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NEWS OF THE WEIRD

S Y R A C U S E

Offbeat yet true facts culled from the worldwide press Page 4 W W W. S Y R A C U S E N E W T I M E S . C O M

MUSIC

PARSN0W

Health benefits are reason enough why Onondaga County should raise the smoking age to 21 Page 5

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SPORTS 8 Coach Dino Babers still has faith in the Orange’s football future EATS

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Flatware from Syracuse China and more are at Smitty’s Curiosities

NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2017

7 It’s often difficult to understand the symptoms of sport-related concussions

ISSUE NUMBER 2410

BODY & MIND

READ! SHARE! RECYCLE!

Joe Whiting leads the charge for a yuletide Classic Canteen show

The missing stories, and exposing patterns of what’s missed

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FR EE

By Paul Rosenberg


SNT

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of the

NEWS WEIRD By the editors at Andrews McMeel

Stroke of Genius

Jen Sorensen

In Munich, Germany, Benjamin David has found a unique way to drown his commuting sorrows: He swims to work. “When I was on my bike, I would yell at cars,” David said. “When I was on foot, I would yell at cyclists. (J)ust a few meters to the side of (the road) is the (Isar) river, and if you just swim down that, it’s completely relaxed and refreshing.” David stores his work clothes, laptop and mobile phone in a waterproof bag, and the river’s current sometimes allows him to float along his 1.2-mile route and enjoy the scenery — including bystanders on bridges.

Ewwww!

Swiss grocery chain Coop announced on Aug. 17 that it will start selling burger patties made from mealworms as an alternative to beef. Essento’s Insect Burgers and meatball-like Insect Balls also contain rice, carrots and spices. “Insects are the perfect complement to a modern diet,” said Christian Bartsch, co-founder of Essento. “They have a high culinary potential, their production saves resources and their nutritional profile is high-quality.”

Totally Awesome!

Two Subway sandwich shop workers in Coventry, R.I., frustrated a potential robber on July 25 by acting like teenagers — ignoring his demands for money until he finally gave up and left the store. Police told a local news station that the robber, caught on security cameras, looked “exasperated” and “mumbled something under his breath as he walked out of the business.”

Irony Defined

Stephen DeWitt, 57, of Aptos, Calif., was “quite intoxicated,” according to an arresting officer, on Aug. 16 when he mowed down a Highway 1 road sign reading: “REPORT DRUNK DRIVERS. CALL 911.” His Jeep continued up an embankment and flipped, leaving DeWitt with serious injuries — and a DUI charge.

Unclear on the Concept

In early August, Volusia (Florida) County Beach Safety officers banished 73-year-old Richard G. Basaraba of Daytona Beach from all county beaches after it was discovered he was handing out business cards to young women, reading “Sugardaddy seeking his sugarbaby.” The mother of a 16-year-old said he approached a group of girls with his cards and continued to speak with the minor girl even after she told him her age. He also produced a bra padding, telling the girls he was “looking for someone who would fill it.” He told the 16-year-old she “would be perfect.”

Animal Antics

A skunk got up close and personal with a 13-year-old boy on July 25 when it climbed into his bed in Hamden, Conn., apparently after hitchhiking into the house in a trash can. The family was able to remove the skunk without the help of the Hamden Animal Control Division, but an officer said the “smell of skunk emanated throughout the house.”

New World Order

The Global Harbour mall in Shanghai has introduced husband storage facilities for bored men who have accompanied

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wheels and carpet. Testers are subjected to a stringent selection process and must not smoke or drink alcohol. “In North America,” said Andy Pan, supervisor for material engineering at a Ford facility in China, “people want a new-car smell and will even buy a ‘new-car’ spray to make older cars feel new and fresh. In China, it’s the opposite.”

their wives shopping. The glass pods include a chair, monitor, computer and game pad where parked husbands can play vintage video games while their wives shop. Reaction from pod dwellers has been mixed, with one man saying the lack of ventilation left him “drenched in sweat.”

ing along the road wearing nothing but sneakers on July 30. The four “protected their modesty with cupped hands” and appeared to be walking quickly, according to Kathryn Lynn, 50, who drove by with her husband and daughter and snapped a photo of the odd group. “It was a bit of a shock to see,” she said.

Weirdo America

People Different From Us

Residents of Hollis, Maine, were unnerved on the evening of July 25 as Corey Berry, 31, wearing a clown mask, walked around town with a machete ducttaped to the place where his arm had been amputated. When Berry, intoxicated, was taken into custody in nearby Waterboro, he explained to officers that he was copying other clown sightings as a prank on a friend. Karmen LePage of Hollis warned: “He’s not funny. We live in the woods; you think we don’t have guns? He’s lucky.”

Naked Truth

Nudity, like everything else, is more fun when you can share it with friends. Or so it appeared to drivers along Route A66 in Workington, Cumbria, in England, who spied four “shame-faced” men walk-

11.29.17 - 12.5.17 | syracusenewtimes.com

In a shocking display of mischief, an unnamed 60-year-old man in Singapore is under investigation for lodging three toothpicks in a seat on a public bus in July. If he is found to be the culprit, he could spend up to two years in prison. Singapore has an extremely low crime rate, and even minor offenses result in harsh punishments. For example, vandalism is punishable by caning. Police said at press time that the investigation was continuing.

Picky, Picky

The Ford Motor Co. has hired smell-testers for its research labs in China, where consumers don’t like the “new-car” smell that many Americans seek out. Ford calls the testers its “golden noses,” who sniff materials such as upholstery, steering

Fan To The End

Jeffrey Riegel, 56, of Port Republic, N.J., left ’em laughing with his obituary’s parting shot at the Philadelphia Eagles. In it, Riegel asked that eight Eagles players act as pallbearers, “so the Eagles can let me down one last time.” Riegel owned season tickets for 30 years, during which the Eagles never won a Super Bowl.

Entrepreneurial Spirit

Police in Osnabruck, Germany, stopped a vehicle on Aug. 19 and found an unusual trove of drugs inside: Plastic bags filled with about 5,000 ecstasy pills, with a street value of about $46,000 — all in the shape of Donald Trump’s head. The orange tablets depicted Trump’s signature sweep of hair and his rosebud mouth. An unnamed 51-year-old man and his son, 17, also had a large sum of cash and were taken into custody.


THINGS THAT MATTER By Luke Parsnow

CURBING TOBACCO’S ROAD FOR YOUTH SMOKERS

There are laws at every level of government that we simply don’t understand why they exist. And there are laws that come with much more common sense. Raising the tobacco purchasing age to 21 is one of those. And Onondaga County should be the place where it comes next. Last week, the County Legislature’s health committee unanimously passed a measure that would raise the required age to purchase tobacco-related products in Onondaga County from 19 to 21. The law would include herbal cigarettes, rolling papers, pipes and electronic smoking devices. Onondaga County raised the age from 18, the current statewide requirement, to 19 back in 2009. The new bill is scheduled to go to the floor of the legislature for a vote on Tuesday, Dec. 5. Should it pass, the county would join a growing list of counties in New York that have already initiated similar statutes, including Cortland and Tompkins counties in Central New York.

The basis for this law’s passage, as it was for other counties and across the country, is that it would fundamentally help prevent people from starting to smoke at a young age. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the United States more than 3,200 people age 18 or younger smoke their first cigarette every day, and 90 percent of smokers start smoking before age 18. It is estimated that 5.6 million Americans currently under age 18 will eventually die from smoking-related illnesses. And while overwhelming scientific evidence, increased prices, a larger array of quitting methods and more anti-smoking campaigns have all helped decrease the overall number of people smoking over the last few decades, a youth smoking problem in Onondaga County remains prevalent. One in five 11th graders and 13 percent of ninth graders have smoked a cigarette, according to a 2012-2013 survey by Prevention Network. Currently,

21 percent of adults in Onondaga County smoke, which is higher than the statewide average. Nearly a quarter of those adults are 18 to 24 years old. Many studies in the past, including a study by the National Academy of Medicine, have provided clear evidence that the later people are exposed to tobacco products, the less likely they are to take up the habit. And if you get to age 21 without ever having smoked, you are not likely to start. That’s the logic behind Onondaga County’s proposed law. While it’s not uncommon for younger high school students to hang out with an 18-year-old who can purchase tobacco products for them, it’s much less common for them to hang out with older college students and young adults who are over the 21-year-old mark — meaning those young high school students are less likely to have someone of legal age get them cigarettes. We used the same logic, as well as the “as comes age so comes maturity” rationale, when we raised the drinking age to 21 in the 1980s. And it has helped save a lot of lives since then. The oldest argument against the Onondaga County bill is that if someone is old enough to die in battle as a member of the armed forces, they should be old enough to decide whether or not they want to buy tobacco products. It’s a sound argument,

and several members of the legislature had reservations about the bill for that reason. Indeed, when Onondaga County raised the age to 19 eight years ago, it exempted 18-year-old members of the military. But you could use the same argument for the drinking age. More than 30 years after it was raised to 21, there’s been no legitimate campaign aimed at turning it back to 18 because its positive results have largely been acknowledged by society. And since smoking is arguably more dangerous than alcohol, it would seem this proposed law is long overdue. Besides, the military has largely been on board with curbing smoking within the ranks. Smoking has been banned in all military workplaces for the last 20 years and is prohibited during basic training. And since smoking is often associated with reduced physical fitness and slower healing of wounds, it’s unlikely to be an activity it would want to embrace. Tobacco use also costs the military about $1.6 billion a year in lost productivity and health care expenses. It’s been longtime public knowledge about the health dangers that come with smoking. Now it’s time for measures that help prevent our most vulnerable from that which can be prevented. Raising the age to 21 is a way to do that. Onondaga County should get on board. SNT

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MUSIC By Bill DeLapp

SEASONAL CHESTNUTS FOR A COOL YULE

W

ith the Christmas season in full swing, the History of Syracuse Rock’n’Roll music series adds to the good cheer with its annual holiday shindig, which takes place Sunday, Dec. 3, 4 to 7 p.m., at the Holiday Inn, 441 Electronics Parkway, Liverpool. This installment is again being dubbed the “Classic Canteen” with its salute to the Sunday-afternoon Teen Canteen rock shows of yesteryear that packed the former Three Rivers Inn nightclub in Phoenix. Series producer Ron Wray still affectionately recalls those days when he joins morning-drive radio host Nick Caplan each week during the 8 a.m. Wednesday slot on The Dinosaur 95.3 FM. Wray has lured the Joe Whiting Band to participate in this edition, with internationally acclaimed guitarist Loren Barrigar also sitting in with the gang. Accompanying sax symbol Whiting will be guitarist John Martellaro, keyboardist Tony Schimizzi, bassist Brian Barrigar and Rick Basha on drums. The afternoon will also feature melodies from the CNY Songbirds, represented by popular vocalists Donna Colton, Joanna Jewett and Maureen Henesey. Expect a mix of covers ranging from Fleet-

wood Mac to Crosby, Stills and Nash, plus several yuletide selections. The ladies will be backed by Frank Neubert on percussion, bassist Sam Paterelli and guitarists Kristopher Heels and Jim O’Mahony. The show closes with tunes from the History of Syracuse Music All-Star Band, featuring Dave Novak on guitar and vocals, bassist Bill Weiss, drummer Ed McBarron, vocalist Gary Branch and Steve Schad on keyboards as they blast through rockers such as “Mustang Sally” and “Twist and Shout.” Donna Colton, Joanna Jewett and Maureen Henesey will provide backup vocals, while Joe Whiting will deliver “Run, Run, Rudolph,” one of the coolest yuletide standards on the planet. Admission is $10. For information, call (315) 472-0222. SNT Joe Whiting will jam away during this Sunday’s History of Syracuse Rock’n’Roll Classic Canteen show.

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BODY AND MIND B y Ta m i S c o t t

HEAD GAMES LEAD TO SPORTS-RELATED CONCUSSIONS

Football season is a time for cool nights under the lights, the roar of the fans fired on by cheerleaders, and coaches fervently hoping to avoid injuries, particularly concussions. Much attention has recently been lavished on this particular sport and its connection to traumatic brain injury, but other sports are hardly exempt. Liverpool High School graduate and lacrosse player Krystyna Sterio experienced her first of two concussions when she was 15, yet she didn’t recognize the symptoms until days later. A sophomore at the time, she was a member of the Central New York Elite Lacrosse Club and was at practice when she was hit in the head with a ball. Because blows to the head with sticks, balls and even other players are common, she just shook it off. Sterio went down, got up, had a quick interaction with the coaches and continued to play. “I really didn’t think anything of it,” she said. “Also, there were a lot of college coaches watching us practice so I didn’t want to sit down.” What Sterio described could be considered a typical day in the life of student athletes given their passion for sports. Eugene Bailey, M.D., school physician for the East Syracuse Minoa School District who specializes in the study and treatment of concussions, would agree. He argues that many concussions go unrecognized or are underreported for many reasons, from delayed symptoms to pressure to play. His goal is to change that. “I actually went two weeks before I (got) checked out,” Sterio said, even though signs began to manifest themselves the next day during another training session. “We were running and I was getting like a tunnel vision. I just figured it was because I was out of shape, it was off season, so I just again didn’t think anything of it.” But the symptoms got progressively worse. Headaches and migraines began to surface at home, and the tunnel vision returned during school hours after long periods of focus and sitting under bright lights. Her parents, Jim and Matina Sterio, were not aware of the lacrosse incident until Krystyna had an a-ha! moment during a conversation 10 days later with her dad, who was concerned with the recent headaches she was enduring. They saw the doctor the next day, and she was put on “brain rest” for three to five days. That meant no TV, no music, no reading, and when possible, no lights. “I took their advice seriously, even though it was hard,” she said, noting the idea of a brain injury is much more unnerving than a sprained ankle. Her symptoms did eventually subside, but it took longer than it could have had she sought immediate medical attention.

Recognizing Concussions

Concussions cannot be diagnosed, but rather recognized through a series of questions given to the patient. A disadvantage to this is that the term concussion is defined many different ways, said Bailey. This makes it that much harder for physicians, athletic trainers and coaches to not only identify them, but also to generate consistent statistics as a basis for further study.

Sideline scenes like this moment during a Syracuse University football game are sometimes connected to later concussion problems. Michael Davis photo

“One person will recognize concussion based on headache alone,” he said. “Another may use headache, nausea and vomiting. Another may use headache and balance testing. Well, there’s three different definitions of concussion.” Another significant problem in recognizing sports-related concussions is in the reporting. Unless you observe a play and see a problem, you need to rely on the athlete to self-report, and athletes may neglect to self-report due to pressure or the desire to stay in the game. If they do come forward, it might be a day or two later, or in Sterio’s case, two weeks. Then we’re behind the eight ball, Bailey said. “Some headaches may go away in 20 minutes, others may not have any symptoms and then 20 minutes later they’re passed out on the field,” he said. “There’s a whole spectrum of signs and symptoms and physiology that makes it difficult.” About 80 percent of concussions are not recognized, he added. And there’s no consensus on one particular test to recognize them. “You can’t image the brain and find concussion. In fact, images are normal. There’s no blood test. So we have to use tools to make the determination and decision, and that’s basically the whole problem,” he said. The most recent detection tools, developed through international conferences, to aid in recognizing and evaluating concussions include the CRT5 (Concussion Recognition Tool), SCAT5 (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool) and Child SCAT5 (designed for individuals under age 13). SCAT5 is the most respected test but many consider it too lengthy and cumbersome to be used for a sideline evaluation. “You want something that’s fast,” he said. ImPACT, an acronym for Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing, is a baseline assessment test used before athletes begin the playing season. Sterio, who played varsity lacrosse as a Liverpool High School sophomore, said she and the other student athletes were given this test prior to taking the field. After her concussion was recognized, she wasn’t permitted to play again until had she repeated the test and the results matched up with her initial assessment. Bailey said, “Other groups are coming up with other modalities that may better monitor concussion and recovery, but SCAT5 still remains the internationally accepted standard for concussion, recognition and management. If you want to stand up to scrutiny, you will use the most accepted standard and guideline out there and right now that’s SCAT5 and ImPACT.”

What’s the EasySCAT App?

Bailey’s goal is to establish an app called easySCAT (more information can be found at easyscat.com) as the standardized sideline assessment for all New York state school districts. He co-created the app with East Syracuse Minoa partnering physician Daniel Rancier and head athletic trainer Mark Powell with the help of other colleagues. The app launched in August and is designed to be used not only for games and practice, but even gym class and recess. “We’ve taken some of the core recommendations for recognition of concussion and we’ve put them into an application where a coach, school nurse, gym teacher or parent, even, could easily recognize concussion based on up to six tests that are done on the sideline, immediately,” Bailey said. “That information is then stored electronically and can be communicated to all parties interested, (also) electronically, to a secured database.” East Syracuse Minoa is currently using the app and since its launch 30 schools have signed on, Bailey said. Unlike paper forms, this documentation cannot get lost. In fact, it syncs to a database in the cloud and is immediately accessible to designated individuals. If the entire state were to pick it up, it would also benefit students who relocate within New York because the database would move with them. “We want to standardize the recognition definition so that every school is doing the same thing,” he said. “Then I want to study it. If we’re finding a school has more concussions now, based on this, we can go in there and find out why. It may be that they don’t have an athletic trainer. It may be that all the schools with athletic trainers are finding more concussions, or we may be finding less when in fact we should be seeing more and that’s because in the past they were just being overlooked. Now they’re not going to be overlooked because we’re going to have something that the coaches can use. We’re excited about it.” As for Sterio, now a freshman at Rochester Institute of Technology and still an ardent lacrosse player, she also has something to say about recognizing concussion for her fellow athletes: “It’s definitely frustrating, but you have to have patience to stop and notice. Your brain is more important than anything else you’re doing. Don’t worry about the schoolwork or keep playing in a game if you think you might be injured. Your health is first.” SNT

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SPORTS By Matt Michael

From left, Coach Dino Babers leads his team into battle one more time this season; plenty of Carrier Dome seats were empty for the contest; and Boston College running back AJ Dillon enjoyed a stellar threetouchdown afternoon. Michael Davis photos

BABERS KEEPS THE FAITH FOR NEXT SEASON A so-so start despite three home games in September. A shocking win over a top-ranked team. An Eric Dungey injury and a brutal November. Final record: 4-8. Wash. Rinse. Repeat. As Yogi Berra once said, it was déjà vu all over again for the Syracuse University football team. On the surface, Dino Babers’ second year as Syracuse’s head coach looked just like his first. After a 2-3 start that included a 30-23 loss to Conference USA-member Middle Tennessee State at the Carrier Dome Sept. 9, the Orange outlasted Pittsburgh 27-24 Oct. 7 at home before stunning then-No. 2 Clemson 27-24 Oct. 13 at the Dome. But the Orange will have to wait until September for its next win. After beating Clemson, Syracuse finished 0-5 as Dungey missed the last three games with a right foot injury. In SU’s final game of the season Nov. 25, Boston College throttled the Orange 42-14 on Senior Day at the Dome as the Eagles’ backup quarterback, Darius Wade, enjoyed a career day and star freshman running back AJ Dillon sliced Syracuse’s defense for 193 yards and three touchdowns. With Dungey on the sidelines, the Orange was outscored 162-67 in losses to Wake Forest, Louisville and Boston College. When Babers took over for Scott Shafer after the Orange finished — you guessed it — 4-8 in 2015, his main message to his players and the media was “belief without evidence.” In other words, everyone was going to have to believe that Babers’ famed hurry-up spread offense would lead to success, even if there wasn’t much evidence of that at the outset of Babers’ tenure. Two years in, Babers is still asking for belief without evidence. The record may not show it, Babers said, but he’s convinced the Orange is on the cusp of greatness.

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11.29.17 - 12.5.17 | syracusenewtimes.com

“I don’t feel like today is the end of what we’re going to do,” Babers said after the Boston College game. “This is the beginning. I really believe that the 2018 season is something that we’re going to talk about around here for a long, long time.” Syracuse has not appeared in a bowl game since 2013, and generally a team needs to finish at least 6-6 to qualify for the postseason. When asked if he had a record or goal in mind that would make next year a success, Babers said, “I’m not going to do it that way, but I think if you look at what we’re doing and you look at what’s going to happen next year, I think you’re going to see drastic improvement.” A closer look reveals that there was some improvement this season. Last year, the Orange was outscored by an average of 38.6-25.7. This season, it was 32.1-27.4. The Orange was competitive in difficult road environments against then-No. 25 LSU, future top-25 North Carolina State, then-No. 8 Miami, and pre-season No. 3 Florida State. “The record may not seem like we got better, but honestly in the games it felt like we had a way better team than when I first got here,” said linebacker Parris Bennett, who along with fellow linebacker Zaire Franklin and wide receivers Steve Ishmail and Erv Phillips will be the most difficult seniors to replace. Babers said the seniors on this year’s team — the players who had to endure the coaching change in the middle of their careers — helped build the foundation for the success that will come because they bought into Babers’ philosophy and helped create a culture that will endure for years. “I just feel like we’ve come a long way just as a program and as a family,” Phillips said. “I think we did some great things this year and hopefully it carries on to next year and we’ll be able to finish some things.”

“Honestly, it means everything to us (to be called the foundation) because even though we didn’t make a bowl game, there are guys who are going to take it and do better than we did,” Bennett said. The task is a daunting one, as the Orange plays in the Atlantic Coast Conference’s Coastal Division, perhaps the most difficult division among the Power 5 conferences. SU finished 2-6 in the ACC and last in the division this year behind Clemson, Louisville, Florida State, Wake Forest, NC State and Boston College. “That’s where we want to be,” Babers said. “We want to be in the toughest conference so that when we are successful, no one can take it away from us.” The key, as always, is recruiting better players and Babers said that’s where the Orange has made the biggest strides in the last two years. As Babers said when talking about the likes of Louisville’s Lamar Jackson and BC’s Dillon, “We need some bigger cats to bring those guys down.” Babers created a bit of a firestorm last week when he said the community needed to be more mature about handling the success of the program, specifically the win over Clemson. Babers later apologized, saying that he meant the SU “football family,” not the fans or media. But in the end, Babers’ point was the same: The Orange program still has a long way to go to be a consistent bowl team and ACC title contender. “Just continue believing,” said Ishmael, who set school records for receptions in a season (105) and career receiving yards (2,891). “We showed so many glimpses of the greatness that we have in this team and the coaching staff. As long as we get everything together, this is going to look crazy and we’re definitely going to be an ACC-championship caliber team in a few years. I just tell SU fans to keep believing and have faith.” Belief without evidence — and a little more patience.


Better in 2018?

Syracuse University football coach Dino Babers said we’ll see “drastic improvement” next season. Here’s what we know so far about SU’s 2018 schedule: Non-conference games: Sept. 1 at Western Michigan; Sept. 8 vs. Wagner; Sept. 29 vs. Connecticut; Nov. 17 at Notre Dame ACC home games: Florida State, Louisville, North Carolina, NC State ACC away games: Boston College, Clemson, Pittsburgh, Wake Forest SNT

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EATS

By Margaret McCormick From left, colorful kitchenware is showcased; Smith Housewares owner M. John Kuppermann; and flatware from Syracuse China is prominently featured.

Michael Davis photos

DISHY DELIGHTS AT SMITTY’S CURIOSITIES There’s always been “way more on the second floor” at Smith Housewares and Restaurant Supply. Over the years, one could find table linens, textiles, barware and other glassware, china, canning supplies, seasonal items, discounted merchandise and more. In the last nine months, the second floor of the landmark building at Erie Boulevard East and Townsend Street has taken a “new” direction. It’s now filled with tables brimming with Syracuse China, Onondaga Pottery, Iroquois China (including Russell Wright’s Mid-Century Modern-style designs), milk glass, Depression glass, milky green Jadeite Fire King pieces, vintage Pyrex and Corningware. Indeed, the list goes on. If you collect china or have a special interest in Syracuse China, you could easily spend a chunk of a morning or afternoon at Smitty’s Curiosities, turning the plates and perusing designs wearing our signature local seal. M. John Kuppermann, owner of Smith Housewares and Hyman Smith Coffee, describes the second floor as an ever-changing and ever-growing collection of mostly consigned items acquired all over Central New York. There’s everything from random pieces to complete sets and collections, some acquired as a result of estate sales. “I could just sense it was going to be successful,” Kuppermann said recently. “It’s actually helping the rest of my business, too, because it’s bringing in new faces, new customers who stay in the store longer.’’ Kuppermann says several “back stories” led him to create Smitty’s Curiosities. One is the story of a historic, Erie Canal-era building stuck in a sort of limbo after many years of discussion and debate over the future of Route 81 in Syracuse.

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If the interstate is rebuilt, Kuppermann’s property, and nearly 30 others, could be taken by eminent domain. If the grid option is approved and the building stays, several things could happen. Kuppermann could retain the building. Or he could try to sell it and lease space from a new owner who redevelops it. Or he could relocate the business. “Until they have this decision made,” Kuppermann says, “you can’t get someone to invest or buy or lend money on a building that perhaps could be seized.” Kuppermann’s great-grandfather, Hyman Smith, founded Smith Restaurant Supply in 1894. It moved to its current location, near Route 690 and Route 81, in 1946. The business has evolved over the years as technology continues to alter consumer behavior and buying practices. The housewares and restaurant business uses just a small fraction of the building because Kuppermann no longer has the need to store vast amounts of equipment, gear and supplies there. He can place orders as needed, sell things more quickly and ship things out. More than half of his business is consumer-driven, he says, and the artisan coffee roasting and sales end of the business is thriving — and imbues the place with a wonderful aroma. Kuppermann put the building up for sale in 2014 and had it under contract at one point, but the deal fell through late last year, he said. To prepare for a change of building ownership, he had largely cleaned out the upper floors, leaving a near-empty, 5,000-square-foot space on the second floor. To start filling it again, he found an online source where he bid on mixed lots of small appliances and other home items returned to Amazon.com and big-box stores (“everything from toasters to vacuum cleaners”) and used those items to re-populate the second floor.

“We had a pretty steady turnover of stuff and the same people would come in every couple of weeks to see what was new,” Kuppermann recalls. Meanwhile, officials of the former Elmwood Presbyterian Church in Syracuse had contacted Kuppermann to inquire if he would like to purchase its church china — sturdy white Syracuse China with a green rim, branded with “EPC” — which Kuppermann’s grandfather had sold the church many years earlier. He took the china on consignment for the church (roughly 3,500 pieces) and it’s one of the first things visitors see now on entering the second floor. Shortly thereafter, another collection of Syracuse China, about 8,000 pieces in all, made its way to the second floor. “Next thing I know people are talking about it,” Kuppermann says. “It just exploded.” Kuppermann calls the vintage/antique china end of his business “internet proof,” because it’s a “nightmare” to sell china on websites like eBay and Etsy and a hassle for most people to package and ship it, especially in quantity. He has considerable experience in those areas and is happy to take on those roles. He works on estate sales, conducts cleanouts and accepts consignments of china sets and other items for people who are downsizing and moving — or family members who have no interest in or use for such items — if the items are in good condition and he believes he can sell them. He researches the pieces and prices them accordingly. His consignment fee is 25 percent. He’s excited about Smitty’s Curiosities heading in to the holiday season and says the second floor is one-stop shopping for people who want to dress up their tables without spending a fortune — as well as for shopping for gifts. “I don’t have the experience of a holiday season yet,” Kuppermann says. “It’s off to the races.” Smith Housewares and Restaurant Sup-


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YOUR CONCUSSION EXPERTS

Margaret McCormick is a freelance writer and editor in Syracuse. She blogs about food at eatfirst.typepad.com. Follow her on Twitter, connect on Facebook or email her at mmccormicksnt@gmail.com.

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PROJECTCENSORED2 0 1 7 The missing stories, and exposing patterns of what’s missed

n America, we commonly think of press freedom and censorship in terms of the First Amendment, which focuses attention on the press itself, and limits on the power of government to restrict it. But the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, drafted in the aftermath of World War II, presents a broader framework; Article 19 reads, “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” By highlighting the right to receive information and ideas, Article 19 makes it clear that press freedom is about everyone in society, not just the press, and that government censorship is only one potential way of thwarting that right. That’s the perspective that has informed Project Censored from the beginning, more than 40 years ago. Even though Project Censored’s annual list focuses on specific censored stories, the underlying issue has never been isolated examples. They serve to highlight how far short we fall from the fully informed public that a strong democracy requires — and that we all require in order to live healthy, safe, productive, satisfying lives. It’s the larger patterns of missing information, hidden problems and threats that should really concern us. Each Project Censored story provides some of that information, but the annual list helps shed light on these broader patterns of what’s missing, as well as on the specifics of the stories themselves. During the 1972 election, Bob Woodward and CarlBernstein were reporting on the earliest developments in the Watergate scandal, but their work was largely isolated, despite running in the Washington Post. They were covering it as a developing criminal case; it never crossed over into a political story until after the election. That’s a striking example of a missing pattern. It helped contribute to the founding of Project Censored by Carl Jensen, who defined censorship as “the suppression of information, whether purposeful or not, by any method — including bias, omission, underreporting or self-censorship — that prevents the public from fully knowing what is happening in its society.” In the current edition’s introduction to the list of stories, Andy Lee Roth writes, “Finding common themes across news stories helps to contextualize each item as a part of the larger narratives shaping our times.” He goes on to cite several examples spanning the top 25 list: four stories on climate change, six involving racial inequalities, four on issues involving courts, three on health issues, “at least two stories” involving the Pentagon, three on government surveillance and two involving documentary films produced by the Shell Oil Co. Roth goes on to say, “There are more connections to be identified. As we have noted in previous Project Censored volumes, the task of identifying common topical themes within each year’s story list and across multiple years transforms the reader from a passive recipient of information into an active, engaged interpreter. We invite you to engage with this year’s story list in this way.” It’s excellent advice. But to get things started on the more limited scope of the top 10 stories, three main

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By Paul Rosenberg

themes clearly seem evident: first, threats to public health (1. Widespread Lead Contamination Threatens Children’s Health, and Could Triple Household Water Bills. 6. Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs Threaten Health and Foundations of Modern Medicine. 8. Maternal Mortality a Growing Threat in the U.S.); second, threats to democracy, both at home (4. Voter Suppression in the 2016 Presidential Election. 5. Big Data and Dark Money Behind the 2016 Election. and 9. DNC Claims Right to Select Presidential Candidate) and abroad (10. 2016: A Record Year for Global Internet Shutdowns); and third, an out-of-control military (2. More Than $6 Trillion in Unaccountable Army Spending. 3. Pentagon Paid UK PR Firm for Fake Al-Qaeda Videos, and 7. The Toll of U.S. Navy Training on Wildlife in the North Pacific.). But don’t let this overview pattern blind you to other patterns you may see for yourself. Even individual stories often involve different overlapping patterns: environmental destruction and an out-of-control military in No. 7, for example, or public health and infrastructure concerns in No. 1. These patterns don’t just connect problems and issues, they connect people, communities and potential solutions as well. A shared understanding of the patterns that hold us down and divide us is the key to developing better patterns to live by together. With that thought in mind, here is Project Censored’s Top 10 List for 20162017.

1. WIDESPREAD LEAD CONTAMINATION

THREATENS CHILDREN’S HEALTH, AND COULD TRIPLE HOUSEHOLD WATER BILLS

After President Barack Obama declared a federal emergency in Flint, Mich., based on lead contamination of the city’s water supply in January 2016, Reuters reporters M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer began an investigation of lead contamination nationwide with shocking results. In June 2016, they reported that although many states and Medicaid rules require blood lead tests for young children, millions of children were not being tested. In December 2016, they reported on the highly decentralized data they had been able to assemble from 21 states, showing that 2,606 census tracts and 278 zip codes across the United States had levels of lead poisoning more than double the rates found in Flint at the peak of its contamination crisis. Of those, 1,100 communities had lead contamination rates “at least four times higher” than Flint. In Flint, 5 percent of the children screened had high blood lead levels. Nationwide, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 2.5 percent of all U.S. children younger than age 6 — about 500,000 children — have elevated blood lead levels. But Pell and Schneyer’s neighborhood focus allowed them to identify local hotspots “whose lead poisoning problems may be obscured in broader surveys,” such as those focused on statewide or countywide rates. They found them in communities that “stretch from Warren, Pa., where 36 percent of children tested had high lead levels, to Goat Island, Texas, where a quarter of tests showed poisoning.” What’s more, “In some pockets of Baltimore, Cleveland and Philadelphia, where lead poisoning has spanned generations, the rate of elevated tests

over the last decade was 40 percent to 50 percent.” In January 2017, Schneyer and Pell reported that, based on their previous investigation, “From California to Pennsylvania, local leaders, health officials and researchers are advancing measures to protect children from the toxic threat. They include more blood-lead screening, property inspections, hazard abatement and community outreach programs.” But there’s a deeper infrastructure problem involved, as Farron Cousins reported for DeSmogBlog in January 2017. “Lead pipes are time bombs” and water contamination is to be expected, Cousins wrote. The United States relies on an estimated 1.2 million miles of lead pipes for municipal delivery of drinking water, and much of this aging infrastructure is reaching or has exceeded its lifespan. In 2012 the American Water Works Association estimated that a complete overhaul of the nation’s aging water systems would require an investment of $1 trillion over the next 25 years, which could triple household water bills. As Cousins reported, a January 2017 Michigan State University study found that “while water rates are currently unaffordable for an estimated 11.9 percent of households, the conservative estimates of rising rates used in this study highlight that this number could grow to 35.6 percent in the next five years.” As Cousins concluded, “While the water contamination crisis will occasionally steal a headline or two, virtually no attention has been paid to the fact that we’re pricing a third of U.S. citizens out of the water market.”

2. MORE THAN $6 TRILLION IN

UNACCOUNTABLE ARMY SPENDING

In 1996, Congress passed legislation requiring all government agencies to undergo annual audits, but a July 2016 report by the Department of Defense’s inspector general found that the Army alone has accumulated $6.5 trillion in expenditures that can’t be accounted for over the past two decades. As Dave Lindorff reported for the website This Can’t Be Happening!, the DoD “has not been tracking or recording or auditing all of the taxpayer money allocated by Congress: what it was spent on, how well it was spent, or where the money actually ended up.” But the Army wasn’t alone. “Things aren’t any better at the Navy, Air Force and Marines,” he added. The report appeared at a time when “politicians of both major political parties are demanding accountability for every penny spent on welfare, ditto for people receiving unemployment compensation,” Lindorff wrote. Politicians have also engaged in pervasive efforts “to make teachers accountable for student ‘performance,’” he added. Yet, he observed, “The military doesn’t have to account for any of its trillions of dollars of spending, even though Congress fully a generation ago passed a law requiring such accountability.” In March 2017, after Trump proposed a $52 billion increase in military spending, Thomas Hedges reported for The Guardian that “the Pentagon has exempted itself without consequence for 20 years now, telling the Government Accountability Office that collecting and organizing the required information for a full audit is too


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costly and time-consuming.” The most recent DoD audit deadline was September 2017, yet neither the Pentagon, Congress, nor the media seem to have paid any attention.

3. PENTAGON PAID UK PR FIRM FOR FAKE AL-QAEDA VIDEOS

Concern over Russian involvement in promoting fake news during the 2016 election is a justified hot topic in the news. But what about our own involvement in similar operations? In October 2016, Crofton Black and Abigail Fielding-Smith reported for the Bureau of Investigative Journalism on one such very expensive, and questionable, operation. The Pentagon paid the British public relations firm Bell Pottinger more than $660 million to run a top-secret propaganda program in Iraq from at least 2006 to December 2011. The work consisted of three types of products: TV commercials portraying al-Qaeda in a negative light, news items intended to look like Arabic TV, and — most disturbing — fake al-Qaeda propaganda films. Former Bell Pottinger video editor Martin Wells told the bureau that he was given precise instructions for production of fake al-Qaeda films, and that the firm’s output was approved by former Gen. David Petraeus — the commander of the coalition forces in Iraq — and on occasion by the White House. They reported that the United States used contractors because “the military didn’t have the in-house expertise and was operating in a legal ‘gray area.’” The reporters “traced the firm’s Iraq work through U.S. Army contracting censuses, federal procurement transaction records and reports by the Defense Department’s inspector general, as well as Bell Pottinger’s corporate filings and specialist publications on military propaganda,” as well as interviewing former officials and contractors involved in information operations in Iraq. Documents show that Bell Pottinger employed as many as 300 British and Iraqi staff at one point; and its media operations in Iraq cost more than $100 million per year on average. It’s remarkable that an operation on this scale has been totally ignored in midst of so much focus on “fake news” here in the United States.

4. VOTER SUPPRESSION IN THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

The 2016 election was the first election in 50 years without the full protection of the Voting Rights Act, first passed in 1965. In Shelby County vs. Holder (2013), a 5-4 conservative majority in the Supreme Court struck down a key provision requiring jurisdictions with a history of violations to “pre-clear” changes. As a result, changes to voting laws in nine states and parts of six others with long histories of racial discrimination in voting were no longer subject to federal government approval in advance. Since Shelby, 14 states, including many Southern states and key swing states, implemented new voting restrictions, in many cases just in time for the election. These included restrictive voter-identification laws in Texas and North Carolina, English-only elections in many Florida counties, as well as last-minute changes of poll locations, and changes in Arizona voting laws that had previously been rejected by the Department of Justice before the Shelby decision. Ari Berman, author of Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, was foremost among a small number of non-mainstream journalists to cover the suppression efforts and their results. In May

The Democratic National Committee strategized to make Hillary Clinton (pictured) the party’s presidential nominee before a single primary vote was cast. Michael Davis photo

2017, he reported on an analysis of the effects of voter suppression by Priorities U.S.A, which showed that strict voter-ID laws in Wisconsin and other states resulted in a “significant reduction” in voter turnout in 2016 with “a disproportionate impact on African-American and Democratic-leaning voters.” Berman noted that turnout was reduced by 200,000 votes in Wisconsin, while Donald Trump won the state by more than 22,000 votes. Nationwide, the study found that the change in voter turnout from 2012 to 2016 was significantly impacted by new voter-ID laws. In counties that were more than 40 percent African-American, turnout dropped 5 percent with new voter-ID laws, compared to 2.2 percent without. In counties that were less than 10 percent African-American, turnout decreased 0.7 percent with new voter-ID laws, compared to a 1.9 percent increase without. As Berman concluded, “This study provides more evidence for the claim that voter-ID laws are designed not to stop voter impersonation fraud, which is virtually nonexistent, but to make it harder for certain communities to vote.” As Berman noted in an article published by Moyers & Co. in December 2016, the topic of “gutting” the Voting Rights Act did not arise once during the 26 presidential debates prior to the election, and “cable news devoted hours and hours to Trump’s absurd claim that the election was rigged against him while spending precious little time on the real threat that voters faced.” The story continues. In May 2017, the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University’s School of Law identified 31 states that have introduced 99 bills in 2017 to “restrict access to registration and voting,” with significant action (meaning committee votes or more) on 35 bills in 17 states. “The majority of states acting to restrict voting are legislating on topics where courts previously acted to protect voters,” the center noted.

5. BIG DATA AND DARK MONEY BEHIND THE 2016 ELECTION

When Richard Nixon first ran for Congress in 1946, he and his supporters used a wide range of dirty tricks aimed at smearing his opponent as pro-Communist,

including a boiler-room operation generating phone calls to registered Democrats, which simply said, “This is a friend of yours, but I can’t tell you who I am. Did you know that Jerry Voorhis is a Communist?” Then the caller would hang up. In 2016, the same basic strategy was employed but with decades of refinement, technological advances and massively more money behind it. A key player in this was right-wing computer scientist and hedge-fund billionaire Robert Mercer, who contributed $13.5 million to Trump’s campaign and also funded Cambridge Analytica, a data analytics company that specializes in “election management strategies” and using “psychographic” microtargeting — based on thousands of pieces of data for some 220 million American voters — as Carole Cadwalladr reported for The Guardian in February 2017. After Trump’s victory, CEO Alexander Nix said, “We are thrilled that our revolutionary approach to data-driven communication has played such an integral part in President-elect Trump’s extraordinary win.” Cambridge Analytica’s parent company, Strategic Communication Laboratories, was more old-school until recently in elections across Europe, Africa and the Caribbean. In Trinidad, it paid for the painting of graffiti slogans purporting to be from grassroots youth. In Nigeria, it advised its client party to suppress the vote of their opposition “by organizing anti-poll rallies on the day of the election.” But now they’re able to micro-target their deceptive, disruptive messaging. “Pretty much every message that Trump put out was data-driven” after they joined the campaign, Nix said in September 2016. On the day of the third presidential debate, Trump’s team “tested 175,000 different ad variations for his arguments” via Facebook. This messaging had everything to do with how those targeted would respond, not with Trump’s or Mercer’s views. In a New Yorker profile, Jane Mayer noted that Mercer has argued that the 1965 Civil Rights Act was a major mistake, a subject never hinted at during the campaign. “Suddenly, a random billionaire can change politics and public policy — to sweep everything else off the table — even if they don’t speak publicly, and even if there’s syracusenewtimes.com | 11.29.17 - 12.5.17

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X Voter restrictions during the presidential election in Wisconsin reduced turnout by more than 200,000 in the state, which Donald Trump (pictured) won by more than 22,000 votes. Michael Davis photo

almost no public awareness of his or her views,” Trevor Potter, former chair of the Federal Election Commission, told Mayer. With the real patterns of influence, ideology, money, power and belief hidden from view, the very concept of democratic self-governance is now fundamentally at risk.

6. ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT SUPERBUGS

THREATEN HEALTH AND FOUNDATIONS OF MODERN MEDICINE

The problem of antibiotics giving rise to more dangerous drug-resistant germs (“superbugs”) has been present since the early days of penicillin, but has now reached a crisis, with companies creating dangerous superbugs when their factories leak industrial waste, as reported by Madlen Davies of the Bureau of Investigative Journalism in September 2016. Factories in China and India, where the majority of worldwide antibiotics are manufactured, have released “untreated waste fluid” into local soils and waters, leading to increases in antimicrobial resistance that diminish the effectiveness of antibiotics and threaten the foundations of modern medicine. “After bacteria in the environment become resistant, they can exchange genetic material with other germs, spreading antibiotic resistance around the world, according to an assessment issued by the European Public Health Alliance, which served as the basis for Davies’ news report,” Projected Censored explained. One strain of drug-resistant bacterium that originated in India in 2014 has since spread to 70 other countries. Superbugs have already killed an estimated 25,000 people across Europe, thus globally posing “as big a threat as terrorism,” according to a UK National Health Service chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies. “At the heart of the issue is how to motivate pharmaceutical companies to improve their production practices. With strong demand for antibiotics, the companies continue to profit despite the negative consequences of their actions,” Project Censored noted. “The EPHA assessment recommended five responses that major purchasers of medicines could implement to help stop antibiotic pollution. Among these recommendations are black-

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listing pharmaceutical companies that contribute to the spread of superbugs through irresponsible practices, and promoting legislation to incorporate environmental criteria into the industry’s good manufacturing practices.” Superbugs are especially threatening modern medicine, in which a wide range of sophisticated practices — organ transplants, joint replacements, cancer chemotherapy and care of pre-term infants — “will become more difficult or even too dangerous to undertake,” according to Margaret Chan, head of the World Health Organization. Superbugs already cause more deaths than breast cancer in the United Kingdom, according to data analysis by the UK Sepsis Trust, as reported by Katie Morley and Madlen Davies in the Telegraph in December 2016. In May 2016, Scientific American reported on a dangerous new superbug that had spread to the United States: a superbug resistant to colistin, known as an “antibiotic of last resort.” The gene for resistance was found both in a human patient and in an American pig. If picked up by other bacteria already resistant to multiple drugs, the results would be “a royal flush: the infection has an unbeatable hand,” one leading expert told Scientific American. “Although the threat of antibiotic-resistant microbes is well documented in scientific publications, there is little to no coverage on superbugs in the corporate press,” Project Censored noted. “What corporate news coverage there is tends to exaggerate the risks and consequences of natural outbreaks — as seen during the Ebola scare in the United States in 2014 — rather than reporting on the preventable spread of superbugs by irresponsible pharmaceutical companies.” Once again, it’s not just a problem of suppressing a single story, but two overlapping patterns: the biological problem of superbugs and the political economy problem of the corporate practices that produce them so wantonly.

7. THE TOLL OF U.S. NAVY TRAINING ON WILDLIFE IN THE NORTH PACIFIC

The U.S. Navy has killed, injured or harassed marine mammals in the North Pacific almost 12 million times over a five-year period, according to research conducted

by the West Coast Action Alliance and reported by Dahr Jamail for Truthout. This includes whales, dolphins, porpoises, sea lions, and other marine wildlife such as endangered species like humpback whales, blue whales, gray whales, sperm whales, Steller sea lions and sea otters. The number was tabulated from the Navy’s Northwest Training and Testing environmental impact statement and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Letter of Authorization for the number of “takes” of marine mammals caused by Navy exercises. “A ‘take’ is a form of harm to an animal that ranges from harassment, to injury, and sometimes to death,” Jamail wrote. “Many wildlife conservationists see even ‘takes’ that only cause behavior changes as injurious, because chronic harassment of animals that are feeding or breeding can end up harming, or even contributing to their deaths if they are driven out of habitats critical to their survival.” As the Alliance noted, this does not include impacts on “endangered and threatened seabirds, fish, sea turtles or terrestrial species” due to Navy activities, which have expanded dramatically, according to the Navy’s October 2015 environmental impact statement, including: • A 778 percent increase in number of torpedoes • A 400 percent increase in air-to-surface missile exercises (including Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary) • A 1,150 percent increase in drone aircraft • An increase from none to 284 sonar testing events in inland waters “It is, and has been for quite some time now, well known in the scientific community that the Navy’s use of sonar can damage and kill marine life,” Jamail reported. “With little oversight on Navy training activities, the public is left in the dark regarding their environmental impacts, including especially how Navy operations impact fish in the North Pacific and marine life at the bottom of the food chain,” Project Censored noted. “There has been almost no coverage of these impacts in the corporate press.”

8. MATERNAL MORTALITY A GROWING THREAT IN THE UNITED STATES

The U.S. maternal mortality rate is rising, while it’s falling elsewhere across the developed world. Serious injuries and complications are needlessly even more widespread with shockingly little attention being paid. “Each year more than 600 women in the United States die from pregnancy-related causes and more than 65,000 experience life-threatening complications or severe maternal morbidity,” Elizabeth Dawes Gay reported, covering an April 2016 congressional briefing organized by Women’s Policy Inc. “The average national rate of maternal mortality has increased from 12 per 100,000 live births in 1998 to 15.9 in 2012, after peaking at 17.8 in 2011.” “The United States is the only nation in the developed world with a rising maternal mortality rate,” Rep. Lois Capps stated at the meeting. “Inadequate health care in rural areas and racial disparities are drivers of this maternal health crisis,” Project Censored summarized. “Nationally, African American women are three to four times more likely than white women to die from pregnancy-related causes, with rates even higher in parts of the United States that Gay characterized as ‘pockets of neglect,’ such as Georgia, where the 2011 maternal mortality rate of 28.7 per 100,000 live births was nearly double the national average.” “The Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health has developed safety bundles of ‘best practices, guidelines


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and protocols to improve maternal health care quality and safety,’” Gay wrote. “These ‘bundles’ include equipping hospital labor units with a fully stocked cart for immediate hemorrhage treatment, establishing a hospital-level emergency management protocol, conducting regular staff drills and reviewing all cases to learn from past mistakes, among other things.” More broadly, Kiera Butler reported for Mother Jones that doctors rarely warn patients of the potential for serious injuries and complications that can occur following birth. “Women have a right to make informed decisions about their bodies and serious medical situations. However, when it comes to birth and its aftereffects, Butler found that doctors simply are not providing vital information,” Project Censored summarized. Many state laws require doctors to inform women of the potential complications and dangers associated with delivery, but none require them to discuss potential long-term problems, including the fact that some complications are more prevalent in women who give birth vaginally, rather than by C-section. “All told, according to a 2008 study by researchers at the California HMO Kaiser Permanente, about one in three women suffer from a pelvic floor disorder (a category that includes urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and prolapse), and roughly 80 percent of those women are mothers,” Butler reported. “Women who deliver vaginally are twice as likely to experience these injuries as women who have a cesarean or who have not given birth. For one in 10 women, the problem is severe enough to warrant surgery.” According to Butler, numerous other studies suggest that “50 percent to 80 percent of women who give birth experience tearing of the pelvic skin and muscles. For more than 1 in 10, the tearing is severe enough to damage the anal sphincter muscle, which often leads to the loss of bowel and bladder control.” Sexual dysfunction, stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse — a chronic and painful condition of the uterus or bladder that often requires multiple surgeries to repair — are other common conditions more prevalent following vaginal birth than following C-sections, Butler reported. Yet doctors rarely discuss these issues with pregnant patients. “The corporate news media have paid limited attention to maternal mortality and morbidity in the United States,” Project Censored notes. There have been scattered stories, but nothing remotely close to the sort of sustained coverage that is warranted.

9. DNC CLAIMS RIGHT TO SELECT PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE

A key story about 2016 election has mostly been ignored by the media: a class-action lawsuit alleging that the

Democratic National Committee broke legally binding neutrality agreements in the Democratic primaries by strategizing to make Hillary Clinton the nominee before a single vote was cast. The lawsuit was filed against the DNC and its former chair, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, in June 2016 by Beck & Lee, a Miami law firm, on behalf of supporters of Bernie Sanders. A hearing was held in April 2017, in which DNC lawyers argued that neutrality was not actually required and that the court had no jurisdiction to assess neutral treatment. As Michael Sainato reported for the Observer, DNC attorneys claimed that Article V, Section 4 of the DNC Charter — which instructs the DNC chair and staff to ensure neutrality in the Democratic presidential primaries — is actually “a discretionary rule” that the DNC “didn’t need to adopt to begin with.” In addition, DNC attorney Bruce Spiva later said it was within the DNC’s rights to “go into back rooms like they used to and smoke cigars and pick the candidate that way.” Sainato also reported that DNC attorneys argued that specific terms used in the DNC charter — including “impartial” and “evenhanded” — couldn’t be interpreted in a court of law, because it would “drag the court into a political question and a question of how the party runs its own affairs.” Jared Beck, representing Sanders supporters, responded, “Your honor, I’m shocked to hear that we can’t define what it means to be evenhanded and impartial. If that were the case, we couldn’t have courts. I mean, that’s what courts do every day, is decide disputes in an evenhanded and impartial manner.” Not only was running elections in a fair and impartial manner a “bedrock assumption” of democracy, Beck argued earlier, it was also a binding commitment for the DNC: “That’s what the Democratic National Committee’s own charter says,” he said. “It says it in black and white.” Much of the reporting and commentary on the broader subject of the DNC’s collusion with the Clinton campaign has been speculative and misdirected, focused on questions about voter fraud and countered by claims of indulging in “conspiracy theory.” But this trial focuses on documentary evidence and questions of law: all publicly visible yet still treated as suspect, when not simply ignored out of hand. As Project Censored notes, “Even Michael Sainato’s reporting — which has consistently used official documents, including the leaked DNC emails and courtroom transcripts, as primary sources — has been repeatedly labeled ‘opinion’ — rather than straight news reporting — by his publisher, the Observer.”

10. 2016: A RECORD YEAR FOR

GLOBAL INTERNET SHUTDOWNS

In 2016, governments around the world shut down internet access more than 50 times, according to the digital rights organization Access Now, “suppressing elections, slowing economies and limiting free speech,” as Lyndal Rowlands reported for the Inter Press Service. “In the worst cases internet shutdowns have been associated with human rights violations,” Rowlands was told by Deji Olukotun, of Access Now. “What we have found is that internet shutdowns go hand in hand with atrocities.” Olukotun said. Kevin Collier also covered the report for Vocativ, noting that Access Now uses a “conservative metric,” counting “repeated, similar outages” — like those which occurred during Gabon’s widely criticized Internet “curfew” — as a single instance. The Vocativ report included a dynamic map chart, designed by Kaitlyn Kelly, that vividly depicts internet shutdowns around the world, month by month for all of 2016, as documented by Access Now. “Many countries intentionally blacked out internet access during elections and to quell protest. Not only do these shutdowns restrict freedom of speech, they also hurt economies around the world,” Project Censored notes. “TechCrunch, IPS and other independent news organizations reported that a Brookings Institution study found that internet shutdowns cost countries $2.4 billion between July 2015 and June 2016” — a conservative estimate according to the study’s author, Darrell West. As Olukotun told IPS, one way to stop government shutdowns is for internet providers to resist government demands. “Telecommunications companies can push back on government orders, or at least document them to show what’s been happening, to at least have a paper trail,” Olukotun observed. In a resolution passed in July 2016, the UN Human Rights Council described the internet as having “great potential to accelerate human progress.” It also condemned “measures to intentionally prevent or disrupt access to or dissemination of information online.” On July 1, 2016, the UN Human Rights Council passed a nonbinding resolution signed by more than 70 countries lauding the internet’s “great potential to accelerate human progress,” and condemning “measures to intentionally prevent or disrupt access to or dissemination of information online.” It noted that “the exercise of human rights, in particular the right to freedom of expression, on the internet is an issue of increasing interest and importance.” Yet “understanding what this means for internet users can be difficult,” Azad Essa reported for Al Jazeera in May 2017. Advocates of online rights “need to be

constantly pushing for laws that protect this space and demand that governments meet their obligations in digital spaces just as in non-digital spaces,” he was told by the United Nations’ special rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye. “Corporate news coverage of internet shutdowns tends to focus on specific countries, especially ones in Africa,” Project Censored noted. Here again, we see another example of how important it is for systemic patterns to be understood. Although Project Censored did note some coverage of internet shutdowns from CNN and the New York Times, it concluded: “However, corporate coverage tends not to address the larger, global scope of internet shutdowns — and, unlike independent news coverage, these reports tend not to address how internet providers might resist government demands.”

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syracusenewtimes.com | 11.29.17 - 12.5.17

15


6-9

JUST JOE

MUSIC

L I STE D IN CH RONOLI GI C A L ORD ER:

W E D N E S DAY 11/ 29 Phil Markert. Wed. Nov. 29, 6 p.m. The

raconteur offers tips on how to improvise on the piano at the Piano and Organ Center, 102 Lawrence Road E., North Syracuse, Free. (315) 454-3823.

Matt Wilson Quartet. Wed. Nov. 29, 7 p.m. The drummer and his jazzy outfit perform at SUNY Oswego’s Sheldon Hall Ballroom, 7060 Route 104, Oswego. $15. (315) 312-4581.

The Fast Lane. Wed. Nov. 29, 8 p.m. The Eagles tribute band at The Vine, del Lago Resort and Casino, 1133 State Route 414, Waterloo. $15. (315) 946-1777, dellagoresort.com. Modern Instincts. Wed. Nov. 29, 8 p.m. CD release party, plus Mattydale Music Collective at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $5. (315) 474-1060, funknwaffles.ticketfly.com.

Society, 109 Waring Road. $35/adults, $30/ seniors, $15/students, free/children grades 3-12. (607) 342-4163.

Cricket Tell the Weather. Fri. 8 p.m. The

indie string band visits May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society, 3800 E. Genesee St. $15. folkus.org.

Dangerous Type. Fri. 8 p.m. A musical evening featuring covers of The Cars and other 1980s-era rockers at The Vine, del Lago Resort and Casino, 1133 State Route 414, Waterloo. Free. (315) 946-1777, dellagoresort.com. Dana Fuchs. Fri. 8 p.m. National phenomenon

and multitalented singer-songwriter at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $25/advance, $30/ door. (315) 474-1060, funknwaffles.ticketfly.com

Syracuse Gay and Lesbian Chorus. Fri. 8 p.m. A presentation of “Songs for a Winter’s Night” takes place at Pebble Hill Presbyterian Church, 5299 Jamesville Road, DeWitt. $18-$20/ adults, $15-$18/seniors and students. (315) 4764329. Barely Alive X Virtual Riot. Fri. 9 p.m. Col-

T H U R S DAY 11/30 Dirty Blanket. Thurs. 9 p.m. Bluegrass with

an attitude at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. Free. (315) 474-1060, funknwaffles.ticketfly.com.

laboration tour between duo and solo dubstep groups plus Bentz & Red Squad at the Westcott Theater, 524 Westcott St. $15/advance, $30/ door. (315) 422-3511, creativeconcerts.com.

Mike Powell & the Black River. Fri. 11 p.m.

F R I DAY 12/1 95XMas Pajama Jam. Fri. 6:30 p.m. Music

from Bishop Briggs, Barns Courtney, The Sheila Divine, Arkells and The Glorious Sons at the Palace Theatre, 2384 James St. $25, $35. (315) 463-9240, palaceonjames.com.

Bagatelles and Impromptus. Fri. 7:30 p.m.

David Breitman on fortepiano takes on Beethoven and Schubert compositions in this NYS Baroque concert at First Unitarian Universalist

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S AT U R DAY 12/ 2 Disco Fever. Sat. 2 p.m. Travel back to the 1970s with all your favorite polyester hits at The Vine, del Lago Resort and Casino, 1133 State Route 414, Waterloo. $15. (315) 946-1777, dellagoresort.com.

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WITH

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Syracuse Gay and Lesbian Chorus. Sat. 2 p.m. See Friday listing. Pebble Hill Presbyterian Church, 5299 Jamesville Road, DeWitt. $18-$20/ adults, $15-$18/seniors and students. (315) 4764329. Rocks and Water. Sat. 6 p.m. Traditional bluegrass and original pieces from the duo at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. Free. (315) 474-1060, funknwaffles.ticketfly.com. Sawyer Fredericks. Sat. 7 p.m. Folk artist who came to fruition on NBC’s The Voice at the Lost Horizon, 406 S. Clinton St. $20/advance, $25/ door. (877) 987-6487, thelosthorizon.com. Eric Schwartz. Sat. 7:30 p.m. The trouba-

dor-humorist in concert, preceded by guitarist John McConnell at the Oswego Music Hall, McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St., Oswego. $14/ advance, $16/door, half-price/ages 5-12, free/ under age 5. (315) 342-1733, oswegomusichall. org.

Enter the Haggis. Sat. 8 p.m. Celtic folk rock band in action, plus Annie in the Water at the Westcott Theater, 524 Westcott St. $15. (315) 422-3511, creativeconcerts.com.

Mere Mortals. Sat. 8 p.m. A variety of songs

rock fab foursome in action, plus the Jimmy Wolf Blues Band at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. Free. (315) 474-1060, funknwaffles. ticketfly.com.

W E D N E S DAY 12/6 California Sun. Wed. Dec. 6, 2 p.m. Beach

Boys tribute band based out of Toronto at The Vine, del Lago Resort and Casino, 1133 State Route 414, Waterloo. Free. (315) 946-1777, dellagoresort.com

Tony Orlando. Wed. Dec. 6, 8 p.m. The vet-

eran crooner mixes hits with seasonal songs at the Turning Stone Resort and Casino Showroom, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $39, $49, $54, $64. (877) 833-SHOW, turningstone.com

Starbird. Wed. Dec. 6, 8 p.m. Jam band trio

that will make you groove, plus Big Sexy and the Scrambled Eggs at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $7. (315) 474-1060, funknwaffles. ticketfly.com

SAYMYNAME. Wed. Dec. 6, 9 p.m. Godfather

of the hard trap sound movement at the Westcott Theater, 524 Westcott St. $15/advance, $17/ door. (315) 422-3511, creativeconcerts.com

C LU B D AT E S

The Wiyos. Sat. 8 p.m. Old-Timey American music inspired by the early American musical idioms of the 1920s and ‘30s at The Nelson Odeon, 4035 Nelson Road, Nelson. $22. (315) 655-9193, nelsonodeon.com.

Acoustic Open Mike. (Full Boar Craft Brewery, 628 S. Main St., North Syracuse), 7p.m

Space Bacon. Sat. 10 p.m. Brooklyn-based

jamtronica quartet with a little improvisation at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. Free. (315) 4741060, funknwaffles.ticketfly.com.

S U N DAY 12/3 Old-Time Music Jam. Every Sun. 1 p.m. Jam

W E D N E S DAY 11/ 29 The Cadleys. (Ridge Tavern, 1281 Salt Springs Road, Chittenango), 7 p.m. Jazz at the Cavalier. (Marriott Syracuse

Downtown 100 E. Onondaga St.), 5:30 p.m.

Jazz at the Plaza. (Le Moyne Plaza, 1135 Salt Springs Road), noon. Karaoke w/Mr Automatic. (Singers Karaoke Club, 1345 Milton Ave.), 9 p.m.

session for all sorts of ramblers and pickers is open to both spectators and players, followed by a potluck dinner at 5 p.m. Kellish Hill Farm, 3192 Pompey Center Road, Manlius. $5/suggested donation. (315) 682-1578.

Mark Nanni. (Empire Brewing Co., 120 Walton

Symphoria. Sun. 2:30 p.m. An afternoon of

Bobaflex. (The Gig, Turning Stone Resort,

St.), 11:30 a.m.

T H U R S DAY 11/30 Thruway Exit 33, Verona), 7 p.m.

Handel’s “Messiah” with the Syracuse University Oratorio Society at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, 220 W. Fayette St. $30/adults, $25/seniors, $5/students, free/ages 18 and under. (315) 299-5598.

torium, 150 Genesee St., Chittenango), 7 p.m.

History of Syracuse Rock’N’Roll Classic Canteen. Sun. 4-7 p.m. The Joe Whiting Band,

Michael Crissan. (Motif, Turning Stone Resort,

Fall Concert. (Chittenango High School AudiKaraoke w/DJ Chill. (Singers Karaoke Club, 1345 Milton Ave.), 9 p.m.

Thruway Exit 33, Verona), 8 p.m.

CNY Songbirds and an all-star jam are featured in this yuletide edition at the Holiday Inn Conference Center, 441 Electronics Blvd., Liverpool. $10. (315) 472-DINO.

Open Jam Night. (DR’s Tavern, 1416 W. Gene-

Brendan Gosson & Friends. Sun. 6 p.m. Boot-stompin’ tunes at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. Free. (315) 474-1060, funknwaffles. ticketfly.com.

Open Mike w/E Ruckus.(Monirae’s, County

M O N DAY 12/4 Pearly Baker’s Best. Mon. 9 p.m. Get down with the Grateful Dead sounds at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $5/ages 18 and older. funknwaffles.ticketfly.com.

Backup Planet. Tues. 8 p.m. Nashville prog11.29.17 - 12.5.17 | syracusenewtimes.com

315-668-3905

from members of several different bands at The Vine, del Lago Resort and Casino, 1133 State Route 414, Waterloo. Free. (315) 946-1777, dellagoresort.com.

T U E S DAY 12/5

16

7 East River Road, Central Square, NY

KARAOKE

see St.), 8 p.m.

Open Mike. (Kellish Hill Farm, 3191 Pompey Center, Manlius), 7 p.m.

Route 10, Pennellville), 7 p.m.

Open Mike w/Frank Rhodes. (Buffalo’s, 2119 Downer Street Road, Baldwinsville), 7 p.m. Open Mike w/Tiger from Off the Reservation. (MJ’s Music Bar, 609 State Route 48, Fulton), 7 p.m.

Phil Petroff and Natural Fact. (Shifty’s Bar & Grill, 1401 Burnet Ave.), 8 p.m.

Paul Davie. (Empire Farm Brewery, 33 Rippleton Road, Cazenovia), 5 p.m.


Songwriters Live. (Buzz Café, 527 Charles Ave.), 6:30 p.m.

F R I DAY 12/1

Quickchange. (Western Ranch, 1255 State Fair Blvd.), 7 p.m.

Minoa Bridgeport Road, East Syracuse), 9:30 p.m.

The Horn Dogs. (Wildcat Pizza Pub, 3680 Mil-

Tom Gilbo (Elvis Show). (Phoenix American

TJ Sacco Band. (Jake’s Grub & Grog, 7 E. River

Ukulele Workshop for Beginners. (Liver-

ton Ave.), 8 p.m.

Battlescars. (Bombadil’s Tavern, 575 Main St., Phoenix), 9 p.m.

Road, Central Square), 9 p.m.

The Cadleys. (Brae Loch Inn, 5 Albany St.,

S AT U R DAY 12/ 2

Cazenovia), 7 p.m.

Carol Bryant Trio. (Finger Lakes On Tap, 35 Fennell St., Skaneateles), 7 p.m.

Battlescars. (Irish Jack’s Beer Shack, 1706

Dirtroad Ruckus. (Timber Tavern, Route 48,

Christmas Concert & Tree Lighting. (Pla-

Route 11, Hastings), 8 p.m.

Baldwinsville), 9:30 p.m.

inville Christian Church, 752 W. Genesee St., Plainville), 7 p.m.

Gina Rose and The Thorns. (Woody’s Pub N

The Coachmen. (Shifty’s Bar & Grill, 1401 Bur-

Grub, 2803 Brewerton Road, Mattydale), 8 p.m.

net Ave.), 9 p.m.

Grit N Grace. (Vernon Downs Casino, Vernon),

9 p.m.

Happy Hour Karaoke w/Holly. (Singers Kara-

oke Club, 1345 Milton Ave.), 6 p.m.

Hard Promises. (Average Joe’s, 2119 Downer St., Baldwinsville), 6 p.m.

Diana Jacobs Band. (Moondog’s Lounge, 24 State St., Auburn), 9 p.m. Hendry. (LakeHouse Pub, 6 W. Genesee St., Skaneateles), 9:30 p.m. Jesse Derringer. (Oswego American Legion.

Jesse Derringer. (Syracuse Moose Lodge 625,

69 W. Bridge St., Oswego), 7 p.m.

John Spillett Jazz/Pop Duo. (Bistro Ele-

Karaoke Club, 1345 Milton Ave.), 9 p.m.

Karaoke w/DJ Denny & DJ Hyrule. (Singers

1121 Milton Ave.), 7 p.m.

Letizia Duo. (Owera Vineyards, 5276 E. Lake Road, Cazenovia), 7 p.m.

phant, 238 W. Jefferson St.), 7 p.m.

Letizia and the Z Band. (Uriah’s, 7990 Oswe-

Lisa Lee Trio. (Anyela’s Vineyards, 2433 W.

go Road, Liverpool), 8 p.m.

Lake Road, Skaneateles), 4 p.m.

Lisa Lee Trio. (LakeHouse Pub, 6 W. Genesee

Mark Zane. (Plowshares Craft Fair, Notting-

St., Skaneateles), 8 p.m.

ham High School, 3100 E. Genesee St.), 4 p.m.

Mark Zane. (WT Brews, 18 E. Genesee St., Baldwinsville), 6 p.m.

The Measure Returns. (Asil’s Pub, 220 Chap-

Monkey Fever. (Shifty’s Bar & Grill, 1401 Bur-

el Drive), 8 p.m.

MRG Recordings. (Turning Stone Resort Casi-

Onondaga Blvd.)

Michael Crissan. (Limp Lizard Bar & Grill, 4628

net Ave.), 9 p.m.

no, Thruway Exit 33, Verona), 8 p.m. Lane, Cazenovia), 7 p.m.

pool Public Library, 101 Tulip St., Liverpool), 1 p.m.

S U N DAY 12/3 Advent Festival of Lessons and Carols.

(Church of the Saviour, 437 James St.), 4 p.m.

Dave Ball Solo Acoustic. (Lakeside Vista, 2437 Route 174, Marietta), 10 a.m.

Jazz on Tap Series. (Finger Lakes On Tap, 35 Fennell St., Skaneateles), 2 p.m. John Spillett Jazz/Pop Duo. (Blue Water Grill, 11 W. Genesee St., Skaneateles), 5 p.m.

Karaoke w/DJ Logic. (Singers Karaoke Club,

1345 Milton Ave.), 9 p.m.

Michael Crissan. (Shifty’s Bar & Grill, 1401 Burnet Ave.), 7 p.m.

TJ Sacco. (Sand Bar & Grill, 1067 Route 49, Bernhards Bay), 4 p.m.

M O N DAY 12/4 Karaoke w/DJ Smegie. (Singers Karaoke Club, 1345 Milton Ave.), 9 p.m.

Open Mike. (The Road, 4845 W. Seneca Turnpike), 7 p.m.

T U E S DAY 12/5 Karaoke w/DJ Streets. (Singers Karaoke Club,

Ron Spencer Band. (Green Gate Inn, 2 W.

1345 Milton Ave.), 9 p.m.

TJ Sacco Band. (Crossroads Tavern, 7119

Open Jam. (Limp Lizard Bar & Grill, 201 First St., Liverpool), 7:30 p.m.

Genesee St., Camillus), 9 p.m.

Paul Davie. (Caz Sports Bowl, 3 Carriage Place

Legion, 9 Oswego River Road, Phoenix), 7 p.m.

$5 BNUS with every purchase of a

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syracusenewtimes.com | 11.29.17 - 12.5.17

17


Blue Spruce Lounge

315-373-0833 400 7th North St. bluesprucelounge.com

Friday, 12/1

SHOWTIME

Saturday, 12/2

IRONHEART

THE WIYOS 12/2 THE NELSON ODEON

Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St.), 5:30 p.m.

W E D N E S DAY 12/6 Acoustic Open Mike. (Full Boar Craft Brewery, 628 S. Main St., North Syracuse), 7 p.m. Holiday Party. (Towne Center, Community

Room 311B, Towne Drive, Fayetteville), 5:30 p.m.

Jazz at the Cavalier. (Marriott Syracuse

Jazz at the Plaza. (Le Moyne Plaza, 1135 Salt

Springs Road), noon.

Karaoke w/Mr Automatic. (Singers Karaoke Club, 1345 Milton Ave.), 9 p.m. Mark Nanni. (Empire Brewing Co., 120 Walton St.), 11:30 a.m.

ENTER TO WIN 2 TICKETS!

to I Do! I Do! A MUSICAL ABOUT MARRIAGE

THURSDAY, DEC. 7 | 7:00pm REDHOUSE ARTS CENTER 201 S. WEST STREET DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES: Tuesday, 12/5/2017 @ noon

Visit syracusenewtimes.com and click the WIN tab!

18

11.29.17 - 12.5.17 | syracusenewtimes.com

Words and Music Songwriter Woodshed. (Liverpool Public Library, 310 Tulip St., Liverpool), 6:30 p.m.

S TAG E

L IS T E D AL P H AB E T IC AL LY: Aladdin. Every Sat. 12:30 p.m.; through Dec.

30. Interactive version of the children’s classic, as performed by Magic Circle Children’s Theatre. Spaghetti Warehouse, 689 N. Clinton St. $6. 449-3823.

Better Football Through High School Chemistry. Thurs.-Sat. 7 p.m. Comedy mixing

weird science and gridiron jocks in this Auburn High School Drama Club production at the Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St., Auburn. $7/adults, $5/seniors and students. (315) 2551253.

A Charlie Brown Christmas. Sat. 11 a.m.,

Sun. 2 p.m.; closes Dec. 30. A puppet variation of the Charles Schulz yuletide show at Open Hand Theater, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. E. $12-$15/adults, $8-$10/children. (315) 476-0466.

A Dickens of a Death. Every Thurs. 6:45 p.m.; through Jan. 5. Interactive dinner-theater whodunit with a yuletide backdrop; performed by

WANDERERS’ REST HUMANE ASSOCIATION PRESENTS:

Santa Paws $50,000 Save-A-Life Challenge We are challenging all our friends and everyone who loves animals, to send us ONE DOLLAR (or more if you can!). With the help of Staffworks of CNY Save-A-Life Campaign, they will “DOUBLE THE DONATION” up to $10,000. Mail your ‘cash’ donation to Wanderers’ Rest Humane Association, PO Box 535, Canastota, NY 13032. Any checks can also be mailed to us, but please make sure you make the check payable to ‘Staffworks Charitable Fund’ with WRHA in the memo line. Staffworks will only double donations that are dated between Dec. 1st - Dec. 31st.

Wanderers’ Rest 7138 Sutherland Dr., Canastota

wanderersrest.org

CORPORATE PARTNER


THE WIYOS Y SATURDAY, DEC 2 FRONT COUNTRY

SATURDAY, DEC 9

Y

LISTEN, ENJOY, RETURN. TICKETS & MORE INFO: NELSONODEON.COM

Acme Mystery Company. Spaghetti Warehouse, 689 N. Clinton St. $29.95/plus tax and gratuity. (315) 475-1807.

Elf Jr: The Musical. Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m.

Encore Youth Productions presents the family treat at the Palace Theatre, 2384 James St. $14/ adults, $11/ages 2-12. (315) 463-9240, palaceonjames.com.

Every Brilliant Thing. Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 4

p.m., Wed. Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m.; closes Dec. 10. Karl Gregory in a one-person show about depression and laughter at the Kitchen Theatre Company, 417 W. State St., Ithaca. $15-$45. (607) 273-4497, (607) 272-0570.

I Do! I Do! Thurs. 7 p.m., Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2

p.m., Wed. Dec. 6, 7 p.m.; closes Dec. 17. Popular musical-comedy charting the ups and downs of a married couple over 50 years. Redhouse Arts Center, 201 S. West St. $27-$32. (315) 362-2785.

The 1940s Radio Hour. Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m.; closes Dec. 16. Laughs and music in this behind-the-scenes nostalgia about a radio broadcast, which continues the season at the Central New York Playhouse, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. E. $28/Fri. & Sat., $25/Sun. (315) 885-8960.

7:30 p.m. Seasoned, intermediate and new comedians looking to try out some material are welcome for the sake of a good laugh, hosted by James Fedkiw at George O’Dea’s, 1333 W. Fayette St. Free. (315) 478-9398.

Chris Franjola. Sat. 7 & 9:45 p.m., Sun. 7:30

p.m. Chelsea Lately writer visits the Funny Bone Comedy Club, Destiny USA. $15. (315) 423-8669, syracuse.funnybone.com.

LEARNING

North Syracuse Art Group. Every Wed.

10 a.m. Bring your own supplies and learn, exchange art knowledge, share fine art with others and work your media. VFW Post 7290, 105 Maxwell Ave., North Syracuse. Free. 6993965.

Improv Comedy Classes. Every Wed. 6-7:45

p.m. Drop-in classes at Salt City Improv Theater, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. $20/adults, $15/students with ID. 410-1962.

Open Figure Drawing. Every Wed. 7-10 p.m.

All skill levels are welcome: if you can write your name, you can draw. Westcott Community Center, 826 Euclid Ave. $8. 453-5565.

The Nutcracker. Sat. 1 & 6 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Syracuse City Ballet presents the timeless classic at the Mulroy Civic Center’s Crouse-Hinds Concert Theater, 411 Montgomery St. $20, $60. (315) 435-2121.

Learn to Paint. Every Thurs. & Sat. 10:30

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical. Tues. 6:30 p.m. Stage adaptation of

Onondaga Lake Open House. Every Fri. noon-4:30 p.m. Come experience the lake cleanup firsthand at the Onondaga Lake Visitors Center, 280 Restoration Way, Geddes. Free. 552-9751.

the 1964 TV kiddie classic, right down to the elf who wants to be a dentist. Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St. $20, $42.50, $55. (315) 475-7979.

AUDITIONS AND REHEARSALS The Media Unit. Central New York teens ages

13-17 are sought for the award-winning teen performance and production troupe; roles include singers, actors, dancers, writers and technical crew. Auditions by appointment: (315) 478-UNIT.

CNY Arts Center. The company will hold auditions for Shrek Jr: The Musical for kids ages 7 to 18 only. Tryouts take place Saturday, Dec. 3, 3-5 p.m.; Sunday, Dec. 4, 3-5 p.m.; and Monday, Dec. 5, 6-9 p.m. at the CNY Arts Center, 11 River Glen Drive, on the Cayuga College Fulton Campus. Auditioners should prepare 16 to 32 bars of a musical theater song (must provide sheet music) and a one-minute comedic monologue. CNYArtsCenter.com, (315) 598-ARTS.

CO M E DY

Comedy Night. Every Thurs. 7 p.m. Comedy-

FLOPS hosts an evening of improv and standup comedy at The Dock, 415 Old Taughannock Blvd., Ithaca. Free, donations appreciated and benefits local charities. (607) 319-4214, thedockithaca.com.

a.m., 1 & 3:30 p.m. Learn in four easy lessons for beginners and intermediate painters. CNY Artists, Shoppingtown Mall. $20/two-hour class. (315) 391-5115, CNYArtists.org.

Improv Drop-In Class. Tues. 6:45 p.m. Every

other week Syracuse Improv Collective provides instruction to help a person gain confidence with becoming a better improviser, actor, listener and communicator at Community Folk Art Center, 805 E. Genesee St. $10. 430-9027, syracuseimprovcollective.com.

SPORTS

Syracuse Crunch Hockey. Fri. 7 p.m. The

puck-slappers take on the Belleville Senators at the Onondaga County War Memorial Arena, 515 Montgomery St. $16, $20. (315) 473-4444, Syracuse crunch.com.

SPECIALS

University Hotel, 801 University Ave. Free. 3806206.

Syracuse Toastmasters. Every Wed. 8 a.m. Learn leadership and public speaking qualities in a positive, constructive environment at the Syracuse Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St. goodmorningsyracuse.toastmastersclubs.org.

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Gray mat-

Trivia Night. Every Wed. 7-9 p.m. Brain power

ing at Trappers II Pizza Pub, 101 N. Main St., Minoa. Free. 656-7777.

with DJs-R-Us at Cicero Country Pizza, 8292 Brewerton Road, Cicero. 699-2775.

Smartass Trivia. Every Wed. 7-10 p.m. Brainy fun with Steve Patrick at Vendetti’s Soft Rock Café, 2026 Teall Ave. Free. 399-5700.

Trivia Night. Every Wed. 7-9 p.m. Nightly prizes. The Brasserie, 200 Township Blvd., Camillus. Free. 487-1073.

Trivia Night. Every Wed. 7-9 p.m. Come out

and test your brainpan against others. Stingers Pizza, 4500 Pewter Lane, Manlius. Free. 6928100.

Trivia Night. Every Wed. 8-10 p.m. Nightly

prizes. The Distillery, 3112 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. Free. 449-BEER.

Trivia Night. Every Wed. 8-10 p.m. Winning

the mental match leaves a bad taste in your opponents’ mouths, plus nightly prizes. Saltine Warrior Sports Pub, 214 W. Water St. Free. 3147740.

Festival of Trees. Thurs. noon-8 p.m., Fri. noon-5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. & Wed. Dec. 6, noon-5 p.m.; closes Dec. 10. The annual display of decorated Christmas trees at the Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St. $8. (315) 474-6064. Author David Yaffe. Thurs. 7:30 p.m. The Syracuse University professor will discuss his book Reckless Daughter: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell with Johanna Keller at Barnes & Noble, 3454 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. Free. (315) 449-2948.

Smartass Trivia. Every Thurs. 7-10 p.m. Steve

Patrick hosts his quiz show at Pizza Man Pub, 50 Oswego St., Baldwinsville. Free.638-1234.

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7 p.m. Nightly prizes to those with the answers to general knowledge questions. Lamont Tavern, 108 Lamont Ave. Free. 487-9890.

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Prizes

for contestants, who needn’t be part of an established team. Sitrus Bar, Sheraton Syracuse

Joel McHale. Thurs. 7:30 p.m., Fri. 10 p.m. The

star of TV’s Community and Talk Soup visits the Funny Bone Comedy Club, Destiny USA, off Hiawatha Boulevard. $45. (315) 423-8669.

AT

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Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7 p.m. Cranium

conundrums at RFH’s Hideaway, 1058 Route 57, Phoenix. Free. 695-2709.

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Battle of

the brains with DJs-R-Us at Smokey Bones, 4036 Route 31, Liverpool. 652-7824.

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Kevin Lee. Thurs. 7 p.m. The juggling comic

takes the stage, plus Corey at The Vine, del Lago Resort & Casino, 1133 Route 414, Waterloo. $15. (315) 946-1777, dellagoresort.com.

ters at this DJs-R-US contest at Spinning Wheel, 7384 Thompson Road, North Syracuse. Free. 458-3222.

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Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Nightly

prizes. Dublin’s, 7990 Oswego Road, Liverpool. Free. 622-0200.

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Nightly

prizes. RFH’s Hide-A-Way, 1058 Route 57, Phoenix. Free. 695-2709.

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Show your zest for knowledge and competition, plus nightly prizes. Sitrus on the Hill, 801 University Ave. Free. 475-3000.

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7:30 p.m. Diamond

Dave knows the answers at Munjed’s Mediterranean Cafe and Metro Lounge, 505 Westcott St. Free. 425-0366.

Poets Lounge. Every Thurs. 9 p.m. Poets,

comedians, musicians, dancers and performance artists of all kinds welcomed to participate at the open mike at Studio 54, 308 W. Genesee St. $3/entry donation.

Trivia Night. Every Fri. 7-9 p.m. Nightly prizes. Lamont Tavern, 108 Lamont Ave., Solvay. Free. 487-9890.

Christmas Craft and Holiday Market. Fri.

5-9 p.m, Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Gift-giving ideas abound at the Center of Progress Building, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $7/adults, free/ages 10 and under. (248) 634-4151.

Breakfast with Santa. Sat. & Sun. 9-10 a.m.,

thebooksend.com

11 a.m.-noon.; through Dec. 17. Have your breakfast served by elves and get your photo taken with Saint Nick. Rosamond Gifford Zoo. 1 Conservation Place. Reserved tickets $18/ general, free/ages 2 and under. Ticket includes post-breakfast zoo admission. (315) 435-8511.

Public Fishing. Every Sat. 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Enjoy a little upstate sporting at Carpenter’s Brook Fish Hatchery, 1672 Route 321, Elbridge. $5/person, registration required. (315) 689-9367, events.onondagacountyparks.com.

Plowshares Craft Fair and Peace Festival.

Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. The Syracuse Peace Council holds its 46th annual event, featuring handmade crafts from more than 120 local artisans, plus live entertainment and food. Nottingham High School, 3100 E. Genesee St. Donation: $2-$5/adults, free/ages 16 and under, and 65 and older. (315) 472-5478.

Santa Paws. Sat. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Take your

pup to get their picture with Santa Claus, plus raffles, kid activities and pups for adoption at this fun-filled event. Entry $3 and $5 for photo with Santa. Driver’s Village, 5885 E. Circle Drive, Cicero.

Dickens’ Christmas. Sat. & Sun. noon-4 p.m.;

through Dec. 24. The Skaneateles Chamber of Commerce hosts the 24th edition, as costumed characters cavort during the annual recreation of old-school yuletides throughout the village

of Skaneateles, Fennell, Jordan and Genesee streets. Free, some activities and specials may have fees. (315) 685-0552, skaneateles.com.

Mindfulness Meditation. Every Sun. 10 a.m.;

through Dec. 17. Focus on deep breathing and open up your mind at Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St., Auburn. $5. (315) 253-6669, auburnpublictheater.com.

Art Mart. Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; through Dec. 23. Original paintings, pottery, photographs, jewelry and textiles by local crafters for sale at 499 S. Warren St. Free. 263-3152, artmart-Syracuse.com. Trivia Night. Every Mon. 6:30 p.m. Knowledge is good at Marcella’s Restaurant, Clarion Hotel, 100 Farrell Road, Baldwinsville. Free. (315) 4578700.

Salt City Sock Hop. Every Mon. 7-10 p.m. Learn a lesson in swing dancing before an evening of dancing at Pulse Fitness Studio, 713 W. Fayette St. $5. (315) 436-3488, facebook.com/ saltcitysockhop. Silent Meditation. Every Mon. 7 p.m. Mum’s the word at Thekchen Choling Temple, 128 N. Warren St. Free. 682-0702, thek.us.

Infinite POP. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. noon-6 p.m. The second installment of the pop-up shop features artists, vendors, workshops and talks from local entrepreneurs at 201

Walton St. Free admission.

Smartass Trivia. Every Tues. 7 p.m. More

brainy fun with Steve Patrick at Nibsy’s Pub, 201 Ulster Ave. Free. 476-8423.

Team Trivia. Every Tues. 8 p.m. Drop some

factoids at Coleman’s Authentic Irish Pub, 100 S. Lowell Ave. Free. (315) 760-8312.

Gingerbread Gallery. Daily, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.;

through Jan. 7. The 32nd annual show features more than 30 original gingerbread creations. Erie Canal Museum, 318 Erie Blvd. E. $7/adults, $5/seniors, $2/ages 2 and under. (315) 471-0593.

Rosamond Gifford Zoo. Daily, 10 a.m.-4:30

p.m. The zoo, located at 1 Conservation Place, features some pretty nifty animals, including penguins, tigers, birds, primates and the ever-popular elephants. $8/adults, $5/seniors, $4/youth, free/under age 2. (315) 435-8511.

Onondaga Lake Skatepark. Daily, noon4 p.m.; through March, weather permitting. The park is open for anyone older than age 5. Helmets must be worn, and waivers (available at the park) must be signed by a parent. Onondaga Lake Park, 107 Lake Drive, Liverpool. $3/ session; $35/monthly pass; $125/season pass. (315) 453-6712. Lights on the Lake. Daily, 5-10 p.m.; through Jan. 8. The annual light spectacular at Onondaga Lake Park, 6790 Onondaga Lake Trail, Liver-

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STA R TS FRIDAY

off against Mark Ruffalo’s Hulk in this Marvel Comics installment. Great Northern 10 (Digital presentation). Daily: 12:50, 4:10 & 7:25 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:25 p.m. Movie Tavern. (Digital presentation/Stadium). Daily: 11:15 a.m., 2:30, 5:45 & 9 p.m.

FIL M S, TH E ATE RS A ND TI MES

Victoria and Abdul. Judi Dench as Queen

FILM

SUBJ E C T TO CHA NGE. A Bad Moms Christmas. Mila Kunis in a

raunchy sequel with a yuletide backdrop. Movie Tavern. (Digital presentation/Stadium). Daily: 7:45 & 10:45 p.m.

Coco. Mexico provides the colorful setting for

this Disney-Pixar cartoon musical. Great Northern 10 (Digital presentation). Daily: 12:45, 3:50 & 7:10 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:10 p.m. Movie Tavern. (Digital presentation/Stadium). Daily: 12:10, 3:40, 7 & 10:15 p.m.

Daddy’s Home 2. John Lithgow and Mel Gibson join Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell for this second helping of loud comedy. Great Northern 10 (Digital presentation). Daily: 1:10, 4:15 & 6:45 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 9:25 p.m. Movie Tavern. (Digital presentation/Stadium). Daily: 1:55, 4:55, 7:55 & 10:55 p.m. Despicable Me 3. Steve Carell returns with his

lovable Minions in this third cartoon. Hollywood (Digital presentation). Sat. & Sun.: 12 p.m.

The Foreigner. Jackie Chan and Pierce Bros-

nan in a serious action-thriller involving terrorists and vengeance. Hollywood (Digital presentation). Daily: 8:55 p.m.

Justice League. The DC Comics superheroes in action, with Ben Affleck, Gal Gadot, Henry Cavill and more. Great Northern 10 (Digital presentation). Screen 1: 1, 4 & 7 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 9:45 p.m. Screen 2: 1:45, 4:45 & 7:45 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:30 p.m. Screen 3: Fri. & Sat.: 9:15 p.m. Movie Tavern. (Digital presentation/Stadium). Screen 1: 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:15 & 9:25 p.m. Screen 2: 1:10, 4:20, 7:30 & 10:35 p.m. Lady Bird. Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf in an acclaimed coming-of-age comedy. Manlius (Digital presentation/stereo). Daily: 7:30 p.m. Sat. & Sun. matinee: 12:30, 2:30 & 4:30 p.m.

The Lego Ninjago Movie. Jackie Chan lends

his voice to this cartoon craziness involving ninjas. Hollywood (Digital presentation). Sat. & Sun.: 2:05 p.m.

Murder on the Orient Express. Kenneth

Branagh goes sleuthing on the choo-choo with an all-star cast in this Agatha Christie adaptation. Great Northern 10 (Digital presentation). Daily: 1:05, 4:05 & 6:50 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 9:35 p.m. Movie Tavern. (Digital presentation/Stadium). Daily: 12:15, 3:25, 6:45 & 9:50 p.m.

My Friend Dahmer. Offbeat biopic treat-

ment of serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer during his troubled teenhood. Great Northern 10 (Digital presentation). Daily: 1:35, 4:35 & 7:35 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:20 p.m.

The People’s Champ. Locally filmed drama about a real-life boxer and his coach amid the Salt City’s meanest streets. Hollywood (Digital presentation). Thurs. Nov. 30: 7 & 9 p.m. Tickets: $12. The Polar Express. Seasonal favorite with Tom Hanks aboard as the choo-choo conductor; presented in 3-D in some theaters. Hollywood (Digital presentation/3-D/stereo). Daily: 4:20 p.m. Roman J. Israel, Esq. Denzel Washington lawyers up in this drama. Movie Tavern. (Digital presentation/Stadium). Daily: 12:30, 3:50, 7:15 & 10:40 p.m. The Star. New animated Christmas gift with

Mariah Carey. Great Northern 10 (Digital presentation). Daily: 1:15, 4:20 & 7:05 p.m. Movie Tavern. (Digital presentation/Stadium). Daily: 12, 2:45, 5:30 & 8:15 p.m.

Victoria in this art-house darling. Hollywood (Digital presentation). Daily: 6:30 p.m.

Wonder. Julia Roberts in an unusual heartwarmer. Great Northern 10 (Digital presentation). Daily: 1:25, 4:30 & 7:20 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10 p.m. Movie Tavern. (Digital presentation/ Stadium). Screen 1: 12:05, 3:15, 6:30 & 9:35 p.m. Screen 2: 1:30 & 4:35 p.m. F I L M, OT HER S L I S T ED A L PHA BE T I C A L LY: A Beautiful Planet. Wed. Nov. 29-Sun. & Wed.

Dec. 6, 2 p.m. Jennifer Lawrence narrates this large-format flick about International Space Station astronauts who take pictures of planet Earth at the Bristol IMAX at the MOST, 500 S. Franklin St. Film: $10/adults, $8/children under 11 and seniors. Film and exhibits: $20/adults, $18/children under 11 and seniors. (315) 4259068.

Call of the Wild. Mon. 7:30 p.m. Rugged 1935 actioner with Clark Gable and Loretta Young features 15 minutes of restored footage, which continues the Syracuse Cinephile Society’s autumn season at the Spaghetti Warehouse, 680 N. Clinton St. $3.50. (315) 475-1807.

Goodbye Christopher Robin. Wed. Nov. 29 & Thurs. 7:15 p.m. The relationship between author A.A. Milne and his son, whose toys inspired the Winnie-the-Pooh series. Cinema Capitol Twin, 234 W. Dominick St., Rome. $7/ adults, $5/students. (315) 337-6453. LBJ. Wed. Nov. 29 & Thurs. 7:30 p.m. Woody

Harrelson portrays President Lyndon B. Johnson in director Rob Reiner’s biopic. Cinema Capitol Twin, 234 W. Dominick St., Rome. $7/adults, $5/ students. (315) 337-6453.

Marnie. Fri. & Sat. 4:15 & 7:15 p.m., Sun. 1:15 & 4:15 p.m., Mon. & Wed. Dec. 6, 7:15 p.m.; closes Dec. 7. Alfred Hitchcock’s underrated 1964 psychological thriller with Sean Connery and Tippi Hedren. Cinema Capitol Twin, 234 W. Dominick St., Rome. $7/adults, $5/students. (315) 3376453. My Friend Dahmer. Fri. & Sat. 10:15 p.m. The

serial killer is recalled during his high school years in this unusual flick. Cinema Capitol Twin, 234 W. Dominick St., Rome. $8/includes pizza and soda. (315) 337-6453.

The Polar Express. Wed. Nov. 29-Sun. & Wed. Dec. 6, 12 & 3 p.m. Ride aboard Tom Hanks’ magic choo-choo in this large-format fantasy. Bristol IMAX at the MOST, 500 S. Franklin St. Film: $10/adults, $8/children under 11 and seniors. Film and exhibit hall: $14/adults, $12/ children under 11 and seniors. 425-9068. Rubber. Tues. 7:35 p.m. A killer tire runs amok in this horror satire that kicks off the Takeout Tuesday movie series at the Cinema Capitol Twin, 234 W. Dominick St., Rome. $5-$7. (315) 337-6453. The Unknown Girl. Sat. 10:30 p.m. French drama about a doctor searching for a dead girl’s identity. Cinema Capitol Twin, 234 W. Dominick St., Rome. $8/includes pizza and soda. (315) 337-6453. Wonderstruck. Fri. & Sat. 4:30 & 7:30 p.m.,

Sun. 1:30 & 4:30 p.m., Mon.-Wed. Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m.; closes Dec. 7. Parallel character arcs from the 1920s and 1970s converge in unexpected ways in this acclaimed flick. Cinema Capitol Twin, 234 W. Dominick St., Rome. $7/adults, $5/ students. (315) 337-6453.

Thor: Ragnarok. Chris Hemsworth returns as the hammer-wielding Norse god as he squares syracusenewtimes.com | 11.29.17 - 12.5.17

21


CLASSIFIED

To place your ad call (315) 422-7011 or fax (315) 422-1721 or e-mail classified@syracusenewtimes.com ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-3622401. AUTOMOTIVE Donate your car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-AWish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 315400-0797 Today!

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LEGAL HBTWG a JV is seeking proposals from qualified and certified NYS MWBE subcontractors and/or suppliers for participation in a New York State Thruway Authority Highway and Bridge Construction Design Build located in the Syracuse Division. Please be aware that this project requires a project labor agreement (PLA). If you would like more information regarding this project, please contact us by email Estimating@ hbtwgjv.com or by phone (518)7625382. LUNG CANCER? And 60+ Years Old? If So, You And Your Family May Be Entitled To A Significant Cash Award. Call 1-877689-5293 To Learn More. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket.

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Support our Service Members- veterans and their families in their time of need. For more information visit the Fisher House website at www.fisherhouse.org.

MISCELLANEOUS

11.29.17 - 12.5.17 | syracusenewtimes.com

ON THE PERSONAL SIDE Herpes but honest. Professional male seeks physcially fit, non-smoking woman. 45-59. Must be understanding or have gone thru the same unfortunate experience. Reply to: PO Box 181 Clay, NY 13041. SERVICES Dish Network-Satellite Television Services. Now Over 190 channels for ONLY $49.99/mo! HBOFREE for one year, FREE installation, FREE Streaming, FREE HD. Add Internet for $14.95 a month. 1-800-373-6508. WANTED NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self-publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 1-877-6353893. LEGAL NOTICE Greenback Records LLC was filed with the SSNY on 10/23/2017. Office: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC whom p r o ce s s against may be served. The address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: Halston Canty, 222 West Newell St., Syracuse, NY 13205. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of YAMAN MANAGEMENT GROUP, LLC — Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York on 10/11/17. Office location: Cortland County. Secretary of State of New York designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. Secretary of State of New York shall mail process to 185 Clinton Avenue, Cortland, New York 13045 which is the

principal office of the limited liability company. The limited liability company was formed for any lawful business purpose. Notice of Formation of YAMAN REFERRAL COMPANY, LLC — Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York on 10/11/17. Office location: Cortland County. Secretary of State of New York designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom p r o ce s s against it may be served. Secretary of State of New York shall mail process to 185 Clinton Avenue, Cortland, New York 13045 which is the principal office of the limited liability company. The limited liability company was formed for the purpose of operating a referral firm. Notice of Formation of 2290 East Avenue Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 13, 2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 124 Port Watson Street, Cortland, New York 13045. Purpose is any lawful purpose. NOTICE OF FORMATION of 406 SCOTT LLC Art. Of Org filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/4/2017. Office location: Onondaga Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom p r o ce s s against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8260 Thimblerock Cir, Manlius, NY 13104. Purpose: any lawful activities. Notice of Formation of 5-7 William St., LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State

of New York (SSNY) on 10/12/2017. Office location: Cortland County, NY. SSNY is the designated agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 5-7 William St., LLC at 1 France PL Larchmont, NY 10538 which is also the principal business location. The purpose is any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of Alton Enterprises LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on Octover 26, 2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Nicholas Alton, 4110 Split Rock Road, Camillus, NY 13031. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Brown IFS LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY ) on 11/6/2017. Office location: County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: LLC, 100 Madison Street, Suite 1905, Syracuse, NY 13202. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Burke Building LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/2/2017. Office location: County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Centolella Green Law, P.C., 6832 E. Genesee Street, Fayetteville, NY 13066. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of COPELAND AVE.,

LLC — Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York on 11/17/17. Office location: Cortland County. Secretary of State of New York designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. Secretary of State of New York shall mail process to 24 Copeland Avenue, Homer, New York 13077 which is the principal office of the limited liability company. The limited liability company was formed for any lawful business purpose. Notice of Formation of Daniel J. Petrone, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 1, 2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Law Office of Daniel J. Petrone, PLLC, 499 S. Warren St., Ste. 220, Syracuse, NY 13202- 2609. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Eastern Premier Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/07/2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to National Structures, Inc. 145 Dwight Park Circle, Syracuse, NY 13209. Notice of formation of Fellows Excavation L LC filed on 09/25/2017. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: Myla Bseirani 112 Cedar Heights Dr. Jamesville NY 13078. Notice of Formation of Harbor Seawall LLC Articles of Organiza-


tion filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/12/2017. Office location: County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Kathleen Centolella, 6832 E. Genesee Street, Fayetteville, NY 13066. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of HB4E.com LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/20/2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1612 Burnet Ave. Syracuse, NY 13206. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of JK General Contracting LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 9/22/2017. Office location; County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Purpose of LLC is to incorporate JK General Contracting (OBA) as 1 entity. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 215 Chamberlin Rd. Jordan NY 13080 Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of formation of Knights Remodeling Service LLC. Articles of Org. filed with New York Secretary of State (NS) on 10/5/2017, office location Onondaga County 781 fairway cir Baldwinsville, NY 13027. NS is designated agent for service of process (SOP), NS shall mail SOP to, United States Corporation Agents INC. 7014 13th Ave Brooklyn, NY 11228, purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Kowalik Development, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 22,2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga.

SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1612 Burnet Avenue Syracuse, NY 13206. Notice of Formation of Lone Wolf Development, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New Yo r k (SSNY ) on10/11/17. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 4408 Dolomite Dr. Syr. NY 13215. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Lost Parachute Press, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY ) on 10/30/2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Peter K McShane, 202 Churchill Lane, Fayetteville, NY 13066. Notice of Formation of Mark A. Caruso Architect, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/6/17. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 219 Burnet Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13203. Purpose: practice the profession of architecture. Notice of Formation of MDBM Distributing, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY ) on 10/27/2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process

to 219 Grenadier Dr. Apt E Liverpool NY, 13090.

bility company was formed for any lawful business purpose.

Notice of Formation of Morcelle-Mazzye Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/13/17. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 4981 Rabbit Run, Liverpool, NY 13090. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of Portal Tools, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on Aug 4, 2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 505 East Molloy Rd. Mattydale NY 13211. Purpose is any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of Ngwashi & Associates, PLLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on May 3, 2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process maybe served. SSNY shall mail process to Ngwashi & Assoc., 224 Genesee Pk Dr., Syracuse NY, 13224. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Nor thbound Coaching & Consulting, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/17. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 151 Beresford Lane, Minoa, NY 13116. Purpose: any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of Organized Solutions of CNY, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/06/2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 105 Northrup Blvd. Syracuse, NY 13209. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of OSBORNE OLD HESS OF CORTLAND, LLC — Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York on 10/24/17. Office location: Cortland County. Secretary of State of New York designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom p r o ce s s against it may be served. Secretary of State of New York shall mail process to 4073 West Road, Cortland, New York 13045 which is the principal office of the limited liability company. The limited lia-

Notice of Formation of Rabi Energy , LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07-10-2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 5329 Amalfi Dr. Clay, NY 13041. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of RKM Enterprise, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/23/2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 403 Shuart Ave. Syracuse NY, 13203. Purpose is any lawful prupose.

Notice of Formation of Spark Sales & Management, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/19/17. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process

against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1106 Cornflower Way North, East Syracuse, NY 13057. Purpose: any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of Starship STEM LLC.

Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 6, 2017. Office location: County of Onondaga SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may

be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: P.O Box 11504 Syracuse, NY 13218. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of STLot2 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with

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Notice of Formation of RLD Development LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on June 6, 2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to RLD Development LLC, 514 Briar Brook Run, Fayetteville, New York 13066. NOTICE OF FORMATION of S.O.S. MAYDAY REPAIR SERVICE, LLC Art. Of Org filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/12/2017. Office location: Onondaga Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom p r o ce s s against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 7643 Farmington Rd, Manlius, NY 13104. Purpose: any lawful activities. syracusenewtimes.com | 11.29.17 - 12.5.17

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Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/17/17. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom p ro ce s s against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 203 Luther Ave., Liverpool, NY 13088. Purpose: any lawful

act or activity. Notice of Formation of SWEENEY FARM, LLC — Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York on 11/14/17. Office location: Cortland County. Secretary of State of New York designated as agent of the limited liability com-

pany upon whom process against it may be served. Secretary of State of New York shall mail process to 5048 Route 41, Homer, New York 13077 which is the principal office of the limited liability company. The limited liability company was formed for any lawful

business purpose. Notice of Formation of Tephran, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secreatry of State of New Work (SSNY) on August 03,2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may

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be served. SSNY shall mail process to 113 Sheraton Rd. Syracuse, NY 13219. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of UPSTATE NY Bottle & Can Retrieval Center, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on October 13,2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Drawer 1034, 449 Broadway, Monticello, New York 12701. Purpose of business of LLC: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Western NY Bottle & Can Retrieval Center, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on October 13,2017. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Drawer 1034, 449 Broadway, Monticello, New York 12701. Purpose of business of LLC: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of yayak LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on 11/16/17. Office is located in the county of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 300 Crestwood Dr. Camillus, NY 13031. S U P P L E M E N TA L SUMMONS Index No. 2017-4647 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF ONONDAGA SUN WEST MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., Plaintiff, -vsTHE HEIRS AT LARGE OF LAURETTA M. HYDE A/K/A LAURETTA HYDE A/K/A LAURET TA MAE HYDE, deceased, and all persons who are husbands, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in

interest of such of them as may be dead, and their husbands and wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest of all of whom and whose names and places are unknown to Plaintiff; MARK R. HYDE; FRANCIS P. HYDE; SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; “JOHN DOE” AND “JANE DOE” said names being fictitious, it being the intention of Plaintiff to designate any and all occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, Defendants. Mortgaged Premises: 109 HARTWELL AVENUE, EAST SYRACUSE NY 13057 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above entitled action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days of the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service of the same is complete where service is made in any manner other than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. Your failure to appear or answer will result in a judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. In the event that a deficiency balance remains from the sale proceeds, a judgment may be entered against you, unless the Defendant obtained a bankruptcy discharge and such other or further relief as may be just and equitable. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer to the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your

home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. These pleadings are being amended to include Mark R. Hyde and Francis P. Hyde as possible heirs to the Estate of Lauretta M. Hyde a/k/a Lauretta Hyde a/k/a Lauretta Mae Hyde. ONONDAGA County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. Dated: October 25, 2017 Mark K. Broyles, Esq. FEIN SUCH & CRANE, LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff Office and P.O. Address 28 East Main Street, Suite 1800 Rochester, New York 14614 Telephone No. (585) 232-7400 Section: 005 Block: 06 Lot: 03.0 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION The object of the above action is to foreclose a mortgage held by the Plaintiff recorded in the County of ONONDAGA, State of New York as more particularly described in the Complaint herein. TO THE DEFENDANT, the plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action. To the above named defendants: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of HON. DEBORAH H. KARALUNAS, Justice of the SUPREME Court of the State of New York, dated November 13, 2017 and filed along with the supporting papers in the ONONDAGA County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a Mortgage. ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND situate in the Village of East Syracuse, County of Onondaga, State of New York, being the front 100 feet of Lot No. 14 in Block 26,

according to an amended map of part of Lot No. 42, Town of Dewitt, made by J.G. Tracy for Upton and Ellis and filed in the Onondaga County Clerk’s Office on November 30, 1878. The lot hereby conveyed is on the west side of Hartwell Avenue and the south side of the continuation of Ellis Street and is laid out on the map aforesaid 50 feet wide, but since said map was made by the continuation of Ellis Street has been widened and the south line of said street, as widened, is made the north line of the premises hereby conveyed. ALSO all interest of grantor in the west half of Harwell Avenue and the south half of the continuation of Ellis Street in front of the premises hereinbefore described and conveyed. Premises:109 Hartwell Avenue, East Syracuse, NY 13057 Tax Parcel ID No.: Section: 005 Block: 06 Lot: 03.0 Mortgaged Premises: 109 HARTWELL AVENUE, EAST SYRACUSE NY 13057 Tax Map/Parcel ID No.: Section: 005 Block: 06 Lot: 03.0 of the VILLAGE of EAST SYRACUSE, NY 13057 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF ONONDAGA , Plaintiff designates ONONDAGA as the place of trial situs of the real property S U P P L E M E N TA L SUMMONS Mortgaged Premises: 909 DEWITT STREET SYRACUSE, NY 13203 Section: 13 Block: 2 Lot: 11 INDEX NO. 2017-259 REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC., Plaintiff -against- JULIE SEIDEN, AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF CONCETTA E. PIAZZA; LINDA TURI, AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF CONCETTA E. PIAZZA; CARL PIAZZA, AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF CONCETTA E. PIAZZA, any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended


to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devis e e s, l e g a te e s, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; HOME HEADQUARTERS, INC., ‘’JOHN DOE #1’’ through ‘’JOHN DOE #12,’’ the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises, described in the complaint, Defendants. To the above named Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief

demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above caption action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure the sum of $115,500.00 and interest, recorded on February 10, 2009, at Liber 15726 Page 0869, of the Public Records of ONONDAGA County, New York, covering premises known as 909 DEWITT STREET, SYRACUSE, NY 13203. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. ONONDAGA County is designated as the place of trial because the real property affected by this action is located in said county. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY ) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: September 12, 2017 Westbury, New York RAS BORISKIN, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff BY: DANIEL GREENBAUM, ESQ. 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106 Westbury, NY 11590 516-2807675 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF ONONDAGA Plaintiff designates ONONDAGA as the place of trial situs of the real property SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS Mortgaged Premises: 210 DUTTON AVENUE

NEDROW, NY 13120 Section: 45 Block: 9 Lot: 13.3 INDEX NO. 2017-576 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ELIZABETH PEREZ, if living, and if she/he be dead, any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devis e e s, l e g a te e s, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; CITY COURT CLERK O/B/O PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; NORTH STAR CAPITAL ACQUISITION, LLC; ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL HEALTH CENTER; ONONDAGA COUNTY; HSBC BANK USA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO HSBC BANK USA; COMMISSIONER OF SOCIAL SERVICES OF ONONDAGA COUNTY; THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ‘’JOHN DOE #1’’ through ‘’JOHN DOE #12,’’ the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises, described in the complaint, defendants. To the abovenamed Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your

answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above caption action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure the sum of $49,300.00 and interest, recorded on March 29, 2002 in Liber 12508 at Page 0310, of the Public Records of ONONDAGA County, New York, covering premises known as 210 DUTTON AV E N U E , NEDROW, NY 13120. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. ONONDAGA County is designated as the place of trial because the real property affected by this action is located in said county. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERV-

ING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY ) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: November 8, 2017 Westbury, New York RAS BORISKIN, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff BY: IRINA DULARIDZE, ESQ. 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106 Westbury, NY 11590 516-280-7675

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ZENSEA, LLC: Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company. Articles of Organization for ZENSEA, LLC (“LLC”) were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on 10/16/2017. Office Location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC, c/o 8898 Center Pointe Drive, Baldwinsville, NY 13027. Purpose: To engage in any lawful activity.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You were born with the potential to give the world specific gifts -- benefits and blessings that are unique to you. One of those gifts has been slow in developing. You’ve never been ready to confidently offer it in its fullness. In fact, if you have tried to bestow it in the past, it may have caused problems. But the good news is that in the coming months, this gift will finally be ripe. You’ll know how to deal crisply with the interesting responsibilities it asks you to take on. Here’s your homework: Get clear about what this gift is and what you will have to do to offer it in its fullness. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Happy Unbirthday, Gemini! You’re halfway between your last birthday and your next. That means you’re free to experiment with being different from who you have imagined yourself to be and who other people expect you to be. Here are inspirational quotes to help you celebrate. 1. “Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.”(George Bernard Shaw) 2. “Like all weak men he laid an exaggerated stress on not changing one’s mind.” (W. Somerset Maugham) 3. “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do.” (Ralph Waldo Emerson) 4. “The snake which cannot cast its skin has to die. As well the minds which are prevented from changing their opinions; they cease to be mind.”(Friedrich Nietzsche)

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everything doesn’t come too easily for you in the coming weeks. I’m worried you will meet with no obstructions and face no challenges. And that wouldn’t be good. It might weaken your willpower and cause your puzzle-solving skills to atrophy. Let me add a small caveat, however. It’s also true that right about now you deserve a whoosh of slack. I’d love for you to be able to relax and enjoy your well-deserved rewards. But on the other hand, I know you will soon receive an opportunity to boost yourself up to an even higher level of excellence and accomplishment. I want to be sure that when it comes, you are at peak strength and alertness.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22) I suggest that you

you

take a piece of paper and write down a list of your biggest fears. Then call on the magical force within you that is bigger and smarter than your fears. Ask your deep sources of wisdom for the poised courage you need to keep those scary fantasies in their proper place. And what is their proper place? Not as the masters of your destiny, not as controlling agents that prevent you from living lustily, but rather as helpful guides that keep you from taking foolish risks.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) In his book Life: The

77%

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81,000

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educated & affluent weekly readers

*Figures compiled by Circulation Verification Council, an independent third party audit company.

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Odds, Gregory Baer says that the odds you will marry a millionaire are not good: 215-to-1. They’re 60,000-to-1 that you’ll wed royalty and 88,000-to-1 that you’ll date a model. After analyzing your astrological omens for the coming months, I suspect your chances of achieving these feats will be even lower than usual. That’s because you’re far more likely to cultivate synergetic and symbiotic relationships with people who enrich your soul and stimulate your imagination, but don’t necessarily pump up your ego. Instead of models and millionaires, you’re likely to connect with practical idealists, energetic creators and emotionally intelligent people who have done work to transmute their own darkness.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) What might you do to take better care of yourself in 2018, Virgo? According to my reading of the astrological omens, this will be a fertile meditation for you to keep revisiting. Here’s a good place to start: Consider the possibility that you have a lot to learn about what makes your body operate at peak efficiency and what keeps your soul humming along with the sense that your life is interesting. Here’s another crucial task: Intensify your love for yourself. With that as a driving force, you’ll be led to discover the actions nec-

essary to supercharge your health. P.S. Now is an ideal time to get this project underway.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Here are themes I

suggest you specialize in during the coming weeks. 1. How to gossip in ways that don’t diminish and damage your social network, but rather foster and enhance it. 2. How to be in three places at once without committing the mistake of being nowhere at all. 3. How to express precisely what you mean without losing your attractive mysteriousness. 4. How to be nosy and brash for fun and profit. 5. How to unite and harmonize the parts of yourself and your life that have been at odds with each other.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) I predict that in the coming months you won’t feel compulsions to set your adversaries’ hair on fire. You won’t fantasize about robbing banks to raise the funds you need, nor will you be tempted to worship the devil. And the news just gets better. I expect that the amount of self-sabotage you commit will be close to zero. The monsters under your bed will go on a long sabbatical. Any lame excuses you have used in the past to justify bad behavior will melt away. And you’ll mostly avoid indulging in bouts of irrational and unwarranted anger. In conclusion, Scorpio, your life should be pretty evil-free for quite some time. What will you do with this prolonged outburst of grace? Use it wisely! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) “What is love?” asks philosopher Richard Smoley. “It’s come to have a greeting-card quality,” he mourns. “Half the time ‘loving’ someone is taken to mean nurturing a warmish feeling in the heart for them, which mysteriously evaporates the moment the person has some concrete need or irritates us.” One of your key assignments in the next 10 months will be to purge any aspects of this shrunken and shriveled kind of love that may still be lurking in your beautiful soul. You are primed to cultivate an unprecedented new embodiment of mature, robust love. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You know that unfinished task you have half-avoided, allowing it to stagnate? Soon you’ll be able to summon the gritty determination required to complete it. I suspect you’ll also be able to carry out the glorious rebirth you’ve been shy about climaxing. To gather the energy you need, reframe your perspective so that you can feel gratitude for the failure or demise that has made your glorious rebirth necessary and inevitable. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) In an ideal

world, your work and your character would speak for themselves. You’d receive exactly the amount of recognition and appreciation you deserve. You wouldn’t have to devote as much intelligence to selling yourself as you did to developing your skills in the first place. But now forget everything I just said. During the next 10 months, I predict that packaging and promoting yourself won’t be so #$@&%*! important. Your work and character WILL speak for themselves with more vigor and clarity than they have before.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) There used to

be a booth at a Santa Cruz flea market called “Joseph Campbell’s Love Child.” It was named after the mythological scholar who wrote the book The Hero with a Thousand Faces. The booth’s proprietor sold items that spurred one’s “heroic journey,” like talismans made to order and herbs that stimulated courage and minibooks with personalized advice based on one’s horoscope. “Chaos-Tamers” were also for sale. They were magic spells designed to help people manage the messes that crop up in one’s everyday routine while pursuing a heroic quest. Given the current astrological omens, Pisces, you would benefit from a place that sold items like these. Since none exists, do the next best thing: Aggressively drum up all the help and inspiration you need. You can and should be well-supported as you follow your dreams on your hero’s journey.


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VAPE SHOP Vape Kult

10 South St. Auburn, NY 13021 315-250-9977

Asian

Cafe

Peach Blossom Restaurant at Turning Stone Resort

The Brick House Cafe

5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 1-800-771-7711

Bakery

Provisions Bakery & Restaurant 216 Walton St. Syracuse, NY 315-472-3475

Jakes Grub & Grog

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Phoebe’s Restaurant & Coffee Lounge 900 E. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 315-475-5154

Diner Stella’s Diner

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110 Wolf St. Syracuse, NY Harrison Bakery 1306 W. Genesee St. 315-425-0353 Syracuse, NY 315-422-1468

Bar/ Pub Lounge/

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5885 Cricle Dr. E Cicero, NY 315-299-4274

New American

916 County Rt. 37 Central Square, NY 315-668-3434

Limestone Grille

Indian

7300 E. Genesee St. Fayetteville, NY 315-637-9999

Dosa Grill

4467 E. Genesee St. Dewitt, NY 315-445-5555

Pizza

Irish

110 Rochester St. Fulton, NY 315-592-9122

Coleman’s Authentic Irish Pub

Red Baron Pizza

Patsy’s Pizza

7 E. River Road Central Square, NY 315-668-3905

100 S. Lowell Ave. Syracuse, NY 315-476-1933

Monirae’s

New Polish American Eva’s European Sweets

668 County Rt. 10 Pennellville, NY 315-668-1248

Buffet Season’s Harvest Restaurant at Turning Stone Resort 5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 1-800-771-7711

Dave & Buster’s

10335 Destiny USA Drive Syracuse, NY 315-401-3706

1205 Erie Blvd. W Syracuse, NY 315-472-4626

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Sandwich Shop

The Food Hall at Turning Stone Resort 5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 1-800-771-7711

PB&J’s Lunch Box

989 James St. Syracuse, NY Ground Floor of Imperial Garden 315-476-3287

Seafood Westvale Fish Cove

2130 W. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 315-468-4767

Sports Bar TS Steakhouse Restaurant at Turning Stone Resort 5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 1-800-771-7711

Steakhouse Portico by Fabio Viviani 1133 State Rt. 414 Waterloo, NY 315-946-1780

Vietnamese Mai Lan Vietnamese Restaurant

505 N. State St. Syracuse, NY A Taste of Philadelphia 315-417-6740 2533 James St. Syracuse, NY 315-463-9422

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