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Buffalo, Buffalo,aaCity Cityon onthe theWaterfront: Waterfront: An An Urban Urban Alternative Alternative forfor theOuter OuterHarbor Harbor Prepared Prepared byby the theCongress Congressfor forthe theNew NewUrbanism Urbanism 1

Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor /


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! ! ! “Altogether, the community has a vision of a waterfront that is the beautiful, active, public edge of our City, continuously accessible from Riverside Park to Gallagher Beach and inland along the Buffalo River and Scajaquada Creek. It is a vision in which residents go down to enjoy the water as a part of daily life, and whose neighborhoods are better off for being there. It is a vision of a waterfront where visitors arrive and immediately see and understand what is so special about this place. It is a vision of a waterfront that is a safe and healthy place to visit. It is a vision of a waterfront that is an important part of our economy, providing an impetus for new development while we protect what is most valuable about it. It is a bundle of connections between our City and the world, but also between the City and the waterfront, braided carefully to accommodate the needs of transportation and safeguard the precious resources of the waterfront.”

- The Buffalo Waterfront Corridor Initiative, An Inventory and Analysis of Buffalo’s Waterfront Planning Legacy

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INTRODUCTION In Fall 2013, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo took a major step in realizing his vision for the City of Buffalo, New York’s largely vacant Outer Harbor waterfront. This step? Transferring more than 400 acres of vacant waterfront land bordering Lake Erie on Buffalo’s Western shore to the State. Governor Cuomo stated: “Buffalo is a beautiful lakefront city and the community deserves a world-class waterfront.” Today, the future of the land is yet unplanned. The Erie Canal Harbor Development Corporation (ECHDC) is leading an exciting debate about the future of the site and, more broadly, Buffalo’s connection to Lake Erie. It’s rare to have this amount of underutilized land on a waterfront anywhere. The City of Buffalo and its residents understand that they should look carefully at the opportunities and challenges this land provides. All levels of government and various community groups have focused their efforts to make Buffalo a true waterfront city, proposing alternative visions ranging from keeping the entire Outer Harbor a public park; to including limited development; to constructing stadiums, amphitheaters, and other major attractions. The City of Buffalo has a long history of waterfront planning and harbor crossing studies. To realize a community-supported vision, a plan that balances public access and competing economic, social, and environmental values is essential. Rather than advocating for a specific cause, the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) seeks to purpose a different perspective that has not been a part of the public dialogue: how the Outer Harbor’s future might look if its redevelopment was guided by the principles of New Urbanism.

This report details CNU’s vision for the Outer Harbor. It is the result of a work session CNU held in May 2014 and was later proposed at the 22nd annual Congress for the New Urbanism in Buffalo, New York on June 5, 2014. This report details an alternative urban vision for the Outer Harbor. It aims to spur debate on how development of this land could better connect the residents of Buffalo to their waterfront. We envision: + +

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112 acres of greenspace; Approximately 5,000 dwelling units, 3.5 million square feet of office space, and 5 million square feet of commercial space, including retail, entertainment, and live-work units, preserving almost 3,000 acres of greenspace in the region; Maintaining the Times Beach Nature Preserve; Converting Route 5 on the Outer Harbor to a local boulevard Several new bridge crossings over the Buffalo River and Ship Canal to increase overall connectivity between Buffalo’s downtown and Lake Erie waterfront; Better transit, bicycle, and pedestrian connections; An interconnected street grid for good vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian access within the Outer Harbor; A diverse real estate market to respond to changing preferences and demographics.

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The Congress for the New Urbanism proposes an urban vision for Buffalo’s Outer Harbor, to offer an alternative perspective to current public dialogue and to spur new debate on how development of this land could better connect Buffalo residents to Lake Erie. More than twenty (20) illustrations, maps, and images are located in the final pages of this report, which explore this vision in depth. Project Site in the Context of Greater Buffalo ..............….....….......13 Ariel View of Existing Conditions ..............….....…...........................14 Transition from Freeway to Boulevard .......…........................…......15 Regulating Plan ..............….....…........................….....…...................16 Figure Field ..............….....…........................….....…..........................17 Illustrative Plan ..............….....…........................….....…...................18 Thoroughfare Network ..............….....…........................….....…........19 Thoroughfare Assignments ..............….....…........................….....….20 Street Sections ..............….....…........................….....…....................21 New Boulevard Section (Type 6) ..............….....…........................…..22 Open Space Plan ..............….....…........................….....…..................23

Area Summary ..............….....…........................….....….....................24 View from Northwest ..............….....…........................….....…...........25 View from Northeast ..............….....…........................….....…............26 View from Southwest ..............….....…........................….....…...........27 View from South ..............….....…........................….....…...................28 View of Town Center ..............….....…........................….....…............29 View of Lakefront ..............….....…........................….....….................30 View of Canal and Central Park ..............….....…........................…..31 Perspective View from Northwest .............….....…..........................32 Perspective View from South ..............….....…........................…......33

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BACKGROUND Buffalo’s Opportunity In 1900, Buffalo was one of North America’s leading cities by almost any measure. Its bustling port was the trans-shipment site between Lake Erie and the Erie Canal. Its manufacturing was booming with access to Minnesota iron ore and Pennsylvania coal. The resulting wealth generated art, culture, magnificent architecture and what has been referred to as America’s “best planned city”. The city and its neighbors on the Niagara Frontier benefited from an extensive streetcar and interurban system. That, combined with boulevards, parks and parkways designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, helped create an extraordinary public realm. Like many eastern and Midwest U.S. cities, Buffalo declined in the post-World War II era. In fact, Buffalo has lost over half its population since 1950. Many factors have contributed to this, including the shift from an industrial to a service-based economy. De-industrialization led to declining population, economic stagnation, and a slew of properties with real or perceived environmental concerns. In addition, the region has been plagued by the environmental and social impacts of urban sprawl; even as the population in both Niagara and Erie counties declined, land consumption increased by 132 percent between 1950 and 1990, producing significant economic, social, and environmental costs for the city.

Today, these trends are reversing. Americans are increasingly embracing urban life both in cities and in suburbs. Placemaking, walkability, biking, and transit-oriented development appeal to more and more people, particularly millennials and baby boomers. The declining population that moved out of the urban core decades ago left 15 percent of the city’s land vacant. Much of this land is located on the Lake Erie waterfront, next to valuable existing infrastructure and poised for redevelopment and economic revitalization. This combination is rare and represents a unique opportunity for the City of Buffalo to transform a district that past generations abandoned into a neighborhood that future generations will seek.

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Great Waterfront Cities Throughout human history, people have chosen to settle on the water's edge, for all the advantages that such locations provide: trade, transportation, food, health, recreation, and unimpeded access to nature. Views of, and access to, adjacent bodies of water bring people into a closer relationship with nature, elevating their quality of life. The Outer Harbor, an open piece of land separated from the city by an elevated expressway and the Buffalo River, presents an unparalleled opportunity for Buffalo to connect with Lake Erie. All of the great port cities of the world—including Venice, Rio de Janeiro, Malecón in Havana, the French Riviera—embrace their waterfronts. In the U.S., in cities like Chicago, Milwaukee, and San Francisco, the built fabric embraces the water’s edge. In Buffalo, most Buffalonians rarely encounter Lake Erie, and visitors have a difficult time understanding that the city is actually on the water. Accces to water provides an economic advantage, even considering the seasonal variability of waterfront activities. Cities around the country, from Florida to Michigan to California, have found significant value in planning mixed-use, walkable development that complements their waterfronts. By integrating compatible, non-water-related uses with water-dependent ones, cities and neighborhoods provide a more stable economic base. If waterdependent activities slow down because of economic conditions, weather or seasonal fluctuations, the compatible non-waterdependent uses can help sustain the local economy and continue to serve the daily needs of those who live, work, and play in the community.1

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Image (top): Outdoor dining is still feasible in cold weather climates where culture permits, like Northern Europe. Image (bottom): The Milwaukee River waterfront in the City of Milwaukee, WI is diverse— it transitions between densely urban, industrial, and natural sharply, all within city limits.

Smart Growth for Coastal and Waterfront Communities (2009), Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Rhode Island Sea Grant, the International City/County Management Association; http://coastalsmartgrowth.noaa.gov/report.html

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Benefits of Density

Parks & Green Space

Buffalo’s Outer Harbor site is the City’s chance to become a truly remarkable waterfront city. Developed appropriately, the Outer Harbor could protect contiguous areas of open space in the region by encouraging denser housing and retail development within Buffalo close to the core. Preserving these larger areas—instead of smaller, scattered sites throughout the region—has a huge net environmental benefit by preserving watersheds, protecting habitat, and leaving sensitive areas undisturbed. 2 Denser development also has the advantage of increasing walking, biking, and transit trips, thus reducing air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and the need for increasing impervious surfaces.

Many of the characteristics that have been well-liked by Buffalonians during this summer’s Outer Harbor public planning sessions—such as large amount of open spaces, preserved parks and woodlands, and better access to the Lake Erie shoreline—are central to CNU’s vision for the Outer Harbor.

In addition to environmental considerations, the Outer Harbor could be developed to be financially sustainable. With the appropriate mix of private development, infrastructure improvements and the means to establish affordable housing options are the only subsidies the city will need to provide. Housing and commercial density will ensure that developers could construct without requiring special financial incentives from the city, as is often the case in other redevelopment projects.

The site, almost 60 city blocks in size, allows the addition of urban green space and urban growth that most cities around the world will be envious. CNU’s vision proposes maintaining 112 acres (almost a third of the study area) for parks and open space, including the Times Beach Nature Preserve. This will keep the area’s unique bird watching opportunities while providing greater access to a variety of habitats for residents and visitors to enjoy. Furthermore, numerous pocket and neighborhood parks close to the developed areas soften the built environment and provide playgrounds and green space within a short walk from homes and businesses. The plan proposes a 100 feet deep linear park that extends around the edge of the entire project, connecting neighborhoods to each other, and also providing public pedestrian access from every part of the project to Lake Erie and the Buffalo Ship Canal. The biking and walking trails along the water will be interesting with Lake Erie at one side and fine grain urban fabric on the other.

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Protecting Water Resources with Higher-Density Development (2006); Environmental Protection Agency; http://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/pdf/protect_water_higher_density.pdf

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Mixed-use Development There is a great and growing demand for communities that are walkable, of high quality, and are mixed in use. Unfortunately, there is not enough supply of dense, balanced development like this in the U.S. to meet the demand. 3 This plan proposes a well-balanced mix of parks and open space, civic, commercial, residential, entertainment, and office uses, creating a vibrant, varied urban environment. Overall, CNU’s vision for the Outer Harbor allows for as many as 5,000 dwellings, 3 million square feet of office space, and 5 million square feet of commercial space, including retail, entertainment, and live-work units. By developing these 173 acres in this manner within the City of Buffalo, the region can save almost 3,000 acres of important farmland and natural areas in the city’s periphery. If coded and platted properly, the building stock and street network developed on the Outer Harbor will have the flexibility to adapt to the changing needs of successive generations, ensuring the long-term sustainability of the site. The proposed density is appropriate to the scale of the surroundings. Buildings range from single and multi-family housing around sensitive natural areas, to three or four stories toward the center. This density will provide a strong and stable financial foundation and property tax base to maintain parks and utilities and support initiatives in other parts of the city. It will also make transit more financially sustainable by ensuring a stable ridership base.

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Several sources: The Next Real Estate Boom from Patrick Doherty and Christopher Leinberger, Brookings Institution, November, 2010; The New Real Estate Boom – Walkable, Transit-Oriented Neighborhoods, Jonathan Blackwell from Atlanta Home Loans Blog, June 12, 2013; Walkable Seattle is in growing demand, Ziprealty.com, accessed 10/30/14; Now Coveted: A Walkable, Convenient Place, Christopher Leinberger, New York Times, May 25, 2012; Housing Recovery Tied to Walkability, But It May Depend On Where You Are, Kaid Benfield, CityLab, May 17, 2012.

Image (top): Development on the Outer Harbor can learn from older Buffalo neighborhoods, like the walkable Elmwood Village. Image (bottom): The Buffalo Metro Rail crosses Court Street in front of Buffalo’s magnificent Art Deco City Hall.

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Transportation & Connectivity For the foreseeable future, the Skyway bridge will remain a feature on the Outer Harbor. However, the Skyway does not need to inhibit revitalization efforts along the waterfront. In order to limit the negatives impacts of the current footprint of the Skyway and Route 5, CNU’s vision proposes bringing Route 5’s embankment down to ground level and converting it to an urban boulevard similar to The Embarcadero in San Francisco, lined with shops, housing, offices, and parks. The Skyway will still function as a bridge for vehicular traffic to and from downtown Buffalo but be designed for slower speeds to make this “grounding” proposal feasible. The boulevard will create better connections to the whole Outer Harbor development, and serve as a central spine for travel, which could include future rail transit.

Outer Harbor site at the north, and the city’s most complete street ever built—Ohio Street—will bring transit riders, cyclists, and pedestrians to the Outer Harbor from the south. Additional connections over the Buffalo Ship Canal will bring more people using various modes to the Outer Harbor. If established, an extension of the existing light rail system will facilitate a simple commute for residents of this neighborhood to the city’s newest emerging employment center—the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus—while simultaneously making the parks, public spaces, restaurants, and shops of the Outer Harbor accessible to other parts of the city without the need for a car.

In addition to the Skyway and boulevard, there will be several new connections across the Buffalo Ship Canal and Buffalo River, increasing permeability between the Outer Harbor and mainland Buffalo, providing greater access and shorter walking and biking routes—especially from downtown. Included in these new connections is a lift bridge at the northern end of the Outer Harbor, directly connecting the downtown and Times Beach Nature Preserve. Under CNU’s vision, the Outer Harbor will be platted with a robust network of streets, taking cues from the historic and successful street patterns, like those found in Allentown and Elmwood Village. Transit service between the Outer Harbor and the rest of the City will be frequent because of the high density of residents, workers, and shoppers. This transit access will allow most residents to avoid driving to meet their daily needs (shopping, visiting friends, medical visits, etc.). It also will allow more people to enjoy the Outer Harbor from other parts of the city. The Special Events Metro Rail Station will be leveraged to bring transit riders to the

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Benefits of an Urban Outer Harbor Environmental The natural features of the Outer Harbor are the most important aspects of the site. For this reason, CNU’s vision calls for one-third of the developable area to be maintained as parks and open space. The vision is bookended by Times Beach Nature Preserve and Wilkeson Pointe to the north, and the new Buffalo Harbor State Park and the Tifft Nature Preserve on the south. All of these assets are and will be extremely important to the Buffalo region for decades. By providing better access to these natural areas, more people will have a chance to appreciate them and understand their importance to migratory birds and the Great Lake’s ecosystem. In between these two major green areas will be several smaller neighborhood parks with different uses, and a walking/biking trail 100 feet wide for people to enjoy the splendid Lake Erie. CNU’s vision specifies that 100% of the water’s edge be reserved for public access. With residents and businesses locating within Buffalo in these mixed-use, pedestrian- and transit-oriented developments, people will have more options to drive less, or to drive shorter distances. Both of these reduce greenhouse gases and other pollutants. This is true for both people who live on the Outer Harbor as well as for people who want to arrive by transit, bicycle, or walk from other parts of Buffalo.

Economic Buffalo has been greatly impacted by a decades-long national and global restructuring of the labor force and economy, yet it retains some significant advantages, specifically in scientific research and development services. One strategy for growth, then, is to retain

some of the 77,000 students from the region’s thirteen universities and to encourage growth in research and sciences. Cities thrive on diversity, and providing new types of housing and retail markets within a city allows it to attract and retain a diverse mix of residents and businesses. The Buffalo region has a large supply of low-density, single family housing and retail areas. As previously noted, real estate demands are changing, especially among baby boomers and millennials, for denser, more walkable neighborhoods. By developing the Outer Harbor with mixed-use residential, retail, office, and civic uses, Buffalo can diversify its housing stock and attract residents and businesses that prefer either type of development. In fact, this trend has already started. Buffalo’s downtown is evolving on a lot-by-lot basis, through project-by-project initiatives, mostly promoted by the private sector (the restoration of the Lafayette Hotel being one example). By connecting the downtown to the waterfront, Buffalo can nurture this kind of development. The City of Buffalo significantly lags behind the region with regard to household income; with a median of $27,600 in the city compared to $44,900 in the region. Buffalo needs to attract residents of all income levels while keeping and prioritizing existing residents. By developing the Outer Harbor in an urban fashion and taking advantage of the popularity of waterfront real estate, Buffalo can offer a variety of housing types for a diverse population. This will lead to more property tax revenue to fund maintenance of parks, transit, affordable housing, revitalization of distressed areas, and to keep people and businesses in the City of Buffalo while attracting new residents and jobs.

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Quality of Life for All Buffalo is an affordable city. The cost of living is just below the national average, partly due to low housing costs. However, this may not always be the case, and CNU’s vision for an urban Outer Harbor will provide for more affordable housing and increase a property tax base to support more city services. In addition, the density in this plan will justify more transit service and better walking and biking infrastructure so that everyone has transportation options to move around Buffalo. There are a lot of subjective factors that contribute to a good quality of life. Natural space is vital, and high quality public spaces are universally valued. This plan makes the beauty of the Times Beach Nature Preserve, Lake Erie, and several other parks and public spaces much more accessible to residents and visitors of Buffalo, ensuring that the city is a great place to live, raise children, and age in place.

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Conclusion City officials, residents, and development professionals are currently debating the future of Buffalo’s Outer Harbor, with the public process having commenced Summer 2014. In redeveloping the Outer Harbor, the City of Buffalo must continue to honor its history and neighborhoods, its climate and seasons, and its human resources. The success of Canalside and the varied civic events that take place along the Buffalo River demonstrate residents’ want for connection to the water. How can this be done without slowing progress elsewhere in Buffalo? CNU’s vision for an urban Outer Harbor is one way. To make CNU’s vision feasible, the City of Buffalo should plat lot sizes and code building elevations, densities, and uses. This has worked very well in many other cities. For example, Milwaukee’s Beer Line—a 28-acre site along the Milwaukee River north of downtown—was bought and built up in 3 years under similar conditions. This and other developments along the Milwaukee River show that Milwaukeeans value their natural environments, even as they live in an urban environment. Today, the Milwaukee River is a major attraction for the city and the Beer Line development has reinforced the downtown, not detracted from it.

Moreover, the kind of work that Buffalo needs to do on the site is not dependent on the economy. The key is to sell land to developers and issue permits to them under the pretense that the streets and water are in place and that their building designs must meet the code. The vision proposed in this report is not a development plan. It highlights the principles of New Urbanism applied to a waterfront redevelopment site. It asks residents and public officials of the City of Buffalo to consider an urban waterfront. The illustrations and perspectives of this vision describe a metropolitan urbanism and demand that the City of Buffalo not lose this opportunity to become a world-class waterfront.

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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 Š moule & polyzoides

Project Site in the Context of Greater Buffalo

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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 © moule & polyzoides

Aerial View of Existing Conditions Scale: 1” = 300’-0”

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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 © moule & polyzoides

Transition from Freeway to Boulevard Scale: 1” = 300’-0”

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T5’ T5 T4’ T4 T3 Parks and Nature

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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 © moule & polyzoides

Regulating Plan Scale: 1” = 300’-0”

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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 Š moule & polyzoides

Figure Field Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 17


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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 © moule & polyzoides

Illustrative Plan Scale: 1” = 300’-0”

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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 © moule & polyzoides

Thoroughfare Network Scale: 1” = 300’-0”

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Type 1 - Lakefront Boulevard Type 2 - Pedestrain Promenade Type 3 - Neighborhood Boulevard Type 4 - Typical Neighborhood Street (Free) Type 5 - Typical Neighborhood Street (Slow) Type 6 - Replacement of Freeway by Fuhrmann Boulevard Type 7 - Canal Road Type 8 - Commercial Street Type 9 - Promenade to Slips Type 10 - Alley

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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 © moule & polyzoides

Thoroughfare Assignments Scale: 1” = 300’-0”

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Type 1 - Lakefront Boulevard

Type 5 - Typical Neighborhood Street (Slow)

Type 9 - Promenade to Slips

Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 © moule & polyzoides

Type 2 - Pedestrain Promenade

Type 3 - Neighborhood Boulevard

Type 7 - Canal Road

Type 6 - Replacement of Freeway by Fuhrmann Boulevard

Type 4 - Typical Neighborhood Street (Free)

Type 8 - Commercial Street

Type 10 - Alley

Street Sections Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”

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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 © moule & polyzoides

New Boulevard Section (Type 6) Scale: 3/16” = 1’-0”

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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 © moule & polyzoides

Open Space Plan Scale: 1” = 300’-0”

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61 62 17 5

4

3

2

1

14

13

15

18

16

21

20

26

25

19

22

23

27

28

7

6

8

9

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Area Summary Buffalo Waterfront – Area Summary Buffalo Waterfront – Area Summary

Block Summary Block Summary Area (Acres) Area (Acres)

Block Area (SF) Area (SF)

376 376 112 112 91 91 173 173

16395582 16395582 1 4879301 4879301

Number

Gross Building Area Gross Building Area

Gross Building Area

Area (sq.ft.) Area (sq.ft.) Residential Residential Office Office Retail Retail Civic Civic

7,331,018 7,331,018 3,511,784 3,511,784 704,329 704,329 66,243 66,243

Total Total

11,613,374 11,613,374

1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

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Sheet1

Sheet1 Sheet1

Total Study Area Total Study Area Open Space Open Space R.O.W. Area R.O.W. Area Developable Area Developable Area

37

36

35

33

11

10

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32

31

30

1

Area (Acres)

Transect Zone

1.75 2.52 2.27 3.28 1.70 3.45 4.85 3.84 1.51 1.58 1.62 4.50 1.45 0.81 1.79 2.72 1.29 1.09 1.00 2.55 3.33 1.78 2.00 1.82 2.64 2.47 2.99 2.73 2.71 3.51 3.29

T3 T3 T3, T4' T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T4' T4' T4' T4' T4' Park T4' T3 T3 T3 T3 T3 T4' T4' T4' T4' T4' T4' T4'

Building Height (Storeys) 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

Total Gross  Building Area  (sf) 44,610 58,821 70,216 142,778 70,570 116,398 209,548 154,000 73,545 81,798 121,815 201,650 23,899 36,905 34,475 152,682 47,894 0 63,399 54,265 50,605 32,729 32,569 27,702 129,387 124,683 143,298 117,960 126,594 213,750 188,688

Area Summary Scale: 1” = 300’-0”

54

56

55

44 Sheet1

Block Summary

60 63

24

57

34

Block Number

29 59

40

Area (Acres)

1.75 1 39 2.52 2.27 3.28 1.70 3.45 4.85 3.84 1.51 1.58 1 1.62 11 4.50 1 1.45 1 0.81 1 1 Sheet1 1.79 2.72 1 1.29 1 Block Summary 1.09 1 1.00 1 2.55 Block  Area  3.33 1 Number (Acres) 1.78 2.00 1.75 1 1.82 2.52 2.64 2.27 2.47 3.28 2.99 1.70 2.73 3.45 2.71 4.85 3.51 3.84 Sheet1 3.29 1 1.51 3.13 1.58 1 2.97 1.62 11 3.86 4.50 1 3.46 1.45 1 3.10 0.81 1 2.88 1.79 1 2.70 2.72 1 2.62 1.29 1 1.45 1.09 1 4.35 1 1.00 1 2.55 Page 4.34 5.11 3.33 1 1.83 1.78 3.26 2.00 3.94 1.82 3.16 2.64 3.82 2.47 3.76 2.99 4.08 2.73 3.18 1 2.71 10.52 3.51 11.82 3.29 1 4.59 3.28 2.40 1.23 2.99 4.70 1.32 2.30 1 4.19

Transect Zone

Building Height (Storeys)

T3 1 64 1 T3 T3, T4' 1 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T5 T4' 1 T4' 1 T4' 1 T4' T4' 1 Park T4' T3 1 Transect  Building Height T3 1 Zone (Storeys) T3 1 T3 1 T3 1 T4' T3, T4' 1 T4' T5 T4' T5 T4' T5 T4' T5 T4' T5 T4' T5 Park T5 T4' T5 T4' T5 T5' T4' 11 T5' T4' 11 T5' T4' 11 T5' 1 T4' T5' T4' 11 T4' Park T4' T4 T3 1 T4 T3 1 T4 T3 1 T4 T3 1 T4' T3 1 T4 T4' T4 T4' T5' T4' T5' T4' T4 T4' T4 T4' T4 T4' T4' T4 T4 Park 1 T4 1 Park Park 1 Park 1 Park

41

43

42

Total Gross 

53

48

Building Area 47 46 (sf) 44,610 58,821 49 70,216 142,778 70,570 116,398 209,548 154,000 73,545 81,798 121,815 201,650 23,899 36,905 34,475 152,682 47,894 0 63,399 54,265 Total Gross  Building Area  50,605 (sf) 32,729 32,569 44,610 27,702 58,821 129,387 70,216 124,683 142,778 143,298 70,570 117,960 116,398 126,594 209,548 213,750 154,000 188,688 73,545 0 81,798 160,356 121,815 177,315 201,650 471,182 23,899 413,640 36,905 396,992 34,475 385,932 152,682 415,951 47,894 103,815 0 313,901 63,399 353,815 54,265 378,413 50,605 158,099 32,729 252,721 32,569 250,485 27,702 232,799 129,387 302,876 124,683 236,278 143,298 291,820 117,960 340,736 126,594 1,294,804 213,750 821,041 188,688 246,894 258,202 165,505 13,874 176,330 0 5,960 27,392 0

45

52 50 51 Sheet1

3.13 2.97 3.86 3.46 3.10 Sheet12.88 2.70 2.62 Block Summary 1.45 4.35 1 4.34 Block  Area  5.11 Number (Acres) 1.83 3.26 1.75 1 3.94 2.52 3.16 2.27 3.82 3.28 3.76 1.70 4.08 3.45 3.18 1 4.85 10.52 3.84 11.82 1.51 4.59 1.58 1 3.28 1.62 11 2.40 4.50 1 1.23 1.45 1 2.99 0.81 1 4.70 1.79 1 1.32 2.72 1 2.30 1.29 11 4.19 1.09 1 42.26 1.00 1 42.10 2.55 4.75 3.33 1 1.78 2.00 1.82 2.64 2.47 2.99 2.73 2.71 3.51 3.29 1

Park T4' T4' T5' T5' T5' T5' T5' T4' T4' T4 Transect T4 Zone T4 T4 T3 T4' T3 T4 T3, T4' T4 T5 T5' T5 T5' T5 T4 T5 T4 T5 T4 T5 T4' T5 T4 T5 T4 T5 Park T4' T4 T4' Park T4' Park T4' Park T4' Park Park T4' Park T3 Park T3 T3 T3 T3 T4' T4' T4' T4' T4' T4' T4'

1 1 1 1 1

Building Height (Storeys) 1 1 1

1 1

1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 24 Page

0 160,356 177,315 471,182 413,640 396,992 385,932 415,951 103,815 313,901 353,815 Total Gross  Building Area  378,413 (sf) 158,099 252,721 44,610 250,485 58,821 232,799 70,216 302,876 142,778 236,278 70,570 291,820 116,398 340,736 209,548 1,294,804 154,000 821,041 73,545 246,894 81,798 258,202 121,815 165,505 201,650 13,874 23,899 176,330 36,905 0 34,475 5,960 152,682 27,392 47,894 0 0 63,399 19,019 54,265 0 50,605 32,729 32,569 27,702 129,387 124,683 143,298 117,960 126,594 213,750 188,688


Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 Š moule & polyzoides

View from Northwest Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 25


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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 Š moule & polyzoides

View from Northeast Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 26


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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 Š moule & polyzoides

View from Southwest Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 27


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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 Š moule & polyzoides

View from South Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 28


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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 Š moule & polyzoides

View of Town Center Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 29


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Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 Š moule & polyzoides

View of Lakefront Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 30


Lake Erie Waterfront Redevelopment Congress of the New Urbansim 5 June 2014 Š moule & polyzoides

View of Canal and Central Park Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 31


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Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 32


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Congress for the New Urbanism / An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor / 34

Profile for Congress for the New Urbanism

Buffalo, A City on the Waterfront: An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor  

This report, prepared by the Congress for the New Urbanism, details an alternative urban vision for the Buffalo's Outer Harbor. It aims to s...

Buffalo, A City on the Waterfront: An Urban Alternative for the Outer Harbor  

This report, prepared by the Congress for the New Urbanism, details an alternative urban vision for the Buffalo's Outer Harbor. It aims to s...

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