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Now

The New York Public Library

September–December 2011

FREE PROGRAMS, CLASSES, EXHIBITIONS

STEPHEN A. SCHWARZMAN BUILDING MID-MANHATTAN LIBRARY SCIENCE, INDUSTRY AND BUSINESS LIBRARY THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE BRONX LIBRARY CENTER


General Information

3 Exhibitions

Throughout the year, The New York Public Library offers more than 40,000 free public programs at its 90 locations in the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island. These lectures, classes, panel discussions, concerts, film screenings, story hours, and more, featuring Library staff members as well as noted writers, fine artists, performing artists, and scholars, are part of the Library’s mission to make available to the public educational and cultural programs of the highest quality. In addition, exhibitions and special displays at the Library’s many locations showcase our rich and varied collections.

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street www.nypl.org/locations/schwarzman Exhibition information: 917.ASK.NYPL (917.275.6975) Free admission. Exhibition hours: Monday, Thursday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Tuesday–Wednesday, 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Building tours: Monday–Saturday, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m., a free one-hour tour of the landmark building. Group tours by appointment; call 212.930.0650 for reservations and fees. Exhibition tours: Gottesman Exhibition tours are offered free of charge Monday–Saturday, 12:30 and 2:30 p.m.; Sunday, 3:30 p.m. All group tours, including school groups, must be scheduled well in advance. Unauthorized tours are not permitted. To schedule a tour, call 212.930.0650. Group tour fees are $7 per person ($5 for seniors); there is no charge for full-time students. The Schwarzman Building will be closed on September 21, November 7, and December 4.

Library hours vary and are subject to change; call to confirm. Programs and exhibitions are subject to change or cancellation; for up-to-date information, visit www.nypl.org/events.

Mid-Manhattan Library 455 Fifth Avenue (at 40th Street) www.nypl.org/locations/mid-manhattan-library Exhibition information: 917.ASK.NYPL (917.275.6975) Free admission. Exhibition hours: Monday–Thursday, 8 a.m.–11 p.m.; Friday, 8 a.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Public Programs 8 Stephen A. Schwarzman Building 14 Mid-Manhattan Library 18 Science, Industry and Business Library 21 Library for the Performing Arts 25 Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture 26 Bronx Library Center 27

Neighborhood Libraries

28 LIVE from the NYPL 28 Conversations from the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers

Cover images are reproduced in full on pages 6, 3, 4, 24, and 15.

Science, Industry and Business Library 188 Madison Avenue (at 34th Street) www.nypl.org/locations/sibl Building tours: Thursday at 2 p.m., a free one-hour tour. For information, call 917.ASK.NYPL (917.275.6975).

Now is published three times a year by the Office of Communications and Marketing: Deanna Lee, Vice President for Communications and Marketing Heidi Singer, Director of Digital and Print Publications Abby Tannenbaum, Editor Two Dogs Design, Design and Production Amanda Breccia, Lucine Kinoian, Contributors

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© The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations, 2011

The Library Shops Library donors receive discounts at the Shops and online. The Library Shop at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street www.thelibraryshop.org Information/phone orders: 212.930.0641. Hours: Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.–5 p.m. The Schomburg Shop 515 Malcolm X Boulevard www.nypl.org/locations/schomburg Information/phone orders: 212.491.2206. Hours: Monday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Now is available in ADA-compliant pdf format at: www.nypl.org/sites/default/ files/now.pdf

Become a Friend of the Library Enjoy discounts at The Library Shop and on LIVE from the NYPL tickets, and receive invitations to members-only events, exhibition previews, and receptions. Visit www.nypl.org/support or call 212.930.0653 for more information.

NYPL News The New York Public Library News is a free e-newsletter that will keep you informed about everything exciting that is happening at the Library. Sign up from home at www.enews.nypl.org.

Space Rental The New York Public Library’s landmark Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, located in the heart of New York City, encourages the use of some of its most beautiful spaces for memorable wedding receptions and social and corporate events. Let us help make your event spectacular. For more information, call 212.930.0730 or visit www.nypl.org/spacerental.

Reproductions Visit the Library’s online Digital Gallery (digitalgallery.nypl.org) to view more than 740,000 images from the collections available for purchase as decorative prints framed and unframed or as TIFF files for editorial or commercial use. For further information, visit www.nypl.org/express.

Free Exhibitions The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center 40 Lincoln Center Plaza www.nypl.org/locations/lpa Exhibition information: 212.870.1630 Free admission. Exhibition hours: Monday, Thursday, 12 noon–8 p.m.; Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 12 noon–6 p.m. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture 515 Malcolm X Boulevard www.nypl.org/locations/schomburg Exhibition information: 212.491.2200 Free admission. Exhibition hours: Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Building tours: Self-guided tours are available Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Bronx Library Center 310 East Kingsbridge Road (at Briggs Avenue) www.nypl.org/locations/bronx-library-center Information: 718.579.4244 Free admission. Hours: Monday–Saturday, 9 a.m.–9 p.m.; Sunday, 12 noon to 6 p.m. Building tours: Group tours are available by ­appointment. Call 718.579.4244.

Indicates locations that are fully wheelchair accessible. All New York Public Library locations will be closed for holiday observances on the following days: September 3–5, October 10, November 11, November 24, and December 24–26; on December 31, all locations will close at 5 p.m.

Click on @ the Library Get connected with free technology classes at The New York Public Library! We offer a wide range of hands-on technology training at many of our locations throughout the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island, and we’re adding new classes all the time. Check out the class calendar, and sign up today! www.nypl.org/events/classes/computer-classes

For Students and Teachers The New York Public Library offers many programs for students and teachers. To arrange an exhibition tour, a student research workshop, a professional development opportunity, or to have a librarian come to your school, visit teachandlearn.nypl.org or contact NYPL’s Division of Teaching and Learning by telephone at 212.576.0037 or by e-mail at teachandlearn@nypl.org.

www.nypl.org Residue: An Installation by Eiko & Koma Through October 30, 2011

Support for The New York Public Library’s Exhibitions Program has been provided by Celeste Bartos, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Mahnaz Ispahani Bartos and Adam Bartos Exhibitions Fund, and Jonathan Altman. Additional support is provided by the Bertha and Isaac Liberman Foundation, Inc., in memory of Ruth and Seymour Klein.

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Shelby Cullom Davis Museum Vincent Astor Gallery

Residue features works and artifacts from Eiko & Koma’s 40-year career as dancers, choreographers, and visual artists. This retrospective exhibition presents videos of the artists’ work—plus sets and costumes—which allow visitors to reexamine Eiko & Koma’s history and better understand their body of work.

The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts gratefully acknowledges the leadership support of Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman. Additional support for exhibitions has been provided by Judy R. and Alfred A. Rosenberg and the Miriam and Harold Steinberg Foundation.

Related program: see page 22.

Out of the Shadows: The Fashion of Film Noir Through November 1, 2011 NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Shelby Cullom Davis Museum Plaza Corridor Gallery

Schomburg Center programs and exhibitions are supported in part by the City of New York, the New York City Council, the State of New York, the New York State Black, Puerto Rican and Hispanic Legislative Caucus, The Rockefeller Foundation endowment for the Performing Arts, and Annie E. and Sarah L. Delany Charitable Trusts.

Fashionable Femme Fatale Bonnie Cashin’s design for the character of Ann Treadwell in the film noir classic Laura (1944). Billy Rose Theatre Division, Bonnie Cashin Collection.

This exhibition features film stills, lobby cards, posters, and designs from a variety of Hollywood film noir releases of the 1940s and early 1950s. Inspired by detective novels and short fiction, film noir was designed to look like real life, reflecting the clothing choices of the audience. The Hollywood studio designers, who created coats, suits, skirts and blouses, and gowns for women characters, were in sympathy with the innovators of American sportswear; some, like Bonnie Cashin, spanned both worlds. In the 1940s, designers were constrained by clothing and fabric rationing, but showed audiences how to contend with the restrictions in a stylish way. As always in film, directors and performers used costumes to convey character, but—spoiler alert!—in film noir, the clothing often aided in deception and disguise. The images of women presented in Out of the Shadows: The Fashion of Film Noir reveal the continuing influence of film noir fashion on the clothing of today.

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Contents


www.nypl.org

Free Exhibitions Katherine Jackson: Storylights Through January 3, 2012 MID-MANHATTAN LIBRARY The Corner Room at 40th and Fifth

STEPHEN A. SCHWARZMAN BUILDING D. Samuel and Jeane H. Gottesman Exhibition Hall and The Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III Gallery

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Artistic Expression The Tale of Genji (top) and a vivid porchoir print by Séguy (above) are on view in Celebrating 100 Years. The Tale of Genji, Spencer Collection. Séguy print, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs, Art and Architecture Collection.

This major exhibition of more than 250 thought-provoking items from NYPL’s vast collections celebrates how the Library has encouraged millions of individuals to gain access to a universe of information during the past 100 years. The first Gutenberg Bible acquired in the Americas is included, as are dance cards, a dime novel, and John Coltrane’s handwritten score of Lover Man. Organized into four thematic sections—Observation, Contemplation, Society, and Creativity—the exhibition highlights the collections’ scope and their value as symbols of our collective memory. Indeed, Celebrating 100 Years also documents changes in the way

information has been recorded and shared over time, beginning with samples from the Library’s collection of Sumerian cuneiform tablets (ca. 2300 BCE) and culminating in selections from the Library’s 740,000-item Digital Gallery. The Wachenheim Gallery focuses on the history of The New York Public Library, from its founding and original collections to the construction of its landmark Beaux-Arts building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, which was dedicated by President William Howard Taft on May 23, 1911, to the ongoing work of the Library through the following century. MetLife Foundation is the Lead Corporate Sponsor of the Centennial Exhibition Celebrating 100 Years and related programming. Additional support for the Library’s Centennial Celebration has been made possible through an endowment established by family and friends of the late Richard B. Salomon, and by Bank of America, The Skeel Fund, The Blackstone Charitable Foundation, Asprey, Wells Fargo, Celeste Bartos, The Wall Street Journal, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Titan, WABC-TV/ Channel 7, Penguin Classics, and Gotham Magazine.

Children’s Book Illustrators and Authors Come Alive Through December 31, 2011 STEPHEN A. SCHWARZMAN BUILDING Children’s Center at 42nd Street

See how the magic of art and language combine to create engaging children’s literature in this exhibition of nearly 20 original children’s-book illustrations. Highlights include Nina Crews and Caldecott Medal winner Paul O. Zelinksy, as well as artist Alix Delinois’s vivid illustrations from Eight Days: A Story of Haiti. Numerous Library copies of the books in which the illustrations appear will also be on hand, so visitors can borrow and share them with their children.

Related program: see page 17.

Malcolm X: A Search for Truth Through January 7, 2012 SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE Main Exhibition Hall

Malcolm X: A Search for Truth draws on the extensive resources of the Schomburg Center, including materials from the Malcolm X Collection, to chronicle the life and times of Malcolm X (1925–1965). The exhibition presents personal and professional papers—speeches and sermons, handwritten letters and diaries—and memorabilia. Most significantly, the exhibition presents fresh insights into the nature of Malcolm X’s intellectual development, as well as his multifaceted, at times seemingly contradictory, persona and personality. Related programs: see page 25.

Family Portrait Malcolm X, wife Betty Shabazz, and daughters Attallah and Qubilah, circa 1962. Richard Saunders. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division, Richard Saunders Collection.

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Celebrating 100 Years Through December 31, 2011

Katherine Jackson’s three-part site-specific exhibition (complementary components open in September and December; see below) explores the dual nature of libraries: physical structures (“stories”), which house the most intangible realities, and the endlessly proliferating “stories” that humankind tells itself. Storylights, which honors the Centennial of NYPL’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, features edge-lit and back-lit (with LEDs or fluorescent lights) etched-glass sculptures and preparatory drawings for the glass pieces. It includes large-scale abstract images inspired by architectural elements of the Library’s landmark building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, as well as text-based work, which tells or hints at stories.


www.nypl.org

Free Exhibitions Romare Bearden: The Soul of Blackness/A Centennial Tribute Through January 7, 2012

The Birth of Promotion: Inventing Film Publicity in the Silent Film Era November 22, 2011–January 2012

SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Latimer/Edison Gallery

Shelby Cullom Davis Museum Vincent Astor Gallery

This centenary exhibition presents artwork from the collections of the Schomburg Center and poet and collector Russell Goings. Celebrating the life and work of the prolific artist (1911–1988), The Soul of Blackness features Bearden’s first collage and his last painting, as well as more than 40 drawings, collages, and prints that vividly illustrate the range and quality of the artist’s vision and his unique interpretations of the African-American experience. Highlights include a collage tribute for the Center’s 50th anniversary and his tapestry Spring Festival. Related programs: see page 25.

Katherine Jackson: Storylights September 10–December 21, 2011 MID-MANHATTAN LIBRARY

This exhibition, which focuses on the development of the promotion and distribution of film, features posters, lobby cards, promotional magazines, advertisements, and exploitation campaigns from the pre-cinema era to the transition to sound film (1890–1930). Highlights include a pro-Union, early sketch for a poster for D. W. Griffiths’s The Birth of a Nation, as well as items the public was never meant to see: periodicals, calendars, and exploitation sheets with advice to theater owners and managers on publicity, advertising, and retail tie-ins for films starring Theda Bara, Harold Lloyd, Mary Pickford, Rudolph Valentino, and many others, both famous and now forgotten.

Art Wall on Third

A Century of Art October 14, 2011–January 15, 2012 STEPHEN A. SCHWARZMAN BUILDING

Katherine Jackson: Storylights December 1, 2011–January 3, 2012 MID-MANHATTAN LIBRARY Art in the Windows

SHOP AT THE LIBRARY!

The Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs continues the celebration of the Library’s Centennial with A Century of Art. The exhibition, which features 100 works created since the Library opened its doors in 1911, offers a glimpse into NYPL’s vast holdings and showcases the talents of both prominent and some lesser-known artists of the 20th and early 21st centuries. Artists include Diane Arbus, Tina Barney, Jasper Johns, and Andy Warhol. This exhibition has been made possible by the continuing generosity of Miriam and Ira D. Wallach.

Seizing Freedom Romare Bearden’s serigraph Cinque (ca. 1975) is a portrait of the leader of the 1839 slave revolt on The Amistad. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Art and Artifacts Division.

Ongoing Displays Pooh and His Friends STEPHEN A. SCHWARZMAN BUILDING Children’s Center at 42nd Street

In 1921, year-old Christopher Robin Milne received a small stuffed bear. Eeyore, Piglet, Kanga, and Tigger soon joined Winnie-the-Pooh as Christopher’s playmates and the inspiration for When We Were Very Young (1924), Winnie-the-Pooh (1926), and other books written by his father, A. A. Milne. Brought to the United States in 1947, the toys remained with the American publisher E. P. Dutton until 1987, when they were donated to The New York Public Library. Children and adults from around the world visit Pooh and his friends daily.

Don’t leave home without a lion! This lightweight lion bag, which folds and easily fits into a pocket, will become your favorite tote. It opens up into a capacious 17-inch-square bag that’s strong enough to hold numerous library books, groceries, or holiday gifts. The Shop also has other lion-adorned items and commemorative Centennial cards and jewelry. And, remember, all purchases support NYPL!

Friends of the Library always receive a 10 percent discount on all Library Shop purchases! Shop in person at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street or online at www.thelibraryshop.org. For more information about The Library Shop, call 212.930.0641 or visit www.thelibraryshop.org. For information about becoming a Friend of the Library, call 212.930.0653 or visit www.nypl.org/support.

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Stokes and Print Galleries


Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street The Celeste Bartos Education Center at South Court is made possible through the extraordinary generosity of Celeste Bartos. Additional leadership support was provided by The Starr Foundation and the Altman Foundation. Programs, Lectures, and Classes Unless otherwise indicated, events take place in the Celeste Bartos Education Center at South Court and last approximately one hour. Enter South Court from Astor Hall at the Fifth Avenue entrance to the Library. Rooms will be opened 10 minutes prior to the class beginning. Except where indicated, no reservations are necessary. Seats are available on a first come, first-served basis.

HANDMADE CRAFTERNOONS AT NYPL Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

2–4 p.m.

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Admission is free, but seating is limited and reservations are recommended. Please reserve your seat by writing handmade@ nypl.org with your name and which event you wish to attend. Check Jessica’s Hand-Made blog (nypl.org/blog_series/handmade) for additional details. September 10 Custom Fabric Stamping with Grace Bonney of Design*Sponge Celebrate the publication of Design*Sponge at Home with author Grace Bonney, who demonstrates how to design a personal stamp and create beautiful custom-printed fabric with it! Bring a tote bag, pillowcase, or other small fabric item to personalize.

September 1 at 10 a.m.–1 p.m. (also September 24, September 27, November 5, November 22, and December 10) Citizen Cartography Workshop: Build a Virtual Atlas of New York

September 13 at 12:30 p.m. (also October 12, November 8, and December 6) Orientation to the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

Mishka Vance, The Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division

Part workshop, part building tour, this orientation will cover how to get a library card, how to use NYPL’s online catalog and databases, and where in the building to find what you’re looking for. Emphasis will be on using the research collections specific to the building, but anyone interested in using NYPL is welcome.

Help NYPL build the geospatial library of the future! This workshop focuses on the basics of map “warping” or georectification (overlaying digital images of historic maps onto a contemporary digital map). Once you learn this powerful new research tool, you can join our Citizen Cartographer corps to help build a resource that will benefit scholars, educators, and history enthusiasts around New York and the world. Limited to 15 participants.

Photo: Shira Kronzon.

Join crafty librarian Jessica Pigza of the Rare Book Division, Crafternoon author Maura Madden, and a special guest who will share her creative passion for a variety of fun projects inspired by NYPL collections.

www.nypl.org

Free Programs

October 15 Lace Making with Lisa Daehlin Lace-loving designer (and opera singer) Lisa Daehlin shares her knowledge of different lacemaking traditions and will teach some beginners’ techniques for making lace. November 19 Bust DIY Guide to Life Debbie Stoller and Laurie Henzel, founders of Bust magazine and authors of the newly published Bust DIY Guide to Life, share a special Bust-inspired activity with us. December 17 Clandestine Crafting We can promise an afternoon of good crafty fun, but for now the details are a secret. Count on a new hands-on project and a cool spread of unique books and vintage magazines from the Library’s collections to provide inspiration.

September 7 at 3:15 p.m. (also September 21, October 5, November 2, and December 14) Basic Internet Tracy Davis and Desmond Hunnighen, General Research Division

This introduction to the Internet covers getting connected, using a web browser, and navigating web pages. September 8 at 3:15 p.m. (also October 14, November 3, and December 9) Uncovering Your Family History: Introduction to Genealogical Research Staff, Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy

NYPL boasts one of the country’s largest free public collections of genealogical resources; this class introduces some key tools. With skills learned here, you might find an ancestor on a ship’s passenger list or family members in census records. Model Home Morrinho (right) is made from materials collected from a favela in Rio de Janiero. See Gods and Snitches: The Real and the Virtual in a Miniature Rio de Janeiro on September 13 at 1:15 p.m.

September 13 at 5–7:30 p.m. (also September 27, and November 8) Citizen Cartography Workshop: Build a Virtual Atlas of New York See description for September 1.

Brooke Watkins, Librarian, General Research Division

September 13 at 1:15 p.m. Gods and Snitches: The Real and the Virtual in a Miniature Rio de Janeiro South Court Auditorium

Alessandro Angelini discusses his anthropological study of a group of teenagers who built a miniature scale model of Rio de Janeiro using materials they collected from a nearby favela. The model, called Morrinho, initiated a role-playing game and serves as a forum to explore cultural objects and the nature of imagination.

September 14 at 2 p.m. (also October 4, November 8, and December 6) Blogging 101 Katerina Dimitriadou-Shuster, Specialist, Special Formats Processing

Learn what a blog is, see examples of blogs, and learn how to create your own blog using WordPress.

DISCUSS GREAT BOOKS IN A GREAT SETTING General Research Division librarian Mary Jones leads monthly book discussions to explore books you’ve been meaning to read or to reread and discuss with other lovers of literature. Participants should read each title before the discussion. Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

2 p.m.

September 14 at 4:30 p.m. (also November 9) Using Zotero in your Research Brooke Watkins, Librarian, General Research Division

This hands-on workshop offers a quick introduction to Zotero, a free bibliographic tool that resides in your Firefox browser and can help you gather, manage, analyze, and share your resources. Learn the basics of the program as well as how to integrate your Zotero library with word-processing software for footnotes and bibliographies. A basic knowledge of web-based research tools and resources is suggested.

September 8 Persuasion by Jane Austen October 13 Frankenstein by Mary Shelley November 10 The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde December 8 Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad This portrait of Oscar Wilde was taken in a photo studio on Union Square in 1882. Billy Rose Theatre Division

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Stephen A. Schwarzman Building


Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street

PERIODICALLY SPEAKING The New York Public Library and the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses present this series of vibrant readings and discussions that provides a forum for emerging writers and highlights NYPL’s rich collection of literary magazines and journals. For more details, visit nypl.org/events. DeWitt Wallace Periodical Room

September 15 at 2 p.m. (also October 20, November 17, and December 15) Researching with E-Resources: Periodicals and Newspapers Mary Jones, Librarian, General Research Division

Interested in reading newspapers and periodicals online? This workshop will explore current and historical newspapers available online through NYPL.

6 p.m. October 11, November 8, and December 13 This series is made possible in part by support from the Axe-Houghton Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency; the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; the National Endowment for the Arts; and Friends of CLMP, a diverse group of individuals committed to supporting independent literary publishing.

September 15 at 3 p.m.; doors open at 2:30 p.m. Design and Style: Rodarte Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

Fashion designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy, who founded the design house Rodarte, discuss their work and present the new monograph of their work for which they collaborated with photographers Catherine Opie and Alec Soth. September 16 at 3:15 p.m. (also November 18) Clues from Family Photos Sachiko Clayton, Librarian, Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy

Would you like to learn more about your old family photographs? The best clues are often found in the images themselves. This class introduces techniques for dating images as well as resources for researching photographs. September 17 at 2 p.m. (also October 29, November 26, and December 10) Block & Lot: New York City

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Mishka Vance, The Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division

Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs, Art and Architecture Collection.

www.nypl.org

Free Programs

Discover how you can use NYPL’s resources to unlock the history of a building, a block, or a borough by examining antiquarian maps, fireinsurance atlases (“Sanborns”), online property data, and historic real estate photos.

September 20 at 1:15 p.m. How the Animal Game Escaped from the Rio de Janeiro Zoo: Brazil’s Clandestine Lottery

September 21 at 6 p.m. Smart People Don’t Retire— They Break Free

South Court Auditorium

Hear panelists who have made the transition from one stage of work or life to another or from one career to another discuss how they determined and accomplished those changes. Self-assessments will be provided to help attendees think about their next transition. Cosponsored by The Transition Network.

Amy Chazkel, the author of Laws of Chance: Brazil’s Clandestine Lottery and the Making of Urban Public Life, presents a lecture exploring a unique aspect of Brazilian history. September 20 at 2 p.m. (also October 11, November 29, December 13) Researching with E-Resources: Catalogs Anne-Marie Belinfante, Librarian, Dorot Jewish Division

This class will concentrate on using NYPL’s online catalog and WorldCat, an online catalog of materials held in libraries around the world. The class will focus on the specific needs of the participants, so bring your current research projects! September 20 at 5:30 p.m. The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society Lecture Series: New Avenues to Italian Family Research June C. DeLalio of the Italian Genealogical Group in New York outlines changes in older Italian research resources and introduces new sites and methods to help researchers meet their objectives. September 21 at 6 p.m.; doors open at 5:30 p.m. Design and Style: Visual Complexity: Displaying Complex Networks and Data Sets Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

Designer, information architect, and design researcher Manuel Lima discusses information visualization, particularly the visualization of complex networks.

South Court Auditorium

September 22 at 4:15 p.m. Digital Gotham: Researching New York City History Online Maira Liriano, Manager, Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy

Travel through New York City history using historical newspapers, books, and thousands of photographs. September 28 at 3:15 p.m. (also October 27 and November 15 at 2:15 p.m. and December 7 at 3:15 p.m.) Old Books, Rare Books: Learning About the Value of Your Books Virginia Bartow, Senior Rare Book Cataloger, Special Formats Processing

Develop an appreciation for antiquarian books and learn what you need to know before buying or selling an old book. September 28 at 6 p.m.; doors open at 5:30 p.m. An Art Book: Are You Experienced?: How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

Looking at art through the lens of psychedelic experience and culture, New York Times veteran art critic Ken Johnson reveals an unexpected and illuminating dimension of art from the 1960s to the present. Artists Deborah Kass and Chris Martin join Johnson in a discussion of the role that psychedelic culture plays in their work and in the work of their peers.

October 6 at 1:15 p.m. Lectures from the Allen Room and the Wertheim Study: Sufficient Respite Is Never Afforded: Jacques Ellul’s Battles Against Lacan, Techno-Utopians, and Bad Writing, with author Megan Hustad South Court Auditorium

THE CHILDREN’S LITERARY SALON This informal monthly gathering welcomes fans of children’s literature. These programs are for adults only. Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

2 p.m.

October 7 at 2:15 p.m. (also November 10 at 2 p.m. and December 2 at 2:15 p.m.) Subversive Shaw: An Introduction to the Life and Work of George Bernard Shaw Robert Armitage, Humanities Bibliographer, General Research Division

Under the cloak of sublime comedy, Shaw sought to expose the hypocrisy of Victorian society and morality. This presentation explores the life and work of this brilliant, witty, and subversive literary figure. October 11 at 4:30 p.m. (also December 7) eNYPL: Access eBooks, Movies, and Music from Home Staff, General Research Division

From e-books and audiobooks to music files and videos, the Library offers a wealth of resources on its website. Learn how to check out e-books for your e-reader or music for your audio player. Everything is free with your library card! October 18 at 5:30 p.m. The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society Lecture Series: Beyond the Draft: WW I Records in the National Archives Marie Varrelman Melchiori instructs researchers how to locate the regiment of a soldier who served during World War I and how they can obtain military service records from the National Archives.

Illustration: Jules Feiffer.

September 10 Storytelling! Its Past, Its Present, Its Future Join a cadre of professional storytellers as they discuss their profession, misconceptions about the job, and the role of storytelling in today’s society. Panelists include LuAnn Adams, Regina Ress, and Bill Gordh. October 1 Coming to America Sergio Ruzzier (Italy), Sophie Blackall, (Australia), and Bo Zaunders (Sweden), and others explore such issues as how American children’s books stack up against those published in other countries, differences that occur in publishing in different nations, and how a book changes when it’s translated into English or even just republished here. November 12 Military Offspring: A Whole New Genre Authors Rosanne Parry (Heart of a Shepherd, Second Fiddle), Sara Lewis Holmes (Operation Yes), and Susan Morgan Williams (Bull Rider) discuss children in military families and how they’re portrayed in contemporary novels for kids. December 3 Bringing the Funny David Roman (Astronaut Academy), Nick Bruel (Bad Kitty), Laurie Keller (Arnie the Donut), and Jules Feiffer (Bark, George) look at funny books in a myriad of forms: funny picture books, funny graphic novels, and funny early chapter books.

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Stephen A. Schwarzman Building


Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street

October 21 at 2:15 p.m. William Shakespeare: From Stratford-on-Avon to The New York Public Library Robert Armitage, Humanities Bibliographer, General Research Division

Discover the world of William Shakespeare at NYPL: Ponder textual problems in the quartos and folios; explore illustrated editions of the plays and poems; experience Shakespearean research through 21st-century databases. October 25 at 6 p.m. 100 Years of the Arab American Novel: Ameen Rihani’s The Book of Khalid and Arab Life in Lower Manhattan South Court Auditorium

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Mirror Image Abe Frajndlich’s new book, Penelope’s Hungry Eyes, is a collection of portraits of other photographers, including Duane Michals (above). See Art and Literature on December 7.

October 19 at 6 p.m.; doors open at 5:30 p.m. An Art Book: First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and the 1963 Exhibition of the Mona Lisa Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

Margaret Leslie Davis, author of Mona Lisa in Camelot: How Jacqueline Kennedy and Da Vinci’s Masterpiece Charmed and Captivated a Nation, and NYPL Director of Collections Strategy Victoria Steele discuss the story of the famous painting’s visit to the United States, which attracted 2 million viewers and pioneered the phenomenon of the blockbuster museum show. October 20 at 1:15 p.m. Lectures from the Allen Room and the Wertheim Study: International Intervention and Conflict Resolution: Lessons for Libya, with Piro Rexhepi, New York University South Court Auditorium

www.nypl.org

Free Programs

Published in 1911, The Book of Khalid by Ameen Rihani chronicles the story of two boys from Lebanon who become peddlers in Manhattan’s Little Syria. Todd Fine, director of Project Khalid, and Akram Khater, a professor at North Carolina State University, discuss the seminal novel and the history of the Little Syria neighborhood at the turn of the 20th century. Lebanese Ambassador to the United States Antoine Chedid will introduce the program. Cosponsored with Project Khalid and the Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center at the CUNY Graduate Center. October 26 at 6 p.m.; doors open at 5:30 p.m. An Art Book: Groundwaters: A Century of Art by Self-Taught and Outsider Artists Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

Charles Russell’s new book offers a survey of more than 100 years of unschooled artists and features works by 12 of the most influential self-taught artists to emerge during the past century. Art historian and curator Valérie Rousseau joins Russell to discuss the Outsider Art movement and share a selection of images from the book.

October 29 at 2 p.m. Lectures from the Allen Room and the Wertheim Study: All Together Different: Yiddish Socialists, Garment Workers, and the Labor Roots of Multiculturalism, with Daniel Katz, Empire State College South Court Auditorium

November 9 at 5:30 p.m. The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society Lecture Series: The Road Less Traveled: Polish and Ukrainian Research Matthew Bielawa of the Polish Genealogical Society and Jonathan Shea, a professor at Central Connecticut State University, discuss sources such as church censuses, marriage dispensations, population registers, cemetery records, and passport applications for researchers tracing Eastern European family history. November 12 at 2 p.m. Lectures from the Allen Room and the Wertheim Study: The Lenox Library and the Art of Display in Gilded Age New York, with Sally Webster, Professor Emerita, CUNY Graduate Center Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

November 16 at 5:30 p.m. The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society Lecture Series: Applying for Your Irish Passport: An Introduction to Irish Research Donna Moughty provides information about how to find Irish ancestors using resources in the U.S. November 22 at 1:15 p.m. Lectures from the Allen Room and the Wertheim Study: Dirty! Dirty! Dirty! Of Playboys, Pigs, and Penthouse Paupers, an American Tale of Sex and Wonder, with author Mike Edison South Court Auditorium

November 22 at 2:15 p.m. Elusive Jane: In Search of Jane Austen at The New York Public Library

December 6 at 5–7:30 p.m. (also December 20 at 10 a.m.–1 p.m.) Citizen Cartography Workshop: Tracing Old New York

Robert Armitage, Humanities Bibliographer, General Research Division

Mishka Vance, The Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division

Examine of the life and works of Jane Austen through the lens of the collections of The New York Public Library.

Learn how to trace important features from maps such as William Perris’s Maps of the City of New York from 1852 to create augmented documents that include a new set of valuable geographic information to old maps. Using tools available at maps.nypl.org, participants will enhance the resources NYPL makes available to researchers, students, geographers, urban planners, and the general public who seek knowledge about early New York.

November 30 at 6 p.m.; doors open at 5:30 p.m. Design and Style: New African Fashion Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

Writer, editor, and fashion expert Helen Jennings shares a selection of images from her new book and discusses the history and future of African fashion with the duo behind womenswear brand Mataano: designer Mimi Plange and modelturned-model-campaigner Bethann Hardison. November 30 at 6 p.m. From Beach Party to Woodstock: The Pop Cultural Revolution of Sixties America South Court Auditorium

This program looks at American popular culture in the 1960s through the lens of film and music. Author Tom Lisanti, Susan Schmidt Horning, a professor at St. John’s University, and Joan DelFattore, a professor at the University of Delaware, discuss the role of political and social factors in shaping popular culture as well as the impact of pop culture on society. Topics include such films as Ride the Wild Surf and Gidget and music ranging from Motown to Woodstock.

December 7 at 6 p.m.; doors open at 5:30 p.m. Art and Literature: Penelope’s Hungry Eyes Margaret Liebman Berger Forum

Photographer Duane Michals and art historian Henry Adams join Abe Frajndlich, photographer and author of Penelope’s Hungry Eyes: Portraits of Famous Photographers, to discuss the book and its 101 images of worldrenowned photographers. December 14 at 6 p.m. Lectures from the Allen Room and the Wertheim Study: The Rise of the New York Skyscraper, with Seth Gopin, Rutgers University South Court Auditorium

December 16 at 2:15 p.m. Out of the Blacking Factory: Charles Dickens at The New York Public Library Robert Armitage, Humanities Bibliographer, General Research Division

This presentation covers various aspects of Dickens’s life and reputation, with a focus on the illustrators who added a crucial visual elements to his writing. Some notable editions of his work will be on display.

December 20 at 1:15 p.m. Lectures from the Allen Room and the Wertheim Study: Asian American Comics in a “Post-Race” Era, with Caroline Kyungah Hong, Queens College South Court Auditorium

Skyline Scene By the early years of the 20th century, New York’s skyline already included lots of tall buildings. See The Rise of the New York Skyscraper on December 14. New York Public Library Picture Collection.

150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOREIGN RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES Staff from the Office of the Historian, U.S. Department of State, present two programs on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the Foreign Relations of the United States, the official documentary record of United States foreign policy and diplomatic activity. October 12 3 p.m. Workshop: New Perspectives on Postcolonial History: Using Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) in the 21st Century Learn how to use FRUS documents for nondiplomatic history research by examining examples of post–World War II history of decolonization and nationalist struggles. 6 p.m. Lecture: Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire: A Conversation about Security and Transparency in the Cold War-Era Foreign Relations Series South Court Auditorium

Josh Botts, Department of State’s Office of the Historian, and historian-biographer Susan Butler discuss the release of the FRUS volume on the 1945 Yalta Conference and how it illuminates historical debates within the U.S. Government over such issues as secrecy and transparency.

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Stephen A. Schwarzman Building


Mid-Manhattan Library

www.nypl.org

Free Programs

455 Fifth Avenue (at 40th Street) Selected Public Programs These programs are presented on the sixth floor of the Mid-Manhattan Library.

THE MID-MANHATTAN LIBRARY COMMEMORATES THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF 9/11

Seats are available on a first come, first-served basis. For information about the many other programs offered, visit www.nypl.org/locations/ mid-manhattan-library.

September 12 at 6:30 p.m. After the World Trade Center: Return to the Normal City? Sharon Zukin and Michael Sorkin, editors of the essay collection After the World Trade Center: Rethinking New York City, examine the changes in the area around the World Trade Center site and look at the rebuilding plans in the context of a renewal of the city’s progressive promise.

Photo: © Brian Rose/Ed Fausty 1980.

In recognition of the 10th anniversary of the attack on the World Trade Center, the Mid-Manhattan Library is hosting a series of programs with historians, journalists, and photographers. Look for additional commemorative events at Battery Park and other neighborhood libraries. Natural Beauty Stickwork (right) was created by artist Patrick Dougherty (above) with help from volunteers. See Artist at the Library on September 26.

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Photo: Rebecca Bullene, courtesy of The Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

September 1 at 6:30 p.m. Market 2.0: The Resurgence of Traditional Markets in New York City Karen E. Seiger, author of Markets of New York City: A Guide to the Best Artisan, Farmer, Food, and Flea Markets; Robert LaValva, director of the New Amsterdam Market; and Suchin Pak, founder of the Hester Street Fair, talk about food trends and new types of markets. September 8 at 6:30 p.m. Artist @ the Library presents: The Art of Joe Ciardiello Joe Ciardiello shows examples of his portraits of blues, jazz, and rock musicians and talks about his work.

September 14 at 6:30 p.m. The Confluence of Creativity: Similarities Between Composing Music and Creating Visual Art Musician and artist Preston Trombly discusses the ways in which music and art share essentially the same processes although they utilize different materials. September 21 at 6:30 p.m. Partners in Crime: Are Two Killers Better Than One? Writers Cici McNair, P.I., Cheryl Paradis, Robert Quackenbush, and Kate White of Mystery Writers of America, New York Chapter, probe partnerships in real and fictional crime in this panel moderated by Elizabeth Zelvin.

September 22 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression Author and scholar Morris Dickstein examines the role arts and entertainment played during the Great Depression. September 26 at 6:30 p.m. Artist @ the Library presents: Stickwork and the Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s First SiteSpecific Sculpture Artist Patrick Dougherty presents photographs and drawings that document Stickwork, a collection of sculptures he made from twigs and branches, which was mounted at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden in 2010.

September 6 at 6:30 p.m. World Trade Center: The Story from Fresh Kills Martin Bellew recounts the role of the Department of Sanitation in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center, including the agency’s coordination of transporting the wreckage to Fresh Kills landfill. September 7 at 6:30 p.m. Watching the World Change: The Stories Behind the Images of 9/11 David Friend, Vanity Fair’s editor of creative development and former director of photography at Life, reveals the stories behind the images of the attack on the World Trade Center.

September 19 at 6:30 p.m. WTC Photographer Brian Rose introduces his new book of images of the World Trade Center over 25 years, from its days as an architectural colossus unloved by most New Yorkers to its position as an integral part of New York’s skyline and beyond. October 24 at 6:30 p.m. Unearthing the Trade Center New York Times reporter James Glanz presents an illustrated talk that explains how he and his colleague Eric Lipton created their book City in the Sky: The Rise and Fall of the World Trade Center over a two-year period as they researched the conception, design, construction, and destruction of the World Trade Center. October 26 at 6:30 p.m. Bikeman: An Epic Poem Journalist Thomas F. Flynn shares his experiences of September 11, 2001, which he recorded in a historical ballad that is part quest, part memoir, part eulogy, and part survivor’s lament.

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A view of the Twin Towers from Henry Street on the Lower East Side.

September 13 at 6:30 p.m. New York and 9/11: A Report Card on the City’s Response to the Emergency and the Way the Tragedy Changed the Metropolis Kenneth T. Jackson offers an evaluation of the first responders, the failure of communications and of command and control at the disaster site, the smooth functioning of food, water, and social services in the immediate aftermath of the crisis, and the myriad ways in which terrorism has changed daily life in the five boroughs.


Mid-Manhattan Library

www.nypl.org

Free Programs

455 Fifth Avenue (at 40th Street)

From The Three Bears, with drawings by Leslie Brooke. The New York Public Library Picture Collection.

October 5 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: The Archaeology of Home: An Epic Set on a Thousand Square Feet of the Lower East Side Katharine Greider chronicles the history of her New York City house and offers a meditation on the growth of America and the meaning of home.

October 4 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust New York Times reporter Diana Henriques, the first journalist to interview Madoff after he went to prison, shares details about how Madoff executed the largest Ponzi scheme in history.

October 6 at 6:30 p.m. Slide Lecture: Tchaikovsky and the Piano in St. Petersburg’s Gilded Age Anne Swartz provides musical examples, photographs, and rare Russian documents that shed light on Tchaikovsky and pianists who performed in St. Petersburg the decade before the composer departed for America. October 11 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: The Once and Future New York: Historic Preservation and the Modern City In this illustrated lecture, Randall Mason examines the emergence of historic preservation in New York.

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October 13 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation’s Remaking Anand Giridharadas shares the story of his family’s departure from India, his return, and his thoughts on the world’s largest democracy. October 17 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: A New Look at the Great War Adam Hochschild, author of To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914–1918, presents a slide show of photographs, posters, and documentary film in this new look at the First World War.

October 18 at 6:30 p.m. A Writers Dialogue with Andrew Gross and Lorenzo Carcaterra of Mystery Writers of America, New York Chapter Two bestselling authors discuss how they got started writing and how they craft their compelling novels. October 19 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements Sam Kean reveals fascinating stories behind the periodic table, including the parlor trick involving gallium alluded to in the book’s title. October 20 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: America’s Medicis: The Rockefellers and Their Astonishing Cultural Legacy Suzanne Loebl examines the Rockefeller family’s cultural contributions, especially to the 20th-century American art world. October 25 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America New York Times correspondent Kate Zernike looks at the rise of the Tea Party, its impact on the 2010 midterm elections, and what influence she expects it will have in 2012. October 27 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: The City Cook: Big City, Small Kitchen, Limitless Ingredients, No Time Kate McDonough, who edits TheCityCook.com, talks about the resurgence of home cooking and how to find and cook with the best ingredients even in a tiny city kitchen while handling the demands of everyday urban life.

November 1 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives Veteran technology reporter Steven Levy takes readers inside Google headquarters, the Googleplex— where he was granted unprecedented access—to show how Google works. November 2 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: New York Dozen: Gen X Architects Michael J. Crosbie’s illustrated lecture focuses on the work of 12 architecture firms that are finding new ways to practice, experimenting with cutting-edge materials, and expressing changing values in their work. November 3 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: A Journey into Dorothy Parker’s New York In this illustrated talk, author Kevin Fitzpatrick chronicles Dorothy Parker’s life in New York, focusing on the theaters, bars, and hotel rooms where she sharpened her wit, polished her writing, and captured the edgy mood of her times. November 9 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: Endgame: The Spectacular Rise and Fall of Bobby Fischer Drawing on family archives, recently released FBI files, and his subject’s e-mail, biographer Frank Brady traces the meteoric ascent—and confounding descent—of Bobby Fischer, the Brooklyn-raised chess champion.

November 21 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams Charles King, a professor of international affairs and government at Georgetown University, presents the story of one of Europe’s great great cosmopolitan—and Jewish— cities through the stories of its geniuses and villains. November 28 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: Beijing Welcomes You: Unveiling the Capital City of the Future Journalist Tom Socca decamped to China in 2004 and now shares his observations on the stunning transformation of Beijing, making the case that it is the world’s defining city now and in the foreseeable future and China is the ascendant global power. December 5 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: Cook This Now: 120 Easy and Delectable Recipes You Can’t Wait to Make James Beard Award winner and New York Times food writer Melissa Clark demystifies the principles behind using seasonal ingredients to cook satisfying recipes for an entire year of good eating. December 12 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: Designing the Underground City: New York City Subways from 1904 to 1940 Carissa Amash, curator at the New York Transit Museum, explores the subway’s rich architecture and design history through archival photographs and original drawings. Illustrations include images of the original 1904 stations and examples of the changing design styles between 1915 and 1940, as the Arts and Crafts aesthetic gave way to Machine Age style.

December 13 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: Honeybee Democracy Thomas D. Seeley, a Cornell professor and passionate beekeeper, explores the inner workings of honeybee colonies, including how the colonies make decisions collectively and democratically. December 17 at 2:30 p.m. An Artist Dialogue: Katherine Jackson and Katherine Bradford Katherine Jackson, whose sitespecific exhibition, Storylights, is on view at Mid-Manhattan Library, discusses her glasswork and drawings with painter and FIT instructor Katherine Bradford.

The Witty Wisecracker Author Dorothy Parker wrote poetry, stories, essays, reviews, and screenplays and was a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. See A Journey into Dorothy Parker’s New York on November 3. Billy Rose Theatre Division.

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Home Cooking Getting a meal on the table is a collaborative effort. See The City Cook on October 27.

October 3 at 6:30 p.m. Author @ the Library presents: Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth Environmental journalist Mark Hertsgaard provides insight into what to expect between now and 2061 in terms of climate, water supply, and sea-level rise.


Science, Industry and Business Library

Free Programs

www.nypl.org

188 Madison Avenue (at 34th Street)

Closing the Deal This humorous card was distributed in a pack of cigarettes. See Unleash Your Inner Sales Genius on September 28. George Arents Collection.

September 6 at 6 p.m. Jump-Starting Your Job Search for Fall Win Sheffield guides you through the process of setting direction and priorities to make your fall career efforts productive.

September 13 at 12 noon Career Evolution: Preparing for Your Career’s Next Leap with Social Media Marketing Learn how to market your achievements, take your career to the next level, and get on the short list for a promotion.

September 7 at 6 p.m. Organizing and Managing Your Job Search Look at your job search and next career opportunity from a different angle. Discover how to plan, set goals, and optimize your job search.

September 29 at 6 p.m. Staying One Step Ahead of the Interviewer Win Sheffield discusses effective ways to prepare for an interview, useful techniques and attitudes to bring to the interview, and decisive ways to follow up.

September 13 at 6 p.m. A Practical Guide to Buying a Co-op, Condo, or House Real estate professional Carmen Lee Shue discusses the ins and outs of buying a first home.

September 8 at 6 p.m. Five Important Characteristics of Successful Small-Business Owners Ken Boyar discusses the keys to starting and maintaining a successful small business.

September 14 at 6 p.m. Staying Motivated Throughout the Job-Search Process Kristina Leonardi shares tips on how to stay positive and motivated throughout your job search.

October 11 at 12 noon Ace Every Interview and Get the Job You Really Want City University of New York employment coordinator Barry Cohen shares hidden techniques and strategies to help you ace that next job interview.

September 15 at 6 p.m. Use LinkedIn to Get and Ace Interviews Robert Hellmann offers advice about how to build your network, research job prospects, contact people, and get interviews.

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September 20 at 6 p.m. Job Search Got You Down? Renee Lee Rosenberg discusses strategies to reevaluate and reenergize your job search. September 27 at 6 p.m. Investing: Smart Ways to Make It Work for You Discover time-tested investing principles and techniques to achieve your financial goals despite the ups and downs of the market. Sponsored by the Financial Planning Association of New York. September 28 at 6 p.m. Unleash Your Inner Sales Genius Francisco J. Acosta demonstrates techniques in the art of selling.

October 11 at 6 p.m. Resume Renovation John Crant shows how making necessary edits increases the value of the items on your resume and makes you stand out during your job search. October 12 at 6 p.m. Speak Your Way to Rainmaking: Networking Skills for Professionals Maria Guida provides advice about how to enhance your communication skills and boost your persuasive power during networking and other professional events. October 18 at 6 p.m. Seven Key Items for a HighPowered Job Search Theodore Henderson offers tips about how to shorten your job search and find the right position at the right salary. Support for The New York Public Library’s Job Search @ NYPL programming has been provided by the JPMorgan Chase Foundation. Support for The New York Public Library’s Financial Literacy programming has been provided by The McGraw-Hill Companies.

FINANCIAL PLANNING WEEK @ SIBL October 4 at 6 p.m. What Makes a Good Financial Plan? Learn how to identify and prioritize financial and personal goals—and how to achieve them.

Collecting Wages This plate from a Russian book is titled “Cash Payment.” See Get Paid What You Are Worth on October 20.

October 5 at 6 p.m. Getting the Most Out of Your Money Figure out how much money and cash flow you have in order to create and live within a budget. Learn how to stretch your dollars so you can keep more of them!

Slavic and Baltic Collections.

October 19 at 6 p.m. A Legal Primer: What Every Business Person and Executive Should Know About the Law Attorney Steven Mitchell Sack dispenses the latest legal information to protect yourself and prosper.

November 1 at 6 p.m. How Do You Want to Be Remembered After Your Interview? Renee Lee Rosenberg shares tips for creating a powerful personal pitch and branding statement.

October 20 at 6 p.m. Get Paid What You Are Worth: Negotiating Job Offers and Asking for Raises Laura Hill discusses how to determine what you are worth, handle compensation questions for interviews, and ask your current employer for a raise.

November 2 at 6 p.m. Making Your Resume Work for You Win Sheffield focuses on the key points to address—and leave out—in a resume.

October 25 at 6 p.m. Personal Credit and Financing Your Small Business Find out how your personal credit affects your small-business financing options and explore the different methods available to finance small businesses at different stages of operation. Sponsored by SCORE, Counselors to America’s Small Business. October 27 at 6 p.m. Speak with Power and Confidence Diane DiResta teaches the skills of confident speaking so you can be more successful in job interviews, meetings, and presentations.

November 8 at 6 p.m. Medicare Update 2012 Get the latest information about Medicare with Eric Hausman from the NYC Department for the Aging Health Insurance Information Counseling Assistance Program (HIICAP). November 9 at 6 p.m. Building Your Professional Network with LinkedIn and How to Use It in Your Job Search Acquire the tools you need to start networking with LinkedIn.com and then use your expanded network in the search for your next career.

October 6 at 11:30 a.m.–7:30 p.m. Financial Planning Day @ SIBL Classes

» Mortgages » Investments » Your Parents—Their Finances » Starting Your Own Business » Retirement Planning » Finding a Financial Adviser Counseling

» Certified financial planners offer 30-minute private sessions Database Demonstrations

» How-to demonstrations of resources to assist you with your personal finances Financial Fair

» Financial information from organizations such as the Securities & Exchange Commission, the Social Security Administration, SCORE, and the Better Business Bureau Sponsored in conjunction with the Financial Planning Association of New York. For a full schedule of Financial Planning Day, visit www.nypl.org/fpd.

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Selected Public Programs These programs are presented in Room 015 or Room 018, Conference Center, Lower Level. Seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise noted. Seating cannot be guaranteed once the program begins. For more information, call 917.ASK. NYPL (917.275.6975).


Free Programs

The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

188 Madison Avenue (at 34th Street)

Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center

THE JOB-SEARCH ESSENTIALS SERIES with Career Coach David Lees September 22 at 6 p.m. Marketing Yourself with Confidence Learn effective tools to better position and package yourself to move forward. October 26 at 6 p.m. Network Your Way into a Job Develop a new way of networking that will enable you to interact with others more confidently. December 14 at 6 p.m. Interview with Confidence Review the job-interviewing process and focus on ways to effectively stand out from other candidates.

November 10 at 6 p.m. Successful Interviewing Learn how to prepare for an interview, answer common and difficult interview questions, and formulate questions you should ask. November 15 at 6 p.m. Elder Law: How to Protect Your Assets Attorney Ronald Fatoullah discusses such topics as Medicaid, asset transfers, and the role of an elder-law attorney.

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November 16 at 6 p.m. Reality Marketing Revolution Sales and marketing strategist Eric Keiles offers tips on how to improve your business. November 17 at 6 p.m. Social Media for Business: The Building Blocks Theodore Henderson teaches straightforward, nontechnical techniques to help you build your personal brand or grow your small business online via social media.

November 29 at 6 p.m. Year-End Tax Tips Find out now if there are smart moves you can make before January 1 to reduce your tax bill. Sponsored by the Financial Planning Association of New York. December 1 at 12 noon Returning to the Workforce After a Long Break or Sabbatical John Crant explains how to overcome many of the challenges that job seekers face when they want to rejoin the workforce after an extended leave. December 1 at 6 p.m. Networking and Its Possibilities Diane Ciccolini demonstrates how to connect and build lasting relationships through networking. December 6 at 6 p.m. Avoiding Common Mistakes in Wills Learn the right things to do when creating a will to assure that your assets go where you want them to. Sponsored by the Financial Planning Association of New York.

December 7 at 12 noon Why Don’t I Have a Job Yet? Win Sheffield discusses how to identify common and uncommon roadblocks that can hinder a job-search effort—and how to tackle them. December 7 at 6 p.m. Reshaping Your Career: SelfAssessment, Taking Stock of Your Skills, and Job-Search Strategies Learn how to determine your key qualities and strengths to develop the best career focus. December 8 at 6 p.m. Obtaining and Utilizing Free PR to Enhance Your Job Search or Grow Your Business Discover how job seekers and business owners can use media attention to differentiate themselves from their competition. December 13 at 6 p.m. Mutual Funds 101 Find out about the different types of mutual funds available, how they work, and whether they’re appropriate for you. Sponsored by the Financial Planning Association of New York. December 20 at 6 p.m. Making Connections and Identifying Mentors: Six Steps to Building a More Effective Network Renee Lee Rosenberg teaches strategies for thinking outside of the box and stepping beyond your comfort zone. December 21 at 6 p.m. Interview Intervention John Crant explains how to research a job opportunity that you’re about to interview for, fully prepare for interview success, and follow up after the interview.

Classes @ SIBL Hands-on training in resources for:

» Job and career opportunities

» Finance and investment decisions » Company, industry, and market research » Creating custom mailing lists » Government information Visit www.nypl.org/ locations/sibl for the schedule.

For a special series of financial programs at NYPL locations throughout the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island, see page 27.

www.nypl.org

40 Lincoln Center Plaza

Selected Public Programs All programs are presented in the Library’s Bruno Walter Auditorium. Admission is free, and first-come, first-served. For further information, call 212.642.0142. For Sunday programs, use the library entrance at 111 Amsterdam Avenue, just south of 65th Street (the Lincoln Center Plaza entrance is closed on Sundays, and the library’s exhibitions, collections, and other services are not available). The LPA Cinema Series is made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency.

Boris Karloff played Dr. Frankenstein’s monster in the classic 1930s films inspired by Mary Shelley’s book. Billy Rose Theatre Division.

Karloff, the Monster (and the Gentleman) Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. October 4 Frankenstein 1931, 71 minutes Directed by James Whale The Bride of Frankenstein 1935, 75 minutes Directed by James Whale October 11 The Black Cat 1934, 66 minutes Directed by Edgar G. Ulmer The Black Room 1935; 69 minutes Directed by Roy William Neill October 18 The Body Snatcher 1945, 77 minutes Directed by Robert Wise

October 25 Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! 1966, 26 minutes Directed by Chuck Jones and Ben Washam Targets 1967, 90 minutes Directed by Peter Bogdanovich Thursday, October 27 at 6 p.m. Jeepers Creepers, It’s Boris Karloff! Just in time for Halloween, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts salutes the life and career of Boris Karloff. Born William Henry Pratt in England in 1887, Karloff became a horror-movie star playing the Monster in James Whale’s 1931 film Frankenstein. He was an equally distinguished stage actor, starring in such Broadway productions as Arsenic and Old Lace, Peter Pan, and The Lark, which earned him a Tony nomination in 1956. The actor’s daughter, Sara Karloff, and others discuss the iconic performer.

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Science, Industry and Business Library


The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts 40 Lincoln Center Plaza

Dynamic Duo Nick Dinnerstein and Pei-Yeh Tsai play 20th- and 21st-century works for cello and piano on October 29.

The Gotham Jazzmen Tuesdays at noon, September 20–December 28 September 15 at 6 p.m. Rebel, Rebel: Anti-Style Keanan Duffty offers a insider’s guide to such iconic rebels as Keith Richards, Jimi Hendrix, Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, Marlon Brando, and Kate Moss. Presented in celebration of Fashion Week at Lincoln Center. September 25 at 1:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA The New York Opera Forum presents a concert version of Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor.

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www.nypl.org

September 26 at 6 p.m. Songbook @ LPA: Broadway’s Future A concert of new music by Broadway composers and lyricists sung by Broadway vocalists. Presented by Arts and Artists at St. Paul, directed by John Znidarsic. October 1 at 2:30 p.m. Pianist Amber Liao Works by Fauré, Handel, Schubert, and Scriabin.

October 2 at 2:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA: My Last Years with Bing Kathryn Crosby remembers Bing Crosby through songs, images, and film. October 6 at 6 p.m. Eiko & Koma: A Retrospective of Films October 9 at 2:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA The Con Brio Ensemble plays works by Bruch, Brahms, and Turina. October 13 Let’s Talk About Water: Screening and Panel Discussion 4 p.m. Screening: Gasland 2010, 107 minutes Directed by Josh Fox 6 p.m. Panel Discussion Academics from Cornell, Clemson, and Penn State universities and the executive director of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science discuss where our water comes from and the process of gas-well drilling known as fracking.

October 15 at 2:30 p.m. Guitarists Charles Mokotoff and Robert Ward Works by Boccherini, Brahms, Granados, Ponce, and Solis.

October 29 at 2:30 p.m. The Dinnerstein/Tsai Duo Nick Dinnerstein and Pei-Yeh Tsai perform works by Prokofiev, Rachmaninoff, Vine, and Rouse.

October 16 at 2:30 p.m. The Philhallmonic Society, under the direction of its founder and musical director, Phil Hall, presents The Best of Times: The Music of Jerry Herman

October 30 at 2:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA Pianist Daniel Beliavsky presents works by Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Shostakovich, and Chopin.

October 17 at 6 p.m. Dr. Queen’s Drag Academy: The Martin Worman Papers This panel discussion and performance celebrates the career of the actor, playwright, lyricist, director, female impersonator, activist, and academic Martin Worman, whose papers are in the Billy Rose Theatre Division. October 20 at 6 p.m. Concert Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of Bridge Records Bridge Records’ founder, guitarist David Starobin, performs with composer George Crumb; the concert also includes world premieres of pieces by Paul Lansky and Poul Ruders. October 22 at 2:30 p.m. Songs of Franz Liszt October 23 at 1:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA The New York Opera Forum presents a concert version of Rossini’s L’Italiana in Algeri. October 24 at 6 p.m. Forgotten Musicals Cabaret artist Steve Ross and friends perform unsung treasures from the Library’s musical theater collection.

October 31 at 6 p.m. Songbook @ LPA: Broadway’s Future A concert of new music by Broadway composers and lyricists sung by Broadway vocalists. Presented by Arts and Artists at St. Paul, directed by John Znidarsic. November 3 at 6:30 p.m. Greece in Silent Cinema: A Slave’s Love (1907) and Damon and Pythias (1914) Rob Stone, Moving Image Curator at the Library of Congress, introduces two silent films from the collection of the Library of Congress that reveal the allure Ancient Greece held for early-20th-century filmmakers. Andrew Simpson, Professor of Music at the Catholic University of America, plays new piano scores. Sponsored by the Cathedral School. November 5 at 2:30 p.m. A Songwriting Community Comes Uptown A cross section of songwriters who came together around New York’s open mic scene share their music at LPA. November 6 at 2:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA Pianist and cabaret artist William Lewis performs a variety of music, from Beethoven to Billy Joel.

November 7 at 6 p.m. League of Professional Theatre Women Conversation November 13 at 1:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA The New York Opera Forum presents a concert version of Verdi’s Il Trovatore. November 17 at 6 p.m. Amazing and Beyond: Creativity and Innovation in Magic Accomplished conjurors explore the creative aspect of the world of illusion and demonstrate relevant effects. Materials from the Library’s noteworthy collection of magic materials will also be on view. November 19 at 2:30 p.m. Beowulf Consort This five-member ensemble performs chamber music featuring viola, harp, cello, piano, and mezzo-soprano. November 20 at 2:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA Pianist Alexander A. Wu puts a fresh spin on the classics with his Bach to the Future program, which features pieces by Bach, Bernstein, Brubeck, Chopin, Debussy, Ellington, Gershwin, Gottschalk, Liszt, Morton, Prokofiev, and more. November 26 at 2:30 p.m. The Dubin/Uchida Duo Cellist Louise Dubin and pianist Reiko Uchida explore the diversity of cello music written by composers who were part of the burgeoning Romantic music scene in early 19th-century Paris, including Mendelssohn, Chopin, and Franchomme; the program also includes the premiere of Divertissement by Roger Stubblefield, written for Dubin.

Illustration: © 2011 Ben Katchor.

Up from the Stacks New musical theater from Ben Katchor and Mark Mulcahy Set in The New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street and in the environs of Times Square, circa 1970, Up from the Stacks is the story of Lincoln Cabinée, a college student working part-time as a page, retrieving books for readers from the stacks. His routine evening job inadvertently thrusts young Cabinée into the treacherous crossroads of scholarly obsession and the businesses of amusement and vice that then flourished in the 42nd Street area. The intellectual life of the city and the happiness of a young man hang in the balance. October 3 at 6 p.m. Library for the Performing Arts October 6 at 8:30 p.m. Target Free Thursdays at the David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center (on Broadway between 62nd and 63rd streets) This piece was co-commissioned by the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at The New York Public Library and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts for Target Free Thursdays at the David Rubenstein Atrium.

23 : The New York Public Library NOW

Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center

Free Programs


Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center November 27 at 2:30 p.m. Pianist Benjamin Bradham Works by Beethoven, Brahms, Ravel, Liszt, and Rachmaninoff.

Free Programs

SILENT CLOWNS FILM SERIES Saturdays at 2:30 p.m. Harold Lloyd gets a fright. See the comic genius in Haunted Spooks on October 8. Photo courtesy of Steve Massa.

December 3 at 2:30 p.m. Gerald Kagan, cello, and Susan Kagan, piano Works by Beethoven and James Cohn.

24 : The New York Public Library NOW

www.nypl.org

515 Malcolm X Boulevard

40 Lincoln Center Plaza

November 28 at 6 p.m. Songbook @ LPA: Broadway’s Future A concert of new music by Broadway composers and lyricists sung by Broadway vocalists. Presented by Arts and Artists at St. Paul, directed by John Znidarsic.

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

December 4 at 1:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA The New York Opera Forum stages a concert version of Puccini’s La Boheme.

This ongoing series presents silent film comedies with live piano accompaniment by Ben Model; the series is programmed by Ben Model, Bruce Lawton, and Steve Massa.

December 11 at 2:30 p.m. (also December 12 at 6 p.m.) Holiday Songbook @ LPA A concert of new holiday music by Broadway composers and lyricists sung by Broadway vocalists. Presented by Arts and Artists at St. Paul, directed by John Znidarsic.

October 8 Spooks on the Second Reel: Scary Comedies Harold Lloyd in Haunted Spooks (1920) Buster Keaton in The Haunted House (1921) Our Gang in Shootin’ Injuns (1925) Lupino Lane in Who’s Afraid? (1927) Ko-Ko’s Earth Control (1928)

December 17 at 2:30 p.m. A Concert of Seasonal Airs Andrew Bolotowsky, flute; Paula Rand, Baroque bassoon; Greg Bynum, recorder; David Bakamjian, cello; Rebecca Pechefsky, Baroque harpsichord; and Mary Hurlbut, soprano, perform works from the Baroque period.

November 12 The Loopy Legacy of Lupino Lane (and his brother Wallace) Maid in Morocco (1925) Hello Sailor (1927) Roaming Romeo (1928) Be My King (1928) Good Night Nurse (1929)

December 18 at 2:30 p.m. On a Sunday Afternoon @ LPA: Deck the Halls A concert of traditional holiday music presented by Harwood Management Vocal Artists.

December 10 The Merry Gentlemen: Mr. Laurel & Mr. Hardy Leave ’Em Laughing (1928) Two Tars (1928) Wrong Again (1929) Big Business (1929)

For information on joining the Schomburg Society and supporting the Center’s work, call 212.491.2252. For program information, call 212.491.2229.

September 19 at 5 p.m. Educators’ Open House Take tours of Malcolm X: A Search for Truth and Romare Bearden: The Soul of Blackness/A Centennial Tribute and learn more about incorporating the Schomburg Center’s vast collections into classroom curriculum. October 18 at 5 p.m. Teaching Malcolm X: Educators’ Workshop In conjunction with the exhibition Malcolm X: A Search for Truth, educators are invited to learn how to prepare their classes for visiting the exhibit and gain new strategies for teaching about him with curricular connections to literacy, history, social studies, politics, and more.

October 25 at 6 p.m. Book Talk: Black Gotham Carla L. Peterson, professor of English at the University of Maryland at College Park, discusses her new book, Black Gotham: A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth-Century New York City, which explores the lives of AfricanAmerican elites in New York City in the 19th century. A book signing will follow the talk. November 8 at 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Chancellor’s Day Teachers’ Seminar: The Art of the Harlem Renaissance Spend the day with Tammi Lawson, the Schomburg’s Arts and Artifacts Librarian, and invited guests for a special presentation.

November 9 at 7 p.m. Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert Series: Maurice Brown Effect Band leader and trumpet virtuoso Brown and his ensemble perform music from their new album, The Cycle of Love. Sponsored by Target. Reservations recommended; call 212.491.2040. November 22 at 6 p.m. Researching Family History @ the Schomburg Author Carla L. Peterson, who delved into the Center’s archives for her book Black Gotham, conducts a workshop about researching family history using the Schomburg’s collections. November 19 at 1 p.m. Malcolm X: Teen Talk Learn about Malcolm X in this youth-led dialogue about his life and work and the meaning of his message today. Teens are encouraged to read The Autobiography of Malcolm X in advance. December 21 at 10:30 a.m. Kujichagulia: A Kwanzaa Celebration for School Groups Celebrate Kwanzaa at the Schomburg and learn about Kujichagulia, the principle of self-determination. Register at schomburged@nypl.org or call 212.491.2234. For more information about programs for educators, contact schomburged@nypl.org or call 212.491.2234.

Trumpet player and composer Maurice Brown performs on November 9.

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The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts


Free Programs

Neighborhood Libraries

310 East Kingsbridge Road (at Briggs Avenue) Selected Public Programs These programs are presented in the Auditorium, located on the Concourse Level. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Wheelchair accessible. For more information, call 718.579.4244.

Selected Public Programs This fall, NYPL expands its financial literacy offerings to libraries throughout the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island with a series of programs that provide information about savings, loans, college costs, and more.

Slavic Soul Party’s music raises the roof on December 10. Photo: Mel O./Monkey Dart Studio.

September 6 at 10 a.m. Bank on It Learn about basic banking services and how to build a positive relationship with a financial institution. September 10 at 2:30 p.m. Classics for a Late Summer Afternoon The Bronx Symphony String Quartet performs works by Mendelssohn and Tchaikovsky.

26 : The New York Public Library NOW

September 13 at 10 a.m. Interest: The Key to Finance Get information about interest and the way it works in the context of avoiding the pitfalls of debt and credit cards; make sense of investments, mortgages, and retirement. September 21 at 6 p.m. History of the Latino in the Bronx Angel Hernandez of the Bronx Historical Society talks about the borough’s role as home to immigrants from Latin America, from the first major arrival of Puerto Ricans in the 1940s to the present day, and examines the Latino experience in the Bronx.

September 24 at 10 a.m. Hispanic Family History Fair The Hispanic Genealogical Society of New York presents workshops on Hispanic genealogy, including such topics as getting started; online sources and databases; and Puerto Rican and Dominican roots. September 24 at 2:30 p.m. An Afternoon of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican Folkloric Music Cuatrisimo, led by Jose Obando, performs Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican folkloric music, including salsa and merengue.  October 1 at 2:30 p.m. Doo Wop Concert by the New York Exceptions The band performs songs from the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s. October 11 at 10 a.m. Investment Choices Find out how to focus on investment goals, recognize the potential risks and rewards of various investments, learn about different asset types, and match individual goals to investment choices.

November 19 at 2:30 p.m. Celia Cruz High School Choir in Concert December 10 at 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert Series: Slavic Soul Party Fiery brass, throbbing grooves, accordion wizardry, and virtuoso jazz chops make Slavic Soul Party the city’s most exciting brass band for Balkan soul and gypsy funk. The group pumps a Balkan brass sound through the filter of the diverse musical life in New York’s outer boroughs. Sponsored by Target. December 13 at 10 a.m. Charge It Right Learn how to use a credit card responsibly and what to do when a credit card is lost or stolen. December 17 at 2:30 p.m. Fourth Annual Holiday String Concert Joe Sherman conducts members of the Bronx Symphony Orchestra with friends and students, plus vocalist Glendalys Sosa, in a performance of seasonal music.

Additional classes at these and other locations cover such topics as the history of paper money, counterfeiting, currency around the world, and business smarts for creative people. For details, visit www. nypl.org/moneymatters.

Financial-Aid Awareness Certified financial planner Alan Katz provides an overview of the types of financial aid and loans available to students and their families for higher education. October 26 at 3 p.m. Great Kills • 56 Giffords Lane Staten Island • 718-984-6670

December 10 at 2 p.m. Port Richmond • 75 Bennett Street Staten Island • 718-442-0158

Investment Choices: What Is Right for Me Certified financial planner John Vento will help investors focus on their goals, recognize the potential risks and rewards of different investments, and match individual goals to investment choices. September 27 at 5:30 p.m. Kips Bay • 446 Third Avenue Manhattan • 212-683-2520

November 12 at 3 p.m.

www.nypl.org

Free Programs It’s a Long Month: Living on a Fixed Income Jay Stevens offers tips on how to “stretch” your income by setting priorities, establishing a budget, planning, and saving. September 6 at 6:30 p.m. Seward Park • 192 East Broadway Manhattan • 212-477-6770

October 6 at 11:30 a.m. George Bruce • 518 West 125th Street Manhattan • 212-662-9727

October 13 at 11:30 a.m. Mott Haven • 321 East 140th Street Bronx • 718-665-4878

A Practical Guide to Buying a Co-Op, Condo, or House Real estate professional Carmen Lee Shue discusses the ins and outs of buying and selling houses, cooperatives, and condos. September 8 at 5:45 p.m. Bloomingdale • 150 West 100th Street Manhattan • 212-222-8030

November 8 at 6:30 p.m. Seward Park • 192 East Broadway Manhattan • 212-477-6770

November 10 at 11:30 a.m. George Bruce • 518 West 125th Street Manhattan • 212-662-9727

December 1 at 11:30 a.m.

115th Street •203 West 115th Street

Mott Haven • 321 East 140th Street Bronx • 718-665-4878

Manhattan • 212-666-9393

December 6 at 10 a.m.

November 17 at 6 p.m.

Bronx Library Center 310 East Kingsbridge Road Bronx • 718-579-4244

Hudson Park • 66 Leroy Street Manhattan • 212-243-6876

Raising Financially Responsible Children Neale Godfrey leads a discussion about the importance of raising financially responsible children and shares tips on ways to teach children about money. September 17 at 2 p.m. Throg’s Neck 3025 Cross Bronx Expressway Extension Bronx • 718-792-2612

October 19 at 1 p.m. Kips Bay • 446 Third Avenue Manhattan • 212-683-2520

November 19 at 5:30 p.m. Francis Martin • 2150 University Avenue Bronx • 718-295-5287

December 13 at 6:30 p.m. Seward Park • 192 East Broadway Manhattan • 212-477-6770

Understanding Your Social Security Benefits Bernard L. Rosen provides a general overview of Social Security and how to get the most out of what you have put in. October 6 at 11:30 a.m. Mott Haven • 321 East 140th Street Bronx • 718-665-4878 The New York Public Library’s Money Matters series is made possible thanks to the generous support of The McGraw-Hill Companies’ Financial Literacy Now: New York campaign.

NYPL Introduces a New, Easy-to-Use Catalog Finding new Library books and materials online is about to get a lot easier—and will more closely resemble a trip to the Library. Using the new online catalog, produced by the Toronto-based company BiblioCommons, NYPL patrons will be able to “browse” the Library’s shelves, find out what staff members or other patrons think about a particular book or DVD, create personal reading lists, and share their lists with other patrons. The BiblioCommons catalog offers a number of features popular with such social-networking

sites as FaceBook and Twitter that allow users to “follow” like-minded patrons and get updates on their recommendations and reviews. Moreover, BiblioCommons features improved, powerful search tools to help patrons discover new materials and related items; it also helps users keep track of checked out items, due dates, fines, and holds more easily. BiblioCommons is also available as mobile apps for iPhone and Android smartphones as well as mobile web access for all web-enabled mobile devices. For more details, go to www.nypl.org/ mobile-help.

27 : The New York Public Library NOW

Bronx Library Center


General Information for LIVE and Cullman Center programs: Sign up for e-mail updates and more information about LIVE at www.nypl.org/live or call 212.930.0855. LIVE tickets are available at www. showclix.com or 888.71.TICKETS (888.718.4253): $25 general public; $15 Library donors, seniors, and students with valid ID.

LIVE from the NYPL is made possible with generous support from Celeste Bartos, Mahnaz Ispahani Bartos and Adam Bartos, and the Margaret and Herman Sokol Public Education Endowment Fund.

LIVE from the NYPL

All events take place in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building* STAY TUNED for more LIVE events. WWW.NYPL.ORG/LIVE

Tuesday, September 20 Shea Hembrey Friday, September 23 Stacy Schiff Copresented with the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers This event takes place in the South Court Auditorium. Monday, September 26 Ariel Dorfman Friday, September 30 Robert Wilson Monday, October 3 Edmund de Waal

Stacy Schiff

Tom Brokaw

Joan Didion

Photo: Elaine Seibert.

Photo: NBC Universal.

Photo: Brigitte Lacombe.

Tuesday, October 11 John Lithgow Copresented with the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers

Tuesday, November 8 Umberto Eco

Monday, November 21 Joan Didion

Thursday, November 10 Gilberto Gil

Wednesday, October 12 Harry Belafonte

Wednesday, November 30 Mary Beard

Monday, November 14 Diane Keaton This event takes place in the Edna Barnes Salomon Room.

THE ANNUAL ROBERT B.

Tuesday, November 1 Tom Brokaw

*Unless otherwise noted, events take place at 7 p.m. in the Celeste Bartos Forum

SILVERS LECTURE

Tuesday, December 6 Josh Ritter, Wesley Stace, and Friends

For more information www.nypl.org/conversations For reservations cswevents@nypl.org All events, except for programs cosponsored with LIVE from the NYPL, are free, but you must reserve seats (no more than four tickets per event per person).

The Cullman Center is made possible by a generous endowment from Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman in honor of Brooke Russell Astor, with major support provided by Mrs. John L. Weinberg, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Estate of Charles J. Liebman, John and Constance Birkelund, The Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, and additional gifts from The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, Mel and Lois Tukman, Helen and Roger Alcaly, The Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation, The Rona Jaffe Foundation, William W. Karatz, Mary Ellen von der Heyden, Merilee and Roy Bostock, Lybess Sweezy and Ken Miller, and Cullman Center Fellows.

Conversations from the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers

All events take place in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building*

Tuesday, October 4 and Wednesday, October 5 Up from the Stacks New musical theater from Ben Katchor and Mark Mulcahy; for a description, see page 23. Up from the Stacks was cocommissioned by the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at The New York Public Library and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts for Target Free Thursdays at the David Rubenstein Atrium. UP FROM THE STACKS WILL ALSO BE PRESENTED AT OTHER LOCATIONS; FOR DETAILS, SEE PAGE 23.

Mark Mulcahy and Ben Katchor

Jean Strouse

Roy Blount, Jr. Photo: Joan Griswold.

Tuesday, October 18 From Larchmont to Lahore Deborah Baker and Elizabeth Rubin

Wednesday, November 16 Alphabetter Juice Roy Blount, Jr., and James Shapiro

Wednesday, November 2 After Alexander James Romm and Daniel Mendelsohn This event takes place in the Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III Trustees Room

Wednesday, December 7 The James Family Louis Menand and Jean Strouse

*Unless otherwise noted, events take place at 7 p.m. in the South Court Auditorium

Thursday, December 15 Pulphead John Jeremiah Sullivan and Wells Tower

NOW  

Free programs, classes, and exhibitions

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