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Presorted Standard U.S. Postage Paid St. Joseph Newsleader St. Joseph, MN 56374 Permit No. 21 ECRWSS Postal Customer

Newsleader St. Joseph

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012 Volume 23, Issue 47 Est. 1989

Postal Patron

St. Joseph company is leader in ‘green’ building by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

Town Crier

Wrappers needed for humane society

Wanted: people who like to wrap gifts and want to volunteer their talents. The Tri-County Humane Society needs gift wrappers to wrap presents for shoppers at Crossroads Center in St. Cloud. A giftwrapping booth will be open during Crossroads business hours in the mall by the Target store from Friday, Dec. 7 to Monday, Dec. 24. The gift wrapping is one of the humane society’s annual fundraising activities. The specialty gift wrapping costs $2 for a small package, $4 for a medium and $6 for a large one. For more information or to volunteer, call Kim at the humanesociety shelter at 252-0896.

Donations sought for Place of Hope

Place of Hope is in need of donations for the holiday season including the following: gift cards, winter hats, coats and mittens, new gifts for children to give to their parents and siblings, backpacks, personal-care items, sponsors for Adopt a Family for Hope, food for meals served on site and $10 gift cards for food. Contact Pastor Carol at Place of Hope at (320) 203-7881.

Bell ringers wanted for Salvation Army

Volunteer to ring The Salvation Army bells over the Christmas season. They have 22 locations within St. Cloud, Sartell, Sauk Rapids and Waite Park. It can be cold outside, so volunteers must be able and willing to stand outside for at lease two hours at a time. Contact the Salvation Army at (320) 252-4552.

Transportation needed for veterans

Transportation assistants are sought and will ride along with the transportation volunteer to monitor safe loading and unloading of passengers, lock-down wheelchairs and interact with riders during transport to the St. Cloud VA Health Care System. Transportation assistants should be interested in providing a highquality experience for riders and be in tune to rider safety at all times. On-the-job training will be provided. Volunteers should be physically able to push, pull, bend and sit for periods of time. Contact Patricia Aljets at the St. Cloud VA Health Care System at (320) 255-6365 or patricia.aljets@ va.gov.

photo by TaLeiza Calloway

Above: Jesse Raden, yard manager for Borgert Products Inc. in St. Joseph, dumps hundreds of gallons of water on a permeable interlocking concrete paving system Nov. 13 to show how quickly it absorbs the water. Left: PICPs are installed at Borgert Products Inc. in St. Joseph. The paving system is considered a best-management practice for stormwater management.

City leaves area human rights commission by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

Members of the St. Joseph City Council voted 4-1 to leave the St. Cloud Regional Human Rights Commission. Council member Renee Symanietz voted against the move to discontinue membership. The commission was created to supervise the St. Cloud Regional Human Rights Office. The

About 20 men and women in the construction industry recently journeyed to St. Joseph to get a lesson in a growing area of environmentally friendly building practices. Hosted by Borgert Products Inc. of St. Joseph, the two-day school offered an introduction to permeable-interlocking-concrete-pavement installation, a practice that helps reduce the amount of run-off in rivers, that can save money and provide a natural groundwater filter. Susan Borgert, chief executive officer for Borgert, a concrete manufacturer, said the company started the “Borgert Technical School” a few years ago to certify contractors on the installation of concrete paving stones. They held their fourth class Nov. 12-13. “We are the first company in the nation to have our own PICP class,” Borgert said. “We’ve had four classes so far. We are one of the original manufacturers of concrete paving stones in the U.S. and the first west of the Mississippi.” Green • page 3

Students gather to celebrate

office opened in September 2010 and provides outreach, education and intake functions for St. Cloud-area residents. St. Joseph was the only area city to enter a joint powers agreement with St. Cloud for the commission. It is funded by St. Cloud, St. Joseph and a Community Development Block Grant. Symanietz, who served on the regional board, said the city City • page 5

Survey to help city prioritize services by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

Residents have a chance to share their thoughts on city services in an effort to make them better. The city is participating in an online survey offered by the League of Minnesota Cities. Specifically, the survey looks

at city services and how they can be improved. This is the second time the city has participated. The LMC coordinated the survey for the first time earlier this year due to a new requirement for cities to receive state aid. Some of the areas the survey looks at include rating the apSurvey • page 5

photo by Dennis Dalman

The CSB Christmas tree contains more than 3,000 white lights. When CSB President Mary Ann Baenninger turned the tree’s lights on, the crowd of students cheered at the sight. Students • page 4

www.thenewsleaders.com


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People Benjamin Evenson, son of Marne and Mark Evenson of St. Joseph, is studying in Chile during fall semester 2012 through the Office for Education Abroad at the College of St. Benedict in St. Joseph, and St. John’s University in Collegeville. Evenson is a junior Hispanic studies

major at SJU. The Chilean program is hosted by Universidad Adolfo Ibañez, a private university located in Viña del Mar, a city of 350,000 residents. The campus is situated in central Chile, 70 miles west of Santiago, the country’s capital. Students are encouraged to

Blotter

advance their Spanish language skills and integrate into the rich and diverse culture through service-learning opportunities and by living with Chilean host families. Marietta Franulic, adjunct instructor of Hispanic studies at CSB and SJU, is the director of the program for fall 2012.

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Culinary Lead The Department of Culinary Services at the College of Saint Benedict, invites applications for the position of Lead. This position is 75% time, benefit eligible. The Lead is responsible for supervision of the daily operation and maintenance of the Gorecki Dining Center front of house operation, including the dish room. This position assists the station and dish room staff; directs student staff; and works with all staff to assure the attractive and safe service of food to our dining guests. In addition, directs operation, maintenance, sanitation and cleaning of dish room; checks that the dish machine is filled, sustains proper temperature and is cleaned. Checks that all dishes, pans, silverware, glasses etc. are properly cleaned and returned to their areas; shuts down and cleans dish machine and dish room. EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE: High school diploma required. 9-12 months related experience or training preferred. Food Safety Certification is preferred. ABILITIES/SKILLS: Good verbal and interpersonal customer service skills; ability to meet the physical demands of the position; ability to lift and move up to 50 pounds, tolerate temperature and humidity fluctuations and loud noise levels; ability to stand for long periods of time and operate dish machine; problem solving and leadership abilities; able to work varied hours and days as needed. APPLICATION PROCESS: Applications are accepted online at https://employment. csbsju.edu. You will be asked to complete an application form. A cover letter and resume are optional. Women, individuals of diverse racial and cultural backgrounds, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. College of Saint Benedict is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

If any readers have tips concerning crimes, they should call the St. Joseph Police Department at 363-8250 or Tri-County Crime Stoppers at 255-1301 or access its tip site at www.tricountycrimestoppers.org. Crime Stoppers offers rewards up to $1,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for crimes.

Nov. 3 5 p.m. Fire alarm. Luetmer Hall, College of St. Benedict Campus. A police officer responded to a fire alarm at Luetmer Hall. The officer arrived and found students standing outside on the south side of the building. He could not find security on scene and attempted to contact them and was unable to get through. The officer walked through the building and smelled smoke on the second floor and had the fire department paged. After alerting the fire department he met with security. Security stated everything was OK. A resident of the dorm had burnt some mac and cheese. Nov. 8 11:20 p.m. Loud party. Minnesota Street E. The police department received a report of a loud party. The resident stated they had a few people over earlier and did not think they were that loud, and had no music playing. She thought the noise was from the people leaving the residence. There was no violation at this time. Verbal warning from of-

ficer.

Nov. 8 8 a.m. Verbal. Elena Lane. There was a verbal altercation between husband and wife over the husband not having job and not doing anything around the house. At this point the matter was only verbal. The officer was able to get things calmed down and cleared.

Nov. 8 9 p.m. Vandalism. Third Avenue N.E. A man reported someone punctured the rear tire on his truck. There was approximately $300 damage to the tire. The man told the officer he had no issues with anyone and had no idea who could have done the damage. The officer told the man he would do extra patrol and let the other night officer know about the damage so he could do extra patrol also.

Nov. 10 6:20 a.m. Criminal damage to property, disorderly conduct, underage consumption, trespassing. College Avenue North. A report of a possible burglary in progress was made to the St. Joseph Police department. An officer arrived and met complainant at the front door. The officer was handed a wallet belonging to a 20-yearold male. The complainant also pointed out the open front door to the business which had been damaged. The officer searched the business and found a male passed out in a back room. The wallet found belonged to the male. The male was transported to jail.

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Publisher/Owner Janelle Von Pinnon Editor Dennis Dalman

Contributing Writers TaLeiza Calloway Cori Hilsgen Amber Roerick

Administrative/Layout Assistant Christian Gilman

Design/Layout Tara Wiese

Advertising Sales Assistant Kathryn Bjorke

Delivery Glen Lauer

P.O. Box 324 • 32 1st Ave. N.W. • St. Joseph, Minn. 56374 Phone (320) 363-7741 • Fax (320) 363-4195 • E-mail address: news@thenewsleaders.com POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ST. JOSEPH NEWSLEADER, P.O. Box 324, St. Joseph, MN 56374.


Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Green from front page

Borgert offers permeable interlocking concrete pavements made from Bogert’s pavers. It’s a permeable surface and is considered a best-management practice for storm-water management. Because it is a flexible pavement system, Borgert said it has the ability to move but stays intact. It does not heave from freezing and thawing, she said. Students in the class earlier this month watched as a fellow classmate dumped gallons of water on the interlocked pavers. It looked as if the water disappeared instantly as it seeped down through the pavers instead of standing on the ground in puddles. Frank Gandora, one of the in-

St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com structors for the class, explained the pavers require less maintenance and last longer than asphalt or concrete. He said in the long term it’s a more costeffective option. “It’s a 50-year design product,” Gandora said. “It’s three times as strong as concrete.” Students in the class were using the pavers to create a parking-lot area for Borgert Products Inc. Because the business is creating a permeable surface that is not considered hard cover, Borgert said she plans to apply to the city for a reduction in their stormwater fee. Borgert has a satellite yard in Colorado. The business pays about $10,000 for the amount of hard cover it has on its property – a fee most municipalities charge businesses. Borgert said the company pays about $3,000 in storm-water fees to the City of St. Joseph. Borgert explained the federal

government regulates municipalities to take action in managing stormwater runoff. A lot of the infrastructure in larger metro areas can’t handle the amount of runoff because of all of the hard cover, like roadways and parking lots. The PICP will now be a part of Minnesota guidelines, something that took time to develop and for engineers to embrace. “It’s a huge problem,” she said. “It (the traditional way) puts pollutants in our groundwater.” While the PICP is an engineered system, it’s a practice that is starting to be incorporated more into building projects. George Strzala, president of Borgert, said the company is a leader in manufacturing this product that can be used for parking lots, roadways and driveways. “It’s like a filter; it recharges the groundwater,” Strzala said.

“You have to give Mother Nature something back. It’s gaining momentum.” Borgert Products Inc. has used the paving system for businesses and schools throughout the state and beyond. Those who walk the campus of the College of St.

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Benedict can see some concrete pavers installed by Borgert. The pavers at CSB are different from the ones installed during the recent class. “We have to start doing stuff like this,” Borgert said. “It’s the Green • page 8

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St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

Students from front page by Dennis Dalman news@thenewsleaders.com

The campus of the College of St. Benedict glowed with flickering lights Nov. 27 when

photos by Dennis Dalman

Above: As attendants hold torches, Mary Geller explains to a large gathering of students the meaning of the first “Christmas at Saint Ben’s,” an event celebrated with lights at the College of St. Benedict. Right: The CSB Choir sings Christmas songs as a large gathering of students waits for the official lighting of the Christmas tree.

students gathered outdoors to celebrate “Christmas at Saint Ben’s.” Hundreds of students cheered as CSB President Mary Ann Baenninger plugged in the 20-foot-tall Christmas tree, covered with more than 3,000 white lights. Many of the students held small candles or torches to honor the CSB motto of “Sic Luciat Lux Vestra,” which is Latin for “So Let Your Light Shine.” Five walkways to the middle of the campus were lined with paper-bag luminaries. The blessing of the tree was presented by Sister Sharon of CSB Campus Ministry. As the students waited for the speakers and the tree lighting, the CSB Choir performed Christmas songs. Mary Geller, vice president for student development, spoke to the students, explaining the meaning of “Sic Luciat

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012 Lux Vestra.” It was inspired, she said, by the Gospel of Matthew 5:16, in which Matthew praises the symbolic value of light – the light of the world and the city on the hill that cannot be hidden. “We do not light a lamp and put it under a bushel basket,” Matthew wrote. “We set it on a stand where it gives light to all . . . In the same way, your light must shine before all so they may see goodness in your acts and give praise to God.” The weather, fortunately for those gathered, was windless and almost spring-like. After the ceremony, students enjoyed refreshments and social interactions in the lobby of one of the campus buildings. In an interview earlier with the Newsleader, Geller said the celebration of light is a way to renew the meaning of CSB as it approaches its centennial celebration in 2013.

Thank you for your continued support.

Have a safe and HAPPY HOLIDAY season! Stearns County Sheriff John Sanner

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Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

City from front page had 17 inquires last year and one complaint. Other than St. Cloud, St. Joseph is the only area city that voted to join the commission. “I think it was because of the cost,” Symanietz said of the decision to leave. “It just seemed like we weren’t using the human rights office locally.” She also said it was hard to get volunteers from St. Joseph to support the commission. She also talked to other neighboring cities and they did not express interest in joining. Even with the city’s exit, anyone can still file complaints and make reports to the state human rights office in St. Paul. “We did have some people use it,” she said. “I thought it

could be a benefit for someone here. It was a viable committee to be on.” St. Joseph Mayor Rick Schultz said the city pays about $5,000 annually for the commission membership. He said if the City of St. Cloud could garner support from other municipalities, the city could rejoin the commission. “There’s been no details [as to whether or not] the service is successful, if it’s being used and how accountable it is to St. Joseph residents,” Schultz said. “It would take a lot at this point for us to rejoin. We need to see more.” The St. Cloud Regional Human Rights Office, the only regional office for the Department of Human Rights, allows residents of St. Cloud and St. Joseph to report potential violations of the Minnesota Human Rights Act locally versus filing reports through a St. Paul office.

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Survey from front page pearance of the city, the overall feeling of safety within the city, the condition of city streets and quality of snowplowing of streets. By design, once a participant rates those areas of the survey, he or she can also provide additional comments. St. Joseph Mayor Rick Schultz said the survey is more of a tool for the LMC in understanding what services are working and those that are not working in cities. “We can react to issues or concerns that come up,” Schultz said. “This survey is more for the state than it is for the city. It helps the League of Minnesota Cities provide stats Survey • page 8 Roofing • Siding • Gutters • Windows • Metal Roofs HAAG™ Certified Roof Inspectors for hail/wind

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CHIROPRACTOR Dr. Jerry Wetterling 103 N. College Ave. St. Joseph 320-363-4573

Drs. Styles, Cotton & Milbert 1514 E. Minnesota St., Box 607 St. Joseph 320-363-7729

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Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Opinion Our View

Do some homework before adopting a pet What is cuter than the face of a little kid who is presented a puppy or kitten as a Christmas present? That cuteness, however, can turn sour fairly quickly if the child and the child’s family are not prepared to take good care of that puppy or kitten. Parents should think twice about giving any kind of animal as a Christmas gift. In fact, every potential pet owner should do some homework before adopting a pet. Please don’t misinterpret this advice as a message from Scrooge. Adoption of animals is a wonderful thing, year-round. But people should remember, before adopting, animals are not stuffed toys that can be tossed into a toy box when not wanted. Here are the factors people should consider before adopting a pet: 1. Do you have the patience to train a dog to go potty outside? It can take quite a bit of work and effort to properly potty-train a dog. It might even require some advice from pet experts. Also pet-owners must be prepared for occasional potty “accidents” inside the house and not yell at or punish the dog when that happens. 2. Cat owners are lucky because cats, unlike dogs, need not be potty-trained. They take to their kitty-litter boxes by instinct. However, the drawback is kitty-litter boxes must be kept clean, and litter must be replenished now and then. The good thing is it takes less than a minute to clean a kitty box if done every day or every other day. 3. Another potential drawback about cats is they like to hone their front claws, and they can scratch to pieces carpets and upholstery. Scratching posts are helpful, but in some cases they don’t solve the problem entirely. Cats can be surgically de-clawed, but pet experts do not recommend it. At most places, that procedure costs in excess of $100. 4. Keep in mind that pets, of course, must be fed. In recent years, the cost of pet food, like everything else, has increased. Can you afford to feed your pets? Call the humane society and get some idea of how much a pet will consume and about how much it will cost to feed that pet. Then do your math and see if you can work it into the budget. 5. A rabies vaccination is vital. A few other shots are also important. Before getting a pet, find out which shots are recommended and how much they will cost. 6. Last but not least, pets should be spayed or neutered. Not only will they be happier house pets, but you can be assured they won’t get pregnant “accidentally.” Getting a cat or dog “fixed” can also cost in excess of $100. There is a mobile spayneuter service called SNAP, geared toward low-income people. However, by far the best way to get a pet is to adopt one from the Tri-County Humane Society in St. Cloud. All of its dogs and cats are spayed or neutered, vaccinated and equipped with identity chips before being adopted out. 7. Never adopt dogs from “puppy mills.” Do not help perpetuate such cruelty. For more information about how to adopt a pet and what it requires, call the TCHS at 252-0896. Local pet stores also have good information about the needs of pets.

Final movie makes me want to read the books I fell under the spell of “Twilight.” I was a little surprised at my positive reaction initially because of what the books and films are about. On the surface they’re about vampires and werewolves. As someone who lives with a phobia of dogs, it still gives my family a chuckle that I can sit through these films. I don’t even buy greeting cards with dogs on them. The series that has taken the world by storm and is said to have changed the Hollywood landscape recently came to a close. Based on author Stephenie Meyer’s novels, the films chronicle a love story between a human, Bella Swan, and vampire Edward Cullen. I might not like dogs, but I love a good love story – even it is between a woman and a vampire. I’m just a romantic that way. During the Thanksgiving break, my fiance and I went to see “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2,” the final installment of the series. We have seen them all now and both felt like there could be more to the story. We left the theater wanting more. Typically after reading a good

TaLeiza Calloway Reporter book, it’s natural to want to see it become a movie. I haven’t read any of the Twilight books but think it’s necessary now to get the full grasp of the Twilight story – a story I think can move anyone once you get past the whole vampire thing. I’m not going into detail about what goes down in the finale. There’s nothing worse than someone spoiling a film for the next viewer. I will say the film opens well and the final scenes of the film are some of the best parts of the viewing experience. What I liked the most was the makers of the film introduced us to all of the characters with the credits at the film’s conclusion. This was a nice flashback into where fans started and the journey along the way. For those who have seen the movies, there is undoubtedly some agreement it’s been an entertain-

ing ride. For those who have not seen it, give it a try. During the Thanksgiving weekend, the film grossed $43.1 million at the box office, according to media reports. The film opened Nov. 16 and still packs this type of power. That makes a statement in my book. The film, which wraps up the five-movie franchise, was the number-one movie for the second straight weekend and has garnered a solid $227 million in 10 days, according to a “USA Today” article. That’s crazy for one film. The fans have spoken. As happens with most films, everyone who goes to see this movie will have their own perspectives. After seeing the final chapter, I want to go back to the beginning to see where it all began through the written word since I’ve seen it through film. Books tend to offer more depth, and after seeing the movies, I am even more intrigued and eager to read the books. Now, all I have to do is go back and track the movie titles and find the corresponding books. The search should be fun. Wish me luck.

Ode to the turkey sandwich Several years ago while still living in Seattle, my wife and I decided not to prepare our traditional Thanksgiving feast. Every year of our marriage we had cooked a huge meal for Thanksgiving with a turkey and all the trimmings. We decided since the kids had left home that this year we would travel down to the Oregon coast and get a motel room right on the beach and just relax and cool it. Our plan was to pick out a great restaurant and have our Thanksgiving meal there. No cooking and no clean up. That is exactly what we did. The traffic was terrible but finally we arrived no worse for wear. The room was beautiful. It even had a fireplace along with a supply of firewood. Since we were right on the beach, all you could hear was the Pacific Ocean crashing on the shore and an occasional sea gull. It couldn’t have been nicer. On Thanksgiving Day we found a great restaurant and ordered the traditional feast. It was very tasty and we enjoyed the meal a lot. Since we were at the shore, we ate a lot of seafood during the next couple of days and all in all it was a marvelous trip. On Sunday evening we returned home. Again the traffic was ridiculous. But we were refreshed from

Ron Scarbro Guest Writer our mini-vacation and actually looked forward to getting back home. We got home, but something just didn’t seem quite right. There seemed to be something missing. What was missing was the smell of Thanksgiving. One of the world’s great smells is that of a turkey and stuffing baking in the oven. I soon discovered another item which was missing. That was left over turkey for sandwiches. Now some would say anyone can go to the store and buy some deli turkey and make a sandwich. Well, it’s just not the same thing. There’s something about a sandwich made from the leftover carcass that cannot be created by a deli slicer. I have a friend named Jerry who is a master turkey sandwich maker. It would be truer to call him a master turkey sandwich builder. This is what he does. He takes a slice of bread and slathers it up with salad dressing. I’m talking about the product you buy that

looks like mayonnaise with bits of pickle in it. Then Jerry adds leftover stuffing, heaps of turkey, slices of cranberry sauce, you know the kind that comes in a can, then he slathers the other slice of bread with the salad dressing and closes up his masterpiece and he does all this with the relish of an artist. He then eats it and watching him deconstruct his creation is not a pretty sight. Fortunately Jerry has a big mouth and can navigate the task rather easily. My idea of a turkey sandwich is a lot easier. I just mayonnaise up a couple slices of bread, any kind, and add mostly dark turkey meat. That’s it. That’s all I need. To me this is one of the great treats available to us mortals. During the years, I have witnessed many variations of this most hallowed of sandwiches, but they all seem to please their creators. Turkey sandwiches, you see, are as individual as their makers. By not being home and preparing this meal, we missed out on some of the best parts of it and I haven’t even mentioned the pecan pie. That is why we have never even considered going away from home on Thanksgiving again. Some things, like turkey sandwiches, are just too good to miss.

Got a comment? Visit www.thenewsleaders.com Fairness and ethics

Newsleader staff members have the responsibility to report news fairly and accurately and are accountable to the public. Readers who feel we’ve fallen short of these standards are urged to call the Newsleader office at 363-7741. If matters cannot be resolved locally, readers are encouraged to take complaints to the Minnesota News Council, an independent agency designed to improve relationships between the public and the media and resolve conflicts. The council office may be reached at 612-341-9357.

Send your opinions to: The Newsleaders • P.O. Box 324 • St. Joseph, MN 56374 or email us at news@thenewsleaders.com


St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

Calendar

Friday, Nov. 30 St. Joseph Farmers’ Market, 3-6 p.m., Resurrection Lutheran Church, Fellowship Hall, 610 North County Road 2, St. Joseph. www.stjosephfarmersmarket.com Sunday, Dec. 2 Holiday shopping expo, with more than 40 vendors, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., VFW in St. Cloud, 9 18th Ave. N. Wednesday, Dec. 5 St. Joseph Area Historical Society, 7 p.m., Old City Hall, St. Joseph. www.stjosephhistoricalmn.org. Thursday, Dec. 6 St. Joseph City Council, 7 p.m., City Hall. 363-7201.

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HEALTH

LEGAL NOTICES CERTIFICATE OF ASSUMED NAME STATE OF MINNESOTA The filing of an assumed name does not provide a user with exclusive rights to that name. The filing is required for consumer protection in order to enable consumers to be able to identify the true owner of a business. 1. State the exact assumed name under which the business is or will be conducted: St. Joe Tax Service. 2. State the address of the principal place of business. 516 Schneider Drive, St. Joseph, MN 56374. 3. List the name and complete street addresses of all persons conducting business under the above Assumed Name, or if the business is a corporation, provide the legal corporate name and registered office address of the corporation. Attach additional sheets if necessary: Robert Ulik, 516 Schneider Drive, St. Joseph, MN 56374. 4. I certify that I am authorized to sign this certificate and I further certify I understand by signing this certificate, I am subject to the penalties of perjury as set forth in Minnesota Statutes section 609.48 as if I had signed this certificate under oath. Dated: July 30, 2012 Filed: Sept. 25, 2012 /s/ Robert Ulik Owner Publish: Nov. 23 and 30, 2012

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CANADA DRUG CENTER is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail-order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90% on all your medication needs. Call today. 888-485-1568 for $25 off your first prescription and free shipping. (MFPA)

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HEALTH

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CLASSES MUSIC LESSONS FOR ALL AGES! Find a music teacher! TakeLessons offers affordable, safe, guaranteed music lessons with teachers in your area. Our pre-screened teachers specialize in singing, guitar, piano, drums, violin and more. Call 1- 888-687-0047! (MFPA)

7

MISCELLANEOUS

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REACH NEARLY 1 MILLION HOUSEHOLDS! Do you have a product, service, or business that would be helped by reaching nearly 1 million households throughout Minnesota? The Minnesota Classified Network will allow you to reach these potential customers quickly and inexpensively. For more information concerning a creative classified ad call this publication or Minnesota Classified Network at 800-866-0668. (MFPA)

CASE TYPE: MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE BY ACTION

LINE OF SAID TWENTY-TWO, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST THIRTY-TWO AND FIVE TENTHS FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST TWO HUNDRED ELEVEN AND EIGHT TENTHS FEET TO A POINT ON THE SHORELINE OF LAKE AUGUSTA; THENCE, ALONG SHORELINE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 37 MINUTES EAST FIFTY FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES WEST TWO HUNDRED NINE AND TWO TENTHS FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINES OF SAID LOT TWENTY-TWO; THENCE, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, NORTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES WEST THIRTY-TWO AND FIVE TENTHS FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING EASTERLY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE; BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT WW, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST THIRTYTWO AND FIVE TENTHS (32.5) FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTH FOUR DEGREES 39 MINUTES 10 FEET WEST TO THE SHORT OF LAKE AUGUSTA AND SAID LINE THERE TERMINATING. (“Property”)

USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIONS, AND ARE ABANDONED.

The time allowed by law for redemption by the mortgagor or mortgagor’s personal representatives or assigns is six (6) months after the date of sale.

John Sanner Sheriff of Stearns County, Minn.

REAL PROPERTY IN STEARNS COUNTY, MINN., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THAT PART OF LOT TWENTY-TWO OF COE’S AUGUSTA SHORES, A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION ELEVEN TOWNSHIP ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE NORTH, RANGE TWENTYEIGHT WEST, STEARNS COUNTY, MINN., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTH

THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES, SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY

REEP LAW OFFICE, PLLC John D. Reep, Attorney Attorney Registration #0197385 Attorney for Plaintiff 919 W. St. Germain St., Suite 2000 St. Cloud, Minn. 56301 (320) 255-8845

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STATE OF MINNESOTA COUNTY OF STEARNS DISTRICT COURT SEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FILE NO. 73-CV-122949 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE UNDER JUDGMENT AND DECREE State Farm Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, vs, Unknown heirs of Ida A. Hawkins, deceased; Pamela C. Washington, Bertram P. Hawkins, Lynn M. Hawkins, also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, estate, interest or lien in the real estate described in the complaint herein, Defendant. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that under and by virtue of a Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Order for Judgment entered in the above entitled action on Oct. 22, 2012, a certified copy of which has been delivered to me directing the sale of the premises hereinafter described to satisfy the amount found and adjudged due to said Plaintiff in the above entitled action from Defendant, as prescribed in the Order, the undersigned Sheriff of Stearns County, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, on Dec. 19, 2012, at 10 a.m., at the Stearns County Sheriff’s Office, Law Enforcement Center, 807 Courthouse Square, St. Cloud, Minn. 56301, said county and state, the premises and real estate, lying and being in the County Stearns, State of Minnesota, described in said of Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Order for Judgment, to-wit:

Mattress Outlet Twin Sets from $99 Full Pillowtop Sets from $160 Queen Pillowtop Sets from $195 King Pillowtop Sets from $350

Sofa and Sectional Sets at Unbeatable Prices!

320-348-9003

EnviroTech Now Hiring! Office cleaning position on St. John’s Campus. Mon./Tue./ Wed./Fri. after 5 p.m. Shifts are 3-4.5 hours per evening starting at $8.50 per hour based on location. Must be 18 or older. Great 2nd job. Apply online at www.bweclean.com or call 320-251-4385.

IF PART OF THE PROPERTY TO BE SOLD CONTAINS YOUR HOUSE, YOU MAY DESIGNATE AN AREA AS A HOMESTEAD TO BE SOLD AND REDEEMED SEPARATELY.

YOU MAY DESIGNATE THE HOUSE YOU OCCUPY AND ANY AMOUNT OF THE PROPERTY AS A HOMESTEAD. THE DESIGNATED HOMESTEAD PROPERTY MUST CONFORM TO THE LOCAL ZONING ORDINANCES AND BE COMPACT SO THAT IT DOES NOT UNREASONABLY REDUCE THE VALUE OF THE REMAINING PROPERTY.

YOU MUST PROVIDE THE PERSON FORECLOSING ON THE PROPERTY, THE SHERIFF, AND THE COUNTY RECORDER WITH A COPY OF THE LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF THE HOMESTEAD YOU HAVE DESIGNATED BY TEN BUSINESS DAYS BEFORE THE DATE THE PROPERTY IS TO BE SOLD.

Property Address: 2575 Arrowwood Road, South Haven, Minn. 55382. Dated: Oct. 25, 2012

By Scott Romstad Deputy Sheriff

THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published: Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 and Dec. 7


St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

8

Green from page 3 future. If we destroy our water sources, you can’t live without water.” St. Joseph is regulated by a federal pollution permit. St. Joseph City Engineer Randy

Survey from page 5

when they lobby for cities. “ In 2010, the Legislature created the Council on Local Results and Innovation and charged it with developing 10 performance measures for cit-

Sabart recently informed city council members the state is requiring a change in managing illicit discharges in the city’s storm sewer. Sabart explained the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is looking for an ordinance that protects the storm sewer, not just the sanitary sewer. The council will consider a new ordinance Dec. 6.

“What we have in place today isn’t quite strong enough,” Sabart said. “The MPCA is requiring we strengthen that protection against pollution in the storm-sewer system.” The revised ordinance will define what’s exempt and explain what is allowed to be discharged, Sabart told officials.

ies. Part of the legislation was for the state auditor to administer the Performance Measurement Program by which cities meeting the eligibility requirements would receive funding of 14 cents per capita, up to $25,000, and be exempt from levy limits if they are in effect. In order to receive the 2013 incentive payment, cities have to

file a signed resolution to adopt the 10 measures with the auditor. Participating cities will also need to administer the online survey that asks 12 questions. A link to the survey can be found on the city’s website, www.cityofstjoseph.com. The deadline to complete the survey is Dec. 10.

Friday, Nov. 30, 2012

photo by TaLeiza Calloway

Frank Gandora, one of the instructors during the Borgert Technical School in St. Joseph, talks about the durability of permeable interlocking concrete pavers. The paving system is considered a best-management practice for stormwater management.

Family Owned and Operated Hearing Center

• Free Hearing Screenings • Hearing Aid Sales & Service • Clean & Check All Hearing Aid Brands

320-258-4494 or 1-888-407-4327 161 19th St. S. • Ste. 111 • Sartell www.accuratehearingservices.com

Lower Your Heating Costs While Improving Your Air Quality

2 pairs of eyeglasses We are a ts for

199!

$

or To Toys f-off site!

drop Includes Single Vision Plastic lenses and any two of our $88 frames.

Hundreds to choose from! (Excludes Coach) Upgrade to Progressive lenses for just $99! “Like” us on Facebook for exclusive deals and updates!

Russell Eyecare & Associates

15 E. Minnesota St., Suite 107, St. Joseph (320) 433-4326 www.russelleyecare.com

Expires: December 13, 2012

FA

! A L LA

Annual Tree Lighting & Caroling Festivities

Evening will include the following:

Downtown St. Joseph

Lighting of the 17 foot Christmas tree on the outdoor plaza of Bello Cucina (corner of Minnesota Street and College Avenue). Caroling by: Kennedy Community Middle School Singers, Benedictine Sisters Schola Choir and members of St. Joseph Church adult choir.

Friday, Dec. 7 6:30-8:30 p.m.

For more information, contact Margy Hughes at 320-249-6779.

FUN FOR ALL AGES! Event planners:

anta S t e me Come rs. Santa! &M

St. Joseph Action Group and Sentry Bank

Contributors:

ree!

T stmas i r h C g

ivin

&aL

Christie Russell-Villnow, O.D.

Bello Cucina Cedar Street Salon & Spa Closet 2 Closet Coborn’s Collegeville LLC Dr. Joseph Styles, D.D.S., River Bluff Tree Farm Joe’s Auto Parts Kay’s Kitchen LaPlayette

Followed byindoor festivities at the LaPlayette dining area.

* Refreshments * Santa and Mrs. Santa * Gift Bags

Support the St. Joseph Food Shelf by bringing a nonperishable food item.


2012 11 30 V23 Issue 47