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I store all of my pen-turning blanks in a special cabinet. The variety of colors and grain patterns is amazing, and I love the symmetry of these little stacks of wood.

my notion of adequate space changed. Jerry and I now share the basement, with my area having grown into a full-fledged 12' x 12' pen turning shop. It accommodates everything I need to make a pen—a large 8' workbench and four other smaller work surfaces, 24 drawers and 18 cabinets. Jerry custom-built them all for me—a great reward for all those years of woodworking-oriented Christmas presents! The workbenches, shelves and cabinets support the scaled-down tools of my “five inch” turning trade: three mini lathes, a mini drill press, a mini disk sander, a mini shaper (for the pen boxes), a mini air filter, a mini metal cut-off saw (for the brass tubes), a mini duplicator, mini air compressors and a mini vacuum. Following my theme of small-scale tools, I cut my pen blanks to length with a fine-cut power handsaw, instead of a using a miter saw. In fact, the only full-size tools in my area are my turning tools. In addition to pens, I now make a host of other five inch projects,

including letter openers, wine bottle stoppers, fishing lures and game calls. These small projects don't throw a lot of sawdust around, so my shop is easy to keep clean and neat. I store my respirators, face protection, project hardware, bits, calipers, rulers, files, glues, gloves, and sanding and finishing supplies inside cabinets and drawers, where they stay dust free and easily accessible. My projects don't require a lot of material (I can get up to 12 blanks out of a small piece of turning stock), so storage space isn't an issue. I've accumulated over a hundred differ-

ent local and exotic hardwood turning blanks. I study books and articles about their origins and the legends that surround some of them, and wherever Jerry and I go, I watch for anecdotes about how they have been or are being used. I write that information on cards that accompany my pens. I get teased about the 144 square feet of space that I "need" to make a pen, but sharing woodworking with Jerry is one of the high points of our 40 years together. —Lynn Vanderpool Gilmanton Iron Works, NH

Tell Us About Your Shop Send us photos of your shop, a layout drawing and a description of what makes your shop interesting. Tell us what you make in it and what makes your shop important to you. If “My Shop” features your shop, you’ll receive $100. E-mail your entry to myshop@americanwoodworker.com with digital photos attached. Or mail your

description with prints or digital photos on a disc to My Shop, American Woodworker, 1285 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 180, Eagan, MN 55121. Please include your phone number. Submissions cannot be returned and become our property on acceptance and payment. We may edit submissions and use them in all print and electronic media.

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American Woodworker June/July 2009  

We hope you enjoy this magazine from the team at American Woodworker!

American Woodworker June/July 2009  

We hope you enjoy this magazine from the team at American Woodworker!