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MICHELLE REID

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HALLOWEEN TIPS

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JOSEPH BOYDEN

NEW TRIBE magazine The Cultural Appropriation Issue

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KRISTY NORTH PEIGAN

*TURN UP THE VOLUME * CREATIVE TRIBE RACISM & SPORTS

Free Vol. 1 2 Issue 8 OCTOBER 2013 Now Available online www.usay.ca


NOTEBOOK from*the*editor Hello New Tribe Readers, Happy Halloween to one and all. Yes, it’s that time of year when kids go out en masse to get as much treats as logistically possible. It also seems like the days are getting shorter and colder, so make sure you bundle up before heading out. In this issue of New Tribe magazine we feature several a r t icles dealing with the issue of Cultural Appropriation, and why the practice of dressing up in the traditional and sacred garb of other cultures is considered offensive, and the reasoning behind it. We hope that we got the message out in a clear and respectful manner and that any question marks are answered. Need updates on upcoming

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USAY and New Tribe Magazine events? Feel free to search us out on Face book and join our growing friends list. We post upcoming events, submission requirements and deadlines, and fun stuff like upcoming movie nights and book clubs. It is also a great place to comment on stories or articles you wish to see in our upcoming issues. Do you have an opinion on this issue of New Tribe magazine? Good, bad, or ugly send in your thoughts and we will print it in the letters section. Spread the word, and stay true to it. John Medeiros Creative Director New Tribe Magazine

NEW TRIBE

Calgary’s Aboriginal Youth Monthly usayeditor@gmail.com Creative Director John Medeiros Graphic Design Aboriginal Design Group Urban Society for Aboriginal Youth Suite 600, 615 Macleod Trail South Calgary, Alberta T2G 4T8 403.233.8225 Executive Director LeeAnne Ireland Program Manager Rachel Paris Office Manager Jessica Hawryluk Board of Directors President Sarena Provost Vice-President Amanda Gonet Treasurer Melaina Patenaude Secretary Cheryl Hanley

NEW TRIBE is a monthly magazine. Our mission is to promote a positive outlook on Aboriginal living in an urban setting by promoting information sharing within the Aboriginal and youth communities Opinions expressed in submitted work/letters are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NEW TRIBE or USAY. This magazine is a forum for Aboriginal youth to speak their minds and share their stories without intervention. The publisher assumes no responsibility or liability for plagiarism of the works in the magazine. All writings are presumed to be the original work of the contributing authors.

Special Thanks to our Community Partners & Funders


CONTENTS

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12

27 OCTOBER

COVER STORY CULTURAL APPROPRIATION 20

4

NEWS BRIEFS

33 22

COMMUNITY

7 WHAT’S GOING ON?

24 TOP 10 LIST

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COMMUNITY

26

USAY AGM

10 STEREOTYPING

27

CREATIVE

12 ON THE TABLE

30

MUSIC REVIEW

14 POETRY

32

MOVIE REVIEW

15 COMMUNITY

34

BOOK REVIEW

16 CULTURAL

38

U AROUND TOWN

18 HALLOWEEN

40

COMMUNITY NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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NEWS*BRIEFS

Aboriginal Happenings From Across Canada First Nations Band is fixing it’s big welfare problem with a small solution. There’s an old proverb that tells how an entire kingdom was lost because a horse throws a shoe, “for want of a nail.” It reminds us how seemingly small details can have big, even disastrous, consequences. One small native band has taken the meaning behind the proverb to heart, but has turned it on its head: The small detail is now saving a community, not dooming it. The local leadership, and their partners in the federal government, have benefited mightily from a decision not to let their community suffer for want of not nails, but boots. With a few buses and shuttle vans thrown in for good measure. The boots in question are steel-toed construction boots, and they’ve made a huge difference on Little Pine First Nations reserve, home to 600-someodd souls located about 90 kilometres southwest of the city of Lloydminster, on

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the border of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Little Pine had been paying unemployed band members welfare, until a pilot project begun last year began putting locals to work. Under the program, run jointly by the band and the federal Northern Affairs Department, resumes were collected and distributed to local (that term is used somewhat loosely here) employers. Job training was provided for anyone who needed to learn, or improve, a skill. Many of the band members were desired by the employers, but were unable to accept the employment because they either had no way to get to where the jobs were, or lacked the equipment necessary to accept the position. Enter the buses and the boots. There were 70 band members who were eager to work and had jobs waiting, but didn’t have the steel-toed safety boots to safely work on the job site, a Husky Energy project. So the band raised

$7,000 dollars and bought every member willing to work a pair of boots. To get the workers to the jobsite, the band also bought two buses and two shuttle vans. The results have been remarkable. After the first 70 band members got working, others in the community began to look for employment. “When they see all these friends and family members go to work, they want to be a part of it too,” said Chief Wayne Semaganis. . “It’s a sense of belonging.” A further 30 band members have found work outside the band, including work in the retail sector or hospitality industries in larger communities in the region. The total effect of the project, thus far, has been cutting Little Pine’s welfare roster. Chief Semaganis said when he first became chief four years ago, he’d have to sign well over 400 welfare cheques a month. Now, it’s just over 100.

SOURCE -National Post


COMMUNITY

Would life be what it is today My biggest fear is not being here People sit back watching me pack all these fears and tears… why must I cry you”ll never know why I seek for help I feel alone I just sit and stare into mid air My biggest fear is not being here Why must you judge who iam You sit there judging while my makeup is smudging Why must I cry My biggest fear is not being here To see who I could be and I want to be is me… So do not judge who I am I will move on….but….still My biggest fear is not being here From Kelsey Manyheads

NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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TRIBE*creative

“Paddle Song” 35mm photography

SHELBY BROWN 6

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What’s Going On? OCTOBER,2013 Oct 01 Zoo Gala Calgary Zoo Calgary, AB

Oct 19 Wayne Brady Deerfoot Inn Calgary, AB

Oct 04 - Oct 31 Olympic Park Calgary, AB

Oct 24 - Oct 26 Boo at the Zoo: Night Event Calgary Zoo Calgary

Oct 05 Jason Aldean in Concert Scotiabank Saddledome Calgary, AB Oct 14 - Oct 20 WordFest International Writers Festival http://www.wordfest.com Calgary, AB Oct 18 Chuck Palahniuk Reception John Dutton Theatre Calgary, AB

Oct 26 - Oct 27 Calgary Woman’s Show BMO Centre Calgary, AB Oct 26 Chris Cornell in Concert Southern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium Calgary, AB Oct 31 Dixie Chicks in Concert Scotiabank Saddledome Calgary, AB

Oct 19 Calgary Tattoo & Arts Festival Oct 31 Halloween BMO Centre Calgary, AB Oct 19 - Oct 20 Calgary Baby & Tot Show BMO centre Calgary, AB

Calgary Flames Home Games 10/06/2013 6:00 PM Vancouver Canucks @ Calgary Flames 10/09/2013 6:00 PM Montreal Canadiens@ Calgary Flames 10/11/2013 7:00 PM New Jersey Devils @ Calgary Flames 10/26/2013 8:00 PM Washington Capitals @ Calgary Flames 10/30/2013 6:00 PM Toronto Maple Leafs @ Calgary Flames Calgary Stampeders Home Games 10/05/2013 4:30 PM Winnipeg Blue Bombers @ Calgary Stampeders 10/11/2013 7:00 PM BC Lions @ Calgary Stampeders 10/26/2013 5:00 PM Saskatchewan Roughriders @ Calgary Stampeders

Calgary YMCA Rec night Every Tuesday 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

If you have an event you’d like us to include in our monthly calendar, email it to us - usayeditor@gmail.com by the third Wednesday of the month. Submission deadline for the Oct 2013 issue: Sep 26 NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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COMMUNITY

WWW.KALUMDAN.COM Kalum Teke Dan Native Artist ktdan@hotmail.ca

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COMMUNITY

NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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COMMUNITY

Stereotyping and Racism Around the Naming of Sports Teams

By: Christine Smith (McFarlane)

What is the problem with naming sports teams and mascots after Aboriginal people?” This is the very question that has many non- Aboriginal people shaking their heads and asking “what’s the big deal?” and First Nations people angered because the naming of certain teams have long been controversial and demeaning to them as a people and as nations within Canada. In the book titled “The Color of Democracy-Racism in Canadian Society,” written by Frances Henry and Carol Tater, they define racism as an ideology “that organizes, preserves, and perpetuates the power structures in a society. It creates and preserves a system of dominance based on race and is communicated and reproduced through agencies of socialization and cultural transmission, such 10

NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

as the mass media, schools, universities, religious doctrines, symbols and images, art, music and literature.” (pg.16) Racism has everything to do with the naming of certain sports teams and it has been downright derogatory. The stereotypical and racist naming of sports teams continues a practice of ingrained stereotypes that have been implemented by a racist system (our nation state) and continues to be seen as acceptable in sports culture. It is a practice that is rightfully being addressed and will hopefully be stopped in its tracks. (pun intended) I have to admit, I have never been the type of person to really pay attention to sports. Sports just don’t hold an interest with me, like books and writing do. I find

it incredibly boring to sit in front of a television screen and watch athletes throwing a ball around, or an individual getting checked in a hockey game. I cringe when I see someone go down on the ice and/or field, writhing in pain from an injury obtained while playing. But with that said, I do have a problem with cultural appropriation and the stereotypical and racist naming of sports teams and mascots. When it comes to the naming of sports teams and mascots, I ask you to consider what you would like to see and/ or what you would like the name to represent Do you not think that that when it comes to naming, the names should reflect unity and be respectful of the members that are not only playing in the team but also respectful of those who


COMMUNITY are watching the team? Sports, after all is about team playing and togetherness out on the field. What is unifying about the names: the Atlanta Braves, the Chicago Black Hawks, the Cleveland Indians and the Washington Redskins and in our own backyard, the Nepean Redskins Football Club in Ottawa, Ontario? I believe that the offensive naming of sports teams and mascots goes beyond cultural appropriation. It delves into a colonial history that has long had a dominant culture assert its authority over a culture (First Nations culture) they have seen as inferior to them. It reinforces negative practices that demean an entire race. With the continued use of Aboriginal stereotypes in sports teams and mascots, what example is the sport industry/culture trying to set for younger generations? How can people move toward a path of reconciliation, if there are names out there that demean Aboriginal people and have them appear to be subhuman, and at the same time continue to marginalize the many issues that we as Aboriginal people face in the struggle against colonialism? Time and time again, cultural appropriation is brought up. It is a term that has been around since the first days of colonization for First Nations

people. It comes from the Hollywood ‘Redsploitation’ era in movies, to the concept of Indigenous mascots for sports teams to the recent trend of cultural appropriation in popular fashion today.

and may take a number of years to complete, but they also state “As a community sport organization, the Club aims to provide a healthy and positive environment for the youth in our programs, encourage sportsmanship at all levels of Cultural appropriation may be play and instill a sense of pride an old argument to some people and support for our community but to others it is not.The most both on and off the field.” recent case of discrimination that has made its way into As a First Nations individual, the headlines is the filing of a I commend Ian Campeau for discrimination complaint with stepping up and filing this the Human Rights Tribunal complaint. I also commend of Ontario by Ian Campeau. the response by the Nepean Campeau, a First Nations man Redskins Football Club because from Nipissing First Nation, even if it did mean that someone who is also a father, a musician had to step forward and file a and a DJ with the immensely complaint, they are accepting popular electronic music group this complaint and moving in “A Tribe Called Red” has caused a positive direction to respect the Nepean Redskins Football First Nations peoples and their Club in Ottawa, Ontario to race by eradicating a name that voluntarily change their name has long been stereotypical and and logo. demeaning, and that is a step forward. On September 19, 2013, it was announced that “after thoughtful There is one last thought, I reflection and discussions with would like you to consider. If the community, the Nepean we as First Nations people Redskins Football Club has were to name our sports teams voluntarily decided to change and mascots with names from the name of the Club, retiring another culture, do you think it the moniker “Redskins” and the would be so readily accepted? associated logo,” and that the I do not think so. Cultural transition will begin at the end appropriation would then of this year’s football season. take on a whole new different (www.anishinabeknews.ca) meaning and we would be the ones scratching our heads and It is stated that the name change asking “why are these people so will have both administrative angry about this?” Think about and financial implications, and it. will cost in excess of $100.000 NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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FLAVOR

On the Table Beef Stew INGREDIENTS

1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin 1 (14 ounce) can EAGLE BRAND速 Sweetened Condensed Milk 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 (9 inch) unbaked pie crust DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Whisk pumpkin, sweetened condensed milk, eggs, spices and salt in medium bowl until smooth. Pour into crust. Bake 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees F and continue baking 35 to 40 minutes or until knife inserted 1 inch from crust comes out clean. Cool. Garnish as desired. Store leftovers covered in refrigerator.

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connect

NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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WORD

Fancy Dancers Tale Written By: Aaliyah De Caire

Warm relaxing winds speak thru the leaves of these breath-taking aged trees, can you hear the voices?, I’m caught in a sensational moment, the mist of these tropical rain-forest refreshes my discouraging thoughts, the texture of the trees bark feeds my spirit I’m connected to mother earth I warm my drum and ground myself, animals surround me as my bare feet touch the blessed ground their here watching me, I’m awakening my ancestors that have passed long ago, the heartbeat of the drum vibrates my wounds, the beauty of my dancing releases my pain & distractions in my everyday life including the stress I carry with me that others left upon me. A woman’s spirit is set free when my silenced voice is released, I let my grandmother know I’m safe, I feel her spirit she still worries I’m lost in the woods cause my voiced has been silenced since the begging of my teenage years, I’m an adult know, I cry as I am a warrior ready for war I’ll claim my voice once again My heart is pure, my love is real, my light finally radiates my struggles & my pain, when I twirl in the in the winds you’ll see my reflection in the sunlight as I dance I’ll tell my story, when my feet touch the blessed grounds you’ll see my tears, real women speak thru their feet, this is me my spirit starts in my feet.

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Community

NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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COMMU NITY

Cultural Appropriation by: Christine Smith (McFarlane) Cultural appropriation… the very words tend to put my back up and I find it difficult to write about. I’m asking you now to please forgive me if this comes out in a way that may offend you. Offending someone who reads this is not my intention, it is my intention for others to learn what cultural appropriation is and for them to learn how to be aware of it happening and helping to stop it if they can.

To a lot of people in the mainstream culture, cultural appropriation is something to laugh about, when in fact it is not. If they are called on it, they get defensive and angry, or they turn a blind eye to it. Mainstream culture thinks that it is cool when stores try to make a dollar out of selling headdresses, dream catchers, mukluks, eagle feathers etc., and they don’t take the time to understand the true meaning behind these items.

First off, let me explain what cultural appropriation is. “Cultural appropriation is the adoption of some specific elements of one culture by a different cultural group. It can include the introduction of forms of dress or personal adornment, music and art, religion, language, or behavior. These elements are typically imported into the existing culture and may have wildly different meanings or lack the subtleties of “their original cultural context”. Because of this, cultural appropriation is sometimes viewed negatively, and has been called “cultural theft.” (Cultural appropriation. http://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Acculturation)

You just need to think about recent headlines about the popular store H&M and how they tried to sell what they called ‘fashionable’ headdresses for fifteen dollars. When a few people complained, they pulled them off their shelves. Cultural appropriation does not just happen with our artifacts, it also happens with how we are seen in the mediathe newspapers, film, and literature. In film, you just need to think of movies such as Dances with Wolves, Avatar and the Disney movie Pocahontas. In the movies we are depicted as the ‘noble savage,’ “the damsel in distress” or ‘we need to be rescued.”

Cultural appropriation is unique to every Indigenous nation and by that I mean that every nation holds their artifacts, images, and ceremonial items within a specific context, and these meanings should not be misconstrued or abused in any way. If you have questions in regards to certain items, do not be afraid to ask someone from that particular nation. I have found that someone is always willing to explain the meaning of something if asked politely and respectfully.

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In researching this article, I found that there was no shortage of materials to look over when it came to cultural appropriation. In one book “Selling the Indian: Commercializing & Appropriating American Indian Culture,” edited by Carter Jones Meyer and Diana Royer, a contributing author S. Elizabeth Bird writes about the construction of the Indian and the role anthropology plays in this construction. She states, “It is not new to point out that mass culture images of American Indians are images created by white culture,

for white culture. In earlier times, that alien image was feared and hated, fed by and feeding a popular culture that mythologized the massacre of whites by savage, uncontrollable Indians.” Bird further argues “the captivity narrative’ in which honourable white women and children were degraded and destroyed by lustful savages, became a staple of popular journalism and fiction in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and echoed on into the twentieth. She also argues “current media representations are understandable only if seen as the legacy of a complex mesh of cultural elements, including formal history, literature, material artifacts, folklore, photography, cartoon, art, mass media, and anthropological discourse.” It is important to note that how we as First Nations people are seen goes back into the work of early historians and anthropologists. We as First Nations people have been seen as the “Other.” Descriptions of us became the core of museum exhibits, world fairs, Wild West Shows, and early silent films. Through the lens of these early images, First Nations people have been effectively placed into a kind of time warp, in which we have not emerged from in the eyes of the non-native. I suggest that if we were a culture that used to be feared and hated, why is it now ‘cool’ to take our culture and traditions and turn them into something that it is not meant to be about? Popular discourse on First Nations people has always been racist and stereotypical, but when a non-native wears feathered


COMMU NITY earrings, or wears mukluks or buys a “fashionable” headdress, it is all of a sudden cool. What incenses me the most about cultural appropriation is the notion that our culture, traditions and languages are seen as what early historians have called ‘primitive or backwards,” and then there is blatant racism played out in the mainstream culture about who we are as a people, and our artifacts, ceremonies and images are the cool thing to do or have. Another form of cultural appropriation is the naming of sports teams and mascots such as the Atlanta Braves, the Chicago Black Hawks, Cleveland Indians and the Washington Redskins. First Nations people have been calling on these teams to change their names and logos to something that is not racist and stereotypical, yet team managers do not care to change anything about these names, and say “oh its no big deal.” First Nations people have struggled since first contact with attacks on their nations through colonialist strategies and policies implemented by the Canadian government. Do I need to call attention to residential schools, the Sixties Scoop, where thousands of children were taken from their families and communities and adopted out to non-native parents, which effectively stole our identities as First Nations peoples? What about ceremonies that were deemed illegal in the early 19th and 20th centuries? You just need to think about the potlatch ceremony on the West Coast. The potlatch ceremony was “an important cultural and spiritual practice among Aboriginal peoples on the Pacific Northwest Coast. Chiefs used potlatches to name children, to transfer titles and privileges from father and son and to mourn the dead.” (http://abed.sd79. bc.ca/acip/references/govt_policies/ ban_traditional_practice.pdf) It was through some missionaries, Aboriginal Christians and the Hudson Bay Company traders that believed the potlatch ceremony encouraged

non-Christian beliefs and distracted Aboriginal peoples from ‘productive work.’ In 2008 Prime Minister Stephen Harper issued an apology, in which he stated “Two primary objectives of the residential schools system were to remove and isolate children from the influence of their homes, families, traditions and cultures, and to assimilate them into the dominant culture…. Indeed, some sought, as it was infamously said, “to kill the Indian in the child.” The last residential school closed in 1996. It is issues such as these that the average mainstream culture struggles to understand because of the absence of Indigenous voices and real identities in film, television, education and literature. First Nations people have been misrepresented for a long time, and it needs to stop! The very utterance of the words “cultural appropriation” incenses First Nations people. I know it incenses me. It upsets me because I grew up not knowing my culture, language and traditions. Though I am now at a point where I understand a lot more of my culture and traditions, I find it infuriating when I witness non-natives trying to integrate themselves into our culture and community, and then do nothing but tell us ‘how’ we should be or ‘what’ we should be doing to better ourselves. To mention just First Nations people as being the only ones that face cultural appropriation would not be fair. It happens to all Indigenous peoples, and all Indigenous peoples face some kind of battle with their government and the policies that have been instilled to eradicate First Nations/Metis/Inuit peoples of their culture, traditions, languages and rights. I find that no matter how hard First Nations people fight to protect their culture and traditions, when it comes to ‘borrowing’ of images or the selling

of artifacts that we hold sacred to ourselves and our nations, we are told “ah, it’s no big deal,” or we’re told “get over it already.” But if you think about it, if we were to take something from another culture and the tables were turned, the whole concept of cultural appropriation would take on a whole new different meaning. Lastly in another book, “Writing As Witness: Essay and Talk,” written by Beth Brant, the reader is privy to the “New Age” religion. This is where cultural appropriation is the most dominant. Brant writes about how we are surrounded by magazines, journals and that there is a heavy reliance on paraphernalia and language, and how some of it is ‘borrowed from Indigenous cultures. She writes “it seems that those folks who are anxious to have an experience with other worldly beings are the same people who would declare they are colour blind or refer to Indigenous peoples of any continent as “our Natives.” There is some kind of patronizing and ethnocentric behavior being acted out as that of the missionary and the liberal.” There is so much to write about when it comes to cultural appropriation, that once I got started, I found it hard to stop. I could go on and on, but my most important message about cultural appropriation is that it is wrong, and the mainstream public needs to understand that First Nations culture, traditions and languages are an integral part of who we are as First Nations people. Our culture, ceremonies, traditions and everything that is a part of us, is not something that can be bought and sold. If you, as a First Nations individual see something from our culture being appropriated, do not be afraid to speak up and say something or take action. Write letters to companies/ corporations that are appropriating our images and artifacts, phone them, or start a campaign to say ENOUGH IS ENOUGH! NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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HALLOWEEN

HALLOWEEN SAFETY TIPS by Joseph Montrose

Halloween is often a child’s favorite holiday because they are given an opportunity to dress up in costume and eat tasty treats. Unfortunately, Halloween can also be a time when dangerous situations present themselves as children are walking the streets in the dark and consuming food given to them by strangers. Keeping your child protected, happy, and healthy this Halloween should be a top priority so follow the tips below to guarantee a holiday that is both safe fun for the entire family.

children avoid getting injured in the street. They should always look both ways prior to crossing the road and whenever possible remain safely on the sidewalk. Motorists should be on high alert on Halloween, but you can never be too careful when it comes to kids dressed in dark costumes.

Avoid Candles: Many homes decorate for Halloween using actual candles or luminaries. It is important to be aware of your surroundings and to help guide children a safe distance from any open flames. As an Trick or Treating Safety Tips additional precaution, many costumes are made to be flameAvoid Traffic: There are many resistant which is particularly common sense tips to help beneficial for small children. 18

NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

Bring a Flashlight: A flashlight should be the most important accessory for an adult to bring along with them trick or treating. Not only does it help guide the way between houses but it also alerts vehicles that you and your children are there. If children are going on their own, be sure to encourage them to bring flashlights as well. Only Visit Well-Lit Houses: Houses that are dark likely have the lights off because they do not want to participate in trick or treating. Be sure to avoid them and instead only visit houses that are lit up and appear inviting. Also, reiterate to children the importance of not accepting rides from strangers


HALLOWEEN on this holiday evening. For Your Home: Always have a pathway that is well lit and free of any obstructions that children might trip over. Also be sure to keep all pets restrained within the home during trick or treating hours. Finally, avoid candles or open flames. Costume Safety Tips

costume should always fit them well to avoid tripping and falling or blocking their vision. This is especially important when it comes to masks. So do not be tempted to recycle an old costume if it does not fit the child well because it could lead to potential injuries while trick or treating.

Homemade treats should not be trusted. Unfortunately, the majority of the time these treats are likely perfectly fine to consume but it is a risk that children should never take. Instead, stick to only factorywrapped candy and treat items and avoid anything that strangers have made themselves.

Wear Reflective Tape: Many Halloween costumes for children today are dark in color. Utilize small pieces of reflective tape on a child’s costume so that any vehicles driving by can see them. This is especially important in neighborhoods that have limited lighting as well as those with busy streets.

Examine Every Piece: Take a look at each and every piece of candy and treat prior to letting your child consume it. It is easy enough to briefly look over each piece to ensure that nothing has been tampered with and the treat is safe for consumption. Also, avoid any potential choking hazards with small children.

Costume Accessories: Many costumes today come with a wide variety of accessories including swords, guns, and knives. While these accessories are often essential to the costume it is just as essential that they are made of soft and flexible material in order to keep children safe when playing with one Avoid Decorative Lenses: another. A variety of costume shops sell eye contact lenses that Costume Makeup: Halloween are designed to change the is often the first time children color of one’s eyes or make put on makeup and they may them appear spookily blank. have a negative reaction, However, these lenses can especially with sensitive be quite dangerous and if skin. It is helpful to test the required for a costume an makeup on a small area that is eye doctor should always be not on the child’s face prior to consulted first to determine applying it and remember to the exact size. always remove it before the child goes to sleep. Candy and Treat Tips Costume

Fit:

A

child’s Avoid

Limit Consumption: Many children are so excited to eat their candy as soon as they get home. While it is fine for them to have some treats, it is unhealthy for them to overdo it. Not only can eating too much sugar keep them up all night but it can also lead to harmful long term eating habits and weight gain so limit the number of treats they eat.

Homemade: NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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Cultural Appropriation For the cover of the October issue of New Tribe magazine, this was my vision of communicating Cultural Appropriation. This is the adoption of some specific elements of one culture by a different cultural group (wikipedia). It is the redefining of cultural elements by a dominant culture that are completely different from their original meaning or intentional use (wikipedia). To show this concept as clearly as possibly, I used the most common incident of cultural appropriation in contemporary society; fashion. Our everyday lives are bombarded by a high society that dictates what clothing is acceptable, and desirable. Unfortunately, trends in popular, main stream culture is also influenced by high fashion. The use of our peoples headdresses have been used in the fashion industry for many years now. Some cases are blasphemous with their use, such as on a nearly naked, but pearled and laced, bodices, bras and underwear of Victoria Secret models. In my generation, the popularity of “hipster headdresses,” are the desired attire of rave goers, and young adults wishing to follow “tribal trends” to appear either fashionable, ethnic, cute, or dynamic, all with the end goal of giving the impression of popularity. All this does is promote the general stereotypes of Aboriginal peoples. To communicate and encompass the themes involved with such a sensitive issue, I chose to juxtapose a traditional woman and the importance of modesty, with a caucasian woman who represents the society and “tribal trends.” These trends are shown through every item of clothing she is wearing. Her arm is aggressive and pulling from the traditional woman, to show just where these items were taken from. She is continuing to pull, but is clearly gaining more from the situation, and this is shown with her care free stance and relaxed face. The traditional woman however, I had her showing the sadness and disappointment traditional thinkers have towards this issue. I had her also pulling on her shawl to keep herself covered, and therefore protected, but she is struggling, and this shows in her facial expression. Fashion as a canvas? Where does choice lie...?

20 NEW TRIBE MARCH 2013 Kristy North Peigan


The Cultural Appropriation Debate John Medeiros artwork by Kristy North Peigan What is Cultural Appropriation? offense of cultural appropriation happens mostly when a sports team It is shocking just how few people decides to adopt a stereotypical are fully aware of what cultural representation of a Native appropriation is in the first place. American tribe member as their Naturally, a problem cannot be mascot. solved without being first defined, so it is important to extinguish the So What’s the Big Deal? ignorance on this topic. For outside onlookers, sometimes Cultural appropriation is any it may be hard to understand incident in which cultural why cultural appropriation is elements from one people group so damaging. This is because are adopted into another culture of these onlookers usually only usually no relation. Some may see see the merchandise that really it as assimilation, which in itself is have no meaning other than their not a terrible thing. The problem aesthetic appeal. To those who arises when these elements are are having their culture exploited adopted without proper respect through appropriation, it can be nor foreknowledge regarding the very unsettling and offensive to practices of the first said culture. see symbols of respect suddenly on display commercially for any Some examples of cultural consumer to buy. appropriation include getting Samoan tribal tattoos when the Cultural appropriation robs the person wearing them has no historical and cultural value behind connection to that culture at all, the tradition of certain apparel displaying indigenous artwork and practices. Furthermore, most when the owner knows little consumers have little to no interest to nothing about the piece’s in knowing about the cultural significance, or even adapting importance behind whatever certain styles of music into mass appropriated item they are commercialization. In regard to purchasing. Due to this widespread Native Americans, the greatest ignorance, many consumers

make offensive generalizations regarding the culturally tied items that they wear. (Think Korean being confused with Chinese.) Especially in the instance of sports team mascots, an entire culture has become an icon for something that probably appears trivial in the eyes of the culture’s people. It is especially upsetting because many of these icons are created without the consent of the people group they are modeling it off of. Current Issues of Cultural Appropriation Regarding Native American Culture Many recent cultural appropriation offenses have occurred within the fashion industry when patterns, designs, and culturally tied apparel are used as the model for a new line of clothing. From tomahawks to war paint, fashion designers have adopted patters precious to the Native American culture all for the sake of marketing. Fortunately, some designers such as Paul Frank have admitted fault, made necessary changes to their designs, and have even gone on to work intimately with Native American NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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COMMUNITY Other incidents of cultural appropriation occurred only a months ago when Canadian H&M stores began featuring Native American headdresses as a popular $15 accessory. Speaking of headdresses, it is important to take the time to understand the value behind these head pieces, so this next section will be dedicated to headdress history. The History of Native America Headdresses Traditionally in Native American culture, headdresses are worn by the chief. Therefore, this headpiece is not regarded as a mere accessory but exists as a symbol of respect and high honor. Furthermore, many people often are not familiar with how a Native American headdress is constructed. Rather than making it in one sitting, a Native American headdress is created over time with each feather being added when an

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act of bravery had been committed American culture, feathers were by the chief himself or by a warrior never to be regarded as a mere fashionable accessory. or other tribe member. This same concept lies behind the wearing of feathers in general. A feather would be rewarded anytime a member of the tribe committed an act of bravery, honor, wisdom, and other valuable qualities as well. The type of feather would also signify which quality was exemplified with the highest honor being a bald eagle feather. Feathers were only awarded after the member of the tribe came before the established court within their community and retold the story of their heroic act. Because of the significance behind a feather, it was disrespectful to leave a feather hidden in a drawer or in a closet. Instead, feathers were to be displayed, if not by being worn, then hanging in the window. As you can see, in Native

Conclusion Ignorance is often what breeds the unfortunate incidents of generalization and cultural appropriation. That being said, it is important that sufficient information is available to the public and for cultural sensitivity to be upheld as a societal priority. Cultural traditions are very valuable aspects of history and also in present day society. If these traditions are allowed to be cheapened, it not only offends our fellow human beings, but damages the ethnic richness and depth that a community could have. It is vital that respect is upheld for all cultures in order to build a stronger future for global society.


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Community

Top 10 list: How not to respond to Indigenous experiences of racism in Canada by Michelle Reid Printed courtesy of rabble.ca www.rabble.ca Earlier this week, Ian Campeau of the band A Tribe Called Red made headlines when he argued that the Nepean Redskins, a youth football league in Ottawa, should change their name because “redskin” is a slur used against First Nations people. Predictably, non-Native people flocked to the internet comment threads to voice their objections to his opinion. Below, a summary of these knee-jerk responses that are always trotted out by the masses when indigenous Canadians describe their experiences of racism, and why you should not use them. 1. Don’t bring up your own experiences of discrimination. My favourite comment on the Nepean Redskins name debate comes from a man who proclaims that “my ancestors came right off the boat to Canada from Scotland however, they were badly discriminated against for many years,” and then goes on to suggest that it’s really the Indigenous people who are racist. Classy! Listen, we all know that everyone’s ancestors were invaded by the British and so you too can lay claim to historic oppression! And everyone has at one point or another been insulted for some intrinsic quality, and it made them feel bad. But someone calling you an “evil ginger” on the playground is not the same as living in a society that tramples your human rights and dignity. And even if you

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think your experience is equally bad -- or even worse! -- the fact is that this particular conversation is not about you. You know that person who interrupts someone else’s story to say, “Oh man, I have an even WORSE story about flying with Air Canada”? Everyone hates that person. Don’t be that person. 2. Don’t claim you have more important things to worry about than racism. Someone is always eager to point out that there are “real things to worry about,” like radiation or Syria or child poverty. This is a really cool way to say, “I don’t care about you or your experience, but I’ll mask my indifference by pretending I am fully preoccupied by a more important cause.” Did you know it’s possible for different awful things to be happening, and that there is not a finite amount of consideration for the awfulness of the world? That you caring about Syria does not preclude you acknowledging that racism is a damaging force in the lives of many, and that other people might want to pay attention to that too? It’s true! 3. Don’t argue that some racism is worse than other racism. Recently, AnOther Magazine put actress Michelle Williams on their cover, done up in dark makeup, feathers and braids. The cover was flagged and criticized for the

depiction of Williams in “redface,” but many felt that even if the cover was tasteless, redface was a grey area that wasn’t as bad as, say, blackface. Even though it was pointed out by many that redface and blackface are both racist, detractors insisted that this wasn’t bad enough to complain about. Let’s just agree that all racism is bad, and should be avoided whenever possible. 4. Don’t act like not being racist is a burden on you in particular. The discussions of headdresses at music festivals have illustrated an interesting phenomenon: people don’t want to seem racist, but they also don’t want to modify their behaviour at all. As Adrienne K from Native Appropriations has pointed out in detail, there are lots of good reasons why you shouldn’t wear a headdress as a fashion statement. And yet many people act like it’s a huge, unreasonable demand to ask them to shelf their Forever 21 headdress and wear something else to Coachella. But they fail to see that they have a choice: shelving their faux-Indigenous accessories or being easily identified as a lazy racist. That’s a privilege, not a burden! You know who doesn’t have a choice? Indigenous people, who have to see white teenagers trampling all over their identities and culture in pursuit of an awful trend.


COMMUNITY 5. Don’t try and trap them in a racism logic puzzle. Ian Campeau of A Tribe Called Red recently submitted to a tedious, insulting series of interview questions attempting to logic-puzzle him into admitting that some acts of cultural appopriation were okay and therefore all acts of cultural appropriation, including the one he thoughtfully objected to, were okay. Do not do this. Using inane thought experiments (“But what about the fact that Roman senators basically killed Christ and also threw Christians to lions, and The Ottawa Senators mascot is a lion?”) to try and justify racism makes you sound not only like a racist but also like a C-minus philosophy undergraduate. 6. Don’t trot out your “Native friend” stories. Did you text your one Native pal to see if he thought this incident was offensive and he texted back “dunno i guess not, what r u up 2 this wknd” and you have decided that opinion represents the other 1.4 million Indigenous people in Canada? In science we call that a “convenience sample” and it’s cheerfully dismissed. That is, assuming we even believe you have this fictional convenient example friend. 7. Don’t use ignorance as a shield. “I don’t get why this is racist!” you say, as if your similar ignorance about other topics -- astrophysics, postmodern literature -- are grounds to refute their existence or validity. It might be possible that as a person who does not belong to the cultural or ethnic group in question, you have never noticed certain incidents

of racism or the erasure of identity because they just didn’t apply to you. Your reality is not everyone’s reality. Your reality is not necessarily the best or the most correct. If your reality involves dismissing or ignoring the suffering and dehumanization of others, well, it’s definitely not the best or most correct. 8. Don’t use history as a scapegoat or an excuse. Yes, we know the past was racist. Extra-racist! But that was a long time ago, right? Well, no, it’s a pretty unbroken continuum of racism. But don’t pretend that just because the past was arguably worse, everything is fine now. Let’s dare to strive for a higher standard than “Not as bad as smallpox blankets.” 9. Don’t refuse to acknowledge that you might be living in a racist society. Everyone would prefer to think of themselves as not-racist. “I’m not racist,” everyone insists, before detailing their racist position. But generally, insisting that you are not racist while trying to defend ideas that others have identified as racist is a losing battle. The fact is, Canada was founded on racism; it was so racist it was actually a role model to other racist regimes. It’s likely that growing up here has resulted in internalizing some racist beliefs. It happens! If you’re called out for them, don’t trip over yourself to explain how you cannot possibly be racist because in your heart you know your intent was pure. Ask yourself: is it possible that living in a country that treats First Nations like a plague to be eradicated may be why you are so ready to

dismiss their voices and claims, to assume that they are exaggerating or flat-out lying about their experiences? Is it possible that you might be wrong? 10. If you realise you’re wrong, don’t refuse to apologize. Apologies are the mythical beasts of social interactions, especially when they are real apologies and not blameshifting versions of “I’m sorry if you misunderstood what I was trying to say with this headdress.” But we have a role model now: Paul Frank, designer (not to be confused with Frank Paul, an Indigenous man left to die by callous police officers!), held a terrible fashion party that was “powwow-themed” and was called out by Indigenous writers. Rather than defending their actions, or claiming that their detractors were just being hypersensitive, the company formally apologized, took responsibility for their actions, and made steps to rectify the situation by consulting with Indigenous designers on new, authentically First Nations collections. I’m not saying that if you make a tasteless Native joke you need to roll out a line of consumer goods in supplication, but a simple, “I see why I was wrong, and I’m sorry,” goes a long way. Michelle Reid is a health researcher, magazine editor and occasional writer living in Vancouver, BC. She is a proud member of the Muskeg Lake Cree Nation but doesn’t use that as an excuse to wear headdresses to music festivals. She tweets frequently as @ ponymalta

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CREATIVE

Christiana Latham NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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! E LEGENDS R E H

COMMUNITY S ’ T I

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BEATS

Turn up the Volume By Katty Jo Rabbit

Best Coast Fade Away

With a third album set for release in 2014, these California Surf Rockers are releasing a mini album, which is strange, they really should just stop being lazy and make an entire album so that old garage rock stoners won’t forget to buy the album when it come out. So far the sounds is amazing, with only seven songs on the track listing, the moment fleets by with fuzzy guitar riffs, quick drums and sleazy base. It is a really freaking great sound, especially if you are into lying around and eating cupcakes in the sun after deep conditioning your hair; it is like a good Sunday visit with your best friend who obsessed with Alice in Wonderland. Or if you don’t have a weird hippy friend like that, then it is just a good album to listen to as the trees change color, it will help with your summer to fall transition. The band consists of Bethany Cosentino, vocals/guitar, Bobb Bruno, Bass and just recently Ali Koehler, drums. This forthcoming album does not have any reference to the Snacks the cat who was on the cover of their last album and has become a celebrity in his own sense as people are starting to buy up beanie babies who somewhat resemble the actual cat. Just to mention some random facts, the two founding band mates, Bethany and Bobb met because she was his baby sitter, they got their start by becoming a sensation on Myspace, and Bethany is a good friend of Drew Barrymore who directed a music video on her past album. Check out the song, Fear of my identity and This lonely morning, you will understand the reference to Alice in wonderland. Arcade Fire Reflektor With so much mystery surrounding their new album this isn’t for the faint of heart, it is more for the hard core problem solver who can put together random clues to find out secrets of the band’s new album. One cool thing about the new album is that on September 9 at 9 o’clock they revealed a new single. It also happened that on the same day they played a small surprise show at Salsatheque Venue in Montreal under the name the Reflektors, the price of the tickets nine dollars. With a theme going on around the number nine, hard core fans are assuming all types of crazy things in reference. Whatever the case, the entire stunt is absolutely genius, it makes for huge interest into the entire albums meaning, release. But again this is only for the really, really hardcore fans, who are also into numerology, and into the Davinci’s code. With a disco influence this feels like a style change from the last album, this doesn’t mean that they are completely popped it just means that their progression into sounds has begun to change, most people can’t handle this, while others embrace it. Anything with David Bowie, you can count me in, intense, sharp synths, horns, and string sections that are a signature sound that remains. Though, after a while it gets a little exhausting, either way check out the songs; Reflektor, We exsist and Porno you might just get into it.

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BEATS

Music You Can Feel In Your Toes Nine Inch Nails Hesitation

With Halloween in the air, this new album of industrial rock is just what every Halloween party needs, rhythmic haunted music to mingle too. Just like Madonna who can do no wrong in the LBGT scene, Trent Reznor can do no wrong in the techno Goth scene. Anyone who can age beautifully with major muscle mass and find ways to remain relevant over years of genres is gold and bringing Industrial rock into the mainstream deserves the label of master producer/ composer. Which Mr. Reznor does with seamless efforts. With cameos by Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac and Adrian Belew of King Crimson you would think that this would be a big deal to fans of the said bands, but really collaborations with NIN seem to always meld into the sound of the overall concept, smartly done as sometimes people think they will have the same sounds not so. The guitar riffs are soaked with the electronic sounds so perfectly that you wouldn’t know unless you did your research. Which most angst ridden fans of NIN tend to do. This new sound takes from the past and makes new dark luscious sounds that create a new theme in his music, which are open to each fan for interpretation; believe me there are a lot of people that would argue that since the hiatus back in 2009 NIN hasn’t changed. Of course there are some core recipes that would make one agree to this hypothesis, but there are a lot more factors affecting the music that makes this argument weak. Check out the songs Everything, Disappointed, and Come Back Haunted. Lorde Pure Heroine Born Ella Yelich-O’Connor this 16 year old singer has been all over the map with her amazing sound, you most likely have heard her song Royals which talks about how the rap game and opulent allure of celebrity is just really bull. For this fact alone and for the fact that she hails from New Zealand, where our tribal cousins reside, whom she is friends with a lot of, is why you need to become a fan. Anyone who supports the plight of the native people is cool in my books. Plus she is a fan of Kurt Vonnegut and Raymond Carver. All gushing aside, the first album from this youngster is one part journal entry, one part feministic perspective, which all makes a great first impression. Not much has really been put out there as this singer tends to shy away from the lime light which is very rare in this selfie world we live in, the mystery and intrigue, not to mention the music is what draws you in. Then when you find out that she is only a youngster it makes you wonder why your little cousins aren’t doing more with their time. With all the Miley Cyrus over kill it is nice to know that there are real girls out there who are smart, beautiful and creative enough to not have to resort to using their bits and pieces to attract new fans, and don’t get me started on her rap skills. Really what more could you ask for when you’re searching for music to set you apart. As an indie-funk minimalist the beats and drums of this album tend to get more powerful as time flows. Other songs to check out are Tennis Court, Team, and her covers of the Kings of Leon song. NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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MOVIES

See You at the Movies Starring Chris Brown, Josh Peck, Caity Lotz, Josh Holloway Synopsis Battle of the Year follows Jason Blake (Josh Holloway, from Lost) and Dante Graham (Laz Alonso) as they try to put together an American breakdancing team capable of winning the Battle of the Year, which is a annual, worldwide dance competition. No American team has won it in fifteen years, but Dante - a hip-hop mogul with a burning desire to see America back on top in the dance world - wants to break that trend, and hires Blake to train a team that can do so. With the belief that thorough and proper coaching is the key to taking any team to victory, Blake recruits the best dancers in the country and begins the biggest challenge of his life. Cast · Chris Brown as Rooster · Josh Peck as Franklyn · Caitzy Lotz as Stacy · Laz Alonso as Dante · Josh Holloway as Blake

Development Screen Gems, an American film company, initially began working on this movie in 2009, the same year when Planet B-Boy (a documentary by Benson Lee) was released. However, they discovered that there was a diminishing interest in breakdancing amongst American citizens. The company started working on the movie again in 2011. The filming of the movie also started in 2011, in Los Angeles, with some filming also taking place in Montpellier, France. Marketing In July 2012, the first trailer for Battle of the Year was released, with Collider’s associate editor, Adam Chitwood, being tasked with marketing the movie prior to its release on September 2013. Reception Though it’s been barely a week since ‘Battle of the Year’ was released, it has received a lot of negative reviews from its critics. Currently, it has a 6% rating from a total of 31 views on Rotten Tomatoes, a website devoted to information, reviews and news regarding films. However, Screen Gems is optimistic that Battle Of The Year will attract a lot of positive reviews with time. They say that many of the critics have not taken their time to watch it keenly and insist that 31 reviews cannot be used as a basis to term a newly released movie flimsy.

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See You at the Movies

MOV IES

Starring Vin Diesel, Karl Urban, Katee Sackhoff

In Riddick, Vin Diesel stars as the title character, Richard B. Riddick, who initially engaged us in the surprising sci-fi movie thriller Pitch Black in 2000, and then proceeded to make a follow up in 2004 with the very disappointing The Chronicles of Riddick. Unlike it’s predecessor, this third attempt in the Riddick franchise seems to succeed. It was able to show a sense of humor as well as a fantastic reappearance of Riddick’s bad ass attitude. Riddick attempts to go back to the basics and recapture the elements that made Pitch Black stand out. The movie is once again about the indomitable anti-hero Riddick being stranded on a desolate planet; this one inhabited by alien jackals, drooling and monstrous scorpions, and all other sorts of potentially lethal creatures. Soon two bands of bounty hunters arrive with the intent to find and kill Riddick. Although most fans would consider this sci-fi action/thriller as another Vin Diesel film, it is significantly supported with nice performances from Jordi Molla, from Columbiana, as Santana, Matt Nable as Boss Johns, and Katee Sackoff, from Star Trek, as Dahl. In Riddick, Twohy smoothly divides the movie into three acts. The first act depicts the full survivalist mode of the bleeding and broken character of the protagonist as he struggles on his own in a hostile and unfriendly planet filled with man-eater dogs. The second act is where the movie really begins, with the arrival of two teams of bounty hunters, whom Riddick proceeds to more or less play with. The second phase seems quickly finished though, as Twohy hastens the movie towards its final stage, in which the survivors must work together to fight against the monstrous aliens. In spite of the movie mainly banking on star Vin Diesel and writer/director David Twohy to achieve a box office hit, it is considerably entertaining and may have even paved the way for a fourth installment of the franchise. Overall, Riddick has successfully abandoned the failed epic of The Chronicles. Star Vin Diesel comes in fine physique and brilliantly portrays his menacing anti-hero character on screen. Thanks to the spectacular upshot of Diesel’s “Fast and Furious” clout, we have this third installment and may possibly expect another series of sequels in the future. All in all, Riddick is a great movie with quality visuals and effects which place the film’s franchise back on the right track. NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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LITERA LLY

Book Reviews For the restless mind The Orenda - Joseph Boyden

Anyone interested in finding out more about Jesuit and Native American history may want to read The Orenda. This is a captivating new book by Joseph Boyden, who is making waves with this newest release. Some people will be drawn in immediately by the opening sequence, which involves a brutal torture scene of a young Iroquois girl. The book itself is written like an epic, with many different characters and situations interwoven together. It is fiction, but it incorporates many different elements that are central to Canadian history. The book itself provides an in depth look at some of the early relations between Native Americans and the arrival of European settlers. The book does feature quite a few different violent scenes, so some may want to think about whether it is right for them. But it does provide a realistic look at some of the tribal warfare that went on during this time period. Some history enthusiasts will enjoy the chance to read about historical warfare as it actually happened during this time period. There are some who have criticized its depiction of the Native American tribes that lived in the area at the time. But other critics counter that this is simply a realistic telling of actual events that occurred during this era. The story itself centers around Christophe, who is a Jesuit missionary compelled to spread the word of Christ. He feels compassion for most of the different settlers and warring tribes in the novel. But the local politics makes it difficult for him to not pick a side in this struggle. His viewpoint allows the reader to take a neutral stance on many of the conflicts that emerge throughout the story. There are many other compelling characters throughout this epic length novel, so be sure to check it out for yourself. The novel itself seems to be headed towards the best seller list for this year. It is growing in popularity and there is a significant amount of media buzz for it. Many readers will be intrigued to see some of the depictions of Native American cultural traditions that are interspersed throughout the novel. The primary conflict occurs between the two tribes, Wendat and Haudenosaunee. But there is plenty of room for character development among many of these people as well. Joseph Boyden does an admirable job at realistically portraying how they might have acted out these different scenarios in his novel. 34

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LITERALLY

Book Reviews For the restless mind Doctor Sleep - Stephen King Fans of The Shining may enjoy this new novel by Stephen King. Doctor Sleep expands on some of the mythos that was set down by The Shining years ago. It involves Dan Torrance and Abra Stone as they travel down the highway together. Some fans will remember Dan Torrance as the young boy that narrowly escaped death at the hands of his father at the Overlook Hotel. This continues his story as he helps other young kids that have the gift that he was given as a child. But the two will need to stay together once they encounter the True Knot tribe of travelers. The story essentially revolves around Dan Torrance and his efforts to escape the mental anguish he has suffered over the years. But the plot will become complicated once the two encounter the True Knot tribe. This is a group of elderly people who have found a way to live seemingly forever. They use ritual sacrifice to kill children with the gift featured in The Shining. They torture the young children and breath in the steam that is generated during the process. This provides the central conflict that draws in Dan and Abra in to the story. They and their combined powers will be challenged by some of the characters they meet in the True Knot. Many readers have already commented on how the story enables them to continue where they left off with The Shining. They will finally be able to find out what happened to the young boy in that story. This new book has drawn quite a bit of praise and promises to be a worthy addition to the Stephen King anthology. It also introduces a new character Abra, who is even more powerful than Danny ever was. This can help readers gain a deeper understand of how these powers tend to work in this universe. Longtime fans of Stephen King and his writings will be impressed by what they get out of this new novel. Each of the characters will be fully fleshed out throughout the course of the story. Readers will be able to get to know more about the True Knot tribe and what their motives may be. It provides a gory and gripping addition that many have been waiting to read. Most anticipate that this new novel will become a bestseller soon, like many other Stephen King novels. General fans of the horror genre will not want to miss out on this new release. NEW TRIBE OCTOBER 2013

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FASHION

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