Honorary Fellows: Barrett Haik, MD; Robert M. Goldwyn, MD Died: Burton M. Krimmer, MD; Margaret F. Obear, MD

2002

New Fellows: Alan B. Brackup; MD; Jean D.A. Carruthers, MD; Kimberly P. Cockerham, MD; Susan K. Freitag, MD; Barry R. Fuller, MD; Gregg S. Gayre; MD; Marc J. Hirschbein, MD; Ignatius S. Hneleski III, MD; Sukhjit S. Johl, MD; David B. Leventer, MD; Scot A. Sullivan, MD International Associates: Angela Maria Dolmetsch, MD; Marco Gallon, MD; Yoon-Duck Kim, MD Life Fellow: John Bullock, MD; Robert G. Small, MD; John G. Yassin, MD

2003

New Fellows: Malena M. Amato, MD; Stephen M. Baker, MD; Eric A. Cole, MD; Chaim Edelstein, MD; Stephen J. Laquis, MD; James W. Gigantelli, MD; Andrew Goldbaum, MD; Simeon A. Lauer, MD; Tina Li, MD; Randy O. Mauffray, MD; Mark Mazow, MD; Timothy J. McCulley; David J. Remigio, MD; Noel Saks, MD; Timothy J. Sullivan, MD; Kristen J. Tarbet, MD; Nancy A. Tucker, MD; Susan Tucker, MD; Michael T. Yen, MD Life Fellows: Francis G. LaPiana; MD, Robert D. Deitch Sr.; MD; Hampson A. Sisler, MD International Associates: Kyung In Woo, MD; Hiroo Yabe, MD; Rudolf Guthoff, MD Died: Crowell Beard, MD; Bernice Z. Brown, MD; John T. Simonton, MD

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2004

New Fellows: Ari D. Abel, MD; James L. Adams, MD; Arash Jian Amadi, MD; Bert Bowden, MD; Vikram Durairaj, MD; David Freilich, MD; Michael Glassman, MD; Scott Goldstein, MD; Boaz Lissauer, MD; Lisa Mansueto, MD; Louise Mawn, MD; Navdeep Nijhawan, MD; Scott Sigler, MD; Charles Soparkar, MD, PhD; Thomas Tann III, MD; International Associates: Francesco P. Bernardini, MD; John S. Chang Jr., MD; Carlo de Conciliis, MD; Jane Olver, MD; Jose L. Tovilla-Canales, MD Life Fellows: George L. Paris, MD; William B. Stewart, MD Resigned: R. Toby Sutcliffe, MD Died: Virginia Lubkin, MD

2005

New Fellows: Dan DeAngelis, MD; Aaron Fay, MD; Roderick N. Hargrove, MD; Stephen Klapper, MD; Hindola Konrad, MD; Michael McCracken, MD; Brett O’Donnell, MD; Cassandra B. Onofrey, MD; William J. Rosen, MD; Jeffrey Schiller, MD; Todd R. Shepler, MD; Debra J. Shetlar, MD; Brian Willoughby, MD; Julie A. Woodward, MD Life Fellow: Milton Boniuk, MD Died: James E. Bennett, MD; Alston Callahan, MD; David Kahanic, MD

2006

New Fellows: William Bearden, MD; Maziar Bidar, MD; Paul Brannan, MD; Wade Brock, MD; Douglas R. Casady, MD; Steven Chen, MD; Laryssa R. Dragan, MD; Michael Grant, MD; Adam S. Hassan, MD; Femida Kherani, MD; Kenneth Morgenstern, MD; Sarit M. Patel, MD; Noel Perez, MD; Chet Reistad, MD; John G. Rose, Jr. MD; Marc D. Shields, MD; Bentley C. Skibell, MD; Alice Song, MD; Dilip A. Thomas, MD; Robert Tower, MD; Valerie L. Vick, MD Life Fellow: J. Earl Rathbun, MD Honorary Membership: Gunther Weiss. Died: Robert D. Deitch, Sr., MD, JD; Robert E. Kennedy, MD; Edward L. Liva, MD

2007

New Fellows: Richard C. Allen, MD; Eric Baylin, MD; John Burroughs, MD; Matthew Hammons, MD; Paul Proffer, MD; Galin Spicer, MD Life Fellow: John D. Griffiths, MD; Martin Kazdan, MD Died: Stephen L. Bosniak, MD; Arthur G. DeVoe, MD; John R. Finlay, MD; Albert Hornblass, MD; Robert H. Kennedy, MD, PhD; Kenneth L. Piest, MD

2008

New Fellows: Cat Burkat, MD; Richard W. Bryant, MD; Albert Dal Canto, MD; Raymond Douglas, MD; Gabriela Espinoza, MD; Amy Fowler, MD; Parag Gandhi, MD; Alon Kahana, MD, PhD; William Katowitz, MD; Bobby S. Korn, MD, PhD; Harry Marshak, MD; David M. Mills, MD; John Pak, MD; Randal T. H. Pham, MD; Jennifer SivakCallcott, MD; Grant W. Su, MD; Matt G. Vicinanzo, MD International Associate: Ioannis Mavrikakis, MD Life Fellows: Richard K. Dortzbach, MD; Perry Garber, MD; John D. Griffiths, MD Died: Lewis Lauring, MD

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2009

New Fellows: Michael Boyle, MD; Eli Chang, MD; Ebby Elahi, MD; Melanie Erb, MD; Marsha Kavanagh, MD; Nadia Kazim, MD; Brett Kotlus, MD; Gary Lelli Jr., MD Cari Lyle, MD; Ronald Mancini, MD; Yasaman Mohadjer, MD; Jeremiah Tao, MD; M. Reza Vagefi, MD Life Fellow: Bartley R. Frueh, MD; Frederick Mausolf, MD; Charles Stephenson, MD; Martha C. Wilson, MD Resigned: Donald Bergin, MD; James Langham, MD; Stephen Soll, MD Died: Ronald E. Dei Cas, MD; Rocko M. Fasanella, MD; Joseph C. Hill, MD

2010

New Fellows: Christine C. Annunziata, MD; Raymond I. Cho, MD; Adam J. Cohen, MD; George K. Escaravage Jr., MD; Denise D. Garcia, MD; Edsel B. Ing, MD; Katherine (Kate) Lane, MD; Edward W. Lee, MD; H. B. Harold Lee, MD; Marcus M. Marcet, MD; Carrie L. Morris, MD; Tanuj Nakra, MD; Noelene K. Pang, MD; Dong Jun (D.J.) John Park, MD; Jerry K. Popham, MD; Vivian Schiedler, MD; Bryan D. Seiff, MD; Pete Setabutr, MD; Eric A. Steele, MD; Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD; Ira Vidor, MD; Bryan J. Winn, MD; Omaya H. Youssef, MD; Renzo A. Zaldivar, MD Reinstated: Stephen Soll, MD Life Fellows: John Burns, MD; Richard M. Chavis, MD; Gary S. Weinstein, MD International Associates: Zainab Alhabbab, MD; John Pitts, FRCP, FRCS; Suk-Woo Yang, MD Died: Bartley R. Frueh, MD; Robert M. Goldwyn, MD; John C. Mustardé, MD

2011

New Fellows: Adam Buchanan, MD; Mauricio R. Chavez, MD; Lauren Eckstein, MD, PhD; Christopher J. Calvano, MD; Lauren Z. Gavaris, MD; Dan Georgescu, MD, PhD; Catherine J. Hwang, MD; Mauricio Jaramillo U., MD; Maria Kirzhner, MD; John J. Koo, MD; Wendy W. Lee, MD, MS; Kevin S. Michels, MD; Lisa D. Mihora, MD; Keshini Parbhu, MD; Edward (Ted) J. Wladis, MD; Christopher I. Zoumalan, MD Life Fellows: Richard P. Carroll, MD; Joseph C. Flanagan, MD; Steven T. Jackson, MD International Associate Members: Altug Cetinkaya, MD; Gabriel Jimenez, MD; Vibeke Vagle, MD Died: Richard R. Tenzel, MD

2012

New Fellows: Hakan Demirci, MD; Mohit Dewan, MD; Kelly Everman, MD; Dongmei Li, MD; Brian Lee, MD; Craig Lewis, MD; Raman Malhotra, MD; Philip Peirce, MD; Carl E. Rosen, MD; Christopher Thiagarajah, MD Life Fellows: W. Andrew Cies, MD; John V. Linberg, MD; Joseph A. Mauriello, MD; Robert C. Pashby, MD; S. Joseph Weinstock, MD International Associates: Adel Alsuhaibani, MD; Habibullah Eatamadi, MD; Rafael Arango-Botero, MD; Alberto Diaz, MD; Julian De Silva, MD; Cristina Gonzalez, MD; Naresh Joshi, MBBS, DO, FRCOphth; Luz Marina Melo, MD; Jose Nieto-Enriquez, MD; Pablo Vanegas-Plata, MD; Angelo Tsirbas, MD Died: John W. Huneke, MD; William J. Pidde, MD; Jack Pincus, MD

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2013

New Fellows: Vinay K. Aakalu, MD, Carlo Roberto Bernardino, MD; Conley B. Call, MD; Christopher J. Calvano, MD, PhD; Christopher B. Chambers, MD; Shu-Hong (Holly) Chang, MD; Steven M. Couch, MD; Harmeet S. Gill, MD; Gregory J. Griepentrog, MD; Robert H. Hill III, MD; Eric M. Hink, MD; Srinivas Iyengar, MD; David F. Jones, MD; Irina V. Koreen, MD, PhD; Daniel R. Lefebvre, MD; Ilya Leyngold, MD; Jill S. Melicher, MD; Eve E. Moscato, MD; Cameron Nabavi, MD; Sang-Rog Oh, MD; Nicholas T. Ranson, MD; Richard E. Roth, DO; Sara Tullis Wester, MD International Associates: Daniel Ezra, MD, FRCOphth; Xian Qun Fan, MD; Roberto Limongi, MD; Peter Bjerre Toft, MD Life Fellows: James L. Adams, MD; Roger Kohn, MD; William J. Meecham, MD Died: Jorge G. Camara, MD; Russell Neuhaus, MD

2014

New Fellows: Chris R. Alabiad, MD; Behin Inglis Barahimi, MD; Chad M. Bingham, MD; César A. Briceño, MD; Bryant P. Carruth, MD; Michael C. Chappell, MD; Christina H. Choe, MD; Dawn Marie DeCastro, MD; Kim Jebodhsingh, MD; Debra M. Kroll, MD; Henry Lee, MD; Lily Koo Lin, MD; Nicholas Mahoney, MD; Francesca D. Nesi-Eloff, MD; Alexander On, MD; Robert J. Peralta, MD; Nicholas A Ramey, MD; Harsha S. Reddy, MD; Michael Richard, MD; Dianne M. Schlachter, MD; Javier Servat, MD; Hassan Shah, MD; Rachael K. Sobel, MD; Katherine M. Whipple, MD; Albert Wu, MD; Tarek El-Sawy, MD; Andrea L. Kossler, MD Life Fellows: A. Tyrone Glover, MD; Larry Quist, MD; Robert Rubenzik, MD Died: Martin S. Kazdan, MD; William L. “Bucky” Walter, MD

2015

New Fellows: Imtiaz A. Chaudhry, MD, PhD; Craig Czyz, DO; Brett Davies, MD; David A. Della Rocca, MD; Kasra Eliasieh, MD; Neda Esmaili, MD; Matthew J. Hauck, MD; Mitesh Kapadia, MD, PhD; Nahyoung Grace Lee, MD; Margaret (Beth) E. Phillips, MD; Michael P. Rabinowitz, MD; David B. Samimi, MD; Matthew Sniegowski, MD; Peter Timoney, MD; Sandy X. Zhang-Nunes, MD International Associates: Harpreet Ahluwalia, MD; Martha C. Arango Munoz, MD; Rodger Davies, MD; Sundar Gangadhara, MD; Abraham Gomez, MD; Helen Lew, MD; Lee Hooi Lim, MD; Milind Naik, MD; Raghavan Sampath, DO, FRCS, FRCOphth; Pari Shams, MD; Eszter von Lovenberg, MD Honorary Fellow: Jack Rootman, MD Life Fellows: Norman C. Ahl, MD; Glen O. Brindley, MD; Frank H. Christensen, MD; Michael J. Hawes, MD; Lawrence B. Katzen, MD; Dwight R. Kulwin, MD; Richard S. Muchnick, MD; Janet L. Roen, MD; David H. Saunders, MD; John J. Schietroma, MD; T. David Wilkes, MD Life International Associate: Rudolf Guthoff, MD

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2016

New Fellows: Eric Ahn, MD; Samuel Baharestani, MD; Eva Chou, MD; Bryan Costin, MD; Shannon G. Cox, MD; Carolee Cutler Peck, MD; Constance Fry, MD; Joseph N. Giacometti, MD; Katherine G. Gold, MD; Mithra O. Gonzalez, MD; Brent R. Hayek, MD; Jennifer I. Hui, MD; Tiffany L. Kent, MD, PhD; H. Jane Kim, MD; Peter MacIntosh, MD; Tamer N. Mansour, MD; Milap Mehta, MD; Sonul Mehta, MD; Ali Mokhtarzadeh, MD; John Nguyen, MD; Payal Patel, MD; Rakesh M. Patel, MD; Sean Paul, MD; Fatemeh Rajaii, MD, PhD; Sol Shaftel, MD, PhD; Chad Zatezalo, MD International Associate: Yonca Ozkan Arat, MD; Aline Pimentel De Miranda, MD Life Fellows: Frank Buffam, MD; Howard Conn, MD; Marco Doxanas, MD; Sam Goldberger, MD; Arthur Grove, MD; Conrad Hamako, MD; Joel Leibsohn, MD; William Rosen, MD; David Savar, MD Died: Donald J. Bergin, MD; Barrett G. Haik, MD; Murray A. Meltzer, MD

2017

New Fellows: Meredith Saylor Baker, MD; Anne Barmettler, MD; Emily Marie Bratton, MD; Alison Callahan, MD; Kian Eftekhari, MD; Molly Fuller, MD; Lora Glass, MD; F. Lawson Grumbine, MD; David K. Isaacs, MD; Scott Jones, MD; Shannon S. Joseph, MD; Bradford W. Lee, MD MSc; Seong Lee, MD; Flora Levin, MD; Jose R. Montes, MD; Ann Murchison, MD; Michael Neimkin, MD; Balaji Perumal, MD; Carisa Petris, MD, PhD; Daniel Repp, MD; Daniel B. Rootman, MD; David Russell, MD; Aaron Savar, MD; Louis Savar, MD; Ryan T. Scruggs, MD; Roman Shinder, MD; Dimitrios Sismanis, MD; Jason A. Sokol, MD; Jordan Spindle, MD; Natalie A. Stanciu, MD; Daniel Straka, MD; Michael Worley, MD

International Associates: Ramzi Alameddine, MD; Chai-Teck Choo, MD; Qian Jiang, MD; Melvin Severino, MD; Brent Skippen, MD Life Fellows: Edwin C. Augustat, MD; George B. Bartley, MD; William P. Chen, MD; J. Timothy Heffernan, MD; Russell S. Gonnering, MD; Kurt W. L. Guelzow, MD; Arthur C. Perry, MD; Polly A. Purgason, MD; David M. Reifler, MD; Alfred C. Marrone, MD; John W. Shore, MD; John J. Woog, MD Died: Peter Ballen, MD; Henry I. Baylis, MD; James R. Boynton, MD; Thomas D. Cherubini, MD; William Fein, MD; James L. Hargiss, MD; Robert G. Small, MD; Gunther Weiss

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2018

New Fellows: Jasmina Bajric, MD; Nariman Boyle, MD; Talmage Broadbent, MD; Ashley Campbell, MD; Yasmin Shayesteh Chambers, MD; Jessica Chang, MD; Rao Chundury, MD, MBA; Christopher Compton, MD; Roxana Fu, MD; Sarah Mireles Jacobs, MD; Charles Kim, MD; Marcus Ko, MD; Nicole Langelier, MD; Lyndon Lee, MD; Kyle T. Lewis, MD; Helen Merritt, MD; Pradeep Mettu, MD; Payam V. Morgan, MD; Jonathan M. Pargament, MD; John David Pemberton, DO, MBA; C. Blake Perry, MD; Paul Phelps, MD; Karen Elizabeth Revere, MD; Tal Rubinstein, MD; Mahsa A. Sohrab, MD; Preeti Thyparampil, MD; Rob Vickers, MD; Marc Yonkers, MD International Associates: Andre Luis Borba da Silva, MD; Suzana Matayoshi, MD; Maria Antonieta Ginguerra Nascimento, MD; Ashkay G. Nair, MD; Qasiem Nasser, MD; Felipe J. Pereira, MD; Allan C. Pieroni Goncalves, MD; Fernando Procianoy, MD, PhD Life Fellows: Bert Bowden, MD; Murray D. Christianson, MD; Douglas P. Felt, MD; Carmen Guberina, MD; Dan McLachlan, MD; John Merriam, MD; James Oestreicher, MD; Sang Yeul Lee, MD; Michael Patipa, MD; Carl S. Shibata, MD; John H. Sullivan, MD; Kenneth P. Vestal, MD; Darrell E. Wolfley, MD Life International Associate: Bryan Arthurs, MD Died: Glen O. Brindley, MD

2019

New Fellows: Michel Belliveau, MD; Alexander D. Blandford, MD; Harinderpal Singh Chahal, MD; Smith Ann Chisholm, MD; Catherine Choi, MD; Sarah DeParis, MD; Tara M. Goecks, MD; Ahsen Hussain, MD; Evan Kalin-Hajdu, MD; H. Joon Kim, MD; Sophie Liao, MD; Catherine Y. Liu, MD; Wenjing Liu, MD; Elysa McClintic, MD; Annie Moreau, MD; Maryam Nazemzadeh, MD; Omar Ozgur, MD; Trey Pegram, MD; Deepak Ramesh, MD; Priya D. Sahu, MD; Kira L. Segal, MD; Marie Brenner Somogyi, MD; Victoria Starks, MD; Jeremy Tan, MD; Andrew Ting, MD; Brian C. Tse, MD; Ana Carolina Victoria, MD; Ivan M. Vrcek, MD; Lilly Wagner, MD International Associates: Lucieni Cristina Barbarini Ferraz, MD; Gabriel Pignata, MD; Ulrich Hugo Schaudig, MD; Silvana Artioli Schellini, MD; Patrick Yang, MD Life Fellows: Richard L. Anderson, MD; Timothy Doucet, MD; Stuart H. Goldberg, MD; Ernst Nicolitz, MD; Thomas C. Naugle Jr., MD Died: George F. Buerger Jr., MD

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Appendix 2

Officers, Senior Appointees, and Standing Committee Chairs David M. Reifler and Tisha A. Kehn

Part I. Officers (1994–2019) 1994 President: George L. Paris, MD President Elect: Richard K. Dortzbach, MD Vice President: John N. Harrington, MD Executive Secretary: Michael A. Callahan, MD Treasurer: David M. Reifler, MD Secretary of Meetings: Ralph E. Wesley, MD Secretary of Education: Michael J. Hawes, MD Program Chair: James C. Fleming, MD Immediate Past President: Albert Hornblass, MD ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

1995 President: Richard K. Dortzbach, MD President Elect: John N. Harrington, MD Vice President: James A. Katowitz, MD Executive Secretary: Perry F. Garber, MD Treasurer: William R. Nunery, MD Secretary of Meetings: Christine C. Nelson, MD Secretary of Education: Michael J. Hawes, MD Program Chair: Robert A. Goldberg, MD Immediate Past President: George L. Paris, MD

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1996 President: John N. Harrington, MD President Elect: James A. Katowitz, MD Vice President: Michael J. Hawes, MD Executive Secretary: Edwin C. Augustat, MD Treasurer: William R. Nunery, MD Secretary of Meetings: Christine C. Nelson, MD Secretary of Education: Bradley N. Lemke, MD Program Chair: David M. Reifler, MD Immediate Past President: Richard K. Dortzbach, MD

1997 President: James A. Katowitz, MD President Elect: Michael J. Hawes, MD Vice President: Perry F. Garber, MD Executive Secretary: Edwin C. Augustat, MD Treasurer: James W. Karesh, MD Secretary of Meetings: John W. Shore, MD Secretary of Education: Bradley N. Lemke, MD Program Chair: George B. Bartley, MD Immediate Past President: John N. Harrington, MD

1998 President: Michael J. Hawes, MD President Elect: Perry F. Garber, MD Vice President: Bradley N. Lemke, MD Executive Secretary: T. David Wilkes, MD Treasurer: James W. Karesh, MD Secretary of Meetings: John W. Shore, MD Secretary of Education: Russell Gonnering, MD Program Chair: Philip Custer, MD Immediate Past President: James A. Katowitz, MD

1999 President: Perry F. Garber, MD President Elect: Bradley N. Lemke, MD Vice President: Ralph E. Wesley, MD Executive Secretary: T. David Wilkes, MD Treasurer: Keith D. Carter, MD Secretary of Meetings: Edwin C. Augustat, MD Secretary of Education: Russell Gonnering, MD Program Chair: Kenneth V. Cahill, MD Immediate Past President: Perry F. Garber, MD

2000 President: Bradley N. Lemke, MD President Elect: Ralph E. Wesley, MD Vice President: William R. Nunery, MD Executive Secretary: Roger A. Dailey, MD Treasurer: Keith D. Carter, MD Secretary of Meetings: Edwin C. Augustat, MD Secretary of Education: Daniel P. Schaefer, MD Program Chair: Sara Kaltreider, MD Immediate Past President: Perry F. Garber, MD

2001 President: Ralph E. Wesley, MD President Elect: William R. Nunery, MD Vice President: John W. Shore, MD Executive Secretary: Roger A. Dailey, MD Treasurer: Robert H. Kennedy, MD, PhD, MBA Secretary of Meetings: James C. Fleming, MD Secretary of Education: Daniel P. Schaefer, MD Program Chair: Jill A. Foster, MD Immediate Past President: Bradley N. Lemke, MD

2002 President: William R. Nunery, MD President Elect: John W. Shore, MD Vice President: David M. Reifler, MD Executive Secretary: Jane J. Jenison (Olson), MD Treasurer: Robert H. Kennedy, MD, PhD, MBA Secretary of Meetings: James C. Fleming, MD Secretary of Education: Jan W. Kronish, MD Program Chair: Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD Immediate Past President: Ralph E. Wesley, MD

2003 President: John W. Shore, MD President Elect: David M. Reifler, MD Vice President: James C. Fleming, MD Executive Secretary: Jane J. Jenison (Olson), MD Treasurer: Robert H. Kennedy, MD, PhD Secretary of Meetings: Brian S. Biesman, MD Secretary of Education: Jan W. Kronish, MD Program Chair: Roberta E. Gausas, MD Immediate Past President: William R. Nunery, MD

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2004 President: David M. Reifler, MD President Elect: James C. Fleming, MD Vice President: Roger A. Dailey, MD Executive Secretary: Robert A. Goldberg, MD Treasurer: Robert H. Kennedy, MD, PhD Secretary of Meetings: Brian S. Biesman, MD Secretary of Education: Kathleen F. Archer, MD Program Chair: John V. Linberg, MD Immediate Past President: John W. Shore, MD

2005 President: James C. Fleming, MD President Elect: Roger A. Dailey, MD Vice President: Robert H. Kennedy, MD Executive Secretary: Robert A. Goldberg, MD Treasurer: Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD Secretary of Meetings: Stuart R. Seiff, MD Secretary of Education: Kathleen F. Archer, MD Program Chair: Susan R. Carter, MD Immediate Past President: David M. Reifler, MD

2006 President: Roger A. Dailey, MD President Elect: Robert H. Kennedy, MD Vice President: James W. Karesh, MD Executive Secretary: Jan W. Kronish, MD Treasurer: Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD Secretary of Meetings: Stuart R. Seiff, MD Secretary of Education: Kathleen F. Archer, MD Program Chair: John D. Ng, MD Immediate Past President: James C. Fleming, MD

2007 President: Robert H. Kennedy, MD, PhD†James W. Karesh, MD succeeded, June 23, 2007 Vice President: Stuart R. Seiff, MD Executive Secretary: Jan W. Kronish, MD Treasurer: Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD Secretary of Meetings: Jill A. Foster, MD Secretary of Education: David B. Lyon, MD Program Chair: Mark J. Lucarelli, MD Immediate Past President: Roger A. Dailey, MD

2008 President: James W. Karesh, MD President Elect: Stuart R. Seiff, MD Vice President: Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD Executive Secretary: Tamara R. Fountain, MD Treasurer: Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD Secretary of Meetings: Jill A. Foster, MD Secretary of Education: David B. Lyon, MD Program Chair: Michael E. Migliori, MD Immediate Past President: Roger A. Dailey, MD

2009 President: Stuart R. Seiff, MD President Elect: Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD Vice President: Jan W. Kronish, MD Executive Secretary: Tamara R. Fountain, MD Treasurer: Gary S. Weinstein, MD Secretary of Meetings: John D. Ng, MD Secretary of Education: David B. Lyon, MD Program Chair: David E.E. Holck, MD Immediate Past President: James W. Karesh, MD

2010 President: Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD President Elect: Jan W. Kronish, MD Vice President: Jill A. Foster, MD Executive Secretary: Tamara R. Fountain, MD Acting Treasurer: Bryan Sires, MD, PhD Secretary of Meetings: John D. Ng, MD Secretary of Education: Simeon Lauer, MD Program Chair: Don O. Kikkawa, MD Immediate Past President: Stuart R. Seiff, MD

2011 President: Jan W. Kronish, MD President Elect: Jill A. Foster, MD Vice President: Michael E. Migliori, MD Executive Secretary: Tamara R. Fountain, MD Treasurer: Jemshed A. Khan, MD Secretary of Meetings: John D. Ng, MD Secretary of Education: Simeon A. Lauer, MD Program Chair: Julian D. Perry, MD Immediate Past President: Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD

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2012 President: Jill A. Foster, MD President Elect: Michael E. Migliori, MD Vice President: Don O. Kikkawa, MD Executive Secretary: Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD Treasurer: Jemshed A. Khan, MD Secretary of Meetings: John D. Ng, MD Secretary of Education: Peter J. Sneed, MD Program Chair: Robert G. Fante, MD Immediate Past President: Jan W. Kronish, MD

2013 President: Michael E. Migliori, MD President Elect: Don O. Kikkawa, MD Vice President: Kathleen F. Archer, MD Executive Secretary: Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD Treasurer: Jemshed A. Khan, MD Secretary of Meetings: Mark J. Lucarelli, MD Secretary of Education: Peter J. Sneed, MD Program Chair: David B. Lyon, MD Immediate Past President: Jill A. Foster, MD

2014 President: Don O. Kikkawa, MD President Elect: Kathleen F. Archer, MD Vice President: Robert A. Goldberg Executive Secretary: Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD Treasurer: Jemshed A. Khan, MD Secretary of Meetings: Mark J. Lucarelli, MD Secretary of Education: Peter J. Sneed, MD Program Chair: Michael T. Yen, MD Immediate Past President: Michael E. Migliori, MD

2015 President: Kathleen F. Archer, MD President Elect: Robert A. Goldberg, MD Vice President: Gerald J. Harris, MD Executive Secretary: Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD Treasurer: Jemshed A. Khan, MD Secretary of Meetings: Susan R. Carter, MD Secretary of Education: Robert G. Fante, MD Program Chair: Andrew R. Harrison, MD Immediate Past President: Don O. Kikkawa, MD

2016 President: Robert A. Goldberg, MD President Elect: Gerald J. Harris, MD Vice President: Tamara R. Fountain, MD Executive Secretary: Jennifer A. Sivak-Callcott, MD Treasurer: Jemshed A. Khan, MD Secretary of Meetings: Susan R. Carter, MD Secretary of Education: Robert Fante, MD Program Chair: Vikram Durairaj, MD Immediate Past President: Kathleen F. Archer, MD

2017 President: Gerald J. Harris, MD President Elect: Tamara R. Fountain, MD Vice President: Daniel P. Schaefer, MD Executive Secretary: Jennifer Sivak-Callcott, MD Treasurer: John P. Fezza, MD Secretary of Meetings: Julian D. Perry, MD Secretary of Education: Robert G. Fante, MD Program Chair: Wendy W. Lee, MD Immediate Past President: Robert A. Goldberg, MD

2018 President: Tamara R. Fountain, MD President Elect: Daniel P. Schaefer, MD Vice President: Mark J. Lucarelli, MD Executive Secretary: Elizabeth A. Bradley, MD Treasurer: John P. Fezza, MD Secretary of Meetings: Julian D. Perry, MD Secretary of Education: Kenneth E. Morgenstern, MD Program Chair: Richard C. Allen, MD, PhD Immediate Past President: Gerald J. Harris, MD

2019 President: Daniel P. Schaefer, MD President Elect: Mark J. Lucarelli, MD Vice President: Robert G. Fante, MD Executive Secretary: Elizabeth A. Bradley, MD Treasurer: John P. Fezza, MD Secretary of Meetings: John J. Martin, MD Secretary of Education: Kenneth E. Morgenstern, MD Program Chair: Jeremiah P. Tao, MD Immediate Past President: Tamara R. Fountain, MD

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Part II. Senior Appointees EDITORS-IN-CHIEF, OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY

1984-1986 1987-1988 1988-1997 1997-1998 1999-2001 2001-2009 2009 – present

Henry I. Baylis, MD Henry I. Baylis, MD and Bernice Z. Brown, MD (Co-Editors) Bernice Z. Brown, MD and Richard K. Dortzbach, MD (Co-Editors) Bernice Z. Brown, MD George B. Bartley, MD Gerald J. Harris, MD Jonathan J. Dutton, MD, PhD

AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION DELEGATE

1998–2019 John N. Harrington, MD 2020 (scheduled) Erin Shriver, MD

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY COUNCILOR

1982–1984 1985–1987 1988–1990 1991–1993 1994–1999 2000–2005 2006–2011 2012–2017 2018 – present

J. Earl Rathbun, MD Mark R. Levine, MD J. Justin Older, MD John N. Harrington Jay Justin Older, MD James C. Fleming, MD Rona Z. Silkiss, MD Louise A. Mawn, MD Kathleen M. Duerksen, MD

Part III. Standing Committee Chairs, 2019 AAO-ASOPRS JOINT PROGRAM COMMITTEE Eric Steele, MD, Chair ARCHIVES COMMITTEE David M. Reifler, MD, Chair AWARDS COMMITTEE Ray Cho, MD, Chair BYLAWS COMMITTEE Tamara R. Fountain, MD, Chair, Immediate Past President CME SUBCOMMITTEE Michael Yen, MD, Chair CODING COMMITTEE Neal Freeman, MD, Chair EDUCATION COMMITTEE Ken Morgenstern, MD, Chair, Secretary of Education Reza Vagefi, MD, Incoming Secretary of Education (See Chapter 2, Table 5 for a list of subcommittee chairs.) FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM DIRECTORS COMMITTEE Evan Black, MD, Chair ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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INDUSTRY RELATIONS COMMITTEE John Martin, MD, Chair, Secretary of Meetings INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY/WEBSITE COMMITTEE Tamara R. Fountain, MD, (Acting Chair) INTERSOCIETY & GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE Stuart Seiff, MD, Chair JOURNAL COMMITTEE Pete Setabutr, MD, Chair NOMINATING COMMITTEE Tamara R. Fountain, MD, Chair PROGRAM COMMITTEE Jeremiah P. Tao, MD, Chair Catherine Hwang, MD, Spring Meeting Program Chair Thomas E. Johnson, MD, Fall Meeting Program Co-chair PUBLIC RELATIONS AND INFORMATION COMMITTEE Michael Migliori, MD, Chair STANDARDS COMMITTEE David Buerger, MD, Chair THESIS COMMITTEE Alon Kahana, MD, Chair WENDELL HUGHES LECTURE COMMITTEE Ralph Wesley, MD, Chair YASOPRS COMMITTEE Andrea Kossler, MD, Chair John Martin, MD Executive Committee Liaison

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Appendix 3

Fellowship Program Directors and Fellows David M. Reifler and Tisha A. Kehn The names of ninety-seven individuals who have served as ASOPRS fellowship preceptors/ program directors during the past twenty-five years are alphabetically listed below along with the names of associate preceptors/faculty and their fellows. (In 2008, the terms “program director” and “faculty” replaced “preceptor” and “associate preceptor,” respectively.) In Chapter 1, Tables 1‒3 list categories of ASOPRS-sponsored preceptors/program directors: (1) twenty-nine emeritus preceptors/program directors who retired between 1994 and 2018; (2) fifty-nine domestic fellowship program directors; and (3) three current and six emeritus international fellowship program directors. The names of fellows trained by preceptors prior to 1994 were compiled by Perry Garber and John Burns and published in the Society’s 25th Anniversary Book in 1994 (pages 245–254). Under those preceptors’ mentorships, 263 fellows were trained prior to 1995.

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In the following up-to-date list, the names of fellows trained by preceptors/program directors prior to 1995 have been placed in brackets to indicate that they were included in the previously published list and the number of fellows trained before 1995 precedes this bracketed list. Some preceptors/program directors have relocated their practices and also relocated their ASOPRS-sponsored fellowship program (indicated by the symbol “→”). When program directors have relocated, retired, or passed away, and when ASOPRS standards and criteria have been fulfilled, associate preceptors/faculty have succeeded as new program directors based upon their own merit with a continuous transition, or only a brief hiatus. The following list is a summary of these transitions between program directors within these “legacy” programs: Richard K. Dortzbach, MD and Bradley N. Lemke, MD in Madison, WI (1997/1998); Robert C. Della Rocca, MD and Richard D. Lisman, MD in New York, NY (1998); John L. Wobig, MD and Roger A. Dailey, MD in Portland, OR (1999); Henry I. Baylis, MD and Robert A. Goldberg, MD in Los Angeles, CA (2000); Orkan George Stasior, MD and Dale R. Meyer, MD in Albany, NY (1999/2001); Bartley Frueh, MD and Christine Nelson, MD in Ann Arbor, MI (2002); Bernice Z. Brown, MD and Steven C. Dresner, MD in Los Angeles, CA (2003); Martin Kazdan, MD and James H. Oestreicher, MD in Toronto, Canada (2003); Arthur S. Grove, MD and John Woog, MD in Boston, MA (2003/2005); Bradley N. Lemke, MD and Mark J. Lucarelli, MD in Madison, WI (2005); John W. Shore, MD and Sean M. Blaydon, MD in Austin, TX (2011); John V. Linberg, MD and Jennifer A. Sivak-Callcott in Morgantown, WV (2011); Joseph C. Flanagan, MD and Mary A. Stefanyszyn, MD in Philadelphia, PA (2011/12); James W. Karesh, MD and Marc J. Hirschbein, MD in Baltimore, MD (2014); James A. Katowitz, MD and William R. Katowitz, MD in Philadelphia, PA (2015); Dale R. Meyer, MD and Edward J. Wladis, MD in Albany/Slingerlands, NY (2017); James H. Oestreicher, MD and Navdeep Nijhawan, MD in Toronto, Canada (2017); Norman Shorr, MD and Jonathan Hoenig, MD in Beverly Hills, CA (2018); Allen Putterman, MD and Peter Setabutr, MD in Chicago, IL (2018); James C. Orcutt, MD, PhD and Chris Chambers, MD in Seattle, WA (2018); and Richard D. Lisman, MD and Gary J. Lelli, Jr., MD in New York, NY (2018). Considerable effort was made to verify and reconcile the accuracy of the lists in this appendix by consulting Society minutes and archives, and by contacting individual program directors. The editor apologizes for inadvertent yet probably inevitable inaccuracies in the following list of fellowship program directors and fellows.

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Richard L. Anderson, MD (Program Director, 1980–2018), Iowa City, IA → Salt Lake City, UT Faculty: Matt Harris, MD; Bhupendra C.K. Patel, MD; John McCann, MD, PhD Fellows: [Fifteen fellows (1980–1994) François Codère, MD (1980–1981); David Tse (1981–1982); Drew Dillman, MD (1982); Jonathan Dutton, MD, PhD (1982–1983); Gary Weinstein, MD (1982–1983); Robert Kersten, MD (1983–1984); Jeffrey Nerad, MD (1984–1985); Thaddeus Nowinski, MD (1984–1985); James Patrinely, MD (1985–1986); David Jordan, MD (1986–1987); John Holds, MD (1987–1988); William McLeish, MD (1990–1991); Patrick Flaherty, MD (1991–1992); Bhupendra Patel, MD (1992–1993); and Paul Langer, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] John H. Hunts, MD, PhD (1994–1995); John D. McCann, MD (1995–1996); David V. Pratt, MD (1996–1998); Ron W. Pelton, MD, PhD (1998–2000); Michael T. Yen, MD (2000–2002); William Bearden, MD (2002–2004); John Burroughs, MD (2004–2006); Reza Vagefi, MD (2006–2008); Dan Georgescu, MD (2008–2010); Ilya M. Leyngold, MD (2010–2012); Michael Worley, MD (2012–2014); Kian Eftekhari, MD (2014-2016); Grant Moore (2016‒2018) George B. Bartley, MD (Program Director, 1993–2003), Rochester, MN Faculty: Robert R. Waller, MD; William McLeish, MD Fellows: Jonathan Lowry, MD (1993–1995); Karen L. Kittredge Chapman, MD (1995–1997); Elizabeth Bradley, MD (1997–1999); Vikram D. Durairaj, MD (1999–2001); Seyda Ugurlu, MD (2001–2003) Henry I. Baylis, MD (Program Director, 1974–2000), Los Angeles, CA Fellows: [Twenty fellows (1974–1994) W. Branson Call, MD (1978–1979); Carl Shibata, MD (1979–1980); Nachum Rosen, MD (1980–1981); Russell Neuhaus, MD (1981–1982); Toby Sutcliffe, MD (1982– 1983); Kevin Perman, MD (1983–1984); Martin Fallor, MD (1984–1985); Mary (Polly) McKinstry (1985–1986); Rona Silkiss, MD (1986–1987); John Long, MD (1987–1988); Michael Groth, MD (1988–1989); Eric Nelson, MD (1989–1990); Martha Wilson, MD (1990–1991); Laurie McCall, MD (1991–1992); Mark Garbutt, MD (1991–1992); and Stacia Goldey (1993–1994) PLUS…] David Weinberg, MD (1994–1995); George Charonis (1995–1996); Glenville March, MD (1996– 1997); Kyle Balch, MD (1997–1998); John T. Tong, MD (1998–1999); Jonathan W. Kim, MD (1999–2000) Evan H. Black, MD (Program Director, 2010–present), Detroit, MI (ACGME Accredited) Faculty: Geoffrey J. Gladstone, MD; Frank A. Nesi, MD; Dianne M. Schlachter, MD; Francesca D. NesiEloff, MD Fellows: Dianne M. Schlachter, MD (2010–2012); Ryan Scruggs, MD (2012–2014); Francisco Castillo, MD (2014‒2016); Kathryn Winkler, MD (2016‒2018); Robert Beaulieu, MD (2018–2020) Sean M. Blaydon, MD (Program Director, 2011–present), Austin TX Faculty: Russel Neuhaus, MD; Tanuj Nakra, MD; John W. Shore, MD; Todd R. Shepler, MD; Bita Esmaeli, MD; Vikram D. Durairaj, MD; Emily Bratton, MD Fellows: Natalie A. Stanciu, MD (2011–2013); Eva Chou, MD (2013‒2015); Ivan Vrcek (2015‒2017); Alison Huggins, MD (2017–2019) Elizabeth A. Bradley, MD (Program Director, 2013‒present), Rochester, MN Faculty: Andrew A. Harrison, MD; George B. Bartley, MD Fellows: Molly Fuller, MD (2013‒2015); Talmage Broadbent, MD (2015‒2017); Viraj Mehta, MD (2017– 2019); Caroline Halbach, MD (2019–2021) Bernice Z. Brown, MD (Program Director, 2001–2003), Los Angeles, CA Faculty: Steven Dresner, MD; Michael Burnstine, MD, Alfred Marrone, MD Fellows: Nicolas Uzcategui, MD (2001–2003); Harry Marshak, MD (2003–2005, completed with Steven Dresner, MD and approved as a Category I applicant in 2008)

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John D. Bullock, MD (Program Director, 1994–2002), Dayton, OH Faculty: Robert Kersten, MD; Dwight Kulwin, MD; Ronald Warwar, MD Fellows: David Magnante, MD (1994–1996); Ronald Warwar, MD (1996–1998); Barry R. Fuller, MD (1998– 2000); Timothy J. McCulley, MD (2000–2002) Michael A. Burnstine, MD (Program Director, 2016‒present), Los Angeles, CA Faculty: Sandy Zhang-Nunes, MD; Jonathan Kim, MD; Guy Massry, MD; Steven Dresner, MD; Melanie Ho Erb, MD; David Samimi, MD; Bruce Becker, MD Fellows: Mica Bergman, MD (2016‒2018); Eric Hamill, MD (2018–2020) Kenneth V. Cahill, MD (Program Director, 2002–present), Columbus, OH Faculty: John A. Burns, MD; Jill A. Foster, MD; Cameron Nabavi, MD; Craig Czyz, DO; James Moses, MD; Daniel Straka, MD Fellows: Kenneth Morgenstern, MD (2002–2004); Paul Proffer, MD (2004–2006); Marsha Cheung Kavanaugh, MD (2006–2008); Kevin Michaels, MD (2008–2010); Robert H. Hill, MD (2010– 2012); Sandy X. Zhang-Nunes, MD (2012–2014); Daniel Straka, MD (2014‒2016); Jeremy Tan, MD (2016‒2018); Lance Bodily, MD (2018–2020) Keith D. Carter, MD (Program Director, 2009–present), Iowa City, IA Faculty: (Current) Erin Shriver, MD (Past) Richard C. Allen, MD, PhD Fellows: Conley Call, MD (Jan. 2010–Dec. 2011); Rachel Sobel, MD (2011–2013); Meredith Baker, MD (2013‒2015); Harinderpal Chahal, MD (2015‒2017): Bryce Radmall, MD (2017–2019); Brittany Simmons, MD (2019–2021) Christopher B. Chambers, MD (Program Director, 2019–present), Seattle, WA Faculty: A.J. Amadi, MD; Holly Chang, MD; James C. Orcutt, MD, PhD; Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD Fellows: Emily Li, MD (2019–2021) Roger A. Dailey, MD (Program Director, 1999–present), Portland, OR Faculty: (Current) John D. Ng, MD; Eric A. Steele, MD (Past) John L. Wobig, MD Fellows: Scot A. Sullivan, MD (1999–2001); Stanley M. Saulny, MD (2001–2003); Robert Tower, MD (2003–2005); Eric Steele, MD (2005–2007); Mauricio Chavez, MD (2007–2009); Douglas Marx, MD (2009–2011); Matthew J. Hauck, MD (2011–2013); Eric Ahn, MD (2013‒2015); Clifton Blake Perry, MD (2015‒2017); Jennifer Murdock, MD (2017–2019); Rohan Verma, MD (2019–2021) Robert C. Della Rocca, MD (Program Director, 1986–1998), New York, NY Faculty: Richard Lisman, MD; Elizabeth Maher, MD Fellows: [Eight fellows (1986–1994) Bryan Arthurs, MD (1986–1987); Ken Hyde, MD (1987–1988); John Nassif (1988–1989); Elizabeth Maher, MD (1989–1990); Nicholas Barna, MD (1990–1991); David Nelson, MD (1991–1992); Mark Weiner, MD (1992–1993); and Leslie Sims, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] John Koh, MD (1994–1995); James Milite, MD (1995–1996); Michael Landa, MD (1996–1997); Raf Ghabrial, MD (1997–1998)

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Richard K. Dortzbach, MD (Program Director, 1978–1997), Madison WI Fellows: [Sixteen fellows (1978–1994) Francis Sutula, MD (1978–1979); Michael Hawes, MD (1979–1980); Russell Gonnering, MD (1980–1981); David Segrest, MD (1981–1982); John McGetrick, MD (1982–1983); Richard Angrist, MD (1983–1984); John Woog, MD (1984–1985); Sara Kaltreider, MD (1985–1986); Victor Elner, MD, PhD (1986–1987); Jan Kronish (1987–1988); David Lyon, MD (1988–1989); George Stasior, MD (1989–1990); Deborah Sherman, MD (1990–1991); Don Kikkawa, MD (1991–1992); Joseph Shovlin, MD (1992–1993); and Roberta Gausas, MD (1993– 1994) PLUS…] Bryan Sires, MD (1994–1995); Gregory Vaughn, MD (1995–1996); Mark J. Lucarelli, MD (1996–1997) Raymond S. Douglas, MD, PhD (Program Director, 2011–present), Ann Arbor, MI → Los Angeles, CA Faculty: (Current) Guy Massry, MD; Michael Groth, MD (Past, in Ann Arbor) Christine C. Nelson, MD; Victory Elner, MD; Hakan Demirci, MD; Alon Kahana, MD, PhD; César Briceño, MD Fellows: Shivani Gupta, MD (2011–2013); Fatemeh Rajaii, MD (2013‒2015); Pimkwan Jaru-ampornpan, MD (2015‒2017); Amy Patel, MD (2017–2019); Yao Wang, MD (2019–2021) Steven C. Dresner, MD (Program Director, 2003–present), Santa Monica, CA Faculty: Michael A. Burnstine, MD; Melanie H. Erb, MD; David Samimi, MD; Sandy X. Zhang-Nunes, MD; Guy Massry, MD Fellows: Harry Marshak, MD (2003–2005); Melanie Erb, MD (2005–2007); Alan W. McInnes, MD (2007– 2009); Srinivas Iyengar, MD (2009–2011); David Samimi, MD (2011–2013); Priya Sahu, MD (2013‒2015); Helen Merritt, MD (2015‒2017); Margaret Pfeiffer (2017–2019); Christine Bokman (2019‒2021) Robert M. Dryden, MD (Program Director, 1974–2009), Tucson, AZ Faculty: Kathleen Duerksen, MD; Allan E. Wulc, MD Fellows: [Nineteen fellows (1974–1994) Kurt Guelzow, MD (1974–1975); Stephen Byars, MD (1975–1976); Joel Leibsohn, MD (1976–1977); Arthur Perry, MD (1977–1978); Frank Meronk, MD (1978–1979); James C. Fleming, MD (1979–1980); Marcos Doxanas, MD (1980–1981); David Wilkes, MD (1981–1982); Jeffrey Popp, MD (1982–1983); James Adams, MD (1983–1984); Allan Wulc, MD (1984–1985); Jeffrey Edelstein, MD (1985–1986); Todd Beyer, DO (1986–1987); Thomas Mather, MD (1987–1988); Joseph Ross, MD (1988–1989); David Kahanic, MD (1990–1991); Joel Meyers, MD (1991–1992); Peter Wong, MD (1992–1993); Perry Waggoner, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Frank G. Baloh, MD (1994–1995); Eugene M. Smith, MD (1995–1996); John Stabel, MD (1996– 1997); Todd B. Engen, MD (1997–1998); Mikel Lo, MD (1998–1999); David J. Remigio, MD (1999– 2001); Donald T. Hudak, MD (2001–2002); Steven Mellul, DO (2002–2003); Brenda Edmondson, MD (2003); [on hold 2004]; Brett Kotlus, MD (2005–2007); Dustin Heringer, MD (2007–2009) Vikram D. Durairaj, MD (Program Director, 2008–present), Aurora, CO → Austin, TX Faculty: (Past) Robert G. Fante, MD; Michael Hawes, MD; Michael McCracken, MD; Brian Willoughby, MD → (Current) John W. Shore, MD; Tanuj Nakra, MD; Sean Blaydon, MD; Malena Amato, MD Fellows: Eric Hink, MD (2008–2010); Mithra Gonzalez, MD (2010–2012); Brett Davies (2012–2014); Emily Bratton (2014‒2016); Marie Somogyi, MD (2016‒2018); Natalie Homer, MD (2018–2020) Jonathan J. Dutton, MD, PhD (Program Director, 1993–2013), Durham, NC → Chapel Hill, NC Faculty: Amy M. Fowler, MD Fellows: [One fellow (1993) Holly Barbour, MD (1993) PLUS... ] David E.E. Holck, MD (1993–1995); Christopher DeBacker, MD (1995–1997); William Lipham, MD (1997–1999); → Gregg S. Gayre, MD (1999–2001); [inactive 2001–2004]; Amy Fowler, MD (2005–2007); George K. Escaravage Jr., MD (2007–2009); Daniel T. Sines, MD (2009–2011); Lyndon Lee, MD (2011–2013)

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Bita Esmaeli, MD (Program Director, 2010–present), Houston, TX (ACGME Accredited) Faculty: (Current) Sean M. Blaydon, MD; Kenneth J. Hyde, MD; John W. Shore, MD; Vikram D. Durairaj, MD; Audrey E. Ahuero, MD; Malena M. Amato, MD (Past) Todd R. Shepler, MD Fellows: Tarek El-Sawy, MD (2010–2012); Matthew Sniegowski, MD (2012–2014); Omar Ozgur, MD (2014‒2016); Thomas Kandl, MD (2016‒2018); Joshua Ford, MD (2018–2020) Aaron Fay, MD (Program Director, 2011‒2017), Boston, MA (ACGME Accredited) Faculty: Francis C. Sutula, MD; Manoj M. Thakker, MD Fellows: Dawn M.K. De Castro, MD (2011–2013); Peter McIntosh, MD (2013‒2015); [Inactive] (2015‒2017) Joseph C. Flanagan, MD (Program Director, 1969–2011), Philadelphia, PA Faculty: Mary A. Stefanyszyn, MD; Robert B. Penne, MD, Edward H. Bedrossian Jr., MD; Jacqueline Carrasco, MD Fellows: [Twenty-seven fellows (1969–1994) John Yassin, MD (1969–1970); Robert White Jr., MD (1970– 1971); Ignatius Hneleski Jr., MD (1971–1972); Herbert Greenwald Jr., MD (1972–1973); JeanClaude Pilet, MD (1973–1974); Christine Zolli, MD (1974–1975); John Negrey Jr., MD (1974–1975); Gerald Cullen, MD (1975–1976); Rutheva Dizon Moore, MD (1975–1976); David Saunders, MD (1976–1977); Ernst Nicolitz, MD (1977–1978); Daniel McLachlan, MD (1978–1979); Gary Aguilar, MD (1979–1980); Charles Campbell III, MD (1980–1981); Mark Ruchman, MD (1981–1982); Joseph Mauriello Jr, MD (1982–1983); Mary Stefanyszyn, MD (1983–1984); David Larned, MD (1984–1985); Daniel Schaefer, MD (1985–1986); James Dickson, MD (1986–1987); George Alter, MD (1987–1988); Robert H. Kennedy, MD (1988–1989); Robert Penne, MD (1989–1990); William Bigham, MD (1990–1991); Robert Mazzoli, MD (1991–1992); Andrea Hass, MD (1992–1993); and Peter Sneed, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Ameet Goyal, MD (1994–1995); David Buerger, MD (1995–1996); Ignatius Hneleski, MD (1996– 1997); Andrew Eiseman, MD (1997–1998); Daniel R. Elizondo, MD (1998–1999); Byron A. Long, MD (1999–2001); John J. Lee, MD (2001–2003); Jacqueline Carasco, MD (2003–2005); Omaya Youssef, MD (2005–2007); Craig Vroman, MD (2007–2009); Paul B. Johnson, MD (2009–2011) James C. Fleming, MD (Program Director, 2003–present), Memphis, TN Faculty: (Current) Brian S. Biesman, MD; Kimberly A. Klippenstein, MD; Louise A. Mawn, MD; Ralph E. Wesley, MD; Matthew W. Wilson, MD (Past) Barrett G. Haik, MD Fellows: Maziar Bidar, MD (2003–2005); Marcus Marcet, MD (2005–2007); Carrie L. Morris, MD (2007– 2009); Alan E. Oester Jr., MD (2009–2011); Margaret E. Phillips, MD (2011–2013); Brian Fowler (2013‒2015); Tara Goecks, MD (2015‒2017); Andrew Meador, MD (2017–2019); George Salloum, MD (2019–2021) Suzanne K. Freitag, MD (Program Director, 2010–present), Boston, MA Faculty: (Current) Michael E. Migliori, MD; Michael K. Yoon, MD; Daniel R. Lefebvre, MD; Grace Lee, MD Fellows: Daniel R. Lefebvre, MD (2010–2012); Grace Lee, MD (2012–2014); Lora Dagi Glass, MD (2014‒2016); Victoria Starks, MD (2016‒2018); Natalie Wolkow, MD (2018-2020) Bartley R. Frueh, MD (Program Director, 1983–2002) Ann Arbor, MI Faculty: Christine C. Nelson, MD; Victor Elner, MD Fellows: [Nine fellows (1983–1994) Douglas Felt, MD (1983–1984); Ross Benger, MD (1984–1985); James Kapustiak, MD (1985–1986); Thomas Bersani, MD (1986–1987); Scott Hobson, MD (1987–1988); Kamel Itani, MD (1988–1989); James Oestreicher, MD (1989–1990); Mont Cartwright, MD (1991– 1992); and Angela Perry, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Asa D. Morton, MD (1994–1996); Robert Fante (1996–1998); Amjad Z. Ahmad, MD (1998–2000); Randy O. Mauffray, MD (2000–2002)

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Roberta E. Gausas, MD (Program Director, 2006–2017), Philadelphia, PA Fellows: Edward Wladis, MD (2006–2008); Lauren A. Eckstein, MD (2008–2010); Christina Choe, MD (2011–2013); inactive (2013–2015); Nicole Langelier, MD (2015–2017) Geoffrey J. Gladstone, MD (International Fellowship Program Director, 2013–present), Southfield, MI Int’l Fellows: Abraham Gomez Hernandez, MD (2013–2015); Rayna Piskova, MD (2015–2017); Nattapol Pokawattana, MD (2017–2019) Robert A. Goldberg, MD, (Program Director, 2001–present), Los Angeles, CA Faculty: (Current) Jonathan Hoenig, MD (Past); Norman Shorr, MD; John D. McCann, MD Fellows: Todd Cook, MD (2001–2003); Robert Schwarcz, MD (2003–2005); Tanuj Nakra, MD (2005–2007); Ray Taban, MD (2007–2009); Shu-Hong (Holly) Chang, MD (2009–2011); Joseph Lin, MD (2011– 2013); Payam Morgan, MD (2013‒2015); Wenjing Liu, MD (2015‒2017); Christopher Lo, MD (2017–2019); Liza Cohen, MD (2017–2019) Arthur S. Grove, MD (Program Director, 1984–2003), Boston, MA Fellows: [Ten fellows (1984–1994) Steven Leibowitz, MD (1984–1985); Arthur Glover, MD (1985–1986); Jemshed Khan, MD (1986–1987); Craig Geist, MD (1987–1988); Richard Palu (1988–1989); Rand Rodgers, MD (1989–1990); Marlon Maus, MD (1990–1991); William L. White, MD (1991–1992); Stuart Farris, MD (1992–1993); and Clifton Slade, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Morris E. Hartstein, MD (1994–1995); Kevin A. Beadles, MD (1995–1996); Andrew M. Goldbaum, MD (1996–1997); Daniel E. Buerger, MD (1997–1998); Lisa A. Mansueto, MD (1998–1999); Suzanne K Freitag, MD (1999–2001); John T.H. Mandeville, MD (2001–2003) Gerald J. Harris, MD (Program Director, 1987–present), Milwaukee, WI Faculty: (Current) Neda Esmaili, MD; Timothy Wells, MD; Gregory Griepentrog, MD (Past) Russell S. Gonnering, MD; Michael L. Murphy Fellows: [Five fellows 1987–1994) Janice Eggert, MD (1987–1988); Randall Beatty, MD (1988–1989); Peter Sakol, MD (1989–1990); Peter Dolman, MD (1990–1991); and Robin Deans, MD (1990–1991) PLUS…] Rosalie Bair, MD (1993–1995); Sangeeta Logani, MD (1995–1997); George Garcia, MD (1997– 1999); B.L. Linda Vu, MD (1999, opted out); Jan L. Iwata, DO (January 2000–December 2001); David E. Freilich, MD (2001–2003); Timothy S. Wells, MD (2003–2005); Grant Su, MD (2005– 2007); Jerry Lai, MD (2007–2009); Peter Emmett Hurley, MD (2009–2011); Neda Esmaili (2011– 2013); Sean Paul, MD (2013‒2015); Jasmina Bajric (2015‒2017); Chad Jackson, MD (2017–2019); Noberto Mancera, MD (2019–2021) Andrew R. Harrison, MD (Program Director, 2007–present), Minneapolis, MN Faculty: Elizabeth A. Bradley, MD; Eric R. Nelson, MD; John J. Woog, MD; Jill S. Melicher-Larson, MD Fellows: Edward Lee, MD (2007–2009); Knut Eichorn-Mulligan, MD (2009–2011); Behin Barahimi, MD (2011–2013); Ali Mokhtarzadeh, MD (2013‒2015); Pradeep Mettu, MD (2015‒2017); Krista Stewart, MD (2017–2019); Christopher Hwang, MD (2019–2021) Eric M. Hink, MD (Program Director, 2016‒present), Aurora, CO Faculty: (Current) Robert Fante, MD; Michael Hawes, MD; Brian Willoughby, MD; Michael McCracken, MD; Sophie Liao, MD Fellow: Leslie Neems, MD (2016‒2018); Elizabeth Echalier, MD (2018–2020) Marc J. Hirschbein, MD (Program Director, 2014‒present), Baltimore, MD Faculty: (Current) James Karesh, MD; Albert S. Cytryn, MD; Marc T. Doxanas, MD; Kevin I Perman, MD; Orin M. Zwick, MD; Brian Lee, MD Fellows: Stephen Winkler, MD (2014–2016); David Gay, MD (2016‒2018); Aimee Lam, MD (2018–2020) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Jonathan Hoenig, MD (Program Director, 2018–present), Los Angeles, CA Faculty: Robert Goldberg, MD; Dan Rootman, MD Fellows: Justin Karlin, MD (2018–2020) David E.E. Holck, MD (Program Director, 2007–present) San Antonio, TX Faculty: (Current) Christopher M. DeBacker, MD (Past) Sheri L. DeMartelaere, MD; Donald A. Hollsten, MD Fellows: Lisa Mihora, MD (2007–2009); Kevin Kalwerisky (2009–2011 completed with Jill A. Foster); Dimitrios “Jimmy” Sismanis, MD (2013‒2015); Trey Amerson Pegram, MD (2015‒2017); Hans Heymann (2017–2019); Wesley Brundridge (2019‒2021) John B. Holds, MD (Program Director, 2002–present), St. Louis, MO Faculty: (Current) Philip Custer, MD; Steven Crouch, MD (Past) Morris Hartstein, MD Fellows: Valerie Vick, MD (2002–2004); Gabriella Espinoza, MD (2004–2006); Yasaman (Jasmine) Mohadjer, MD (2006–2008); Adam G. Buchanan, MD (2008–2010); Steven Couch, MD (2010– 2012); Tiffany Kent, MD (2012–2014); Michael Neimkin, MD (2014‒2016); Krishna Kalyam, MD (2016‒2018); Robi Maamari, MD (2018–2020) Donald A. Hollsten, MD (Program Director, 2014‒present), San Antonio, TX Faculty: Constance Fry, MD Fellows: Jordan Hollsten, MD (2014‒2016); Aida Bounama, MD (2016‒2018); Jason Lewis, MD (2018–2020) Albert Hornblass, MD (1982–2003), New York, NY Faculty: Byron Smith, MD; Murray Meltzer, MD; Richard Lisman, MD; Ira Eliasoph, MD Fellows: [Twelve fellows (1982–1994) Brian Herschorn, MD (1982–1983); David Reifler, MD (1983–1984); Carl Hanig, MD (1984–1985); Larry Kass, MD (1985–1986); Neil Gross, MD (1986–1987); Michael Gingold, MD (1987–1988); Daniel Coden, MD (1988–1989); Michael Loeffler, MD (1989–1990); Polly Purgason, MD (1990–1991); Joseph Eviatar, MD (1991–1992); Brian Biesman, MD (1992– 1993); and Kip Dolphin, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Marc Werner, MD (1994–1995); Guy Massry, MD (1995–1996); Mark T. Duffy, MD, PhD (1996– 1997); Daniel Ebroon, MD (1997–1998); Mitchel A. Lautenberg, MD (1998–1999); Reynaldo M. Javate, MD (1999–2000); Michael Glassman, MD (2000–2001); Boaz Lissauer, MD (2001–2003) Thomas E. Johnson, MD (Program Director, 2002‒present), Miami, FL Faculty: (Current) David T. Tse, MD; Wendy W. Lee, MD; Sara D. Tullis Wester, MD; Chrisfouad R. Alabiad, MD (Past) Erin M. Shriver, MD; Fellows: Chrisfouad Alabiad, MD (2008–2010); Chad Zatezalo, MD (2010–2012); Marcus Ko, MD (2012– 2014); Benjamin Erickson, MD (2014‒2016); Nathan Blessing, MD (2016‒2018); Andrew Rong (2018–2020) Alon Kahana, MD, PhD (Program Director, 2019‒present), Ann Arbor, MI Faculty: Victor M. Elner, MD, PhD; Christine Nelson, MD; Hakan Demirci, MD; Denise Kim, MD; Shannon Joseph, MD Fellows: Anais Carniciu, MD (2019–2021) Sara A. Kaltreider, MD (International Fellowship Program Director, 2002–2003), Charlottesville, VA Int’l Fellow: Nir Seider, MD (2002-2003)

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James W. Karesh, MD (Program Director, 2004–2014), Baltimore, MD Faculty: Albert S. Cytryn, MD; Marc T. Doxanas, MD; Marc J. Hirschbein, MD; Kevin I. Perman, MD; Orin Zwick, MD Fellows: Alex On, MD (2004–2006); Lauren Gavaris, MD (2006–2008); Sumit Sitole, MD (2008–2010); William Rob Vickers, MD (2010–2012); Ana Carolina Victoria, MD (2012–2014) James A. Katowitz, MD (Program Director, 1984–2015), Philadelphia, PA Faculty: Roberta Gausas, MD; Scott Goldstein, MD; Alan Brackup, MD; Jurij R. Bilyk, MD; William R. Katowitz, MD; Alan Brackup, MD; César Briceño, MD Fellows: [Ten fellows (1984–1994) Thomas Kropp, MD (1984–1985); Michael Welsh, MD (1985–1986); Donald Hollsten, MD (1986–1987); Peter Fries, MD (1987–1988); Michael Kazim, MD (1988– 1989); Kenneth Piest, MD (1989–1990); Jill Foster, MD (1990–1991); Joanne Low, MD (1991–1992); Lawrence Handler, MD (1992–1993); and Katrinka Heher, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Ronald E. Dei Cas, MD (1994–1995); Elsa M. Raskin, MD (1995–1996); Michael Johnson, MD (1996–1997); Steven Covici, MD (1997–1998); Jeffrey B. Goldstein, MD (1998–2000); Scott M. Goldstein, MD (2000–2002); Femidah Kherani, MD (2002–2004); [fellow withdrew 2004–2005]; William R. Katowitz, MD (2005–2007); Katherine Lane, MD (2007–2009); Christopher Chambers (2009–2011); Yasmin Shayesteh (Chambers), MD (2011–2013); Maryam Nazemzad (2013–2015) William R. Katowitz, MD (Program Director, 2015–present), Philadelphia, PA Faculty: James A. Katowitz, MD; Jurij R. Bilyk, MD; Alan Brackup, MD; Scott M. Goldstein, MD; Sonul Mehta, MD; Alan E. Wulc, MD Fellows: Karen Revere, MD (2015‒2017); Christiana Munroe, MD (2017–2019); Sana Ali Bautista, MD (2019–2021) Martin Kazdan, MD (Program Director, 1964–2003), Toronto, Ontario, Canada Faculty: Robert Pashby, MD; James Oestreicher, MD Fellows: [Twenty-four fellows (1965–1994) Y. Dayall, MD (1965); Kulshestra, MD (1966); David Rodrique, MD (1970); Ray Noble, MD (1971–1972); Richard Apt, MD (1974–1975); Walter Bethel (1975– 1976); Norman Ahl, MD (1976–1977); David Savar, MD (1977–1978); Gary Lissner, MD (1979– 1980); Gary Raflo, MD (1980–1981); Timothy Doucet, MD (1980–1981); Ted Rosenstock, MD (1981–1982); Narieman Nik (1982–1983); Dennis Galbraith, MD (1983–1984); Richard Weise, MD (1984–1985); Steve Mishkin, MD (1985–1986); Kathleen Archer, MD (1986–1987); Scott Corin, MD (1987–1988); Angela Veloudios, MD (1988–1989); Michael Ashenhurst, MD (1989–1990); Sam Goldberger, MD (1990–1991); Conrad Kavalec, MD (1991–1992); David Cowen, MD (1992–1993); and Sajeev Katchuia, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Mark Berkowitz, MD (1994–1995); Bita Esmaeli (1995–1996); Roger Newsom, MD (1996–1997); Mounir Bashour, MD (1997–1998); Stephen M. Baker, MD (1998–1999); Alicia M. Carroll, MD (1999–2001); Navdeep Nijhawan, MD (2001–2003) Michael Kazim, MD (International Fellowship Program Director 1995–2012, Program Director, 2013– present), New York, NY Faculty: (Current) Gary J. Lelli Jr., MD; Elizabeth A. Maher, MD; James P. Milite, MD (Past) Richard Lisman, MD Fellows: Carisa Kay Petris (2013–2015); Ashley Campbell, MD (2015–2017); Kyle Godfrey, MD (2017–2019); Van Ann Tran, MD (2019–2021)

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Robert C. Kersten, MD, (Program Director, 2003–present), Cincinnati, OH → Denver, CO → San Francisco, CA Faculty: (Current) M. Reza Vagefi, MD; Stuart R. Seiff, MD (Past) Gary L. Aguilar, MD Fellows: Paul A. Brannan, MD (2003–2005); Kathy Flanagan, MD (2005–2007); Chris Thiagarajah, MD (2007–2009); H. Jane Kim, MD (2011–2013); Francis Grumbine, MD (2013‒2015); Evan KalinHajdu, MD (2015‒2017); Thomas Bacon, MD (2017–2019); Davin C. Ashraf (2019‒2021) Don O. Kikkawa, MD (Program Director, 2003–present), La Jolla, CA Faculty: (Current) Asa Morton, MD; Arthur Perry, MD; Bobby Korn, MD, PhD; Geva Mannor, MD (Past) Charles Stephenson, MD Fellows: Karim G. Punja, MD (2003–2005); Bobby S. Korn, MD, PhD (2005–2007); Christine Annunziata, MD (2007–2009); Sang Oh, MD (2009–2011); Katherine M. Whipple, MD (2011–2013); Bradford Lee, MD (2013‒2015); Audrey Ko (2015‒2017); Lilangi Ediriwickrema, MD (2017–2019); Daniel Ozzello, MD (2019–2021) Bobby Korn, MD, PhD (International Fellowship Program Director, 2014–present), San Diego, CA Int’l Fellow: Ramzi Alameddine, MD (2014–2016); Patrick Yang, MD (2016–2018); Zvi Gur (2018–2020) Wendy Lee, MD, (International Fellowship Program Director, 2014‒present), Miami, FL Int’l Fellow: Juan Ayala, MD (2014‒2016); Zakeya Al-Sadah, MD (2016-2018); Apostolos Anagnostopoulos, MD (2018–2020) Faculty: Sara Wester, MD; Chris Alabiad, MD, Bradford Lee, MD Hui Bae Harold Lee, MD, (Program Director, 2016‒present), Louisville, KY/Indianapolis, IN Faculty: William Nunery, MD; Richard Burgett, MD; Ronald T. Martin, MD; Michael G. Welsh, MD Fellows: Mark Prendes, MD (2016‒2018); Kevin Tomasko, MD (2018–2020) Gary J. Lelli, Jr., MD (Program Director, 2018–present), New York, NY Faculty: Elizabeth A. Maher, MD; Michael Kazim, MD; Richard D. Lisman, MD Fellows: Andrea Tooley, MD (2018–2020) Bradley N. Lemke, MD (Program Director, 1998–2005), Madison, WI Faculty: Mark J. Lucarelli, MD; Russell S. Gonnering, MD; Richard K. Dortzbach, MD Fellows: Kristin Tarbet, MD (1997–1999); Briggs E. Cook, Jr., MD (1999–2001); John G. Rose, Jr., MD (2001–2003); Cat N. Burkat, MD (2003–2005) Peter S. Levin, MD (Program Director, 2016‒present), Palo Alto, CA Faculty: (Current) Andrea Kossler, MD; Tarek El-Sawy, MD Fellows: Katie Topping, MD (2016‒2018); Emily S. Charlson, MD (2018–2020) John V. Linberg, MD (Program Director, 1996–2011), Morgantown, WV Fellows: John Langford, MD (1996–1997); Natan Kahn, MD (1997–1999); David B. Leventer, MD (1999– 2001); David Freilich (2001–2003); Sarit M. Patel, MD (2003–2005); Albert Dal Canto, MD (2005– 2007); Ira Vidor, MD (2007–2009); Matheson A. Harris, MD (2009–2011) Richard D. Lisman, MD (Program Director, 1998–2018), New York NY Faculty: Elizabeth A. Maher, MD; Michael Kazim, MD; Gary J. Lelli, Jr., MD; James P. Milite, MD, Robert C. Della Rocca, MD; Murray A. Meltzer, MD Fellows: Joseph P. Campbell, MD (1998–2000); Brian J. Willoughby, MD (2000–2002); Galin Spicer, MD (2002–2004); Jennifer Scruggs, MD (2004–2006); Gary J. Lelli, Jr., MD (2006–2008); Christopher I. Zoumalan, MD (2008–2010); Katherine G. Gold, MD (2010–2012); Payal J. Patel, MD (2012– 2014); Alison Callahan, MD (2014‒2016); Kristen Dunbar, MD (2016‒2018)

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Don Liu, MD (Program Director, 1994–1996), Los Angeles, CA; (International Fellowship Program Director 1998–2001), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Fellows: Tamara Fountain, MD (1994–1996) Int’l Fellows: Yasir Al Sadhan, MD (1998–2000); Hala Ali Nassim, MD (1999–2001) John A. Long, MD (Program Director, 2000–present), Birmingham, AL Faculty: (Past) Michael Callahan, MD (Current) Matthew G. Vicinanzo, MD; Valerie L. Vick, MD Fellows: Thomas Tann III, MD (2000–2002); Wade Brock, MD (2002–2004); Matthew Vicinanzo, MD (2004–2006); Michael Boyle, MD (2006–2008); Keshini Parbhu, MD (2008–2010); Cameron Nabavi, MD (2010–2012); Shannon Cox, MD (2012–2014); Jordan Spindle, MD (2014‒2016); Joseph Armenia, MD (2016‒2018); Katherine Orman, MD (2018–2020) Mark J. Lucarelli, MD (Program Director, 2005‒present), Madison, WI Faculty: (Current) Cat N. Burkat, MD; John G. Rose, MD; Bradley N. Lemke, MD; Richard K. Dortzbach, MD (Emeritus) Fellows: Alon Kahana, MD, PhD (2005–2007); Nancy Kim, MD, PhD (2007–2009); Greg Griepentrog, MD (2009–2011); Nicholas Ramey, MD (2011–2013); Leslie Wei, MD (2013‒2015); Courtney Kauh, MD (2015‒2017); Suzanne van Landingham, MD (2017–2019); Jaclyn Gurwin, MD (2019–2021) Ronald Mancini, MD (Program Director 2019–present), Dallas TX Faculty: Kamel Itani, MD Fellows: Phillip Tenzel, MD (2019–2021) Guy Massry, MD (Program Director, 2017‒present), Los Angeles, CA Fellow: Amy Patel, MD (2017‒2019) Louise Mawn, MD (Program Director, 2018–present), Nashville, TN Faculty: Behin Barahimi, MD; Rachel Sobel, MD Fellow: Anna Kupcha, MD (2018–2020) John D. McCann, MD, PhD (Program Director, 2015‒present), Sandy, UT Faculty: Richard L. Anderson, MD Fellows: Jonathan M. Pargament, MD (2015‒2017); Maria Choudhary, MD (2017–2019); Daniel Rubinstein, MD (2019–2021) Timothy J. McCulley, MD, (Program Director, 2009‒present), San Francisco, CA → Baltimore, MD Faculty: Gary L. Aguilar, MD; Peter S. Levin, MD; Stuart R. Seiff, MD; Rona Z. Silkiss, MD → Michael P. Grant, MD, PhD; Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD Fellows: Michael K. Yoon, MD (2009–2011); Laura Phan, MD (2011‒2013); W. Jordan Piluek, MD (2013‒2015); Jessica Chang (2015‒2017); Nickisa Hodgson, MD (2017–2019); Emma McDonnell, MD (2019–2021) Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD, (Program Director, 2008‒2018), Baltimore, MD Faculty: Michael P. Grant, MD, PhD; Nicholas R. Mahoney, MD; Fatemeh Rajaii, MD, PhD Fellows: John Koo, MD (2008–2010); Nicholas R. Mahoney, MD (2010–2012); Kasra Eliasieh, MD (2012– 2014); Masha A. Sohrab, MD (2014‒2016); Sarah DeParis, MD (2016‒2018) Dale R. Meyer, MD, (Program Director, 2001‒2017), Albany, NY Faculty: George O. Stasior, MD; Orkan G. Stasior, MD; Edward J. Wladis, MD; Thomas A. Bersani, MD; Alan B. Brackup, MD; Daniel P. Schaefer, MD; Allan E. Wulc, MD Fellows: Ari D. Abel, MD (2001–2003); Douglas R. Casady, MD (2003–2005); David Mills, MD (2005–2007); Rhonda Vestal Barrett, MD (2007–2009); Mohit Dewan, MD (2009–2011); Bryant P. Carruth, MD (2011–2013); Balaji Perumal, MD (2013‒2015); Paul Owen Phelps, MD (2015‒2017) ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Christine C. Nelson, MD, (Program Director, 2002‒present), Ann Arbor, MI Faculty: Victor M. Elner, MD; Alon Kahana, MD, PhD; Hakan Demirci, MD (Past) César Briceño, MD; Raymond S. Douglas, MD, PhD; Fellows: Adam Hassan, MD (2002–2004); Hakan Demirci, MD (2004–2006); Randy Karger, MD (2006– 2008); Brian Lee, MD (2009–2011); César Briceño, MD (2011–2013); Shannon Joseph, MD (2014‒2016); Kira Segal, MD (2016‒2018); Dane Slentz, MD (2018–2020) Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD (Program Director, 1992–present) Iowa City, IA → Cincinnati, OH Faculty: [None] Fellows: [One fellow (1993–1994) Ronan Conlon, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Michael Murphy (1994–1996); Mark Alford, MD (1996–1998); Lynette M. Watkins, MD (1998– 2000); Junhee Lee, MD (2000–2002); Alice Song, MD (2002–2004); Richard Allen, MD (2004– 2006); Adam de la Garza, MD (2006–2008); → Jill Melicher-Larson, MD (2008–2010); Robert Peralta, MD (2010–2012); Samuel Baharestani, MD (2012–2014); Blake Fausett, MD (2014‒2016); Caroline Vargason, MD (2016‒2018); Trevor Smith, MD (2018–2020) Frank A. Nesi, MD (Program Director, 1998–present), Southfield, MI Faculty: Evan H. Black, MD; Geoffrey J. Gladstone, MD; Dianne M. Schlachter, MD; Francesca D. Nesi-Eloff, MD Fellows: [Fellow accepted for 1996–1997 withdrew]; Evan H. Black, MD (1998–2000); Cesar A. Sierra, MD (2000–2002); Chet Reistad, MD (2002–2004); Eric B. Baylin, MD (2004–2006); Nadia Kazim, MD (2006–2008); Francesca Nesi-Eloff, MD (2008–2010); Javier Servat, MD (2010–2012); Anne Barmettler, MD (2012–2014); Jackson Lever, MD (2014‒2016); Timothy Ekhlassi, MD (2016‒2018); Austin Pharo, MD (2018–2020) Navdeep Nijhawan, MD (Program Director, 2017‒present), Toronto, Ontario, Canada Faculty: James H. Oestreicher, MD Fellows: Imran Jivraj, MD (2017–2019); Patrick Daigle, MD (2019–2021) William R. Nunery, MD (Program Director, 1987‒present), Indianapolis, IN Faculty: Scott R. Hobson, MD; Hui Bae Harold Lee, MD; Richard Burgett, MD; Ronald T. Martin, MD; Michael G. Welsh, MD Fellows: [Three fellows (1987–1993) Ronald Martin, MD (1987–1989); Mark Cepela (1989–1991); and Grant Heinz, MD (1991–1993) PLUS…] Toan Vihn Truong, MD (1993–1995); John Ng, MD (1995–1997); Richard Burgett, MD (1997– 1999); Sukhjit S. Johl, MD (1999–2001); Kelly Everman, MD (2001–2003); Matthew Hammond, MD (2003–2005); Jeremiah Tao, MD (2005–2007); H. B. Harold Lee, MD (2007–2009); Peter Timoney, MD (2009–2011); Hassan Shah, MD (2011–2013); Christopher Compton, MD (2013‒2015); Roxana Fu, MD (2015‒2017); Austin Gerber (2017–2019); Benjamin Campbell (2019‒2021) James H. Oestreicher, MD (Program Director, 2003‒2017), Toronto, Ontario, Canada Faculty: Dan DeAngelis, MD; John T. Harvey, MD; Martin S. Kazdan, MD; Navdeep Nijhawan, MD; Robert C. Pashby, MD; Nancy A. Tucker, MD Fellows: Bentley C. Skibell, MD (2003–2005); Noelene Pang, MD (2005–2007); Kim Jebodhsingh, MD (2007–2009); Albert Wu, MD (2009–2011); Sonul Mehta, MD (2011–2013); Michel Belliveau, MD (2013‒2015); Ahsen Hussain, MD (2015‒2017)

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James C. Orcutt, MD, PhD (Program Director, 2001–2017), Seattle, WA Faculty: Bryan Sires, MD, PhD; Kristin J. Tarbet, MD; James L. Hargiss, MD; A.J. Amadi, MD; Robert Tower, MD; Christopher Chambers, MD; Holly Chang, MD Fellows: Arash Jian Amadi, MD (2001–2003); Manoj Thakker, MD (2003–2005); Vivian Schiedler, MD (2005–2007); Denise D. Garcia, MD (2007–2009); Harsha Reddy, MD (2009–2011); Michael C. Chappell, MD (2011–2013); Solomon Shaftel, MD (2013‒2015); Sarah Jacobs, MD (2015‒2017) Julian D. Perry, MD, (Program Director, 2008–present), Cleveland, OH Faculty: Catherine J. Hwang, MD Fellows: Craig Lewis, MD (2008–2010); Milap P. Mehta, MD, MS (2010–2012); Bryan Costin, MD (2012– 2014); Rao Chundury, MD (2014-2016); Alexander Blandford, MD (2016‒2018); Brian Chon, MD (2018–2020) Allen M. Putterman, MD (Program Director 1977–2018), Chicago, IL Faculty: Amjad Z. Ahmad, MD; Pete Setabutr, MD Fellows: [Seventeen fellows (1977–1994) Jack Chalfin, MD (1977–1978); Robert Mondshine, MD (1978– 1979); Gil Epstein, MD (1979–1980); Larry Katzen, MD (1980–1981); Frank Christensen, MD (1981–1982); James Karesh, MD (1982–1983); Geoff Gladstone, MD (1983–1984); David Fett, MD (1984–1985); Arthur Millman, MD (1985–1986); Michael Migliori, MD (1986–1987); Steve Fagien, MD (1987–1988); Herb Glatt, MD (1988–1989); Ken Feldman, MD (1989–1990); Gideon Schneck, MD (1990–1991); Jean Olson, MD (1991–1992); Albert Cytryn, MD (1992–1993); and Zachary Klett, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Fred Bodker, MD (1994–1995); Michael Mercandetti, MD (1995–1996); Michael Burnstine, MD (1996–1997); Mark Brown, MD (1997–1998); Eric A. Cole, MD (1998–1999); Noel D. Saks, MD (1999–2000); Roger E. Bassin, MD (2000–2002); Mark Shields, MD (2002–2004); John Pak, MD (2004–2006); Pete Setabutr, MD (2006–2008); Kiran Sajja, MD (2008–2010); Vinay K. Aakalu, MD, MPH (2010–2012); Rakesh M. Patel (2012–2014); Scott Jones, MD (2014‒2016); Yunxiang (Catherine) Liu, MD (2016‒2018) Stuart R. Seiff, MD (International Fellowship Program Director, 1990–1999; Program Director, 1991– present), San Francisco, CA Faculty: (Current) Eve Moscato, MD; Gary L. Aguilar, MD; Devron H. Char, MD; Rona Z. Silkiss, MD; James Newman, MD; Reza Vagefi, MD; Robert C. Kersten, MD (Past) Crowell Beard, MD; Eva H. Hewes, MD; E. James Langham, MD; John H. Sullivan, MD; J. Earl Rathbun, MD; Susan Carter, MD; Timothy J. McCulley, MD Int’l Fellows: John S. Chang, MD (1990–1991); Jose Luis Tovilla, MD (1997); Hiroo Yabe, MD (1999) Fellows: [Two fellows (1991-1994) William Meecham, MD (1991-1993); and Mark Boerner, MD (1993-1994) whose names/dates were not correctly listed in the 1994 publication PLUS…] Susan R. Carter, MD (1994–1996); Philip H. Choo, MD (1996–1998); Prashanth Vallabhanath, MD (1998–2000); Dan DeAngelis, MD (2000–2002); Laryssa Dragan, MD (2002–2004); Orin Zwick, MD (2004–2006); Brian Seiff, MD (2006–2008); Eve E. Moscato, MD (2008–2010); Harmeet S. Gill, MD (2010–2012); Louis Savar, MD (2012–2014); David J. Russell, MD (2014‒2016); Lilly Wagner, MD (2016‒2018); Isaiah Giese, MD (2018–2020) Pete Setabutr, MD (Program Director 2018–present), Chicago, IL Faculty: Allen Putterman, MD; Vinay Aakalu, MD Fellows: Chau Pham, MD (2018–2020)

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John W. Shore, MD (Program Director, 1992–2011), Boston, MA → Austin, TX Faculty: Russell W. Neuhaus, MD; Sean M. Blaydon, MD; Malena M. Amato, MD Fellows: [One fellow (1992–1994) Jurij Bilyk, MD (1992–1994) PLUS…] John Choi, MD (1994–1996); (→ Fellowship relocation to Austin) M. Cristina Moyer, MD (1996– 1998); Sean M. Blaydon, MD (1998–2000); Malena M. Amato, MD (2000–2002); Todd Sheppler, MD (2002–2004); Sheri DeMartelaere, MD (2004–2006); Christopher Westfall, MD; Michael Connor, MD (2009–2011) Norman Shorr, MD (Program Director, 1983–2018), Beverly Hills, CA Faculty: Robert A. Goldberg, MD; Jonathan Hoenig, MD; Catherine Hwang, MD Fellows: [Eleven fellows (1983–1994) Joel Kopelman, MD (1983–1984); Stuart Seiff, MD (1984–1985); Joan McFarland, MD (1985–1986); Jonathan Christenbury, MD (1986–1987); Robert Goldberg, MD (1987–1988); Alan Lessner, MD (1988–1989); Marc Cohen, MD (1989–1990); Herbert Bowden Jr., MD (1990–1991); Yoash Enzer, MD (1991–1992); Cynthia Boxrud, MD (1992–1993); and Kenneth Steinsapir, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Jonathan Hoenig, MD (1994–1995); Jeffrey Green, MD (1995–1996); Jeffrey Jacobs, MD (1996– 1997); Chaim Edelstein, MD (1997–1998); Julian D. Perry, MD (1998–1999); Troy J. Woodman, MD (1999–2000); Tina G. Li, MD (2000–2002); Raymond Douglas, MD, PhD (2002–2004); Richard Bryant, MD (2004–2006); Ron Mancini, MD (2006–2008); Catherine J. Hwang, MD (2008–2010); David K. Isaacs, MD (2010–2012); Daniel B. Rootman, MD (2012–2014); Erin Lessner, MD (2014‒2016); Sathyadeepak Ramesh, MD (2016‒2018) Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD (Program Director, 2007‒present), Kirkland, WA Faculty: Christopher B. Chambers, MD; Eric A. Cole, MD Fellows: Bryan J. Winn, MD (2007–2009); Audrey Ahuero, MD (2009–2011); Henry Lee, MD (2011–2013); Daniel Repp, MD (2013‒2015); Tal Rubinstein, MD (2015‒2017); Phillip Radke, MD (2017–2019); Garrison Wier, MD (2019–2021) Jennifer A. Sivak-Callcott, MD (Program Director, 2011–present), Morgantown, WV (ACGME Accredited) Faculty: John Nguyen, MD; Ira Vidor, MD Fellows: Chad M. Bingham, MD (2011–2013); Laura Gadzala, MD (2013‒2015); Jean-Paul Abboud (2015‒2017); Jamie Schaefer, MD (2017–2019) Orkan George Stasior, MD (Program Director 1972–1999), Albany, NY Faculty: George Stasior, MD; Dale R. Meyer, MD Fellows: [Nineteen fellows (1972–1993) Larry Stewart, MD (1972); Richard Apt, MD (MD1973); Claude Warren III, MD (1973); Robert Della Rocca, MD (1974); Douglas Rampona, MD (1974); J. Wynn Jacobs, MD (1975); Richard Anderson, MD (1975); Bradley Lemke, MD (1979–1980); Don Liu, MD (1980–1981); Janet Roen, MD (1981–1982); Donald Cerise, MD (1982–1983); Elliot Korn, MD (1983–1984); Ronald Kristan, MD (1984–1985); Kenneth Kesty, MD (1985–1986); Paul Rosenberg, MD (1986–1987); John Bortz, MD (1987–1988); Guy Kezirian, MD (1988–1989); Kathleen Duerksen, MD (1990–1991); and David Turock, MD (1992–1993) PLUS…] James C. Sanderson, MD (1994–1995); William P. Mokracek, MD (1995–1996); William Mack, MD (1995–1996); Lopa Gupta, MD (1996–1997); Catherine Durboraw, MD (1997–1998); Marc J. Hirschbein, MD (1998–1999) Mary A. Stefanyszyn, MD (Program Director 2012–present), Philadelphia, PA Faculty: Jacqueline R. Carrasco, MD; Robert B. Penne, MD; Jerry A. Shields, MD Fellows: Michael Rabinowitz, MD (2012–2014); Charles Kim, MD (2014‒2016); Matthew Zhang, MD (2016‒2018); Maximilian Padilla, MD (2018–2020)

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Jeremiah P. Tao, MD (Program Director 2015–present), Irvine, CA Faculty: Kenneth A. Feldman, MD; John Park, MD Fellows: Marc Yonkers, MD (2015‒2017); Seanna Grob, MD (2017–2019); Sanja Galeb, MD (2019–2021) David T. Tse, MD (Program Director, 1991‒present) Miami, FL Faculty: Thomas E. Johnson, MD; Wendy W. Lee, MD; Erin M. Shriver, MD Fellows: [One fellow (1991–1992) Steve Gilberg, MD (1991–1992) PLUS…] Melissa Jablon Meldrum, MD (1994–1996); Warren Chang, MD (1996–1998); Ann G. Neff, MD (1998–2000); Cassandra B. Onofrey, MD (2000–2002); Wendy Lee, MD (2002–2004); Kambiz Parsa, MD (2004–2006); Erin Shriver, MD (2006–2008); Sara Tullis Wester, MD (2008–2010); Andrea N. Lora Kossler, MD (2010–2012); Sophie D. Liao, MD (2012–2014); Brian Tse, MD (2014‒2016); Catherine Choi, MD (2016‒2018); Michelle Wilson Latting, MD (2018–2020) Timothy Wells, MD (Program Director, 2016–present), Milwaukee, WI Faculty: Gerald Harris, MD; Neda Esmaili, MD; Gregory Griepentrog, MD Fellows: Smith Ann Chisholm, MD (2016‒2018); Thomas Clark, MD (2018–2020) Ralph E. Wesley, MD (Program Director, 1990–present), Nashville, TN Faculty: Harvey P. “Chip” Cole, MD; John P. Fezza, MD; Clinton D. McCord, MD; Brent A. Murphy, MD; Deborah Sherman, MD; Brian S. Biesman, MD; James C. Fleming, MD; Barrett G. Haik, MD; Kimberly A. Klippenstein, MD; Louise A. Mawn, MD; Matthew W. Wilson, MD Fellows: Three fellows (1990–1994) PLUS… Kimberly Klippenstein, MD (1994–1996); John Fezza, MD (1996–1998); Samuel A. Gallo, MD (1998–2000); Stephen J. Laquis, MD (2000–2002); Roderick Hargrove, MD (2002–2004); Parag Gandhi, MD (2004–2006); Cari Lyle, MD (2006–2008); Maria Kirzhner, MD (2008–2010); David F. Jones, MD (2010–201MD2); Carolee Cutler-Peck, MD (2012–2014); James Chelnis, MD (2014‒2016); Kendra Clemons, MD (2016‒2018); Sara Reggie, MD (2018–2020) Robert B. Wilkins, MD (Program Director, 1972–1996), Houston, TX Fellows: [Twenty-three fellows (1972–1994) Alan Baum, MD (1972–1973); Richard Carroll, MD (1973– 1974); William Hancock, MD (1974–1975); Kurt Guelzow, MD (1975–1976); Dennis Tibble, MD (1975–1976); James Pressly, MD (1976–1977); Gerard Hunter, MD (1977–1978); Dwight Kulwin, MD (1978–1979); Craig Berris, MD (1979–1980); Michael Patipa (1980–1981); Weldon Havins, MD (1981–1982); James Merritt, MD (1982–1983); Steven Laukaitis, MD (1983–1984); William Byrd, MD (1984–1985); Jeffrey Hoffman, MD (1985–1986); Walter Murrell, MD (1986–1987); Paul Garland, MD (1987–1988); Rex Yannis, MD (1988–1989); Scott Lance, MD (1989–1990); Timothy Carey, MD (1990–1991); Brian Wong, MD (1991–1992); Richard Urso, MD (1992–1993); and Amyia Prasad, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Paul Stallman, MD (1994–1995); Jon Caster, MD (1995–1996) Edward J. Wladis, MD (Program Director, 2017–present), Albany (Slingerlands), NY Faculty: George O. Stasior, MD; Orkan G. Stasior, MD; Dale R. Meyer, MD; Thomas A. Bersani, MD; Alan B. Brackup, MD; Daniel P. Schaefer, MD; Allan E. Wulc, MD; (Past) Robert M. Schwarcz, MD Fellows: Valerie Chen, MD (2017–2019); Michael Rothschild, MD (2019–2021) John L. Wobig, MD (Program Director, 1988–1999), Portland, OR Fellows: [Six fellows (1988–1994) Roger Dailey, MD (1988–1989); Dale Meyer, MD (1989–1990); Daniel Dale, MD (1990–1991); Diana Habich, MD (1991–1992); Grant Gilliland, MD (1992–1993); and Lloyd Hildebrand, MD (1993–1994) PLUS…] Howard J. Loff, MD (1994–1995); Scott Sigler, MD (1995–1996); Matthew W. Wilson, MD (1996– 1997); David L. Wirta, MD (1997–1998); Andrew R. Harrison, MD (1998–1999)

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Ted Wojno, MD (Program Director, 2018‒present), Atlanta, GA Faculty: (Names unavailable) Fellow: Krishna Patel, MD (2018‒2020) Julie A. Woodward, MD (Program Director, 2015–present), Durham, NC Faculty: (Current) Michael Richard, MD (Past) Parag Gandhi, MD Fellow: Nicole Langelier, MD (2015‒2017); Roshni Ranjit, MD (2017–2019); Anna Ginter, MD (2019–2021) John Woog, MD, (Program Director, 1998–2009), Boston, MA → Rochester, MN Faculty: Arthur Grove, MD; Katrinka Heher, MD; Michael Migliori, MD → Elizabeth Bradley, MD; Andrew Harrison, MD; Eric Nelson, MD Fellows: Vacant (1998–2005); Dong Jun (John) Park, MD (2005–2007); Renzo Zaldivar, MD (2007–2009) R. Patrick Yeatts, MD, (Program Director, 2010–2018), Winston Salem, NC Fellows: Irina Koreen, MD, PhD (2010–2012); Andrew Ting, MD (2012–2014); Elysa Brown McClintic, MD (2014–2016); Stanley Tyler Pace, MD (2016‒2018). Michael T. Yen, MD, (Program Director, 2010‒present), Houston, TX Faculty: (Current) Milton Boniuk, MD; Richard Allen, MD; Debra Shetlar, MD (Past) Douglas Marx, MD Fellows: Seong Lee, MD (2010–2012); Joseph Giacommetti, MD (2012–2014); Preeti Thyparampil, MD (2014‒2016); Adam Weber, MD (2016‒2018); Adam Sweeney, MD (2018–2020) Michael K. Yoon, MD (Program Director, 2017–present), Boston, MA Faculty: Suzanne Freitag, MD; N. Grace Lee, MD; Daniel Lefebvre, MD Fellow: Larissa Habib, MD (2017–2019); Victor Liou, MD (2019–2021)

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Appendix 4

Annual Fall Meetings

David M. Reifler [Editor’s note: This appendix is a continuation of a similar list found in the Society’s 25th Anniversary Book which was published in 1994. As before, details of ASOPRS annual scientific symposia over the past quarter-century were derived from published programs and society archives. As before, presentations were sequentially numbered to potentially assist with cross-reference. A diligent attempt was made to present a consistent style and the correct spelling of titles and authors. The editor accepts responsibility for any inaccuracies and the decision to not list specific posters and videos except for those presented in the main scientific sessions. However, at the end of the list of main presentations for each year, tabulations of the numbers of posters and videos are presented in brackets.]

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TABLE 10. FALL SYMPOSIA DATES AND LOCATIONS, 1994–2019 No.

Date(s)

Location

25th

October 29, 1994

Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, CA

26th

October 28, 1995

Atlanta Market Center Inforum, Atlanta, GA

27th

October 26–27, 1996

Chicago Hilton Towers, Chicago, IL

28th

October 25, 1997

Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, CA

29th

November 7, 1998

Fairmont Hotel, New Orleans, LA

30th

October 23, 1999

Renaissance Orlando Hotel, Orlando, FL

31st

October 20–21, 2000

Adam’s Mark Hotel, Dallas, TX

32nd

November 9–10, 2001

Marriott Hotel, New Orleans, LA

33rd

October 18–19, 2002

Renaissance Orlando Resort, Orlando, FL

34th

November 14–15, 2003

Disneyland Hotel, Anaheim, CA

35th

October 22–23, 2004

Sheraton Hotel, New Orleans, LA

36th

October 14–15, 2005

Chicago Hilton Towers, Chicago, IL

37th

November 15–16, 2006

Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV

38th

November 9–10, 2007

Marriott Canal Street, New Orleans, LA

39th

November 12–13, 2008

Westin Peachtree, Atlanta, GA

40th

October 21–22, 2009

Hilton O’Farrell Street, San Francisco, CA

41st

October 13–14, 2010

Fairmont Hotel, Chicago, IL

42nd

October 21–23, 2011

Hilton Bonnet Creek, Orlando, FL

43rd

November 8–9, 2012

Swissôtel, Chicago, IL

44th

November 14–15, 2013

Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA

45th

October 16–17, 2014

Sheraton Hotel, Chicago, IL

46th

November 12–13, 2015

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, NV

47th

October 13–14, 2016

Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL

48th

November 9–10, 2017

Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA

49th

October 25–26, 2018

Hilton Chicago, Chicago, IL

50th

October 10‒11, 2019

Hilton Union Square, San Francisco, CA

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Presentations Listed in Fall Scientific Symposia Programs, 1994–2018 25th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Insights and Innovations in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery” Dedicated to the memory of Wendell L. Hughes, MD October 29, 1994, Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, CA

1. Introduction George Paris, MD, President and James C. Fleming, MD, Program Chair  Free Papers – Session One Moderators: Don Liu, MD and James W. Karesh, MD 2. Unusual Penetrating Intraorbital Foreign Body H. Michael Haik, John D. Bullock 3. Facilitated Paraffin-Embedded Tangential Sections in the Management of Malignant Sebaceous and Melanocytic Eyelid Neoplasms R. Patrick Yeatts, Barry Leshin, Wain White 4. Cultured Epithelial Allografts for Eyelid Reconstruction John A. Long, Deborah Wiatrak 5. The Medial Extent of the Blepharoplasty Incision Paul T. Gavaris 6. “One Stitch” Canalicular Repair Robert C. Kersten 7. Orbital Cysticercosis G.C. Chandra-Sekhar, Bradley N. Lemke 8. Patients Perceive Reduced Headaches Following Optic Nerve Sheath Decompression for Pseudotumor Cerebri Jemshed A. Khan, Armin Vishteh, John F. Doane, Jeffrey Nerad, Keith Carter, Lenworth Johnson 9. Polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) Slings for Ptosis Correction Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Paul Langer, Richard L. Anderson 10. The Incidence of Graves’ Ophthalmopathy George B. Bartley, Vahab Fatourechi, Eddie F. Kadrmas, Steven J. Jacobsen, Duane M. Ilstrup, James A. Garrity, Colum A. Gorman  Insights and Innovations – Session One: Enucleation 11. Etiology, Prevention, and Management of Complications Related to the Hydroxyapatite Implant Sara A. Kaltreider, Steven A. Newman 12. A New Variety of Hydroxyapatite: Histological Comparison to the Current Form* (Integrated Orbital Implants) David R. Jordan, Shane Munro, Steve Gilberg, Anna Ells, Seymour Brownstein, Steve Grahovac, Francoise Raymond 13. A New Enucleation Implant: Conical Shape with Sulcus Support Peter A.D. Rubin, Jerry K. Popham, Jurij R. Bilyk, John W. Shore 14. Treatment of Non-Vascularized Hydroxyapatite Orbital Implants with Hyperbaric Oxygen Jeffrey C. Popp, Allan E. Wulc, Lawrence F. Handler, Eileen Lilley

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15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging vs. Bone Scan for Assessment of Vascularization of the Hydroxyapatite Orbital Implant Gary A. Jamell, Donald A. Hollsten, Michael J. Hawes, William L. White, Dennis J. Griffin, Joseph Spirnak, William Klingensmith 16. Pain Control Following Enucleation T. David I. Wilkes 17. Enucleation for Refractory Fulminant Ocular Infection: Is Primary Reconstruction with an Orbital Implant Safe? Dale R. Meyer, Kevin W. Hulseberg, Paul M. Beer 18. Hydroxyapatite Implant: Comparative Motility Philip L. Custer 19. Periocular Autografts for Socket Reconstruction Hilary A. Beaver, James R. Patrinely, John B. Holds, Marcus P. Soper, 20. Presentation of the Lester Jones Award Presented by: Jonathan Dutton, MD; Presented to: Deborah Sherman, MD  Oculoplastic Surgical Rounds – Session One Moderators Edwin C. Augustat, MD and Michael A. Callahan, MD 21. Doppler Assisted Vascular Pedicle Flaps in Eyelid Repair and Periorbital Reconstruction R. Patrick Yeatts, Roger Newsom 22. The Full Thickness Eyelid Excision for Ptosis Reoperations and Eyelid Contour Deformities Martha C. Wilson, Henry I. Baylis 23. Management of Canalicular Injury Associated with Eyelid Burns Dale R. Meyer, Dwight R. Kulwin, Robert C. Kersten, Joseph R. Paskowski 24. Transconjunctival Lower Eyelid Blepharoplasty with Inferior Retractor Aponeurosis Recession R. Toby Sutcliffe 25. External Dacryocystorhinostomy: Efficiency, Success, Patient Satisfaction Kristin J. Tarbet, Philip L. Custer 26. The Vascularized Temporoparietal Fascial Flap for Correction of the Deep Superior Sulcus D.E. Cowen, O. Antonyshyn, John T. Harvey 27. Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy Without Laser: A Successful, Cost-Effective Procedure Geoffrey J. Gladstone, Steven Chen, Frank A. Nesi 28. Award to the Past President of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Presented by George Paris, MD to Albert Hornblass, MD  Free Papers – Session Two 29. Electromyography of the Reconstructed Lower Eyelid after a Modified Hughes Procedure George B. Bartley, William Litchy 30. Noninfectious Inflammatory Response to Gold Weight Eyelid Implants Rosalie L. Bair, Gerald J. Harris, David B. Lyon, Richard A. Komorowski 31. The Blepharogram in Eyelid Motion (Blinking) Disorders Robert G. Small, Stephen R. Fransen, Robert Adams 32 Anatomy of the Common Canaliculus John V. Linberg, Susan M. Tucker, Nancy A. Tucker 33. Changes in Astigmatism after Blepharoptosis Surgery David E.E. Holck, Jonathan J. Dutton 34. Invasive Rhino-Sino-Orbital Aspergillosis with Rapidly Progressive Proptosis, Ophthalmoplegia, and Visual Loss Joseph A. Mauriello Jr., Ramin Mostafavi, John Barofsky, Soly Baredes, John Norris, Rajendra Kapila, MD 

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Featured Guest Speaker 35. Introduction of Featured Speaker, Paul Manson James C. Fleming 36. Orbital Fractures–Current Management of Early and Delayed Repair Paul N. Manson  Oculoplastic Surgical Rounds – Session Two: Solutions to Difficult Problems Moderators Harvey P. Cole III, MD and Michael Kazim, MD 37. Trapezoidal Debulking of Pre-Aponeurotic Platform–Application in Asian Blepharoplasty William Pai-Dei Chen 38. Congenital Entropion and Epiblepharon Brett A. O‘Donnell, J. Richard O. Collin 39. Complications of Tarsoconjunctival Grafts Michael J. Hawes, Gary A. Jamell 40. Correction of Lower Eyelid Retraction When There is Full-Thickness Vertical Shortage of Eyelid Tissue John W. Shore, Christopher T. Westfall, John Choi 41. Inverted Papilloma Invading the Orbit Victor M. Elner, Michael A. Burnstine, Max L. Goodman, Richard K. Dortzbach 42. Correction of Lower Lid Retraction in Graves’ Disease in Patients with Residual Exophthalmos Clinton D. McCord Jr. 43. The Lateral Wall Revisited: Extensive Lateral Bony Orbital Decompression Using a Coronal Approach Robert Alan Goldberg, Stacia Goldey 44. Subperiosteal Abscess of the Orbit: Computed Tomography and the Clinical Course Gerald J. Harris 45. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising De Novo in the Young Adult: A Different Animal Perry Waggoner, Robert M. Dryden  Featured Guest Speaker 47. Introduction of Featured Speaker Harry Buncke, MD Stuart Seiff, MD 48. The Use of Microvascular Transplants in the Reconstruction of the Face and Scalp Harry J. Buncke, MD  ASOPRS Thesis Section Moderators: Joe F. Arterberry, MD and Jan Kronish, MD 49. Introduction to the ASOPRS Thesis Section Ken Cahill, MD 50. Floppy Eyelid Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Alan McNab 51. The Anatomy of the Suspensory Apparatus of the Conjunctival Fornix Joseph Shovlin, Richard Dortzbach 52. Functional Electrical Stimulation of Orbicularis Oculi: A Blink Device and Its Effect on Muscle Histopathology David Cowen, James Oestreicher 53. A New Concept in Reversible Punctal Occlusion Peter S. Levin 54. Presentation of the Marvin A. Quickert Thesis Award [to David Cowen, MD] Presented by James W. Karesh MD 55. Presentation of the Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Joseph Shovlin, MD] Presented by Christine C. Nelson, MD 

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56. Milestones in Oculoplastic Surgery: 25 Years of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery George Paris  Insights and Innovations – Session Two: Discussions 57. An Adjustable Suture Technique for Levator Recession John J. Woog 58. Comment on the Previous Paper Richard Collin 59. Topical Anesthetic Cream Decreases the Pain of Oculinum Injections Lawrence F. Handler, Allan E. Wulc 60. Comment on the Previous Paper Roger A. Dailey 61. Orbital Reconstruction After Resection of Paranasal Sinus Neoplasm Jeffrey A. Nerad, Timothy M. McCulloch, Gerry F. Funk, Scott M. Graham, Henry T. Hoffman 62. Comment on the Previous Paper Michael Patipa 63. Eradication of HIV from HIV Impregnated Sclera Arthur C. Perry 64. Comment on the Previous Paper Stuart R. Seiff 65. Forehead Rejuvenation: A New Approach With and Without Use of Endoscopic Instrumentation Paul Gavaris, Scott Hobson  Free Papers – Session Three 66. ONSD in Perspective: A Good Operation in Search of Indications Thomas C. Spoor, John G. McHenry, John M. Ramocki, Ernest C. Skidmore 67. The Holmium:YAG Laser for Canalicular Reconstruction Jonathan J. Dutton, David E.E. Holck 68. Results of Levator Resection in Children When Performed Under Local Anesthesia Versus General Anesthesia Thomas A. Bersani, Philip A. Fraterrigo 69. Orbital Rim and Tear-trough Augmentation Implants – A Significant Benefit in Eyelid Reconstruction and Cosmesis Norman Shorr 70. Contact Nd:YAG Laser Endonasal Dacryocystorhinostomy Michael E. Migliori 71. Management of Dural-Cavernous Sinus Fistulas: Indications for Primary Embolization Via the Superior Ophthalmic Vein Stacia H. Goldey, Henry I. Baylis, Robert A. Goldberg, Gary Duckwiler  Featured Video Presentation 72. Introduction of the Featured Video Interview Bernice Z. Brown, MD 73. “The Way It Was” for Crowell Beard Crowell Beard, MD  Poster Section [Total = 8]

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26th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Challenging the Future” October 28, 1995, Atlanta Market Center Inforum, Atlanta, GA

1. Introduction Richard K. Dortzbach, MD, President and Robert Alan Goldberg, MD, Program Chair  Free Papers – Orbit Moderators: R. Toby Sutcliffe, MD and Alan M. Lessner, MD 2. Carpe Dentem—An Unusual Orbital Foreign Body John D. Bullock 3. Demineralized Bone in Orbital Reconstruction Janet Neigel, Peter O. Rusicka 4. Adjunctive Intra-Arterial Cytoreductive Chemotherapy for Management of Extensive Adenocystic Carcinoma of the Lacrimal Gland Melissa L. Meldrum, David T. Tse, Pasquele Benedetto 5. The Multi-Disciplinary Management of Psammomatoid Ossifying Fibroma of the Orbit Morris E. Hartstein, John J. Woog, Arthur S. Grove Jr., John W. Shore, Michael Joseph, Max Goodman, Robert G. Ojemann, Michael Yaremchuk 6. Sickle Cell Orbitopathy: Case Report and Review of Orbital Manifestations in Sickle Cell Disease James C. Fleming, Edward L. Curran, Winfred C. Wang 7. Pitfalls and Complications of Orbital Decompression: Successful Management Using Endoscopic Techniques Scott R. Hobson 8. Management of Relative Proptosis with Orbital Rim Onlay David A. Weinberg, Robert A. Goldberg, Jonathan Hoenig, Norman Shorr 9. Maxillary Sinus Antrostomy and Endoscopy in Orbital Floor Fracture Repair John J. Woog, Morris Hartstein, Richard Gliklich 10. Porous Polyethylene Channel Implant for Orbital Wall Reconstruction John W. Shore, John C. Choi, James C. Fleming Phil A. Aitken, John B. Holds, James R. Patrinely, Peter A.D. Rubin, Michael Patipa, Michael Yaremchuk, Mark Lucarelli 11. Orbital Decompression for Ophthalmic Graves’ Disease William R. Nunery, Camden W. Nunery, Troan V. Truong, Ronald T. Martin, Daniel R. Osborn

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12. The Association of Cerebellopontine Angle Tumors with Hemifacial Spasm Ameet Goyal, Emil Shieh, Joseph C. Flanagan 13. Predictability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Differentiation of Orbital Lymphoma from Orbital Inflammatory Syndrome Albert A. Cytryn, Allen M. Putterman, Gideon L. Schneck, Enriko Beckman, Galdino E. Valvassori  Dialogues – Session One 14. Methylprednisolone Adversely Affects Outcome in an Experimental Model of Traumatic Optic Neuropathy Kenneth D. Steinsapir, David A. Hovda, Norman Shorr, Robert Alan Goldberg 15. Comment on the Previous Paper Stuart R. Seiff 16. Reversal of Dysthyroid Optic Neuropathy Following Orbital Fat Decompression Michael Kazim, Golge Acaroglu, Stephen L. Trokel 17. Comment on the Previous Paper William R. Nunery 18. Optic Nerve Decompression for Orbital Gliomas John H. Hunts, Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Paul Langer, Richard L. Anderson 19. Comment on the Previous Paper Jonathan J. Dutton 20. Delayed Reoperation and Repair of Orbital Fractures David A. Kostick, John V. Linberg 21. Comment on the Previous Paper Albert Hornblass  Free Papers: Reconstructive and Aesthetic Moderators: John Long, MD and Eric Nelson, MD 22. Maximizing Motility in Secondary Orbital Implant Surgery Paul T. Gavaris MD 23. A Simplified Ptosis Repair with a Single Adjustable Suture Murray A. Meltzer, Paul Taupeka, Elsa Flores 24. Prepping and Draping the Surgical Area: How Much Is Enough? Russell W. Neuhaus 25. Transconjunctival Lower Eyelid Blepharoplasty with Inferior Retractor Aponeurosis Recession R. Toby Sutcliffe 26. Frontalis Suspension for Congenital Ptosis: Appropriate Timing John A. Burns, Kenneth V. Cahill 27. Silicone Rod Frontalis Slings for the Correction of Blepharoptosis Susan R. Carter, Stuart R. Seiff, William Meecham 28. Quantitating the Fasanella-Servat Procedure in Patients with Negative Phenylephrine Tests Steven C. Dresner 29. Oculoplastic Surgery in Patients Receiving Warfarin: Suggestions for Management George B. Bartley, William L. Nichols, Duane M. Ilstrup, MS 30. Subperiosteal Malar Cheeklift with Lower Lid Blepharoplasty Mark Codner, Clinton D. McCord, T. Roderick Hester 31. Trichloracetic Acid Periorbital Chemical Peel Roger A. Dailey, 32. Endoscopic Brow Lift: Controlling Lateral Forces with the “ABC” Technique Harvey P. Cole III 33. Endoscopic Coronal Brow/Forehead Lift Norman Shorr, Jonathan A. Hoenig, Robert A. Goldberg, Kenneth Steinsapir, David Weinberg, Henry I. Baylis 

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Featured Guest Speaker 35. Introduction of Featured Speaker, Zein E. Obagi, MD Norman Shorr, MD 36. Skin Conditioning and the Eyelid Peel Zein E. Obagi, MD  Free Papers – Orbit Moderators: Don O. Kikkawa, MD and Martha Wilson, MD 37. Detection of Orbital Implant Infection with Leukocytes Labeled with Technetium 99m Haraldur Sigurdsson, Jóhannes Kári Kristinsson, Ásbjörn Sigfússon, Sigurdur Gudmundsson 38. Site of Service, Anesthesia and Postoperative Practice Patterns among American Ophthalmic Plastic Surgeons Dale R. Meyer, Miray Bartamian 39. Spontaneous and Enhanced Bone Formation in the Pores of Hydroxyapatite Orbital Implants Bryan S. Sires, John B. Holds Marilyn C. Kincaid, A. Ari Reddi 40. Frontal Periosteum Graft for Orbital Implant Coverage John B. Holds, Guy G. Massry 41. Mitomycin-C in the Treatment of Conjunctival Overgrowth around Hydroxyapatite Peg Sites Jeffrey C. Popp, Todd B. Engen 42. The Effect of Maturation on Stimulation of Orbital Bony Tissue Growth by Tissue Expanders in the Anophthalmic Cat Orbit Grant W. Heinz, William R. Nunery, Mark A. Cepela 43. Muscle Fiber Type in Human Orbicularis Oculi J. Pitts, N. Rowson, J.R.O. Collin, C. Watts, G. Vrbova 44. Introduction to ASOPRS Thesis Section James W. Karesh, MD 45. The Role of Secondary Intention Healing in Periocular Reconstruction Jonathan C. Lowry, George B. Bartley, James A. Garrity 46. Understanding mid-facial anatomy: The SOOF and the SMAS Jonathan A. Hoenig, Norman Shorr, Henry I. Baylis, Robert A. Goldberg 47. Avoiding Hydroxyapatite Ocular Implant Exposures with a Modified Implant Wrapping Technique Using Autogenous Fascia Lata Kenneth L. Piest 48. The Lacrimal Gland Secretory Ducts James C. Sanderson, Orkan G. Stasior, George O. Stasior 49. Presentation of the Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award Presented by Christine C. Nelson, MD to James C. Sanderson, MD  Free Papers – Reconstruction Moderators: Bruce B. Becker, MD and Harvey P. Cole III, MD 50. Complications of Hard Palate Mucosa Grafts Jill A. Foster, David E. Holck, Jonathan J. Dutton, Jeffrey C. Popp, Allan E. Wulc 51. Use of a Levator Labii Superioris Alaeque Nasi Muscle Hinge Flap in Medial Canthal Reconstruction Brian S. Biesman 52. Mucous Membrane Grafting in Erythema Multiforme Syndrome G. Chandra Sekhar, Bradley N. Lemke 53. Brow Suspension in Pretarsal Blepharospasm R. Sampath, J. Pitts, J.R.O. Collin 54. Eyelid Microanatomy and the Spread of Basal Cell Carcinomas Kristin J. Tarbet, Philip L. Custer, Morton Smith 55. The Use of Galeal-Pericranial Flaps for Reconstruction of Orbital and Eyelid Defects David T. Tse, Thomas Johnson, Steve Gilberg 56. Reconstruction of Combined Oculomotor and Facial Nerve Paresis Arthur L. Millman ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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57. Presentation of the Lester T. Jones Surgical Anatomy Award Presented by James A. Katowitz, MD to Robert A. Goldberg, MD 58. Presentation of the ASOPRS Research Award Presented by Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD to William R. Nunery, MD  Dialogues – Session Two 59. Involutional Entropion and Enophthalmos: Is There Any Relationship Robert C. Kersten, Bryan J. Hammer, Dwight R. Kulwin 60. Comment on the Previous Paper Bartley R. Frueh 61. Involutional Entropion and the Capsulo-Palpebral Fascia Revisited R. Bruce Ramsey Ernesto A. Calvo 62. Comment on the Previous Paper John L. Wobig 63. Endoscopic Evaluation and Management of the Lacrimal Sump Syndrome Michael E. Migliori 64. Transcanalicular KTP:YAG for revision Dacryocystorhinostomy Bhupendra C.K. Patel, William McLeish, Barratt Phillips, Richard L. Anderson 65. Comment on the Previous Papers Russell S. Gonnering  Free Papers – Lacrimal Moderators: Marc S. Cohen, MD and Steven M. Gilbard, MD 66. The Bubble Test: An Atraumatic Method for Canalicular Laceration Repair Howard J. Loff, John L. Wobig, Roger A. Dailey 67. Nasolacrimal Intubation with Canalicular Atresia or Traumatized Canaliculus Eugene O. Wiggs 68. Non-Laser Endonasal Revision of Failed DCRs Peter J. Dolman, François Codère, François Theriault 69. Office removal of Silicone Lacrimal Tubes in Children via the Nose David B. Lyon 70. Intranasal Dacryocystorhinostomy (Without Laser or Endoscope) Ralph E. Wesley 71. Modified Monocanalicular Silicone Stent Joseph A. Mauriello Jr., Ahmed A. Salam 72. Balloon Catheter Dacryocystorhinostomy: An Alternative to Standard and Laser DCR Jerry K. Popham, Bruce B. Becker, F. Dean Berry, Eugene O. Wiggs 73. Award to Past President George L. Paris, MD Presented by Richard K. Dortzbach, MD  Poster Section [Total = 27]

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27th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Spotlight on Aesthetics” October 26–27, 1996, Chicago Hilton Towers, Chicago, IL

1. Introduction John N. Harrington, MD, President and David M. Reifler, MD, Program Chair  Part One: Blepharospasm, Anatomy and Matinal Dialogues Moderators: George B. Bartley, MD and Susan M. Hughes, MD Free Papers – Blepharospasm 2. Photophobia and Benign Essential Blepharospasm Gary E. Borodic, Charlene Quigg 3. Twelve Years of Botulinum Toxin in Treatment of Craniocervical Dystonia Russell S. Gonnering 4. Limited Myectomy in the Treatment of Essential Blepharospasm David E.E. Holck, Christopher M. DeBacker, Jonathan J. Dutton 5. Selective Facial Neurectomy for Essential Blepharospasm Robert G. Small Keynote Speaker 7. Introduction of Keynote Speaker: Richard L. Anderson, MD David M. Reifler, MD 8. Blepharospasm: Multifactorial in Origin and Management Richard L. Anderson, MD  Free Papers – Anatomy 9. Multipositional High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Orbit Functional Anatomy Jacques G.H. Lasudry, Bradley N. Lemke, Lindell R. Gentry, Richard K. Dortzbach, Bryan S. Sires, Marie-Paule Boncoeur-Martel, Joan S. Kozel, Jean-Paul Adenis 10. New Findings on the Anatomy of the Lateral Canthus Pierre Ritleng, Stephane Gentil, Andre Bourgeon, Jean François Michiels, Joel Thevenot 11. Relationship of the Eye to the Bony Orbit Robert Alan Goldberg, Anurag Relan, BA, Jonathan Hoenig 12. Presentation of the Lester Jones Anatomy Award Presented by Robert Alan Goldberg to David R. Jordan  Matinal Dialogues 13. Preoperative Assessment of Eyelid Cancer Margins with Ultrasound Backscatter Microscopy Kenneth D. Steinsapir, Norman Shorr, Robert Alan Goldberg 14. Comment on the Previous Paper Albert Hornblass 15. Surgical Approach to Circumscribed Conjunctival Tumors Jerry A. Shields, Carol L. Shields, Patrick De Potter 16. Comment on the Previous Paper Jonathan J. Dutton 17. A New Physical Finding in Floppy Eyelid Syndrome: Lash Ptosis and Loss of Eyelash Parallelism John D. Langford, John V. Lindberg 18. Comment on the Previous Paper James W. Karesh ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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19. Pulsed Versus Continuous Wave Incision with the UltraPulse CO2 Laser: A Histopathologic Study Brian S. Biesman, Kevin A. Beadles, Sterling S. Baker 20. Comment on the Previous Paper: Cutaneous Resurfacing Comparing Different Superpulsed CO2 Lasers Arthur Millman 21. Results of Judging of 1996 Posters: Blue Ribbon Winners Announced by David M. Reifler, MD  Morning Sessions Continued Part Two: Spotlight on Aesthetics Moderators: Rona Z. Silkiss, MD and Murray A. Meltzer, MD Free Papers – Cosmetic Surgery 22. The Effects of Blepharoplasty on Eyelid Kinematics and the Blink David E. Cowen, S. Akbar Hasan, Wensi S. Sun, Robert S. Baker, John D. Porter 23. The Use of Botulinum A Toxin to Ameliorate Facial Wrinkles Jill A. Foster, Allan E. Wulc, Donald A. Barnhorst, Francis A. Papay 24. CO2 Laser Upper Eyelid Blepharoplasty David M. Reifler, Brian Biesman 25. Cosmetic CO2 Laser Upper Eyelid Blepharoplasty William N. Offutt IV, Sterling S. Baker 26. Full-Face CO2 Laser Resurfacing Jemshed A. Kahn, Michael E. Migliori, Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Sam Goldberger 27. Cost-Effectiveness and Safety of Office-Based Blepharoptosis Repair Dale R. Meyer, Hugh M. Cooper Free Papers – Eyelid Lesions and Reconstruction 28. Sensitivity and Specificity of Oculoplastic Surgeons in the Diagnosis of 358 Periocular Lesions John T. Harvey, Tim R. Hillson, Jeffrey J. Hurwitz, Eugene Liu, James H. Oestreicher, Robert C. Pashby 29. Multiple Aesthetic Unit Flaps for Medial Canthal Reconstruction Sangeeta C. Logani, Gerald J. Harris 30. Medial and Lateral Canthopexy: A New Procedure Using Soft Tissue Suture Anchoring Devices David E. Cowen, David Pienkowski, Oleh Antonyshyn 31. Medial Tarsal Suspension: A Method for Elevating the Medial Lower Eyelid Charles S. Su MD, Bartley R. Frueh 32. Techniques in Gold Weight Implantation: A Comparison Analysis Jonathan C. Lowry, Islon Woolf, George B. Bartley, James A. Garrity 33. Presentation of the ASOPRS Research Award Presented by William R. Nunery to Chi-Wah Yung Free Papers – Orbit and Socket 34. Biophysical Analysis of Launched Water Balloon Induced Orbital Blow-out Fracture John D. Bullock, Richard J. Bullock, Alan R. Faulkner 35. Spiral CT Imaging of Orbital Disease Michael Kazim, Charles Pfaff 36. The Thirty-Degree Test: An Early Detector of Compressive Optic Neuropathy in Graves’ Eye Disease Christine C. Nelson, Charles S. Su, David C. Musch 37. Reversal of Dysthyroid Optic Neuropathy Following Orbital Fat Decompression Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Kathleen Digre, Jane Durcan MD, Richard L. Anderson 38. Eyelid Crease Incision for Lateral Orbitotomy Gerald J. Harris, Sangeeta C. Logani 39. The Multi-disciplinary Management of Primary Intraosseous Orbital Hemangioma Kevin A. Beadles, Arthur S. Grove Jr., John J. Woog 40. The Role of Local Amphotericin B for Orbito-sinus Fungal Infections Stuart R. Seiff, Susan R. Carter

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41. Volume Replacement in the Anophthalmic Socket Sara Kaltreider, Jeffrey Jacobs 42. Medpor Motility coupling Post: A New Coupling Device for Medpor Orbital Implants John C. Choi, Peter A.D. Rubin, Jerry K. Popham, Mami A. Iwamoto, John W. Shore  Part Three: Video Tribute, Vespertine Dialogues, Closing Remarks Moderators: James W. Karesh, MD and Steven C. Dresner, MD  Featured Video 43. Introduction of Featured Video Richard L. Petrelli 44. Masters of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery—Rocko Michael Fasanella: A Reminiscence Paul T. Gavaris, James W. Karesh  Vespertine Dialogues 45. Long-term Stability of Hydroxyapatite Orbital Implant Density Bryan S. Sires, John B. Holds, Carol R. Archer 46. Comment: Non-synthetic vs. Synthetic Hydroxyapatite Implants David R. Jordan 47. Intracanalicular Laser Assisted Conjunctivo-dacryocystorhinostomy (CDCR) Ronald W. Kristan, Jeffrey Roffman 48. Comment on the Previous Paper John J. Woog 49. Radiotherapy and Graves’ Orbitopathy Joseph A. Mauriello Jr., Shamina Dhillon, Tina Leone, Uri Adler, Mark Franklin, Charles S. Cathcart 50. Comment on the Previous Paper George B. Bartley 51. Award to Immediate Past-President Richard K. Dortzbach, MD and Closing Remarks John N. Harrington, MD  Poster Section [Total = 26] Video Presentations [Total = 6]

28th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Oculoplastic Surgery – An Integrated Approach” October 25, 1997, San Francisco, CA

1. Introduction James A. Katowitz, MD ASOPRS President  Part One: Orbital, Socket, and Traumatic Disorders Moderators: Keith D. Carter, MD and Geoffrey E. Rose 2. Congenital Orbital Varices: Evaluation and Treatment Alternatives David B. Lyon, Graham K. Lee 3. Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients with Orbital Lymphangioma Devron H. Char

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4. Sotradecol Injection for the Treatment of Orbital Vascular Lesions Ted H. Wojno 5. Orbital Dermoid Cysts: Clinicopathologic Correlations, Classification, and Management Dale R. Meyer, Alan M. Lessner, R. Patrick Yeatts, John V. Linberg 6. A Three-Dimensional Imaging System for Monitoring Clinical Features and Treatment Success in Dysthyroid Eye Disease Ewan Kemp, Fiona Irvine 7. Benefits of the Stereolithographic (SLA) Anatomic Modeling system in Complex Orbital Surgery David E.E. Holck, Stuart Farris, Christopher M. DeBacker 8. Orbital Rim Reconstruction Following Maxillectomy Don O. Kikkawa, Robert A. Weisman, Lisa A. Orloff 9. Orbital Tissue Expanders in Congenital Microphthalmos: Surgical Technique (Preliminary Report) Robert Alan Goldberg 10. Vertical Lid Split Orbitotomy Robert C. Kersten, Dwight R. Kulwin 11. Internal Orbital Contouring: A Modified Lateral Orbital Decompression Michael Kazim, Stephen L. Trokel 12. Endoscopic Transillumination of the Ethmoid Sinuses during Medial Wall Orbital Decompression Thomas C. Naugle Jr. 13. The Biophysics of Orbital Floor Fractures: Experimental and Technical Considerations Ronald E. Warwar, John D. Bullock, Dilip R. Ballal, Rahul D. Ballal 14. Absorbable Plating Hardware for Orbital Blow-Out Fracture Surgery Jeffrey L. Jacobs, Robert Alan Goldberg, Norman Shorr, Glenville March Jr. 15. Medpor Motility Coupling Post: Primary Placement in Humans Peter A.D. Rubin, Jeffrey Paul Green, Charles Kent, John W. Shore 16. A More Biologically Inert and Less Expensive Porous Orbital Implant than Hydroxyapatite: Alumina David R. Jordan, Louise Mawn, Steve Gilberg, Seymour Brownstein, V. Hill, S.M. Grahovac 17. Orbital Volume Augmentation with Demineralized Bone in Anophthalmos and Enophthalmos Jeffrey Schiller, Janet M. Neigel, Lisa Higgins 18. A New Approach to Pain Management Following Anophthalmic Socket Surgery James S. Linder, Murray D. Christianson  Guest Lecture 19. Introduction of Guest Lecturer James A. Garrity 20. Measuring Results of Treatment for Graves’ Ophthalmopathy: Bad Science Integrates Us All Colum A. Gorman  Video Tribute 21. Video Tribute: Byron C. Smith Introduction: Paul T. Gavaris  Aesthetics Moderators: Philip L. Custer, MD and Jonathan C. Lowry, MD 22. Tissue Effects of Defocused Carbon Dioxide Laser Energy: A Histopathologic Study Brian S. Biesman, Sterling S. Baker, Jemshed Khan, Resham R. Wadhwani 23. Use of the Krypton Yellow-Green Laser for the Treatment of Facial Vascular and Pigmented Lesions Bhupendra C.K. Patel, David Pratt, Richard L. Anderson 24. Successful Retreatment of Patients Who Had Previously Undergone Laser Skin Resurfacing Brian S. Biesman, Sterling S. Baker 25. Rationale and Methods for Aesthetic Lower Eyelid Fat Distribution Norman Shorr

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26. Laser Assisted Periosteal Release in Endoscopic Browlift Robert Alan Goldberg, Arthur Millman MD 27. Biodegradable Screw Fixation in Endoscopic Browlift Surgery David E.E. Holck, Christopher M. DeBacker, Jill A. Foster 28. Effectiveness of Internal Browpexy for Moderate Brow Ptosis and Suprabrow Furrows Albert Hornblass, Mart T. Duffy 29. The Mini-browlift Robert G. Small 30. Injecting Autogenous Fat to Reproducibly Fill Depressions and Contour Abnormalities Norman Shorr 31. Presentation of the Lester Jones Anatomy Award Presented by David A. Jordan, MD to David B. Lyon, MD  Guest Lecture 32. Introduction of the Guest Lecturer Michael J. Hawes, MD 33. Who Does What and When Robert M. Goldwyn, MD  Systemic Disease; Lacrimal Disorders Moderators: Kathleen F. Archer, MD and Jemshed A. Khan, MD 34. Evaluation, Treatment, and Oculoplastic Intervention for the Ophthalmic and Systemic Manifestation of Erdheim-Chester Disease Daniel P. Schaefer 35. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma: Report of Three Cases R. Patrick Yeatts; Wain L. White, Barry Leshin, Brian L. Matthews, William F. McQuirt 36. Coexistence of Three Tumors of Neural Crest Origin: Meningioma, Neurofibroma, and Melanoma John D. Bullock, Ronald E. Warwar, Jerry A. Shields, Ralph Eagle Jr. 37. Late Onset Chemosis in Patients with Previous Head and Neck Tumors Gerald J. Harris, Ramin Tayani, Christopher Schultz, Efrain M. Cancel 38. A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to the Management of Atypical Lacrimal Outflow Obstruction in Children John J. Woog, Jamie Wong, Michael J. Cunningham, Peter A.D. Rubin, Barbara L. Carter, Hugh Curtin 39. Endocanalicular Neodymium:YAG Laser Dacryocystorhinostomy Martin L. Leib, Aaron M. Fay 40. Endonasal DCR in the Primary Management of Acute Dacryocystitis with Abscess Formation Tae Soo Lee, John J. Woog 41. Severe Visual and Functional Impairment in Patients with Acquired Nasolacrimal Obstruction Geva E. Mannor, MPH, Geoffrey E. Rose 42. Oral and Topical Antibiotic Therapy of Complete Acquired Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction in Adults Joseph A. Mauriello Jr., Carlos Guzman 43. Dacryocystographic Intraoperative Evaluation of Balloon Catheter Dacryoplasty in the Treatment of Dacryostenosis and Epiphora Arthur L. Millman 44. Balloon Dacryoplasty for Adults with Partial Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Julian D. Perry, Marlon Maus, Thaddeus Nowinski 45. Improving the Patency of External Dacryocystorhinostomy in Complicated Cases: A Laboratory Study and Clinical Application James R. Patrinely, Charles N.S. Soparkar 46. The Use of Mitomycin C in Repeat Dacryocystorhinostomy Robert B. Neves, R. Patrick Yeatts

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47. Presentation of the ASOPRS Research Award Presented by Deborah Sherman MD to Jonathan J. Dutton, MD, PhD  Guest Lecture 48. Introduction of Guest Lecturer John D. Bullock 49. The Evolving Integration of Health Care Systems in the United States: Implications for Oculoplastic Surgeons Robert R. Waller  Eyelid Disorders and ASOPRS Theses Moderators Robert C. Kersten, MD and Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD 50. The Limited Myectomy: Technique and Results Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Ricardo Morschbacher, John McCann, David Pratt MD, Richard L. Anderson 51. Transconjunctival Frontalis Suspension: A Clinical Evaluation Roger A. Dailey, Howard J. Loff, John L. Wobig 52. The Fasanella-Servat Procedure: Indications, Efficacy and Complications Roger W. Newsom, John T. Harvey 53. Small Incision Levator Repair Mark J. Lucarelli, Bradley N. Lemke 54. The Blepharosternutatory Reflex Paul Langer, Bhupendra C.K. Patel, John Hunts, Richard L. Anderson 55. Introduction to the ASOPRS Thesis Section Roger A. Dailey 56. Evolutionary Multipositional Orbital Anatomy in Thyroid-Associated Ophthalmopathy by HighResolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging Gregory Vaughn 57. Magnetization Transfer Imaging of Extraocular Muscles in Graves’ Disease Sangeeta Logani 58. Distribution of Adrenergic Receptor Subtypes in the Retractor Muscles of the Upper Eyelid Bita Esmaeli 59. Orbital Fibroblast Interleukin-6 Gene Expression and Immunomodulation Michael Burnstine 60. Presentation of the Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Bita Esmaeli, MD] Presented by Roger Dailey, MD 61. Presentation of the Marvin Quickert Thesis Award [to Michael Burnstine, MD] Presented by Roger Dailey, MD 62. The Role of Lower Eyelid Fat in Involutional Entropion Gary L. Aguilar, Susan Carter 63. Tarsal Margin Rotation with Posterior Lamella Super-Advancement: An Aesthetic Approach to Cicatricial Entropion of the Upper Eyelid Stuart R. Seiff 64. Floppy Eyelid Syndrome: A New Surgical Correction Fiona Robinson, Sally Wheatcroft, Richard Collin 65. Stabilization of Involutional Ectropion Repair through Modified SOOF Lift in Patients at Risk for Early Failure John C. Choi 66. The Cheeklift as a Reconstructive Procedure of the Lower Eyelid Mark A. Codner, Clinton D. McCord, T. Roderick Hester 67. Comparison of Homologous Sclera to Autologous Hard Palate Mucosa in the Treatment of Dysthyroid Lower Eyelid Retraction David E.E. Holck, Jill A. Foster, Christopher M. DeBacker, Jonathan J. Dutton, Randy Mauffray, Angela Kim

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68. Contoured Auricular Cartilage Grafts for Lower Eyelid Support John V. Linberg, David Kostick, Mary Rose L. Pe, John D. Langford 69. Burn Scar Malignancies of the Eyelids David Pratt, Bhupendra Patel, Ionnis Ntountas, Heliton Lemos, Richard L. Anderson 70. Presentation to Immediate Past President, John N. Harrington MD; Closing Remarks James A. Katowitz, MD  Poster Section [Total = 25] Video Presentations [Total = 9]

29th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “The Evolution of Oculoplastic Surgery” November 7, 1998, Fairmont Hotel, New Orleans, LA

1. Introduction Michael J. Hawes, MD, ASOPRS President  Free Papers – Orbit and Socket Moderators: John B. Holds, MD and Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD 2. Orbital and Eyelid Expansion in Clinical Anophthalmos: Adherence to Physiologic Principles with Orbital Tissue Expanders Grant W. Heinz, Don O. Kikkawa, Haila Al-Hussain 3. Complications Associated with Pegging Hydroxyapatite Implants David R. Jordan, S. Chan, L. Mawn, S. Gilberg, T. Dean, 4. Surgical Technique for a Novel Titanium Motility/Support Peg System Daniel J. Coden 5. Sterilization Techniques for HIV-1 Infected Donor Sclera Arthur C. Perry 6. Conical Porous Polyethylene Implants for Enucleation and Evisceration Steven C. Dresner, A. Linn Murphree, James W. Karesh 7. Mucocele: A Multidisciplinary Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge Mark R. Levine, Howard Levine, Jennifer Wang 8. Treatment of Frey’s Syndrome (Gustatory Sweating) and “Crocodile Tears” (Gustatory Epiphora) with Purified Botulinum Toxin R. Jeffrey Hoffmann 9. Ten Year Retrospective Study of Periorbital Skin Cancers: Statistical Analysis of Criteria for Orbital Exenteration Michael A. Callahan, Christopher Harmon, Gary D. Monheit 10. Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis and Optic Nerve Sheath Decompression Roger A. Dailey, Lance T. Marr, BS, William T. Shults, John L. Wobig 11. Endoscopic Transantral Approach for Repair of Inferior Orbital Bone Fracture Using Flexible Silastic Sheet Tae Soo Lee 12. Solid Silicone in the Orbit: Now on Even Less Solid Ground? Charles N.S. Soparkar, James R. Patrinely, Ashraf Khan, Ronald Pelton, Ramon Font, Gonzalo Blanco, Pascale Perusse, Charles Keen 13. Use of Bioabsorbable Fixation Devices in Orbital and Midfacial Fractures Ralph Garremone, Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Richard L. Anderson ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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14. A New Clinical Finding in Thyroid-Associated Orbitopathy: Glabellar Furrows Noel D. Sacks, Michael A. Burnstine, Allen M. Putterman 15. Intracranial Prolapse of Orbital Fat as CT Evidence of Optic Neuropathy in Graves’ Orbitopathy Michael Kazim, JoAnn Giaconi, Tae Rho, Charles Pfaff 16. Orbital Decompression for Graves’ Orbitopathy: A Comparison of the Transantral Approach (WalshOgura Procedure) versus Combined Transconjunctival and Endoscopic Transnasal Approach Jeffrey B. Goldstein, Kyle Balch, Ted H. Wojno 17. “Doorstop” Lateral Orbital Decompression Robert C. Kersten, Dwight R. Kulwin 18. Dynamic M.R.I. Charles M. Citrin, Paul T. Gavaris 19. Ocular Surface Reconstruction with Amniotic Membrane William J. Lipham, Terry Kim, Christopher M. DeBacker, Jonathan J. Dutton  Featured Speaker 20. Introduction of Invited Member Lecture Russell S. Gonnering, MD 21. Invited Member Lecture: An Aesthetic Approach to Orbital Surgery Gerald J. Harris, MD  Free Papers: Lacrimal and ASOPRS Theses Moderators: Sara A. Kaltreider, MD and David B. Lyon, MD 22. Common Canalicular Obstruction: Results of Management Sung-Gyun Shin, Bartley R. Frueh, David C. Musch 23. Comparative Lacrimal Sac and Ethmoid Anatomy in Asian and Western Adult Patients Jung Chul Shin, Tae Soo Lee, Daniel Buerger, Hugh Curtin, Barbara Carter, John J. Woog 24. Comparison of Oxymetazoline and Lidocaine versus Cocaine for Outpatient Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Dale R. Meyer 25. The Safety and Efficacy of Mitomycin C in Endonasal Endoscopic Laser Assisted Dacryocystorhinostomy Jorge G. Camara 26. A Plea for Preservation of the Middle Turbinate During Dacryocystorhinostomy George B. Bartley, Ray O. Gustafson 27. Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy Using Powered Instrumentation Michael Mercandetti, Joseph P. Mirante, Charles S.G. Maris 28. Pediatric Conjunctival Dacryocystorhinostomy Katrinka L. Heher, Michael A. Johnson, James A. Katowitz 29. Intraocular Invasion by Conjunctival Squamous Cell Carcinoma Jerry A. Shields, Carol L. Shields, Kaan Gunduz, Ralph C. Eagle Jr.  ASOPRS Theses 30. The Effects of Tetanus Toxin on the Orbicularis Oculi Muscle John P. Fezza, Jane Howard, Ron Wiley, Ralph E. Wesley, Kimberly Klippenstein, Wolf Dettbarn 31. Conjunctival Cytology Features of Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Associated with Ocular Prostheses Warren J. Chang, David T. Tse, Robert H. Rosa, Andrew Huang, Thomas E. Johnson, Joyce Schiffman, MS 32. An Orbital Approach to Medial Canthal Ligament Plication for Lower Eyelid Laxity Robert G. Fante, Victor M. Elner 33. The Anatomy of Midfacial Ptosis Mark J. Lucarelli, Sang In Khwarg, Bradley N. Lemke, Joan S. Kozel, Richard K. Dortzbach, MD 34. Presentation of the Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presented by David B. Lyon to Mark J. Lucarelli, MD

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35. Presentation of the ASOPRS Research Award Presented by David B. Lyon to Morris E. Hartstein, MD 36. Presentation of the Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Ramon Font, MD] Presented by Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD 37. Presentation of the Lester Jones Anatomy Award [to Jack Rootman, MD] Presented by David R. Jordan, MD  Guest Lecture 38. Introduction of Guest Lecturer, Morton E. Smith Philip L. Custer, MD 39. Melanocytic Lesions of the Eye and Orbit Morton E. Smith, MD  Free Papers – Eyelid and Aesthetics Moderators: Thomas M. Kropp, MD and Thomas A. Bersani, MD 40. Müllerectomy as a Primary Procedure for Exposure Keratitis Secondary to Seventh Nerve Paralysis Victor M. Elner, Amjad Z. Ahmad, Robert G. Fante 41. Entropion and Ectropion of the Asian Eyelid Susan R. Carter, Stuart R. Seiff, Gary Aguilar, John Chang 42. The Versatile Lateral Tarsal Strip: A Review of Over 5000 Cases Richard L. Anderson, Bhupendra C.K. Patel 43. Horizontal Mattress (Base-up Triangle) Suture for Repair of Medial Canthal Tendon Laxity for Eyelid Reconstruction Joseph A. Mauriello Jr., Lan Nguyen 44. Cicatricial Entropion after the Fox Procedure: Repair with the Quickert “Four Snip” Technique John B. Holds 45. Incisional Lateral Canthal Refixation and Horizontal Lower Lid Tightening: A Minimal Approach John C. Choi, John W. Shore 46. Internal Eyelash Bulb Extirpation for Trichiasis Jonathan J. Dutton, Christopher M. DeBacker, William Lipham 47. Congenital Horizontal Tarsal Kink: Clinical Characteristics From a Large Series Bryan S. Sires 48. The Correction of Lower Eyelid Retraction by Transconjunctival Retractor Excision and Lateral Eyelid Suspension Jonathan W. Kim, Don S. Ellis, William B. Stewart 49. Predicting Lagophthalmos in Ptosis Surgery Geoffrey J. Gladstone, Brian G. Brazzo, Frank A. Nesi, Shoib Myint 50. Frontalis Suspension for Severe Unilateral Congenital Ptosis with Poor Levator Function Kristin J. Tarbet, Sang In Khwarg, Mark J. Lucarelli, Richard K. Dortzbach, Bradley N. Lemke 51. Removal of Infected Silicone Rod Frontalis Slings Without Recurrence of Ptosis Ted H. Wojno, Jeffrey P. Green 52. Success of Supra-Whitnall’s Levator Muscle Resection in the Treatment of Fair-Function Ptosis David E.E. Holck, Jonathan J. Dutton, Christopher DeBacker, John Ng, Jill A. Foster 53. Anatomic Observations in Involutional Blepharoptosis Jeffrey A. Nerad, Mark A. Alfred, Keith D. Carter 54. Correcting Upper Eyelid Horizontal Laxity During Ptosis Repair John W. Shore, Russell W. Neuhaus, Sean Blaydon 55. The Endoscopic Brow Lift for the Management of 7th Nerve Palsies and Blepharospasm Stuart R. Seiff, Susan R. Carter, Phillip H. Choo 56. The Use of Alloderm in Eyelid Reconstruction Norman Shorr, Jonathan Hoenig 57. Facial Soft Tissue Augmentation with AutologenTM and DermalogenTM Steven Fagien

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58. A Clinical Comparison of Surgical Modalities Used in Aesthetic Eyelid Surgery Roger E. Bassin, Murray Meltzer, Geva Mannor, Arthur Millman, James Milite, Ira Eliasoph, Michael Landa 59. Determination of Skin Excision in Upper Eyelid Blepharoplasty: A Mathematical Model John J Woog, Santosh Vempala  60. Member Tribute: Richard R. Tenzel, MD Introduction by Ted H. Wojno, MD  Free Papers – Aesthetics Moderators: Harvey P. Cole III, MD and Kenneth V. Cahill, MD 61. Skin Healing Following Periorbital CO2 Laser Resurfacing Geva E. Mannor, Robert Phelps 62. Aesthetic Erbium Laser Resurfacing: The Michigan Experience Brian G. Brazzo, Frank A. Nesi, Geoffrey J. Gladstone 63. Combined Erbium:YAG and CO2 Laser Skin Resurfacing Arthur L. Millman, Geva E. Mannor 64. Festoon Reduction by CO2 Laser Resurfacing Techniques Sterling S. Baker, Brian S. Biesman, John J. Woog 65. Radiation: Relative or Absolute Contraindication for Laser Skin Resurfacing Brian S. Biesman, Bhupendra C.K. Patel, David Wazur 66. Nd:YAG Laser Closure of Upper Eyelid Blepharoplasty Incisions: Preliminary Results Jemshed A. Khan 67. Effect of Manually Applied Tension on the Zone of Thermal Damage in CO2 Laser Eyelid Incision Brian C. Mulrooney, Jemshed A. Khan, George Timberlake 68. Complete Midfacial Augmentation: Combining Subperiosteal Soft Tissue Elevation, Silicone Implants and Fat Transplantation Jonathan A. Hoenig, Norman Shorr 69. Corono-canthopexy: Retrospective Review of 125 Consecutive Cases and Description of Procedure Robert S. Flowers, Eugene M. Smith Jr. 70. Liposuction: Perspectives on Liposuction and Klein’s Tumescent Liposuction of the Body Kenneth D. Steinsapir  Symposium on Aesthetics 71. Introduction Harvey P. Cole III 72. Considerations in Developing an Aesthetic Practice Robert M. Dryden 73. Reconstructive and Cosmetic Rhytidectomy William R. Nunery 74. Neck Rejuvenation: A Systematic Approach Bhupendra C.K. Patel 75. Presentation to Immediate Past President James A. Katowitz, MD Michael J. Hawes, MD, ASOPRS President Poster Section [Total = 25] Video Presentations [Total = 9]

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30th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Three Decades of Oculoplastic Surgery” October 23, 1999, Renaissance Orlando Hotel, Orlando, FL

1. Welcome and Introductory Remarks Perry F. Garber, MD, ASOPRS President  Orbit, Socket Moderators: Robert A. Mazzoli, MD and David M. Reifler, MD 2. Three Decades of Oculoplastics: Orbital and Socket Advances Bartley R. Frueh 3. Orbital Blow-Out Fractures: Correlation of Preoperative Computed Tomography and Postoperative Ocular Motility Gerald J. Harris, George H. Garcia, Sangeeta C. Logani, Michael L. Murphy 4. The International Optic Nerve Trauma Study. What Has It Told Us and Where Do We Go From Here? Stuart R. Seiff 5. Orbital Exenteration for Advanced Conjunctival Melanoma. A Report of 20 Cases Jerry A. Shields, Carol L. Shields, Kaan Gündüz, Jacqueline Cater 6. “Cheese Whiz” DCR: Use of Reprisol to Mark and Protect the Nasal Lacrimal Sac Robert Alan Goldberg, John D. McCann, Jun Hosohata, Norman Shorr 7. The Effect of Cigarette Smoke Constituents on the Expression of HLA-DR in Orbital Fibroblasts Derived from Patients with Graves’ Ophthalmopathy William P. Mack, George O. Stasior, H. James Cao, Orkan George Stasior, Terry J. Smith 8. Strabismus Following Balanced Medial Plus Lateral Wall versus Lateral Wall Only Orbital Decompression for Dysthyroid Orbitopathy Julian D. Perry, Robert A. Goldberg, John Tong 9. InstaTrakTM Imaging System for Transnasal Optic Canal Decompression in Dysthyroid Optic Neuropathy and More... Mark Duffy, Louis Portugal 10. Enucleation of Blind Painful Eyes Philip L. Custer, Chet Reistad 11. Evisceration: Improved Orbital Volume Augmentation with Trans-Ocular Implant John A. Long 12. Analysis of Seven Different Anophthalmic Orbital Implant Wraps Stephen R. Klapper, David R. Jordan, Steven Gilberg, Karim Punja, Seymour Brownstein 13. Results of Unwrapped Conical and Spherical Porous Polyethylene Enucleation Implants Todd Cook, Mark J. Lucarelli, Bradley N. Lemke 14. Management of Exposed Porous Polyethylene Implants Steven C. Dresner 15. Prosthetic Motility in Pegged Versus Unpegged Integrated Porous Orbital Implants Don O. Kikkawa, Sunil N. Vasani, Paulo Guillinta, Geva E. Mannor, Grant W. Heinz 16. Temporalis Muscle Transfer Flap in the Treatment of the Contracted Socket David E.E. Holck, John D. Ng, Jill A. Foster, Christopher M. DeBacker, Jonathan J. Dutton  Guest Lecture 17. Introduction of Guest Lecture Sterling S. Baker, MD

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18. The Anatomy of the Forehead, Periorbital Area, and Midface Nicanor Isse, MD  Eyelid Disorders Moderators: David G. Buerger, MD and Steven C. Dresner, MD 19. Three Decades of ASOPRS and Oculoplastic Surgery: Advances of Eyelid Surgery Richard L. Anderson 20. Long-Term Outcome of Ocular and Systemic Involvement in Patients with Necrobiotic Xanthogranuloma Seyda Ugurlu, George B. Bartley, Lawrence E. Gibson 21. Periocular Sebaceous Gland Carcinoma: A Retrospective Review of 42 Cases Hatem A. Tawfik, Jonathan J. Dutton, Christopher M. DeBacker, William J. Lipham, Gordon K. Klintworth 22. Periorbital Basal Cell Carcinoma in Young Patients: Incidence Trends 1990–1998 Jung Chul Shin, Lisa A. Mansueto, Scott Meyers, Donald Grande, Carlos Pl Adams, Thomas Rohrer, John J. Woog 23. Prognostic Factors for Malignant Melanoma of the Eyelid Bita Esmaeli-Gutstein, Bao Wang, Eduardo Diaz, Ann Gillenwater, Susan Eicher, Helmuth Goepfert 24. Cicatricial Entropion Treated by Amniotic Membrane Spacer Graft Placement Michael A. Burnstine, Jane J. Olson 25. Lower Eyelid Retraction Repair: A New Material, A New Technique Charles N.S. Soparkar, James R. Patrinely 26. Combined Flap Repair of Moderate Lower Eyelid Defects Jemshed A. Khan, Valerie Garden 27. Advancement Flaps for Large Defects of the Glabella, Eyebrow, and Forehead Gerald J. Harris, George H. Garcia 28. Multiple Periorbital Flap Reconstruction of Large Medial Canthal Soft Tissue Defects David E. Cowen 29. Catastrophic Corneal Complications after Severe Thermal Burns to the Eyelids Joseph A. Mauriello Jr. 30. Construction and Implementation of Clinical Study Instrument for Hemifacial Spastic Disease Gary E. Borodic 31. Trial of Cervical Sympathetic Blockade for the Treatment of Photophobia Associated with Benign Essential Blepharospasm John D. McCann 32. Blepharoptosis Surgery: Outcomes at Moorfields Eye Hospital from 1990 to 1995 Hindola Konrad, Christine C. Nelson, C. Bunce, J.R.O. Collin FRCS, FRCOphth 33. Marcus Gunn Jaw-Winking Phenomenon: A New Supplemental Test in the Preoperative Evaluation James F. Wong, Jean François A. Thériault, Chedley Bouzouaya, François Codère (ESOPRS) 34. A Unique Approach to Brow Elevation in the Elderly Bhupendra C.K. Patel 35. Endoscopic Brow Lift for Brow Ptosis in Facial Palsy: A Viable Option with Appropriate Modifications in the Standard Technique Ron Pelton, Shu Lang Liao, Bhupendra C.K. Patel  Aesthetics Moderators: Jeffrey P. Edelstein, MD and Daniel P. Schaefer, MD 36. Technique for Revision Upper Blepharoplasty in Asians Robert S. Flowers, Eugene M. Smith Jr. 37. Cosmetic Lower Lid Tightening: Lateral Tarsal Strip vs. Inferior Retinaculum Geva Mannor, Don O. Kikkawa, Peter Sakol 38. Cautery of the Orbital Septum during Blepharoplasty Phillip H. Choo, J. Earl Rathbun 39. Management of the Lower Eyelid Hypertrophic Orbicularis Paul J. Weber, Allan E. Wulc, Robert M. Dryden, Jill A. Foster ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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40. Comparative Histology: Application of High Fluence Small Spot Size in Erbium Resurfacing Sterling S. Baker, Adam J. Scheiner 41. Periorbital Erbium:YAG Laser Resurfacing: Histologic Correlation of Clinical Outcome Geva Mannor, Murray Meltzer, Roger Bassin, Robert Phelps 42. The KTP Laser in Oculoplastic Surgery Brian S. Biesman, Ralph E. Wesley, Kimberly A. Klippenstein 43. Treatment of Periocular Xanthelasma with the Long-Pulse Frequency-Doubled Nd:YAG Laser Michael E. Migliori 44. Combination Treatment for Glabellar Folds: Botulinum Injections with Autologous Fat Transplantation Katrinka L. Heher, Louis P. Bucky 45. The Botox® Brow Lift Jill A. Foster, Allan E. Wulc, David E.E. Holck, Everardo Castro, Wilber Huang 46. Upper Facial Rejuvenation: Composite Forehead and Mid-Face Lifting, Laser Blepharoplasty, Canthal Fixation, and Dual Wave Laser Resurfacing Arthur L. Millman, Geva Mannor, Thomas Romo III 47. Modified Endoscopic Forehead Lift: Suction Radiofrequency Corrugator Motor Neurotomy and Periosteal Release, Multi-Vector Suspension, and Rapid Laser-Assisted Multi-Screw Fixation Jemshed A. Khan, Reynaldo M. Javate, Valerie Garden 48. The “S Lift”: A Simplified Mini-Facelift Norman Shorr, Robert Alan Goldberg, John D. McCann, Jonathan A. Hoenig  Guest Lecture 49. Endoscopic Techniques of the Forehead, Periorbital Area, and Midface Nicanor Isse, MD  Lacrimal Disorders and ASOPRS Theses Moderators: Susan R. Carter, MD and Jemshed A. Khan, MD 50. Three Decades of ASOPRS and Oculoplastic Surgery: ASOPRS – In the Beginning George F. Buerger 51. Video Tribute: Wendell Hughes, MD Introduction by Paul T. Gavaris, MD 52. Three Decades of Oculoplastics: Advances in Lacrimology John L. Wobig 53. Complications of Intracanalicular Silicone Plugs Junhee Lee, Joseph C. Flanagan 54. Transfer of the Autologous Submandibular Gland for Severe Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Gerd Geerling, John K.G. Dart, J. Richard O. Collin 55. Hassle-Free Pseudococaine for Office Use James R. Patrinely, Charles N.S. Soparkar, C. Richard Stasney 56. Radiologic Analysis of the Ethmoid Bone-Cribiform Plate Spatial Relationship David P. McCann, Mark J. Lucarelli 57. Endoscopic Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy (CDCR) with Jones Tube Placement: A Comparative Study Dale R. Meyer, William L. Trotter 58. Conjunctival Incision for Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy (CDCR) with Jones Tube Don Liu 59. Introduction of the ASOPRS Thesis Section R. Patrick Yeatts 60. Comparison of Cadaveric Acellular Dermal, Dura Mater, and Pericardial Conjunctival Allografts John T. Tong

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61. Color Doppler Imaging Abnormalities in Traumatic Optic Neuropathy Richard A. Burgett 62. Histologic Analysis and Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of the Muscle of Riolan: Implications for Functional Relationships William J. Lipham, Hatem A Tawfik, Jonathan J. Dutton 63. Secondary Fractures of LeFort I Osteotomy Matthew W. Wilson 64. Presentation of the Marvin Quickert Thesis Award [to William J. Lipham] Presented by R. Patrick Yeatts 65. Presentation of the Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Roberta E. Gausas, MD] Presented by David B. Lyon, MD 66. Presentation of the ASOPRS Research Award [to Bita Esmaeli, MD] Presented by Jeffrey A. Nerad MD 67. Presentation of the Jones Anatomy Award [to Gerald J. Harris, MD] Presented by David R. Jordan, MD 68. Presentation to Immediate Past President Michael J. Hawes, MD and Closing Remarks Perry F. Garber, MD, ASOPRS President Poster Section [Total = 34] Video Presentations [Total = 4]

31st Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Innovations & Excellence” October 20–21, 2000, Adam’s Mark Hotel, Dallas, TX

Friday, October 20, 2000 1. Welcome and Introductory Remarks Bradley N. Lemke, MD, ASOPRS President and Sara A. Kaltreider, MD, Program Chair  Aesthetics Modalities and Techniques Moderators: Jill A. Foster, MD and Marc S. Cohen, MD 2. Evaluation of a New Method for Facial Rejuvenation Utilizing Intense Pulsed Light John H. Hunts, Lisa Worden, RN, Tina L. Callina, COMT 3. Blepharoplasty or Ptosis Repair? Modified Preoperative MRD1b Measurement Predicts Post-Blepharoplasty MRD1 Jemshed A. Khan, Valerie Garden 4. Power of Combined Therapies: Botox and Ablative Facial Laser Resurfacing Jean Carruthers, Alastair Carruthers, Agniescha Zelichowska, Sterling Baker 5. Treatment of Refractory Post-Laser Hyperpigmentation with Glycolic Washes Michael E. Migliori 6. Comparison of the Healing after CO2 Laser Blepharoplasty and Traditional Methods Daniel E. Buerger, John Hunts, Patrick M. Flaharty, Brian S. Biesman 7. Spot Size and Skin Cooling are Important Parameters in Laser-Assisted Hair Removal Brian S. Biesman, Ralph E. Wesley, Kimberly A. Klippenstein, Lou Reinisch 8. Enhancement of Eyelid Cosmesis and Reconstruction with Meneuzes Technique of MicroPigmentation Stephen Bosniak, Marian Cantisano-Zilkha, Valfrido Meneuzes

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9. Comparative Histology of the Clinicon SureBladeTM to Other Conventional Incisional Methods Jon R. Berlie, Sterling S. Baker 10. The Value of Radiosurgery in Cosmetic and Reconstructive Oculoplastic Procedures Jay Justin Older 11. Radiosurgical Shave Biopsy Technique to Remove Benign Sin Lesions Chedley Bouzouaya, Sterling Baker  The First Annual Henry I. Baylis Lecture 12. Introduction Robert A. Goldberg 13. Concepts and Management of the Eyelid Facial Contour Continuum Norman Shorr  Midface Rejuvenation Moderators: Roger A. Dailey, MD and Christine C. Nelson, MD 14. Endoscopic Midface Lift: What is the Best Plane? Robert Alan Goldberg, John D. McCann, Jonathan W. Kim 15. Endoscopic Subperiosteal Midface Lift: Indications and Outcomes Scot A. Sullivan, Roger A. Dailey 16. The Modified Cook-Giampapa Midface Lift Susan M. Hughes 17. The “Mini SOOF� Procedure Paul T. Gavaris 18. A Modified Approach to Midface Lifts Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Lucia Lucci, Ron Pelton  Lower Facial Rejuvenation Moderators: Deborah D. Sherman, MD and Harvey Cole III, MD 19. The Mini-Facelift: Why Bother? Kathleen M. Duerksen 20. Tumescent Liposuction of the Neck Kathleen F. Archer 21. Modified Extended Supraplatysmal Plane (ESP) Facelift Patrick M. Flaharty, Mont J. Cartwright  Featured Guest Speaker 22. Introduction David E.E. Holck 23. Soft Tissue Augmentation with Skin Filling Substances Gary D. Monheit  Mini-Sessions: Four Concurrent Afternoon Sessions 24. Endoscopic Forehead Rejuvenation: Live Surgical Demonstration, Procedural Pearls, and Panel Discussion Asa Morton III, Oscar Ramirez, Don O. Kikkawa, Robert Fante, Geva Mannor, Andrew Eiseman 25. Midface Lift: Techniques and Controversies Joel Kopelman, Robert Goldberg, Mark Lucarelli, Jonathan Hoenig, Norman Shorr, Michael Patipa 26. Recent Advances in Laser Skin Rejuvenation: Case Presentations and Discussion Sterling Baker, Brian Biesman, Jemshed Khan, Jean Carruthers, Gary Monheit 27. Implants and Enhancers John Shore 

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Saturday, October 21, 2000 28. Welcome and Introductory Remarks Bradley N. Lemke, MD, ASOPRS President and Sara A. Kaltreider, MD, Program Chair  Lacrimal Disorders Moderators: Mark J. Lucarelli, MD, John D. Langford, MD 29. Double-blind Prospective Study Comparing Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) Coated versus Uncoated Silicone Stents for DCR Surgery Marlon Maus, Mark Iacobucci, Joseph Flanagan, Timothy McDevitt 30. Involvement of the Lacrimal Drainage System by Leukemia or Lymphoma Chee-Chew Yip FRCS, George B. Bartley, James A. Garrity 31. Lacrimal Sac Dacryoliths: Predictive Factors and Clinical Characteristics Dale R. Meyer, Bulent Yazici, Amjad M. Hammad  Eyelid Disorders 32. Resurfacing Post-Mohs Defects of the lower Eyelid, Cheek and Lateral Canthus: Avoiding Eyelid Distortion Gerald J. Harris, Jan L. Iwata 33. Involutional Lateral Entropion of the Upper Eyelid: A Physical Finding in Asian Patients Jorge G. Camara, Jessica P. Fernandez-Suntay, R. Ronald Zabala, Jesus N. Ong 34. Lateral Limbal-Canthal Distance (LCD): A useful New Clinical Parameter Bradley N. Lemke, Sara Tarrus-Montaner, Mark J. Lucarelli, Briggs Cook 35. “Reverse� Cutler-Beard Bridge Flap for the Reconstruction of Large Defects of the Lower Eyelid Santosh G. Honavar 36. The Arm as a Skin Graft Donor Site for Eyelid Reconstruction Philip L. Custer, Heather Harvey 37. Use of Heat Malleable Thermoplastic Splints in Eyelid Skin Grafting William L. White 38. Risk of Infectious Amyloid Transmission with the Use of Allografts and Xenografts William R. Nunery 39. Amniotic Membrane and Its Ability to Promote Healing and Decrease Inflammation in the Human Eyelid after Thermal Injury / Carbon Dioxide Laser Dermabrasion Ivan P. Hwang, Richard L. Anderson 40. From Eyelid Bumps to Thyroid Lumps: Report of a MEN Type IIb Family and Review of the Literature Jason M. Jacobs, Michael J. Hawes  Aesthetics Featured Guest Speaker The First Annual ASOPRS Foundation Lecture dedicated to Orkan George Stasior 41. Introduction George O. Stasior, MD 42. Cosmetic Evaluation of Photoaging Skin Gary D. Monheit, MD  Face, Orbit, and Socket Moderators: Daniel P. Schaefer, MD and Edward H. Bedrossian Jr., MD 43. Tertiary Procedures in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease Allan E. Wulc, Jill A. Foster, Robert M. Dryden 44. A Simple Reliable One Hour Bilateral Cheek Suspension Norman Shorr 45. The Entropy Law and Eye Plastic Surgery: Risk, Uncertainty, and Irreversible Degradation in the Surgical Process Kenneth D. Steinsapir ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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46. Experience with Eyelid Sparing Orbital Exenteration Jerry A. Shields, Carol L. Shields, Hakan Demirci, Santosh G. Honavar, Arun D. Singh 47. Orbital Exenteration: Results of an Individualized Approach Jonathan W. Kim, Robert A. Goldberg, John McCann, Norman Shorr 48. Use of Iris Conformers Following Enucleation Roger A. Dailey, Kevin R. Schou, Scot A. Sullivan 49. Experience with 50 Bioceramic Orbital Implants David R. Jordan, Steve Gilberg, Ivan P. Hwang 50. Repair of Exposed Porous Polyethylene Implants Utilizing Flaps from the Implant Capsule Hatem A. Tawfik, Ossman M. Zico, Jonathan J. Dutton 51. Exposure of Porous Orbital Implants: The Results of 56 Cases and Management Algorithm Charles N.S. Soparkar, Jamie F. Wong, James R. Patrinely, Keith Carter, James W. Gigantelli, Gene Howard, Peter Levin, John Linberg 52.Pericranium – Where Have You Been All My Life? Paul T. Gavaris  Afternoon Session Moderators: Daniel E. Buerger, MD and Sangeeta C. Logani, MD 53. Rational Approach to the Management of the Microphthalmic Orbit John T. Tong, MD, Robert A. Goldberg, MD  Featured Member Speakers 54. Introduction Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD 55. Rehabilitation of the Microphthalmic Socket James A. Katowitz, MD 56. Enucleation: Past, Present, and Future Philip L. Custer, MD  Application of New Technology 57. Sentinel Lymph Node Localization and Biopsy for Conjunctival Melanomas Bita Esmaeli, Susan Eicher, Ebrahim Delpassand 58. Sentinel Node Mapping and Biopsy for Orbital and Ocular Adnexal Tumors Matthew W. Wilson, James C. Fleming, R.M. Fleming, Ronald T. Martin, William R. Nunery, Raymond Cho 59. The Use of Calcium Phosphate Cement in Craniofacial Repair Tamara R. Fountain, Gail Rosseau 60. The Orbito-Facial Uses of NovaBone-C/M, a Bioactive Glass Synthetic Bone Graft Particulate for Craniofacial and Maxillofacial Surgery Sean M Blaydon, Malena M. Amato, Russell W. Neuhaus, John W. Shore 61. Orbital Roof Fractures: Which Cases Benefit from Surgery? Timothy J. Sullivan, Tim Fulcher  International Papers 62. Comparative Artificial Eye Motility with Acrylic and Hydroxyapatite Spherical Enucleation Implants R.J. Kloos, A.D. Paridaens, T. Colen, H.G. Lemij, M.Ph. Mourits, W.A. van den Bosch 63. A Prospective Randomized Study Comparing Division of the Pedicle in Hughes Flaps at Two or Four Weeks Alan A. McNab, Peter Marin, Ross Benger, Brett O’Donnell, Gina Kourt  ASOPRS Thesis Presentations Moderators: Jane J. Olson, MD and Jeffrey P. Edelstein, MD 64. Introduction of ASOPRS Thesis Section Jill A. Foster, MD ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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65. Bovine Hydroxyapatite Orbital Implant: A Preliminary Report Julian D. Perry, Robert A. Goldberg, Norman Shorr, John McCann, John Tong, Robert Engstrom 66. The Incidence of Post-Blepharoplasty Orbital Hemorrhage and Associated Visual Loss Andrea N. Hass 67. Social Implications of Blepharoptosis and Dermatochalasis Ronald E. Warwar, John D. Bullock, Ronald J. Markert, Sara L. Marciniszyn, David G. Bienenfeld 68. The Superomedial Lid Crease Approach to the Medial Intraconal Space: A New Technique for Orbital Access Ron W. Pelton  Presentation of Awards 69. Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presented to Julian D. Perry, MD 70. Merrill Reeh Pathology Award Presented to Michael Burnstine, MD 71. ASOPRS Research Award Presented to Jorge Camara, MD 72. Lester T. Jones Anatomy Award Presented to Edward H. Bedrossian Jr., MD  Video Tribute 74. Introduction to ASOPRS Member Video Tribute to Charles K. Beyer-Machule, MD Robert G. Small, MD 75. Video Tribute to Charles K. Beyer-Machule, MD  76. Presentation to ASOPRS Immediate Past President, Perry F. Garber, MD and Closing Remarks Bradley N. Lemke, MD, ASOPRS President Posters [Total = 35] Videos [Total = 6]

32nd Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Face, Form & Function” November 9–10, 2001, Marriott Hotel, New Orleans, LA

Friday, November 9, 2001 Welcome President Ralph E. Wesley MD Program Chairs: Robert A. Goldberg, MD and Jill A. Foster, MD Aesthetic Symposium 1. Introduction: The Evolving Discipline of Aesthetic Reconstructive Orbitofacial Surgery Robert Alan Goldberg 2. Evaluation of the Aging Face: Designing a Surgical Plan for the Individual Patient Jonathan Hoenig 3. Designing and Managing the Aesthetic Office Mark Cohen 4. Making Aesthetic Patients Happy, and Dealing with the Ones Who Aren’t Robert Dryden

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5. Introduction of Invited Speaker Gary Lask Robert Alan Goldberg 6. New Aesthetic Lasers: What Works and What Doesn’t Work? Gary Lask  Instruction Courses – Period I [Four concurrent morning courses, each held under the direction of a senior presenter] 7. Course A: Forehead and Upper Face Lift Harvey “Chip” Cole, David E.E. Holck, Susan Carter, Asa Morton 8. Course B: Minimal Incision Facial Rejuvenation Surgery Norman Shorr, Tina Li, Karen Chapman 9. Course C: Midface Lift Joel Kopelman, Rod Hester, Sonny McCord, Bhupendra Patel, Jonathan Hoenig 10. Course D, Period 1: Practical Facial Anatomy for Aesthetic Orbitofacial Surgery Roger Dailey 11. Course D, Period 2: Rejuvenation of Aging Skin: The Palate of Options John D. McCann, Brian Biesman, Gary Lask, John Hunts, David Kamin  Afternoon Session 12. Recognizing, Managing, and Preventing Complications of Facelift Surgery Jeffery Jacobs 13. Recognizing, Managing, and Preventing Complications of Midface Lift Surgery Allan E. Wulc 14. Recognizing, Managing, and Preventing Complications of Cutaneous Laser Surgery Sterling Baker  Invited Speaker 15. Introduction of Invited Speaker Rod Hester, MD Jill A. Foster, MD 16. My Current Approach to the Midface T. Roderick Hester, MD  ASOPRS Featured Speaker 17. Introduction of the ASOPRS Featured Speaker Norman Shorr, MD 18. The Making of a Cosmetic Facial Surgeon Bradley N. Lemke, MD 19. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Award Presented by Ralph E. Wesley, MD to Bradley N. Lemke, MD  Instruction Courses – Period II [Four concurrent afternoon courses, each held under the direction of a senior presenter] 20. Course A: Lower Face and Neck Lift Alan Brackup, Robert Dryden, Henry Baylis, Allan E. Wulc 21. Course B: Liposuction and Fat Injection Ken Steinsapir, Cynthia Boxrud, Susie Hughes, Jeff Popp 22. Course C: Advanced Techniques in Blepharoplasty Robert Alan Goldberg, Julian, Perry, Jane Olson, Jonathan Kim, Troy Woodman 23. Course D: Botox and Soft Tissue Augmentation Richard Anderson, John Shore, Jill A. Foster, Jean Carruthers, Steve Fagien, David A. Jordan, Francis C. Papay 

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Saturday, November 10, 2001 24. Introductory Remarks President Ralph E. Wesley MD and Program Chairs Robert A. Goldberg, MD and Jill A. Foster, MD  Orbit Moderators: Kenneth L. Piest, MD and Deborah Sherman, MD 25. A Simple Algorithm for Selection of Implant Size for Enucleation and Evisceration Sara A. Kaltreider, Mark Lucarelli 26. Stimulation of Orbital Growth by the Use of Spherical Hydrogel Auto-Expansile Implants in the Anophthalmic Pig Orbit David E.E. Holck, Gary Lane, Sheri DeMartelaere, John D. Ng, Jill A. Foster, Sean Blaydon 27. Medial Rectus Injuries Associated with Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS) Dale R. Meyer, Christine Huang, MS, James R. Patrinely, Charles N.S. Soparkar, Roger A. Dailey, Marlon Maus, Peter A.D. Rubin, R. Patrick Yeatts, Thomas A. Bersani, James W. Karesh, Andrew R. Harrison, Joseph P. Shovlin 28. Complications Associated with 400 Porous Orbital Implants David R. Jordan, Vernon Ho Yuen, Steve Gilberg, Ahmed Bawazeer 29. The Effect of Preemptive Retrobulbar Analgesia on Perioperative Hemodynamics and Postoperative Pain Following Enucleation Chad R. Brasington, R. Patrick Yeatts, P.E. Scuderi 30. Reconstruction of Complex Orbitocranial Deformities Using Bioresorbable Mesh, Sterilized Orbital Models and In Situ Contouring Kanograt Pornpanich, Don O. Kikkawa, Ralph E. Holmes, Steven R. Cohen, Hal Meltzer, Peter Nakaji 31. Second Insult After Post-Traumatic Optic Neuropathy Resulting in Irreversible Blindness: Something We Should All Know About? Charles N.S. Soparkar, James R. Patrinely, Jamie F. Wong 32. Complications of Supramid Orbital Implants Philip L. Custer  ASOPRS Foundation Sponsored Speakers Given in Honor of Arthur J. Schaefer, MD, ASOPRS President 1988 33. Introduction William L. Walter, MD 34. The Mayo ORGO (Orbital Radiation for Graves’ Ophthalmopathy) Study: Lessons Learned George B. Bartley, MD 35. The Rational Use of Orbital Radiation Therapy in Graves’ Orbitopathy Michael Kazim  Lacrimal Moderators: Tamara R. Fountain, MD and Robert A. Mazzoli, MD 36. Modified Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy with as High a Success Rate as External Dacryocystorhinostomy Tae Soo Lee 37. The Effect of Muller’s Muscle-Conjunctiva Resection on Schirmer Testing and the Development of Dry Eye Symptoms Roger A. Dailey, Stanley M. Saulny, Scot A. Sullivan 38. Experience with a Medpor Coated Jones Tube Ted Wojno 39. Canalicular Stenosis Secondary to Weekly Docetaxel (Taxotere) in Patients with Breast Cancer Bita Esmaeli, Amir Ahmadi, Francisco Esteva, Daniel Booser, Nuhad Imbrahim, Ebrahim Delpassand, Rebecca Arbuckle, Gabriel Hortobagyi 40. Preserving the Integrity of the Orbicularis during Blepharoplasty in the Dry Eye Patient Steven C. Dresner, Daryoush Sadaat

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41. Monocanalicular Stenting and Balloon Dacryoplasty Following Failed Probing for Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Jeffrey B. Goldstein, Scott M. Goldstein, James A. Katowitz 42. Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery L. Neal Freeman  Featured Speaker 43. Introduction of Featured Speaker Jill A. Foster, MD 44. The Human Face: Form Influenced by Function, and the Intrinsic and Cultural Aspects of Human Beauty Bruce Latimer  Aesthetics Moderators: Susan M. Hughes, MD and John D. Ng, MD 45. Lip Augmentation Using Eyelid Tissue from Upper Blepharoplasty Surgery John P. Fezza, Mont Cartwright 46. Ten Tips for a Safe, Reliable Deep Plane Facial Rhytidectomy David E.E. Holck, O. Bailey Robertson, John D. Ng Jill A. Foster, Christopher M. DeBacker 47. Can Nonablative Resurfacing be Accomplished with the Carbon Dioxide Laser? Brian S. Biesman, Ralph E. Wesley, Kimberly A. Klippenstein, Brian Moore, Lou Reinisch 48. Are Cosmetic Injectables Safe? Jean Carruthers 49. A Modified New Instrument for Remote Access in Cosmetic Midface Lifts Bhupendra C.K. Patel 50. Facelift with Botulinum Toxin Type A Allan E. Wulc, Brent R. Rosen, Jill A. Foster, David E.E. Holck, Julian D. Perry  Thesis Moderators: John Holds, MD and Christine Nelson, MD 51. Introduction of the Thesis Section John Holds, MD 52. Eyelid Lymphatics: A Search for Drainage Patterns in the Monkey and Human Briggs E. Cook Jr., Mark J. Lucarelli, Bradley N. Lemke, Richard K. Dortzbach, Paul L. Kaufman, Lisa Forrest, Eric Green, B’Ann T. Babelt 53. The Inferomedial Orbital Strut: An Anatomic and Radiographic Study Jonathan W. Kim, Robert A. Goldberg, Norman Shorr 54. Balloon-Assisted Dacryocystorhinostomy: A New Technique for Treatment of Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Jerry K. Popham, Robert G. Fante 55. ASOPRS Thesis Award Presented to Jonathan W. Kim, MD  Featured Guest Speaker 56. Introduction of Guest Lecturer Robert Goldberg, MD 57. Treatment of Epithelial Neoplasia Gary Lask, MD 58. Presentation of Orkan Stasior, MD Award Presented by Ralph E. Wesley, MD, ASOPRS President to Gary Lask, MD  Eyelid Moderators: Sara A. Kaltreider, MD and Bhupendra Patel, MD

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59. When Best Friends Bite, Lawyers Begin to Bark John R. Burroughs, Charles N.S. Soparkar, James R. Patrinely, Patrick Williams, David E.E. Holck 60. Lower Eyelid Reverse Ptosis Repair George R. Bartley, Bartley R. Frueh, John B. Holds, John V. Linberg, Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Michael J. Hawes 61. The Depressor Supercilli Muscle: Anatomy, Histology, and Cosmetic Implications Briggs E. Cook Jr., Mark J. Lucarelli, Bradley N. Lemke 62. Anophthalmic Ptosis: Mechanism Affecting Optimal Aesthetic Outcome Sara A. Kaltreider, Marc Shields, Scott Hippeard 63. Sub-SMAS Midface Lift for Lower Eyelid Reconstruction Jonathan W. Kim, Robert A. Goldberg 64. Efficiency Modifications of Muller’s Muscle-Conjunctiva Resection for Ptosis Repair Jemshed A. Khan, Jeffrey A. Boomer 65. Visual Improvement in Severe Conjunctival Cicatrizing Disease Following Fornix Reconstruction with Buccal Mucous Membrane Susan R. Carter 66. Consideration of the Aesthetic and Functional Units of the Face in Eyebrow Reconstruction Malena M. Amato, John W. Shore, Russell W. Neuhaus, John J. Ghidoni  Oncology and Orbit Moderators: Peter D. Fries, MD and Matthew W. Wilson, MD  Guest Lecture 67. Introduction of Guest Lecturer James C. Fleming, MD, ASOPRS Secretary of Meetings 68. Pediatric Orbital Tumors Barrett G. Haik, MD  69. The Diagnosis and Management of Orbital Meningioma Using Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy with 111In DPATA-Octreotide Stephen J. Laquis, James C. Fleming, Ralph E. Wesley, Matthew W. Wilson, Barrett G. Haik 70. Cancer Metastatic to the Orbit Jerry A. Shields, Carol L. Shields, Heather K. Brotman, Cynthia Carvalho, Noel Perez, Ralph C. Eagle Jr. 71. Orbital Apical Tumors: Do We Need to Lift the Frontal Lobe? Robert Alan Goldberg, Vernon Ho Yuen, John D. McCann, Miguel Gonzalez-Candial 72. Epidemiology of 888 Cases of Periocular Skin Cancer Geva E. Mannor, C. Patrick Hybarger, William J. Meecham, Jonathan W. Kim 73. Primary Cysts of the Orbit: An International Comparative Study Mark J. Lucarelli, M Subrahmanyam, MS, Bradley N. Lemke, Russell S. Gonnering, Richard K. Dortzbach 74. Lower Fornix Approach to Large, Medial Intraconal Tumors Gerald J. Harris, Noel Perez  Awards Presentations 76. Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Jerry A. Shields, MD and Carol L. Shields, MD] Presented by Jeff A. Nerad, MD 77. ASOPRS Research Award [to Mark Alford, MD] Presented by Jeff A. Nerad, MD 78. Lester Jones Anatomy Award [to Asa Morton III, MD] Presented by Jeff A. Nerad, MD

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79. ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award [Presented Posthumously to Leo Koornneef, MD] Presented by Jeff A. Nerad, MD Posters, November 10, 2000 [Total = 53] Videos [Total = 7]

33rd Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “The Science of Clinical Practice” October 18–19, 2002, Renaissance Orlando Resort, Orlando, FL

Friday, October 18, 2002 1. Introductory Remarks William R. Nunery, MD, ASOPRS President Mark S. Cohen, MD, Bradley N. Lemke, MD, and Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD, Program Chairs Section 1 – Current Approaches to “Traditional Oculoplastic Surgery” 2. Periocular Botox Mark Cohen 3. The Upper Eyelid Crease in Blepharoplasty Robert Goldberg 4. Combined Upper Blepharoplasty and Ptosis Stuart Seiff  ASOPRS Featured Speaker 5. Introduction of ASOPRS Featured Speaker Allan E. Wulc, MD 6. What Is the Specialty of Aesthetic Reconstructive Orbital Facial Surgery in the Year 2002? Robert Dryden, MD 7. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Award Presented by William Nunery, MD to Robert Dryden, MD  The New “Face” of Oculoplastic Surgery 8. Lower Blepharoplasty and the Lower Eyelid Midface Continuum Norman Shorr  Featured Speaker 9. Introduction of Featured Speaker Jeffrey Nerad, MD 10. Rhinoplasty: An Overview Frederick Menick, MD  11. Cosmetic Dermatology: Matching the Problem with the Treatment Nancy Swartz 12. Soft Tissue Augmentation Jean Carruthers 13. Recognizing the “Lateral Sweep”: An Unintended Consequence of Modified Deep Plane Facial Rhytidectomy Surgery David E.E. Holck, Bailey Robertson, Christopher M. DeBacker

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14. A Comparison of Cold Air vs. a Thermoelectrically Cooled Sapphire Window for Epidermal Protection Brian S. Biesman, Lou Reinisch 15. Alloderm in Lip Augmentation Shoib Myint DO, Cesar Sierra, Geoffrey Gladstone, Frank Nesi 16. A Five-Year Brazilian Experience with Restylane Non-Animal-Derived Hyaluronic Acid Gel Injections for Facial Rejuvenation Stephen Bosniak, Marian Cantisano-Zilkha  Practice Management 17. Introduction of Featured Speaker Marc Cohen, MD 18. Management Techniques to Help Improve Your Staff for a More Successful Cosmetic Practice David Mattson, Vice President, The Sandler Systems, Inc.  Instruction Courses – Period I [Concurrent courses, each held under the direction of a senior presenter] 19. Course 1, Part 1: Practical Facial Anatomy Roger Dailey 20. Course 1, Part 2: Rejuvenation of Aging Skin John McCann, Brian Biesman, Richard Gregory, John Hunts, David Kamin 21. Course 2: Minimal Incision Facial Rejuvenation Norman Shorr Robert Goldberg, Raymond Douglas, Jonathan Hoenig, Todd Cook 21. Course 3: Liposuction and Fat Injection Ken Steinsapir, Susan Hughes, Allan E. Wulc, Cynthia Boxrud 23. Course 4: Sales Techniques for the Cosmetic Surgeon, Part 1 David Mattson, The Sandler Systems, Inc.  Instruction Courses – Period II 20. Course 1: Lower Face and Neck Lift Alan Brackup, Henry Baylis, Robert Dryden 22. Course 2: Advanced Techniques in Blepharoplasty Robert Alan Goldberg, Julian, Perry, Jonathan Kim, Troy Woodman, Nancy G. Swartz 23. Course 3: Botox and Soft Tissue Augmentation Richard Anderson, John Shore, Frank C. Papay, David A. Jordan, Jean Carruthers, Steve Fagien 24. Course 4: Sales Techniques for the Cosmetic Surgeon, Part 1 David Mattson, The Sandler Systems, Inc.  Additional Instruction Course 25. Cosmetic Blepharoplasty Using 4.0 MHz High Frequency/Low Temperature Radiosurgery (Instructors not listed)  Saturday, October 19, 2002 26. Introductory Remarks William R. Nunery, MD, ASOPRS President Jeffrey A. Nerad and Mark S. Cohen, MD, Program Chairs  Thyroid Orbitopathy and Orbital Oncology Moderators: Andrew R. Harrison, MD and Geva Mannor, MD 27. Orbital Triamcinolone Injections for Orbital Inflammation in Graves’ Disease Tina Li, Robert A. Goldberg John McCann, Norman Shorr 28. Orbital Fat Decompression for Graves’ Orbitopathy: Recent Results and Modifications Liselotte Pieroth, Michael Kazim, Brian Willoughby

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29. Orbito-Malar Augmentation as an Adjunct to Lateral Orbital Decompression Stephen J. Laquis, James C. Fleming, Ralph E. Wesley, Brenda Edmonson, Valerie Vick 30. Immunotherapy for Orbital Lymphoma Bita Esmaeli, James L. Murray, M. Amir Ahmadi 31. Plaque Brachytherapy as an Alternative to Exenteration for Selected Orbital Malignancies Jerry A. Shields, Carol L. Shields, Jorge E. Freire, Luther W. Brady 32. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography in Diagnosing and Managing Patients with Fungal Cellulitis Melanie L. McCarty, Matthew W. Wilson, Barrett G. Haik, James C. Fleming, Jerome W. Thompson, Patricia M. Flynn, J. Torre Sandlund, Katherine Knapp 33. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Orbit: Is It Rare? Report of a Case Series and Review of the Literature Francesco P. Bernardini, Carlo de Conciliis, Robert C. Kersten 34. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Orbit: A Case Series Eric Tam, Navdeep Nijhawan, Edsel B. Ing, John T. Harvey, James H. Oestreicher  The Science of Orbital Disease: Immunology for Oculoplastic Surgeons 35. Introduction of Guest Speakers George B. Bartley, MD 36. Immunology for the Clinician Charles S. Bouchard, MD 37. Postulated Immunologic Mechanism of Graves’ Disease James A. Garrity, MD  Lacrimal Disorders Moderators: Thomas M. Kropp, MD and Santosh G. Honavar, MD 38. Lacrimal Drainage System Obstruction Related to Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Thyroid Cancer John A. Burns, Kenneth V. Cahill, Jill A. Foster, Vani Dunuuri, Richard T. Kloos 39. Balloon Dacryoplasty after Failed Probing and Silicone Intubation Douglas S. Mehr, Morris E. Hartstein, John B. Holds 40. A Comparison of Non-laser Assisted Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy With and Without the Use of Adjunctive Mitomycin-C Cesar A. Sierra, Rana Yayciolu, Geoffrey J Gladstone, Frank A. Nesi 41. The Adjunctive Use of Mitomycin-C (MMC) in Transcanalicular Endoscopic Laser Assisted Dacryocystorhinostomy (TELA-DCR) Jorge G. Camara, Roderick Barton Domondon, Marither Sangalang-Chuidian, Lionel D. Francisco, Ly T. Nguyen 42. Transcaruncular Jones Tube Intubation Without Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Seok W. Yang, Woong C. Choi, Bhupendra C.K. Patel 43.Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: Look at Us Now L. Neal Freeman  ASOPRS Foundation Speaker 44. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation-Sponsored Speaker Given in Honor of Charles K. BeyerMachule, MD George F. Buerger, MD, James C. Fleming, MD 45. Facelift Techniques for the Reconstructive Surgeon Frederick Menick, MD  Aesthetics Moderators: Jerry K. Popham, MD and Katrinka L. Heher, MD 46. Radiologic Measurement of the Subcutaneous Depth of the SMAS in the Midface John G. Rose Jr., Mark J. Lucarelli, Bradley N. Lemke

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47. Midface Lifts: Subperiosteal or Supraperiosteal? A Comparative Study Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Woong C. Choi 48. Myobloc for Treatment of Glabellar Folds Jill A. Foster, Nisba Husain, Kenneth V. Cahill, John A. Burns, Allan E. Wulc, David E.E. Holck, Julian D. Perry 49. Little Things That Make a Big Difference Frederick Menick, MD  Thesis Presentations Moderators: John D. Ng, MD and Joseph A. Mauriello, MD 50. Introduction of the Thesis Section 51. Orbicularis Oculi Muscle Graft Augmentation after Protractor Myectomy in Blepharospasm Michael T. Yen, Richard L. Anderson 52. Assessment of Vacuum-Generated Air Fluid Exchange in Biointegratable Anophthalmic Sphere Implant James W. Gigantelli, Michael D. Bosku, Kenneth J. Knudtson 53. ASOPRS Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presented by Joseph A. Mauriello, MD to Michael T. Yen, MD 54. Introduction of New ASOPRS Members William R. Nunery, MD  The Science of Ptosis: Genetics for Oculoplastic Surgeons 55. Introduction of Guest Speakers Keith D. Carter, MD 56. Principles of Molecular Genetics Edward M. Stone, MD, PhD 57. The Genetics of Myogenic Ptosis François Codère, MD 58. Presentation of Orkan George Stasior Leadership Award Presented by William R. Nunery, MD, ASOPRS President to Richard K. Dortzbach, MD  Eyelid Disorders Moderators: Peter J. Sneed, MD and Kimberly A. Klippenstein, MD 59. MRDf and MRDp: Two New Measurements for Evaluating Upper Eyelid Malposition Steven C. Dresner, Nicolas Uzcategui, Michael Burnstine 60. The Medpor® Lower Eyelid Spacer: Follow-up for Over 200 Cases Charles N.S. Soparkar, James R. Patrinely 61. A Modification of the Cutler-Beard Procedure Utilizing Donor Achilles Tendon for Upper Eyelid Reconstruction Keith D. Carter, Erin L. Holloman, John W. Kitchen, Jeffrey A. Nerad 62. Lymphoscintigraphy for Ocular Adnexal Tumors Malena Amato, Ebrahim Delpassand, M. Amir Ahmadi, Mehdi H. Tehrani, Jeffrey Gershenwald, Merrick Ross, Bita Esmaeli 63. Processed Human Pericardium Barrier for Gold Weight Implantation Julian D. Perry, Jill A. Foster, David E.E. Holck, Kenneth V. Cahill 64. Results of Mohs Surgery for Periocular Sebaceous Cell Carcinoma Mark J. Lucarelli, Bradley N. Lemke, Stephen N. Snow, Paul O. Larson 65. Visual Acuity and Corneal Compensation Improvement with the Use of Gold Eyelid Implants in the Management of Facial Paralysis: A Statistical Analysis Stuart R. Seiff  Eyelid Disorders 66. Upper Eyelid Lengthening in Graves’ Disease: A Simplified Approach Christopher Hintschich, Christos Haritogiou ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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67. Sebaceous Gland Carcinoma of the Eyelids in Asian Indian Population Santosh G. Honavar, Uma Sridhar, FRCS, Milind Naik, Geeta K. Vemuganti 68. Bone Tunnel Assisted Forehead Fixation in Endoscopic Brow Lift Procedure Nicolas Uzcategui, Steven C. Dresner  The Anophthalmic Socket Moderators: Martin H. Devoto, MD and Dale B. Meyer, MD 69. Bovine Pericardium versus Homologous Sclera as a Wrapping for Hydroxyapatite Orbital Implants Yonca Oskan Arat, Debra J. Shetlar, Milton Boniuk 70. Localization of Extraocular Muscles During Secondary Orbital Implantation: The Tunnel Technique David R. Jordan, Vernon Ho Yuen 71. Conjunctival Melting Syndrome Associated with the Use of Bovine Pericardium Wrapping Material Maziar Bidar, Michael J. Hawes, Steven C. Dresner, Gil Epstein, Mark J. Lucarelli, Tyrone Glover, Robert G. Fante, Michael E. Migliori 72. Use of Dermis Fat Grafts for Reconstruction of the Infected Anophthalmic Socket Donald A. Hollsten, Don Liu, Michael E. Migliori 73. Stimulation of the Unilateral Anophthalmic Porcine Orbit Using Hydrogel Autoexpansile Orbital Implants: Reducing Orbital Volume Asymmetry David E.E. Holck, John D. Ng, Sheri DeMartelaere, Jill A. Foster, Sean Blaydon, John Burroughs 74. The Medpor SST™ Implant: Early Clinical Results John J. Wood, Steven Dresner, Tae Soo Lee, Yoon Duck Kim, Morris Hartstein, John Shore, Russell Neuhaus, John Mandeville, Joo Hoen Roh, Malena Amato 75. Porous Polyethylene Spherical Orbital Implants Containing Synthetic Bone Graft Particulate: An Improved Porous Implant David E.E. Holck, Sheri DeMartelaere, Jill A. Foster, John D. Ng, Sean Blaydon, Christopher M. DeBacker 76. Can Continuous Suture of Conjunctiva and Tenon’s Capsule with a 5-0 Polypropylene (Prolene®) in One Layer at the Time of Enucleation Reduce the Exposure Rates of Orbital Implants? Tae Soo Lee  Presentation of the ASOPRS Awards David B. Lyon, MD, Michael Kazim, MD and Jeffery A. Nerad, MD 77. Merrill Reeh Pathology Award Presented to Andrew Harrison, MD 78. ASOPRS Research Award Presented to Kimberly P. Cockerham, MD 79. Lester Jones Anatomy Award Presented to Don O. Kikkawa, MD 80. ASOPRS Past President Award Presented by William R. Nunery, MD to Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD  Posters [Total = 52] Videos [Total = 8]

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34th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “New Frontiers for Oculoplastic Surgery” November 14–15, 2003, Disneyland Hotel, Anaheim, CA

Friday, November 14, 2003 1. Introductory Remarks John Shore, MD, President, ASOPRS Susan R. Carter, MD and Roberta E. Gausas, MD, Program Chairs  Section I – Surgical Perspectives: Tips and Techniques 2. Management of Lower Lid Dermatochalasis in the Setting of Prominent Globes Bhupendra Patel 3. Management of Brow Ptosis in the Setting of a High Hairline Roger Dailey 4. Management of Facial Rhytids with CO2 Laser Resurfacing Michael Migliori 5. Management of the Hollow Superior Sulcus after Upper Blepharoplasty Jill A. Foster 6. Management of Malar Festoons Don O. Kikkawa  Featured Speaker 7. Introduction of Featured Speaker Brian Biesman 8. Dermal Fillers: State of the Art 2003 Jeffrey Dover  Section II – Aesthetic Research and Developments  Featured Speaker 9. Introduction of ASOPRS Featured Speaker Norman Shorr, MD 10. Minimal Incisions and Orbitofacial Surgery: A Match Made in Heaven Robert Alan Goldberg, MD 11. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Award Presented to Robert Alan Goldberg, MD  12. Comparison of High Dose Botulinum Toxin Type B to Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Treatment of Lateral Canthal Rhytids: A Side by Side Comparison David E.E. Holck 13. Coblation: A Novel Modality for Electrosurgery on the Eyelids Robert Dryden 14. Evaluation of a New Radiofrequency Device for Nonablative Cutaneous Rejuvenation Brian Biesman 15. Non-Invasive Neck Rejuvenation Stephen Bosniak 16. Narrowed Horizontal Palpebral Fissure: Complication of Lower Lid Blepharoplasty and Midface Lift Joseph Mauriello

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17. Endoscopic Mid Forehead Techniques: Improved Outcomes with Decreased Operative Time and Cost Asa Morton 18. Autogenous Dermis and Fascia for Prominent Glabellar Furrows Allan E. Wulc 19. Experience with a Multipoint Fixation Device for Endoscopic Brow Lifts Sterling Baker 20. Non-Ablative Skin Rejuvenation: Why All the Fuss? Jeffrey Dover  Section III – Instruction Courses 21. Course 1, Part 1: Practical Facial Anatomy Roger Dailey 22. Course 1, Part 2: Rejuvenation of Aging Skin: The Palate of Options John McCann, David E.E. Holck, Brian Biesman, John Hunts, Gregory Keller 23. Course 2: Liposuction and Fat Injection Ken Steinsapir, Susan Hughes, Allan E. Wulc, Cynthia Boxrud 24. Course 3: Minimal Incision Facial Rejuvenation Norman Shorr 25. Rejuvenation of the Aesthetic Surgery Practice John Holds, Ron Fante, John Hunts, John McCann, Frank Nesi, Jane Olson  Instruction Courses – Period II 26. Course 1: Lower Face and Neck Lift Alan Brackup, Henry Baylis, Robert Dryden 27. Course 2: Advanced Techniques in Blepharoplasty Robert Alan Goldberg, Troy Woodman, Jonathan Kim, Nancy G. Swartz 28. Course 3: Botox and Soft Tissue Augmentation Richard Anderson, Jean Carruthers, David A. Jordan, John Shore 29. Course 4: Management of Complications of Aesthetic Facial Surgery Stuart Seiff, Allan E. Wulc, David E. E. Holck  Saturday, November 15, 2003 30. Introductory Remarks John Shore, MD, President, ASOPRS Susan R. Carter, MD and Roberta E. Gausas, MD, Program Chairs  Lacrimal Surgery: New Horizons 31. Canalicular Trephination and Silicone Stent Intubation for the Treatment of Canalicular Obstruction: Effect of the Level of Obstruction Farzad J. Khoubian, Don O. Kikkawa, Russell S. Gonnering 32. A Prospective Study Comparing Success Rates of Non-Laser Endonasal DCR With and Without Adjunctive Mitomycin C Peter Dolman, Carlos Eduardo Alas 33. Non-laser Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy With Adjunctive Mitomycin C in Children Angela Maria Dolmetsch, Marco Gallon, Claudia Zuluaga 34. Postoperative Evaluation of Skin Incision in External DCR Martin Devoto, Cadela Zaffaroni  Featured Speaker 35. Introduction of Featured Member Speaker Roberta E. Gausas, MD

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36. The Paradox of “Success” in Lacrimal Surgery Geoffrey E. Rose, MD  New Vistas: Orbital Oncology and Radiotherapy 37. Eosinophilic Granuloma of the Orbit: Aggressive Destruction Responsive to Minimal Intervention Gerald J. Harris, Kyung In Woo 38. Juvenile Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma of the Orbit Terry L. Kaiura, Michael Kazim, Linda Granowetter, Roger Turbin, Paul D. Langer 39. Ocular Adnexal Lymphoma: Clinical Behavior of Distinct World Health Organization Subtypes Claire Y. Fung, Mark J. Lucarelli, Nancy L. Harris, Judith A. Ferry 40. Primary Epithelial Malignancies of the Lacrimal Gland Jerry Shields, Carol Shields, John A. Epstein, Richard Scartozzi, Ralph C. Eagle Jr. 41. Development of Clinically Relevant Metastatic Mouse Models of Ocular Tumors for Anticancer Treatment Evaluation: Bridging the Gap from the Laboratory to the Clinic Eli L. Chang, Carlo R. Bernardino, Peter A.D. Rubin, Bruce R. Ksander 42. Lateral Orbitotomy for Potentially Malignant Lacrimal Gland Tumors: Incision Design Based on Radiotherapy Considerations Carlo R. Bernardino, Norbert J. Leibsch, Peter A.D. Rubin 43. The Role of Radiation in Sphenoid Wing Meningiomas Kimberly Peele Cockerham, John S. Kennerdell 44. Introduction of Guest Speaker Jerry Shields 45. Contemporary Radiation Oncology for the Eye and Orbit Luther W. Brady  Thyroid Orbitopathy and the Orbit: News on the Horizon 46. Growth Factor Receptor Expression in Orbital Lymphangioma: Possible Therapeutic Implications Bita Esmaeli, Victor G. Prieto, M. Amir Ahmadi, Todd R. Shepler, Misha Faustina, Michael J. Hawes, Mark Lucarelli, Zeynel Karcioglu, Russ Gonnering 47. Clinical Outcomes of Novabone-C/M in Orbital Reconstruction Malena M. Amato, John W. Shore, Sean Blaydon, Russell W. Neuhaus, Todd R. Shepler, Robert G. Fante 48. Sclerosing Therapy for Orbital Lymphangioma Todd Cook, Robert Allan Goldberg 49. Measurement of Eyelid and Orbital Fat Volume in Different Age Groups by Computed Tomography Milton Boniuk 50. Thyrotropin Receptor Antibodies as a Measure of the Severity of Graves’ Ophthalmopathy Navdeep Nijhawan, Chloe Gottlieb, BSc, Jose Ensor, John T. Harvey 51. Introduction of Guest Speaker Robert Goldberg, MD 52. Insights into the Pathogenesis of Graves’ Ophthalmopathy Terry J. Smith, MD  Thesis Presentations 53. Introduction of Thesis Section David E.E. Holck, MD 54. Successful Late Correction of Post-Traumatic Enophthalmos, Hypoglobus, and Diplopia Charles N.S. Soparkar, James R. Patrinely, Samuel Stal, Saleh M. Shenaq, Hector M. Marines, Stephen R. Klapper, Jerome Kong 55. Lymphoproliferative Disease of the Ocular Adnexae: A Clinical, Imaging, and Pathological Study, with Statistical Analysis of 69 Patients Timothy J. Sullivan, Kevin Whitehead, Richard Williamson, David Grimes, David Schlect, Ian Brown, Graham Dickie

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56. Orbital Volume Augmentation in Anophthalmic Patients Using Injectable Hydrogel Implants Tina G. Li, John D. McCann, Robert A. Goldberg 57. Histologic Comparison of Autologous Fat Processing Methods John Rose Jr., Mark J. Lucarelli, Bradley N. Lemke, Richard K. Dortzbach, Cynthia A. Boxrud, Suzan Obagi, Sarit Patel 58. ASOPRS Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presented by David E.E. Holck, MD to Tina G. Li, MD 59. Introduction of New ASOPRS Members John W. Shore, MD, ASOPRS President  Allografts, Implants and Disease Transmission: Relevance for Oculoplastic Surgery 60. Autogenous Dermis Grafts in Lower Eyelid Reconstruction Wade D. Brock, William Bearden, Thomas Tann III, John A. Long 61. Amniotic Membrane Transplantation and Intraoperative Application of Mitomycin C to Reduce Conjunctival Inflammation and Increase Success of Fornix Reconstruction Scheffer C.G. Tseng, Mario Di Pascuale, Edgar M. Espana, Tetsuya Kawakita, V.K. Raju, David Tse 62. Oculocentric Orbitofacial Surgery: Connecting a Glaucoma Valve Shunt to Extraorbital Locations in Severe Glaucoma Peter A.D. Rubin, Carlo R. Bernardino, Eli E. Chang, Claes H. Dohlman  Featured Member Speaker 63. Introduction of Featured Member Speaker John W. Shore, MD 64. Risk of Infectious Disease Transmission Through Allografts Robert H. Kennedy, MD  Implants and the Anophthalmic Socket 65. The Use of Hydrophilic Expandable Conformers in the Microphthalmic Socket Kenneth E. Morgenstern, David E.E. Holck, John Ng, Jill A. Foster, John A. Burns 66. 18-Month Follow-up with the Hydrogel Osmotic Tissue Expander for Clinical Anophthalmos John T. Tong 67. Coated Bio-eye Hydroxyapatite: The Rough Made Smooth Arthur C. Perry, James Cahill 68. Porous Orbital Implants and Evisceration Surgery: Experience with 86 Patients David R. Jordan 69. Muscle Pedunculated Lamellar Scleral Flaps for Implant Coverage: A Microsurgical Modification to Improve Prosthesis Motility R.F. Guthoff, M.P. Schittkowski, A. Klett 70. Current Trends in Managing the Anophthalmic Socket after Primary Enucleation and Evisceration Grant Su, Michael T. Yen  ASOPRS Awards Presentations by David Lyon, MD, Chair, ASOPRS Awards Committee 71. Lester Jones Anatomy Award Presented to Geoffrey E. Rose, MD 72. Merrill Reeh Pathology Award Presented to Nariman Sharara, MD 73. ASOPRS Research Award Presented to Scot A. Sullivan, MD 74. Orkan Stasior Leadership Award Presented to James A. Katowitz, MD  ASOPRS Foundation Lecture 75. Dedication of the 2003 ASOPRS Foundation Lecture to Dr. Crowell Beard John Sullivan, MD ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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76. ASOPRS Foundation in South Africa William R. Nunery, MD  Eyelid Disorders: News and Updates 77. Carbon Dioxide Laser Ablation of Syringomas Michael E. Migliori 78. Treatment of Multiple Apocrine Hidrocystomas with Trichloroacetic Acid Roger A. Dailey, Stanley M. Saulny 79. Refinements and Management of Complications in Transconjunctival Lower Eyelid Involutional Entropion Repair Melanie H. Erb, Nicholas Uzcategui, Steven C. Dresner 80. Double-Bridged Flap Reconstruction for Severe Full-Thickness Upper Eyelid Cicatricial Retraction Jonathan J. Dutton 81. Epiblepharon Management: Technique, Results, and Complications Gangadhara Sundar, Shantha Amrith, Robert Goldberg  Eyelid Disorders: Droops and Blinks 82. Blepharochalasis: Pillow Talk Kenneth V. Cahill, Kenneth Morgenstern, Jill A. Foster, John A. Burns 83. The Horizontal Translation of the Central Eyelid on Opening and Closing the Eye Bartley Frueh, Adam S. Hassan, David C. Musch 84. Sutureless Fixation for Ptosis Surgery Jill A. Foster, Julian D. Perry, David E.E. Holck, Allan E. Wulc, John A. Burns, Kenneth V. Cahill, Kenneth E. Morgenstern 85. Unilateral Frontalis Sling for the Surgical Correction of Unilateral Poor Function Ptosis Robert C. Kersten, L. Khouri, M. Moin, Dwight R. Kulwin 86. Use of Ptose-up (ePTFE) Implants for Frontalis Suspension in Congenital Ptosis F. Kherani, James A. Katowitz 87. Classification of Blepharoptosis in Korea and the Type of Surgery Used Sang Yeul Lee, Koung Hoon Kook, In Sik Kim 88. Management of Photophobia in Blepharospasm with FL-41 Tinted Glasses Bhupendra C.K. Patel, Simon Taylor, Kathleen Digre, Judith Warner, Chuck Swallow  Posters [Total = 48] Videos [Total = 4]

35th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “The Art & Science of Oculoplastic Surgery” October 22–23, 2004, Sheraton Hotel, New Orleans, LA

Friday, October 22, 2004 1. Introductory Remarks David M. Reifler, MD, ASOPRS President John V. Linberg, MD and John D. Ng, MD, Program Chairs  Session I: Addressing the Aging Mid and Lower Face – Surgical Pearls Moderator: Scot Sullivan, MD

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2. The Subperiosteal Midface Lift Using Bioabsorbable Implants for Fixation David E.E. Holck 3. Options for Addressing the Nasolabial Fold Jill A. Foster  Featured Speaker 4. Introduction of Featured Speaker John D. Ng 5. State-of-the-Art Facelifting Techniques Stephen W. Perkins  6. Tissue Fillers: What’s Out There? Stephen L. Bosniak 7. The Lunch Time Midface Lift: Augmentation of the Midface with Injectable Fillers Kenneth D. Steinsapir 8. The Evolution of Facial Microfat Transplants Susan Hughes 9. Injectable Fillers for the Orbital Rim Hallow: Better than Blepharoplasty? Robert A. Goldberg  Session II: Special Panel Session Moderator: Kathleen F. Archer, MD 10. Panel on Tissue Fillers and Live Injections Panelists: Kathleen F. Archer, Stephen L. Bosniak, Kathleen Duerksen, Jemshed A. Khan, Stephen W. Perkins  Session III: Aesthetics Techniques and Developments Moderator: Andrew Eiseman, MD 11. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Award to Clinton D. McCord Jr., MD Presented by Robert A. Goldberg, MD 12. Hyaluronic Acid Gel (Restylane) Filler for Facial Rhytids: Lessons Learned from Treatment of 286 Patients Jemshed A. Khan, Allan E. Wulc, John B. Holds, Robert G. Fante, Michael E. Migliori, Daniel A. Ebroon, Malena M. Amato, Rona Z. Silkiss, Bhupendra C.K. Patel 13. Endoscopic Forehead Lifting Using the Endotine Fixation System Michael Mercandetti, Adam J. Cohen 14. Treatment of Eyeliner Tattoos Using 810 nm Diode Laser Randal T.H. Pham, Sterling S. Baker 15. Advanced Thermage Procedure Techniques Stephen L. Bosniak, Marian Cantisano-Zilkha, Ioannis P. Glavas 16. Radiofrequency Heating of Eyelid Tissue: Human Ex-Vivo Safety Study Brian S. Biesman, Karl Pope 17. The Role of Fat in the Appearance of the Upper Eyelid Marc S. Cohen, Nancy G. Swartz 18. Lower Eyelid Blepharoplasty: “This Page Still Under Construction” Don O. Kikkawa, Karim Punja 19. Minimally Invasive Rejuvenation of the Perioral Region: The Lateral Commisure Lift Robert M. Schwarcz, Norman Shorr, Tanuj Nakra, Raymond S. Douglas 20. Endoscopic Total Facelift Susan Hughes 21. Combination Techniques for Non-Surgical Facial Rejuvenation Stephen L. Bosniak, Marian Cantisano-Zilkha, Ioannis P. Glavas

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22. Know Now How to Say NO George F. Buerger Jr.  Lunch/Seminar 23. Radio Frequency Tissue Tightening and Contouring Without Surgery Presenter Not Listed  Session IV: Aesthetic Breakout Workshops – Period I 24. Course 1: Rejuvenation of Aging Skin: The Palate of Options Brian S. Biesman, Mark S. Nestor, George Stasior, Sterling Baker, John Hunts 25. Course 2: Liposuction and Fat Transfer Kenneth D. Steinsapir, Susan Hughes, Allan E. Wulc, John Rose 26. Course 3: Botox and Soft Tissue Augmentation Jean A. Carruthers, Roger A. Dailey, Mary Lupo, Jane Jenison Olson 27. Course 4: Rejuvenation of the Aesthetic Surgery Practice John B. Holds, Robert Fante, John McCann, Frank Nesi, John Hunts, Jane Jenison Olson  Session IV: Aesthetic Breakout Workshops – Period II 28. Course 1: Lower Face and Neck Rejuvenation Alan Brackup 29. Course 2: Advanced Techniques in Periorbital Rejuvenation Robert A. Goldberg, Norman Shorr, Jonathan Kim, Robert Schwarcz, Richard Bryant 30. Course 3: Botox and Soft Tissue Augmentation (Repeat session from Period I) Jean A. Carruthers, Marc Cohen, Mark S. Nestor, Brian S. Biesman 31. Course 4: Management of Complications of Aesthetic Facial Surgery Stuart Seiff, David E.E. Holck, Allan E. Wulc  Saturday, October 23, 2004 32. Introductory Remarks David M. Reifler, MD, ASOPRS President and John V. Linberg, MD, 2004 ASOPRS Program Chair  Session I: Orbital Disease and Surgery Moderators: Steven Dresner, MD and James Karesh, MD 33. Restricted Expression of IGF-1 Receptor Autoantibodies in Graves’ Disease Stimulates Orbital Fibroblast Cytokine Production Raymond S. Douglas, Terry J. Smith, Robert A. Goldberg 34. The Effect of Corticosteroids in the Acute Management of Pediatric Orbital Cellulitis with Subperiosteal Abscess Michael T. Yen, Kimberly G. Yen 35. Natural Killer T Cell Lymphoma of the Orbit John J. Woog Yoon Duck Kim, Bita Esmaeli, Stella Kim, R. Patrick Yeatts, J. Douglas Cameron, Diva Salomao 36. Graves’ Orbitopathy Associated with Periocular Surgery Angelo Tsirbas, Michael Kazim 37. Primary-gaze Diplopia in Thyroid Related Orbitopathy (TRO) Patients Undergoing Deep Lateral Orbital Decompression with Intraconal Fat Debulking Guy J. Ben Simon, Lillian Wang, John D. McCann, Robert A. Goldberg 38. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Lacrimal Gland: Management and Outcome Raman Mittal, Ramesh Murthy, Milind Naik, Vijay Anand, P. Reddy, Geeta K. Vemuganti, Santosh G. Honavar 39. Coleman Fat Transfer Use in Orbital and Periorbital Surgery Jane M. Olver, FRCOphth, Krishna Tumuluri 40. SPECT/CT Image Fusion Improves Resolution of Octreotide Scans for Graves’ Orbitopathy Simeon A. Lauer, Stanley J. Goldsmith, Serge Somrov ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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41. Early vs. Late Repair of Orbital Blowout Fractures Guy J. Ben Simon, Hasan Syed, John D. McCann, Robert A. Goldberg 42. Cranial Bone Grafting for Orbital Reconstruction. Is It Still the Best? Adam J. Cohen, Christopher P. Kelly, C. Reha Yavuzer, Ian T. Jackson  Featured Guest Speaker 43. Introduction of Featured Speaker Roger A. Dailey, MD 44. Craniofacial Techniques for Orbital Reconstruction Joseph S. Gruss, MB BCHIR  Session II: Oncology of Orbit and Adnexa Moderators: Philip Custer, MD and Dale Meyer, MD 45. Clinical Course and Outcome in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia Roshmi Gupta, Santosh G. Honavar, Milind Naik, Geeta K. Vemuganti 46. Conjunctival Pagetoid Invasion by Sebaceous Carcinoma: Incidence and Distribution: The 2003 J. Howard Stokes Lecture, Part 3 Jerry A. Shields, Hakan Demirci, Brian P. Marr, Ralph C. Eagle Jr., Carol L. Shields, Mary A. Stefanyszyn 47.Chlamydia Psittaci and Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas Carlo de Conciliis, Francesco P. Bernardini, Martin H. Devoto, Andres J.M. Ferreri, Massimo Guidoboni, Antonia Anna Lettini, Claudio Doglioni, Mauro Boiocchi, Riccardo Docetti 48. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma Rona Z. Silkiss, Jill E. Green, Howard D. Maccabee 49. The Influence of Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Hybridization and Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis on the Diagnosis of Orbital and Ocular Lymphoproliferative Disorders David Cheung, Venketash Prabhakarn, Rachel Pilling, Laurence Brown, Raghavan Sampath  Invited ASOPRS Speaker 50. Introduction of Invited Speaker Jonathan Dutton 51. Sentinel Node Biopsy for Periocular Malignancy Bita Esmaeli  Session III: Eyelid Papers Moderators: Philip Custer, MD and Dale Meyer, MD 52. Cryosurgery of Eyelid Basal Cell Carcinomas Gun Lindgren, Ollë Larko 53. Medial Canthopexy: A Proven Technique Adam J. Cohen, Christopher P. Kelly, Reha Yavuzer, Ian T. Jackson 54. The “O” Purse String Suture for Medial Ectropion Allan E. Wulc, Brenda C. Edmonson, Jill A. Foster  ASOPRS Foundation Guest Speaker Dedicated to the Memory of Bernice Z. Brown, MD 55. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation Guest Speaker Bartley Frueh, MD 56. Effect of Cosmetic Surgery on a Specialty Robert M. Goldwyn, MD, Editor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery  DUSA Pharmaceuticals Luncheon Seminar 57. Fundamentals of Levulan Photodynamic Therapy: Photodynamic Rejuvenation and Levulan Photodynamic Therapy for Mild to Severe Acne Mark S. Nestor, MD, PhD

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58. Strategies for Dealing with Difficult Patients Eva C. Ritvo, MD  ASOPRS Thesis Session 59. Introduction of Thesis Session Tamara R. Fountain, MD, Vice Chair, Thesis Committee 60. Lymphatic Drainage Patterns of the Human Eyelid Navdeep Nijhawan 61. Expression of Sodium Iodide Symporter in the Lacrimal Drainage System Kenneth E. Morgenstern 62. Clinical Features and Treatment of Graves’ Ophthalmopathy in Pediatric Patients Vikram Durairaj  ASOPRS Award Presentations 63. Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presentation Presented to Kenneth E. Morgenstern, MD 64. Merrill Reeh Pathology Award Presented by Michael Kazim MD to N.G. Anderson, MD and Ted Wojno, MD 65. ASOPRS Research Award Presented by Michael Kazim MD to Malena Amato, MD 66. Lester Jones Anatomy Award Presented by Michael Kazim, MD to Philip Custer, MD 67. ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award Presented by David M. Reifler, MD to Albert Hornblass, MD 68. Tribute to Bernice Brown, MD Sponsored by the ASOPRS Foundation Stuart Seiff, MD  Session IV: Lacrimal Disease and Surgery Moderators: Robert Kersten, MD and David A. Jordan, MD 69. Dacryocystorhinostomy: Flap versus No Flap Todd R. Shepler, Owen R. Davenport, Russell W. Neuhaus, John W. Shore 70. The Omni-Ultrasonic Bone Curette: Its Application in Oculoplastic Surgery Nancy A. Tucker 71. Holmium:YAG Laser Assisted Lacrimal Bypass Surgery in Management of Severe Trauma to Lacrimal Drainage Pelin Kaynak-Hekimhan, Omer F. Yilmaz 72. New “Frosted” Jones Tubes: Preliminary Experience Roger A. Dailey, Robert N. Tower  Session V: Anophthalmos 73. Outcomes after Enucleation in Retinoblastoma Patients Melanie L. McCarty, Matthew W. Wilson, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, Barrett G. Haik 74. Complications of Scleral-Covered Enucleation Implants Philip L. Custer, Sharon McCaffery 75. Osmoexpanders in Congenital Clinical Anophthalmos: Up to Six Years’ Experience in 28 Patients Michael P. Schittkowski, K.K. Gundlach, R.F. Guthoff 76. Enucleation with Preservation of Scleral Rim Kalpana K. Jatla, Lisa D. Mihora, Steven R. Anderson 77. Transection of the Optic Nerve in Enucleation for Retinoblastoma and Other Intraocular Tumors: A New and Safe Technique Bhupendra C.K. Patel

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78. Lid and Conjunctival Sparing Orbital Exenteration with Use of Dermis-Fat Grafts for Volume Replacement and Socket Reconstruction: A Report of Two Cases Femida Kherani, William A. Katowitz, James A. Katowitz  Featured Speaker 79. Introduction of Featured Speaker John V. Linberg, MD 80. Information Technology in Practice and Research John McCann, MD, PhD  Session VI: Frontalis Suspension Moderators: Keith Carter, MD and John Harvey, MD 81. Frontalis Suspension as an Effective Treatment of Eyelid Apraxia and Blepharospasm Xiaoquin Lu, Michael E. Migliori 82. Unilateral Poor Function Congenital Ptosis: To Treat or Not to Treat the Unaffected Side? Francesco P. Bernardini, Robert C. Kersten, Martin H. Devoto, Carlo de Conciliis, Mohammad Moin, Dwight R. Kulwin 83. Transconjunctival Frontalis Suspension with Silicone Rods Andrew Harrison, Charles Whisler 84. Use of Tutoplast for Frontalis Suspension in Congenital Ptosis Cathy J. Hwang, Femida Kherani, Scott M. Goldstein, Katrinka L. Heher, James A. Katowitz 85. Autologous Pedal Extensor Tendon for Frontalis Suspension Jeremiah P. Tao, James B. Dickson, Rafael Trespalacios 86. Frontalis Enhanced Levator Resection for 3rd Nerve Palsy Ptosis Erfan A. Elgazayerli, Mohammad Abdul Hafez  Session VII: Acquired Ptosis 87. Lid Position Following a MĂźller Muscle-Conjunctival Resection: What is the Most Important Predictor? Elizabeth M. Holley, Mark S. Brown, Noel Saks, Donna Retzlaff-Roberts, Allen M. Putterman 88. The Effect of Unilateral Blepharoptosis Repair on Contralateral Eyelid Position Melanie H. Erb, Timothy J. McCulley, Robert C. Kersten  Session VIII: Eyelid Disease 89. Cold Urticaria: An Under Recognized Cause of Pseudo-Orbital Cellulitis John Burroughs, James R. Patrinely, Jeffrey S. Nugent, Charles N.S. Soparkar, Richard L. Anderson 90. Eyelid Abscess as a Presenting Sign of Occult Sinusitis Douglas R. Casady, Jitka L. Zobal-Ratner, Dale R. Meyer 91. The Acquired Lax Eyelid Syndrome: An Unrecognized Cause of the Chronically Irritated Eye Cat N. Burkat, Bradley N. Lemke 92. Treatment of Trichiasis Using 810 nm Diode Laser: An Efficacy Study Randal T. Pham, Brian S. Biesman, Rona Silkiss 93. Modified Posterior Approach in Upper Eyelid Retraction Surgery Audrey Looi, Basant Sharma, Peter Dolman  Posters [Total = 55] Videos [Total = 9]

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36th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Face the Future: Oculofacial Plastic & Orbital Surgery 2005” October 14–15, 2005, Chicago Hilton Towers, Chicago, IL

Friday, October 14, 2005 Aesthetics for Your Practice 1. Introductory Remarks James C. Fleming, MD, President, ASOPRS Susan R. Carter, MD, 2005 ASOPRS Program Chair Mark J. Lucarelli, MD, 2005 ASOPRS Program Co-Chair 2. Trends in Facial Cosmetic Surgery Robert H. Kennedy 3. Fate or Reflate: Current Concepts in Facial Rejuvenation with Fillers Jean Carruthers  Featured Speaker 4. Introduction of Featured Guest Speaker Mark J. Lucarelli, MD 5. Advancements in Endoscopic Forehead Lifting Oscar Ramirez, MD  6. Medicolegal Considerations in Oculofacial Cosmetic Surgery John W. Shore  Featured Speakers 7. Introduction of Featured Guest Speaker John D. Ng, MD 8. The Science and Art of Facial Scar Revision J. Regan Thomas, MD 9. Endoscopic Three-Dimensional Midfacial Rejuvenation Oscar Ramirez, MD  Featured ASOPRS Speaker 10. Introduction of ASOPRS Featured Speaker Robert N. Dryden, MD 11. The Versatile Orbicularis Flap in Cosmetic Lower Eyelid and Midfacial Surgery Allen Putterman, MD 12. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Award Presented by Robert N. Dryden, MD to Allen Putterman, MD  Free Papers 13. The Retro-Orbicularis Fat Pad and the “Intermediate Fascia Layer in the Eyebrow Region” Jonathan W. Kim, Audrey Mok, Don O. Kikkawa, Robert A. Goldberg 14. Monopolar Radiofrequency Treatment of Human Eyelids: A Prospective Evaluation Brian Biesman 15. Facial Contouring in Patients with HIV-Associated Lipoatrophy Joseph Eviatar, Stacey Silvers, Michael Echavez 16. Botox Efficacy Decreased by Topical Anesthetics Mirwat S. Sami, Charles N.S. Soparkar, James R. Patrinely, Lisa M. Hollier, MPH, Larry H. Hollier ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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17. Loss of Botox Effectiveness for Cosmetic Facial Application from Circulating Neutralizing Antibodies to Type A Botulinum Neurotoxin after Repeated Injections Gary E. Borodic 18. A First Look at the “Next Generation” of High-Purity Botulinum-A Neurotoxins: Safety and Efficacy Results for First Human Subjects Jemshed A. Khan, Kenneth A. Buchwach, Phil Leese, Gary Borodic, Eric Johnson, Mike Goodnough, Carl Milizio, Doris K. Weilert 19. Facial Telangiectases Treated with the DioLite™ 532 nm Laser Charles D. Rice, Jack Zuckerman, BA 20. Complications of Meloplication for Minimally-Invasive Midface Lifting Cynthia A. Boxrud, John G. Rose Jr., Cat N. Burkat, Mark J. Lucarelli 21. The Periosteal Suspender Flap with Multipoint and Multi-level Fixation: The Keys to Supraperiosteal Midface Lifting Yoash R. Enzer 22. The Vertical Facelift: The Ultimate Midface Lift Kenneth D. Steinsapir 23. Cosmetic Lower Eyelid Blepharoplasty with Fat Repositioning via Intra-Suborbicularis Oculi Fat (SOOF) Dissection: Technique and Outcome Yasaman Mohadjer, John B. Holds 24. Experience with Internal Browpexy via a Transblepharoplasty Approach Using the Endotine Resorbable Fixation Device David E.E. Holck, Jill A. Foster, John D. Ng Aesthetic Breakout Sessions – Period I 25. Course 1: Facial Shaping with Botox and Fillers Jane Jenison Olson, Deb Sherman, Roger Dailey, Allen Putterman, John Fezza 26. Course 2: Evaluation of the Aesthetic Patient: Developing a Customized Analysis and Treatment Plan Robert A. Goldberg 27. Course 3: Beautiful Skin: Cosmeceuticals, Chemical Peels, and the Esthetician Jill A. Foster, Rebecca Tung, William Miller 28. Course 4: Management of Complications of Aesthetic Facial Surgery Stuart Seiff, David E.E. Holck, Allan E. Wulc Aesthetic Breakout Workshops – Period II 29. Course 1: Rejuvenation of the Aesthetic Surgical Practice John Holds, Rob Fante, John McCann, Frank Nesi, John Hunts, Bradley Lemke 30. Course 2: Technologies of Skin Rejuvenation Brian Biesman 31. Course 3: Overcoming Challenges in Midfacial Surgery: Which Techniques Work? Don O. Kikkawa, Asa Morton, Phil Custer, Bhupendra Patel, Rona Silkiss 32. Course 4: Minimally Invasive Face Lifting and Neck Lifting Techniques 101 Allan E. Wulc, Julie Woodward, Frank Papay, Kenneth Steinsapir, Alan Brackup, Janet Neigel, Jonathan Hoenig  Saturday, October 15, 2005 32. Introductory Remarks James C. Fleming, MD, ASOPRS and Susan R. Carter, MD, 2005 ASOPRS Program Chair Session I: Thyroid Orbitopathy 33. Correction of Eyelid Retraction in Thyroid Orbitopathy Patients: Can It Be Performed with Orbital Decompression Surgery? Guy J. Ben Simon, Ahmad M. Mansury, BS, Robert M. Schwarcz, Seongmu Lee, BS, John D. McCann, Robert A. Goldberg 34. Oral Montelukast/Cetrizine for Thyroid Associated Ophthalmopathy Simeon A. Lauer, Rudrani Banik, Benjamin F. Mason, Steven A. McCormick 35. Treatment of Active Thyroid Orbitopathy with Pulsed IV Steroids John G. Rose Jr., Mark J. Lucarelli, Cat N. Burkat, Noel Palmero, Cynthia A. Boxrud ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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36. Aberrant Phenotype and Function of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Graves’ Disease: Implications for Disease Etiology and Potential Treatment Raymond S. Douglas, Robert A. Goldberg, Terry J. Smith Session II: Lacrimal Disease and Surgery 37. Transconjunctival Dacryocystorhinostomy: Scarless Surgery with the Endoscope Pelin Kaynak-Hekimhan, Omer F. Yilmaz 38. Endoscopic-Assisted CDCR with Jones Tube Martin H. Devoto, Francesco P. Bernardini, Carlo de Conciliis 39. Results of Modified Probing (Swing of Probe) for Treatment of Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Tae Soo Lee Sr., Seongwoo Kim, Kyu Mee Kay 40. Corneal Melt Driven by Occult Obstruction of the Lacrimal Drainage System Ajay Tripathi, David Cheung, B. Ilango, Raghavan Sampath, Jeremy Prydal  Featured Speaker 41. Introduction of Featured Guest Speaker George Bartley, MD 42. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and the Role of Fungi: What is the Evidence? Jens U. Ponikau, MD  Session III: Eyelid Ptosis and Retraction 43. Change in Palpebral Fissure after Frontalis Suspension with Fascia Lata: In Consideration of Lagophthalmos Induced by General Anesthesia Jin S. Yoon, Min Kim, Jung B. Choi, Kyung H. Kook, Sang Y. Lee 44. Childhood Ptosis Repair: Safety and Efficacy of Silicone Rod Frontalis Suspension Surgery Carrie L. Morris, Edward Buckley, Laura Enyedi, Sandra Stinnett, Sharon Freedman 45. Small Incision Levator Repair Revisited: Technique, Long Term Results Cat Nguyen Burkat, Bradley N. Lemke 46. Steroid-Induced Ptosis: Case Studies and Histopathologic Analysis Alice Song, Keith D. Carter, Jeffrey A. Nerad, Culver Boldt, James Folk  Featured ASOPRS Speaker 47. Introduction of Featured ASOPRS Speaker John V. Linberg, MD 48. Simpler, Faster and Better: Correction of Lid Retraction and Ptosis Bartley R. Frueh, MD  Session IV: Eyelid Disorders and Surgery 49. Doxil for Blepharospasm Treatment Trial: Early Results Andrew Harrison 50. Blepharitis Treated by Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Preliminary Study Gary E. Borodic 51. Something New on the Entropion Menu: The BLT – Botox, Laser and Tarsorrhaphy Charles D. Rice 52. Surgical Technique That Provides Effective Eye Protection While Maintaining Cosmesis in Patients with Facial Palsy Sheri L. DeMartelaere, Sean M. Blaydon, John W. Shore 53. Novel Corticosteroid-Eluting Porous Polyethylene Implants for the Management of Lower Eyelid Retraction Daniel C. Garibaldi, Michael R. Robinson, Susan S. Lee, D.J. John Park, Howard F. Fine, MPh, Luke Deitz, Nicholas Ranson, Sam D’Anna, Nicholas T. Iliff, Shannath L. Merbs 54. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy of Upper Eyelid Anatomy in Normal Eyelid Hakan Demirci, Christine C. Nelson

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55. A New Instrument and New Concept in Instrument Retractor Configuration to Avoid a Significant but Previously Unrecognized Iatrogenic Complication of Lower Transconjunctival Approach Surgery Norman Shorr, Todd Cook, Raymond Douglas, Robert Schwarcz, Richard Bryant, Robert Goldberg 56. Comprehensive, Combined Anterior and Transcaruncular Orbital Approach to Medial Canthal Ligament Plication Victor M. Elner, Hakan Demirci, Adam S. Hassan 57. Sutureless Fixation of Full Thickness Free Skin Grafts in Eyelid Reconstruction Nancy A. Tucker  ASOPRS Thesis and Awards Session 58. Introduction of the Thesis Session Tamara R. Fountain, MD, Chair, Thesis Committee 59. A Stepwise Treatment Paradigm for Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Douglas R. Casady 60. Modified Tarsal Resection Operation for Congenital Ptosis with Fair Levator Function Sarit M. Patel 61. Optic Canal Decompression: Histopathologic Effects of Surgery Cassandra B. Onofrey 62. Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presentation Presented by Tamara R. Fountain, MD to Sarit M. Patel, MD  ASOPRS Award Presentations 63. ASOPRS Research Award Presented by Don O. Kikkawa, MD to Louise Mawn, MD 64. Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Andrew R. Harrison, MD] Presented by Don O. Kikkawa, MD 65. Lester Jones Surgical Anatomy Award [to Michael Kazim, MD] Presented by Don O. Kikkawa, MD 66. Orkan Stasior Leadership Award [to Michael J. Hawes, MD] Presented by Don O. Kikkawa, MD 67. ASOPRS President’s Award [to David M. Reifler, MD] Presented by James C. Fleming, MD, ASOPRS President 68. Introduction of New ASOPRS Members James C. Fleming, MD 69. Tribute to Richard Dortzbach, MD Francis Sutula, MD  Session V: Oncology of the Orbit and Adnexa 70. Oral Chlorambucil Treatment for Orbital Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT) Lymphoma Guy J. Ben Simon, Danny Cheung, Penny McKelvie, Richard Fox, Alan McNab 71. Low-dose Cyclophosphamide and Interferon Alpha-2a for the Treatment of Juvenile Capillary Hemangioma of the Orbit Matthew W. Wilson, Mary Ellen Hoehn, Barrett G. Haik, Ulrike Reiss, Martha Rieman, FNP 72. Development of an Orthotopic Xenograft Mouse Model of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Lacrimal Gland Eli L. Chang, Carlo R. Bernardino, Peter A.D. Rubin 73. Ocular Adnexal Pseudo-Cyst Formation as a Characteristic Feature of Perineural Spread in Squamous Cell Carcinoma Timothy J. Sullivan, Alejandra A. Valenzuela, Kevin J. Whitehead 74. Applications of Hyperbaric Oxygen in the Irradiated Orbit Amjad Z. Ahmad, Brent R. Hayek, Jaime Villanueva, Darl Vandevender

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75. Optic Nerve Glioma: Can MRI Predict a Tumor-Free Surgical Margin? Galin J. Spicer, Michael Kazim, Jack Rootman, Gerald J. Harris, Neil R. Miller, Timothy J. Sullivan  Featured Guest Speaker 76. Introduction of Featured Guest Speaker Stuart R. Seiff, MD 77. Meningiomas of the Orbital Region: Treatment Options and Results Michael W. McDermott, MD  78. Orbital Tuberculosis Debraj Shome, Santosh G. Honavar, Milind N. Naik, Geeta K. Vemuganti 79. Sarcoid-like Granulomatous Orbital Inflammation Induced by Interferon-alpha Treatment Catherine J. Hwang, Roberta E. Gausas  ASOPRS Foundation Featured Speaker 80. Dedication of ASOPRS Foundation Lecture to Gerard M. Shannon, MD William Offutt, MD 81. Idiopathic Orbital Inflammations: Current Concepts and Treatment Strategies Gerald J. Harris, MD  Session VII: Orbital Surgery and Trauma 82. Optic Nerve Sheath Fenestration: Pearls and Pitfalls Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa, Karim G. Punja, Nonette Y. Pasco 83. Visual Outcomes in Blunt Ocular Rupture with an Associated Orbital Fracture Gregory W. Schmidt, Holly B. Hindman, Daniel C. Garibaldi, Nicholas T. Iliff, Shannath L. Merbs, Michael P. Grant 84. Complications of Supramid Orbital Implants in Traumatic Orbital Fractures: A Case Series of 181 Patients D.J. John Park, Daniel C. Garibaldi, Nicholas T. Iliff, Michael P. Grant, Shannath Merbs 85. Mepor TITAN: A New Alloplastic Orbital Implant Shannath L. Merbs, Daniel C. Garibaldi, Michael P. Grant, Nicholas T. Iliff Session VIII: Anophthalmos 86. Hollow Porous Spherical Orbital Implants! Safak Karslioglu, Ilke B. Simsek, Ender Uysal 87. Porous Implant Exposure: Incidence, Management, Morbidity Philip L. Custer 88. Hydrogel Tissue Expanders in Reconstruction of Anophthalmic Sockets Robert A. Mazzoli, Travis C. Frazier, William R. Raymond IV, Jeffrey L. Shere, Roger A. Anderson, Elizabeth A. Hansen, Darryl J Ainbinder  Posters [Total = 55] Videos [Total = 6]

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37th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “37th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium” November 15–16, 2006, Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV

Wednesday, November 15, 2006 1. Opening Remarks Roger A. Dailey, MD, ASOPRS President John D. Ng, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Session 1 – Orbit Moderators: Sean Blaydon, MD and Alice Song, MD 2. Evidence for Anatomic Site-Selective Actions of Th2 Cytokines in Graves’ Disease Beiling Chen, Shan Li Tsui, William Boeglin, Raymond S. Douglas, Terry Smith 3. Role of IV Methylprednisolone Immunosuppression in the Management of Active Thyroid Eye Disease Ajay Tripathi, Maria E. Gregory, Raghavan Sampath 4. Development and Testing of Thyroid Eye Disease (TED) Quality of Life Instrument Jing Li, Lauren Crow, BA, Kimberly P. Cockerham 5. Errors of Single Mirror or Prism Hertel Exophthalmometers and Recommendations for Increasing Reading Accuracy Bartley R. Frueh, Walter T. Frueh 6. Comparison of Orbital Fat and Subcutaneous Body Fat Edward Lee, Nancy Tucker 7. Causes of Orbital Cellulitis and Resulting Visual Loss in a Tertiary Eye Care Center Imtiaz A. Chaudhry, Elsanusi Elzaridi, Farrukh A. Shamsi, Waleed Al-Rasheed, Abulrahman al-Amri, Fahad al-Anezi, Yonca O. Arat, David E.E. Holck 8. Medial Canthal Open Nasal Fracture Repair Jeremiah P. Tao, William R. Nunery 9. Management of Fronto-Ethmoidal Mucoceles with Orbital Extension: Is Primary Orbital Reconstruction Necessary? Avani Shah, Dale Meyer  Featured Speaker 10. Introduction of Featured Speaker John D. Ng, MD 11. Surgical Management of Congenital Vascular Abnormalities of the Orbit and Face Milton Waner, MD  Session 2 – Eyelid Moderators: Scott Goldstein, MD and Adam Hassan, MD 12. Age- and Fatigue-Related Markers of Human Faces: An Eye Tracking Study Peter A.D. Rubin, Huy T. Nguyen, Derek M. Isaacowitz 13. Palpebral Spring in the Management of Upper Eyelid Retraction Secondary to Facial Nerve Palsy Hakan Demirci, Bartley R. Frueh, David Musch 14. Corneal Astigmatism with Upper Eyelid Gold Weight Implantation Using the Combined High Pretarsal and Levator Fixation Technique George M. Saleh, Ioannis Mavrikakis, Jean-Louis de Sousa, Wen Xing, Raman Malhotra 15. The MACS Facelift with Gortex Suspension in Chronic Facial Palsy Jane M. Olver, Ravi Singh  ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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ASOPRS Foundation Speaker 16. ASOPRS Foundation Update Daniel Schaefer, MD 17. Dedication of 2006 ASOPRS Foundation Lecture to James Hargiss, MD Daniel Schaefer, MD 18. Introduction of Invited ASOPRS Foundation Speaker William R. Nunery, MD 19. Update on Management of Facial Dystonias Richard Anderson, MD  20. Medial Pre-Tarsal Fat of the Upper Lid: Applied Anatomy to Prevent Medial Under-Correction in Blepharoptosis Surgery Sunny Shen, Rajendran Kana Gasuntheram, Kee Siew Fong 21. Securing the Anterior Extension of Levator Muscle Sheath in Oriental Aponeurotic Ptosis Surgery Chai Teck Choo, Sunny Shen 22. Treatment of Lower Eyelid Retraction with Dermis Fat Grafting Bobby S. Korn, Kanajana Leelapatranurak, Christine C. Annunziata, Don O. Kikkawa 23. Sliding Tarsal Flap for Reconstruction of Large, Shallow Lower Eyelid Tarsal Defects Jean-Louis deSousa, Raman Malhotra, Garry Davis 24. Minimal Pentagonal Excision: A Modification of the Classical Technique for Upper Eyelid Reconstruction Terry J. Alexandrou, Nancy A. Tucker 25. Floppy Eyelid Syndrome (FES): A Management Algorithm Imran Ashfaq, Yajati Ghosh, Harpreet Ahluwalia 26. Bilobed versus Glabellar Flaps in Medial Canthal Reconstruction Mehryar Taban, Julian D. Perry 27. Acellular Human Dermal Matrix as a Skin Substitute for Reconstruction of Large Cutaneous Defects Flora Levin, Roger E. Turbin, Paul Langer  ASOPRS Thesis and Awards Section 28. Introduction to Thesis Section Jurij Bilyk, MD, Chair, ASOPRS Thesis Committee 29. Broad Fascial Fixation Enhances Frontalis Suspension Sheri L. DeMartelaere 30. Human Orbital Sympathetic Nerve Pathways, Part I and II Manoj M. Thakker 31. The Study of Orbital Development Using Zebrafish: A Powerful Tool for Understanding Orbital Biology and Disease Alon Kahana 32. Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presentation [to Alon Kahana, MD, PhD] Presented by Jurij R. Bilyk, MD 33. Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Manoj Thakker, MD] Presented by Bita Esmaeli, MD 34. ASOPRS Research Award [to Vikram D. Durairaj, MD, George B. Bartley, MD, and James A. Garrity, MD] Presented by Bita Esmaeli, MD  Session 3 – Oncology Moderators: Dan DeAngelis, MD and Kenneth Morgenstern, MD 35. Lymphoproliferative Diseases of the Ocular Adnexa in Korea Oh Dong-Eun Kim Yoon-Duck 36. Sebaceous Cell Carcinoma of the Ocular Adnexa: Clinical Presentations and Outcomes Alice Song, Keith D. Carter, Jeffrey A. Nerad

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37. The Role of Post-Operative Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Eyelid and Conjunctival Tumors Bita Esmaeli, Viet H. Ho, Matthew Ballo, Steven Frank, Adam Hsu 38 Receptor Expression in Orbital Inflammatory Syndromes and Implications for Targeted Therapy Viet H. Ho, Jeffrey L. Jorgensen, Patricia Chevez-Barrios, Rona Z. Silkiss, Bita Esmaeli 39. Ophthalmic Complications Following Treatment of Primary Orbital or Paranasal Rhabdomyosarcoma Parag D. Gandhi, Matthew W. Wilson, James C. Fleming, Barrett G. Haik 40. Inverted Papilloma Involving the Lacrimal System and Orbit John J. Woog, Bita Esmaeli, Julian Perry, Stuart Seiff, Jack Rootman, Jill A. Foster, Bryan Sires, Don O. Kikkawa, Dan DeAngelis, Elizabeth Bradley 41. Conformal Radiation for Optic Pathway Gliomas Cari E. Lyle, Matthew W. Wilson, Thomas Merchant, DO  Featured Speaker 42. Introduction of Guest Speaker Stuart Seiff, MD 43. Update on Management of Cutaneous Melanoma Mohammed Kashani-Sabet, MD  Session 4 – Lacrimal 44. The Microbiological Spectrum of Dacryocystitis: A National Study of Acute vs. Chronic Infection David M. Mills, Marc Bodman, Dale R. Meyer, Asa D. Morton, The ASOPRS Dacryocystitis Study Group 45. The Effect of Short Duration Silicone Tube Intubation in Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Neal J. Peterson, R. Grey Weaver, R. Patrick Yeatts 46. Dacryocystorhinostomy Below Versus Under Medial Canthal Ligament Pelin Kaynak Hekimhan, Omer Faruk Yilmaz 47. Dacryocystorhinostomy Utilizing a Hydrogel Lacrimal Stent Robert A. Goldberg, David B. Samimi, BA, Seongmu Lee, Angelo Tsirbas, Ray Douglas, PhD 48. Indications for Silicone Intubation for Canalicular Stenosis Associated with Taxotere Based on Experience with Over 200 Patients Bita Esmaeli 49. Canalicular Reconstruction Utilizing Acellular Human Dermal Allograft (Alloderm) Philip R. Rizzuto  Session 5 – Anophthalmic Socket 50. Comparison of Vascularization of Porous Polyethylene (Medpor) and Synthetic Bone Graft Particulate-Enhanced Porous Polyethylene (Medpor-Plus) as an Integrated Orbital Implant Milind N. Naik, Ramesh K. Murthy, Priya G., Praveen Nirmalan, Santosh G. Honavar 51. Long-Term Results of Postenucleation Socket Syndrome Correction by New Nanocrystalic Hydroxyapatite and High-Pore Alumoxide Penoceramic Implant Viktoria Leonidavna Krasilnikova, Ludmila Konstantinovna Yachnitskaya, Inna V. Sasim 52. Evaluation of a Magnet Coupling System for a Porous Enucleation Implant Shannath L. Merbs, Kevin C. Lee, Timothy P. Friel, Daniel C. Garibaldi, Nicholas T. Iliff, Michael P. Grant 53. Rigid Nylon Foil Anchored Polytetrafluoroethylene Sheet Implant Inferior Conjunctival Fornix Reconstruction Hakan Demirci, Adam Hassan, Victor M. Elner  Thursday, November 16, 2006 54. Welcome Remarks/Introductions Roger A. Dailey, MD, ASOPRS President Michael E. Migliori, MD, Thursday Program Chair

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Session 6 – Aesthetic Moderators: Katrinka L. Heher, MD and John Y. Koh, MD 55. Orbital Septal Resection and Lower Eyelid Blepharoplasty Sheri L. DeMartelaere, Kevin I. Perman, John W. Shore 56. Modified Pinch Technique for Combined Skin-Muscle Flap Lower Blepharoplasty/Midface Lift Steven C. Dresner, Melanie Ho Erb 57. Results of Intra-SOOF Fat Repositioning vs. Septal Reset Lower Blepharoplasty Techniques via a Transconjunctival Approach John B. Holds, Gabriela M. Espinoza, Yasaman Mohadjer 58. Midfacial Recontouring with Orbitomalar Resuspension Don O. Kikkawa, Bobby S. Korn, Kanajana Leelapatranurak, Christine Annunziata 59. Current Concepts in Asian Blepharoplasty: The Double Eyelid Operation Jeffrey Schiller 60. Treatment of Cicatricial Lower Lid Retraction Using Mid-Lower Eyelid Tarsoconjunctival Flap-Skin Graft John Pak, Allen M. Putterman 61. The Revision Midface Lift for Post-Blepharoplasty Lower Eyelid Retraction: Combined Transconjunctival and Sublabial Subperiosteal Release Norman Shorr, Tanuj Nakra, Ron Mancini 62. Intraconal Fat Transfer and Lower Lid Retractor Release for Treatment of Lower Eyelid Retraction and Volume Collapse in the Prominent Eye Patient Robert A. Goldberg, Richard Bryant, Tanuj Nakra, Raymond Douglas, Angelo Tsirbas 63. Preliminary Results of a Blinded-Evaluator, Retrospective Review of the Effect of Radiesse (Calcium Hydroxylapatite) Soft Tissue Augmentation to the Midface and Periorbital Region and its Effect on Lower Eyelid Contour Joseph A. Eviatar, Alexandra L. Pappas 64. A Clinical Evaluation of the Preferred Areas of Restylane in Orbital and Facial Soft Tissue Augmentation Carrie L. Morris, Julie A. Woodward 65. The “Sausage” or “Hot Dog” Deformity Following Fat Transfer Demonstrates Long-Term Adipocyte Viability John G. Rose Jr., Cynthia A. Boxrud, Amol Kularni, Cat N. Burkat 66. Microdroplet Cosmetic Botulinum Toxin: A New Treatment Paradigm Kenneth D. Steinsapir  Featured Speaker 67. Introduction of Featured Speaker Roger A. Dailey, MD 68. Chemical Peels in an Era of Lasers Mark G. Rubin, MD  Free Papers Moderators: Suzanne Freitag, MD and Robert J. Hofmann, MD 69. Facial Pattern Recognition and Platysmaplasty Techniques in Rhytidectomy Alan B. Brackup 70. Comparison of Temple Lifting Using the Biplanar Temple Lift (BTL) versus a Uni-Planar Technique Harry Marshak, David M. Morrow 71. Contour Threads Brow Lifting: Evaluation of the Technique Mohammad Abdul Hafez, Hatem A. Tawfik, PhD 72. Evaluation of Effectiveness of the Contour Threadlift™ in the Management of Brow Ptosis: A Six Month Review David E.E. Holck, Jill A. Foster, Andrew David

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73. Barbed Polypropylene Sutures in Association with Endotine Forehead in Endoscopic Brow and Midface Lift Alessandro Gennai, Angelo Saponaro, Francesco P. Bernardini  Henry Baylis Award Speaker 74. Introduction of Henry Baylis Award Speaker Allen M. Putterman, MD 75. Botulinum Toxin: Deadly Neurotoxin to Cosmetic Icon Jill A. Foster, MD 76. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Cosmetic Award Presented by Allen M. Putterman, MD to Jill A. Foster, MD  Free Papers 77. Surgical Treatment of “Crow’s Feet” with the Wire Scalpel Bret S. Kotlus, Robert Dryden 78. Harmony Laser with ST Handpiece Combined with Radiofrequency (Thermage) Skin Tightening for Facial Rejuvenation Stephen Bosniak, Marian Cantisano-Zilkha, Ioannis P. Glavas 79. Carbon Dioxide and Broadband Light Therapies for Facial Rejuvenation Stephen Bosniak, Marian Cantisano-Zilkha, Ioannis P. Glavas 80. Fractional Resurfacing of the Eyelids: Initial Clinical Experience Brian S. Biesman 81. The Modified Deep Plane Facelift Robert M. Schwarcz, Ronald W. Strahan 82. Facelift Closure Techniques Robert M. Schwarcz, Robert A. Goldberg, Ronald W. Strahan 83. Combined Cervicofacial Rhytidectomy and Autologous Fat Transfer: Simultaneous 3-Dimensional Facial Rejuvenation Alan B. Brackup 84. Direct Jowl Liposuction John P. Fezza  Aesthetic Breakout Sessions – Period I 85. Course 1: Facial Shaping with Botox and Fillers Jane J. Olson, Brian Biesman, John Fezza, Jean Carruthers, Roger Dailey 86. Course 2: Skin Care 2006 Mark G. Rubin 87. Minimally Invasive Face Lifting and Neck Techniques 101 Allan E. Wulc, Robert M. Dryden, Jonathan Hoenig, Janet Neigel, Kenneth Steinsapir, Brian Willoughby 88. Evaluation of the Aesthetic Patient: Developing a Customized Analysis and Treatment Plan Robert A. Goldberg  Aesthetic Breakout Sessions – Period II 89. Course 1: Technologies of Skin Rejuvenation Brian Biesman 90. Course 2: Contemporary Techniques for the Rejuvenation of the Midface Patrick Flaharty, David E.E. Holck, Kenneth Steinsapir 91. Course 3: Beautiful Skin: Cosmeceuticals, Chemical Peels Jill A. Foster, Rebecca Tung

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92. Liposuction and Liposculpture Alan Brackup, Allan E. Wulc, Jonathan Hoenig, Bhupendra Patel  Posters [Total = 59] Videos [Total = 6]

38th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Rebuild, Restore, Rejuvenate” November 9–10, 2007, Marriott Canal Street, New Orleans, LA

Friday, November 9, 2007 1. Welcome/Opening Remarks James W. Karesh, MD, ASOPRS President Mark J. Lucarelli, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair David E.E. Holck, MD, Friday Program Chair Session One – Aesthetic Moderators: Vikram Durairaj, MD and Julian Perry, MD 2. Analysis of the Anatomic Changes of the Aging Face Using Computer-Assisted Tomography Carrie Morris, Julie Woodward, Byron Deen, Michael Richard 3. Orbital Sexual Dimorphism and Attractiveness Mounir Bashour, Craig Geist 4. Plasmakinetic Resurfacing of the Eyelids: Initial Clinical Investigation Brian Biesman 5. Active FX Fractional Laser Resurfacing for Facial Skin Rejuvenation John Fezza 6. Observations on Involutional Epicanthus and Upper Blepharoplasty Philip Custer, Yasaman Mohadjer 7. A New Technique Using Radiesse through an Intra-Oral Approach for Facial Recontouring Sheila Barbarino, Joseph Eviatar 8. Lower Eyelid Rejuvenation: When to Fill and When to Cut Marc Cohen, Nancy Swartz 9. Lower Eyelid Blepharoplasty with Fat Re-injection Nancy Tucker 10. Periocular and Facial Autologous Fat Injections Utilizing a Disposable 20 Gauge Harvesting and Transfer System Norman Shorr, Ronald Mancini, Mehryar Taban, Jonathan Hoenig 11. The Malar Tear Trough Implant Robert Schwarcz 12. Temporal Brow Reinflation at Time of Brow-Lifting David E. E. Holck, Lisa Mihora, Jill A. Foster, Manuel Lopez, Morris Hartstein, Kevin Kalwerisky 13. SMAS/Fat Grafting During Browlift Surgery John Fezza  Featured Speaker 14. Introduction of Featured Speaker David E. E. Holck, MD

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15. Putting It All Together: Fine Tuning Facial Plastic Surgery Edwin F. Williams III, MD  16. Lipodissolve in the Periocular Area John Holds 17. Suture (FeatherLift) Midface Lift: Round 2? David E. E. Holck 18. The State of Fillers in 2007 Rebecca Tung  Henry Baylis Award Speaker 19. Introduction of Henry Baylis Award Speaker Jill A. Foster, MD 20. The Bottom Line Jonathan Hoenig, MD 21. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Cosmetic Award Presented by Jill A. Foster, MD to Jonathan Hoenig, MD  Session Two – Techniques and Controversies in Aesthetic Oculofacial Surgery Moderator: David E.E. Holck, MD 22. Bleeding in Oculofacial Plastic Surgery John Burroughs, Jonathan Dutton, Tamara R. Fountain 23. Photography in Facial Aesthetic Surgery, Q&A Peter Rubin, John Holds, Robert A. Goldberg 24. De-Mystifying the Midface Roger Dailey, Mike Yen, Jill A. Foster, Don O. Kikkawa, David E. E. Holck, Asa Morton  Session Three – Concurrent Breakout Sessions 25. Course 1: Evaluation of the Cosmetic Patient Robert A. Goldberg 26. Non-surgical Cutaneous Rejuvenation: Topicals, Peels, and Fillers Jill A. Foster, Rebecca Tung 27. Facelifting Techniques Jonathan Hoenig, Allan E. Wulc 28. Liposuction, Liposculpture, Facial Fat Injection Brian Willoughby, Robert Fante 29. Rhinoplasty Manuel Lopez, Robert Schwarcz 30. ASOPRS Aesthetics Consultants’ Corner John Burroughs, Christopher DeBacker, John Fezza, Scott Goldstein, Bobby S. Korn,  Saturday, November 10, 2007 31. Welcome/Opening Remarks James W. Karesh, MD, ASOPRS President Mark J. Lucarelli, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair  Session Four – Orbit Moderators: Peter Rubin, MD and Julie Woodward, MD 32. Lymphatic Lineage Demonstrated in Lymphatic Malformation of the Orbit Roberta Gausas, Lena Chheda, Johnstone Kim, Ralph Eagle 33. Vein Thrombosis as a Mechanism of Exacerbation in Venous and Combined Venous Lymphatic Malformations of the Orbit Ioannis Mavrikakis, Manraj Heran, Valerie White, Jack Rootman

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34. Presentation and Management of Thyroid Eye Disease in Childhood and Adolescence Ana Morley, Jimmy Uddin, Geoffrey Rose 35. Radiographic Analysis of Soft Tissue Changes in Thyroid-Related Orbitopathy Following Orbital Decompression Christine C. Annunziata, Bobby S. Korn, Kanjana Leelapatranurak, Don O. Kikkawa 36. IGF-1R is Overexpressed in Graves’ Orbital Fibroblasts and Provides a Growth Advantage in Vitro Terry Smith, Vibha Naik, Robert Goldberg, Raymond Douglas, PhD 37. Time Resolved Imaging of Contrast Kinetics (TRICKS) Magnetic Resonance Angiography in the Evaluation of Orbital Vascular Tumors Alon Kahana, Mark J. Lucarelli, Cat N. Burkat, Jeremy J. Van Buren 38. Orbital Fungal Infection Study Group: Preliminary Results Dan Georgescu, David Weinberg 39. Nylon Foil “Wraparound” Repair of Combined Orbital Floor and Medial Wall Fractures William Nunery, Jeremiah P. Tao, Sukhjit Johl 40. Incomplete Repair of Orbital Wall Fractures: Clinical and Radiologic Characteristics, Surgical Outcome Roman Shinder, Paul Langer  Featured Speaker 41. Introduction of Featured Speaker: Luigi Bartalena, MD Mark Lucarelli, MD 42. Novel Immunomodulating Drugs on the Horizon of Graves’ Orbitopathy Luigi Bartalena, MD  Session Five – Eyelid 43. Metastatic Tumors to the Eyelid: A Report of 13 Cases Hakan Demirci, Carlos Gustavo, Carol L. Shields, Ralph C. Eagle Jr., Jerry A. Shields 44. The Relationship of the Globe to the Orbital Rim Lauren A. Eckstein, Robert A. Goldberg 45. Small Incision External Levator Resection for Congenital Ptosis Melanie Erb, Michael Burnstine 46. Comparison of Fibrin Sealant vs. Suture for Wound Closure in Müller Muscle Conjunctival Resection Ptosis Repair Marsha C. Kavanagh, Matthew P. Ohr, Craig N. Czyz, Kenneth V. Cahill, David E.E. Holck, Jill A. Foster 47. Silicone Rod Frontalis Suspension: A 3-Year Review of 160 Consecutive Procedures for Pediatric Ptosis Repair William Katowitz, Kate Lane, James Katowitz 48. Preservation of Eyelid Crease by Modified Levator Recession and Muellerectomy for Thyroid-related Lid Retraction Erin Shriver, Keith Carter 49. Trans-canthotomy Lateral SOOF Lift and Orbitomalar Ligament Resuspension in Lower Lid Ectropion Repair Alon Kahana, Mark J. Lucarelli 50. The Buccal Fat Pad: A Vascular Pedicle for Oculo-facial Reconstruction Tanuj Nakra, Ronald Mancini, Dianna Lee, Angelo Tsirbas, Robert Goldberg 51. Peri-ocular Community Acquired MRSA Infections: A Problem on the Rise Scott M. Goldstein  ASOPRS Foundation Update and Lectures 52. Foundation Update Ralph Wesley, MD, Chair, ASOPRS Foundation 53. Dedication of ASOPRS Foundation Lecture to George Buerger, MD Bartley Frueh, MD ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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54. Introduction of Invited ASOPRS Foundation Speaker: Timothy Sullivan, MD Mark Lucarelli, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair 55. How Understanding the Genetics of Periocular Malignancies Can Improve Management Timothy Sullivan, MD  ASOPRS Thesis and Awards Section Moderator: Andrew Harrison, MD 56. Introduction to Thesis Section Andrew Harrison, MD 57. Reflected CO2 Laser and Effects on Operative Field Materials Matthew Hammons, MD 58. Human Orbital Adipose Tissue: A Source of Pluripotential Adult Stem Cells Bobby S. Korn, MD, PhD 59. Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presentation Andrew Harrison MD for John Ng, MD, Chair, ASOPRS Thesis Committee 60. ASOPRS Award Presentations Andrew Harrison, MD and Robert Goldberg, MD, ASOPRS Awards Committee Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Todd Shepler, MD] Lester Jones Anatomy Award [to Roberta Gausas, MD] Wendell Hughes Lecture Award [to John Harrington, MD] ASOPRS Research Award [to Peter J. Dolman, MD] Orkan Stasior Leadership Award [to Ralph E. Wesley, MD] ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award [to Gerald J. Harris, MD] Henry Baylis Cosmetic Surgery Award [to Jonathan Hoenig, MD]  61. International Thyroid Eye Disease Study Group (ITEDS) Update Ray Douglas, MD, PhD, Michael Kazim 62. Introduction of New ASOPRS Members James Karesh, MD, ASOPRS President  Session Six – Oncology 63. Topical Imiquimod (AldaraTM) for Periocular Lentigo Maligna Hakan Demirci, Carol L. Shields, Brian P. Marr, Jerry A. Shields 64. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Eyelid and Conjunctival Melanoma and Sebaceous Cell Carcinoma: Long-term data in 30 Patients Treated at a Single Center Bita Esmaeli, Merrick Ross, Stella Kim, Victor Prieto 65. Value of Positron Emission Tomography in Evaluating Response to Therapy of Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas Isis Gayed, Bita Esmaeli 66. The Use of the Purse-string Closure with Multiple “M-plasties” in Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Jonathan Hoenig, Tanuj Nakra 67. The “Reverse Facelift” Flap in the Management of Lateral Nasal and Medial Midface Facial Defects Jonathan Hoenig, Tanuj Nakra, Raymond Douglas  Session Seven – Lacrimal Moderators: Dale Meyer, MD and Peter Dolman, MD 68. The Role of Fungi in Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Noelene K. Pang, Dan D. DeAngelis, John T. Harvey, Jeffrey J. Hurwitz, James H. Oestreicher, Tony Mazzulli, David Howarth 69. Three Dimensional CT Virtual Dacryoendoscopy Marsha C. Kavanagh, Peter Haar, Jill A. Foster, J. Geoffrey Wiot, Kenneth V. Cahill 70. The Round-tipped Eye Pigtail Probe for Canalicular Intubation: A Review of 228 Patients David A. Jordan, Steve Gilberg, Louise Mawn

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71. Efficacy of the Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery Simulator as a Training Tool for Ophthalmology Residents Meredith Weiss, Marvin P. Fried, Simeon Lauer, Babak Sadoughi, Michael Zeltsan, Jose Uribe  Session Eight – Anophthalmic Socket Moderators: Evan Black, MD and Shannath Merbs, MD 72. Methods of Antibiotic Instillation in Porous Orbital Implants Jaime Badilla, Peter Dolman 73. Management of Anophthalmic Implant Exposure with Split Thickness Extraocular Muscle Flaps Pelin Kaynak-Hekimhan, Omer Faruk Yilmaz, Mustafa Elcioglu 74. Superior Conjunctivoplasty-Muellerectomy for Correction of Chronic Discharge and Ptosis in the Anophthalmic Socket David Jones, Cari Lyle, James Fleming 75. Hyaluronic Acid Gel (Sub-Q®) Use in Anophthalmic Volume Deficient Sockets and Phthisical Eyes Jane Olver, Sri Thyagarajan, Maryam Zamani, Peter Addison, Eugene Tay  Posters [Total = 55] Videos [Total = 7]

39th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Oculofacial Plastic Surgery: Imagination, Art, Science” November 12–13, 2008, Westin Peachtree, Atlanta, GA

Wednesday, November 12, 2008 1. Welcome/Opening Remarks James W. Karesh, MD, ASOPRS President Michael E. Migliori, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Session 1 – Oncology Moderators: Robert G. Fante, MD and Geva Mannor, MD 2. Periocular Basal Cell Carcinoma Treated with Mohs Micrographic Surgery in Argentina Abel Gonzalez, Martin Devoto, Candela Zaffaroni, Mario Rivero 3. AJCC Staging for Eyelid Carcinomas Bita Esmaeli, Deborah Seigler, Roman Shinder, Serdar Dogan, Aron Savar 4. Conjunctival Metastasis from Malignant Melanoma: Atypical Presentations Jerry Shields, Carol Shields, Ralph Eagle 5. Surgical Reconstruction and Prosthetic Rehabilitation After Orbital Exenteration for Cancer Matthew Hanasono, Aaron Savar, Gregory Reece, Roman Skoracki, Bita Esmaeli 6. A Correlation of the Histology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Optic Nerve in Eyes Primarily Enucleated for Retinoblastoma Matthew Wilson, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, Catherine Billups, Barrett Haik, Fred Laningham, Zoltan Patay 7. Chemoreduction Prior to Surgery and Radiation for Adult Orbital Sarcoma Aaron Savar, Jonathan Trent, Roman Shinder, Bita Esmaeli 8. Orbital Involvement in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Houman Vosoghi, Matthew Wilson, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo 9. Social Challenges of Cancer Patients with Orbitofacial Disfigurement Alessandro Bonanno, Bita Esmaeli  ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Featured Speaker 10. Introduction of Featured Speaker: Steven J Frank, MD Bita Esmaeli, MD 11. Protons, Photons, and Electrons in the Management of Ocular Tumors Steven J. Frank, MD  Session Two – Anophthalmic Socket Moderators: Dale R. Meyer, MD and Noel D. Saks, MD 12. Update on Adequate Trans-scleral Volume Implantation in Evisceration Cat Burkat, Mark Lucarelli 13. Silicone Gel [MED-361] Enhanced Growth of Silicone Ocular Prostheses: Potential Noninvasive Socket Contracture Reconstruction C.L. Morris, M. Singer, J.C. Fleming 14. Use of the Inferior Oblique Muscle for Implant Coverage in Enucleation Alan McInnes, Steven Dresner 15. Exposed Porous Orbital Implants Treated with Simultaneous Secondary Implant and Dermis Fat Graft Brian Lee, Craig Lewis, Julian Perry 16. Orbital Augmentation with Injectable Calcium Hydroxylapatite M. Reza Vagefi, Dan Georgescu, John McCann, Richard Anderson 17. Autologous Dermis Graft at the Time of Evisceration or Enucleation John McCann, John Burroughs, Dan Georgescu, Richard Anderson, M. Reza Vagefi  Session Three – Eyelid Disorders Moderators: Jane J. Olson, MD and Martin H. Devoto, MD 18. A Histological Analysis of the Muellerectomy: Redefining Its Mechanism in Ptosis Repair C.L. Morris, W. Morris, J.C. Fleming 19. Transconjunctival Lateral Cantholysis for Closure of Full Thickness Eyelid Defects Craig Lewis, Julian Perry 20. Reverse Modified Hughes Procedure for Upper Eyelid Reconstruction Ho-Seok Sa, Kyung-In Woo, Yoon-Duck Kim 21. Adjunctive Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Life-Threatening Periocular Necrotizing Fasciitis Alice Song, Julia Song, Michael Strauss, Stuart Miller, Igor Aksenov, George Hart 22. Benefits of Temporalis Tendon Transfer via a Nasolabial Approach in the Comprehensive Management of the Facial Nerve Palsy Patient David E.E. Holck, Manuel Lopez, Lisa Mihora, Jill A. Foster, Sheri DeMartelaere 23. Long-term Outcomes of Surgical Approaches to the Treatment of Floppy Eyelid Syndrome Daniel Ezra, Mano Sira, Sabrina Shah-Desai, Jimmy Uddin, David Verity, Richard Collin, Michele Beaconsfield 24. High Concentration Versus Low Concentration Botulinum Toxin A for Benign Essential Blepharospasm: Does Dilution Make a Difference? Michael Boyle, Gerald McGwin, Courtney Flanagan, Matthew Vicinanzo, John Long 25. Periosteal Flap Augmentation of the Tarsal Strip Suspension in Ectropion Repair David Reifler, Elizabeth Nguyen 26. International Thyroid Eye Disease Study Group (ITEDS) Update Michael Kazim, MD  ASOPRS Thesis and Awards Section Moderator: Andrew R. Harrison, MD 27. Introduction to Thesis Section Andrew R. Harrison, MD 28. Characterization of Periorbital Inflammation in DJ-1 Knockout Mice: Implications for Neurodegenerative and Oculoplastic Disease Edward J. Wladis, MD ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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29. Comparison of Orbital Tumor Composition in a Community Based Oculoplastic Setting versus a Tertiary Care Setting Carl E. Lyle, MD 30. Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presentation Andrew R. Harrison, MD 31. ASOPRS Awards Presentation Andrew R. Harrison, MD, Robert A. Goldberg, MD, and James W Karesh, MD Lester T. Jones Surgical Anatomy Award [to Victor Elner, MD, PhD] Wendell Hughes Lecture Award [George Bartley, MD] ASOPRS Research Award [to Jeremiah P. Tao, MD and William Nunery, MD] Orkan George Stasior, MD Leadership Award [to Roger A. Dailey, MD] Robert Kennedy Presidential Award [presented to Roger A. Dailey, MD by James Karesh, MD, ASOPRS President] 32. Introduction of New ASOPRS Members James W. Karesh, MD, ASOPRS President  ASOPRS Foundation Update and Lectures Moderator: James C. Fleming, MD 33. ASOPRS Foundation Update James C. Fleming, MD 34. ASOPRS Lecture Dedication to Charles M. Stephenson, MD Arthur Perry, MD 35. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation Lecture Michael E. Migliori, MD 36. Military Oculofacial Plastic Surgery: from Battlefield to Germany to Walter Reed David E.E. Holck, MD, Omaya H. Youssef, MD, Andrew S. Eiseman, MD  Session Four – Lacrimal Disorders Moderators: Sean M. Blaydon, MD and Sara A. Kaltreider, MD 37. Intranasal Findings Associated with Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Angela Dolmetsch 38. Lacrimal Endoscopy in the Diagnosis of Patients with Epiphora Carlo de Conciliis 39. Microbial Flora, Choice of Antibiotics and Effect on Outcome in Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Roshmi Gupta, Sukhada Mishra, Vasudha Erraguntla, Savitri Sharma, Milind Naik, Santosh Honavar 40. Acquired Lacrimal Sac Fistula Following Incision and Drainage for Dacryocystitis: A National Study Rhonda Barrett, Dale Meyer, ASOPRS Lacrimal Fistula Study Group 41. The Use of Topical Mitomycin C Drops with Lacrimal Intubation to Treat Disparate Cases of Punctal Occlusion in Trachomatous Patients Haitham Nassr 42. Flap Suturing During Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy Nattawut Wanumkarng, Aree Nimitwongsakul 43. Results with a Medpor-coated Tear Drain Ted Wojno 44. Lacrimal Nerve Stimulation by a Neurostimulator for Tear Production Andrea Lora, Jianhua Wang, Shuliang Jiao, Elut Hernandez, Jean-Marie Parel, David T. Tse 45. Results of Lacrimal Gland Botox Injection for Epiphora in 45 Patients Ted Wojno 46. Late Complications of Thermosensitive Acrylic Rod-shaped Punctal Plugs Daniel C. Garibaldi, Henry D. Perry, Gerard D’Aversa, Charles G. Eberhart, Shannath L. Merbs  Session Five – Orbital Disease Moderators: Kenneth V. Cahill, MD and Gabriela M. Espinoza, MD ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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47. Orbital Hydatid Cyst in Iraq: Probably a Simpler Surgical Approach A. Hadi al Khalili 48. T2 Fat Suppression Versus T2 STIR for Quantitative MRI Evaluation of the Orbit in Thyroid Eye Disease Simeon Lauer, Eleanore Kim, Rona Silkiss 49. Histology of Brow and Orbital Fat in Graves’ Disease Catherine Hwang, Mehryar Taban, Benjamin Burt, Terry Smith, Raymond Douglas 50. Transcaruncular Medial Wall Orbital Decompression: An Effective Approach for Patients with Unilateral Graves’ Ophthalmopathy Robert Hill, Thomas Bersani 51. Change in the Volume of Extraocular Muscles Following Orbital Decompression for Thyroid Orbitopathy Adel Alsuhaibani, Jeffrey Nerad, Keith Carter, Bruno Policeni 52. Visual Field Defect Following Orbital Floor Fracture Jonathan Bhargava, Katya Tambe, Joyce Burns, Raghavan Sampath 53. Total Lateral Orbitotomy Jonathan Kim, Barbara Yates, Robert Goldberg 54. Combination Polyene-Caspofungin Treatment of Rhino-Orbital-Cerebral Mucormycosis Richard Bryant, Caitlin Reed, Brad Spellberg, Robert Goldberg 55. Progressive Bilateral Enophthalmos Following Venticuloperitoneal Shunting for Acquired Hydrocephalus Thomas N. Hwang, Soraya Rofagha, William F. Hoyt, Timothy J. McCulley  Thursday, November 13, 2008 56. Welcome/Opening Remarks James W. Karesh, MD, ASOPRS President, Michael E. Migliori, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair, Don O. Kikkawa, MD, ASOPRS Aesthetic Day Program Chair  Forehead and Brow Aesthetics Moderator: Asa D. Morton, MD 57. Tips on Endoscopic Brow Lifting Guy G. Massry, MD 58. Palpebral Approaches to the Brow and Forehead Stuart R. Seiff, MD 59. Non-surgical Brow Rejuvenation Kathleen M. Duerksen, MD 60. Panel Discussion – Lead by Moderator Asa D. Morton, MD, Guy G. Massry, MD, Stuart Seiff, MD, Kathleen M. Duerksen, MD  61. Introduction of the Henry Baylis Award Speaker – Steven Fagien, MD Allen M. Putterman, MD (video presentation) 62. Blepharoplasty and Injectables for Facial Rejuvenation: Roots and Evolution…From Technique to Aesthetics Steven Fagien, MD 62. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Cosmetic Award Don O. Kikkawa, MD  Session Six – Aesthetic Papers 63. Brow Elevation Outcomes: A Comparison of Four Techniques Dan Georgescu, John D. McCann, Richard L. Anderson 64. Persistent Blepharoptosis Following Cosmetic Botulinum Toxin A Treatment Kenneth Steinsapir, Michael Groth, Cynthia Boxrud 65. Volumetric Rejuvenation of the Lower Lid Region with the Orbicularis Hitch Morris Hartstein ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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66. Use of BioGlue for Brow Fixation in Transblepharoplasty Browlifting: Preliminary Results Joseph Eviatar, Michael Jasin, Diana Ng  Featured Speaker – Mark A. Codner, MD 67. Introduction of Featured Speaker: Mark A Codner, MD Clinton D. McCord, MD 68. Midfacial Rejuvenation Mark A. Codner, MD  Blepharoplasty and Midface Moderator: Allan E. Wulc, MD 69. Fat Removal During Blepharoplasty Steven C. Dresner, MD 70. Fat Preservation in Lower Lid Rejuvenation John B. Holds, MD 71. Lower Lid/Midfacial Surgery in High Risk Patients Michael P. Grant, MD 72. Panel Discussion – Led by Moderator Allan E. Wulc, MD, Mark A. Codner, MD, Steven C. Dresner, MD, Steven Fagien, MD, Michael P. Grant, MD, PhD, John B. Holds  Featured Speaker – Steven R. Cohen, MD 73. Introduction of Featured Speaker: Steven R. Cohen, MD Don O. Kikkawa, MD 74. Customizing Facial Aesthetic Surgery Steven R. Cohen, MD  Facelift Moderator: Roger A. Dailey, MD 75. Small Incision Face Lift John G. Rose, Jr., MD 76. SMAS Facelift Techniques Harvey P. “Chip” Cole, MD 77. Deep Plane Facelift David E.E. Holck, MD 78. Panel Discussion – Led by Moderator Roger A. Dailey, MD, Harvey P. “Chip” Cole, MD, David E.E. Holck, MD, John G. Rose, Jr. MD  Featured Speaker – E. Victor Ross, MD 79. Introduction of Featured Speaker: E. Victor Ross, MD Geva Mannor, MD 80. Aesthetic Laser Therapy of the Skin E. Victor Ross  Injectables and Non-Surgical Rejuvenation Moderator: Cynthia Boxrud, MD 81. Rescue Fillers Wendy W. Lee, MD 82 Combined Fillers and Neurotoxins Joan H. Kaestner, MD 83. Fat Injections Robert G. Fante, MD

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84. Panel Discussion Led by the Moderator Cynthia Boxrud, MD, Steven R. Cohen, MD, Robert Fante, MD, Joan H. Kaestner, MD, Wendy W. Lee, MD  Session Seven – Aesthetic Papers Moderators: Bobby S. Korn, MD, PhD and Jeremiah P. Tao, MD 85. Large Volume Facial Fat Transfer Tanuj Nakra, Robert Schwarcz, Benjamin Burt, Mark Berman 86. Nasolabial Fold Angle Measurements Using Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography in Normal Subjects Marcus Lim, Han Aung, Tin Aung, Audrey Looi 87. Sclerotherapy of Periorbital and Facial Veins Norman Shorr, Mehryar Taban, Catherine Hwang, Ronald Mancini, Raymond Douglas, Robert A. Goldberg 88. Treatment of Skin Laxity with an 1100–1800 Infrared Light Device: Patient Satisfaction and Independent Physician Evaluation of Improvement in Facial and Neck Skin Laxity Using a New Protocol Lisa Bunin  Posters [Total = 40] Videos [Total = 11]

40th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Honoring Our Heritage, Challenging Our Future” October 21–22, 2009, Hilton O’Farrell Street, San Francisco, CA

Wednesday, October 21, 2009 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases Moderators: Lisa D. Mihora, MD and Brett S. Kotlus, MD 1. Isolated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Orbital Apex Jeffrey Peckinpaugh, Bryan Winn, Rhonda Barrett, Douglas Jacobson, Bryan Sires 2. Delayed Diagnosis for Progressive Eyelid Distortion Due to Invasive Microcystic Adnexal Carcinoma George M. Saleh, Sidath Liyanage, Geoff E. Rose, Michele Beaconsfield, J. Richard O. Collin, David H. Verity 3. Nonsurgical Management of Parotid Sialocele after Rhytidectomy Brett Kotlus 4. The Use of Fraxel to Treat a Facial Scar Wendy Lee, Thomas Johnson 5. Delayed Hypersensitivity Reaction to Injected Hyaluronic Acid Filler Wendy Lee, Thomas Johnson 6. Nocardia Preseptal Cellulitis After Cosmetic Surgery Chrisfouad Alabiad, Thomas Johnson 7. A Case of Charles Bonnet Syndrome Following Unilateral Eye Patch Placement in Eyelid Retraction Surgery Nicole Khadavi, Helen Lew, Robert Goldberg, Ronald Mancini 8. A Huge Sebaceous Gland Carcinoma of Lower Eye Lid Jung Bin Won, Jin Sook Yoon, Sang Yeul Lee

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9. Oculocardiac Reflex Elicited from an Empty Orbit Edward H. Bedrossian Jr, James Heitz, James Tsai 10. Peri-Ocular Desmoplastic Melanoma with Orbital Invasion Vinay Aakalu, Kiran Sajja, Veena Kulchaiyawat, Amjad Ahmad 11. Hidradenocarcinoma of the Eyelid Genie Bang, Kiran Sajja, Pete Setabutr 12. Orbital Weber-Christian Disease. Favourable Response to Infliximab and Review of the Literature Ioannis Mavrikakis, Thomas Georgiadis, Petros Sfikakis 13. Primary Apocrine Adenocarcinoma of the Eyelid Alejandra Valenzuela, Curtis Archibald, Godfrey Heathcote 14. Primary Adenoidcystic Carcinoma of the Lacrimal Sac with Co-existing Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Case Report Shubhra Goel, John Rose  15. Welcome/Opening Remarks Stuart R. Seiff, MD, ASOPRS President David E.E. Holck, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Julian D. Perry, MD, Aesthetic Day Program Chair  Forehead and Upper Eyelid Moderators: Cat N. Burkat, MD and Susan R. Carter, MD 16. Efficacy of Pulsed Electromagnetic Energy in Postoperative Recovery from Blepharoplasty Craig Czyz, Jill A. Foster, Vincent Lam, David E.E. Holck, Allan E. Wulc, Kenneth Cahill, Kelly Everman, Kevin Michels 17. Ultratine Breakage Aaron Savar, Tanuj Nakra, Sean Blaydon, Todd Shepler, Russell Neuhaus, John Shore 18. Analysis of Upper Eyelid Fat Pad Changes with Aging Sang-Rog Oh, Weerawan Chokthaweesak, Christine C. Annunziata, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa 19. Eyelid Characteristics in Different Southeastern Asian Populations Brenda Bohnsack, Elizabeth Wang, David Musch, Christine Nelson 20. PAAO Invited Speaker: Martin H. Devoto, MD Aesthetic Eyebrow Management in Argentina Martin H. Devoto, MD 21. Asian Blepharoplasty William P. Chen 22. A Customized Approach to Maximize Browlift Results John P. Fezza  Henry Baylis Lecture – Marc S. Cohen, MD 23. Introduction of the Henry Baylis Award Speaker: Marc S. Cohen, MD Robert A. Goldberg, MD 24. Understanding Patients’ Choices: How A Few Words Changed My Practice Marc S. Cohen, MD 25. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Cosmetic Award Julian D. Perry, MD  Lower Eyelid and Midface Moderators: Kathleen F. Archer, MD and Femida Kherani, MD 26. Hollow Eye Rings Treatment by Hyalurostructure: New Technique of Periorbital Filling with Hyaluronic Acid and Specific Cannula. Clinical Review of 52 Injections Berros Philippe, Betis Frederic 27. Vertical Repositioning of the Orbicularis Muscle in Fat Repositioning Lower Eyelid Blepharoplasty Surgery John Holds, Adam Buchanan ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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28. Upper and Midface Rejuvenation – The Hammock Lift: Technique and Long-term Results Bhupendra C.K. Patel 29. Nuances in Fat Repositioning in Lower Blepharoplasty Jill A. Foster 30. Blepharoplasty Approach to Eyelid, Eyebrow, and Midface Rejuvenation John D. McCann 31. Eyelid Reconstruction with Nasa Septal Grafts Robert Schwarcz  Featured Speaker – Frank Papay, MD 32. Introduction of Featured Lecturer: Frank Papay, MD Jill A. Foster, MD 33. Periorbital and Midface Augmentation with Allograft Frank Papay, MD  Skin Rejuvenation: Energy Moderator: Malena M. Amato, MD 34. Relaxed ExpressionsTM As Potential Alternative to Botox CosmeticTM for the Treatment of Glabellar and Brow Furrows: Interim Results of a Pilot Study Paul B. Johnson, Joseph A. Eviatar 35. Combining Confluent and Fractionally Ablative Modalities of a Novel 2,790 nm YSGG Laser for Facial Resurfacing Brian Biesman 36. A Prospective Multi-Center Clinical Study Using 2,790 nm Laser for Asian Periorbital Rejuvenation Carol Yu, Kei Negishi, Samantha Shek, David Wong, Henry Chan 37. Nonablative 4 MHz Dual Radiofrequency Treatment for Periorbital Rhytids and Midface Laxity Reynaldo Javate, Raul Jr. Cruz, Jemshed Khan, Nikalaos Trakos, Ronald Gordon 38. Update on Energy Based Technologies Brian Biesman  Skin Rejuvenation: Injectables and Fillers Moderators: Joanne E. Low, MD and Amy M. Fowler, MD 39. Comparison of Pain Levels with Bicarbonate-buffered Lidocaine vs. Unbuffered Lidocaine during Bilateral Eyelid Subcutaneous Anesthesia Michael Welch, Kevin Kalwerisky, Lisa Mihora, David E.E. Holck 40. An Analysis of Safety Data from 5 Phase-3 Clinical Trials on the Use of BoNT-A for the Treatment of Glabellar Lines Mark Rubin, Jeffrey Dover, Cory Maas, Mark Nestor 41. Micro-Fat Graft Lipo-structure in Aesthetic Peri-ocular and Orbital Volume Augmentation Robert Weiss 42. Update on FAMI Donald M. Fox  Featured Speaker – Jacqueline M. Calkin, MD 43. Introduction of Featured Speaker: Jacqueline M. Calkin, MD Julian D. Perry, MD 44. Filler Pearls Jacqueline M. Calkin  Rhinoplasty Moderators: Alon Kahana, MD, PhD and Jeremiah P. Tao, MD 45. Consideration of Nasal Contour in Endoscopic Forehead Rejuvenation Sean Blaydon, John Shore, Michael Connor

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46. Non-surgical Rhinoplasty Tanuj Nakra, Brett Kotlus, Robert M. Schwarcz 47. Lower Eyelid Necrosis from Hyaluronic Acid (Restylane) Injection into the Nasal Bridge Debra Kroll, Katrinka Heher 48. Custom Silicone Nasolabial Implants Placed Through an Intranasal Approach Ronald Mancini, Tanuj Nakra, Ronald Strahan 49. The Extended Columella Strut Graft with Footplates: For Superior Rotation and Projection of the Nasal Tip Robert Schwarcz, Tanuj Nakra 50. Anatomical Considerations in Rhinoplasty William R. Nunnery 51. Surgical Considerations in Rhinoplasty Robert M. Schwarcz  Facelifting Moderators: Suzanne K. Freitag, MD and M. Polly McKinstry, MD 52. Statistical Validity of the Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Literature – A One Year Retrospective Review Craig Czyz, Nicole Rich, James Jenkins, Jill A. Foster 53. Placement of Silicone Midface/Cheek Implants During Rhytidectomy Surgery Ronald Mancini, Ronald Strahan 54. Autologous Fat Transfer During Rhytidectomy Tanuj Nakra, Robert M. Schwarcz, Ronald Mancini, Ronald W. Strahan 55. The Split SMAS Rotation Flap: For a Redefined Jawline Robert Schwarcz 56. Toward a Comprehensive Theory of Cosmetic Surgery Kenneth D. Steinsapir 57. A Graduated Approach to Neck Rejuvenation Jonathan Hoenig 58. Expanded Indications for Vertical Vector Small Incision Rhytidectomy Alan B. Brackup 59. The Evolution of Facelifts: Current Trends and Problems Frank Papay  Thursday, October 22, 2009 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases Moderators: Raymond I. Cho, MD and Wendy W. Lee, MD 60. Two Unusual Presentations of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Alexandra Braunstein, Christopher Zoumalan, Michael Kazim 61. Presumed Periocular Wegener’s Granulomatosis Katya Tambe, Jonathan Bhargava, Ioannis Kyprianou, Mike Duddridge, Joyce Burns, Raghavan Sampath 62. Bilateral Spontaneous Subperiosteal Hematomas in the Post-Partum Period: A Case Report Johnson Tan, Audrey Looi 63. Factor XIII Deficiency Presenting as a Subgaleal Hematoma: A Case Report Ana Carolina Victoria, Aha Fazelat, Assumpta Madu, Robert Schwarcz 64. Subperiosteal Orbital Hematoma After Balloon Sinuplasty Bryan Winn, Ronald Krueger, Bryan Sires 65. Idiopathic Orbital Inflammation Leading to Unilateral Blindness over a Two-day Presentation in a Child Kian Eftekhari, Kudakwashe Chikwava, William Katowitz 66. Optic Nerve Sheath Decompression for Acute Visual Loss in Chronic Hydrocephalus Bryant Carruth, P. Emmett Hurley, Thomas Bersani, Melissa Ko

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67. Late Recurrence of Orbital and Systemic Reactive Lymphoid Hyperplasia Following Clinical Resolution with Rituximab Treatment Michael Yoon, Thomas Hwang, Timothy McCulley 68. Atypical Unilateral Chronic Chemosis Treated by Endoscopic Drainage of Sphenoid Sinus Cyst Altug Cetinkaya, Dwight Kulwin, Adam Kaufman 69. Eosinophilic Orbital Myositis Nancy Kim, John Rose, Jack Rootman 70. Necrotizing Orbital Cellulitis Due to Streptococcus Anginosis Nancy Kim, Cat N. Burkat 71. Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma of the Eye: First Case Report Carlo de Conciliis, Silvia Pedenovi, Massimo Freschi 72. Globe Subluxation Secondary to Thyroid-related Orbitopathy and Floppy Eyelid Syndrome Babak Maleki, Alejandra A. Valenzuela, Timothy J. Sullivan 73. Microphthalmos in PHACES Syndrome Roshni Vasaiwala, Kiran Sajja, Pet Setabutr  74. Welcome/Opening Remarks David E.E. Holck, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Session One – Oncology Moderators: Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD and Louise Mawn, MD 75. PAAO Invited Speaker: Antonio Cruz, MD Biplanar Facio-cervico-pectoral Rotation Flaps for Reconstruction of Complex Orbital Defects Gustavo Eichenberger, Rodrigo Brigato, Francisco Melo-Filho, Antonio Cruz 76. Indications for Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Conjunctival and Eyelid Melanoma Bita Esmaeli, Aaron Savar, Victor Prieto, Doina Ivan, Merrick Ross 77. Effect of Oral Doxycycline Monotherapy for B-cell Lymphoma of Conjunctival Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue Min Joung Lee, Sang In Khwarg, Dae Seog Heo, Ho-Kyung Choung, Nam Ju Kim 78. Reconstruction of Large Medial Lower Eyelid Defects with an Island Flap and a Cheek Rotational Flap Martin Devoto, Abel Gonzalez, Candela Zaffaroni, Marina Torres 79. Impact of Chemotherapy and External Beam Radiation on the Pediatric Anophthalmic Orbit Yevgeniy Shildkrot, Maria Kirzhner, Barrett Haik, Matthew Wilson 80. Classification and Management of Orbital Extension of Uveal Melanoma Jerry Shields, Carol Shields, Ralph Eagle, Jr 81. Bony Involvement from Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Lacrimal Gland: Histologic vs. Radiographic Documentation Bita Esmaeli, Michell Williams, Nagham Al-Zubidi, Matthew Debnam, Roman Shiner, Franco Demo 82. Special Lecture – “What We Really Don’t Know” Sentinel Node Biopsy – When Is It Justified? Matthew W. Wilson  Featured Speaker – Maria Siemionow, MD, PhD, DSc 83. Introduction of Featured Speaker: Maria Siemionow, MD, PhD, DSc David E.E. Holck, MD 84. Challenges in Face Allograft Transplantation Maria Siemionow  Session Two – Anophthalmic Socket Moderators: Sheri L. DeMartelaere, MD and Melanie H. Erb, MD 85. Primary Enucleation in a Large Pediatric Cohort: A Comparison of Polymer-coated and Wrapped Hydroxyapatite Implants Maria Kirshner, Yevgeniy Shildkrot, Barrett Haik, Matthew Wilson 86. Evisceration with Equatorial Sclerotomy for Phthisis Bulbi and Microphthalmos Dan Georgescu, Yian Jones, M. Reza Vagefi, John McCann, Richard Anderson ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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87. The Psychosocial Effects of Ocular Prosthesis Wear Daniel Eza, Hayley James, Stan Newman, Nigel Sapp, Geoff Rose 88. The Bikini Procedure for Eyelid Cul-de-sac Reconstruction James Merritt, Jorge Corona 89. Outcomes of Orbital Implants after Evisceration and Enucleation in Patients with Endophthalmitis Justin Townsend, Jennifer Hui, Thomas Johnson 90. Current Practice Patterns Among ASOPRS Members in the Treatment of Painful Blind Eyes with Opaque Media Mark Lucarelli, Shubhra Goel, Cat Burkat 91. Special Lecture – “What We Really Don’t Know” – Evisceration Surgery – Controversies and Solutions Jonathan J Dutton 92. Honoring the Founding and Charter Fellows of ASOPRS Stuart R. Seiff, MD  Session Three – Eyelid Disorders Moderators: Jennifer A. Sivak-Callcott, MD and Tamara R. Fountain, MD 93. PAAO Invited Speaker: Pedro Bravo, MD Cicatricial Ectropion Pedro Bravo 94. Lateral Canthal Resuspension Sine Canthotomy Dan Georgescu, Yian Jones, Richard Anderson, John McCann 95. Modified Frontalis Suspension Technique with Review of Large Series Ivey L. Thornton, William R. Nunery, H.B. Harold Lee, Jason A. Sokol 96. Impact of Lid Position Surgery on Social and Emotional Aspects of Quality of Life in Adults Angela Sanchez-Castellanos, Christine Nelson, David Musch 97. Asymmetric Eyebrow Elevation and Its Association with Ocular Dominance Adam Hassan, Elizabeth Nguyen 98. Orbicularis Oculi Myo-Osseous Fixation (MOF): A New Treatment for Benign Essential Blepharospasm and Blepharospasm Associated with Diffuse Facial Dystonia (Meige Syndrome) Gary Borodic 99. Trends in Ophthalmic Manifestations of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in a Pediatric Population Matthew Walvick, Malena Amato, Suzann Pershing, Stephen Tanaka 100. Assessment of Brow Ptosis Following Upper Blepharoplasty Brian Haugen, Christopher Huot, David Lyon, Aaron Bonham 101. Endotine Forehead Device Effect on Brow Lift Over Time Arpitha Charlu, Keith Carter, Jeffrey Nerad 102. A Modified Posterior Approach for Repair of Involutional Entropion Atif Collins, Julian Perry 103. Special Lecture – “What We Really Don’t Know” – Eyelid Disorders: Does Levator Dehiscence Really Exist? Jeffrey A. Nerad  ASOPRS Thesis and Awards Section Moderators: Robert A. Goldberg, MD and Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD 104. Introduction to Thesis Section Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD 105. Orbicularis Oculi Force Comparison after Pretarsal and Preseptal Botulinum Toxin A Injections for Benign Essential Blepharospasm Neolene K. Pang, MD 106. Surgical Microanatomy of the Müller’s Muscle-Conjunctival Resection Ptosis Procedure Marcus M. Marcet, MD

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107. Evaluation of Homeopathic Arnica Montana for Ecchymosis after Upper Blepharoplasty: A Placebocontrolled, Randomized, Double-Blind Study Brett S. Kotlus, MD, MS 108. Marvin Quickert Thesis Award Presentation Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD 109. ASOPRS Award Presentations Robert A. Goldberg, MD Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Jack Rootman, MD] Lester T. Jones Surgical Anatomy Award [to Hirohiko Kakizaki, MD, PhD] Wendell Hughes Lecture Award [to Michael Hawes, MD] ASOPRS Research Award [to John Linberg, MD and Albert Dal Canto, MD, PhD] Orkan Stasior Leadership Award [to David M. Reifler, MD] ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award [to Kathleen Archer, MD] Robert Kennedy Presidential Award [Presented to James Karesh, MD by Stuart R. Seiff, MD, ASOPRS President]  ASOPRS Foundation Update and Lectures Moderators: Ralph E. Wesley, MD and James C. Fleming, MD 110. ASOPRS Foundation Update Ralph E. Wesley, MD and James C. Fleming, MD 111. ASOPRS Foundation Lecture Dedication to Murray Meltzer, MD Ebby Elahi, MD 112. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation Lecture Jill A. Foster, MD 113. The Ethics and Politics of the First American Face Transplant Frank Papay, MD  Session Four – Lacrimal Disorders Moderators: Rona Z. Silkiss, MD and Yoon-Duck Kim, MD, PhD 114. PAAO Invited Speaker: Angela M. Dolmetsch, MD Mitomycin C in Endoscopically Assisted Nasolacrimal Duct Probing in Children Angela M. Dolmetsch 115. Creation of an Objective Nasolacrimal Duct Pressure Sensor Bryant Carruth, Robert Hill, Thomas Bersani 116. Efficacy of Endoscopic Lacrimal Duct Recanalization Using Microendoscope Reynaldo Javate, Ferdinand Pamintuan, Raul Jr. Cruz 117. Yield of Lacrimal Gland Biopsy in the Diagnosis of Sarcoidosis in Patients with no History of Sarcoidosis Michael Rabinowitz, Colleen Halfpenny, Edward H. Bedrossian Jr. 118. Buccal Mucous Membrane Graft-assisted Lacrimal Drainage Surgery: Forestalling the Jones Tube Jeremiah P. Tao, Clinton McCord 119. Larger Osteotomies Result in Larger Ostia in External Dacryocystorhinostomies But Size Does Not Determine Surgical Success Guy Ben Simon, Chris Brown, Alan McNab 120. Special Lecture – “What We Don’t Know” – Surface Tension, A Sticky Problem Geoffrey E. Rose  Session Five – Orbital Diseases Moderators: Christine C. Nelson, MD and Tina G. Li, MD 121. Early Experience with Propranolol to Treat Infantile Hemangioma in the Periocular Area François Codère, Julie Powell, Ospina Luis, Ariane Millet

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122. Non-Invasive Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography Aids Diagnosis and PeriOperative Planning for Orbital Venous and Arteriovenous Malformations Brenda Bohnsack, Raymond Cho, Angela Sanchez-Castellanos, Hemant Parmar, Joseph Gemmete, Cormac Maher, Christine Nelson, Alon Kahana 123. Impact of Hospital Volume and Specialization on the Cost of Orbital Trauma Care John Koo, Jiangxia Wang, Carol Thompson, Shannath Merbs, Michael Grant 124. Super-medial Approach for Optic Nerve Sheath Fenestration: 100 Consecutive Cases Bhupendra C.K. Patel 125. Lymphoproliferative Tumors of the Orbit: Analysis of the Clinical Features, Systemic Involvement and Lymphoma Related Death Purnima Mehta, Ioannis Kyprianou, Louai Wehbeh, Avinash Manna, Nonavinakere Manjunatha, Aneesa Rahman, Joyce Burns, Tristan Reuser, Aidan Murray, Laurence Brown, Ragahavan Sampath, Omar Durrani 126. The Natural History of Infraorbital Nerve Hypesthesia Following Orbital Floor or ZMC Fractures Jesse Richman, Yoash Enzer 127. Marrow-Derived, Circulating, Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Called Fibrocytes Populate Orbital Tissues in Thyroid Associated Ophthalmopathy (TAO) – An Alternative Pathway for Orbital Autoimmunity and Fibrosis? Kelvin Chong, Nikoo Fatemeh, Helene Chokron Garneau, Diana Lee, Cathy Hwang, Helen Lew, Terry Smith, Robert Goldberg, Raymond Douglas 128. Microbiology of Explanted Periorbital Biomaterials: A 30-Year Review David B. Samimi, Darlene Miller, Thomas E. Johnson 129. Underestimation and Variability of Orbital Floor Fracture Measurement by CT Scan Readers Matthew Vicinanzo, Gerald McGwin, John Long 130. Special Lecture – “What We Really Don’t Know” – Thyroid Disease Michael Kazim  Aesthetic Day Posters (Wednesday, October 21, 2009) [Total = 67] Functional Day Posters (Thursday, October 22, 2009) [Total = 69] Videos (Both Days) [Total = 12]

41st Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Oculofacial Plastic Surgery in the New Decade: Technology, Innovation, Inspiration” October 13–14, 2010, Fairmont Hotel, Chicago, IL

Wednesday, October 13, 2010 1. Welcome Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD, ASOPRS President Robert G. Fante, MD, Aesthetic Day Program Chair Don O. Kikkawa, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair  Volume Improvement Moderators: Adam J. Cohen, MD and Joel E. Kopelman, MD 2. Hyaluronic Acid Fillers Jemshed Khan, Ron Pelton

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3. Introduction of Featured Speaker, Mark Berman, MD Jeffrey C. Popp, MD 4. 3-Dimensional Face Lift Mark Berman, MD 5. Non-Surgical Treatment of Asian Eyelid Crease Asymmetry Katherine Whipple, Sang-Rog Oh, Ayelet Priel, Bobby S. Korn 6. A Time-Dependent 3-Dimensional Analysis of Saline Trials Prior to HA Malar Augmentation Brett Kotlus, Tanuj Nakra, Robert Schwarcz 7. Evolving Minimally Invasive Techniques for Tear Trough Enhancement Craig Czyz, Jill A. Foster, Robert Hill, Allan E. Wulc 8. Lower Eyelid Rejuvenation Utilizing a Combination of Filling and Excisional Surgery John Fezza 9. Introduction of Featured Speaker – Dr. Frank Trepsat, MD Brian Willoughby, MD 10. Combining Microfat Grafting and Surgery for Facial and Periorbital Rejuvenation Frank Trepsat  Henry Baylis Lecture – David E.E. Holck, MD 11. Introduction of the Henry Baylis Lecture Award Speaker Jonathan J. Dutton, MD, PhD 12. The Ups and Downs of Rhytidectomy Surgery David E.E. Holck, MD  Concurrent Breakout Sessions 13. Demystifying Rhinoplasty: How Do I Get Started? Tanuj Nakra, MD, Robert M. Schwarcz, Brett S. Kotlus, MD 14. Strategies in Addressing the Eyelid-Cheek Junction John B. Holds, MD, Jill A. Foster, MD, David E.E. Holck, MD 15. Aesthetic Lasers and Other Devices for Facial Rejuvenation Julie Woodward, MD, Brian S. Biesman, MD, John J. Martin, Jr., MD, Joe Niamtu, DMD, Randal T.H. Pham, MD, Raminder Saluja, MD, Heidi A. Waldorf, MD 16. Add Tissue or Remove Tissue? Customized Diagnosis and Decision Making in Periorbital Rejuvenation Robert A. Goldberg, MD, Norman Shorr, MD, Catherine J. Hwang, MD, Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD  Featured Speaker – Rod J. Rohrich, MD 17. Introduction of Featured Speaker Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD 18. How the Human Face Ages: What We Have Learned/How Fat Compartments Help Us Restore a Natural Face Rod Rohrich, MD  19. Midface Aging, Rejuvenation, and Restoration: Anatomic Considerations Kenneth Steinsapir 20. Relationship and Significance of Facial Ligaments to Lifting Vectors in Midface, Face, and Neck Lift Surgery Allan E. Wulc, Craig Czyz, Jill A. Foster 21. Recognition of Asymmetry in Lid Position, Tarsal Platform Show, and Brow Fat Span by the Lay Observer Mark Joshua Gordon, Ravi Menghani, Robert A. Goldberg  Lifting and Rearrangement Moderators: Carrie L. Morris, MD and Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD

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22. From the Neck Up: Options for Aesthetic Neck Rejuvenation John Fezza 23. Managing the SMAS in Facelift Surgery Robert Dryden 24. Modified S Lift John Hunts 25. Orbitomalar Suspension in Facial Rejuvenation Bobby S. Korn 26. The Orbicularis Oculi Muscle: Role in Periorbital Aging and a Tool for Maximum Rejuvenation in Aesthetic Blepharoplasty Steven Fagien 27. Eyelid and Periocular Fat Grafting in the Cosmetic Patient Brian Willoughby 28. Fat Preservation in Upper Eyelid Blepharoplasty Guy Massry 29. Electrocautery Sub-SMAS Dissection during Rhytidectomy Tanuj Nakra, Michael Connor, Ronald Mancini, Mehryar Taban, Robert Schwarcz, Ronald Strahan 30. Treatment of Festoons by Direct Excision Morris Hartstein 31. Malar Festoon and Mound – Multiple Causes, Multimodality Treatments Kelvin Chong, Diana Katsman, Cathy Hwang, Holly Chang, Imran Jarullazada, Robert Goldberg 32. Minimal Incision Browlift Surgery John Martin 33. Aesthetic Challenges in Eyebrow Reconstruction Michael Connor, Malena Amato, Sean Blaydon, John Shore  Skin Quality Improvement Moderators: Maziar Bidar, MD and Erik M. Hink, MD 34. Lasers and Related Devices: So Many Options, What You Should Know in 2010 Brian Biesman 35. Ocular Damage Secondary to Intense Pulsed Light Therapy to the Face Wendy W. Lee, Jennifer Murdock, Terrence P. O’Brien, Thomas Albini, Michael Levine, Thomas E. Johnson 36. Ablative Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing for the Face and Neck Usha Reddy, Amina Husain, Michael Richard, Julie Woodward 37. Topical Bimatoprost 0.03% Solution (Latisse®) for Eyebrow Follicle Enhancement Joseph Eviatar, Paul Johnson  Practice Management Moderator Bryan D. Seiff, MD 38. Incorporating a Medical Spa into Your Practice John Shore, Tanuj Nakra 39. Ethical Issues in Physician Self-Promotion and Advertising Mark Alford  Thursday, October 14, 2010 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases Moderators: Pete Setabutr, MD and Ira Vidor, MD 40. Cutaneous Carcinosarcoma with Orbital Invasion Sriranjani Padmanabhan, Kelly Malloy, M. Reza Vagefi 41. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Associated Orbital Inflammation Albert Wu, Josh Teichman, John Harvey 42. Use of Nasal Turbinate in Orbital Reconstruction Following Radical Exenteration Shu-Hong Chang, Chau Nguyen, Ronald Mancini ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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43. Sclerosing Orbital Pseudotumor Following Orbital Reconstruction with Porous Polyethylene Jeremy Clark, Jason Sokol, Hui Bae Harold Lee, Michael George, Peter Timoney, William Nunery 44. Orbital Lymphoma in the Setting of Idiopathic CD4+ Lymphocytopenia (HIV-negative AIDS) Kian Eftekhari, Emil Say, Carol Shields, Roberta Gausas, Jerry Shields 45. A Case of Unilateral Cyclic Eyelid Retraction Gina Rogers, Nandini Gandhi, Randy Kardon, Richard Allen 46. Compressive Optic Neuropathy Caused by Post-neurosurgical Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Jason Ruggiero, Michael Yoon, Timothy McCulley 47. Massive Conjunctival Melanoma in an African American Patient Yasmin Shayesteh, Carol Shields, Tania Lamba, Bryan Edgington, Ralph Eagle, Jerry Shields 48. Repair of Superior Orbital Fissure Injury Associated with Fungal Contaminated Vegetative Wooden Foreign Body Douglas Sigford, Jason Sokol, Amir Azari, Peter Timoney, Harold Lee, William Nunery 49. Malignant Rhabdoid Tumor of the Orbit in an Adult on Chronic Immunosuppression Maulik Zaveri, Bo Jian, Franz Fogt, M. Reza Vagefi  50. Welcome Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD, ASOPRS President Don O. Kikkawa, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Robert G. Fante, MD, Aesthetic Day Program Chair  Eyelid Session Moderators: Amjad Z Ahmad, MD and Boaz J. Lissauer, MD 51. Comparison of Gold Weight and Platinum Chain Insertion in Primary Upper Eyelid Loading for Lagophthalmos John Bladen, Jonathan Norris, Raman Malhotra 52. Treatment of Cutaneous Capillary Hemangiomas with Topical Timolol Maleate Gel .25% Christopher Chambers, William Katowitz, James Katowitz 53. The Medial Canthopexy Mini-Tarsorrhaphy Procedure Dan Georgescu, Geeta Belsare, Richard Anderson 54. Template Technique: A new Method for Eyelid Debulking in Patients with Orbitopalpebral Plexiform Neurofibroma Santosh Honavar, Anirban Bhaduri, Svari Desai, Sima Das, Anagha Medsinge, Milind Naik 55. Eyelid Edema Imran Jarullazada, Mehryar Taban, Robert Goldberg 56. Hughes Tarso-conjunctival flaps and Timing of Pedicle Separation: A 25 Year Experience Maria Kirzhner, Yevgeniy Shildkrot, Kimberly A. Klippenstein, Ralph E. Wesley 57. Effect of Dietary Zinc Supplementation on Botulinum Toxin Treatments: A Modified Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Pilot Study John Koshy, Safa Sharabi, Evan Feldman, Lisa Hollier, Larry Hollier Jr., James Patrinely, Charles Soparkar 58. Medial Canthal Reconstruction with Island Pedicle Cheek Flaps Brian J. Lee, Victor M. Elner  Featured Speaker – Rod J. Rohrich, MD 59. Introduction of Featured Speaker Don O. Kikkawa, MD 60. The Missing Link in Lower Blepharoplasty – Role of the Deep Malar Fat Compartment Rod Rohrich, MD  Orbit Session Moderators: Christine C. Annunziata, MD and Debra J Shetlar, MD 61. Delayed Complications of Porous Polyethylene Implant in Orbital Blow-Out Fracture Repair Alice Siew Ching Goh, Jung-Hoon Yum, Kyung In Woo, Yoon-Duck Kim ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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62. Time-Resolved Imaging of Contrast Kinetic S (TRICKS) MRA for Management of Vascular Orbital Lesions Cat Burkat, Gregory Avey, Lindell Gentry, Mark Lucarelli, Patrick Turski 63. Validity and Sensitivity of the TED-QOL: A New Three-Item Questionnaire for Measuring Quality of Life in Thyroid Eye Disease Tessa Fayers, Peter Dolman 64. Flow Cytometric Quantification of Fibrocytes in Thyroid-Associated Ophthalmopathy (TOA): Evidence for CD40 Mediating Cellular Regulation Konstantinos Papageorgiou, Kimberly Cockerham, Stephanie Chan, Victor Elner, Christine Nelson, Terry Smith, Raymond Douglas 65. Size of Extraocular Muscle in Classifying Patients with Thyroid Associated Ophthalmopathy Kelvin Chong, Cathy Hwang, Nicole Khadavi, Diana Lee, Jonathan Said, Helene Chokron Garneau, Robert Goldberg 66. Reduction of Orbital Inflammation Following Decompression for Thyroid-Related Orbitopathy Sang-Rog Oh, Ayelet Priel, Katherine M. Whipple, Bobby S. Korn 67. Visual Recovery after Orbital Decompression in Functionally Blind Compressive Optic Neuropathy Martin Devoto, Marina Torres 68. Unilateral Orbital Lymphoma Dan Rootman, Ioannis Mavrikakis, Joseph Connors, Jack Rootman 69. Cytokine Concentrations in Idiopathic Orbital Inflammation Edward Wladis, Bibiana Iglesias, Edmund Gosselin  Featured Speaker – Lelio Baldeschi, MD 70. Introduction of Featured Speaker Don O. Kikkawa, MD 71. The EUGOGO Experience: Take-Home Messages for the Oculofacial Specialist Lelio Baldeschi, MD  72. ITEDS Update Michael Kazim, MD  AAO Update 73. Introduction of David W. Parke, II, MD Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD 74. AAO Update David W. Parke, II, MD  ASOPRS Thesis and Awards Section Moderators: James W. Gigantelli, MD and Julian D. Perry, MD 75. Introduction to Thesis Section James W. Gigantelli, MD 76. Tarsus-Hard Palate Graft Composite as Posterior Lamella Substitute in Total Upper Eyelid Reconstruction Wendy W. Lee, MD 77. Expression Pattern of Neural Crest Stem Cell Markers in Human Adipose Tissue Christine C. Annunziata, MD 78. Silicone Intubation for the Treatment of Epiphora in Adults with Presumed Functional Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Stuart R. Seiff, MD, on behalf of Eve E. Moscato, MD 79. Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award Presentation James W. Gigantelli, MD 80. ASOPRS Awards Presentations Julian D. Perry, MD Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Christine Annunziata, MD] ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Lester Jones Surgical Anatomy Award [to Mark Lucarelli, MD] Wendell Hughes Lecture Award [to Russell Gonnering, MD] ASOPRS Research Award [to Bobby S. Korn, MD, PhD, Don O. Kikkawa, MD, and Kevin C. Hicok, MD] Orkan Stasior Leadership Award [to Stuart R. Seiff, MD] ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award [to Bryan S. Sires, MD, PhD] Robert Kennedy Presidential Award [presented by Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD, ASOPRS President to Stuart R. Seiff, MD]  ASOPRS Foundation Update and Lecture Moderator: Ralph E. Wesley, MD 81. ASOPRS Foundation Update Ralph E. Wesley, MD 82. ASOPRS Lecture Dedication to Bart Frueh, MD Christine C. Nelson, MD 83. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation Lecture Roger A. Dailey MD 84. The Surgeon as Student: Learning from Our (My) Mistakes George B. Bartley, MD  Oncology Session Moderators: Parag D. Gandhi, MD and M. Reza Vagefi, MD 85. Perineural Invasion in Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Eyelid Michael Connor 86. Conjunctival Melanoma Invasion into the Orbit in 50 Cases Carol Shields, Sara Lally, Thaddeus Nowinski, Jerry Shields 87. Lessons Learned in the Management of Conjunctival Melanoma: The More We Know Lauren Ditta, Yevgeniy Shildkrot, Matthew Wilson 88. Periocular Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Retrospective Case Series and Updates on Current Management Gregory Griepentrog, Rosemarie Liu, Stephen Snow, Mark Lucarelli 89. Surgical Excision of High Risk Periorbital Capillary Hemangiomas: A Multi-Institution Study Ruth Hill Yeilding, Jennifer Sivak-Callcott, Vikram Durairaj, Don O. Kikkawa, Sean Donahue, Justin Saunders, Louise Mawn 90. Diffusion Weighted MR Imaging as a Potential Non-Invasive Biomarker to Assess Treatment Response in Ocular Adnexal Lymphoma Krishna Surapaneni, Marta Calsina Prat, Hamid Chalian, Ernst Garcon, Robert DeLaPaz, Michael Kazim 91. Medpor Titan Orbital Reconstruction with Microvascular Free Flap for Malignant Tumors John Ng, Douglas Marx, Lani Hoang, Mark Wax, Peter Andersen, Timothy Smith, Ted Cook, Neil Gross, Stephen Weber 92. Prognostic Accuracy of the AJCC 6th vs 7th Edition Tumor Classification of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Lacrimal Gland Aaron Savar, Michelle Williams, Michael Connor, Roman Shinder, Bita Esmaeli  Lacrimal Session Moderators: Sukjit S. Johl, MD and Bryan J. Winn, MD 93. Consecutive Conjuntivodacryocystorhinostomy Instrumentation Allen Putterman 94. Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy: Modified Technique with Bone and Mucosal Removal Ayelet Priel, Sang-Rog Oh, Katherine Whipple, Bobby S. Korn

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95. Prospective, Randomized Study on Silicone Intubation in Endoscopic Mechanical Dacryocystorhinostomy for Acquired Nasolacrimal Obstruction (SEND) Kelvin Chong, Frank Lai, Ben Wong, Terence Goh, Philip Lam, Dylan Chan, Marvin Tse, Lawrence Lam, Yee Hung Chong, George Cheng, Hunter Yuen, Kenneth Yuen, Wai Man Chan, Frederick Wong, Robert Goldberg, Dennis Lam 96. Success Rate of Non-Endoscopic Intranasal Dacryocystorhinostomy Stephen Laquis, Jonel Gomez, Ralph Wesley 97. Postoperative Infection Rate after Dacryocystorhinostomy without use of Routine Systemic Antibiotic Prophylaxis Simon Dulku, Aderonke Akinmade, Pavi Agrawal, Omar M. Durrani  Socket Session Moderators: Melanie H. Erb, MD and Vivian Schiedler, MD 98. Inferior Oblique Fixation in Enucleation with the Smooth Surface Tunnel Porous Polyethylene Implant Srinivas Iyengar, Michael Burnstine, Melanie Erb, Steven Dresner 99. A Late Pain Syndrome Associated with Hydroxyapatite Anophthalmic Orbital Implants Douglas Sigford, Jason Sokol, Peter Timoney, Harold Lee, William Nunery 100. Initial Experience with the AlphaSphere Orbital Implant Sung Bok Lee, Natan Kahn, David Weinberg, C. Robert Bernardino 101. The Use of Acellular Cross-Linked Porcine Dermal Collagen-Wrapped Acrylic Primary Ocular Implantation During Enucleation Joseph Walrath, Ted Wojno 102. Changing Trends in the Use of Orbital Implants Purnima Mehta, Ali Bodia, Aidan Murray  Posters [Total = 75] Videos [Total = 10]

42nd Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Investigation, Innovation, Inspiration” October 21–23, 2011, Hilton Bonnet Creek, Orlando, FL

Friday, October 21, 2011 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases Moderators: Arash Jian Amadi, MD, and Sherri L. DeMartelaere, MD 1. Acute Orbital Compartment Syndrome with Normal Intra-ocular Pressure James Earl, Sean Tsao, Jeremiah P. Tao 2. Primary Orbital Melanoma in Patients with a Cellular Blue Nevus Tarek El-Sawy, Qasiem Nasser, Michael Tetzlaff, Mathew Sniegowski, Vikram Durairaj, Bita Esmaeli 3. Doxycycline for Treatment of Blepharochalasis via Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinases Tanya Karaconji, Brent Skippen, Nick Di Girolamo, Simon Taylor, Geoff Wilcsek, Ian Francis, Minas Coroneo 4. Punctum-Sparing Canaliculotomy for the Treatment of Canaliculitis James Khu, Ronald Mancini 5. Spontaneous Superior Ophthalmic Vein Thrombosis: A Rare Entity with Potentially Devastating Consequences Lee H. Lim, Katherine M. Whipple, Sang Oh, Mark J. Lucarelli, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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6. Tumors Masquerading in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease Mark Lucarelli, Greg Griepentrog, Cat Burkat, Don O. Kikkawa 7. Periocular Necrotizing Fasciitis Sean Paul, Roger Turbin, Alison Crum, Annie Moreau, Adam de la Garza, Flora Levin 8. Eyelid Laxity in Keratoconus Matthew S. Pihlblad, Daniel P. Schaefer 9. Autogenous Fascia Lata Graft Fixation to Treat Severe Exotropia Resulting from Iatrogenic Orbital Trauma and Medial Rectus Transection Matthew Vicinanzo, John Long, Fredrick Elsas 10. Modified Cutler-Beard Procedure: Secondary Placement of a Tarso-conjunctival Graft ProP Michael Yoon, Laura Phan, Timothy McCulley  11. Welcome Jan W. Kronish, MD, ASOPRS President David B. Lyon, MD, Aesthetic Day Program Chair Julian D. Perry, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair  Facial Volumization Moderators: Lauren Z. Gavaris, MD and John G. Rose Jr., MD 12. Autologous Fat Orbital Volume Augmentation Using a Closed, Cannula-Based Technique: A Pilot Study Donald Fox 13. Clinical Viability of Transposed Fat after Lower Eyelid Arcus Marginal Release Fat Transposition Surgery David Isaacs, Norman Shorr, Jonathan Hoenig, Konstantinos Papageorgiou, Robert Goldberg 14. Depot Injection of Calcium Hydroxylapatite Microspheres for Midfacial Volume Augmentation Michael Migliori 15. Refining the Goals of Periocular Facial Rejuvenation with Dynamic Ultrasonography Konstantinos Papageorgiou, Shu-Hong Chang, Michael Ang, Catherine Hwang, Robert Goldberg 16. Gravity of Volume Loss as a Cause of Facial Aging: Settling the Dispute Pooja Sharma, Craig Czyz, Jill A. Foster, Allan E. Wulc Featured Speaker – Jonathan M. Sykes, MD, FACS 17. Introduction of Featured Speaker David B. Lyon, MD 18. Volume Restoration of the Face with Fillers and Autologous Fat Jonathan M. Sykes, MD 19. Synergy of Endoscopic Brow Lifting Surgery with Autologous Fat Transfer to the Forehead Tanuj Nakra, Natalie Stanciu, Sean Blaydon, John Shore, Robert Schwarcz, Brett Kotlus 20. Injectable Filler Complications and Management Roger A. Dailey  Breakout Sessions 21. Periorbital Rejuvenation in Asian and Dark Skin Randal T.H. Pham, Ashish Bhatia, Cat N. Burkat, Keith D. Carter, Kelvin K.L. Chong, Tamara R. Fountain, Yoon-Duck Kim, Wendy W. Lee, Mark R. Levine, Michael T. Yen 22. Skin Care 2011: Lasers, Lotions, Potions, and Other Devices for Facial Rejuvenation Julie A. Woodward, John J. Martin Jr., Joel Schlessinger, Hema Sundaram 23. The Spectrum of Midface Surgery Kenneth D. Steinsapir, Harvey P. “Chip” Cole III, Morris E. Hartstein, Michael McCracken, Allan E. Wulc  Lifting and Rearrangement Moderators: Carrie L. Morris, MD and John P. Fezza, MD

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Featured Speaker – Daniel S. Alam, MD, FACS 24. Introduction of Featured Speaker Julian D. Perry, MD 25. Facial Nerve Anatomy in Rhytidectomy Daniel S. Alam, MD, FACS 26. The External Browpexy Guy Massry 27. Quantification of the Ideal Midface Position Pooja Sharma, Craig Czyz, Jill A. Foster, Allan E. Wulc 28. The Lift and Fill Lower Blepharoplasty Morris E. Hartstein, Guy G. Massry 29. The 3-D Lower Blepharoplasty: Combining Midfacial Fat Transfer, Orbital Fat Transposition, and Transcutaneous Orbicularis Flap Lower Blepharoplasty Tanuj Nakra, Michael Connor, Qasiem Nasser, Natalie Stanciu, Sean Blaydon, Brett Kotlus, Robert Schwarcz 30. Small-Incision Facelift: Technique, Pearls and Outcomes John Rose 31. Deep Plane Facelift: Anatomy, Biomechanics, and Rationale Jonathan M. Sykes  Lasers, Skin Quality and Cyber Professionalism Moderators: Cari E. Lyle, MD and Richard C. Allen, MD, PhD Henry Baylis Lecture – Sterling S. Baker, MD 32. Introduction of the Henry Baylis Lecture Award Speaker Suzanne K. Freitag, MD 33. Selected Aspects of Periorbital CO2 Laser Surgery: A 30-Year Perspective Sterling S. Baker, MD 34. Henry Baylis Award Presentation David B. Lyon, MD 35. Ocular Surface Temperature Changes Associated with Pelleve Radiofrequency Treatment Scott Goldstein 36. Use of an Imaging Device after Nonablative Radiofrequency (Pellevé) Treatment of Periorbital Rhytids Reynaldo Javate, Raul Cruz 37. CO2 Laser Blepharoplasty versus Colorado Needle Tip Electrocautery Blepharoplasty: A Pathologic and Clinical Comparison Roxana Rivera, Donald Hudak, Zelia Correa 38. Eyelash Growth: Over the Counter Options Julie Woodward, Michael Ehrlich 39. Social Networking and Cyber Professionalism Scott Goldstein  Saturday, October 22, 2011 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases Moderators: Cat N. Burkat, MD and Carrie L. Morris, MD 40. Topical Plasminogen as an Adjunctive Treatment in Recurrent Ligneous Conjunctivitis Michael Ang, Konstantinos Papageorgiou, Robert Goldberg 41. Lemierre’s Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis and Facial Nerve Palsy Prachi Dua, Justin Gutman, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 42. Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma Masquerading as Embryonal Subtype: The Value of Modern Molecular Genetic Testing Kian Eftekhari, Christopher Chambers, Larissa Bilaniuk, William Katowitz, James Katowitz 43. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Orbit with Parotid Metastasis Responsive to Erlotinib Tarek El-Sawy, Anita Sabichi, Sarah Mirza, Jeffrey Myers, Bita Esmaeli ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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44. Intraoperative Paradoxical Response to Graded Full Thickness Blepharotomy for Eyelid Retraction in Graves’ Disease Kasra Eliasieh, Debra M. Kroll, Elizabeth Maher 45. Management of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma with Intralesional 5-Fluorouracil David Isaacs, Robert Goldberg 46. The Treatment of Primary Localized Optic Nerve Sheath Amyloidosis with Subsequent Orbital Infiltration Andrea Kossler, Thomas Johnson 47. Full-Thickness Skin Necrosis Following Transcanalicular Laser-Assisted Dacryocystorhinostomy Scott McClintic, Michael Yoon, Robert Kersten 48. Intravenous Bevacizumab for Recalcitrant VEGF-Receptor Positive Sclerosing Idiopathic Orbital Inflammation David Samimi, Chrisfouad Alabiad, Phillip Rosenfeld, Wendy Lee, David Tse 49. Bilateral Periorbital Edema Associated with Pioglitazone Use Meredith Saylor, Gina Rogers, Nasreen Syed, Richard Allen 50. Bicanalicular Laceration Repair Via an Endoscopic Retrograde Approach Albert Wu, Nancy Tucker  51. Welcome Jan W. Kronish, MD, ASOPRS President David B. Lyon, MD, Aesthetic Day Program Chair Julian D. Perry, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair  Eyelid Session Moderators: Vikram D. Durairaj, MD and Tanuj Nakra, MD 52. Periocular Abscesses Following Brow Epilation Solly Elmann, Sean Blaydon, Cindy Calderon, Michael Connor, Flora Levin, Robert Schwarcz, Todd Shepler, John W. Shore, Edward J. Wladis, Roman Shinder 53. Biologic Tissue Expansion: Combination of 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) and Hyaluronic Acid (HA) Fillers in the Treatment of Cicatricial, Acquired Eyelid Malpositions Shivani Gupta, César Briceño, Christine Nelson, Raymond Douglas 54. Endocrine Mucin-Producing Sweat Gland Carcinoma of the Eyelid: Diagnostic and Prognostic Considerations Ambika Hoguet, David Warrow, Tatyana Milman, Steven McCormick, Elizabeth Maher, Robert Della Roca, David Della Roca, Andrew Goldbaum, James Milite 55. Nasal Floor Mucosa: New Donor Site for Mucous Membrane Grafts Catherine Hwang, Jeffrey Suh, Chang Shu-Hong, Papageorgiou Costas, David Isaacs, Taban Mehryar, Robert Goldberg 56. Superior Fornix Depth after Conjunctivo-Müllerectomy Surgery Trevor Kerr, James Khu, Marlene Morales, Ronald Mancini 57. Porcine Dermal Xenografts for Lower Eyelid Retraction: A 7-year Review of Outcomes and Complications Sophie D. Liao, Shannath L. Merbs, Michael P. Grant 58. Refining Cosmetic Outcomes of Posterior Eyelid Retraction Surgery in Thyroid Associated Orbitopathy Konstantinos Papageorgiou, Michael Ang, Shu-Hong Chang, Helene Chokron Garneau, Joseph Lin, Robert Goldberg 59. Autologous Fat Transfer by Injection and Lower Eyelid Position Jeffrey Peckinpaugh, Sam Naficy, Arash-Jian Amadi 60.Eyelid Considerations in Patients with Boston Keratoprosthesis Meredith Saylor, Mark Krakauer, Shivani Gupta, Jose de la Cruz, Kenneth Goins, Richard Allen, Pete Setabutr

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61. Cytokine Concentrations in Cutaneous Specimens of Ocular Rosacea Edward Wladis, Bibiana Iglesias, Edmund Gosselin  Featured Speaker – William E. Shiels II, DO 62. Introduction of Featured Speaker Julian D. Perry, MD 63. Percutaneous Treatment of Orbital Lymphatic Malformations William E. Shiels II, DO  Orbit Session Moderators: Shannath L. Merbs, MD, PhD and Jennifer A. Sivak-Callcott, MD 64. Orbital Fat Decompression – Analysis of 217 Cases Marta Calsina, Alexandra L. Braunstein, Zhe Xu, Michael Kazim 65. Retrocaruncular Approach for the Repair of Medial Orbital Wall Fractures: An Anatomical and Clinical Study Yun-Dun Shen, Daniel Paskowitz, Shannath Merbs, Michael Grant 66. Pneumatization of the Palatine Bone: Anatomical Considerations in Orbital Decompression David Isaacs, Konstantinos Papageorgiou, Robert Goldberg 67. Nonsurgical Orbital Volume Expansion in Patients with Normal Vision Tanuj Nakra, Robert Goldberg 68. Extranodal Rosai Dorfman Disease of the Orbit Sherry Narang, Chrishan Gunasekera, Baljeet Purewal, Paul Langer, Sean Blaydon, Robert Schwarcz, Steven McCormick, Joon Kim, Joseph Walrath, Benjamin Burt, Roman Shinder 69. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy for Cavernous Venous Malformations (Hemangioma) of the Orbit Dan Rootman, Jack Rootman, Kenneth Feldman, Roy Ma 70. Extraocular Muscle Enlargement as the First Presentation of Systemic Disease – Can Systemic Imaging Reduce the Morbidity of Orbital Biopsy? Senthil Selvam, Purnima Mehta, Harpreet Ahluwalia 71. Collateral Optic Nerve Damage from Heat Transfer During Neurosurgery Cases: How Far is Too Close? MyLe Shaw, Brian Kelley, Paul Camarata, Jason Sokol  Featured Speaker – Daniel S. Alam, MD, FACS 72. Introduction of Featured Speaker Julian D. Perry, MD 73. Free Flaps: Outcome, Limits and the Role of Face Transplantation Daniel S. Alam, MD, FACS  74. ITEDS/Multicenter Trial Update Raymond S. Douglas, MD, PhD and Bita Esmaeli, MD  ASOPRS Thesis and Awards Section Moderators: Susan R. Carter, MD and Victor M. Elner, MD, PhD 75. Introduction to Thesis Section Susan R. Carter, MD 76. A Combined Transcranial Orbital Approach for Resection of Optic Nerve Gliomas: A Clinical and Anatomical Study Erin M. Shriver, MD 77. Brow Fat Enlargement in Thyroid Associated Orbitopathy Catherine J. Hwang, MD 78. Percutaneous Drainage and Ablation as First Line Therapy for Macrocystic and Microcystic Orbital Lymphangiomas Robert H. Hill, MD ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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79. Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award Presentation Susan R. Carter, MD 80. ASOPRS Awards Presentations Victor M. Elner, MD, PhD Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Alan Proia, MD, PhD] Lester Jones Surgical Anatomy Award [to Allen Putterman, MD] Wendell Hughes Lecture Award [to Ralph Wesley, MD] ASOPRS Research Award [to Navdeep Nijhawan, MD] Orkan Stasior Outstanding Contribution Award [L. Neal Freeman, MD, MBA] Robert Kennedy Presidential Award [presented to Jeffrey A. Nerad, MD by Jan W. Kronish, MD, ASOPRS President)  ASOPRS Foundation Update and Michael J. Hawes Lecture Series Moderator: James C. Fleming, MD 81. Memorial Tribute to Richard R. Tenzel, MD Myron Tanenbaum, MD 82. ASOPRS Lecture Dedication to Michael J. Hawes, MD David R. Segrest, MD 83. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation Lecture John A. Burns, MD 84. ASOPRS Foundation Lecture: Out of Step, or a Step Ahead? Kenneth V. Cahill, MD  Oncology Session Moderators: Gerald J. Harris, MD and Wendy W. Lee, MD 85. Toll-Like Receptor Expression in Idiopathic Orbital Inflammation Edward Wladis, Bibiana Iglesias, Tipu Nazeer, Edmund Gosselin 86. Does Size Matter for Eyelid Sebaceous Carcinoma? Bita Esmaeli, Qasiem Nasser, Hilda Cruz, Melissa Felman, Carla Marneke, Doina Ivan 87. Are Frozen Section Control and Map Biopsy Mandated in Sebaceous Gland Carcinoma of the Eyelid? P.M. Fairooz, Santosh G. Honavar, Milind Naik, Geeta K. Vemuganti 88. Eyelid Margin Basal Cell Carcinoma Managed with Full Thickness En-Face Frozen Section Histopathology Harmeet S. Gill, Eve E. Moscato, Stuart R. Seiff 89. Dorsal Hump Reduction for Flap Construction in Midfacial Mohs Defects Michael Connor, Aaron Savar, Natalie Stanciu, Qasiem Nasser, Sean Blaydon, Tanuj Nakra 90. Prophylactic Internal Nasal Valve Repair during Midfacial Advancement Flaps Tanuj Nakra, Robert Schwarcz, Brett Kotlus 91. Lymphgiomatous Lesions of the Conjunctiva (Lymphangioma and Lymphangiectasis) Personal Experience with 54 Cases Jerry Shields, Arman Mashayekhi, Brad Kligman, Carol Shields  Lacrimal Session Moderators: Raymond S. Douglas, MD, PhD and Ronald Mancini, MD 92. The Diagnostic Correlation Between Computed Tomographic Dacryocystography (CT-DCG) Abraham H. Gomez, Carlos Milla, Miguel Gonzalez-Candial 93. Transcanalicular Endoscopic Findings in Lacrimal Drainage Systems of Patients with Anatomic and Functional Obstructions Pelin Kaynak-Hekimhan, Can Ă–ztĂźrker, Ahmet Demirok, Omer Faruk Yilmaz 94. The Incidence of Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Requiring Dacryocystorhinostomy in Orbital Fracture Patients Jacob Koczman, Peter Timoney, H.B. Harold Lee, William Nunery

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95. Experience with Lacrimal Intubation During Dacryocystorhinostomy Utilizing the STENTube Qasiem Nasser, Roman Shinder, Sean Blaydon, Tanuj Nakra, Michael Connor, Tarek El-Sawy, Justin Gutman, Russell Neuhaus, John Shore, Todd Shepler 96. Lacrimal Bypass Surgery in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated with High-dose Radiation Therapy Tarek El-Sawy, Rasha Ali, Qasiem Nasser, Bita Esmaeli 97. Combined Dacryocystorhinostomy and Rhinoplasty Mehryar (Ray) Taban, Robert Goldberg, Ronald Strahan, Tanuj Nakra, Catherine Hwang, Ronald Mancini  Socket Session Moderators: Suzanne K. Freitag, MD and Bryan D. Seiff, MD 98. Implant Selection in Enucleation and Evisceration Surgery, A Survey of ASOPRS Members Byron Wilkes, Peter Timoney, Harold Lee, William Nunery 99. Long-term Outcomes of Hydroxyapatite Orbital Implant Following Enucleation of 531 Pediatric Eyes Sanket Shah, Carol Shields, Arthur Au, Noel Perez, Masood Naseripour, Raza Shah, Sara Lally, Jacqueline Carrasco, Jerry Shields 100. Use of 5 Fluorouracil (5 FU) and Fibrin Sealant in Complex Socket Reconstruction with Mucous Membrane Grafts Shivani Gupta, Raymond Douglas 101. Conservative Management of Congenital Anophthalmos with a Single Surgical Intervention Chad Zatezalo, Thomas Johnson, Andrea Kossler, Yasser Bataineh 102. Improving Motility in Orbital Dermis Fat Grafts in Children with the Use of a Novel Coupling Device Angela Dolmetsch  Friday Posters [Total = 83] Saturday Posters [Total = 89] Videos [Total= 7]

43rd Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Perspective, Passion, Progress” November 8–9, 2012, Swissôtel, Chicago, IL

Thursday, November 8, 2012 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases Moderators: Alon Kahana MD, PhD and Alice Song, MD 1. Methylphenidate for Refractory Facial Dystonias Kian Eftekhari, Christina H. Choe, M. Reza Vagefi, Roberta E. Gausas, Lauren A. Eckstein 2. Neuropathic Pain Following poly-L-lactic acid (Sculptra) Injection Tarek El-Sawy, Theresa Allen, Tanuj Nakra 3. Repair of Medial Canthal Dystopia Using the Mitek Suture Anchors Omer Gal, Michael Worley, Adham al Hariri 4. Orbital Radiotherapy for Thyroid Eye Disease – Compressive Optic Neuropathy Katherine Gold, Stacy Scofield, Michael Kazim 5. Lacrimal Sinus Diversion: Cadaveric Proof of Concept Mithra Gonzalez, Christopher Oliver, Donald Schomer, Brian Willoughby

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6. The Sandwich Graft: An Innovative Way to Address Lower Eyelid Retraction and Ectropion Due to Multiple Lamellar Deficiency using an Untraditional Approach David Isaacs, Joseph Lin, Jocelyn Kohn, Robert Goldberg 7. A Minimal Incision Medial Epicanthoplasty Technique Joseph L. Lin, David K. Isaacs, Catherine J. Hwang, Robert A. Goldberg 8. Effect of Eyelash Ptosis on Visual Field Tiffany S. Liu, Jeffrey M. Joseph, Jeremiah P. Tao, Sean Tsao 9. Demographics and Culture Results of Chalazia in a Tertiary Care Setting Christopher Lo, Albert Wu 10. The 90°-Rule in Posterior Ptosis Surgery Ronald Mancini 11. A Novel Surgical Technique for the Treatment of Giant Fornix Syndrome Cameron Nabavi, John Long, Christopher Compton, Matthew Vicinanzo 12. Comparison of Methodologies in Developmental Orbitometry Tammy Osaki, Dawn DeCastro, Eric Ting, Barbara Fullerton, Ottie Thomas-Smith, Hugh Curtin, Aaron Fay 13. Floppy Eyelid Syndrome: A Modified Surgical Approach Margaret E. Phillips, James C. Fleming 14. Arcanobacterium Haemolyticum Orbital Cellulitis: A Rare but Aggressive Disease Nicholas A. Ramey MD, Cat N. Burkat MD 15. Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder: Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Erin Shriver, Wendy Lee 16. Custom Conformers for Orbital Growth in Microphthalmia and Anophthalmia Frank Tsai, Tanuj Nakra, Andrew Gougelman, Roman Shinder 17. Glomus Tumor: A Rare Extracranial Tumor of the Thermoregulatory Apparatus Katherine Whipple, LeeHooi Lim, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa 18. Toll-like Receptors and Vascular Markers in Ocular Rosacea Edward Wladis, Alejandro Adam, J. Andrew Carlson  19. Welcome Jill A. Foster, MD, ASOPRS President Michael T. Yen, MD, Aesthetic Day Program Chair Robert G. Fante, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair  Rejuvenating the Upper Face Moderators: Audrey E. Ahuero, MD and Vikram D. Durairaj, MD 20. 3-Point Fixation for Endoscopic Brow Lifting: A New Surgical Technique David Isaacs, Joseph Lin, Jocelyn Kohn, Gina Goldberg, Robert Goldberg 21. A Comparative Study of Non-Endoscopic Surgical Approaches to Elevation of the Forehead and Brows Alon Kahana, César Briceño 22. Modified Pretrichial Brow Lift in Combination with Upper Lid Blepharoplasty Christopher Shah, Matthew Martin, Payal Attawala, Keith Neaman, Melissa Meldrum, Adam Hassan 23. The Marionette Brow Lift: A Customized Approach to Eyebrow Rejuvenation Using a Modified Double-Ended Shuttle Katherine Whipple, Steven Cohen, Tunc Tiryaki, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa 24. Effacing the Orbitoglabellar Groove with Transposed Upper Eyelid Fat Guy Massry 25. Understanding the Nasofrontal Angle in Planning for Rhinoplasty Surgery Robert Schwarcz, Tanuj Nakra, Brett Kotlus 26. Using A Brassiere Suture Technique to Define Lateral Tarsal Platform and Eyebrow Fat Contours Neeta Varshney, Joseph L. Lin, Jocelyne C. Kohn, David K. Isaacs, Jonathan A. Hoenig, Robert A. Goldberg

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27. A Comparison Between Onabotulinumtoxin A and Incobotulinumtoxin A in Treatment of Glabellar Frown Lines Srinivas Kondapalli, Robert Hill, Craig Czyz, Kelly Everman, Kenneth Cahill, Jill A. Foster 28. The Microdroplet Botulinum Toxin Forehead Lift: 5-Year Experience Kenneth Steinsapir  Henry Baylis Lecture — Brian S. Biesman, MD 29. Introduction of the Henry Baylis Lecture Award Speaker Suzanne K. Freitag, MD 30. Technology-based Devices in Aesthetic Rejuvenation: Current State of the Art and a Glimpse into the Future Brian S. Biesman, MD  Pearls for Eyelid and Periorbital Rejuvenation Moderators: William H. Bearden, MD and M. Reza Vagefi, MD 31. Peri-orbital Filler Injections and the Risk of Visual Loss Konstantinos Papageorgiou, Sarah Hull, Ehud Reich, Sheena George, Jane Olver 32. Evolving Minimally Invasive Techniques for Tear Trough Enhancement with Combined Malar Volume Augmentation Robert Hill, Srinivas Kondapalli, Craig Czyz, Kelly Everman, Kenneth Cahill, Jill A. Foster 33. Volumetric Rejuvenation of the Tear Trough with Repo and Ristow Morris E. Hartstein, John B. Holds 34. Periorbital Filling: Considerations for Treatment of the Lateral Orbital or “Charlie Brown Hollow” Robert A. Goldberg, Jocelyne C. Kohn, Catherine J. Hwang, Danica Fiaschetti 35. The Double-Layered Closure for Eyelid Crease Formation: Long Term Results Laura Phan, W. Jordan Piluek, Timothy McCulley 36. Lateral Orbicularis Oculi Flap Excision versus Imbrication in Midface Lifting Kristin Hirabayashi, Jeremiah P. Tao 37. Sigmoid Upper Eyelid Blepharoplasty: Restoring Youth and Beauty John Fezza 38. Surgical Management of the Rounded Lateral Canthus: A New Technique Konal Saha, Naresh Joshi 39. Implementing the Power of Fat Grafting Used in Conjunction with Lower Eyelid Blepharoplasty When Other Modalities Are Just Not Enough Robert Schwarcz, Tanuj Nakra, Brett Kotlus 40. Transconjunctival Lower Blepharoplasty with Fat Repositioning to the Subperiosteal vs. Supraperisoteal Planes Donald B. Yoo, Guy G. Massry 41. Bleeding and Blepharoplasty: Is Cautery Necessary? Robert A. Goldberg, Jocelyne C. Kohn, Saray Martinez 42. Deep and Superficial Eyelid Fascia Allen Putterman 43. How to Succeed in an Academic Environment (Lunchtime seminar) Sponsored and organized by the Young ASOPRS (YASOPRS) group  Rejuvenating the Midface and Lower Face Moderators: Bobby S. Korn, MD, PhD and Timothy J. McCulley, MD 44. Ischemic Complications of Soft Tissue Fillers: Cases and Concepts Catherine Hwang, Rebecca Fitzgerald, Norman Shorr, Gary Duckwiler, Shu-Hong Chang, Robert Goldberg 45. Electromyographic Differences Between Normal Upper and Lower Facial Muscles and the Influence of Botulinum Toxin A Bryan Winn, Bryan Sires

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46. Dealing with Tough Necks: Digastric Muscle Resection and Double Corset Platysmaplasty Tanuj Nakra, Robert Schwarcz, Brett Kotlus 47. An Anatomic Approach to Neck Rejuvenation Robert Schwarcz 48. Identification and Avoidance of Common Facelift Incision-Related Complications Tanuj Nakra, Robert Schwarcz, Brett Kotlus 49. Microfocused Intense Ultrasound Therapy in Facial Rejuvenation Konstantinos Papageorgiou, Maryam Zumani, Jane Olver  Featured Speaker – Shan R. Baker, MD 50. Introduction of Featured Speaker Robert G. Fante, MD 51. Tips and Pitfalls of Surgical Facial Rejuvenation Shan R. Baker, MD  Featured Speaker – Mitchel P. Goldman, MD 50. Introduction of Featured Speaker Michael T. Yen, MD 51. Rejuvenating the Aging Face with Volume Augmentation and Resurfacing Mitchel P. Goldman, MD  Breakout Sessions 52. Advanced Face-Lifting Techniques Robert M. Schwarcz, MD, Tanuj Nakra, MD, Brett Kotlus, MD, John Fezza, MD, Julian DeSilva, MD 53. Anatomical and Surgical Foundations for Rhinoplasty Tanuj Nakra, MD, Brett S. Kotlus, MD, Robert M. Schwarcz, MD 54. Expanding Your Practice with Cosmetic Dermatology Techniques Julie A. Woodward, MD, Brian S. Biesman, MD, Steve Dayar, MD, Brooke Jackson, MD 55. Periorbital Rejuvenation in Asian and Dark Skin Randal T.H. Pham, MD, William P. Chen, MD  Friday, November 9, 2012 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases Moderators: Mithra Gonzalez, MD and David A. Weinberg, MD 56. Keloidal Scarring in Hard Palate Grafts Meredith Baker, Angela McAllister, Nasreen Syed, Richard Allen 57. Orbital Manifestations of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Emily Bratton, Eric Hink, Vikram Durairaj 58. Diffusion of Retrobulbar Injections: A Study in Patients Undergoing Enucleation Sheila Goyal, Michael C. Chappell, Arash Jian-Amadi, Shu-Hong (Holly) Chang 59. Subjective and Objective Outcome Measures in the Treatment of Hemifacial Spasm with Botulinum Toxin A (Botox) Rao Chundury, Steven Couch, John Holds 60. Percutaneous Sclerotherapy (sodium tetradecyl sulfate and ethanol) for Lateral Orbital Cystic Cavities Catherine Hwang, Jocelyne Kohn 61. Silent Sinus Syndrome following Orbital Trauma H. Jane Kim, Michael Geske, M. Reza Vagefi, Robert Kersten 62. Infratemporal Fossa Fat Enlargement in Chronic Maxillary Atelectasis Jocelyne C. Kohn, Dongdong Xu, David K. Issacs, Robert A. Goldberg 63. One Stage Orbital Cartilage Graft and Balloon Sinus Dilatation for Chronic Maxillary Atelectasis Treatment Joseph L. Lin, Jocelyne C. Kohn, David K. Issacs, Robert A. Goldberg

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64. Septoplasty during Dacryocystorhinostomy Tanuj Nakra, Brett Kotlus, Robert Schwarcz, Cathy Hwang, Mehryar Taban, Ronald Mancini 65. Upright Ptosis Surgery Tanuj Nakra, Tarek El-Sawy 66. Predictors of a Positive Temporal Artery Biopsy in the Diagnosis of Giant Cell Arteritis in an Inner-City Population Rakesh Patel, Albert Hazan, Geoffrey Basson, Robert Schwarcz 67. Orbital Osteoma: A Clinicopathologic Review and Update Nicholas A. Ramey, Vikram D. Durairaj, Augusto V. Cruz, Peter J. Dolman, Mark J. Lucarelli 68. PROSE Scleral Lens: A Novel Aid for Staged Eyelid Reconstruction David B. Samimi, Gloria B. Chiu, Michael A. Burnstine 69. Trabeculectomy Bleb-Induced Eyelid Retraction Repair: Case Series and Review of the Literature Ann Shue, Jeffrey M. Joseph, Jeremiah P. Tao 70. Lower Eyelid Tarsal Ectropion Repair with the Putterman Ptosis Clamp for Lower Eyelid Conjunctival Muller Muscle Resection and Lateral Tendon Tuck Ramesh Singa, Vinay Aakalu, Allen Putterman, Gil Epstein 71. Pediatric Idiopathic Orbital Inflammation Jordan Spindle, Marco Pellegrini, Bita Esmaeli, Ted Wladis, Carol Shields, Roman Shinder 72. The Prevalence of Air Regurgitation and Its Consequences After Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy with Lester Jones Tube and Dacryocystorhinostomy with Silicone Intubation Matthew Vicinanzo, Christopher Compton, John Long, Cameron Nabavi 73. The “Flipped Tarsal Bridge” Technique for Reconstructing Moderate Sized Upper Eyelid Defects Michael Yoon, Laura Phan, Timothy McCulley  74. Welcome Jill A. Foster, MD, ASOPRS President Robert G. Fante, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Michael T. Yen, MD, Aesthetic Day Program Chair  Eyelid Session Moderators: Guy G. Massry, MD and Carl E. Rosen, MD 75. Mapping Disparities in Access to ASOPRS Specialists in Metropolitan Statistical Areas Rachel K. Sobel, David A. Whelan, Richard C. Allen 76. A Comparison of Patient Preferences Between Incobotulinumtoxin A (Xeomin) and Onabotulinumtoxin A (Botox) in the Treatment of Benign Essential Blepharospasm Rao Chundury, Steven Couch, John Holds 77. LESCS: Lateralising Eyelid Sleep Compression Study Ian Francis, Edwin Figueira, Geoffrey Wilcsek 78. Surgical Correction of Floppy Eyelid Syndrome with Concomitant Blepharoptosis Michael A. Connor, Tarek El-Sawy, Sean M. Blaydon, John W. Shore 79. Effect of Eye Dominance and Hering’s Law on Bilateral Blepharoptosis Repair Surgical Results Michael Worley, Omer Gal, Adham al Hariri 80. The Modified Fasanella-Servat Procedure: Description and Quantitative Analysis David B. Samimi, Melanie H. Erb, Christianne J. Lane, Steven C. Dresner 81. Near Contrast Sensitivity Testing as a Screening Tool in Functional Dermatochalasis and Ptosis Brian Fowler, Carolee Cutler-Peck, Mark Kosko, James C. Fleming, Alan Oester 82. Digital Image Analysis of Eyelid Contour and Position Brenda Nuyen, Katherine Whipple, Phuc Nguyen, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa 83. Single Suprabrow Incision Frontalis Suspension for the Surgical Correction of Poor Levator Function Ptosis Jason Moss, Soosan Jacob, Amar Agarwal, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 84. Long Term Efficacy and Patient Satisfaction with the Lateral Internal Brow Pexy Technique Stephen Laquis, Jonel Gomez, Samantha Prabakaran, Sabrina Prabakaran

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85. Divided Eyelid Nevus: A Lid-Sparing, Staged Surgical Approach Sarah Jacobs, Steven Couch, Philip Custer 86. The Internal Lateral Canthopexy – A Minimally Invasive Technique for Lateral Eyelid Tightening Paul Rosser, Thomas Kersey 87. Analysis of Lower Eyelid Retraction Surgery and Dermis Graft using High Resolution Ultrasound Dawn Yang, Jocelyne C. Kohn, Robert A. Goldberg, Norman Shorr 88. Kaolin-Impregnated Gauze in Oculoplastic Surgery Srinivas Sai Kondapalli, Craig Czyz, Kenneth Cahill, Jill A. Foster, Robert Hill  Featured Speaker – Shan R. Baker, MD 89. Local Flaps in Facial Reconstruction – Which Flap Should I Choose? Shan R. Baker, MD  Anophthalmic Socket Session Moderators: John R. Burroughs, MD and John Pak, MD, PhD 90. Complication Rates of a Cost-Sensitive Enucleation Procedure: Wrapping of Silicone Sphere Implants in Vicryl Mesh for Extraocular Muscle Attachment Michel Belliveau, Vladimir Kratky 91. Scleral Shield: New Surgical Technique to Protect Orbital Implants Tamer Gawdat 92. Exposure Rate of Porous Polyethylene Smooth Surface Tunnel Orbital Implants after Enucleation and Comparison to Other Porous Orbital Implants Nicholas Mahoney, Michael Grant, Nicholas Iliff, Shannath Merbs 93. Reconstruction of Orbital Exenteration Defects by Primary Closure Using Cheek Advancement Mano Sira, Raman Malhotra  Oncology Session Moderators Jasmine Mohadjer, MD and Matthew W. Wilson, MD 94. The Impact of Primary Tumor Size and AJCC “T” Designation on Nodal Metastasis and Survival in Patients with Squamous Carcinoma of Eyelid and Periocular Region Qasiem Nasser, Katherine Roth, Tarek El Sawy, Bita Esmaeli 95. Interferon for Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia: Role as Immunotherapy, Immunoreduction, and Immunoprevention Carol Shields, Swathi Kaliki, H. Jane Kim, Sara Lally, Robert Penne, Jerry Shields 96. Sonic Hedge Hog Inhibition for Periocular Gorlin-Golz Syndrome Bita Esmaeli, Michael Migden 97. Neo-adjuvant Chemotherapy in Advanced Sebaceous Gland Carcinoma P.M. Fairooz, Santosh G. Honavar, Vijay Anand P. Reddy, Geeta K Vemuganti 98. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibition as a Treatment Strategy for Advanced Orbital/ Periorbital Squamous Cell Carcinoma Bita Esmaeli, Tarek El-Sawy, Anita Sabichi, William William, Bonnie Glisson, Scott Lippman, Jeffrey Myers, Merrill Kies 99. Cutaneous Melanoma Metastatic to the Orbit David Shield, Enzo Fulco, Carol Shields, Jerry Shields, Miguel Materin, Daniel Greene, Javier Servat, Flora Levin 100. The Semi-Open Skull (S.O.S.) Approach: A Limited Transcranial Technique for the Correction of Vertical Orbital Dystopia Ana Carolina Victoria, S. Anthony Wolfe 101. Optic Nerve Glioma: Clinical, Operative, Radiographic and Pathologic Characteristics Lora Dagi Glass, Peter Canoll, Azra Ligon, Denise Garcia, Michael Kazim 

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Featured Speaker – Mitchel P. Goldman, MD 102. Treatment of Periorbital Veins and Vascular Lesions Mitchel P. Goldman, MD  Lacrimal Session Moderators: Michael A. Connor, MD and Eric A. Steele, MD 103. Multidetector CT of Nasolacrimal Canal Morphology: Normal Variation by Age, Gender, and Race Nicholas Ramey, Jason Liss, Julie Woodward, Michael Richard 104. Intravenous Acetaminophen Improves Postoperative Analgesia in Oculoplastic Surgery Bryant Carruth, Edward Wladis 105. Use of the SONOPET® Ultrasonic Aspirator in Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy Michael Chappell, Arash Jian Amadi, Kristen Moe, Shu-Hong Chang 106. Surgical Outcomes of Adult Nasolacrimal Duct Intubation Using A Micro Lacrimal Endoscope Naoshi Tsurumaru, Ryoji Yamakawa, Yoshihiro Noda 107. Tackling the Blocker: Systemic Disease in Bilateral Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Rachel K. Sobel, Keith D. Carter, Richard C. Allen 108. Lacrimal Diversion to the Paranasal Sinuses: A Novel Approach for the Treatment of Epiphora Brian Willoughby, Guillermo Salcedo-Casillas, Christopher Oliver, Ariel Ceriotto-Garcia, Itzair Gonzalez, Hugo Quiroz-Mercado  ASOPRS Foundation Update and Michael J. Hawes Lecture Series Moderator: Ralph E. Wesley, MD 109. ASOPRS Foundation Update Ralph E. Wesley, MD 110. Lecture Dedication to Richard K. Dortzbach, MD Mark J. Lucarelli, MD 111. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation Lecture Malena M. Amato, MD 112. Reflections on the Mechanics of Upper Eyelid Movement: Lessons for the Ptosis Surgeon John W. Shore, MD  Featured Speaker – Petros Perros, MD 113. Introduction of Featured Speaker Geoffrey E. Rose, DSc, MS, FRCS, FRCOphth 114. Multidisciplinary Management of Thyroid Eye Disease Petros Perros, BSc, MBBS, MD, FRCP  Orbit Session Moderators: Amjad J. Ahmad, MD and Bryan J. Winn, MD 115. Cytokine Profiles in Clinical Subtypes of Ophthalmic Graves’ Disease Jason A. Sokol, Rebecca Linquist, Thomas Whittaker, R. Sidney White, RC Andrew Symons 116. Cell-signaling Effects of Prostaglandin Analogues on Orbital Adipocytes Edward Wladis, Hung Le, Martin O’Malley, Dorina Avram 117. Idiopathic Orbital Inflammation: A Review of Treatment Response Patterns Ze Zhang, Jonathan E. Silbert, Javier Servat, Justin Gutman, Roman Shinder, Flora Levin 118. The Use of Systemic Steroids as Adjuvant Treatment of Orbital Cellulitis in Adults Michael Chappell, Arash Jian-Amadi, Shu-Hong Chang 119. Invasive Fungal Sinusitis with Orbital Involvement: A 20-Year Review of Clinical Manifestations, Management, and Outcomes Hee Kim, Francis Grumbine, John DelGaudio, Brent Hayek, Ted Wojno 120. A Prospective Study of Intralesional OK-432 (Picibanil) in the Treatment of Vision Threatening and Cosmetically Unacceptable Orbital or Peri-Orbital Lymphangiomas Imtiaz Chaudhry, Fahad Al-Saikhan, Abeer Al-Oufi, Osama Al-Sheikh, Waleed Al-Rashed, Yonca Arat, Milton Boniuk ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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121. Management of Dural Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas through Thrombosed Superior Ophthalmic Vein Altug Cetinkaya, Bulent Yazici, Suzan Guven, Ayse Yagci 122. Bilateral Lacrimal Gland Disease: From Docile to Deadly Sunny Tang, Carlos Bianciotto, Saad Al-Dahmash, Sean Blaydon, Michael Connor, Brent Hayek, Gary Lelli, Paul Langer, Todd Shepler, Christina Choe, Edward Wladis, Ronald Mancini, Vikram Durairaj, Jerry Shields, Carol Shields, Roman Shinder 123. The Use of Fracture Size and Soft Tissue Herniation on Computed Tomography to Predict Diplopia in Isolated Orbital Floor Fractures Hassan Shah, William Nunery, Harold Hui Bae Lee 124. Self-irrigating Piezoelectric Device in Orbital Surgery in Adults Dawn De Castro, Aaron Fay, Edward Wladis, John Nguyen, Tammy Osaki, Ralph Metson, William Curry 125. Acute Orbital Syndrome in Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus Renelle Pointdujour, Jenny Temnogorod, Alex Kartvelishvili, Ronald Mancini, Shu-Hong Chang, Shetal Shah, Ilya Lim, Bita Esmaeli, Roman Shinder 126. Cavernous Venous Malformations of the Orbit (so called Cavernous Hemangioma): New Insights from a Pathologic Case Series Dan Rootman, Jack Rootman, Valerie White, Yeni Yucel, Robert Goldberg  ASOPRS Thesis and Award Section Moderators: Mark A. Alford, MD and Suzanne K. Freitag, MD 127. Introduction to Thesis Section Mark A. Alford, MD 128. Assessment of Autologous Postauricular Dermal Grafts as Posterior Lamellar Spacers in the Management of Lower Eyelid Retraction Michael K. Yoon, MD 129. Clinical Features and Treatment of Pediatric Orbit Fractures Eric Hink, MD 130. Anatomic Position of Hyaluronic Acid Gel Following Injection to the Infraorbital Hollows Gregory J. Griepentrog, MD 131. Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award Presentation Mark A. Alford, MD 132. ASOPRS Awards Presentations Suzanne K. Freitag, MD Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Catherine Hwang, MD] Lester Jones Surgical Anatomy Award [to David Tse, MD] Wendell Hughes Lecture Award [to Christine Nelson, MD] ASOPRS Research Award [to Edward J. Wladis, MD] Orkan Stasior Leadership Award [to Tamara R. Fountain, MD] ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award [to Jeffrey Edelstein, MD] Robert Kennedy Presidential Award [presented to Jan W. Kronish, MD by Jill A. Foster, MD, ASOPRS President)  Thursday Posters [Total = 29] Friday Posters [Total = 27] Videos [Total = 4]

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44th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Insight, Evolution, and Performance” November 14–15, 2013, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA

Wednesday, November 14, 2013 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases Moderators: M. Reza Vagefi, MD and Cat N. Burkat, MD 1. Post-Blepharoplasty Lower Eyelid Retraction: An Algorithm for Management Jean-Paul Abboud, Katherine Whipple, Richard Scawn, Preamjit Saonanon, Don O. Kikkawa, Bobby S. Korn 2. Z-plasty for the Correction of Late Post-traumatic Medial Canthal Dystopia Raymond Raymond Cho 3. Subjective and Objective Outcome Measures in the Treatment of Facial Nerve Synkinesis with Onabotulinumtoxin A (Botox®) Steven Couch, Rao Chundury, John Holds 4. Caution: Blindness after Temporal Filler Injection Catherine Hwang, Steven Schwartz, Robert Goldberg 5. Hyaluronic Acid Gel Injection for Multiple Eyelid Folds in Asian Eyelids Kristina Pao, Ronald Mancini 6. Does the Tyndall Effect Describe the Blue Hue Periodically Observed in Subdermal Hyaluronic Acid Gel Placement? Dan Rootman, Joseph Lin, Robert Goldberg 7. Does Brow Lifting Affect the Amount of Skin Removed in Blepharoplasty? Cameron Nabavi, Craig Czyz, Sandy Zhang-Nunes, Kenneth Cahill, Jill A. Foster 8. Internal Cantholysis for Transconjunctival Floor Fracture Repair Natalie Stanciu, Vivian Yin, Eva Chou, Tanuj Nakra, John Shore 9. Acute Vision Loss After Cosmetic Filler Injection for Gluteal Augmentation Basil Williams, Audrey Ko, Rebecca Shields, Wendy Lee, Chrisfouad Alabiad  General Session 10. Welcome Michael E. Migliori, MD, ASOPRS President David B. Lyon, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Andrew R. Harrison, MD, Aesthetic Day Program Chair  Fat, Fillers, and Toxins Moderators: Jill A. Foster, MD 11. Ten Tips That You Need to Know About Fat Transfer Allan E. Wulc, MD 12. Ten Tips That You Need to Know About Facial Fillers John B. Holds, MD 13. Ten Tips That You Need to Know About Neurotoxins Wendy W. Lee, MD 14. Fat, Fillers and Toxins Panel Discussion John B. Holds, MD, Allan E. Wulc, MD, Wendy W. Lee, MD Henry Baylis Cosmetic Surgery Award Lecture - Jean D. Carruthers, MD, FRCSC 15. Introduction of the Henry Baylis Lecture Award Speaker Roger A. Dailey, MD

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16. The New World of Injectables Jean D. Carruthers, MD, FRCSC 17. Presentation of the Henry Baylis Award Andrew R. Harrison, MD  Aesthetic Papers I Moderators: Dong Jun Park, MD and Vikram D. Durairaj, MD 18. Minimal Incisions Vertical Endoscopic Lift (MIVEL) and Fat Grafting for the Cosmetic Rejuvenations of the Periocular Aesthetic Unit Francesco Bernardini, Alessandro Gennai, Martin Devoto 19. The Lateral Brow: Position in Relation to Age, Gender and Ethnicity Lora Dagi Glass, Jennifer Lira, Enkhnasan Enkhbold, Emmanuel Dimont, Stacy Scofield, Pamela Sherwood, Bryan Winn 20. A Novel Double Fixation Technique Combining Endoscopic Brow Lift with Transblepharoplasty Absorbable Implant Brow Fixation Approaches Sang Hong 21. Trans-Blepharoplasty Arcus Marginalis Release as an Alternative Surgical Approach in Endoscopic Brow Lift Stephen Laquis, Jonel Gomez 22. Evaluation of Periocular Hyaluronic Acid Gel Distribution Pattern with High Resolution Ultrasound Imaging Alice S. Goh, Jocelyne C. Kohn, Daniel B. Rootman, Joseph L. Lin, Robert A. Goldberg 23. In Vivo Imaging of a Novel Mouse Model of Filler-Induced Tissue Necrosis Shu-Hong Chang, Michael Chappell, Siavash Yousefi, Jia Qin, Kristin Tarbet, Suzan Dziennis, Ruikang Wang  Eyebrow and Forehead Moderator: Asa Morton, MD Featured Speaker - Peter A. Hilger, MD 24. Introduction of Featured Speaker: Peter A. Hilger, MD Andrew R. Harrison, MD 25. Endoscopic Browlift Peter A. Hilger, MD 26. The External Browpexy Guy G. Massry, MD 27. Pretrichial Brow Lift Roger A. Dailey, MD 28. Non-Surgical Brow Lifting Jane J. Olson, MD 29. Eyebrow and Forehead Panel Discussion Guy G. Massry, MD, Roger A. Dailey, MD, Jane J. Olson, MD, Peter A. Hilger, MD  YASOPRS Lunch Lecture 30. Coding Lessons from ASOPRS Masters L. Neal Freeman, MD, Jeffrey Paul Edelstein, MD, Charles B. Slonim, MD  Aesthetic Papers II Moderators: Renzo A. Zaldivar, MD and Julian D. Perry, MD 31. Upper Eyelid Blepharoplasty: A Novel Method to Predict and Improve Outcomes Anne Barmettler, Geoffrey Gladstone 32. Upper Eyelid Fractional CO2 Resurfacing with Incisional Blepharoplasty Brett Kotlus, Robert Schwarcz, Tanuj Nakra

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33. Calcium Hydroxyl Apatite (Radiesse) for the Correction of Tear-Trough, Dark Circles and Lower Lid Bags Francesco Bernardini 34. Transposition of the Lateral Fat Pad through a Lateral Canthal Angle Sparing Small Incision Approach Erin Lessner, Alan Lessner, Robert Goldberg 35. Intralesional Injection of Tetracycline in the Treatment of Lower Eyelid Festoons Viraj J. Mehta, Bryan R. Costin, Julian D. Perry 36. A Comparison of Physician and Patient Satisfaction with Various Revisional Aesthetic Eyelid and Periorbital Procedures Guy Massry  Blepharoplasty Moderator: William P. Mack, MD Featured Speaker - Peter A. Hilger, MD 37. Introduction of Peter A. Hilger, MD Andrew R. Harrison, MD 38. Lower Blepharoplasty Peter A. Hilger, MD 39. Fat Resection in Blepharoplasty Steven C. Dresner, MD 40. Fat Preservation in Blepharoplasty John P. Fezza, MD 41. Complications of Blepharoplasty and Identifying the Patient at Risk Grant Gilliland, MD 42. Blepharoplasty Panel Discussion Steve C. Dresner, MD, John P. Fezza, MD, Grant Gilliland, MD, Peter A. Hilger, MD  Facelifting Moderator: David E.E. Holck, MD 43. In-Office Facelifting Christopher M. DeBacker, MD 44. Facelift Peter A. Hilger, MD 45. Pearls and Pitfalls in Facelifting Techniques Tanuj Nakra, MD 46. Facelift Panel Discussion Christopher M. DeBacker, MD, Peter A. Hilger, MD, Tanuj Nakra, MD  Aesthetic Papers III Moderators: Francesco P. Bernardini, MD and Jill S. Melicher-Larson, MD 47. Phi, Fat and the Mathematics of a Beautiful Midface Morris E. Hartstein, John B. Holds, Allan E. Wulc 48. The Superiority of the Sub-Periosteal, Drill-Hole, Mid-Face Lift C. Blake Perry, Christine Petersen, Richard C. Allen 49. Orbicularis/SMAS Wedge Resection for Improved Midface Rejuvenation Craig Czyz, T. William Evans, Jill A. Foster 50. Patient Satisfaction with Full-Face Rejuvenation Using Fat Grafting Vivian Yin, Emily Guo, Eva Chou, Natalie Stanciu, John Shore, Tanuj Nakra 51. To Drain or Not to Drain: Yet Another Decision in Facelift Management Robert Schwarcz, Brett Kotlus, Tanuj Nakra 52. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Cosmetic Oculofacial Plastic Surgery: A Systematic Review Nicholas Ramey, Cat Burkat, Zeeshan Butt, Mark Lucarelli, John Rose  ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Thursday, November 15, 2013 YASOPRS Eye Openers - Rapid Fire Cases and Presentations Moderators: Sheri L. DeMartelaere, MD & Raymond I. Cho, MD 53. Immunologic Characteristics of Ocular Rosacea Edward Wladis, Alejandro Adam 54. Retrospective Case Series of Successful Müller Muscle-Conjunctiva Resection in Patients with a Boston Keratoprosthesis Type I Janet M. Lim, Genie M. Bang, Maria S. Cortina, Jose De La Cruz, Pete Setabutr 55. Mucosal Surface, Fornix and Eyelid Rehabilitation in Keratoprosthesis Patients Affected by Mucous Membrane Disease Dan Rootman, Michelle Kim, Anthony Aldave, Raymond Douglas, Catherine Hwang, Robert Goldberg 56. Age Related Gender Differences in the Occurrence of Acquired Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction in Saudi Arabia Laura Phan, Timothy McCulley 57. Orbital Fractures and Intimate Partner Violence: A New Perspective on Repair Thomas Clark, Rachel Sobel, Lynette Renner, Keith Carter, Richard Allen, Erin Shriver 58. Biodegradable Fixation of the Orbital Rim after Lateral Orbitotomy Brett W. Davies, Reid A. Mollman, Mithra O. Gonzalez, Eric M. Hink, Vikram D. Durairaj 59. Primary Adenocarcinoma of the Lacrimal Gland: A Pictorial Case Report of Disease Evolution without Curative Intervention Anupam Jayaram, Christopher Chambers 60. Diagnostic Approach to Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma of the Orbit M Reza Vagefi, Michael J Geske, Euna Koo, Michele Bloomer, H Jane Kim, Robert C Kersten 61. Pulsatile Tinnitus as the Sole Sign or Symptom for a Cavernous Carotid Fistula Jennifer Kung, Tarek El-Sawy, Ami Shah, Tanuj Nakra, Todd Shepler, Sean Blaydon 62. Acronyms in Magnetic Resonance Imaging: What the Oculofacial Surgeon Always Wanted to Know but was Afraid to Ask Nicholas Ramey, Brandon Metcalf, Lindell Gentry, Mark Lucarelli  General Session 63. Welcome Michael E. Migliori, MD, ASOPRS President David B. Lyon, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Andrew R. Harrison, MD, Aesthetic Day Program Chair  Eyelid Session Moderators: Evan H. Black, MD and Parag D. Gandhi, MD 64. Dimensional Variation of the Orbicularis Oculi Muscle in Non-preserved, Fresh Frozen Human Cadavers Bryan Costin, Natta Sakolsatayadorn, Stephen McNutt, Tal Rubinstein, Jennifer McBride, Julian Perry 65. Comparison of Transcutaneous and Transconjunctival Local Anesthesia for Outpatient Eyelid Surgery Leon Rafailov, Amy Kulak, Jeremy Weedon, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 66. Perioperative Pregabalin for Attenuation of Postoperative Pain After Eyelid Surgery Leslie Wei, Brett Davies, Eric Hink, Vikram Durairaj 67. A Multi-Center Analysis of Super-Maximum Levator Resection for Unilateral Congenital Ptosis without Compensatory Frontalis Hyperaction Antonio Augusto Cruz, Ana Karina Silveira, Patricia Akaishi, Francesco Bernardini, Martin Devoto 68. Microscopic and Ultra-Structural Changes of Müller Muscle in Patients with Isolated Congenital Ptosis Adel Alsuhaibani, Mohammad Alshehri, Yasser Alfakey, Hisham Alkhaldi 69. Müllerectomy: Is This an Effective Surgery for Blepharoptosis in Asian Eyelid? Preamjit Saonanon, Richard Scawn, Katherine Whipple, Sung Mo Kang, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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70. Combined Blepharoplasty and Müller’s Muscle-Conjunctival Resection: Brow Compensation and the Effect of Preoperative Phenylephrine Grant Moore, Dan Rootman, Nariman Nassiri, Catherine Hwang, Robert Goldberg 71. Bilateral Müller Muscle-Conjunctiva Resection in a Patient with Oculosympathetic Spasm Kasra Eliasieh, Christiana Fitzgerald, Shannath Merbs, Roxana Rivera-Michlig 72. Safety of Botulinum Neurotoxin Injection to the Central Upper Eyelid and Eyebrow Regions Lily Huang, Bryan Costin, Natta Sakolsatayadorn, Julian Perry 73. Brow Pin (Myo-osseous brow fixation) for the Treatment of Essential Blepharospasm- Extended Follow Up Gary Borodic MD 74. Upper and Lower Contour Abnormalities in Graves’ Lid Retraction Gherusa Helena Milbratz, Denny Marcos Garcia1, Antonio Augusto Cruz 75. The Spectrum of Prostaglandin-Induced Orbitopathy Philip Custer, Tiffany Kent 76. Rationale for Nasal Floor Mucosa Grafts: Histological Analysis of Nasal and Oral Mucosa Grafts Catherine Hwang, Jeffrey Suh, Sunita Bhuta 77. A Novel Approach to Managing Burn-Induced Cicatricial Ectropion: Ablative Fractional Laser Skin Resurfacing Followed by Laser-Assisted Delivery of Topical 5-Fluorouracil Bradford Lee, Alexandra Levitt, Wendy Lee 78. Eyelid Splitting and Conjunctival Pedicle Flap Recoverage of Complex Glaucoma Drainage Device Tube Erosions James Merritt, Davinder Grover, Ron Fellman, David Godfrey 79. Gray Line Mucosal Wedge Grafts for Cicatricial Entropion and Trichiasis James Merritt, Helen Merritt, Jorge Corona, Meredith Abbott 80. Periorbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Edward Wladis, Bryant Carruth, Roman Shinder, Flora Levin 81. A Mobile Phone Application to Quantify Goldmann Ptosis Visual Field Results Robi Maamari, Michael D’Ambrosio, Jeremiah P. Tao  Featured Speaker – Tessa A. Hadlock, MD 82. Introduction of Featured Speaker Aaron Fay, MD 83. Contemporary Management of Facial Nerve Weakness Tessa A. Hadlock, MD  Anophthalmic Socket and Oncology Session Moderators: Daniel L. Dale, MD and Srinivas Iyengar, MD 84. Calcitonin-Gene Related Peptide in Blind, Painful Eyes Edward Wladis, Devang Bhoiwala, Matthew Wang, Martha Farber, Philip Albrecht, Frank Rice 85. Extrascleral Extending Uveal Melanoma: Clinical Aspects and Genetic Profile Loreley Robie, Steven Couch 86. Clinicopathological Profile of 119 Patients Undergoing Orbital Exenteration in a Tertiary Eye Care Centre Aditi Pujari, Mohammad Javed Ali, Santosh Honavar, Milind Naik 87. The Moorfields Exenteration Experience Anuradha Jayaprakasam, George Saleh, Badrul Hussain, Olivia Morris, Michele Beaconsfield, John Hungerford, David Verity, Jimmy Uddin, Geoff Rose, Richard Collin 88. Vismodegib (Erivedge) in the Treatment Periocular and Orbital Basal Cell Carcinoma Hakan Demirci, Christine Nelson, Victor Elner, Alon Kahana 89. Sebaceous Gland Carcinoma: Clinical Profile, Management, and Outcomes in 147 Patients Akshay Nair, Swathi Kaliki, Mohammad Javed Ali, Santosh Honavar, Milind Naik 90. The Utilization of ICG in Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsies of Conjunctival and Eyelid Malignancies Tal Rubinstein, Julian Perry, Brian Gastman, Jason Korn, Arun Singh

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91. Prognostic Factors for Metastasis Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Eyelid Matthew Sniegowski, Carla Wernecke, William Morrison, Vivian Yin, Bita Esmaeli 92. Ocular Adnexal Lymphoma: Validation of American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th Edition Staging Guidelines Matthew Sniegowski, Diana Roberts, Vivian Yin, Bita Esmaeli 93. Association Between Helicobacter Pylori and Ocular Adnexal Lymphoma – An Ongoing Study Evan Kalin-Hajdu, Eric Frost, Annie-Claude Labbé, Jamie Wong, François Codère, Patrick Boulos, Bryan Arthurs, Isabelle Hardy 94. Multidisciplinary Management of Lacrimal Sac/Nasolacrimal Duct Carcinomas Tarek El-Sawy, Steven Frank, Ehab Hanna, Matthew Sniegowski, Jeffery Myers, Bita Esmaeli  YASOPRS Lunch Lecture 95. Coding Lessons from ASOPRS Masters L. Neal Freeman, MD, Jeffrey P. Edelstein, MD, Jeffrey Paul Edelstein, MD, Charles B. Slonim, MD  Lacrimal Session Moderators: Roberta E. Gausas, MD and Jeremiah P. Tao, MD 96. Retrospective Study of Botulinum Toxin Injection for Gustatory Lacrimation Naeem Haq, Brent Alexander, Rahim Aneesa, Burns Shirley, Raghavan Sampath 97. Botulinum Toxin A Injection to Lacrimal Gland for the Treatment of Epiphora in Patients with Bicanalicular Obstruction Pelin Kaynak, Gamze Karabulut, Can Öztürker, Ahmet Demirok 98. Canalicular Reconstruction with an “Open Sky” Approach Utilizing the Pigtail Probe Helen Merritt, James Merritt, Jorge Corona, Meredith Abbott 99. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Dacryoadenitis Wenjing Liu, Dan Rootman, Jessica Berry, Catherine Hwang, Robert Goldberg 100. Bilateral Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction with Salivary Gland Dysfunction Following I-131 Therapy: A Case Report Mack Savage, Rachel Sobel, Henry Hoffman, Keith Carter, Michael Finkelstein, Erin Shriver 101. Piezosurgery in External Dacryocystorhinostomy Craig Czyz, Kenneth Cahill, Jill A. Foster, Robert Hill, Kelly Everman, Cameron Nabavi  ASOPRS Foundation Update and Michael J. Hawes Lecture Series Moderator: Ralph E. Wesley, MD 102. ASOPRS Foundation Update Ralph E. Wesley, MD, ASOPRS Foundation Chair James C. Fleming, MD, ASOPRS Foundation Treasurer 103. Lecture Dedication to William L. “Bucky” Walter, MD Mark R. Levine, MD 104. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation Lecture John B. Holds, MD 105. Imaging Misadventures Philip L. Custer, MD  Featured Speaker - Alan A. McNab, MB BS, FRANZCO, DMedSc 106. Introduction of Invited Speaker David B. Lyon, MD 107. Non-traumatic Orbital Hemorrhage Alan A. McNab, MB BS, FRANZCO, DMedSc  Orbit Session Moderators: R. Patrick Yeatts, MD AND Steven M. Couch, MD 108. Volume of the Sphenoid Trigone Based on CT Measurements in Different Genders and Races Daniel R. Lefebvre, Michael K. Yoon ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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109. Trends in Orbital Decompression Techniques Shani Reich, Peter Timoney, William Nunery, Jason Sokol 110. Compressive Optic Neuropathy and Repeat Orbital Decompression: A Case Series Courtney Kauh, Shivani Gupta, Raymond Douglas, Christine Nelson, Victor Elner, Alon Kahana 111. Lessons Learned in Repeat Orbital Decompression Sung Mo Kang, Richard Scawn, Katherine Whipple, Preamjit Saonanon, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa 112. Pseudotumor Cerebri in the Pediatric Population Rebecca Shields, Audrey Ko, Basil Williams, Kara Cavuoto, Wendy Lee 113. Pediatric Optic Nerve Sheath Decompression: A 25-Year Review Thomas Bersani, Dimitrios Sismanis, Austin Meeker 114. Carotid Cavernous Fistulas without Superior Ophthalmic Vein Enlargement Sarah M. Jacobs, Eric J. Arias, Colin P. Derdeyn, Steven M. Couch, Philip L. Custer 115. Use of Percutaneous Bleomycin Sclerotherapy for Orbital Lymphangiomas H. Joon Kim, Justin Saunders, Ted Wojno 116. Gravitational Bleomycin Sclerosis with Image Guidance to Treat Orbital Lymphatic Malformations Aaron Fay, Srinivasan Paramasivam, Alejandro Berenstein 117. Utility of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRA in the Evaluation and Perioperative Management of Periocular Vascular Anomalies Denise Kim, Hemant Parmar, Victor Elner, Alon Kahana 118. Radiographic Features of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Orbital Cellulitis Daniel Straka, Ami Shah, Ruth Hill Yeilding, Louise Mawn 119. Evaluation of 7 Tesla MR Orbitofacial Imaging Sandy Zhang-Nunes, Petra Schmalbrock, Kenneth Cahill  ASOPRS Thesis and Awards Section Moderators: Richard C. Allen, MD, PhD and Mark J. Lucarelli, MD 120. Introduction to Thesis Section Richard C. Allen, MD, PhD 121. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Orbit: Spectrum of Disease and Risk of Central Nervous System Sequelae in Unifocal Cases Neda Esmaili, MD 122. Neurostimulation of the Lacrimal Nerve for Enhanced Tear Production Andrea L. Kossler, MD 123. Patient Reported Outcomes in Functional Oculofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: A Comprehensive Systematic Review and Primer Nicholas A. Ramey, MD 124. Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award Presentation Richard C. Allen, MD, PhD 125. ASOPRS Awards Presentations Mark J. Lucarelli, MD Bartley Frueh Award for Best YASOPRS Presentation [to Daniel Rootman, MD for Thursday Presentation and to Edward Wladis, MD for Friday Presentation] Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Tammy H. Osaki, MD] Lester T. Jones Surgical Anatomy Award [to Dale R. Meyer, MD] ASOPRS Research Award [to Jerry A. Shields, MD] Orkan Stasior Leadership Award [James C. Fleming, MD] Wendell Hughes Lecture Award [James C. Fleming, MD] ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award Robert Kennedy Presidential Award [presented to Jill A. Foster, MD by Michael E. Migliori, MD, ASOPRS President]  Thursday Posters [Total = 36] Friday Posters [Total = 39] Videos [Total = 4] ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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PROGRAM BOOK ASOPRS 45TH FALL SCIENTIFIC

Symposium OCTOBER 16-17, 2014 SHERATON, CHICAGO, IL

45th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Oculofacial Insights from the Windy City” October 16–17, 2014, Sheraton Hotel, Chicago, IL

Oculofacial Insights from the

Windy City

ASOPRS Fall Scientific Symposium Program Book 1

Thursday, October 16, 2014 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases and Presentations Moderators: Albert Ya-Po Wu, MD, PhD, Shu-Hong Chang 1. A Cyst You Don’t Want to Miss: Endocrine Mucin-Producing Sweat Gland Carcinoma of the Eyelid Nada Farhat, Rachel Sobel, Avneet Sodhi, Katrinka Heher, Julia Schneider, Mitesh Kapadia, Nora Laver 2. Carcinoma ex Pleomorphic Adenoma of the Lacrimal Gland with Clear Cell and Myoepithelial Differentiation Ema Avdagic, Nicholas Farber, Nora Katabi, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 3. Retrobulbar Hemorrhage: An Algorithm to Guide Canthotomy/Cantholysis By Non-Ophthalmologists Benjamin Erickson, Wendy Lee, Nathan Blessing 4. Metastatic Melanoma of the Lateral Rectus Misdiagnosed as Idiopathic Orbital Inflammation Nicholas Farber, Ai-Lin Shao, Renelle Pointdujour, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 5. Ophthalmic Manifestations and Outcomes of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis in Children Garett Frank, Jesse Smith, Brett Davies, David Mirsky, Eric Hink, Vikram Durairaj 6. Lateral Canthoplasty Combined with “En-glove” Placement of Acellular Porcine Dermis Graft for Correction of Lower Eyelid Retraction F. Lawson Grumbine, Robert Kersten, Sarah Deparis, M. Reza Vagefi 7. Orbital Fibroblastic and Myofibroblastic Proliferation Resembling Fibromatosis Colli Audrey Ko, Sophie Liao, Benjamin Erickson, Rebecca Shields, J. Antonio Bermudez-Magner, Sander Dubovy, Wendy Lee 8. Outcomes of a Non-image-guided Injection Technique for Intralesional Bleomycin Injection for Orbital Lymphangiomas Bradford Lee, Richard Scawn, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa 9. Blepharoptosis from Statin-induced Necrotizing Myopathy Jessica Lin, Juan Javier Servat, Gary Lelli, Flora Levin 10. Medial Orbital Wall Anatomic Landmarks Milap Mehta, Julian Perry 11. Hydrogel Expansion and Glue Tarsorrhaphy for Congenital Anophthalmia and Microphthalmia Maryam Nazemzadeh, Michael Sulewski, Jr., William Katowitz, James A. Katowitz. 12. Lateral Browlift Using Temporal (Pretrichial) Subcutaneous Approach Under Local Anesthesia Mehryar Taban 13. Osseointegrative Implants for Orbito-Facial Prostheses: Six Preoperative Planning Tips and Intraoperative Pearls Leslie Wei, Julie Brown, Dori Hosek, Cat Burkat 14. External Dacryocystorhinostomy Through a Midface Rhytidectomy Incision Kate Xie, Swapna Vemuri, Jeremiah P. Tao  General Session 15. Welcome Don O. Kikkawa, MD, , ASOPRS President Michael T. Yen, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Vikram D. Durairaj, MD, ASOPRS Fall Meeting Co-Chair  ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Eyelid Session Moderator: Eric A. Steele, MD 16. Reducing the Risk of Operating Room Fires in Eyelid Surgery with a Mixture of Medical Air and Oxygen via Nasal Cannula Charles Rice, Michael Twilley 17. Comparison of Revision Rates Between External Levator Advancement vs Muller’s Muscle-Conjunctival Resection for Correction of Upper Eyelid Ptosis Eva Chou, Matthew Sniegowski, Cathleen Seaworth, Malena Amato, Vikram Durairaj, Tanuj Nakra, John Shore, Sean Blaydon 18. The Impact of Ptosis on Driving Performance: Implications for Functional Surgery Bobby S. Korn, Bradford Lee, Richard Scawn, Jane Kim, Don O. Kikkawa, Felipe Medeiros 19. Levator Aponeurectomy John Martin 20. Worldwide Comparison of Prophylactic Antibiotic Use for Eyelid Surgery Nambi Nallasamy, Francesco Bernardini, Aaron Fay, Ted Wladis  Volumization Session I Moderator: Michael McCracken, MD 21. End-to-end Fat Pedicle Redraping for Improved Contour of the Lower Eyelid Mid-face Junction Matthew Sniegowski, Eva Chou, Vikram Durairaj, Malena Amato, Sean Blaydon, John Shore, Tanuj Nakra 22. The Role of Nitropaste in Ischemic Filler Complications: Should we use it? An Animal Model with ICG Imaging Catherine Hwang, Payam Morgan, Shu-Hong Chang, Aline Pimentel, Gary Duckwiler 23. Initial Experience with Juvederm Volbella (Hyaluronic Acid) and Volift (Hyaluronic Acid) for Facial Volume Augmentation Morris E. Hartstein, Guy Ben Simon, Oren Benyamini 24. Superficial Enhanced Fluid Fat Injection (SEFFI) for Aesthetic Enhancement on the Periocular Aesthetic Unit Francesco Bernardini, Alessandro Gennai 25. Filling the Pre-Jowl Sulcus to Streamline the Jawline Robert Schwarcz  Featured Speaker – Mark Glasgold, MD, FACS 26. Introduction of Dr. Mark Glasgold Michael T. Yen, MD 27. Volumization in Facial Aesthetics Mark Glasgold, MD, FACS  Volumization Session II Moderator: John B. Holds, MD 28. Lower Eyelid Position After Aesthetic Injection of Hyaluronic Acid Filler for Midface Augmentation Eric Ahn, Roger Dailey 29. Use of Hyaluronic Acid Gel to Improve the Appearance of Lower Eyelid Fat Prolapse as an Alternative to Eyelid Surgery Debra Kroll, Mitesh Kapadia, Janet Neigel 30. Belotero Rescue for Patients with Complications from Restylane (Hyaluronic Acid) Treatment in the Lower Eyelids Wenjing Liu, Catherine Hwang, Robert Goldberg 31. Prospective Evaluation of Three Different Hyaluronic Acid (HA) Gels to Varying Doses of Hyaluronidase Sandy Zhang-Nunes, Dan Straka, Cameron Nabavi, Kenneth Cahill, Craig Czyz1, Jill A. Foster

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32. Volumetric Rejuvenation of the Hollow Superior Sulcus – The Final Frontier Morris E. Hartstein, Guy G. Massry  Featured Speaker – Mark Glasgold, MD, FACS 33. Techniques for Fat Transfer Mark Glasgold, MD, FACS  YASOPRS Lunch Lecture 34. How to Build and Grow a Successful Practice Brian S. Biesman, MD  Orbit Session I Moderator: Jennifer A. Sivak-Callcott, MD 35. Secondary Orbital Reconstruction in Patients with Prior Orbital Fracture Repair Jane S. Kim, Bradford W. Lee, Richard Scawn, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa 36. Subperiosteal Abscess of The Orbit: Evolving Pathogens and the Therapeutic Protocol Janice Liao, Gerald Harris 37. Orbital Fractures in Emergency Departments: Discharge, Observation or Admission? Lilly Wagner, Scott Ketner, Simeon Lauer 38. Orbital Tumors: An Epidemiologic Survey at a Tertiary Referral Center Jordan Thompson, Sophie Liao, Sander Dubovy, Thomas Johnson 39. C-reactive Protein as a Marker for Initiating Steroid Treatment in Children with Orbital Cellulitis Brett W. Davies, Jesse M. Smith, Eric M. Hink, Vikram D. Durairaj  The Practice of Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Moderator: John D. McCann, MD, PhD 40. Oculoplastic Hospital Call Coverage Utilization: A Prospective Study Craig Czyz, Adam Strittmatter, Kenneth Cahill, Jill A. Foster 41. A Modified Action Camera for High-Quality, Cost-Effective Oculofacial Surgical Videography Robi Maamari, Swapna Vemuri, Jeremiah P. Tao 42. ASOPRS Atlas: Does the Distribution of the Over-65 Population Account for Uneven Access to ASOPRS Specialists in Metropolitan Statistical Areas? Rachel Sobel, David Whelan, Richard Allen 43 Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery: Millennia in the Making George Bartley  ASOPRS Foundation Update and Michael J. Hawes Lecture Series Moderator: Ralph E. Wesley, MD 44. ASOPRS Foundation Update and Foundation Service Award Ralph E. Wesley, MD 45. ASOPRS Foundation Lecture Dedication to John N. Harrington, MD James C. Fleming, MD 46. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation Michael J. Hawes Lecturer Mark J. Lucarelli, MD, 47. Thyroid Eye Disease 25 Years of Progress — What’s Next? Michael Kazim, MD  Neck and Facial Rejuvenation Session Moderator: Robert G. Fante, MD, 48. Direct Submentoplasty Combined with Limited-Incision Facelift for Male Lower Facial Rejuvenation Tanuj Nakra, Brett Kotlus, Robert Schwarcz, Jonathan Hoenig 49. A Definitive Surgical Approach to Festoons Bhupendra Patel

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50. Central Platysmaplasty with a Bidirectional, Barbed Suture Brett Kotlus, Robert Schwarcz, Tanuj Nakra  Featured Speaker – Andrew Jacono, MD 51. Introduction of Dr. Andrew Jacono Guy G. Massry, MD 52. A Structured Anatomic Approach to Face and Necklifting Andrew Jacono, MD  Pediatric Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Moderator: Eric M. Hink, MD 53. Trends in Pediatric Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH): A Multicenter Study of Treatment Outcomes Rebecca Shields, Roberto Warman, Wendy Lee, Kara Cavuoto 54. Surgical Outcomes in Pediatric Orbital Cellulitis Jesse Smith, M. Leslie Pfeiffer, Brett Davies, Emily Bratton, Eric Hink, Vikram Durairaj 55. Characteristics and Management of Tessier #3 Clefts Peter Bin-yu Xie, Bradford W. Lee, Dongmei Li, Jane S. Kim, Bobby S. Korn, Don O. Kikkawa 56. Use of a Double Triangle Silicone Sling for Early Repair in Congenital Ptosis Karen Revere, Maryam Nazemzadeh, William Katowitz, James Katowitz  Friday, October 17, 2014 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases and Presentations Moderators: Pete Setabutr, MD and Christina Choe, MD 57. Intralesional Rituximab: An Effective Therapeutic Alternative for Recurrent Orbital Lymphoma in a Patient with Severe Dry Eye Courtney Kauh, Victor Elner, Hakan Demirci 58. Quantified Incision Placement for Transconjunctival Blepharoplasty with Retroseptal Fat Entry César Briceño, Satyen Undavia, Guy Massry 59. Combined Endoscopic Endonasal Transorbital Approach with Transconjunctival Medial Orbitotomy for Orbital Tumor Excision: Our Experience and Technique Lisa Chen, Tarek El-Sawy, Andrea Kossler 60. One Stage Hughes Flap Erin Lessner, Alexander Blandford, Anthony Greer, Alan Lessner 61. Acellular Dermal Matrix-supported Modified Tenzel Flap for Reconstruction of Large Lower Eyelid Defects Pradeep Mettu, Andrew Munro, Parag Gandhi 62. Granulocytic Sarcoma of the Orbit Presenting as a Fulminant Orbitopathy in an Adult with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Ali Mokhtarzadeh, Andrew Harrison 63. Intralesional Clindamycin Injections for the Treatment of Necrotizing Fasciitis Payam Morgan, Catherine Hwang, Robert A. Goldberg 64. MRI Findings of Non-Specific Orbital Inflammation (NSOI) of the Optic Nerve in a Child Carisa Petris, Payal Patel, Michael Kazim 65. Cosmetic Hyaluronic Acid Injection: Delayed Periocular Edema as an Uncommon Complication Sherveen Salek, Jessica Chang, Jordan Piluek, Charles Eberhart, Timothy McCulley 66. Mutational Landscape of Lacrimal Gland Carcinomas and Implications for Treatment Matthew Sniegowski, Diana Bell, Khalida Wani, Michael Tetzlaff, Kenneth Aldape, Bita Esmaeli 67. Impaled Orbital Taser Injury Jenny Temnogorod, Frank Tsai, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 68. Changes in Intraocular Pressure During Orbital Floor Fracture Repair Preeti Thyparampil, Michael Yen, Phillip Freeman, John Ng, Jeremiah P. Tao, Douglas Marx

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69. Differential Expression of Micrornas in Sebaceous Carcinoma of Eyelid Compared with Sebaceous Adenoma Vivian T. Yin, Michael T. Tetzlaff, Jonathan Curry, Khalida Wani, Ganiraju C. Manyam, Diana Bell, Li Zhang, Kenneth Aldape, Bita Esmaeli 70. Neuroendocrine (Carcinoid) Tumor Metastasis to the Extraocular Muscles: Variability in Presentation and Primary Location Sara Alshaker, Nariman Nassiri, Dan Rootman, Robert Goldberg  General Session 71. Welcome Don O. Kikkawa, MD, ASOPRS President Michael T. Yen, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Vikram D. Durairaj, MD, ASOPRS Program Co-Chair  Oncology Session Moderator: Jonathan W. Kim, MD 72. Globe Sparing Surgery and Post-operative high-dose Radiation Therapy for Lacrimal Gland Carcinoma Bita Esmaeli, Vivian Yin, Ehab Hanna, Merrill Kies, William William, Diana Bell, Steven Frank 73. Systemic Rituximab Therapy for Ocular Adnexal Mucosal-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT) Lymphoma Hakan Demirci, Brian Marr, Victor Elner 74. Primary Periocular Sweat-Gland Carcinomas: Epidemiology and Prognosis Meredith Baker, Vivian Yin, Doina Ivan, Bita Esmaeli, Erin Shriver 75. Periocular Melanoma in-situ Treated with Imiquimod Maxwell Elia, Sara Lally, Krishna Kalyam, Shabnam Pakneshan, Mark Fisher, Caleb Ho, John Sinard, Allison Hanlon, Jennifer Choi, Gary Lelli, Juan Servat, Jerry Shields, Carol Shields, Flora Levin 76. Targeting the Hedgehog Pathway in Patients with Periorbital Locally Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma or Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome Bita Esmaeli, Vivian Yin, Eva Chou, William William, Merrill Kies, Michael Migden  Henry Baylis Cosmetic Surgery Award Lecture 77. Introduction of the Henry I. Baylis Award Lecturer: Dr. Guy Massry Roberta E. Gausas, MD 78. A Personal Perspective on Treating the Eyelids and Periorbita with Injectable Hyaluronic Acid Gels Guy G. Massry, MD 79. Henry I. Baylis Award Presentation Roberta E. Gausas, MD  Lacrimal Session Moderator: John D. Ng, MD, MS 80. Surgical and Epidemiologic Factors Affecting Canalicular Laceration Repair with the Mini Monoka Monocanalicular Stent Blair Armstrong, Michael Rabinowitz, Brianna Kenney, Robert Penne 81. Bicanalicular Silicone Intubation with Intra-Lacrimal Sac Fixation Suture for Punctal and Canalicular Stenosis Kasra Eliasieh, Jessica Chang, Nicholas Mahoney, Michael Grant, Shannath Merbs 82. Computed Tomographic Findings Can Discriminate Lacrimal Sac Malignancies from Dacryocystitis Pimkwan Jaru-ampornpan, Tabassum Kennedy, Cat Burkat, Mark Lucarelli 83. Technique and Success Rate of Transcanalicular Endoscopic Lacrimal Duct Recanalization (TELDR) with Silicone Intubation Reynaldo M. Javate, Armida L. Suller, Kathleen Faye N. Buyucan, Elise Estelle T. Ma Guerrero, Kristina C. Teope

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84. Tear Trough Incision for External Dacryocystorhinostomy Brett W. Davies, Michael S. McCracken, Michael J. Hawes, Eric M. Hink, Vikram D. Durairaj, Ron W. Pelton  Eyelid Session II Moderator: Tanuj Nakra, MD 85. Anatomy and Histology of the Frontalis Muscle Bryan Costin, Thomas Plesec, Natta Sakolsatayadorn, Tal Rubinstein, Jennifer McBride, Julian Perry 86. Stop Blaming the Septum Robert Schwarcz, John Fezza, Andrew Jacono, Guy Massry 87. The Beauty of the Crease: Cosmetic Eyelid Crease Elevation to Enhance the Aesthetics of the Brow-Eyelid Continuum Abraham Gomez, Geoffrey Gladstone 88. A Novel At-Home Procedure Providing Marked Improvements for Lower Lid Aesthetics Utilizing a Tensile, Elastic, Non-Invasive Polymer System with In-Situ Cross-Linking Functionality Brian Biesman, Zoe Draelos, R. Rox Anderson, Patricia Farris, Derek Jones, Doris Day, Steven Dayan, Fernanda Sakamoto, Soo-young Kang, Barbara Gilchrest, Betty Yu  Featured Speaker — Andrew Jacono, MD 89. An Algorithmic Multi-Modality Approach to the Devolumized Lower Eyelid Andrew Jacono, MD  Orbit Session II Moderator: Suzanne K. Freitag, MD 90. Symmetry of the Angle of the Orbital Strut (AOS) – A Radiological Study Raghuraj Hegde, Gangadhara Sundar, Eric Ting, Thiam Chye Lim, Michael Grant 91. Axial Globe Position Measurement: A Prospective Multicenter Study Sponsored by the International Thyroid Eye Disease Society Chad Bingham, Jennifer Sivak-Callcott, Mathew Gurka, John Nguyen, Steve Feldon, Aaron Fay, Lay-Leng Seah, Diego Strianese, Vikram Durairaj, Jimmy Uddin, Martin Devoto, Matheson Harris, Justin Saunders, Audrey Looi, Livia Teo, Michael Kazim 92. Lateral Rectus Muscle Expands More than Medial Rectus Following Maximal Deep Balanced Orbital Decompression Sara Alshaker, Alex Nobori, Dan Rootman, Robert Goldberg, Yi Wang 93. Dilated Superior Ophthalmic Vein: Features of 113 Cases Jenny Temnogorod, Christopher Adam, Carol Shields, Joon Kim, Brent Hayek, Flora Levin, Bryan Winn, Ivan Vrcek, Craig Linden, Christina Choe, Mithra Gonzalez, Johanna Fifi, Alejandro Berenstein, Vikram Durairaj, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 94. Intracranial Hypotension Related Skull Remodeling with Enophthalmos and Sphenoid Sinus Expansion Timothy McCulley, Jordan Piluek, Jessica Chang, Thomas Hwang  Featured Speaker — Suresh Mukherji, MD, MBA, FACR 95. Introduction of Dr. Suresh Mukherji Alon Kahana, MD 96. Imaging of the Orbit and Globe Suresh Mukherji, MD, MBA, FACR  Eyelid Session III Moderator: Sean M. Blaydon, MD 97. The Abbreviated National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ 9) is a Sensitive and Time Efficient Method for Detecting the Changes in Visual Function Caused by Blepharoptosis and Dermatochalasis and Their Surgical Correction César A. Briceño, Molly L. Fuller, Elizabeth A. Bradley, Christine C. Nelson ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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98. Lid Crease Approach for Margin Rotation in Upper Cicatricial Entropion Antonio Cruz, Patricia Akaishi, Mohammed Dufaileej, Alicia Galindo 99. Upper Eyelid Myectomy for Essential Blepharospasm: Cost Benefit Analysis to the US Medicare System Tiffany Kent, Carisa Petris, John Holds 100. Conjunctiva-Sparing Modification to Posterior Approach Ptosis Repair Ivan Vrcek, Ronald Mancini 101. The Versatility of the Lateral Tarsoconjunctival Onlay Flap Swapna Vemuri, Amy Patel, Jeremiah P. Tao 102. Medial Anchoring of the Upper Eyelid Skin During Blepharoplasty Fatemeh Rajaii, Victor Elner 103. Upper Eyelid Skin Contracture in Facial Paralysis Kimia Ziahosseini, Vanessa Venables, Charles Nduka, Raman Malhotra  Orbit Session III Moderator: Timothy J. McCulley, MD 104. Orbital and Periorbital Extension of Congenital Dacryocystoceles Francesco Bernardini, Altug Cetinkaya, James Katowitz, Pelin Kaynak 105. Radiation Exposure from Orbital CT Scans – Spiral vs Traditional Scans Tiffany Kent, Philip Custer 106. Efficacy of Intravenous Mannitol as an Adjunct to Lateral Canthotomy and Cantholysis in the Management of Orbital Compartment Syndrome: A Non-Human Primate Model Davin Johnson, Andrew Winterborn, Vladimir Kratky 107. A Four-Year Retrospective Review of Space Occupying Lesions of the Orbit Alina V Dumitrescu, Anna W. Berry, William R. Nunery, Jason A. Sokol 108. Orbital Exenteration: The 10-year Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Experience Sonali Nagendran, N. Grace Lee, Aaron Fay, Daniel Lefebvre, Francis Sutula, Suzanne Freitag 109. ITEDS Update Mark J. Lucarelli, MD, Peter Dolman, MD  ASOPRS Thesis and Awards Session Moderators: Michael T. Yen, MD, Roberta E. Gausas, MD 110. Clinical and Immunohistochemical Features of Conjunctival Melanocytic Lesions Harsha S. Reddy, MD 111. Patterns of Strabismus Following Orbital Decompression in Thyroid Eye Disease Katherine M. Whipple, MD 112. In Vivo Imaging of a Novel Mouse Model of Filler Induced Tissue Necrosis Michael C. Chappell, MD 113. Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award Presentation [to Michael Chappell, MD] Michael T. Yen, MD 114. ASOPRS Awards Presentations Roberta E. Gausas, MD, Chair, ASOPRS Awards Committee Bartley R. Frueh Award for Best YASOPRS Presentation [to Milap Mehta, MD for Thursday Presentation and to Preeti Thyparampil, MD for Friday Presentation] Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [to Francesco Quaranta-Leoni, MD] Lester T. Jones Surgical Anatomy Award [to Petros Konofaos, MD] ASOPRS Research Award [to David B. Samimi, MD] Orkan G. Stasior Leadership Award [to William R. Nunery, MD] Wendell Hughes Lecture Award [to Philip Custer, MD] ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award [to Richard Anderson, MD]

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Robert H. Kennedy Presidential Award [presented to Michael E. Migliori, MD by Don O. Kikkawa, MD, ASOPRS President]

 Thursday Posters [Total = 38] Friday Posters [Total = 40] Videos [Total = 4]

46th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Winning Big: Strategies for Success in Oculofacial Plastic Surgery” November 12–13, 2015, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, NV

Thursday, November 12, 2015 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases and Presentations Moderators: M. Reza Vagefi, MD and Steven M. Couch, MD 1. Comparing the Search Engine Optimization (SEO) of ASOPRS Versus Related Disciplines for Common Oculoplastics Procedures Christopher Lo, Samuel Baharestani 2. The Brow Fat Pad Suspension Suture Kian Eftekhari, Grace Peng, Guy Massry 3. Online Ratings of ASOPRS Surgeons: What Do Your Patients Really Think of You? Rao Chundury, Alexander Vu, Gabriela Espinoza, Julian Perry 4. Local Anesthesia for Enucleation Surgery: Patient Perception of Pain Neda Nikpoor, Thomas Johnson, Brian Tse 5. Large Orbital Floor Fracture – Indication for Surgery or Not? Nora Silverman, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 6. The Incidence of Air Regurgitation through the Eyelid in Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Users Matthew Powers, Katarzyna Petz, Andrea Kossler 7. Oral Clarithromycin for the Treatment and Prevention of Recurrent Childhood Chalazia Loreley Robie, Gregory Griepentrog, Tracey Strombeck, Steven Couch 8. IgG4 Related Disease of the Punctum and Canaliculus Lauren Ng, Nora Silverman, Sonali Lanjewar, Raavi Gupta, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 9. A Case of Cocaine-induced Pyoderma Gangrenosum Resulting in Severe Cicatricial Ectropion Jill Melicher-Larson, Phillip Radke 10. Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Ocular Adnexa: A Series of 52 Patients Nathan Blessing, Benjamin Erickson, Brian Tse, Thomas Johnson  General Session 11. Welcome Kathleen F. Archer, MD, ASOPRS President Andrew R. Harrison, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Wendy W. Lee, MD, ASOPRS Fall Meeting Co-Chair  Eyelid Session Moderators: Dale R. Meyer, MD and Amy M. Fowler, MD 12. Surgical Approach, Reimbursement and Practice Patterns in Ptosis Repair Michael Neimkin, Steven Couch, John Holds, Zach Bodnar

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13. The Efficacy of the Phenylephrine Test as a Predictor of Post-operative Contralateral Lid Height in Unilateral Ptosis Repair Sam Kuchinka, Michael Neimkin, John Holds 14. Eyelid Contour Following Conjunctival Müllerectomy with or without Tarsectomy Blepharoptosis Repair Maria Choudhary, Rao Chundury, Julian Perry 15. Ptosis Sensitivity Threshold for the Lay Observer with Gender Differences Joseph Christenbury, Mark Gordon, Daniel Rootman, Robert Goldberg 16. The Effect of Gravity on Eyelid Position in Patients with Ptosis and Normal Controls Daniel Rootman, Sara Alshaker, Tyler Moreno, Robert Goldberg 17. Comparing the Effect of Levator Advancement and Conjunctival-Müllerectomy Ptosis Surgery on Tear Production and Dry Eye Symptoms Vivian T. Yin, Grace Qiao, David Rossman, Peter Dolman, Matthew Sniegowski  Orbit Session Moderators: Julian D. Perry, MD and Renzo A. Zaldivar, MD 18. Estrogen Selectively Increases Aquaporin-1 Function in a Xenopus Model for Pseudotumor Cerebri Marc Yonkers, Sarah Farukhi, Jeremiah P. Tao 19. 15-year Review of Repeat Optic Nerve Sheath Fenestrations for Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Andrew Anzeljc, H. Joon Kim, Brent Hayek, Ted Wojno 20. Creating an Animal Model for Traumatic Optic Neuropathy Brian Tse, Daniel Pelaez, David Tse 21. Predictability of Clinical and Radiographic Features in the Diagnosis of Extraocular Muscle Entrapment Margaret L. Pfeiffer, Helen Merritt, Karina Richani, Margaret E. Phillips 22. Deep Orbital Horizontal Rectus Muscle Extirpation Treatment of Infantile Nystagmus Catherine Y. Liu, Amanda Gerling, Jeremiah P. Tao  Featured Speaker – Claudio DeLorenzi, MD, FRCS 23. Introduction of Dr. Claudio DeLorenzi Andrew R. Harrison, MD, Program Chair 24. Vascular Complications of Fillers Claudio DeLorenzi, MD, FRCS  Aesthetic Session Moderators: Robert M. Schwarcz, MD and Shu-Hong Chang, MD 25. A Finer Superficial Enhanced Fluid Fat Injection (.3 SEFFI) for Skin Regeneration and Volume Restoration of the Periocular Aesthetic Unit Francesco Bernardini, Alessandro Gennai 26. Prevention and Management of Periorbital Fat Transfer Contour Irregularities Jonathan Hoenig 27. Comparison of Brow Ptosis Correction with Endoscopic Brow Lifting Performed at Two Time Periods Approximately Ten Years Apart Bryce Radmall, Eric Ahn, Roger Dailey 28. Chasing the Perfect Brow Lift: Combining Endoscopic and Transpalpebral Brow Lifting Utilizing a Shared Calvarial Bone Tunnel Bradford Lee, Ramzi Alameddine, Audrey Ko, Nickisa Hodgson, Don O. Kikkawa, Bobby S. Korn 29. Platysma: To Tighten or Not to Tighten… That is the Question! John Fezza  Featured Speaker – Claudio DeLorenzi, MD, FRCS 30. Nonvascular Complications of Fillers Claudio DeLorenzi, MD, FRCS  ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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Eyelid Session Moderators: Bobby S. Korn, MD, PhD and Cat N. Burkat, MD 31. A Comparative Analysis of Three Anterior-Approach Surgical Techniques for Thyroid-Related Upper Eyelid Retraction Repair Jacob Evans, Thomas Clark, Miriam Zimmerman, Richard Allen, Jeffrey Nerad, Keith Carter, Erin Shriver 32. Lower Lid Recession in Thyroid Related Orbitopathy – a Mathematical Model Bryan Arthurs, Cyril Archambault, Paul Arthurs 33. Micro and Dermis Fat Grafting to Treat Lower Eyelid Retraction and Volume Loss Amjad Ahmad, Scott Jones 34. Endoscope-assisted Placement of Tissue Expanders for Periocular Reconstruction Benjamin Erickson, Brian Tse, Thomas Johnson, David Tse 35. Lift and Fill II: Correcting Post-blepharoplasty Lower Lid Retraction with Autologous Fat Transfer Francesco Bernardini, Morris Hartstein, John Fezza  Eyelid and Periorbital Filler Session Moderator: Guy G. Massry, MD 36. Periorbital Filler Technique with Cannula Guy G. Massry, MD 37. Periorbital Filler Technique with Needles Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD 38. Periorbital Hyaluronic Acid Gel Product Selection Daniel B. Rootman, MD 39. Update on Hyaluronidase Products and Their Applications Julie A. Woodward, MD 40. Histopathologic Evidence of Hyaluronic Acid Gel Behavior in the Periorbital Tissues Gregory J. Griepentrog, MD 41. Case 1: Overfill Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD 42. Case 2: Edema Daniel B. Rootman, MD 43. Case 3: Granuloma Raymond I. Cho, MD 44. Case 4: Infection Brian S. Biesman, MD  ASOPRS Foundation Update and Michael J. Hawes Lecture 45. ASOPRS Foundation Update and Foundation Service Award to: Janet L. Roen, MD Ralph E. Wesley, MD 46. ASOPRS Foundation Lecture Dedication to Richard P. Carroll, MD Allen M. Putterman, MD 47. Introduction of ASOPRS Foundation Michael J. Hawes Lecturer Guy G. Massry, MD 48. ASOPRS and Oculofacial Surgery - Current Challenges and the Future John B. Holds, MD  Pediatric Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Session Moderators: William R. Katowitz, MD and Femida Kherani, MD, FRCSC 49. Simultaneous versus Sequential Ptosis and Strabismus Surgery in Children Karen Revere, Gil Binenbaum, Jonathan Li, James Katowitz, William Katowitz 50. Nasolacrimal Duct Intubation Using a Microendoscope in Children with Congenital Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction after Failed Probing Naoshi Tsurumaru, Toru Suzuki, Hiroo Yabe, Ryoji Yamakawa

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51. Upper Eyelid Gold Weight Implantation in Pediatric Patients Denise Kim, H. Joon Kim, Brent Hayek, Ted Wojno 52. Silicone Stent Length and Loss: Outcomes of 638 Consecutive Pediatric Cases with Monocanalicular Intubation for Pediatric Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Christiana Munroe, Lama Khatib, James Shaffer, Gil Binenbaum, William Katowitz 53. Preferred Methods for Ptosis Repair in the Pediatric Population Jennifer Murdock, Nathan W. Law, Preeti J. Thyparampil, Michael T. Yen, Douglas P. Marx  Orbit Session Moderators: Jill A. Foster, MD and Jeremiah P. Tao, MD 54. Use of Bovine Glycosaminoglycan Matrix Dermal Substitute in the Reconstruction of the Exenterated Socket Leon Rafailov, Roger Turbin, Paul Langer 55. Histologic Evidence of Orbital Inflammation from Retrobulbar Alcohol and Chlorpromazine Injection: A Clinicopathologic Study in Human & Rat Orbits Kian Eftekhari, Kenneth Shindler, Vivian Lee, Kimberly Dine, Lauren Eckstein, M. Reza Vagefi 56. Proof of Concept for a Digital Display Prosthetic Eye with Functional Eye Mimicry Matin Khoshnevis, Jeremiah P. Tao 57. Efficacy and Safety of Intravenous Methylprednisolone in Active Thyroid Eye Disease Stephanie Young, Charmaine Chai, Hazel Lin, Gangadhara Sundar 58. Thyroid-Related Orbital Decompression Surgery: An Analysis of Risk Factors and Outcomes Alon Kahana, Chris Wu, Leslie Niziol, David Musch 59. Quantification of Baseline IgG4 Plasma Cell Population in Orbital Inflammatory Diseases Adam Sweeney, C. Dirk Keene, Shu-Hong Chang  Friday, November 13, 2015 YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases and Presentations Moderators: Jill S. Melicher-Larson, MD and Edward J. Wladis, MD 60. Eyebrow Position after Blepharoplasty Daniel Straka, Thabit Ali Mustafa Odat, David Straka, Craig Czyz, Cameron Nabavi, Kenneth Cahill, Jill A. Foster 61. Comparison of Temporal Fossa Volume in Young versus Senescent Human Skulls Rao Chundury, Yue Zhao, Julian Perry 62. Low Flow Combined Venous-Arterial Lesions of the Orbit Alison Callahan, Philip Meyers, James Garrity, Carisa Petris, Michael Kazim 63. Accuracy of Bone Removal in Orbital Decompressions Using Pre-Operative Planning and Intra-Operative Navigation Mahsa Sohrab, Shannath Merbs, Michael Grant, Roxana Rivera-Michlig, Nicholas Mahoney 64. IgG4-related Orbital Disease – Clinical Features of 24 Cases Lauren Ng, Michelle Xu, Nora Silverman, Alberto Distefano, Albert Wu, Janet Roen, Murray Meltzer, Jason Sokol, Raymond Cho, Angelo Tsirbas, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 65. A Novel Intense Pulsed Light Treatment for Refractory Dry Eye Disease Katherine Whipple 66. The Bleph and the Brain: The Effect of Upper Eyelid Surgery on Headache Related Quality of Life Ali Mokhtarzadeh, Michael Lee 67. Metastatic Orbital Leiomyosarcoma Masquerading as a Sixth Nerve Palsy Nailyn Rasool, Dean M. Cestari, Daniel R. Lefebvre, Mark A. Latina, Ian F. Dunn, Sandro Santagata, Suzanne K. Freitag 68. Gene Expression Profiling Test of Uveal Melanoma: Prognostic Validation Hakan Demirci, Zeynep Gursel Ozkurt, Naziha Slimani, Robert Cook, Kristen Oelschlager 71. Long-term Management Following Microvascular Free Flap for Total Eyelid Loss with Preserved Vision Christopher Lo, Alison Callahan, Carisa Petris, Payal Patel, Richard Lisman  ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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General Session 72. Welcome Kathleen F. Archer, MD, ASOPRS President Andrew R. Harrison, MD, ASOPRS Program Chair Wendy W. Lee, MD, ASOPRS Fall Meeting Co-Chair  Oncology Session Moderators: Bita Esmaeli, MD and Chris R. Alabiad, MD 73. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Ocular Adnexal Melanoma: A Single-Center Update in 49 Patients Omar Ozgur, Margaret L. Pfeiffer, Jeffrey N. Myers, Mark Zafereo, Bradley Thuro, Merrick I. Ross, Bita Esmaeli 74. The Stein Eye Institute Ten-Year Incidence of Unexpected Neoplasms After Evisceration Erin Lessner, Tyler Moreno, Gina Goldberg, Nariman Nassiri, Robert Goldberg 75. Findings on Total Body PET and Bone Marrow Biopsy in 119 Patients with Ocular Adnexal Lymphoma Bradley Thuro, Stanley Pace, Gagan Dudeja, Omar Ozgur, Bita Esmaeli 76. Proteomic Profiling of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Neda Nikpoor, Daniel Pelaez, David Tse 77. Orbital Involvement in Periocular Sebaceous Gland Carcinoma: Clinical Profile and Outcomes Anuradha Ayyar, Swathi Kaliki, Milind Naik, Javed Ali, Dilip Mishra 78. Comparison of Primary and Secondary Enucleation for Uveal Melanoma Chau Pham, Steven M. Couch, Philip Custer, P. Kumar Rao  Aesthetic Session: Injectable Pearls Moderator: Don O. Kikkawa, MD 79. Nuances of Upper Face Injections Deborah D. Sherman, MD, Jose Raul Montes, MD 80. Pearls for Midface Injections Brian S. Biesman, MD 81. Update on Lower Face/Neck Injections Roger A. Dailey, MD 82. Intra-arterial vs. Subcutaneous Injection of Hyaluronidase: A Cadaver Study Catherine Hwang, MD, Shani Golan, MD  Oculoplastics Smackdown: Controversies in Functional Oculofacial Plastic Surgery 83. Controversial Topics in Oculoplastic Surgery Refereed by Andrew R. Harrison, MD and Wendy W. Lee, MD, Program Chairs Team 1 vs. Team 2 Dale R. Meyer, MD vs. Mark J. Lucarelli, MD Tamara R. Fountain, MD vs. Jill A. Foster, MD Stuart R. Seiff, MD vs. Richard L. Anderson, MD Asa D. Morton III, MD vs. Kimberly P. Cockerham, MD  New Technology Panel – Lasers and Lights Moderator: Joseph A. Eviatar, MD 84. How to Optimize Treatments in Patients < 40 years old John J. Martin Jr., MD 85. How to Optimize Treatments in Patients Between 40‒60 years old Brian S. Biesman, MD 86. How to Optimize Treatments in Patients > 60 years old John P. Fezza, MD 

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Featured Speaker â&#x20AC;&#x201C; James T. Rosenbaum, MD 87. Introduction of Dr. James Rosenbaum John D. Ng, MD, MS 88. Personalized Medicine for Orbital Inflammatory Disease James T. Rosenbaum, MD  Eyelid Session Moderators: Grant Gilliland, MD and Erin M. Shriver, MD 89. A Modified Myectomy Technique for Blepharospasm with Improved Cosmesis Krista Stewart, Shannon Joseph, Shivani Gupta, Raymond Douglas 90. Quantitative Tear-Film Evaluation After Chemodenervation with Botulinum Toxin in Hemifacial Spasm Edward Wladis, Yasmin Mali, Elizabeth Diamantatos, Robert Schultze 91. Temporary Corneal Topographic and Eyelid Morphometric Changes in Patients with Hemifacial Spasm Treated with Botulinum Toxin-A: Serial Monitoring of a One Treatment-cycle Tammy Hentona Osaki, Teissy Osaki, Mauro Campos, Flavio Hirai, Midori Hentona Osaki 92. Utility of PROSE in the Management of Complex Oculoplastic Pathology Stacy Scofield, Michael Kazim 93. Porcine Urinary Bladder Matrix Skin Substitute Graft Material for Periorbital Reconstruction Mark Alford 94. Cell Signaling and Gene Expression in Ocular Rosacea: Identification of Targets for Highly-Selective Therapies Edward Wladis, Alyssa Herrmann, Supraja Swamy, Alejandro Adam  Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award Presentation 95. The Latino Eyelid: Anthropometric Analysis of a Spectrum of Findings Constance L. Fry, MD, Thomas C. Naugle, Jr, MD, Shelley A. Cole, PhD, Jonathan Gelfond, PhD, Geetha Chittoor, PhD, Angeline F. Mariani, BA, Martin W. Goros MS, Barrett G. Haik, MD, Venkata Saroja Voruganti, PhD 96. Marvin H. Quickert Thesis Award Presentation to Constance L. Fry, MD Presented by Kenneth E. Morgenstern, MD  Orbit Panel: Complex Cases Moderator: Robert C. Kersten, MD 97. Complex Orbital Cases Martin H. Devoto, MD 98. Complex Orbital Cases Timothy J. Sullivan, MD, FRANZCO 99. Complex Orbital Cases Francesco P. Bernardini, MD  Lacrimal Session Moderators: Stuart R. Seiff, MD and David Samimi, MD 100. External Dacryocystorhinostomy Revisited: Do We Really Need to Switch to Endoscopic or Endocanalicular Technique? Altug Cetinkaya 101. To Stent or Not to Stent? Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Routine Use of Lacrimal Stent Placement after DCR in a Large Claims Database Kian Eftekhari, Elliott Kozin, Liyuan Ma, Brian VanderBeek 102. A 9-year Observation of Tube Extrusion and Symptomatic Relief of Tearing in Patients Treated with Frosted and Non-frosted Jones Tubes Phillip Radke, Ryan Wilson, Ali Mokhtarzadeh, Andrew Harrison 103. Natural Course of Ostium Granulomas after Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy Seonae Shin, Kyung In Woo, Yoon-Duck Kim ASOPRS 50th Anniversary Book

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104. The Pseudo-NLDO Method for Common Canalicular Laceration Repair: A Cadaveric Proof of Concept Benjamin Erickson, Nathan Blessing, Thomas Johnson, Wendy Lee  Aesthetic Surgical Pearls Moderator: Melanie Ho Erb, MD 105. Pearls for Brow Surgery Jonathan Hoenig, MD 106. Pearls for Upper and Lower Eyelid Surgery Don O. Kikkawa, MD 107. Pearls for Face Surgery Robert M. Schwarcz, MD  Hollywood’s Perspectives on Beauty and Aging Featured Speakers–Paul Nassif, MD, FACS and Brett Ratner Moderator: Wendy W. Lee, MD 108. Introduction of Dr. Nassif and Mr. Ratner Wendy W. Lee, MD 109. Surgeons Going Too Far in Aesthetic Facial Surgery Paul Nassif, MD, FACS 110. Beauty in Hollywood – Director’s Cut Brett Ratner  ASOPRS Awards Presentations Jasmine Mohadjer, MD, Chair, ASOPRS Awards Committee Bartley R. Frueh Award for Best YASOPRS Presentation [to Jill Melicher-Larson for Thursday Presentation; to Alison Callahan, MD for Friday Presentation] Merrill Reeh Pathology Award [Mohammad Javed Ali, MD, FRCS, FRCGP] Lester T. Jones Surgical Anatomy Award [to Julian D. Perry, MD] ASOPRS Research Award [to Andrea L. Kossler, MD] Orkan G. Stasior Leadership Award [L. Neal Freeman, MD, MBA] Wendell Hughes Lecture Award [to David T. Tse, MD] ASOPRS Outstanding Contribution Award [to Daniel P. Schafer, MD] Richard K. Dortzbach Teaching Award [to Norman Shorr, MD] James A. Katowitz Pediatric Award [to Rudolf E. Guthoff, MD] Robert Kennedy Presidential Award [to Don O. Kikkawa, MD, presented by Kathleen F. Archer, MD, ASOPRS President]  Thursday Posters [Total = 25] Friday Posters [Total = 25] Videos [Total = 8]

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ASOPRS 47th ANNUAL

FALL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM

Innovation and Insight: The Keys for Success in Oculofacial Surgery October 13-14, 2016 Palmer House Hilton Chicago, IL

47th Annual Fall Scientific Symposium “Innovation and Insight: The Keys for Success in Oculofacial Surgery” October 13–14, 2016, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL

PROGRAM BOOK

Thursday, October 13, 2016 YASOPRS Professional Development 1. Developing Your Cosmetic Surgery Practice Faculty: Jill A. Foster, MD and Jeremiah P. Tao, MD YASOPRS Eye Openers: Rapid Fire Cases and Presentations Moderators: Mithra O. Gonzales and Sean Paul, MD 2. Self-Inflicted and Traumatic Enucleations: Clinical Features of 20 Cases Mamta Shah, Valerie I. Elmalem, Jason Sokol, Edward J. Wladis, Suzanne Freitag, Ivan Vrcek, Ronald Mancini, Roger Turbin, Ilyse D. Haberman, Roni Levin, Todd Shepler, Vivian Lee, Tanuj Nakra, Roman Shinder 3. Extrusion of Metallic Intraorbital Foreign Body Following MRI Jason Lewis, James Karesh, Keith Wroblewski, Eva Chou 4. Management of Periocular Melanoma and Challenges in Reconstruction James Chelnis, Preston Hewgley, Xin Huang, Brian Fowler, Martin Fleming 5. Simple Solutions to Jones Tube Complications Altug Cetinkaya 6. Malignant Lesions of the Medial Canthus: Current Surgical Practices of ASOPRS Members Luke D. Dolezal,