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M O N TA N A

FINEST HOMES A SHOWCASE OF MONTANA’S FINEST ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

2009-10

M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

$9.95


Editor’s Note M O N TA N A

FINEST HOMES

Legacies

VOLUME 2

The legacies of Montana’s builders and craftsmen will endure — even in times like these THE HOME was a true masterpiece of design. Walking through the front door, you could tell the architect, the builder and the designer had gotten it all right; size and proportion were to scale, the materials were eclectic yet consistent, and the house had that intimate, relaxing quality that’s created when all the elements come together properly. But the home has sat on the market for over a year, and the builder, who has enjoyed a 20-year run as a contractor, was contemplating exiting the business. “I guess I’ll go into day trading,” he said. That got my attention. And it brought to light the effect that the recession is having on businesses in Montana. Here’s a guy who has spent the last 20 years creating peoples’ dream homes, who has done well by his efforts, and now was looking at going out of business.

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2009-10

Montana’s Finest Homes is published by NewWest Communications, 309 Wisconsin, Whitefish, MT 59937 EDITOR David M. Reese ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Therese Wood BUSINESS MANAGER Lynda Tveidt CONTRIBUTING PHOTORAPHERS Heidi Long, Karl Neumann, Michael Zilz, Living Images, Allen Kennedy PHONE: (406) 862-6489 FAX: (406) 862-6487 E-MAIL: editor@montanaliving.com

“Hang in there,” was all I could say. The best-financed builders are able to hang on through these difficult times.

TO SUBSCRIBE, LOG ON TO: www.montanaliving.com

Others, like my friend, may have to transition into other businesses. Yes, we have enjoyed a solid building and construction market (off and on) over the last 15 years, but now it’s time to hunker down for some of us. I can see a few positive effects of this slowdown. As one builder in Big Sky told me, he’s begun building smaller, more intimate spaces for his clients. And this movement, I think, will create more cohesive design that’s relevant not only

All contents © 2009. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. Application to mail periodicals postage rates is at Whitefish, MT 59937 and additional mailing offices. M O N TA N A ’ S

FINEST HOMES

to the market, but to the Montana lifestyle.

A SHOWCASE OF MONTANA’S FINEST ARCHITECTURE

It’s about balance, this particular builder told me. It’s about creating homes that are here for a reason, not just for seasonal enjoyment. The true efforts, though, of Montana’s builders, will be around for generations to come, and families for many years will still be enjoying what our talented people have created in the last decade. As the editor of Montana’s Finest Homes, and Montana Living magazine, I get to see many of Montana’s grandest homes. Some of them are featured in this issue. Most aren’t, however. They’re out there among the trees, meadows, lakes and plains of Montana, testament to many years of good, hard work, solid design and craftsmanship. And despite this building slowdown, those are things that will never go away

ON THE COVER: ON THE COVER: A home at Meadow Lake Golf Community glows in the twilight. Living Images Photo

in Montana. • David Reese editor@montanaliving.com

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Montana Living, 309 Wisconsin, Whitefish, MT 59937

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CONTENTS FEATURES

RESOURCES

FRENCH CONNECTION 8 A bit of France comes home to Montana

NATURE’S ENHANCEMENT Nature’s Enhancement landscaping

A NEW LIFE 14 Syme Design gives an old barn in Bigfork a new lease on life FAIRWAY STYLE 20 Meadow Lake Golf Community offers golf course living — in style URBAN SOPHISTICATION 24 In the heart of Helena, the Placer Hotel brings style and convenience to urban living PARADISE FOUND 27 A home in the Paradise Valley captures a frontier mood BACK TO BASICS 30 Rocky Mountain Rustics in Big Sky gets back to basics with an emphasis on simplicity ROUGHING IT GENTLY 39 Kootenai Lodge defines elegant style in a rustic setting on Swan Lake AMAZING GRACE 40 The Knolls at Hillcrest brings ease of lifestyle to Bozeman CROSSING OVER A new take on urban living in Bozeman

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TIMBER BAY TOWNHOMES 36 Affordable, luxurious townhomes in Bigfork LEGENDARY FINISHES Legendary Finishes painting contractor

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KIBLER & KIRCH Red Lodge design firm

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MALCHI TILE Setting quality in stone and tile

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MONTANA ROCKWORKS 72 Why architects love to use Montana rock

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RBM LUMBER 74 A family-owned business in Columbia Falls provides quality milled lumber VIKING FINISHES 76 From concrete to wood, Viking Finishes puts the final touch on your home project INTERIOR OUTFITTING 80 A sustainable approach to window coverings

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A NEW APPROACH 48 Hoyt Homes creates a contemporary home with traditional look FAMILY TIES 52 On 23 acres west of Kalispell, Glimm Homes builds a comfortable family retreat SKI CAMP RETREAT 58 The ultimate ski hideaway at Spanish Peaks

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THE HOMESTEAD 62 Luxury abounds in this home at the Homestead in Whitefish MODERN CLASSIC 68 Classic meets contemporary in this lakefront home from Malmquist Construction

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Montana’s Finest Homes: LANDMARK BUILDERS

French Connection A bit of France comes home to Bigfork

PHOTOS BY HEIDI LONG AND DAVE REESE • STORY BY DAVE REESE

Built by Landmark Builders, this French Country home overlooks a small lake north of Bigfork. DAVE REESE PHOTO

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Montana’s Finest Homes: LANDMARK BUILDERS

Swan River Door in Bigfork created the arched interior and exterior doors for this home near Bigfork. HEIDI LONG PHOTOS/LONGVIEW STUDIOS 10 MONTANA’S FINEST HOMES VOL. 2 2009

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aris is a long way from Montana. But on a small lake near Bigfork, a bit of France has come home. Here, Landmark Builders has built a spectacular French country home overlooking a small lake, where the Swan Mountains form the backdrop to this pristine, quiet setting just 10 minutes from Bigfork. For Landmark Builders owner Orlan Sorensen, creating this unique home gave his company a chance to create something entirely out of the ordinary for northwest Montana. The home is full of custom touches, from custom doors, to custom cabinetry in the kitchen, to a marble fireplace in the dining room. A spectacular water fountain in the front yard adds to the European feel of this home. Having never done a home in French country architecture, Landmark Builders thoroughly researched this style of French architecture and came up with a plan that the owners loved. Building the home gave Sorensen and his team at Landmark Builders a chance to flex their creative muscles. “We have done different types of homes, from arts and crafts, to timber frame and log, but we had never done a French country home before,” Sorensen said. Never doing the same house twice means each home has its own unique, custom touches. “We really invent the wheel a lot of times and do most of the construction work right on site,” Sorensen said. In the kitchen you see a grand example of the craftsmanship in this home. Cornerstone Cabinetry in Kalispell designed and built the kitchen masterpiece, which features oak with carved onlay details. Distressed aging and shadow accenting on the buttercream finish gave the cabinets an authentic, European feel. The center island and range area were made from maple. and the kitchen was designed around two main pieces of furniture: two, 200year-old antique cabinets from northern France.

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continued on next page Cornerstone Cabinetry created the cabinets for the kitchen as well as several different cabinet features throughout the home. HEIDI LONG PHOTOS/LONGVIEW STUDIOS M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

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Montana’s Finest Homes: LANDMARK BUILDERS

The great room of this home from Landmark Builders exhibits timber frame accents and arched windows and doors. HEIDI LONG PHOTO


Dave Reese photo Heidi Long photo

from previous page A dining area off the kitchen overlooks the lake, which unfolds with continual drama of nature and wildlife. Cornerstone Cabinetry created the cabinets not just for the kitchen, but for 10 rooms in the home. As examples of their varied design ideas, Cornerstone Cabinetry created several different looks throughout the home. The downstairs wet bar was made with quartersawn oak, and a French blue cabinet made of knotty alder serves the laundry room. The wine room was built with knotty alder and featured stick construction. The homeowners were helpful in coming up with the different design ideas. “It was extremely custom,” said Kevin Kelleher, a designer at Cornerstone Cabinetry. “The owner put a lot of thought into it. It was nice working with someone who envisioned what they wanted, and we were able to work with them to make it happen. It was a very unique project. It was fun to be a part of.” It was a trip to France that captured the homeowner’s imagination to create their home in French country style. “After Europe, I knew what I wanted,” one of the homeowners said. Accenting the home’s style was the use of custom doors from Swan River Door. Using its team of craftsmen at its Bigfork shop, Swan River Door created all of the arched exterior and interior doors using woods like oak and fir. The home was another example of craftsmanship of Swan River Door, a 10-year old Bigfork business that specializes in high-end custom doors. Sorensen, at Landmark Builders, said the homeowners’ eagerness was a breath of fresh air throughout the process. “I don’t think I’ve ever had a client who has come to me with so many thoughts and dreams of what they wanted,” he said. From the interior to the exterior, the home is a display of craftsmanship. The home was the 2004 winner of the Flathead Building Association’s Parade of Homes. The setting where the house was built is an idyllic place. But it was the community of Bigfork that really drew the couple to the area.

Heidi Long photo

“What sold us on the area are the people,” one homeowner said. “We were looking for a place to call home. There’s a true sense of community here.” The biggest challenge, Sorensen said, was to do something different. “This was not quite the normal house around here,” he said. “It was a good experience researching into the architecture and delving into French architecture. We learned how they lived, and what really meant French architecture.” This learning process has inspired Sorensen throughout his career as a builder, which began decades ago as a drafting student at Montana State University. He began drawing floor plans in the seventh grade, and his father and grandfather were also builders. He combined his love of architecture with his passion for business. “I really enjoy meeting new clients, getting new ideas, because it’s a constant learning process,” he said. “Everybody has something new. When you build a home, you have to understand that it’s a business, and I get to do both. It’s the best of both worlds.” •

LANDMARK BUILDERS

406.253.3839 landmarkbuildersmontana.com

CORNERSTONE CABINETRY SWAN RIVER DOOR M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

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406.755.8999 406.837.3766

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Montana’s Finest Homes: SYME DESIGN

A New LIFE An 80-year-old barn gets a new lease on life


Syme Design of Bigfork worked with Valley Glass, Swan River Door, Glacier Steel Roofing and Montana River Properties to renovate an old barn into a home near Bigfork.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAVE REESE M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

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The dining area on the main floor of the barn looks out over a deck and the Swan River.

‘It’s like pounding out an old Bentley. It has its own appeal.’ — Doug Syme, Syme Design

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here’s an old barn that sits on the edge of a wide, green field just above the Swan River. Built over 80 years ago near Bigfork, the barn used to be home for pigs and cows. But now with the help of Bigfork designer Doug Syme, this historic barn has been dramatically converted to a usable, livable — and gorgeous — 6,000-square-foot home. Syme and the homeowner were able to use all of the existing structural elements of the original barn, and turn it into a spacious, two-story guest home. Just a few minutes from the town of Bigfork, this tranquil setting gives the homeowners access to a vibrant arts and cultural town, combined with the peace and quiet of a pastoral farm setting. And they’ve preserved a piece of Montana history. Where once there were stalls for animals, there are now bedrooms. Where pigeons and songbirds once occupied the second floor, a spacious entertaining area now looks out over the meandering Swan River. Where cats, raccoons and bats inhabited the ground floor, a new living area with kitchen, dining room and bedrooms was created. In fact, when Syme Design started the project several years ago, the barn didn’t even have a locking door. When the barn was first built, the original owner could only afford to paint one side of it red — the side facing the road that people could see. Now, the weathered barn wood has been used throughout the home’s renovation, from trim to shutters to flooring. Some of the red barn wood was used to create a unique powder room — what the designer jokingly refers to as the outhouse. The barn is rich in local history. During the renovation process, longtime locals were curious about what was happening to the old structure just south of Swan River School. Unlike many Montana barns that have had to be pushed over by bulldozers to avoid safety hazards, this barn was being saved. continued on next page

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Montana’s Finest Homes: SYME DESIGN

The ground floor of the home is spacious and roomy, with bedrooms off of the great room.

Original rafters and beams were maintained in the upstairs renovation of the barn. M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

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from previous page

The kitchen has a true country feel, with modern conveniences.

Spacious comfort in the downstairs living area.

The upstairs powder room was created from old roofing and re-used siding from the barn.

In keeping with a rustic style, Swan River Door created new doors (right).

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Bedrooms along the main floor are decorated in a western, country style. The kitchen opens to a dining area that looks out over the river, and with this open feel, the home is perfect for entertaining. Quiet nooks off the second floor offer places to sit and relax with a book or play board games. Syme has designed custom homes throughout northwest Montana, but had never done a renovation project like this. “Every piece of it is a restoration,” he said. “You’re not trying to just refurbish, but modernize.” This meant adding structural stability to the barn and installing modern conveniences like air conditioning, high-speed digital wiring, and insulation, among the dozens of other custom improvements. Syme used local artists and craftsmen to get the barn converted into a livable home. “Your best idea is only good until you find somebody to bring it to life,” Syme said. “There are some very talented people here, and everybody on the project enjoyed working on this.” Swan River Door created doors for the renovation project with wood reclaimed from the barn’s original doors. “The owner wanted something rustic but also upscale,” says Jeff Matern, owner of Swan River Door in Bigfork. “We created an authentic look." Swan River Door specializes in custom looks and their craftsmen are adept at creating everything from Tuscan and European styles to western, rustic doors made for the barn. The barn’s history dates back over 80 years, and throughout that time the local community had used the barn to house their various 4-H projects. One well-known Bigfork developer remembers keeping his 4-H hogs in there. Syme was intrigued by how well the barn had actually withstood the test of time. “Here’s this building that’s 80-some years old, that was built by common sense and simple triangulation,” he said. “It’s held together quite nicely. It was a functional piece.” By upgrading and renovating the outer shell of the barn, Syme helped create a building that will stand the test of time. “Hopefully it will last another 100 years,” he said. “All the additions are creature comforts. In the end it’s a functioning piece ... it’s just that it has changed its function. Other elements were added to the barn, like cupolas on the rooftop. “Some of the embellishments were fun, like adding jewelry,” Syme said. The barn’s owner, who lives out of state, was inspired by the idea of reclaiming and recycling the historic structure. “Dollar for dollar you could probably just start over again,” Syme said, “But in reclaiming and re-using, it gives you the satisfaction of having that original piece. The authenticity is very important.” Some of the barn’s materials had to be replaced, but much of it was re-used. The old metal roof was torn down but some of it was used as the roof of the powder room on the upstairs level. Recycled roofing was installed by Glacier Steel Roofing. Windows from Valley Glass in Kalispell were trimmed with the old barn wood, too, and old baling wire found on the property was used to tie together parts of the upstairs beams. Valley Glass was able to match the color and style of the old barn window, and also brought a modern, divided-light style that is energy efficient. Valley Glass project manager Larry Iverson spent many hours with the owner to create the look she wanted. Valley Glass was able to keep the integrity of the old sash look with a modern, high-performance, energy-efficient window. In keeping with the barn’s original style, even some of the old knee-braces on the upstairs roof supports were chiseled out with axes to give them an authentic look. “If you can’t tell the new from the old, then we did our job,” Syme said. “It’s like pounding out an old Bentley,” Syme said. “It has its own appeal.” •


Montana’s Finest Homes: SYME DESIGN

Glacier Steel Roofing provided 100 percent recycled materials for the roofing.

Windows were trimmed with barn wood from the original building.

SYME DESIGN

406-253-7293 douglas.syme@symeusa.com

VALLEY GLASS

406-257-9200

MONTANA RIVER PROPERTIES mtriverproperties.com

One of the downstairs bedrooms has a western feel.

GLACIER STEEL ROOFING

406-892-7525

SWAN RIVER DOOR

406.837.3766

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Montana’s Finest Homes: MEADOW LAKE GOLF COMMUNITY

BY DAVE REESE • PHOTOS BY LIVING IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY 20 MONTANA’S FINEST HOMES VOL. 2 2009

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Fairway Style Meadow Lake Golf Community offers golf course living in style

This home, built by Ski Construction, overlooks the fourth tee at Meadow Lake Golf Community in Columbia Falls.

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Montana’s Finest Homes: MEADOW LAKE GOLF COMMUNITY

hen it comes to golf course living, one course in Montana stands out above the rest. Set among the forests and meadows near Glacier National Park, Meadow Lake Golf Community offers a relaxing golf lifestyle on a spectacular 18-hole course. The lifestyle and living choices at Meadow Lake are as diverse as the golf course. Meadow Lake has many options for home ownership, from condominiums and townhomes, to single family residences. One such custom home is a 6,700-square-foot custom home overlooking the fourth tee box. Custom features abound in this home, from marble floors in the master bath, to a downstairs family area that provides comfort and special features including a 10-seat home theatre, billiards room and bar. The home, built by Ski Construction, was designed with full home automation, from lighting and communications to custom sound. Perhaps the best amenity of Meadow Lake is, of course, its golf. The 18-hole course, given a 4 1/2-star rating by Golf Digest, is notched out of a forest just on the outskirts of Columbia Falls, and the setting offers mountain fairways with views into Glacier National Park, which is only a 20-minute drive away. Nearly all the holes at Meadow Lake are separate from adjoining fairways, so privacy and quiet surround you during your round. And with its narrow, densely lined fairways and water hazards, it is one of the more challenging courses in the Flathead Valley. “The course offers challenges for all skill levels,” says Barb Riley of Meadow Lake Real Estate. Meadow Lake Golf Community is open to the public, so memberships are not required to play golf there. “I think what most people find is that the atmosphere is relaxed and family-oriented. It creates a feeling of a hide-away community, yet so close to everything that Northwest Montana has to offer,” Riley added. “You can walk in here and walk away from the rest of the world.” •

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This 6,700-square-foot custom home is on the fourth tee box at Meadow Lake Golf Community.

Photos by Living Images Photography

MEADOW LAKE REAL ESTATE

406-892-2801

meadowlakerealestate.com 494 St. Andrews Dr., Columbia Falls MT 59912


This home, built by Ski Construction at Meadow Lake Golf Community, was designed with full home automation, from lighting and communications to custom sound.

Saving the Best for Last A home with a view in Tamarack Heights — Meadow Lake’s final phase SOME OF THE BEST of the Meadow Lake development may have been saved for last. On a long, wide ridge overlooking Meadow Lake golf course, Tamarack Heights offers some of the best building sites at Meadow Lake. It’s here at Tamarack Heights, the final phase of development at Meadow Lake, that builder Dave Bailey created one of the first custom homes in Tamarack. Set on a high ridge, the home offers custom features throughout, and was designed after the grand chalets of Glacier National Park. It's a unique home that captures the essence of a Montana lifestyle. •

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Montana’s Finest Homes: THE PLACER HOTEL

The Placer Hotel in downtown Helena was built in 1913. The building is now home to Urban Mountain Development’s condominium project.

Urban sophistication In the heart of Helena, the Placer Hotel brings style and convenience to urban living BY MICHAEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS BY CHAD CHRISTENSEN owntown is truly the place to be — again. Set on the idyllic walking mall of Last Chance Gulch in Helena, the Placer Hotel has become the epicenter of a Montana downtown revitalization. Urban Mountain Development, with owners Karina Christensen and Blair Williams, has added the essential ingredient to any vibrant downtown community — classic architecture located close to cultural amenities. Urban Mountain Development bought the historic Placer Hotel in 2008 and is remaking it into Helena’s premiere downtown living destination. The Placer has combined turn-of-the-century architecture along with dwellings that display modern design and décor. Built in 1913, the Placer shows classic architecture that captures the historic spirit of Montana. By utilizing the existing structure and capitalizing on the building’s timeless artistry, Urban Mountain has developed studio, one- and two-bedroom units priced from $95,000 to $145,000. Some of the units have been purchased side-by-side and combined by removing adjoining walls, creating an urban loft experience that’s new and unique to Montana.

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Residents of the Placer can enjoy the city’s overwhelming cultural choices presented daily.


Condos at the Placer Hotel bring a fresh, contemporary design to Montana.

Originally planned to be a three-story building in 1913, the Placer Hotel grew to seven stories after gold was discovered during excavation of the basement. The unexpected find bankrolled the additional four stories. Tales of gold discoveries from Last Chance Gulch are legendary Montana lore and are just one historical aspect that Helena has to cherish. Urban Mountain Development knows that with such a historic building, they have become stewards of history — a role they readily embrace. "A community comes from the social fabric that surrounds it. By respecting the past and building for the future, we honor the historic community. We are focused on developing people, place, and prosperity," said Williams. By offering 60 residences in the existing seven-story structure, the developers avoided the need for another multiple-lot, multipleacre subdivision somewhere on the outskirts of town. The overall footprint of the building is confined to one magnificent corner on Last Chance Gulch, within walking distance to schools, theatres, museums, parks, trails, libraries, dining and shopping. Walking, biking and transit offer quick access to everything a resident would need. Urban Mountain Development has immediate plans for the main floor, as well as the basement. The main floor and lobby area are being remodeled to include a coffee bar, and the basement will be home to a wine cellar that will offer live music — a resurrection of the original Ratskeller that once welcomed locals and visitors. The basement will also have a high-end fitness center and spa facility.

Residents of the Placer can enjoy the city’s overwhelming cultural choices presented daily. Right out their front door is Mount Helena, one of America’s largest city parks, which towers over town. The Myrna Loy offers live and cinematic theatre, and the Grand Street Theatre has a constant rotation of plays Placer Hotel owners Blair Williams, left, and throughout the year. Karina Christensen are overseeing development “Helena is lucky that we of the condominium project in downtown Helena. don't have to create a historic downtown experience — it already exists,” said Christensen. “Our walking mall makes the downtown feel more like a European village.” •

URBAN MOUNTAIN DEVELOPMENT urbanmountaindevelopment.com M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

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Resources

NATURE’S ENHANCEMENTS Nature’s Enhancement brings the best of nature to your home estled in the valley of the majestic Bitterroot Mountains of Montana is a unique company specializing in the production of Rocky Mountain native and hardy plants. If you are entranced with the natural beauty of Montana, this is where to find it. Nature’s Enhancement was formed in 1995 by owners Gregory and Julie Monk, in response to the demand for plants that will thrive in the frequently harsh weather conditions of the West, where weather swings occur on a daily and hourly basis. Over 100,000 shade and fruit trees, colorful shrubs, lush evergreens, blooming wild flowers, and various grasses are grown annually in sizes ranging from one gallon plants to 30-foot-tall trees. “Our plants are grown locally, not brought here from other areas of the country, like many of the plants found at retail and big box stores throughout Montana,” says Julie Monk. “Our customers not only enjoy the benefits of low grower wholesale prices, but also take advantage of high quality plants that will thrive, with little maintenance, for many years to come.” From dawn to dusk, trees and shrubs create In addition to a wide selection of locally grown unique shadows and a mystical enviroment. plants, Nature’s Enhancement also offers a fullservice landscape division. The experienced staff works closely with property and home owners to create their own personalized custom landscapes. “With our design, consultation, and installation expertise, we can make any landscape dream or goal a reality,” said Gregory Monk, who A striking entrance introduces the property and sets leads the landscape divi- Weeping larch, aspen and the tone for the upcoming house and landsape. sion. Whether your vision fir give a feel of serenity includes a bubbling brook and blend into the natural setting. filled with trout, a lush wildflower meadow or adding the finishing touches of color and texture to the outside of your home, Nature’s Enhancement has the plants, knowledge, and trained staff to blend any new construction, private ranch, or existing property back into the natural beauty of Montana. If you are planning for new construction or a landscape makeover, Nature’s Enhancement provides custom design, installation, and the right plants to make your landscape project a success. •

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Nature’s Enhancement creates the beauty of Montana in your outlying acreage.


Montana’s Finest Homes: BUTLER CONSTRUCTION

Paradise Found A home in the Paradise Valley captures a frontier mood

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n the Paradise Valley south of Livingston, old has become new. Where sage-covered foothills rise up to tall mountain peaks, a 4,500-square-foot home was built to look as though it has been here since Montana’s territorial times. The home reflects the ruggedness of this beautiful land above the Yellowstone River. “We wanted it to look like it had been there 100 years,” Kevin Butler, owner of Butler Construction, said. “For the most part, we achieved that.” Butler Construction created an aged patina on the siding by spraying ferrous sulfate on the new wood. This process gave the home an aged look, like the rustic homesteads that dot the landscape in the Paradise Valley. >>>

Just south of Livingston, this home built by Butler Construction was designed to reflect a frontier Montana home. Roofing and siding by Bridger Steel.

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL ZILZ • STORY BY DAVE REESE M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

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Montana’s Finest Homes: BUTLER CONSTRUCTION

Butler Construction used waxed Italian plaster on the walls to give the home an authentic feel. Flooring was created out of rough sawn fir from local forests.

To complete the rustic look, Butler then turned to Bridger Steel, which supplied the metal wainscoting and roofing. Bridger Steel, one of the largest suppliers of new and recycled metal roofing, helped give the home that frontier feel. “This home has some cool artistic value to it,” says Bridger Steel’s Chris Graff. Bridger Steel uses cold-rolled and Corten metal, two types of metal that produce various colors. Coldrolled metal is a bare metal that rusts as it ages, while Corten has certain alloys that will start to rust and when treated will stop at a certain point. The homeowners, Michael and Megan Zilz, designed the home themselves, with Megan taking the lead. Raised in southern Australia, she designed the home in the vernacular of open spaces — something common between Montana and Australia. The shed roofs and corrugated steel are design elements from Megan’s own upbringing in Australia. She used her detail-oriented skills as a software designer to put function into places in the home that might surprise you. For instance, ladder steps on bunk beds in the upstairs children’s room pull out for extra storage. Megan also thought of small details like having the theater room downstairs adjoin the bar — so that people can meander openly between the two spaces, instead of having them separate. Inside this home, the cabinets and several countertops were constructed out of reclaimed materials, including barn wood that had been in a fire. Since most older houses in Montana’s frontier era had some kind of addition, Megan designed what would look like an addition — but was actually part of the original design. Outside, a wooden boardwalk around 28 MONTANA’S FINEST HOMES 2009-10

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The master bath looks out over the wide prairie of the Paradise Valley near Livingston. Photos by Michael Zilz

the house adds to the rustic appeal of the home. The aesthetic of Megan’s design gives the house a genuine, uninterrupted flow from exterior to interior. “We really wanted this home to look like a Montana home,” Megan said. •

BUTLER CONSTRUCTION 406-220-0085 BRIDGER STEEL WWW.BRIDGERSTEEL.COM


The feel of the Montana frontier was designed into this home near Livingston. Home by Butler Construction. Steel roofing and wainscoting by Bridger Steel.

An Aga stove is the only appliance you see in the kitchen; the rest are paneled and hidden so they don’t distract from the frontier appeal of the open kitchen. Soapstone countertops provide durability and style. Photos by Michael Zilz

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Montana’s Finest Homes: ROCKY MOUNTAIN RUSTICS

Rocky Mountain Rustics built this timber frame home in Big Sky, with an emphasis on creating smaller, livable spaces.

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Back to THE BASICS Rocky Mountain Rustics in Big Sky gets back to basics with an emphasis on simplicity

BY DAVE REESE • PHOTOS BY KARL NEUMANN

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Montana’s Finest Homes: ROCKY MOUNTAIN RUSTICS

something that Rocky Mountain Rustics owner Chad Rothacher is seeing more of: people wanting a smaller footprint on the land and, of course, a smaller construction budget. “We're doing all the same kind of building, but less of it,” Rothacher said. “All of a sudden in the last year, people are saying they want something small. The ‘keeping up with the Joneses’ kind of died with the economy.” This means that Rocky Mountain Rustics is doing more homes in the 2,500-square-foot range, than in the 5,000-square-foot homes of yesterday. The timber frame home in Big Sky’s Porcupine Park is testament to what can be accomplished with small spaces. The home features recycled wood, from the floors to trim. Much of the wood came from the company’s own mill in Sheridan, Montana, where they process the recycled barn wood. In contrast to the rustic style, the home also has a complete home-automation system that allows the owner to run his home by laptop computer. The smaller-is-better approach appeals to people who want to live in Montana fulltime, and not just build huge spec homes. “With a smaller home like this, you get the feeling you've arrived, instead of larger homes, that when you step into, you say ‘where’s the bathroom?’” Rothacher said. “Building a home like this isn’t about making six figures on the big flip," he added. “It’s about a lifestyle. It’s about the skiing, the hiking, the fishing.” •

ROCKY MOUNTAIN RUSTICS WWW.RMRGROUP.NET

THE MASTER BATH has rustic barnwood elements with refined touches.

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he town of Big Sky is notched out of a wide, open valley at the base of Lone Mountain. Like the town itself, this home by Rocky Mountain Rustics is carved out of nature. Set on a hillside just across the Gallatin River from Big Sky, the home typifies Rocky Mountain elegance. Dove-tailed timbers form the frame of the home, and the timber accents are brought inside in true timber frame fashion. The cabin has a gabled roof, and the builders added two shed roofs that cover the porches on either side of the home. In the kitchen you see some creativity with recycled wood. Rocky Mountain Rustics used a recycled snow fence and put a waxed finish on it. They accent the granite countertops and high-end appliances. Anchoring the living room is a tall, dry-stacked rock fireplace. The home is small by comparison to other mansions around Big Sky, but in this case, less is more. And that's 32 MONTANA’S FINEST HOMES 2009-10

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OWNER CHAD ROTHACHER designed this door that leads from the bedroom to the outside out of rock and metal.


INTERIOR DESIGNER Elizabeth Schultz used smaller furniture to give the living room a sense of size.

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Montana’s Finest Homes: ROCKY MOUNTAIN RUSTICS

OLD SNOW FENCING was used in the kitchen to complete the home’s rustic, recycled character.

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What’s Developing

VILLAGE BY THE BAY Timber Bay is a cozy retreat in the village of Bigfork imber Bay is a development of eight luxury town homes situated above Commerce Street in Bigfork, within easy walking distance to downtown and sporting a magnificent view of Flathead Lake. Originally envisioned by Wayne Heaton of Clearwater Montana Properties and Paul McElroy of Montana Build, Inc., construction of the George Gibson design was well underway when the project’s current owners, David and Carolyn Vale, came on the scene. “We first met Paul exploring potential builders for our own home in Montana,” says David. Timber Bay townhomes in Bigfork com“Looking at his work we were, bine location, design and opulence at a frankly, blown away with the reasonable price point. style and quality that radiate from all of his homes. When he showed us the Timber Bay project and offered us the opportunity to take it over, the decision was really a no-brainer.” Paul introduced the Vale’s to Nancy O’Kelly of Nancy O’s Interiors. “We knew we wanted these town homes to have the Montana feel, that dignified, rustic feel that characterizes the best Luxurious suites homes in Montana,” says Carolyn. “We just weren’t quite sure how to make it happen. Turns out Nancy knew exactly how to do it.” “I got involved toward the end of construction, making the selections of finishes, fixtures, and final fit out,” recalls Nancy. “The Vales also gave me the opportunity to design and furnish two model units.” Among the notable features are the slate floors throughout the lower levels, wood floors in the main living area, luxurious master suite, artistry in the handfinished decorative concrete countertops, high-end appliances, and premium plumbing and electrical fixtures throughout. The two-and three-bedroom models, furnished with antiques, unique furniture, and custom pieces, are now open almost every day. Wayne is thrilled to see the culmination of his original vision. “The Timber Bay town homes occupy a unique niche in the Bigfork vacation home market,” says Wayne. “Without compromising on that premium feel an owner in this market expects, Timber Bay has managed to fit location, design, and opulence into a price point that will especially appeal to the first-time vacation home buyer.”

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Wine room “I’ve had a lot of fun with this project,” admits Nancy. “My primary goal was to create a space where someone walks in and doesn’t want to leave. I’m really pleased with how well we achieved that goal.” Nancy’s favorite room? She answers with a wink and a smile: “Wait ‘til you see the wine room. It was supposed to be an office, but in these surroundings, who wants to work?” •

TIMBER BAY TOWNHOMES

www.timberbaymontana.com

NANCY O’S INTERIORS

406.837.7242

CLEARWATER MONTANA PROPERTIES INC. 406.837.1090 www.cmpmontana.com

MONTANA BUILD INC.

406.837.4975 www.montanabuild.com


Resources

LEGENDARY FINISHES Legendary Finishes provides a great finish to your home ne of the most important elements in achieving a high level of quality in a home are the finishes used, whether it’s stain or paint. Some homes require a rustic look, while others lean toward a cleaner finish with brighter coloring or natural glazes. Legendary Finishes, a diversified company that offers both quality staining and painting of home interiors and exteriors, focuses on creating these finishes. Seeing that their clients preferred having their materials finished off-site and then delivered to them ready for installation, the Kalispell company expanded from just painting to providing both pre-finished materials and custom wood finishing at their eight thousand square foot facility. This not only ensured a quality finish, but also helped ease scheduling conflicts with other subs on job sites. They work with all kinds of woods and all kinds of budgets, from 50 to 50,000 feet, and are now even shipping finished wood to other locations across the country. The facility in Kalispell allows the wood to be kept in a dry, secure environment before being wrapped and shipped to the work site for installation. This

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keeps the high-quality finish work out of the elements, and provides a consistent finished product. Whether it's detailing metal garage doors to look like wood, finishing siding or providing multiple coats of stain on fine Brazilian cherry wood, Legendary Finishes has the experience to approach most any job. "You name the species of wood and it's been through our shop," owner Mat Driear said. The company employs a trained work force that takes care of the job, whether it's a do-it-yourself project that needs a little help or a high-end estate. "There is a certain amount of quality that comes with an established company. I keep a really good relationship with my clients, even if that means coming back to fix something down the road. We are one of the only companies that offers an 8 year warranty on our exterior repaints as well as a warranty on our finishes." Legendary Finishes has captured a niche in the Flathead Valley by providing guaranteed superior full service painting as well as off-site finish work to help contractors and homeowners achieve an extra level of quality in their finished project. •

From custom interior painting (top photo) to painting metal garage doors to look like wood (above), Legendary Finishes has the capabilities to give your home the finish it deserves.

LEGENDARY FINISHES

406-756-5463 2520 Hwy 2, Kalispell

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Montana’s Finest Homes: THE KOOTENAI LODGE

San Francisco design firm Warren Sheets gave the Evans Cabin at Kootenai Lodge a refined look.

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Built in the 1880s, the Lindbergh Cabin was restored and modernized to a luxurious, five-bedroom home on the Swan River.

Roughing it gently Kootenai Lodge defines elegant style in rustic setting

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he new look of the Kootenai Lodge on Swan Lake is taking shape. Built in 1921 at the north end of Swan Lake near Bigfork, the Kootenai Lodge was once a playground for Montana’s and America’s most influential people. It was here that people like artist Charlie Russell, aviator Charles Lindbergh, actress Jane Wyatt and Montana’s early copper magnates came to vacation. It was here at the Kootenai Lodge along the shore of Swan Lake that Montana’s early industrial leaders built a sprawling complex of log lodges and cabins. Now, the lodge and its many outbuildings have undergone a massive restoration. The 14,000square foot main lodge was raised off the ground and a new foundation put in place. New furniture accents the original taxidermy mounts and original log work that remains from the lodge’s early days. Three fireplaces in the main lodge were removed and restored, using the original rock work. During the renovation, 42 cabins will be renovated or built, with prices ranging from $2 million to $6 million. The Evans Cabin is one of the many single residences that was completely overhauled. The Evans Cabin was originally built in the early 1900s for Orvis Evans, the attorney for the Anaconda Company. This was the first cabin to be restored during the Kootenai Lodge’s massive renovation. All of the interior design work on the renovation project is being done by well-known San Francisco designer Warren Sheets. When the original Kootenai Lodge was built, the individual cabins had no kitchens, since all of the cooking was done in the main lodge. Now, new kitchens are being added to the cabins, making them self-sufficient. In the Evans cabin, a luxurious but traditional approach was taken by Sheets, keeping the period effect of the kitchen intact, but giving the homeowners the amenities of a modern kitchen. The Kootenai Lodge renovation is all a part of modernizing — and preserving — a rich piece of Montana history. •

KOOTENAI LODGE

406-837-3000 www.thekootenai.com

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What’s Developing: THE KNOLLS AT HILLCREST

With convenient access to medical facilities, the arts, culture and recreation, The Knolls at Hillcrest brings ease of living to Bozeman. DAVE REESE photo

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Amazing Grace The Knolls at Hillcrest brings ease of lifestyle to Bozeman

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t’s no secret that Baby Boomers represent one of the largest population demographics in the United States. And as they retire, this generation is looking for convenient access to health care, abundant recreation and quality cultural offerings. Enter the Knolls at Hillcrest, a Bozeman development that offers an interesting alternative in city living. The Knolls at Hillcrest is located adjacent to Bozeman Deaconess Hospital and is within walking distance of downtown Bozeman and Montana State University. With views of town and the Bridger Mountains, the development offers a lifestyle that caters to ease of living, with easy access to the outdoor and cultural amenities of Bozeman. The Knolls at Hillcrest is Montana’s first 55-plus active adult lifestyle community, and it’s a reflection of a trend that is showing up in other areas of the United States, as Baby Boomers enter retirement. People are looking for access to health care, cultural arts and recreation — all things that Bozeman has plenty of. Custom homes, designed to accommodate a range of interior design preferences from contemporary to classic Montana, are specifically appointed to accommodate the needs of the 55+ lifestyle. The homes are built on zero lot lines, in order to maximize exterior space defined by urban density requirements. This lot configuration was creatively used to inspire private courtyards that transition and extend the indoor/outdoor living space with “outdoor rooms.” The majority of square footage in each floor plan is concentrated on the living and entertainment spaces of a home, rather than to accommodate a specific number of bedrooms that has become the more traditional model for home configurations. Once children are grown and gone, the space needs of parents change, and these designs reflect renewed lifestyle choices and options. The Knolls community is also designed to accommodate and support the ultimate active lifestyle. Seasonal landscaping, lawn maintenance, snow removal, and security checks are provided for all residences. Offering a ‘lock and leave’ lifestyle, home owners are free to travel whenever it is convenient. “It gives folks SEE PAGE 43 M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

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What’s Developing: THE KNOLLS AT HILLCREST

Designed by Place Architects, the architectural styles at The Knolls at Hillcrest accommodate a range of interior finishes and décor from contemporary to classic. Dave Reese photos

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Custom homes at the Knolls at Hillcrest in Bozeman are built using a zero-lot-line configuration to keep yard maintenance to a minimum.

an opportunity to enjoy life, and not have to spend their weekends taking care of the lawn,” Cheryl Ridgely, vice president of business development, said. The Knolls has eight different floor plans available, each suited for particular lots around the development. Homes range in size from 1,500 square feet to just over 4,000, and are priced between $424,000 to $795,000. The homes, designed by Bozeman’s Place Architecture, feature a universal design concept, which creates an aesthetically pleasing integration of accessibility throughout a home so transitions are easily accommodated as the homeowners’ lifestyles change. Each lot was specially engineered for one-story living. While some home plans offer lofts and/or walk-out lower levels, primary living spaces are all located on the main floor of each house, which is barrier free. Access from the driveway, to garage, to the main living areas of the house can be accomplished without navigating any stairs. Place Architecture has used clean lines in each of the designs, and no matter which floor plan is chosen for a particular home site, the results have already been remarkable. Abundant natural light, gracious corridors, and open living spaces are the hallmark of the home designs. The custom homes are sized for the lifestyles of singles or couples, yet are big enough to easily accommodate extended family visits. One floor plan even includes a casita guest house that is perfect for a studio, college kids home on vacation, the mother in law, or a home office. The development is owned by The Highlands, a subsidiary of Bozeman Deaconess Health Services and it is adjacent to Hillcrest, the hospital’s senior living community. The Knolls features parks, trail access, mixed-use and residential areas — all features that the developers gleaned from examining active adult living projects around the country. “We took the gems of what we learned, and applied them here,” Ridgely said. •

The unique floor plans at The Knolls at Hillcrest make good use of abundant natural light in almost every room. Architectural Design by Place Architecture. Interior Design for The Knolls model homes by Rocky Mountain Design Interiors.

THE KNOLLS AT HILLCREST 406-522-7084 theknollsathillcrest.com PLACE ARCHITECTURE placearch.com Dave Reese photo

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What’s Developing: THE KNOLLS AT HILLCREST

THE DINING AREA of a home at the Knolls at Hillcrest in Bozeman reflects a modern flair, while a kitchen (opposite page) shows a more traditional approach. DAVE REESE photos

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What’s Developing: THE CROSSING

Crossing Over Bozeman’s Crossing offers maintenance-free living in a new urban community

ozeman’s Crossing development resembles something we might have all grown up with: a neighborhood unto itself, with parks, paths, playgrounds and pavilions. In fact, PC Development, the Crossing’s owner, set out to build a community that would offer family lifestyle with close access to commercial and office space. The Crossing, whose streets are named after Montana mountain passes, is part of the Baxter Meadows 460-acre development. Within the two developments nearly 190 acres have been set aside as open space. Home plans from Locati Architects, one of Montana’s top design firms, give the Crossing’s homeowners six floor plans to choose from. The homes, from 1,500 square feet to 3,400 square feet, are sited on 6,000- to Homeowners at the Crossing in Bozeman have six 8,000-square-foot lots, and there are three intefloor plans to choose from. The homes range from rior design finishes available. 1,500 square feet to 3,400 square feet. Potter Clinton Development got its start in high-end developments in the Jackson Hole, Wyo., area before coming to Montana in 1991. They’ve set out to build communities in beautiful places. “There just isn’t anything here that combines so many urban components as Baxter Meadows,” says PC Development’s Mark Meissner. For someone looking to raise a family and be close to their work place, the Crossing offers abundant amenities. The Crossing is directly adjacent to Gallatin County Regional Park, which consists of 100 acres. The park’s master plan offers sports fields, lakes with beaches, floating docks, boat ramps and fountains. Within the park environment, you’ll also find an amphitheater, garden, wetlands, dog park, playground, pavilions, bike paths and plenty of lawn to stretch out on. A YMCA is also planned, and the park is home to Bozeman’s new middle school. The Crossing is perfect for empty-nesters, second-home owners or urban professionals wanting to work from home — or at the office park right across the street from The Crossing. With LightNex’s fiberoptic cable running throughout the development, high-speed Internet is available for fast data transfers. Living at the Crossing means leaving much of your home maintenance cares behind. The Crossing’s maintenance program takes care of snow removal on all driveways, sidewalks and patios as well as landscape maintenance. For those large family or corporate get togethers, the Crossing is planning an owners’ center that will provide executive conference facilities with full kitchen, outdoor patios and large gathering areas. The Crossing reflects the live-work-play concept, and with THE CROSSING Bozeman right in the middle of abundant recreation, the “play” portion of the equation has been solved. The rest is up to you to enjoy all that one of Montana’s most well-planned communities offers. •

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406-586-9922 discoverthecrossing.com


The Crossing is perfect for empty-nesters, second-home owners or urban professionals wanting to work from home. Fiberoptic cable runs throughout the development.

The Crossing in Bozeman offers six floor plans with three interior design finishes.

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Montana’s Finest Homes: HOYT HOMES

Hoyt Homes Inc. of Missoula built this custom home in the Nine Mile Valley. The home has a concrete log exterior from EverLog Systems.

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A New Approach Hoyt Homes and EverLog Systems team up to create a contemporary home with a traditional look

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Architect Pat Suppele from Studio Modera in Missoula designed this home in the Nine Mile Valley. The home was built by Hoyt Homes Inc.

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he Nine Mile Valley is an idyllic Montana place. A stream meanders through the broad valley and tree-covered mountains stretch into the sky. In this unmatched setting it’s here that Hoyt Homes built a unique home that blends contemporary touches with the look of a log home. Driving into the 30-acre property on the west side of the Nine Mile Valley you get your first glimpse of the home, which appears to be made out of logs. But on closer inspection you see that in fact it’s not a log home at all; the builder used concrete logs from EverLog Systems in Missoula to give the home the look of log, without the drying, splitting logs to be chinked nor the worry of damage from woodpeckers or mites of a traditional log home. The home was built by Hoyt Homes Inc. of Missoula. Owner Wade Hoyt had never worked with concrete logs before this project, and he liked the way they added to the design of Pat Suppele, an architect with Studio Modera. “We like the uniqueness,” Hoyt said. “As an owner of a log home I know how much upkeep they are. This totally takes the upkeep out of the picture.” EverLog Systems supplied all of the exterior log components and deck support systems, all of which were built out of concrete. With concrete logs, there is no staining, sealing, shifting or settling of the wood. “The owners wanted a worry-free home and a very energy efficient home,” Stewart Hansen, president of EverLog Systems, said. “They understood what they wanted, and they just didn’t want any of those maintenance issues with this house.” The owners had lived in a natural log home previous to building this home. With this home they wanted something with a more modern design appeal, along with the look of log. On the interior they used American clay to give the home Southwest design accents. By supplying everything from the concrete deck supports to the concrete “logs” used in the home, EverLog Systems was 50 MONTANA’S FINEST HOMES 2009-10

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The soapstone fireplace from WARMSTONE FIREPLACES in Livingston is a custom design, and was built out of three large boulders.


Montana’s Finest Homes: HOYT HOMES

Hoyt Homes hand-built the stairway out of beams and planks and assembled it with dowels. Fireplace by WarmStone Fireplaces and Designs, Livingston. Concrete logs by EverLog Systems of Missoula.

able to help Hoyt Homes’ client get the home they wanted. “This really showed the diversity of our product,” Hansen said. “It’s an amazing house.” From a design standpoint, the 4,400-square-foot home represents a contemporary look. Glass and metal are used as design elements throughout the home, which has tall, storefront windows. A glass walkway connects the master bedroom to the library, while a large soapstone fireplace anchors the center of the home. The fireplace, also known as a masonry heater, was built by Tulikivi in Finland and it’s an efficient way to heat the home. The heater is a custom design, and was built out of three large soapstone boulders, then disassembled, shipped to the United States and assembled by WarmStone Fireplaces and Designs of Livingston, Montana. The boulder heaters are so unique that only about five of them have been installed in Montana. “There are no two that are alike,” WarmStone owner Ron Pihl said. The 11,000-pound fireplace has channels throughout the structure that heat up the soapstone mass. Soapstone is one of the heaviest, most dense stones in the world, so

once it’s been brought to full warmth, the fireplace can provide up to 24 hours of continual heat. In addition to wood heat from the soapstone fireplace, energy efficiency is increased by the use of a Ground Source heat pump. Keeping the home well insulated are 12-inch structured insulated panels on the roof. Passive solar heat from the tall windows allow sunlight to help heat the home also. The house is so energy efficient that the owner was actually able to sell power back to the utility in the summer. •

HOYT HOMES INC. EVERLOG SYSTEMS WARMSTONE FIREPLACES

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Family TIES On 23 acres west of Kalispell, GLIMM HOMES creates a comfortable family retreat

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Montana’s Finest Homes: GLIMM HOMES

The Glimm family home glows at dusk west of Kalispell. Dave Reese photo

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Montana’s Finest Homes: GLIMM HOMES

BMC Millwork provided the wood for the doors and trim, while Huntwood Custom Cabinets created the cabinets in this open living room built by Glimm Homes. Dave Reese photo

t's deep in the winter, and five horses graze in the snow as the sun drops behind the mountains near Ashley Lake. But even though it's the cold of winter outside, a warm house beckons from across the snowy field as the Glimm family sits down for dinner. The Glimm family, owner of Glimm Homes, created this 4,000-square foot home on 23 acres as their family enclave. But as custom home builders they've also built a reputation doing the same for other families around Northwest Montana. "What we really enjoy about building custom homes is that every home is different,” says Amy Glimm. “We get to work with each client to build them a home that fits their unique lifestyles and tastes. We want every client to have fun and really enjoy their building experience. We had a lot of fun with this project, getting to make our perfect family home become a reality.”

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Hammered copper sinks throughout the home provide a unqiue design flair.

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As a builder of custom homes who takes only a few projects each year, owner Carl Glimm is able to focus on the details of each project. He does all of the finish work himself. Warmth abounds in the two-story home, and it starts at the front door. Accenting the front entry is timber-frame woodwork and custom door created by BMC Millwork. Walk into the main room of the home and you're greeted by a twostory fireplace built out of rock from from a nearby McGregor Lake quarry. It was installed by West Masonry. The home, designed by Impact Drafting and Design, is rich in its simplicity. With two young children, the Glimms built the home with family in mind. “No matter where people are in the home, it’s a real open feeling,” says Carl Glimm. “With the kids running around, whether we’re


The fireplace in the great room was built with stone from a nearby quarry and installed by West Masonry.

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Montana’s Finest Homes: GLIMM HOMES

This home by Glimm Homes features cabinets by Huntwood Custom Cabinets. cooking or working, it all feels like it’s really close. It feels like everybody is connected.” The home was designed for energy efficiency. A geothermal heat pump from McRorie Heating and Cooling keeps the home at a constant, comfortable temperature, and propane fireplaces help create ambiance and backup heat when needed. Triple-glazed windows and blown-in fiberglass insulation keep the home comfortable all year. Even for a two story, 4,000-square foot home, Carl Glimm says the home’s heating costs in winter are about $80 per month. The home doubles as a family estate but also provides a working area for the family business — Glimm Homes. “We got everything in it that we wanted for our family and our business,” Carl says. His wife, Amy, had grown up in nearby Lost Prairie, a remote mountain valley 30 miles west of Kalispell. There are certain design flairs throughout the home, including a fireplace in the master bedroom that is framed by old barnwood from Amy Glimm’s grandfather’s ranch. In the dining room there is an oldfashioned tin ceiling and there are hammered copper sinks in bathrooms throughout the home. The couple had searched long and hard for a place to build their family home, and when they found this 23-acre parcel about 24 miles from Kalispell, they knew they'd found it. “When we found this property, it felt like home,” Amy said. “We knew this was home. We knew this was where we wanted to stay and where we wanted to build our dream house.” •

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A fireplace in the master bedroom was framed with wood from an old barn.


A cozy master bath looks out over the home’s property near Ashley Lake.

A sitting area doubles as storage space in the tv room. BMC Millwork provided the custom doors and millwork on the front entry.

GLIMM HOMES glimmhomes.com 406-756-9052 WEST MASONRY 406-203-4363 email: info@westmasonry.com BMC MILLWORK

406-752-8393

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Montana’s Finest Homes: THE CLUB AT SPANISH PEAKS

This home is at the Club at Spanish Peaks in Big Sky and is for sale by Rivers to Peaks Realty. General contractor: Hackbarth Construction. Logs: Bear Creek Log Homes. Interior: Little Bear Interiors

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Ski Camp Retreat The ultimate cabin in the woods at The Club at Spanish Peaks

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Montana’s Finest Homes: THE CLUB AT SPANISH PEAKS

A hand-tooled leather ottoman is part of the design scheme from Little Bear Interiors. The home is at the Club at Spanish Peaks in Big Sky.

Dave Reese photo

erched on a ridge overlooking the Club at Spanish Peaks, this log home is the epitome of the classic Montana lodge. The structure commands a presence, with its massive, hand-peeled logs, and the stone fireplace is a fortress within the living room, beckoning all who enter to sit, relax and take in the sweeping view. The home was built for the kind of mountain lifestyle that lends itself to recreation and entertaining. In the winter, a ski trail leads right past the home, carrying skiers toward the Club at Spanish Peaks and the slopes at Big Sky Resort. Built by Hackbarth Homes, the home was created as a spec, and it's for sale through Rivers to Peaks real estate in Big Sky. Bear Creek Log Homes created the structure at its yard near Bozeman, then they disassembled the home and assembled it onsite. All of the trees that went into the home were from around Montana. The stone used in the fireplace is from the Oklahoma prairie and was laid as dry stack to give it the authentic look of an old-time cabin. “It gives it that cozy cabin feeling,” said Hackbarth Homes owner Mark Hackbarth. With such heavy accents as log and stone, the home’s countertops needed to balance the mass, so Bozeman Marble and Granite was brought in to create the granite countertops in the kitchen and baths. Despite its feeling of mass and weight, the home does feel like a home — due largely to the work of Little Bear Interiors. Although the home had already been built when the interior design firm was brought in, Little Bear owner Debra Young and designer Tracie Floyd were able to take the canvas they were given and paint a vibrant picture of stunning design. The first thing Young noticed was the great views from all the windows. “This house has beautiful views, so we wanted to make sure when we were doing space planning that we left the profile of the furniture fairly low, so you can enjoy these views," she

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said. “There’s nothing to obstruct that. Your eyes are attracted to the views, not the furniture.” With a retail store in Bozeman, Little Bear Interiors is able to match the furnishings to the home until the feeling is just right. “When we come in and design a house like this, we can work off our retail floor,” Young said. “And when we want to make a change, we can take something back to the store, swap it out and we’re done.” A unique style of wood floor is used throughout the main floor of the home. The wood was reclaimed from old pickle vats. The wood has a blend of rich, blond hues and deep accents, and it plays nicely off of the light-colors of the massive interior logs. Hackbarth Homes searches the country for unique woods like this, coming up with interesting reclaimed finds, such as those from mush-


Reclaimed wood from old pickle vats was used for the flooring in this home by Hackbarth Construction in Big Sky. A massive elk antler chandelier (top, right) hangs above the dining area and great room.

HACKBARTH HOMES hackbarthhomes.com; 406-763-4890 BEAR CREEK LOG HOMES bearcreekloghomes.com; 877-763-4709 THE CLUB AT SPANISH PEAKS spanish-peaks.com; 406-993-5400 LITTLE BEAR INTERIORS littlebearinteriors.com; 406-585-2927

room beds. Another type of unusual wood was used for the downstairs bar. Reclaimed from a cow barn, this freestanding bar was created out 12-inch thick timbers. Next to the bar is another unusual creation: a handmade poker table. The table was made by local artists and craftsmen out of scalloped wood, with painted bronze trout lining the interior of the poker table. Hackbarth was also able to reclaim local wood for the staircase railings. He came across a rancher in the nearby Gallatin River canyon who was going to burn slash piles of juniper, and rather than see this wood — a relative of the cedar family — go up in smoke, Hackbarth’s crews salvaged much of the wood and used it for the custom stairway railing. “With everyone moving toward the green uses of wood, it was nice to be able to reclaim some of that wood,” Hackbarth said. Just out the backdoor of the home, known as “Ski Camp Retreat,” are 300 acres of private skiing on kid-friendly Spirit Mountain as well as private lift access to the combined terrain of Big Sky and Moonlight Basin (over 5,430 acres of pristine, uncrowded Montana powder). Nearby is the Tom Weiskopf Signature Golf Course, which was rated the No. 1 golf course in Montana by Golf Digest in 2009. The recreation coupled with the authentic design of the home make Ski Camp Retreat an exceptional opportunity, says Will Brunner of Rivers to Peaks Realty. “One unexpected feature of Ski Camp Retreat is the unique camaraderie of membership at The Club at Spanish Peaks,” Brunner said. “Spanish Peaks' current membership comes from 32 states and four foreign countries, and they're a group of like-minded people who share an appreciation for this unique corner of Montana.” •

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Montana’s Finest Homes: THE HOMESTEAD AT WHITEFISH

Built in 2008, this home by High Country Builders captured several top awards in the 2008 Flathead Building Association’s Parade of Homes.

alt Landi knows what a dream job looks like. He got to experience it when his firm, High Country Builders, was chosen to design and build two custom homes in the Homestead at Whitefish. The home sits on 20 acres northwest of Whitefish in the Salish Mountains. It’s an area of peace and tranquility, with fantastic views into the Canadian Rockies and the Whitefish Mountain Range. It was here that High Country Builders created Sharptail Meadows, one of the first two homes to be built at the Homestead. Sharptail Meadows sits in a saddle between two small ridges, overlooking a lake. The home is rustic, yet elegant, with heavy timbers that play off of the rich furnishings and details. Very little was spared in the creation of this two-story, 5,200-square-foot home. Rock from Montana Rockworks, cabinets by Old World Cabinet Co., tile from Rocky Mountain Tile and furnishings from Wright’s Furniture all combine to create a sense of grandeur and opulence. The large, heavy timbers used throughout the home were distressed with four types of stains to give them an antique look. This plays nicely off the effect of the thin wall plaster, the rusted wrought iron railings, and the distressed alder on the cabinetry. The home is designed to accommodate two families, with separate master suites upstairs and downstairs. As such, there are dual master baths, bedrooms and amenities, such as two private decks and a hot tub off of the upstairs master bedroom. Just off the living area of the main floor is a unique room that fits the Montana lifestyle. This craft and utility room offers space for storage and a place to do laundry. “It's a room where you can have

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The Homestead Luxury abounds in this home at the Homestead in Whitefish PHOTOS BY HEIDI LONG

many different things going on, with lots of storage, and laundry and utilities,” Landi said. “It’s the type of room you’d need on 20 acres in Montana.” With a solid granite island in the center, beautiful tiled floor, creative cabinet space and plenty of room for moving around, this is more than just a laundry room. “Rooms like that are really multi-purpose rooms,” says Ole Netteberg, owner of Old World Cabinet Co., who designed and made all the cabinets in the home. He installed cubby holes for gift wrapping paper, a built-in ironing board and baskets in the island. “Women have told me they just love to be in a room like this to focus and do projects. It's a kind of sanctuary,” he said. The home received the Best Kitchen and Best Interior awards in the 2008 Flathead Building Association's Parade of Homes. High Country Builders’ other home in the Homestead, called First Claim, won five awards in the Parade of Homes. High Country Builders was able to balance the tasks of creating a sense of grandeur, while not taking the design theme to extremes. “In every design there is an element of scale that is very important,” Landi said. There were places in the home where big was better, like the imposing rock fireplace in the great room. But that's balanced by other design aspects such as the delicate chandelier that hangs over the dining room table. Accenting the home's style are luxurious furnishings from Wright's Furniture in Whitefish. Pam Wright of Wright's Furniture brought an elegant but rustic flare to the interior of the home. By using pieces that matched the existing colors, like the gold walls and dark wood cabinets, she has created interest and drama throughout the home. “With a home of this quality I wanted you to walk in and say ‘wow!’," she says. The great room imme-

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Montana’s Finest Homes: THE HOMESTEAD AT WHITEFISH

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Montana’s Finest Homes: THE HOMESTEAD AT WHITEFISH

In the upstairs master bath, a granite counter from Rocky Mountain Tile lends a refined look. Cabinetry by Old World Cabinet Co.; Home by High Country Builders

diately invites an elegant, relaxed sense with two dark, soft leather chaise lounges placed directly under the dramatic 11-foot by 13-foot window. Each bedroom has its own flare, the only common thread being the flow of earth tones and big beds. “I really like big beds,” says Wright. “They give that sense of drama and luxury.” The developers allowed an ample budget and time to get everything just right. Wright’s job included making the home turn-key, so she has supplied the home with everything the new owner will need including dishes and linens. The result is a stunning mountain home that is at once inviting and a place to admire. “Wright's did a great job furnishing this,” Landi said. Travertine “Volcano” tile from Rocky Mountain Tile was used in the laundry room and several bathrooms. “It's one of my favorite tiles,” says Rocky Mountain Tile owner Kathy Sjostrom. “It has a very rustic yet elegant look, with a kind of wood grain running through it.” Both homes that High Country Builders created at the Homestead gave Landi’s company — and his suppliers — an opportunity to set a high standard in design and construction. “How could you not like a situation where you’re given total flexibility in the design and selection of materials?” Landi said. “It was just a real joy, the whole project.” • 66 MONTANA’S FINEST HOMES 2009-10

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HIGH COUNTRY BUILDERS highcountrybuilders.com; MONTANA ROCKWORKS montanarockworks.com; OLD WORLD CABINET CO. towcc.com; ROCKY MOUNTAIN TILE rockymountaintile.com; WRIGHT’S FURNITURE wrightsfurniturestore.net; MALCHI TILE aamalchi@yahoo.com;

863-9511 752-7625 862-5324 862-2500 862-2455 253-6016


Resources

Malchi Tile installed 18-inch by 18-inch travertine stone flooring in this laundry room for High Country Builders at the Homestead in Whitefish. Living Images photo

QUALITY UNDER FOOT Malchi Tile shows a commitment to quality for each high-end job flare for color and attention to detail and space are key when it comes to setting tile and stone. Aaron Malchi of Malchi Tile in Kalispell has made a name for himself with his expertise in these

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areas. Malchi’s talent shows in the beauty and precision of many high-end installations he has performed in Montana’s Flathead Valley. Some of the key elements in Malchi’s tile work deal with geometry of space and choosing each tile or stone carefully to complement the one next to it. “I snap out lines for a whole room to get started. I don’t just put spacers around pieces as I go.” He explains that by gridding out each individual tile he can guarantee a perfect layout. “When working with stone each piece can have a different thickness and you have to make sure you finish with a flat surface,” he points out. “But the great thing about stone is that you can fabricate your own finish pieces – if you have the skill.” This gives the setter more creativity in designing the space. Tile, however, has prefabricated, finished pieces and they must come together in a defined way. Malchi carefully studies each piece for color variations when he begins a project so that he can choose a pleasing mix to the pattern.

Although the traditional methods are important to Malchi, he attends trade shows and training on new materials whenever he has the chance. “There are always new products coming out and I like to keep informed on what’s available and how to use it,” he says. The most important thing to Malchi is to create the vision his clients want. His flare for creating a beautiful, dramatic space with tile or stone shines through on each unique project. “He’s very particular and pays attention to layout and detail,” says Greg Schafer, one contractor who has worked with Malchi since he started building homes years ago. “I don’t use anyone else.” •

MALCHI TILE M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

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Montana’s Finest Homes: MALMQUIST CONSTRUCTION

This home near Whitefish was built for a Seattle couple who wanted to bring their love for Pacific Northwest-influenced architecture with them.

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MODERN Classic Classic meets contemporary in this lakefront home near Whitefish BY D. MICHAEL REESE • PHOTOS BY HEIDI LONG

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he proximity of Seattle to Montana seems to be drawing closer. You can see a small but noticable shift toward contemporary design in Montana homes, and this home on a small lake near Whitefish brought Pacific Northwest architecture inland. Tucked away on a secluded knoll overlooking Bootjack Lake near Whitefish is this contemporary home from Malmquist Construction. One of northwest Montana’s longest-tenured builders of fine custom homes, Malmquist Construction brought Seattle architect Barry Gehl’s plans to life. The home was built for a Seattle couple, who wanted to bring their love for Pacific Northwest-influenced architecture with them. Low roof lines, abundant glass and native stone give the home sharp, angular features and a feeling of contemporary design. “They really brought that flavor to this project,” Casey Malmquist said. “It’s very different from what people classify as the Montana look. The site is pretty amazing, too.” Bringing the Pacific Northwest style to Montana required some creativity also, as that architecture generally doesn’t address issues of snow and cold. The three-bedroom home and detached guest house are sandwiched between the lake and a small creek, with only a one-lane road available for access. The home is in a delicate natural area. “The big challenge was continued on next page M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

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Malmquist Construction built this home overlooking a small lake near Whitefish. The home features a modern design with traditional Montana touches. Photos by Heidi Long getting the house to fit into the site,” Malmquist said. Landscape architect Bruce Boody had his work cut out for him on this project. “It had some issues,” Malmquist said. One of the issues was having to put the septic drain field 1/4 mile from the home. “That took a lot of really careful planning,” Malmquist said. With the home being placed on a cliff, blending the home into the natural surroundings also took some creativity. Helping Malmquist make the home look even more natural was the use of Shotcrete, a spray-on concrete that can be formed to look exactly like natural rock. A hot tub overlooking the lake appears as if it was sculpted out of natural rock, and parts of the ledge where the guest house sits were built with the artificial “zoo rock” material. “It’s a beautiful setting. The challenge was making it fit into this environment, but the architect’s vision was that it would fit in,” landscape architect Bruce Boody said. One reason why the Shotcrete product was used is that getting heavy equipment into the home to place and set large boulders would 70 MONTANA’S FINEST HOMES 2009-10

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have been impossible — at least without creating a heavy impact on the land. The company that installed the artificial rock created fissures, colors and cracks to make the product blend seamlessly into its natural surroundings. “It’s an art,” said Boody. As design styles expand from the traditional Montana architecture, Montana builders like Malmquist Construction are poised to create contemporary homes for the new generation of Montana homeowners. This home is testament to the skill required of bringing Pacific Northwest architecture to Montana. •

MALMQUIST CONSTRUCTION

malmquist.com 406.862.7846


Montana’s Finest Homes: MALMQUIST CONSTRUCTION

Native Montana stone was used in the creation of the fireplace.

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Resources

STANDING THE TEST OF TIME The world’s oldest building material is still a strong choice

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tone has been a part of architecture since time immemorial. And now with that architectural element becoming a major part of Montana designs, more people are incorporating native Montana stone into their home and commercial designs. One of Montana’s largest rock providers is Montana Rockworks in Kalispell. Co-owner Bill Carter says Montana rock is popular with architects throughout the country. “Montana has this great western mystique,” he says. “Having Montana stone in their projects, wherever it is around the country, carries a mystique of its own. Montana gets people excited.” One of the company’s most popular products is its stone veneer. By cutting the rock down to a thickness of one to two inches thick, you get the best of what rock is all about — great looks — but by taking off most of the weight of the rock, it’s easier for masons, or even do-it-yourself homeowners, to install the thin veneer rock produced by Montana Rockworks. Color is another reason people around the country choose rock from Montana. Different selections of the rock in Montana have high iron and lichen content, which makes it appealing with its browns, reds, greens and grey colors. The uses for native stone are limited only by the imagination. It can be used for walkways, fireplaces, entry ways, hearths, or as decorative landscape boulders. Montana Rockworks supplies rock for fireplace veneers, dry-stack retaining walls, landscape boulders, river rock and flagstone. Their rock, most of which is harvested in Montana, has been used in projects around the country, from the Nike headquarters in Oregon to a private residence in Lake Tahoe that used 2,000 tons of stone (that’s 83 semitrailer loads.) The use of native stone in home and commercial applications has been around for centuries. And that’s what appeals to architects like Bozeman architect Jerry Locati. “Masonry is our oldest material, and we’re seeing a trend of getting back to native materials,” Locati says. “We’re looking to create something that looks like it was built 100 years ago.” •

MONTANA ROCKWORKS

756-1909

montanarockworks.com

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Roger Wade photo


M O N TA N A ’ S

FINEST HOMES BUILDERS

design guide CABINETRY

FIREPLACES

BEAR CREEK LOG HOMES

CORNERSTONE CABINETS

KIENITZ MASONRY

bearcreekloghomes.com 877-763-4709

406.755.8999

406-857-2687 roy@kienitzmasonry.com

BUTLER CONSTRUCTION

OLD WORLD CABINET CO

406-220-0085

www.towcc.com 406-862-5324

FURNISHINGS

WRIGHT’S FURNITURE

GLIMM HOMES CONCRETE LOGS

glimmhomes.com 406-756-9052

HACKBARTH HOMES

EVERLOG SYSTEMS

hackbarthhomes.com 406-763-4890

everlogs.com

HOYT HOMES INC.

CUSTOM DOORS

hoythomes.com

406-862-2455

INTERIOR DESIGN

LITTLE BEAR INTERIORS littlebearinteriors.com 406-585-2927

LANDMARK BUILDERS

SWAN RIVER DOOR

INTERIOR OUTFITTING

landmarkbuildersmontana.com

406-837-3766

jap@aboutmontana.net

406.253.3839

HIGH COUNTRY BUILDERS highcountrybuilders.com 406-863-9511

DRAFTERS/DESIGN

MALMQUIST CONSTRUCTION malmquist.com

KIBLER & KIRCH kiblerkirch.com 406-446-2226

SYME DESIGN

NANCY O’S INTERIORS

406-253-7293 symeusa.com

406-837-7242

ROCKY MTN RUSTICS FAU X F I N I S H / T E X T U R E

www.rmrgroup.net

LANDSCAPING

SKI CONSTRUCTION

VIKING STUDIOS

NATURE’S ENHANCEMENT

www.skiconstruction.com

vikingfauxfinishes.com 406-862-2675

naturesenhancementinc.com 406-777-3560

BUILDING SERVICES

FIREPLACES

O R I E N TA L R U G S

FISCHWORKS

WARMSTONE FIREPLACES

ALANYA RUG GALLERY

fischworks.com

warmstone.com

alanyacarpetgallery.com

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M O N TA N A ’ S

design guide PA I N T I N G

FINEST HOMES

ROOFING/SIDING

LEGENDARY FINISHES

BRIDGER STEEL

406-756-5463

www.bridgersteel.com

GLACIER STEEL ROOFING

R E A L E S TAT E

KOOTENAI LODGE thekootenai.com

406-892-7525

TILE

MEADOW LAKE

MONTANA TILE & STONE

406-892-2801 meadowlakerealestate.com

406-556-8417 montanatile.com

MONTANA RIVER PROP.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN TILE

mtriverproperties.com

406-862-2500 rockymountaintile.com

CLUB AT SPANISH PEAKS

MALCHI TILE

spanish-peaks.com 406-993-5400

406.253.6016

KNOLLS AT HILLCREST 406-522-7084 theknollsathillcrest.com

406-586-9922 discoverthecrossing.com

406-257-9200

TIMBER BAY TOWNHOMES

PELLA WINDOWS

timberbaymontana.com

www.pella.com

See Montana’s Finest Homes on Montana Living Television.

LUMBER/WOOD

BMC MILLWORK

ROCK

BROUGHT

WINDOWS

VALLEY GLASS

urbanmountaindevelopment.com

HOMES TO LIFE.

PC DEVELOPMENT

URBAN MTN. DEVELOP.

FINE

406-752-8393

MONTANA ROCKWORKS

RBM LUMBER

406-752-7625 montanarockworks.com

rbmlmber.com 406-892-4208

Now airing at montanaliving.com

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M O N TA N A ’ S

FINEST HOMES DESIGN GUIDE

A NEW APPROACH

FRENCH CONNECTION

from page 48

from page 8

HOYT HOMES INC. hoythomes.com EVERLOG SYSTEMS everlogs.com WARMSTONE FIREPLACES warmstone.com

LANDMARK BUILDERS 406.253.3839

FAIRWAY STYLE

landmarkbuildersmontana.com

CORNERSTONE CABINETRY 406.755.8999 SWAN RIVER DOOR 406.837.3766

PARADISE FOUND

from page 20

from page 27 MEADOW LAKE REAL ESTATE 406-892-2801 meadowlakerealestate.com 494 St. Andrews Dr. Columbia Falls MT 59912

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A NEW LIFE from page 14 SYME DESIGN 406-253-7293 douglas.syme@symeusa.com VALLEY GLASS 406-257-9200 MONTANA RIVER PROPERTIES mtriverproperties.com GLACIER STEEL ROOFING 406-892-7525

BACK TO BASICS from page 30

BUTLER CONSTRUCTION 406-220-0085 BRIDGER STEEL WWW.BRIDGERSTEEL.COM

M O N TA N A L I V I N G . C O M

ROCKY MOUNTAIN RUSTICS WWW.RMRGROUP.NET


M O N TA N A ’ S

FINEST HOMES DESIGN GUIDE

SKI CAMP from page 58

FAMILY TIES from page 52

AMAZING GRACE from page 40 THE KNOLLS AT HILLCREST 406-522-7084 theknollsathillcrest.com

GLIMM HOMES glimmhomes.com 406-756-9052 KIENITZ MASONRY 406-857-2687 troy@kienitzmasonry.com BMC MILLWORK 406-752-8393

HACKBARTH HOMES hackbarthhomes.com 406-763-4890 BEAR CREEK LOG HOMES bearcreekloghomes.com 877-763-4709 THE CLUB AT SPANISH PEAKS spanish-peaks.com 406-993-5400 LITTLE BEAR INTERIORS littlebearinteriors.com 406-585-2927

HOMESTEAD from page 62 HIGH COUNTRY BUILDERS 863-9511 MONTANA ROCKWORKS 752-7625 OLD WORLD CABINET CO. 862-5324 ROCKY MOUNTAIN TILE 862-2500 WRIGHT’S FURNITURE 862-2455

MODERN CLASSIC from page 68 MALMQUIST CONSTRUCTION malmquist.com 406.862.7846

URBAN SOPHISTICATION URBAN MOUNTAIN DEVELOPMENT from page 24 urbanmountaindevelopment.com

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Resources

RBM LUMBER A family lumber company takes a sustainable approach to wood

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quality trim or molding emphasizing the lines and style of a room can add the flare that makes all the difference to a

home. Several Montana companies produce these products in a range of custom styles and quality wood choices. While RBM Lumber Inc. of Columbia Falls is one of these, they have a company that goes one step further. Started in 1980 by the Thompson family and still family owned, they adhere to a committed philosophy of timber management and sustainability. Most of their sawmill equipment is built from locally salvaged materials. They are constantly looking for better ways to use the resource of timber and no part of the tree goes unused. Everything is sorted and graded again and again to make sure they are getting all they can from the tree. “Everything we manufacture is made from local species, right out of northwest Montana forests,” says owner Roy Thompson. These woods include fir, larch, pine and western red cedar. Finding the trim style, flooring or siding to fit a client’s vision is not difficult, with RBM’s vast selection of products. A client can walk through the large, well-organized warehouse in Columbia Falls and look at combinations of trim pieces, from Victorian to Colonial or Craftsmen style. Also available are many grades and styles of tongue and groove paneling, wood flooring, furniture and cabinet wood, rough beams and various styles of sidings, from standard to specialty like natural edge or drop siding. Thompson emphasizes that moisture content in any wood product is critical for a quality project. For this reason they dry all their interior products to 6-8% and exterior products to 12% moisture content. “Because we sell only what we produce, we can maintain control over our quality,” says Thompson. All their products are raw, stain grade wood. Wood grades at RBM can involve more than what is standard for most lumber yards or building centers, Thompson explains. For example, a lower standard grading might be determined by how many knots are in a piece, but at RBM the knots can be an asset if they are “good” knots. Some fine home finishes call for the beauty of tight knots which can raise the grade of the wood. “Rather than following industry grade standards, we tailor ours to the customers’ needs,” says Thompson. Skilled and highly trained workers cut and prepare the products to exact specifications and the care and precision shows. RBM prides itself on listening to what their clients want and fitting the product to their needs. “When you walk in the door, we will ask you a lot of questions about what you’re looking for and what the project is,” Thompson explains. “Then we educate people about wood products, especially ours. If we have a product that best fits their needs, the product sells itself.” •

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rbmlmbr.com 406.892.4208


Resources

VIKING STUDIOS Viking Studios puts the final touch on your home project

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aux finishes on walls and stained concrete overlays on countertops or mantles are two ways to upgrade your home’s interior. Diane Duff of Viking Studios in Kalispell has raised this skill to an art form. In 1998, after working on a faux finish project with a family-owned commercial building, Duff realized how much she enjoyed it and began taking classes. “I am very big on educaConcrete overlay floor from Viking Studios tion,” she says. She took courses on the West and East coasts and adapted techniques to fit the more rustic look clients want for their Decorative concrete overlay is another specialty of Viking Studio. For Montana homes. remodels or ease in new construction, a thin concrete topping can be She began experimenting with the plasters, concretes, colorants, applied over existing countertops or wood platforms for counters or stains and other products used in the industry and found countless ways mantles. This makes the finished cement piece much lighter, needing to create custom looks. On one high-end project Duff created everything less base support. Concrete overlays on floors are troweled on and then from an embossed leather look on the walls, to snakeskin borders, and glazed or stained and sealed. “It’s nice when people are remodeling and even used the effect of stain running down from wall sconces to create have an old cement floor that needs help,” she says. “We can go right the effect of aging. Stencils can be used for more interest in a finish, or over it. For new construction, this process can give a classic, old stone Duff can create a number of variations of cracked plaster (some with a look. second layer bleeding through) with any color a project calls for. Whatever the style of the project, Viking Studios can create the cusTreatments can also be used to make a metal garage door or old cabitom look to fit it, and it will have the flare of a one-of-a-kind piece. • nets look like fine grained or aged wood. For a more contemporary appeal Duff uses a high-sheen finish on the plaster, or can create a metallic finish. Duff likes using the acrylic plaster because it is so sturdy VIKING STUDIOS vikingfauxfinishes.com and will stand the test of time, but also likes many of the the lime plasters for environmentally conscious building because it will naturally 406.862.7846 change color over time. •

PROJECT: KITCHEN CABINETS FEATURES: White laminate cabinets redone with wood grain treatment to match log walls

PROJECT: Painted and plastered chest Features: Faux ostrich skin finish

PROJECT: Fireplace FEATURES: Lime plaster finish above a mantle with faux mahogany woodgrain

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Resources Solar weave shades can maintain your view and block out damaging ultraviolet light and heat buildup.

WINDOWS ON THE WORLD Interior Outfitting offers a sustainable approach to window coverings his past year has been a bit like returning from the land of Oz. The economic downturn has given us time to reflect and give pause to our footprint on this planet. Oz was, of course, an illusion, but now our illusion is being replaced with substance; an awakening to reality and a new beginning. The new beginning is a movement toward sustainable design and green building. Ideas grounded in practicality as well as a healthy environment. The best part of this evolution. We have options and lots of them. Green building is the implementation of design, construction and operation strategies that reduce a building’s environmental impact during construction and operation. These principles also improve energy conservation, comfort and productivity throughout the building’s life. The green movement is becoming a welcome conservative change in which we can be confident of leaving behind a healthier place to live.

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The trade-off for creating glass-covered holes in the wall of our buildings is the energy inefficiencies and glare. If an office faces south, the low winter sun bakes the occupants even in cold weather. Homes lose precious heat from leaky windows and homeowners see their utility bills skyrocket. Our window, our connection to the outdoors, is a critical area to focus upon. The downside to using daylight is exposing naked windows to the elements. To address this, fabric treatments, draperies, Roman shades, as well as solar shades, blinds and shutters provide an excellent solution. Considerable energy can be saved by the correct specifications and the use of window coverings. These savings result from significantly reducing the heat entering the building in the hotter months and by reducing heat loss in winter. By helping to control the internal environment, less artificial cooling and heating is required. One of several effective and available products is solar weave shades. This specific solution can maintain a view and block out damaging ultraviolet light and heat buildup. By choosing the density of weave, we can control the amount of natural light filtering into the room. Light entering through the woven threads is known as diffused light, which allows our eyes to adapt to the filtered light while maintaining the view to the outside. Solutions for environmentally sound window treatments are available within our communities in Montana. You can find resources, like those at Interior Outfitting in Kalispell, that use local products creatively such as natural materials and local artists, keeping employment in our immediate areas. Our land of Oz is changing to sustainable environment ethics and we need to look at this earth as a giant patchwork quilt, where each person is responsible for their own quilt block. •

INTERIOR OUTFITTING

406-756-1909 324 S. Main, Kalispell


Resources

KIBLER & KIRCH Red Lodge design firm spans a wide range of tastes, styles hether it’s helping someone pick out a paint color or decorate an entire home, the designers at Kibler and Kirch believe that it all matters. The Red-Lodge based design firm has over 30 years experience, with projects taking them across the state — and the nation. Kibler and Kirch was founded by owners Rosina Kastelitz and Erica Hash, along with former partners Anita Evans and Jean Foster. Rosina leads the design team, and Erica leads the retail team. Their design philosophy is to enhance the quality of their clients’ lives by making positive changes in their living environments. “We approach each project with the knowledge and the confidence that we can, and will, make a difference in the lives of those we work with,” says Rosina. One of the firm’s services is “Playhouse Day.” This is where the designers spend a day redesigning a home with the client’s existing furniture and accessories. In doing so, they help clients redefine spaces, reorganize and revitalize without them having to buy anything new. They have created styles from contemporary to country, English traditional to Florida tropical. Often, though, it’s a Montana look their clients are hoping for. Many of Kibler and Kirch’s clients are owners of second homes that wish to create a regional look. When this is the design direction, much can be learned from the way the Montana pioneers organized and decorated their homes. “The Montana pioneers came with their most precious possessions — a crystal chandelier, a Persian rug, a fine piece of artwork or fine china,” Rosina said. “When they got here, they built their homes with the materials that were available.” A lead designer and a team designer work on each project. “We see ourselves as facilitators of the goals and dreams of our clients,” Rosina said. “As the clients participate in the process, they become aware of their own creativity, talent and design abilities.” Hash and Kastelitz have enjoyed a long career in the design industry, from the moment

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LOCATION: Kibler and Kirch retail store FEATURES: Mango wood dining room set and buffet. Fine dinnerware from “WesternWare” showcasing images of the historic American West by L.A. Huffman.

Many of Kibler and Kirch’s clients are owners of second homes that wish to create a regional look. When this is the design direction, much can be learned from the way the Montana pioneers organized and decorated their homes.

they opened their doors. But it hasn’t been the artwork they’ve hung or the furniture they’ve arranged that have made them satisfied with their jobs; it’s been the people. “People make the dream jobs,” Rosina said. “Dream projects are the result of building wonderful relationships that last a lifetime.” •

KIBLER AND KIRCH

LOCATION: Kibler and Kirch retail store, Red Lodge FEATURES: Handmade ceramic bowl, antique calligraphy brushes and an antique serving tray.

406-446-2226 kiblerandkirch.com

LOCATION: Kibler and Kirch retail store FEATURES: traditional chairs in new leather and suede combination combine with art and accessories that have a more contemporary flavor.

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DAVE REESE PHOTOS

Best In Show THE EDITOR’S CHOICE

Rebirth of a barn Syme Design’s makeover of an old barn captures this year’s editor’s choice

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OOKING AT the spacious, well-appointed two-story barn, it’s hard to imagine that cows once roamed through here. But then again it isn’t. The place was built as a barn and was used for nearly 80 years as a bovine palace. After Doug Syme and countless other craftsmen turned their attention to the project, the barn was wondrously converted to palatial living quarters — for humans. From the quarter-sawn wood flooring to the impeccable interior furnishings, the barn is a model for what can be done by restoring what we already have. And that’s something we should, in this time of downsizing, pay more attention to. The vision that the owners had in the renovation and the ability of the contractors to carry out that vision are why we chose the Bigfork barn renovation for this year’s Editor’s Choice. •

See the video at montanaliving.com

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Montana's Finest Homes  

The best in Montana architecture and design, from the publishers of Montana Living.

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