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A Proud History Building on Our Strengths New York Medical College 2008–2009 Annual Report

A Clear Focus


Saverio S. Bentivegna, M.D. ’50 Professor of Surgery and Senior Associate Dean


Vigorous and outspoken, with a prodigious memory and a penchant for getting things done, Dr. Bentivegna’s deep devotion to New York Medical College is evident in a 50-year legacy he is still crafting. He is a familiar figure around campus, often wearing a white coat and always dapper. Since his first faculty appointment as assistant professor of surgery, which he received in 1959 following his discharge from the U.S. Army Medical Corps, Saverio (Sal) Bentivegna, M.D. ’50, has taught at a half-dozen College-affiliated hospitals, presided over the Alumni Association, completed a stint as head of Continuing Medical Education, and has shepherded the Fifth Pathway Program, recently rechristened the Pre-Internship Program, since its inception in 1974. As the College’s longest-serving full-time faculty member, Dr. Bentivegna can call up memories that inspire awe. He fondly remembers his days as a resident at Metropolitan Hospital when it was located on Welfare Island: “We lived at the hospital, and everything was provided—room and board, uniforms, stethoscopes. Of course, we had no money, so we couldn’t go anywhere,” he recalls, shedding light on the terms “residents” and “house staff.” The Bentivegna family is fairly brimming with New York Medical College graduates, including Sal’s son Peter (Class of ’85), his cousin Robert (Class of ’91), and two second cousins. In 2006, he set up the Bentivegna Family Award and Scholarship, given annually to a graduating student who enters the field of surgery with honors. “New York Medical College is a diamond, and its rays are the students it sends out all over the United States,” he said at that time. “I’ve established this scholarship in memory of my parents to ensure that those rays continue to shine.”

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A brilliant researcher who has devoted virtually her entire career to probing the mysteries of inflammation, Dr. Schwartzman has added immeasurably to the lives of her students and the reputation of her department—and that of New York Medical College. Young Michal Schwartzman was a graduate student at Tel Aviv University, a “star in the biochemistry lab,” according to John C. McGiff, M.D., chairman of the Department of Pharmacology, who recruited her in 1981 on a prestigious Fogarty fellowship from the NIH. Since then, Dr. Schwartzman has won scores of accolades as one of her department’s most prolific investigators. She is a member of the team that comprises a longstanding NIH Program Project Grant worth more than $2.1 million annually. In 2001, she received the Dean’s Distinguished Research Award for her pioneering work in inflammatory conditions of the eye, for which she had already received three patents. Now approaching her third decade as a member of the medical school and basic sciences faculty, she considers what is most important. “In this small community of researchers, I find the atmosphere is very supportive and collegial,” she says. “You must have that kind of support, or else you cannot grow.” Hardly a year goes by that doesn’t find her flying overseas to present a paper at an international conference, serving on editorial boards of peer-reviewed journals, or pulling an all-nighter in the laboratory when a major grant deadline looms. But she always finds time to mentor graduate students and fellows—more than two dozen over the years—whom she calls “My most important achievement. Most of them have gone on to prominent positions in government, academia and industry. I’m very proud of them and what they have become.”

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Michal L. Schwartzman, Ph.D. Professor and Graduate Program Co-Director, Department of Pharmacology

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Ariadne Avellino, M.P.H. ’09, MS-IV Class of 2010

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Fourth-year medical student Ariadne Avellino knows what matters most in medical school: people. “You gain knowledge and skills from books, but it’s the people who teach you. Skills alone don’t make you a physician. People do.” To paraphrase an old saying, if you want something done fast and right, ask Ari Avellino. Throughout her medical school years, this vivacious highflyer has been a top student, held office in numerous student groups, participated in student government, both on campus and at the national level, and is a vocal advocate for causes ranging from domestic violence awareness to bringing back the Student Follies. Yet she never takes for granted those who taught her all she knows, and she was instrumental in nominating a beloved faculty member for a national award for humanism in medicine, a cause very close to her heart. Ari will graduate in December with her M.D., having collected her M.P.H. last May—and her life is about to get even busier. During medical school she took a half-year’s maternity leave to give birth to son John, now a toddler, and is expecting her second child in late fall—feats she attributes to her “very supportive family.” Ahead is a residency in emergency medicine, a lifelong dream that propelled her to medical school after serving a stint as an EMT. Why did she choose New York Medical College? She cites the diversity of clinical rotations that are a key component of the College’s network of 20-plus academic affiliates. “Doing a rotation in a major public hospital will give you completely different experiences than doing one in a suburban community hospital,” she says. “I really liked being able to do it all.”

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A M e s s a g e f r om THE L e a d e r s h i p

It doesn’t seem possible that an entire year has passed since the autumn of 2008, when the nation found itself in the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Banks and major corporations collapsed or went bankrupt, credit markets came to a standstill, and millions of jobs were lost. Colleges and universities felt the full force of the cataclysm, and the value of endowments at some of the nation’s most prestigious and wealthy institutions plunged as much as 40 percent. The outlook seemed grim as fundraising campaigns were postponed, new construction was scrapped, and budgets were slashed.

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Yet in the face of such dire circumstances, new hope emerged and the nation began to rally. At New York Medical College, the situation, though serious, seemed to inspire a greater determination among individuals and departments to forge ahead, facing adversity with strength: the collected wisdom of our alumni and our administrative leaders; the energetic forward direction set by our gifted faculty and superb students; and the creativity and inspiration felt by the entire community as we looked at our present situation in the context of our history, and the milestone we are about to reach. That milestone is our Sesqui­centennial—the celebration of a century and a half since New York Medical College first opened its doors in the fall of 1860. Although early plans for the celebration to come were necessarily modest as we grappled with the more immediate concerns of how to survive the seismic shifts of the economy, just contemplating the proud history of this institution served to energize many and restore faith in our most cherished principles. The slogan that was chosen for the College’s sesquicentennial, “Building on the Excellence of Our Past,” seemed to echo that sentiment and remind us of why we are here.

Karl P. Adler, M.D. President and CEO

Our Annual Report, “Building on Our Strengths,” takes a look at three remarkable individuals whose gifts, energy, and dedication to their own dreams, and to the mission of New York Medical College, are an inspiration to us all. Their stories, which reflect on their experiences as part of this community, offer insight into their compelling reasons for why the College is, and always will remain, vitally important to them. And in the reports that follow, you will see more evidence of our proud history, our clear focus and our brilliant future.

Ronald F. Poe

Chairman, Board of Trustees

Ralph A. O’Connell, M.D.

Provost and Dean, School of Medicine

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Sc h ool of M e d i c i n e In 2008–2009, the School of Medicine introduced an innovative program designed for graduating medical students called “Transition to Residency.” The four-day pilot elective course puts the College at the forefront of a national effort to impart to fourth-year medical students the practical information and skills that were once considered part of residency training. The trend reflects a high priority of the Institute of Medicine to reduce the number of medical errors in hospital practice. The school added new teaching sites at Phelps Memorial Hospital Center in Tarrytown, N.Y., and Norwalk Hospital in Norwalk, Conn. When Montefiore Medical Center acquired Our Lady of Mercy Medical Center, the former university hospital affiliate, the College adapted its affiliation to reflect the new entity, now known as the North Division of Montefiore Medical Center. In the spring, the College opened the Translational Center for Pulmonary Hypertension, which combines the expertise of a consortium of researchers, diagnosticians and clinicians from the College and Westchester Medical Center (WMC). The goals of the new center are to raise public and physician awareness of the disease as well as the need for multidisciplinary treatment teams, and to boost research funding.

The medical school welcomed a new chairman of the Department of Radiology, Zvi Lefkovitz, M.D., who joined the faculty from Mount Sinai Medical Center. The College also elevated two distinguished retirees to emeritus status, George Bousvaros, M.D., professor emeritus of medicine, and Martin Horowitz, M.D., professor emeritus of biochemistry and molecular biology. In January, Wenhui Wang, M.D., professor of pharmacology, was honored with the 2008 Dean’s Research Award for his work with ion channels and the role they play in the kidney in causing hypertension. Zahir Basraid and Benitas Liao, two fourth-year medical students, were awarded prestigious Ferdinand C. Valentine Grants in Urology from the New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM), one of only four such grants given last year. The students spent the summer researching prostate cancer and presented their work at the NYAM Medical Student Research Forum in September. Finally, 469 members of the faculty in all three schools published a total of 1,018 books, chapters, journal articles, editorials, reviews, or letters in scholarly literature during the preceding academic year. The achievement was celebrated at the annual Author Recognition Sherry, sponsored by the Health Sciences Library.

Graduate Medical Education Stats

Admissions Stats

Number of affiliated hospitals and medical centers................ 23

Number of applications.................................................... > 8,500 Acceptance rate....................................................... 8 out of 100 Number of matriculants.......................................................... 187 Percent women........................................................................ 51 Average age............................................................................. 24 Number of states represented................................................. 29 Number of colleges and universities represented................. 103 Average GPA........................................................................... 3.6 Average MCAT......................................................................... 31

Number of sponsored Graduate Medical Education programs................................................................. 83 Number of specialties represented.......................................... 21 Number of subspecialties represented.................................... 24 Number of GME program graduates in 2008–2009.................. 428 residents/104 interns

S C H O O L O F HEA L TH S C IEN C ES AND PRA C TI C E Newly reorganized and renamed in the spring of 2009, the School of Health Sciences and Practice (SHSP) engaged a broader mission, employing its strengths as an institution that encompasses three accredited academic programs—physical therapy, public health, and speech-language pathology—and a new Institute of Public Health (IPH). The IPH incorporates three centers of excellence—the Center on Disability and Health, Center for Disaster Medicine, and the Center on Medical Outcomes Research—as well as the Partnership for a Healthy Population. During 2008–2009, the IPH provided research and community outreach opportunities to students and faculty, and made progress toward fulfilling the university’s commitment to collaborate with clinical investigators and partners in the community, local health departments and communitybased organizations.

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Twelve doctoral students inaugurated the school’s Dr.P.H. program in health policy and management, which was approved last year by the New York State Department of Education. The school launched a fully on-line M.P.H. degree course of study in health policy and management, and a graduate certificate program in health education. The latter confers eligibility to take the national Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam offered by the National Com­ mission for Health Education Credentialing. The school provided research and grant application support to local health departments and to clinical departments in the School of Medicine. Research activity grew considerably in the areas of disaster preparedness, environmental toxicology, regional health assessment, medical outcomes assessment and health economics.


GRAD U ATE S C H O O L O F B ASI C M EDI C A L S C IEN C ES The pinnacle achievement of the Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences during academic year 2008–2009 was the full-scale launch and extraordinary success of the Accelerated Master’s Program (AMP). Designed for academically sound students who need an extra boost to gain admission to medical school or other rigorous biomedical programs, the aptly abbreviated AMP introduces them to the kind of heavy course load typically undertaken by medical school first-years. AMP students also receive one-to-one counseling on choosing the right medical school, constructing a strong application, and presenting themselves well during admissions interviews. In March, the Graduate Student Association (GSA) hosted the 21st Annual Graduate Student Research Forum, which featured 38 research presentations by master’s and doctoral students. Faculty judges awarded prizes in categories that recognized winning entries in both oral and poster formats at novice and experienced levels. Rita Kirk, Ph.D. ’02, was invited to return as the Alumna Master of Ceremonies. The keynote speaker was

Kathleen W. Scotto, Ph.D., an internationally recognized researcher who explores regulation of drug-resistant genes that impact the sensitivity of cancer cells to therapeutic agents. Michael S. Wolin, Ph.D., received the GSA’s Honored Faculty Award. Two students received special recognition during 2008–2009. Linnea Vose, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, received a Young Investigator’s Award from the Children’s Tumor Foundation to study the effects of certain drugs on learning disabilities in children born with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Man Ying Wong, a Master’s student in the Department of Pharmacology, was one of 15 students nationwide who were chosen for an elite National Space Biomedical Research Institute internship at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, last year. Other GSBMS activities throughout the year included a series of Ph.D. colloquia, hour-long talks by senior graduate students about their ongoing dissertation research, and student research forums presented by individual departments.

Admissions and Graduation Stats

AMP Stats

Number of applications......................................................... 380*

Pilot year..................................................................... 2007–2008

Number of matriculating new Master’s students.................... 74*

Number of students in pilot year................................................ 1

Total number of matriculated Master’s students................... 147*

Number of students in 2008–2009.......................................... 19

Number of M.D./Ph.D. students who began the Ph.D. phase of their studies...................................................... 6*

Number of AMP graduates who applied to medical school..................................................................... 18

Number of Ph.D. degrees awarded......................................... 10

Number of AMP students who were admitted to medical school..................................................................... 15

Number of M.S. degrees awarded.......................................... 29 *A new record!

The school collaborated with the New York State Bar Association to provide a “Mini-M.P.H.” course for attorneys. The program featured faculty in the Department of Health Policy and Management and nationally recognized experts in health administration and law. Another collaboration, with physicians at the Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center, resulted in the opening of a new Children’s Environmental Health Center, whose aim is to treat, educate and research the effects of environmental pollutants and toxicants on young children. Throughout the year, the school conducted a series of grand rounds under the rubric “Milestones in Public Health.” Faculty members addressed timely and relevant issues in public health. Among the topics were emergency preparedness in a post-9/11 world, what to expect from the new health care legislation, and health literacy, a new approach to health communication.

Number who chose NYMC and are enrolled in the Class of 2013............................................................................. 7

ADMISSIONS AND GRADUATION STATS Number of applications in 2008–2009.................................. 720 Number of degrees awarded in Public Health..................................................................... 104 Physical Therapy................................................................. 26 Speech-Language Pathology............................................. 18 Total degrees conferred in May 2009.................................... 148 Number of students enrolled in Public Health...................................... 348 (Fall) 362 (Spring) Physical Therapy*................................................................ 75 Speech-Language Pathology*............................................ 40 *Full-year program 9


U n i v e r s i t y D e v e lo p m e n t

Last year, the College received more than $4.6 million in private gifts and grants from more than 2,000 individuals and groups, including trustees, alumni, corporations, foundations, community leaders, faculty, staff, parents and friends. The generosity of these forward-thinking donors ensures the university’s continuing leadership in the education of skilled and compassionate physicians, scientists, and healthcare professionals well into the future. FUNDS RAISED IN 2008–2009 Unrestricted.................................................... $3,031,676 Annual Giving............................................... $  641,694 Founder’s Dinner.......................................... $  512,565 Bequests....................................................... $1,877,417 Restricted........................................................ $1,040,723 Scholarships................................................... $  357,446 Research......................................................... $  156,375 Endowment..................................................... $   24,742 Total

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$4,610,962

Recognizing Generosity There is a special pride that accompanies the acknowledgment of our donors, whose philanthropy links them with the proud history and achievements of New York Medical College. On the next page we offer tribute to some of our most generous benefactors who have demonstrated their commitment through their generosity. Their names comprise a partial listing of the many donors who gave last year in support of the College’s mission. A complete listing of organizations and individuals who made contributions during FY 2008–2009 appears in the latest Donor Report, a separate publication prepared and issued by the Office of Development and Alumni Relations.


BRYANT SOCIETY ($25,000 & Above) $1,000,000 and Above Estate of Dale Hylton, M.D. ’53 $500,000 to $999,999 Sarah Upham Trust $250,000 to $499,999 University Orthopaedics, P.C. David E. Asprinio, M.D. John A. Galeno, M.D. Howard J. Luks, M.D. ’91, M.S. ’91 Richard M. Magill, Jr., M.D. Iris E. Schlesinger, M.D. William J. Walsh, Jr., M.D. ’64 $100,000 to $249,999 Adriel and Evelyn H. Harris Trust Benjamin H. Homan, Jr. Charitable Trust $50,000 to $99,999 Bernard and Dorothy Layton Foundation Naurex, Inc. $25,000 to $49,999 The Jack and Mimi Amsterdam Foundation ENT Faculty Practice, LLP The Sidney E. Frank Foundation Camille Mallouh, M.D. Mrs. Miriam K. Moran Mark Novitch, M.D. ’58 Maureen and Joe Roxe, The Roxe Foundation The Louis and Rachel Rudin Foundation, Inc. Carl J. Saphier, M.D. Henry I. Saphier, M.D. ’61 Richard A. Stram, M.D. ’78 Robert A. Welke Cancer Research Foundation, Inc. 1860 SOCIETY ($10,000 TO $24,999) Anonymous Karl P. Adler, M.D. Alumni Association of New York Medical College, Inc. David E. Asprinio, M.D. Bank of America Saverio S. Bentivegna, M.D. ’50, F.A.C.S. Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation, Inc. Cappelli Enterprises, Inc. Mr. John K. Castle

Community Housing Management Corporation Estate of Sidney L. Cramer, M.D. ’41 Mr. and Mrs. Gerald W. Cunningham Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Entergy Emalie and John Feerick Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Hales Kelley Drye & Warren LLP Paige V. Kreegel, M.D. ’82 The Mack Goldner Memorial Foundation/Philip A. Marraccini, M.D. ’50, President Mutual of America Dr. and Mrs. Ralph A. O’Connell Mr. Jonathan O’Herron Mr. and Mrs. Eugene C. Rainis Roche Laboratories, Inc. Theresa A. Smith, M.D. ’56 This Close for Cancer Research, Inc. The Westchester Community Foundation Renal Research Fund Westchester Medical Center PRESIDENT’S SOCIETY ($2,500 TO $9,999) $5,000 to $9,999 Anand’s Cancer Survival Mission Archdiocese of New York Patricia A. Barry, M.D. ’83 and John M. Cosgrove, M.D. ’83, F.A.C.S. Bayer Schering Pharma AG Bleakley Platt & Schmidt, LLP Mr. and Mrs. James M. Butler Calvary Fund, Inc. Catholic Health Care System Children’s & Women’s Physicians of Westchester, LLP Mr. George K. Cooney Michael B. Corbett, M.D. ’61 Danbury Hospital Department of Pediatrics Dermatology & Medical Research Associates, P.C. Empire BlueCross BlueShield Fallon Medica LLC Mr. Timothy C. Forbes Nancy J. Freeman, M.D. ’81 William H. Frishman, M.D. Mrs. Joann Giamelli Good Samaritan Hospital, Suffern Greenwich Hospital Jean F. Jones, M.D. ’51 Mr. and Mrs. Joe G. Kulangara Jay Y. Lee, M.D. ’86 Mrs. Diane Levere

Jocelyn A. Luongo, M.D. ’06 Mr. John H. McAteer Kathryn E. McGoldrick, M.D. and Jonathan Mardirossian, M.D. Montefiore Medical Center Chitti R. Moorthy, M.D. Neurological and Spine Surgery Associates, P.C. Neurology Associates of Westchester, PLLC The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Leonard J. Newman, M.D. ’70 and Randi Newman Phelps Memorial Hospital Center Raymond M. Planell, Esq. Mr. and Mrs. Ronald F. Poe PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Saint Vincent Catholic Medical Centers John A. Savino, M.D. Dr. Lester J. Schultz Memorial Fund The William and Sylvia Silberstein Foundation Sound Shore Medical Center of Westchester John R. Stabile, M.D. ’76 Foster H. Taft Jr., M.D. ’57 Lucille P. Taverna-Giardina, M.D. ’71 Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center Willis of New York, Inc. $2,500 to $4,999 Anonymous Robert M. Ahrens Jr., M.D. ’78 Michael S. Alexander, M.D. ’78 Robert W. Amler, M.D. and Sherlita Amler, M.D. Gladys M. Ayala, M.D. Doris Bate, M.D. ’50 Francis L. Belloni, Ph.D. Augusta H. Belmonte, M.D. Marcelle Bernard, M.D. ’44 Michael Campion, M.D. ’82 CardioMedical Associates, LTD. Centocor, Inc. Harry M. Cohen, M.D. ’84 Waldemar A. Comas, Esq. DelBello Donnellan Weingarten Wise & Wiederkehr, LLP Lawrence J. DeLorenzo, M.D. ’76 Dept. of Surgery WMC Association, Inc. Joseph F. Dursi, M.D. ’59 Joseph T. English, M.D. Michael and Judy Gewitz Dr. Ronald J. Glatzer, M.D. ’68 The Gerald and Barbara Glickstein Foundation

Elaine M. Grammer-Pacicco, M.D. ’85 and Thomas J. Pacicco, M.D. ’85 Cono M. Grasso, M.D. ’74 Martha S. Grayson, M.D. Greenwich Medical Anesthesia Jane N. Haher, M.D. ’67 Thomas R. Haher, M.D. ’75 Naomi R. Ham, M.D. ’84, and Elmer C. Agustin, M.D. James H. Heym, Ph.D. Hi-Link Computer Corporation Peter Hoffmann, M.D. ’83 Mr. and Mrs. Hau N. Huynh Mario A. Inchiosa Jr., Ph.D. Minas C. Joannides III, M.D. Kenneth L. Kaye, M.D. ’78 John J. Kearney, M.D. ’63 Orest J. Kozicky, M.D. ’81 Mrs. Julie A. Kubaska Mr. Edward V. Lahey, Jr. George A. Levine, M.D. ’65 Heather Lurie-Perla, M.D., and Elliott N. Perla, M.D. ’74 George W. Lutz, M.D. ’61 George D. Lyons, M.D. ’92 William W. MacLaughlin, M.D. ’81 Edmund D. Marinucci, M.D. ’44 Neal Mittman, M.D. ’77 MRA Physicians George Neuman, M.D. Dr. and Mrs. Bruce W. Peek ’82 Pharmacia Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Piccolo Jr. John T. Repke, M.D. ’78 Mr. and Mrs. Gerard D. Robilotti Richard E. Rohr, M.D. ’80 Daniel M. Rose, M.D. Audrey and Samuel H. Rubin, M.D. Norman S. Sas, M.D. ’74 Sidney A. Sass Associates, Inc. Justin Scheer, M.D. ’50 Mrs. Mary Ann Phipps Silbermann Richard K. Stone, M.D. ’68 The Surgical Society of New York Medical College Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. University Imaging and Medical Associates, P.C. Verizon Foundation Matching Gifts Vincent J. Vigorita, M.D. ’76 Stanley E. Waintraub, M.D. ’77 Westchester Radiation Medicine, PC Kerri L. Wilks, M.D. ’85 Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceuticals Muhammad B. Zaman, M.D. Dianne S. Zullow, M.D. ’82, and Scott S. Gordon, M.D. ’82

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F i na nci a l R ep ort

Statement of Financial Position (Preliminary Unaudited—$ in Thousands)

38.4%

31.3%

25.5%

4.8%

Assets

%

Cash

$

9,567

4.8

Receivables

50,454

25.5

Investments

61,800

31.3

Land, Buildings and Equipment, Net

75,862

38.4

$197,683

100.0

Total

30.1%

29.1%

28.3%

Liabilities and Assets

12.5%

%

Payables & Other Liabilities

$ 55,947

28.3

Deferred Revenues

24,705

12.5

Long-term Debt

57,506

29.1

Net Assets

59,525

30.1

$197,683

100.0

Total

Change in Unrestricted Net Assets (Preliminary Unaudited—$ in Thousands)

48.5%

19.9%

16.8% 10.9%

Revenues and Other Support Affiliation Contracts Faculty Practice

3.9%

%

47.4%

29.3%

10.3%

$ 100,507

48.5

Expenditures and Decreases in Unrestricted Net Assets

22,674

10.9

Affiliation Contracts

$ 98,372

47.4

21,385

10.3

%

Tuition, Net

41,241

19.9

Faculty Practice

Research and Other Grants and Gifts

34,924

16.8

Instruction and Research

60,863

29.3

Support Activities

46,409

22.4

$ 227,029

109.4

Other

8,122

3.9

Total

$ 207,468

100.0

Subtotal Decrease in Unrestricted Net Assets Total

12

22.4%

(19,561) $ 207,468

(9.4) 100.0


F i n a n c e a n d A d m i n i s t r at i o n

In FY 2008–2009, the College reviewed and revised its statement of purpose, resulting in a new mission and vision statement that served as a basis when College leaders appointed a task force to write a five-year strategic plan, the first formal plan since 1995. The task force, which included faculty, administration and trustees, met throughout the year to develop a set of goals and long-range planning initiatives through 2014. During academic year 2008–2009, a number of improve-

A project initiated in 2008, the NYMC Disaster Recovery/

ments were made to the physical plant, including the

Business Continuity Planning and Implementation Initiative,

renovation of four stately columns fronting the Alumni

continued making progress with the objective of having

Center, and replacement of the roof of the School of Health

a fully executable disaster recovery plan in place and

Sciences and Practice building.

operational by the end of academic year 2010–2011.

In the Basic Sciences Build­ing, the recently refurbished

In other operations areas, the College rolled out a single

lobby was further adorned by a series of graphic art pan-

stream recycling program, a simplified approach that

els featuring historical photos of buildings and people to

lowers the costs associated with refuse removal, benefits

mark important milestones along the fascinating journey

the environment and complies with new county laws.

the College has taken throughout its 150-year history—a most fitting enhancement, in light of the College nearing its sesquicentennial.

Two significant upgrades to campus safety—blue light emergency phones and additional security cameras— were implemented.


University Leadership Board of Trustees Ronald F. Poe Chairman of the Board Henry J. Amoroso, Esq. Michael A. Antonelle, M.D. ’62 George K. Cooney Louis E. Fierro, M.D. ’60 Jane N. Haher, M.D. ’67 Thomas E. Hales James H. Heym, Ph.D. Henry J. Humphreys Michael D. Israel, M.P.H. Edward V. Lahey Jr., Esq. Philip A. Marraccini, M.D. ’50 Miriam K. Moran Jonathan O’Herron Raymond M. Planell, Esq. Eugene C. Rainis Bernard E. Reidy Gerard D. Robilotti Maureen L. Roxe William E. Whiston Albert Willner, M.D. ’43 Honorary Members John K. Castle Edmund D. Pellegrino, M.D. UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION Karl P. Adler, M.D. President and Chief Executive Officer Ralph A. O’Connell, M.D. Provost and Dean, School of Medicine Robert W. Amler, M.D. Dean, School of Health Sciences and Practice, Vice President of Government Affairs Francis L. Belloni, Ph.D. Dean, Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences Stephen Piccolo Jr. Senior Vice President for Finance, Chief Financial Officer and Vice Provost, Administration William A. Steadman II Vice Provost and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Administration Judith A. Ehren, M.A., J.D. Associate Provost and University Registrar Renee Garrick, M.D. Vice Dean for New York Medical College and Chief Medical Officer for Westchester Medical Center Richard G. McCarrick, M.D. Vice Dean for Graduate Medical Education and Affiliations James J. O’Brien, Ph.D. Vice Dean, School of Health Sciences and Practice Waldemar A. Comas, J.D. Vice President and General Counsel Julie A. Kubaska, M.S. Vice President, University Development and Alumni Relations

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Department Chairs

SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES AND PRACTICE

Physiology Thomas H. Hintze, Ph.D. ’80

Chairs and Program Directors Amy Ansehl, R.N., M.S.N., F.N.P.C. Director of Public Health Practice, Partnership for a Healthy Population Peter Arno, Ph.D. Director of Doctoral Studies, Health Policy and Management Ansley Bacon, M.A., Ph.D. Director, Center on Disability and Health Frank Baker, Ph.D. Director, Center for Medical Outcomes Research Chia-Ching Chen, Ed.D., C.H.E.S. Director of Health Education, Epidemiology and Community Health Annette Choolfaian, R.N., M.P.A. Chair, Health Policy and Management Martin Diner, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D. Director of M.P.H. Studies, Behavioral Sciences and Health Promotion Diane E. Heck, Ph.D. Chair, Environmental Health Science Penny Liberatos, M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D. Director, Maternal and Child Health Michael J. Majsak, P.T., Ed.D. Chair, Physical Therapy David S. Markenson, M.D. Interim Chair, Epidemiology and Community Health and Director, Center for Disaster Medicine Padmini Murthy, M.D., M.P.H. Director, Global Health Michael J. Reilly, M.P.H. Director, Emergency Preparedness Howell Sasser, M.P.H., Ph.D. Director of M.P.H. Studies in Epidemiology Qiuhu Shi, M.S., Ph.D. Director, Biostistics Deborah Viola, M.B.A., Ph.D. Director of M.P.H. Studies, Health Policy and Management Ben Watson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP Chair, Speech-Language Pathology

Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Joseph T. English, M.D.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BASIC MEDICAL SCIENCES

Anesthesiology Kathryn E. McGoldrick, M.D. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Ernest Y.C. Lee, Ph.D. Cell Biology and Anatomy Joseph D. Etlinger, Ph.D. Dental Medicine Joseph F. Morales, D.D.S. Dermatology Bijan Safai, M.D. Emergency Medicine Gregory L. Almond, M.D., M.S. ’00, M.P.H. ’00 Family and Community Medicine Montgomery Douglas, M.D. Medicine William H. Frishman, M.D. Microbiology and Immunology Ira Schwartz, Ph.D. Neurology Brij Singh Ahluwalia, M.D. Neurosurgery Raj Murali, M.D. Obstetrics and Gynecology Howard Blanchette, M.D. Ophthalmology Joseph B. Walsh, M.D. Orthopedic Surgery David E. Asprinio, M.D. Otolaryngology Steven D. Schaefer, M.D. Pathology John T. Fallon III, M.D., Ph.D. Pediatrics Leonard J. Newman, M.D. ’70 Pharmacology John C. McGiff, M.D.

Radiation Medicine Chitti R. Moorthy, M.D. Radiology Zvi Lefkovitz, M.D. Rehabilitation Medicine Maria P. de Araujo, M.D. Surgery John A. Savino, M.D. Urology Muhammad Choudhury, M.D.

Program Directors Francis L. Belloni, Ph.D. Integrated Ph.D. Program Victor A. Fried, Ph.D. Cell Biology Program (M.S. and Ph.D.) Henry P. Godfrey, M.D., Ph.D. Experimental Pathology Program (Ph.D.) Kenneth Lerea, Ph.D. Basic Medical Sciences Program (M.S.) Norman Levine, Ph.D. Accelerated Master’s Program

Fred Moy, Ph.D. Experimental Pathology (M.S.) Alberto Nasjletti, M.D. Pharmacology Program (Ph.D.) Fabio A. Recchia, M.D., Ph.D. M.D./Ph.D. Program Michal L. Schwartzman, Ph.D. Pharmacology Program (Ph.D.) Charles T. Stier Jr. Ph.D. Pharmacology Program (M.S.) Carl I. Thompson, Ph.D. Physiology Program (M.S. and Ph.D.) Raj K. Tiwari, Ph.D. Microbiology and Immunology Program (M.S. and Ph.D.) Yuk-Ching Tse-Dinh, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program (Ph.D.) Joseph M. Wu, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program (M.S.) AFFILIATED HOSPITALS Academic Medical Centers Saint Vincent Catholic Medical Centers Westchester Medical Center University Hospitals Danbury Hospital Metropolitan Hospital Center Specialty Hospital The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Affiliated Hospitals Benedictine Hospital Calvary Hospital Good Samaritan Hospital, Suffern Greenwich Hospital Kingston Hospital Montefiore Medical Center, North Division Mount Vernon Hospital Northern Westchester Hospital Center Norwalk Hospital Phelps Memorial Hospital Center Richmond University Medical Center Saint Joseph’s Medical Center, Yonkers Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, Bridgeport Sound Shore Medical Center of Westchester Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center VA Hudson Valley Health Care System Affiliated Ambulatory Care Programs Center for Comprehensive Health Practice Westchester Institute for Human Development

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New York Medical College Annual Report 2008-2009  

Annual Report 2008-2009