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Newsleader St. Joseph

Friday, Nov. 2, 2012 Volume 23, Issue 43 Est. 1989

Moose on the loose in St. Stephen

Town Crier

by Dennis Dalman news@thenewsleaders.com

Daylight savings ends

When Don Smoley came running up at noon to Randy Asseln’s house – as if the house was on fire – Asseln knew something was up. “Quick! Grab your camera,” Smoley shouted. “You’ve got to get over to Larry Omann’s farm a mile west of town. There’s a moose in his cornfield.” It didn’t take long for Asseln, a passionate photographer, to grab his camera gear. Just minutes later, at the cornfield, sure enough, there was a moose, but all Asseln could see is a pair of ears sticking up from the corn tops. There were a few other people at the cornfield on a “moose watch.” Smoley made moose-call sounds, but the creature didn’t heed them. The animal, perhaps spooked, would not come out of the field. That early afternoon, Smoley and Asseln decided to leave and come back about an hour before sundown. Then they waited about a half an hour, Smoley on one end of the field, Asseln on the other. Smoley was again making moose calls. The moose

Daylight savings time, which started in March, ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 4. Residents should turn clocks back one hour to reflect the ending of daylight savings time.

Winter parking rules are in effect

Winter parking rules are in effect in St. Joseph. Rules kicked in Nov. 1. Parking on any city street is prohibited between the hours of 2 and 7 a.m. The winter parking rules are in effect until April 1. If residents have questions about the parking rules, they can call the St. Joseph Police Department at 363-8250.

United Way gives competitive grants

Competitive grants will be awarded to nonprofit organizations serving the United Way of Central Minnesota service area for funding in 2013-2015. Funding will be awarded within the five aspirations community volunteers, service providers, subject experts and business leaders have established. A complete listing of the aspirations, outcomes and expectations can be found at www. unitedwayhelps.org. Applications are due Nov. 16. For more information, visit www. thenewsleaders.com and click on Town Crier.

Bromenschenkel to host meeting

Stearns County Commissioner Mark Bromenschenkel will host another citizen meeting to hear from the people in his district. Residents of Stearns County District 2 are invited to attend “Coffee with Commissioner Bromenschenkel” from 10-11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 3 at the Local Blend Coffee Shop on Minnesota Street in St. Joseph. Anyone not able to attend the meeting can contact Bromenschenkel at P.O. Box 190, Sartell, MN 56377, by phone at 320.493.9180 or by email at mark. bromenschenkel@co.stearns. mn.us.

INSERTS:

Festival of Cultures Riff City Guitar State Sen. Candidate Peggy Boeck State Rep. Rich Bohannon

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would stop and look at the two men and then keep on walking slow as could be, toward the east. Finally, the moose had reached the western edge of the field. He then proceeded to walk across the road. At that point, Asseln, camera ready, was standing 50 feet from the animal ready to “shoot” it, using his zoom lens. He kept snapping his camera and “captured” the moose in a series of photos. The moose was plodding slowly to the east, toward St. Stephen. A full moon had risen, and it looked as if the moose was heading straight for that moonrise. The two men watched the moose with rapt attention as it walked all the way to the tamarack swamp at the edge of town. Then, the moose walked right into that swamp and disappeared from sight. Asseln and Smoley weren’t the only ones to see that moose. He had been sighted in the Sauk Centre area a week before. There were also sightings in Melrose and Freeport, Asseln noted. Asseln knows it was the same moose because it’s a rather peculiar-looking animal. On its left side, he sports just one 18-inch

photo by Randy Asseln

After crossing the road, the moose heads east toward a tamarack swamp next to St. Stephen. The creature had also been spotted in and near Sauk Centre, Melrose and Freeport. antler and on the right side there is just an antler stub of only four or five inches. “He looks a little goofy,” Asseln said. “That’s why we call him the ‘one-horned wandering moose.’” Asseln figures the bull moose weighs about 600-800 pounds. Asseln works as an industrial

electronic technician for “USA Today” newspaper operations in Maple Grove. He also has an athome business focused on his art photography and his own specialized method of printing large photos onto canvas. To see more of his photographic art, go to www.randyasseln.com.

Hours extended for absentee ballots Hours have been extended for absentee balloting at the Stearns County and Benton County auditor’s offices. The offices will be open from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3 and from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 5 for absentee voting by those who, for one reason or another, will not be able to vote at the polls on Election Day, Nov. 6. Nov. 5 will be the last day to cast an absentee ballot in person at the auditor’s office. Many absentee voters vote

via mailed ballots, but as of today, Nov. 2, it is unlikely, if not impossible, to get ballots, fill them in and send them back by mail in time. However, ballots can also be emailed or faxed to absentee voters. Ballots can be returned by scanning them and emailing them to elections@ co.stearns.mn.us. They can also be faxed to 320-656-3916. All ballots must be received at the auditor’s office by Election Day, Nov. 6. Residents of Benton County can email their absentee ballots

to karri.thorsten@co.benton. mn.us or fax them to 320-9685337. An alternative is to vote an absentee ballot in person at the

auditor’s office. It’s located in the Stearns County Administration Building, Room 148, 705 Courthouse Square in downBallots • page 2

Christmas at Whitby opens by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

The Sisters of the Order of St. Benedict are already thinking about the holidays. The Christmas at Whitby Gift Shop in St. Joseph will

open Saturday, Nov. 3 with new offerings. In addition to pottery, silk scarves, needlework, candles, jewelry, cards and more made by the nuns, customers will find homemade candy made Whitby • page 7

New road to reroute truck traffic, increase efficiency by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

Residents might be wondering about why dirt has been moved west of town and what appears to be a new road. The work going on is the fruition of a plan to create a bypass at Stearns County Road 2. City Engineer Randy Sabart said the project has been planned for years with the most physical part of the work starting this

year. The county project is expected to be completed this fall. What Stearns County wanted to do is direct increased truck traffic around St. Joseph on the west side. So, instead of CR 2 wrapping into the west side of St. Joseph, it will continue north after drivers cross under the bridge at Interstate-94 and it will connect to CR 75 in the vicinity of CR 3, Sabart said. “There will be a brand new intersection where CR 2 and

CR 3 are connecting at CR 75,” he said. The connection point is located on the land of the former King’s Trucking site, west of Millstream Park. The bypass will bring truck traffic directly to CR 75 and it won’t route it through downtown or the College of St. Benedict area. Specifically, the intersection at CR 3 near Millstream Park will move to the west. Construction crews are aligning CR

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3 and CR 2 across from each other. The portion of CR 3 along Millstream Park will no longer be there for people to travel on from CR 75. With increasing traffic volume, safety is always a concern. Sabart said the county also saw the project as a way to help with efficiency of moving vehicles. Even with the new road and realignments, some things will Road • page 4


St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

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Friday, Nov. 2, 2012

Blotter If any readers have tips concerning crimes, they should call the St. Joseph Police Department at 363-8250 or Tri-County Crime Stoppers at 255-1301 or access its tip site at www. tricountycrimestoppers.org. Crime Stoppers offers rewards up to $1,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for crimes. Oct. 24 5:12 p.m. Traffic stop. Minnesota Street. An officer observed a woman talking on her cell phone and proceeded west on Minnesota Street without coming to a complete stop at the

stop sign. The officer stopped the vehicle and identified the woman by her Minnesota driver’s license. The woman knew why she was stopped and was issued a citation for a stop-sign violation. 10:10 a.m. Suspicious person. Elm Street. An employee called the police requesting an officer to drive through the parking lot. The employee stated the male was harassing them in the store. The officer was unable to locate the person. Oct. 26 11:57 p.m. Assist business. College Avenue. A police officer took a deposit from the

business to the bank. 6:01 p.m. Fire. 13th Avenue. A report of smoke detectors going off was reported. The caller stated they could not see any smoke. A police officer responded. There was no fire. The officer waited for the St. Joseph Police department to clear the area. Oct. 27 10:36 p.m. Traffic stop. Minnesota Avenue. A police officer was at a red light facing north when he saw a woman turn south from a westbound turn lane. The woman had a red arrow and green lights for westbound and east bound traffic.

A truck going eastbound had to stop to avoid hitting the woman. The officer pulled the woman over who denied the event. Oct. 28 12:48 a.m. Agency assist. County Road 2. A police officer went to assist another officer. When the officer arrived the suspect had already been tazed and was placed in handcuffs. The suspect was still verbal and trying to pull away. The officer stood by for safety reasons until Gold Cross arrived. The suspect was placed in the ambulance and transported to the St. Cloud Hospital.

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Ballots from front page town St. Cloud. The Benton County Administration Building is located at 531 Dewey St. in Foley. Regular hours are from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., in addtion to the extended Saturday hours and the extra one-half hour on Monday, Nov. 5. In order to vote by absentee ballot, a person must meet one of the following requirements for needing an absentee ballot: • Absence from precinct on Election Day • Illness or disability • Religious discipline or observance of religious holiday • Service as an election judge in another precinct, or • Eligible emergency declared by the governor or quarantine declared by the federal or state government. For more information, contact the Stearns County Auditor-Treasurer’s office at 656-3920, or email elections@ co.stearns.mn.us.

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Publisher/Owner Janelle Von Pinnon Editor Dennis Dalman

Contributing Writers TaLeiza Calloway Cori Hilsgen Amber Roerick

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P.O. Box 324 • 32 1st Ave. N.W. • St. Joseph, Minn. 56374 Phone (320) 363-7741 • Fax (320) 363-4195 • E-mail address: news@thenewsleaders.com POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ST. JOSEPH NEWSLEADER, P.O. Box 324, St. Joseph, MN 56374.


St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

Friday, Nov. 2, 2012

3

Council votes to replace welcome sign at city entrance by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

Residents and visitors to St. Joseph will get a digital greeting as they enter the city. St. Joseph City Council members voted recently to replace the welcome sign along CR 75 with an electronic one. The community sign will

be located at the southwest corner of the intersection of CSAH 75 and College Avenue North/CR 2. It is adjacent to the St. Joseph Gas and Bait complex. The current sign says “Welcome to St. Joseph.” Elected officials voted to enter a 10year agreement with Feneis Enterprises Inc. to create an

electronic community sign that will say the same thing but with digitally printed vinyl graphics and an electronic message center. The company has 60 days to find four sponsors for the sign. A rough schematic drawing of the sign shows an area for four sponsors near the top of the sign with the electronic message

center in the middle and a stone base. A final design has not been approved. St. Joseph City Administrator Judy Weyrens said construction of the sign is about $100,000. The city has control over the design of the sign and will get 20 seconds per minute to advertise non-profit city sponsors, city events and

weather alerts in the electronic message center of the sign. Weyrens said the timeline for construction of the sign is still unknown. It is contingent on how fast Feneis Enterprises secures sponsors for the project, she said. The sponsors over time will help absorb the cost of the project.

City council candidates share goals during forum by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

Balancing the city’s budget was a common thread in responses given by city council candidates during a forum Oct. 28. Sponsored by the St. Joseph Action Group, the forum was held in the council chambers and moderated by St. John’s

University professor James Read. About 15 people showed up to hear from potential leaders. Five candidates are vying for two open four-year council seats. Incumbents Renee Symanietz and Bob Loso face challenges from Troy Goracke, Thomas Gustafson and Matt Killam. Varied visions

While candidates agreed fiscal management is a priority, each has different goals beyond the budget. Incumbents were asked to talk about goals they set for the city before their last election, which of these goals has been achieved, which ones have not and future goals. “I don’t set personal goals,” Loso said. “I deal with the

issues as they come. Issues change every week.” As for future goals, Loso said his goal is to continue maintaining the budget and trying to make sure the city’s expenses and revenues match. Symanietz said she has really pushed to make the information on the city’s website better for the last four years. A new website is slated to debut

soon. She is still fighting for the connection of the Wobegon Trail between St. Joseph and Waite Park. New candidates were also asked to share their goals and plans to achieve them. Goracke is a strong supporter of building a high school in St. Joseph; something he says will bring more people to the Forum • page 5

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STATE OF MINNESOTA COUNTY OF STEARNS DISTRICT COURT SEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FILE NO. 73-CV-122949 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE UNDER JUDGMENT AND DECREE State Farm Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, vs, Unknown heirs of Ida A. Hawkins, deceased; Pamela C. Washington, Bertram P. Hawkins, Lynn M. Hawkins, also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, estate, interest or lien in the real estate described in the complaint herein, Defendant. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that under and by virtue of a Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Order for Judgment entered in the above entitled action on Oct. 22, 2012, a certified copy of which has been delivered to me directing the sale of the premises hereinafter described to satisfy the amount found and adjudged due to said Plaintiff in the above entitled action from Defendant, as prescribed in the Order, the undersigned Sheriff of Stearns County, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, on Dec. 19, 2012, at 10 a.m., at the Stearns County Sheriff’s Office, Law Enforcement Center, 807 Courthouse Square, St. Cloud, Minn. 56301, said county and state, the premises and real estate, lying and being in the County Stearns, State of Minnesota, described in said of Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Order for Judgment, to-wit: REAL PROPERTY IN STEARNS COUNTY, MINN., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THAT PART OF LOT TWENTY-TWO OF COE’S AUGUSTA SHORES, A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION ELEVEN TOWNSHIP ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE NORTH, RANGE TWENTY-EIGHT WEST, STEARNS COUNTY, MINN., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TWENTYTWO, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST THIRTY-TWO AND FIVE TENTHS FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST TWO HUNDRED ELEVEN AND EIGHT TENTHS FEET TO A POINT ON THE SHORELINE OF LAKE AUGUSTA; THENCE, ALONG SHORELINE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 37 MINUTES EAST FIFTY FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES WEST TWO HUNDRED NINE AND TWO TENTHS FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINES OF SAID LOT TWENTY-TWO; THENCE, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, NORTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES WEST THIRTY-TWO AND FIVE TENTHS FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING EASTERLY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE; BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 22, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST THIRTY-TWO AND FIVE TENTHS (32.5) FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTH FOUR DEGREES 39 MINUTES 10 FEET WEST TO THE SHORE OF LAKE AUGUSTA AND SAID LINE THERE TERMINATING. (“Property”) The time allowed by law for redemption by the mortgagor or mortgagor’s personal representatives or assigns is six (6) months after the date of sale. THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTEREED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES, SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS,

ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIONS AND ARE ABANDONED. IF PART OF THE PROPERTY TO BE SOLD CONTAINS YOUR HOUSE, YOU MAY DESIGNATE AN AREA AS A HOMESTEAD TO BE SOLD AND REDEEMED SEPARATELY. YOU MAY DESIGNATE THE HOUSE YOU OCCUPY AND ANY AMOUNT OF THE PROPERTY AS A HOMESTEAD. THE DESIGNATED HOMESTEAD PROPERTY MUST CONFORM TO THE LOCAL ZONING ORDINANCES AND BE COMPACT SO THAT IT DOES NOT UNREASONABLY REDUCE THE VALUE OF THE REMAINING PROPERTY. YOU MUST PROVIDE THE PERSON FORECLOSING ON THE PROPERTY, THE SHERIFF AND THE COUNTY RECORDER WITH A COPY OF THE LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF THE HOMESTEAD YOU HAVE DESIGNATED BY TEN BUSINESS DAYS BEFORE THE DATE THE PROPERTY IS TO BE SOLD. Property Address: 2575 Arrowwood Road, South Haven, Minn. 55382. Dated: Oct. 25, 2012 John Sanner Sheriff of Stearns County, Minn. By Scott Romstad Deputy Sheriff REEP LAW OFFICE, PLLC John D. Reep, Attorney Attorney Registration #0197385 Attorney for Plaintiff 919 W. St. Germain St., Suite 2000 St. Cloud, Minn. 56301 (320) 255-8845 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published: Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 and Dec. 7


St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

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Road from front page

photos by TaLeiza Calloway

Stearns County is constructing a bypass on CR 2 in St. Joseph. The new road will redirect traffic from the west side of town to CR 75.

remain. County Road 2 will be a 55 mph road up to CR 75. “In theory it should be a faster route for traffic that wants to go north on CR 2 and connect to CR 75,” he said. New construction will also create a four-leg intersection between Minnesota Street and CR 2. “All of this is new road,” he said. The county has been developing this project for years. Though originally planned to begin in 2009, the project was delayed because the county had to acquire right-of-way for the project. City involvement The city’s portion of the project is the construction of a detached pedestrian/bicycle

trail on the east side of CR 2 that will eventually connect to the Wobegon Trail. The estimated cost to construct the trail is $346,000. The city had to relocate some water utilities and a few water hydrants for the project because the city’s water main lies in the county’s right-ofway for the project. This work was completed earlier this year. The road itself will still have 12-foot driving lanes and 8-foot shoulders. There will be stop conditions but no stop lights at this time. They could come later. For example drivers going west on Minnesota Street toward the I-94 interchange will have a stop sign. At the intersection of CR 2 and CR 3, Sabart said the county is installing equipment for a future traffic signal but the intersection will have to meet traffic-signal requirements before the installation of a signal.

Friday, Nov. 2, 2012 Sabart said initially there will be a reduction in vehicle traffic all together from people looking to bypass the city and head east to St. Cloud. But depending on the audience a reduction in vehicles can be seen as a negative impact on businesses, he said. “I think the biggest benefit will be some of the truck traffic the west side of town sees coming through town will be directed to CR 75 and north,” Sabart said. Just west of the city, traffic volumes on Minnesota Street were measured by the state at 10,000 vehicles per day in 2009. Once in town closer to College Avenue, traffic dropped down to 6,000 vehicles per day. The new road will redirect some of this traffic volume to CR 75. The Knife River Corp. of St. Cloud is the general contractor for the project.

Farm restoration project nurtures artistic spirit by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

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Artists Anne Meyer and Dom Venzant knew they wanted to transform the farms they grew up on into a haven for creative expression. Rather than Venzant living out this vision in Wisconsin and Meyer doing the same in St. Joseph, they decided to anchor in Minnesota and the Meyer Farm Project was born. “The goal is to repurpose space at my family’s farm to nurture my artistic pursuits and others’ in the community,”

Meyer said. “I want it to be a place for all ages.” The project will be completed in phases. Work includes the revamping of three areas: the ground-level of the barn, the hayloft and the Quonset, a large shed. Venzant has wanted to restore his family’s farm in Simcoe, Wis. for about 12 years. He sees the project as a way for people to explore art. This exploration will include anything from soap-making workshops to classes on fabric-dying, woodcarving and canning fruits and vegetables.

“The purpose is to create space that allows people to pursue other interests,” Venzant said, “to learn new things and experience things that are out of touch sometimes.” While the revamped barn space will serve as an anchor for Meyer’s artwork, they will offer community education art classes and work space for artists. They might even host a barn dance or two. When Meyer was growing up, she says she didn’t see much of an arts scene in the area. To see the increased interFarm • page 5

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St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

Friday, Nov. 2, 2012

Forum from page 3 city and provide another reason to stay. “With population growth and more students going to the community school, we foresee more students going to school here,” Goracke said. “My goal is to work with District 742 to have a high school here in St. Joseph.” Gustafson said his goals include getting a budget that leaves a surplus every year. He photo by TaLeiza Calloway has also stressed the need for Above: A selection positive growth and investment of bowls made from in the city’s industrial park. the clay on the Meyer For Killam, working with the farm in St. Joseph sits St. Joseph Economic Developon a table during a ment Authority and the St. Jofundraiser Oct. 28 for seph Chamber of Commerce to the Meyer Farm Proj- establish the city’s tax base is ect. Left: St. Joseph an area of focus for him. resident Anne Meyer Candidates also shared ideas talks Oct. 30 about her on increasing transparency and plans to transform her televising all open meetings. family’s farm into a “Being transparent is a big space where art can thing,” Gustafson said. “I think be created. the city is moving in the right direction.” from page 4 Killam and Goracke agree it’s important for the decisions made by city officials to be est excites her. community (is) small but pres- shared with the public. Killam Venzant said having it (a ent.” said he’d like to see meetings space to create art) in St. JoHistory live streamed online at some seph is a testament to the growMeyer and Venzant met point. ing arts community in the area about eight years ago at the Loso said he is in favor of and shows how much people St. John’s University Pottery televising meetings if it really have invested in staying in the Studio. Meyer was entering an is all meetings and not certain community. art apprenticeship and Venzant “There’s really a vibrant but was finishing up his studies small arts community,” Venz- there. It was there they discovant said. “The identity of this Farm • page 8

Farm

Vote Schroeder Nov. 6!

5

ones. He said sometimes they lose people coming to meetings because they are televised. Both Loso and Symanietz encouraged more people to come to meetings to see decisions first hand. Symanietz also reminded audience members some meetings are closed for legal reasons. Community center Plans for a community center and what amenities should be included was another topic evaluated during the forum. Killam views the community center as a large and complex issue. As a parent, he would like to see a kitchen and even a playground area but it all depends on funding. “It really depends on how much we can incorporate in the budget,” Killam said. Before moving forward with a community center, Gustafson said more input from the public is needed and a plan for how the city will pay for it so it doesn’t become a tax burden. Goracke said amenities for a community center have to do with specifically what the people want. Whether or not it’s a recreation center or a community center will help determine the amenities, he said. Loso reminded the audience the specifics about what’s going into the center have not been determined and it will come down to money. The city has about $1.5 million in sales tax funds to support the center, Loso said.

“We are fiscally constrained,” Loso said. “It’s a tough decision.” Symanietz said an open house held last month shed a lot of light on what residents want. “The biggest thing I heard was a need for a basement for storage” she said, “And it should really be for all ages.” Michael McDonald, one of the event’s organizers, said the venue for the forum was an improvement from last year when it was held at Sal’s Bar and Grill in St. Joseph and it was hard to hear candidates at times, he said. “I think it went well,” McDonald said. “We had a good turnout. I think this was a good place to have it.” More than 15 people attended the forum. St. Joseph Action Group member Ellen Wahlstrom was pleased by what she heard from candidates. “I think the candidates were prepared and presented themselves well, “Wahlstrom said. “I think anyone listening or viewing will come away better informed and can feel (confident) about their voting decision.” For those unable to attend the forum, it will be rebroadcast on cable access channel 10 by Midcontinent and channel 19 by Charter. The forum will be replayed from 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. and from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2, Saturday, Nov. 3 and Sunday, Nov. 4.

Shannon Schroeder State Representative District 13B Working Class Values, Genuine Solutions, Genuine Leadership Our current Representative:

• Led us to a 20 day Government Shutdown in • Borrowed $2.4 Billion from our schools, (HJP 2011. 4163). • Eliminated the Market Value Homestead Credit • Voted against fairer taxation, this is the first time and increasing property taxes for 95% of in 16 years the majority of the states’ revenue Minnesotans, (HJP 1279). comes from property taxes (HJP 3940). It is time to stop putting the burden of running our state government on the backs of property owners, seniors, farmers, and the middle working-class citizens. Do you want more of the same representation that will continue to vote the party line or a voice that will represent our district’s interests?

Vote No to Rep. Tim O’Driscoll

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Friday, Nov. 2, 2012

Opinion Our View

Your vote matters With the election just four days away, we are officially in information overload. Every time you check the mailbox, it’s no longer just the usual bill or solicitation to start a magazine or newspaper subscription. With every visit down the driveway, there is a political flyer reminding us why a particular candidate deserves a chance or an additional term in office. And it doesn’t stop there. Try counting the number of yard signs on your way to work. There are at least 10 along St. Joseph’s Minnesota Street in support of city council challengers and incumbents. It hasn’t mattered much where we are, candidates want our votes. While it can seem overwhelming at times, the constant mailings, random campaign calls and sign-filled yards mean one thing. It means your voice matters. Elected officials need votes to get in office. They are nothing without the support of the citizenry. They know that. And that is why they are trying so hard to make sure we don’t forget how important we are Nov. 6. Not only are we tasked with selecting the next U.S. president, but we also have to select state representatives, members of Congress and local officials. Do your part. Don’t fall into the mindset that your vote doesn’t count. It does. In the 2008 general election, there were about 3.7 million eligible voters in Minnesota. Voter turnout was about 78 percent, according to data from the Office of the Secretary of State. Minnesota was one of two states with the highest voter turnout rate in the 2008 presidential election, according to U.S. Census data. In 2010, voter turnout shifted in the state, though there were more eligible voters. In the 2010 general election, there were close to 3.8 million voters in Minnesota. Voter turnout was about 56 percent. The face of leadership could change on the St. Joseph City Council in four days. St. Joseph Mayor Rick Schultz is running unopposed. The chairs held by the men and women who serve alongside him could be filled with newcomers soon. There are two open four-year seats on the city council. They are currently held by Bob Loso and Renee Symanietz. Both are seeking re-election to the council. Loso and Symanietz face challenges from council hopefuls Troy Goracke, Matt Killam and Thomas Gustafson. Polling places will be open from 7 a.m.-8 p.m. on election day. For residents living in Precinct 1, which means those living west of College Avenue, their polling place is Kennedy Community School. The school is at 1300 Jade Road. Residents living in Precinct 2, those who reside east of College Avenue, will vote at the Community Fire Hall, 323 Fourth Ave. NE in St. Joseph. Township residents can vote at the St. Joseph Township Hall at 935 College Ave. S.

Fairness and ethics

Newsleader staff members have the responsibility to report news fairly and accurately and are accountable to the public. Readers who feel we’ve fallen short of these standards are urged to call the Newsleader office at 363-7741. If matters cannot be resolved locally, readers are encouraged to take complaints to the Minnesota News Council, an independent agency designed to improve relationships between the public and the media and resolve conflicts. The council office may be reached at 612-341-9357.

Mother’s diabetes raises health consciousness When I learned recently my mother had Type 2 Diabetes, I felt like Forrest Gump when he learned his mother was ill. In the movie, before a family friend could finish telling him about his mother’s condition, he took off running to be at her side. I have wanted to take off to Ohio for a few weeks now and am surprised I’m still in Minnesota. The first thing I thought about when she told me was surprisingly not her. I thought about other family members and friends who are living with this disease and even those we’ve lost from complications from it. Her older sister, Amelia, and my “Aunty Mimi” has Type 1 diabetes. She takes an insulin shot every day and has to watch what she eats. Growing up in Ohio, I knew when it was time for Aunty Mimi to eat and when she had to take her shot. When I learned of my mother’s recent diagnosis, I was scared and still am to think if her sugar levels are not monitored correctly and medication doesn’t work, the outcome could be fatal. I’m a mama’s girl. I don’t hide it and my father respects it. He knows I love him. My mother and I are so close, people have said I am a younger version of her. It’s true, and it freaks people out when we finish each other’s sentences or say the same thing at the same time. What can I say? I’m even named after her. This is only natural. My mother’s name is Leiza. My grandmother added “Ta” to her name

TaLeiza Calloway Reporter and named me TaLeiza. Though I worry about my mother, the distance between us makes me work harder to learn about this disease. It also has made me watch what I’m eating. Initially I started to interview her every time we spoke. “What did you have for breakfast?” I’d ask. “Did you take your medicine? How are you feeling?” One of the things her doctors required was for her to attend a weekly group meeting with other people recently diagnosed with the disease. This was to help her learn how to navigate this new way of life. I liked the idea my mother was not alone. I’ve also eased up on grilling her as she seems to have it under control. Every day is different. According to the American Diabetes Association, Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Some groups have a higher risk for developing it than others. This type of diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, as well as the aged population, according to the organization. Well, that includes my Mommy. In type 2 diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin or

the cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is necessary for the body to be able to use glucose for energy. Information on the association’s website explains when you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, which is the basic fuel for the cells in the body. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it can cause your cells to be starved for energy and over time high blood-glucose levels can hurt your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Reading about the millions of people living with diabetes is still scary, but the important word in this sentence is “living.” They are living with the disease. Any disease is life-changing and diabetes is no different. This is the case even if you’re not the one who has it. My mother is more than 800 miles away from me. But ever since the “D-word” has arrived, I find I think more about what I eat and feel a little guilty about ordering the fries when I could have chosen a salad. I’ve already started to notice my groceries have more fresh greens in them versus my usual frozen entrees. Pizza rolls have been replaced by rice cakes and more whole grains. It’s funny how your parents have an impact on your life no matter how far away they are from you. I just figured if my mother has to transform her diet to be healthier, why can’t I?

Letter to editor

D re a m e r s g i v e v i s i o n a r i e s y o u r i d e a s Mayor Rick Schultz, St. Joseph 320-260-0393, Rschultz25@msn.com

I want to hear from you. With the end of the year approaching and knowing there will be turnover within the city’s boards and commissions, the city needs your help. “Dreamers dream about the world being different, but visionaries envision themselves making a difference. Dreamers think about how nice it would be for something to be done. Visionaries look for an opportunity to do something.” Steve Corn The dictionary definition of visionary describes such a person as having “vision or foresight,” but also says they are “dreamy,” “unrealistic” and “utopian.” The “dreamy” might idly speculate that a park would be nice – and then take a nap. The visionary, though,

would begin communicating the vision, get organized, make a plan and push what has been envisioned through the barriers – the costs, the apathy, the “it costs too much” or “nobody will want to bring their kids here” mentality. Too often, the dreamy become fixated on the obstacles and freeze, without getting anything done. Here’s where the dream is tested, as it must be real enough for the visionary to follow – like striving to reach a snowcapped mountain peak across a valley of mud, hedgerows, barbed wire and chasms. We need dreamers and thinkers who will look at the world differently and come up with solutions to the problems and issues we face. We need new ideas, new ways of thinking about things, new processes to solve problems. We need that person in his garage working late into the night to come up with the

next new technology. The person willing to start a new industry, employ a couple of dozen people and generate thousands in revenue. We need an army of them to help develop new concepts of governance, economic development, leadership and learning in our fastpaced, interconnected and increasingly complex world. A new year will soon begin and a fresh start can be made, if you want to put in the effort. Visionaries are leaders who make a difference and after all, isn’t that what we’re all about – making a difference. I challenge all of you to become involved. The city wants to hear from you. I want you to get involved. I want to hear from you.

Got a comment? Visit www.thenewsleaders.com The St. Joseph Newsleader invites readers to comment on the newspaper’s contents via its reader-friendly website: www.thenewsleaders.com. The site, on average, receives more than 18,000 “hits” monthly. To comment on stories, columns, editorials or any of the other content, here’s what you do. Click on St. Joseph

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St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

Friday, Nov. 2, 2012

Whitby from front page in the monastery kitchen. New this year is the addition of truffles, peanut brittle and caramel corn. Cracked-wheat bread mix from the monastery bakery will also be available. “There will be a nice variety,” said Sister Karen Rose, OSB, who is the communications director for the monastery. This variety includes art made by the nuns and local artists. The Whitby Gift Shop is owned and operated by the Sisters of the Order of St. Benedict.

It is located at 104 Chapel Lane, St. Joseph. Regular gift shop and gallery hours are 10 a.m.4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 1-3:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday; closed Mondays. The gift shop will open one hour earlier on Saturday, Nov. 3 at 9 a.m. The Sisters of the Order of St. Benedict is a community of religious women who are committed to enhancing the spiritual lives of others. The nuns serve in parishes, social-justice organizations and educational and health-care institutions that reflect the current needs of the church and the world. For more information, call 320-363-7113 or visit www. sbm.osb.org.

Calendar

Friday, Nov. 2 St. Joseph Farmers’ Market, 3-6 p.m., Resurrection Lutheran Church, Fellowhip Hall, 610 N. County Road 2, St. Joseph. www. stjosephfarmersmarket.com Saturday, Nov. 3 Craft sale, sponsored by Eagle’s Auxiliary, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., Eagle’s Club, 41st and Veterans Drive (8th St. N.) by Centrasota. Holiday Craft and Bake sale, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Great Hall, St. John’s University. Wednesday, Nov. 7 St. Joseph Area Historical Society, 7 p.m., Old City Hall, St. Joseph. www.stjosephhistoricalmn.org. Thursday, Nov. 8 St. Joseph Action Group, 7 p.m., American Legion, St. Joseph. 320-363-7666.

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Hearts was surrendered because her previous owner was moving. She is 3-and-a-half-years-old, spayed and has short black hair. Hearts arrived at TCHS in May, but hasn’t been at the shelter the entire time. Because she came in during peak season and had all the cute kittens to compete with, Hearts was sent to a foster home until there was less competition in the cat room. Her foster parents fell in love with her and said that she has a very sweet and gentle personality. Regardless of folklore and superstitions, black cats have their own large group of loyal followers, people who love to be surrounded by these glossy black vessels of love.

“Helping one animal won’t change the world … but it will change the world for that one animal!” Dogs - 14 Hamster - 1

Cats - 15 Kittens - 12

Guinea Pig - 1

Tri-County Humane Society 735 8th St. NE • PO Box 701 St. Cloud, MN 56302

252-0896

www.tricountyhumanesociety.org

Hours: Monday-Thursday Noon-6 p.m., Friday Noon-8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. & Sunday Noon-5 p.m.

BEAUTY

DENTISTRY

Mary Kay Cosmetics Joyce Barnes St. Joseph 320-251-8989

Michael F. Contardo D.D.S. 26 2nd Ave. NW St. Joseph 320-363-4468

CHIROPRACTOR Dr. Jerry Wetterling 103 N. College Ave. St. Joseph 320-363-4573

Drs. Styles, Cotton & Milbert 1514 E. Minnesota St., Box 607 St. Joseph 320-363-7729

CHURCHES

DESKTOP PUBLISHING

Gateway Church

Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday, 6 p.m. Saturday

106 2nd Ave. NW St. Joseph (next to the Post Office) 320-282-2262

Von Meyer Publishing 32 1st Ave. NW St. Joseph 320-363-7741

EYECARE

Russell Eyecare & Associates 15 E. Minnesota St., Ste. 107 Resurrection Lutheran, ELCA St. Joseph 320-433-4326 Gateway Church St. Joseph

Sunday Worship 8:30 & 11 a.m. WoW! (Worship on Wednesday) 6:30 p.m.

610 N. CR 2 St. Joseph 320-363-4232 www.rlcstjo.org St. Joseph Catholic Church Masses: Tuesday-Friday 8 a.m. Saturday 5 p.m. Sunday 8 and 10 a.m.

320-363-7505 St. Joseph www.churchstjoseph.org

PLUMBING & HEATING Metro Plumbing & Heating 545 8th Ave. NE St. Joseph 320-363-7761


St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

8

Farm from page 5 ered their shared vision. Work to repurpose the dairy farm that sits along CR 121 started last year. Built in 1935, it still had the original cedar shingle roof. It has one plumbing line, no heat or electricity. Meyer’s great-grandfather built all the buildings on the farm in the 1930s. They include a woodworking shed for her grandfather, a red chicken coop and a storage shed her younger brother uses for bee-keeping supplies. Because the barn still had the original cedar-shingles roof, this was the first thing they worked to replace. The duo hosted a fundraiser/community dinner called, “Bouja for the Barn” to raise money to help re-roof the barn. They made bowls using clay from the farm and vegetables from the family garden to make the bouja. It was successful as they were able to complete the month-long project of replacing the cedar shingles with metal this June. “We want to do a lot of (the work) ourselves,” she said. “We want to take enough time to do a good job.” Venzant said they plan to make the bricks for a kiln they will add in the future. A kiln is a big oven used to heat clay when making pottery. When Meyer told her parents her plans for the barn, her father told her she would need to move back home to com-

plete it. The 30-year-old had to think about this a little since one never really wants to move back home, she said with a big smile. It has been going great so far, especially being about to help her parents tend to their vegetable garden. Pursuing a dream Earlier this month, the duo with the help of Meyer’s family removed a large concrete feeding trough to make room for the ground-level space of the farm project. Her parents, Ray and Jackie Meyer, still use the barn for cold storage and rent the 69-acre farm to area farmers. As plans developed to redesign the areas of the barn, she discovered more than 3,000 bales of hay in the hayloft. True to the do-it-yourself attitude she and her five siblings were raised with, she found an Avon farmer who agreed to help her get rid of the hay manually. Once stacked to the ceiling of the 70-by-34-foot barn, much of the hay has been transported. For Meyer, this is a dream come true. Since she could talk, she has always loved to draw and paint. She knew she would be an artist. She has an art degree from the University of Minnesota-Morris, has completed art residencies at K-12 schools and has taught at the Paramount Theatre and Visual Arts Center in St. Cloud. “I feel alive when I make art,” she said. “I like being able to invest my care and concern into a material. The piece of art comes from that investment. I’m elated I get to pursue my

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ect l e e R

Christie Russell-Villnow, O.D.

Renee Symanietz

foR St. joSeph city council Tuesday, Nov. 6 Authorized and paid for by Renee Symanietz, 354 4th Ave. SE, St. Joseph, MN 56374

Friday, Nov. 2, 2012

What: Bouja for the Barn fundraiser When: Noon-6:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 3-4 Where: American Legion, St. Joseph Website: meyerfarmproject.com

dream in my hometown.” Venzant, who has a biology degree, found his love of art later. He has a graduate degree in art and is an assistant professor of sculpture and ceramics at Minneapolis Community and Technical College. The 32-year-old said the project would not be possible without Meyer’s parents and grandfather Pete Giroux, someone he sees as a hero. He has learned a lot from Giroux and this project. “(I’ve learned) if you’re passionate and people see it,” he said, “it’s magnetic.” Next steps include installing a floor, heating, electricity and replacing windows. Within a year they hope to offer some classes on the ground-level of

the barn during the warmer months. While they are eager to welcome visitors, Meyer and

Vote

Venzant said they would rather it take five years and be done right than less time and be incomplete.

PRO-LIFE November 6th!

Sen. Michelle Fischbach MN Senate District 13

Jeff Howe MN House District 13A

This is an independent expenditure, not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee. Prepared and paid for by the Senate District 13 Republicans: 614 5th Ave. S., Sartell, MN 56377


Volume 23 Issue 43