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Mars rover shows planet could have supported life


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Woodward woman charged with bogus check By Marione Martin Jennifer Lowe, also known as Jennifer Ann Pulse or Jennifer Mitchell, 26, of Woodward, has been charged with a felony of obtaining cash and/or merchan-

dise by bogus check in Alfalfa County. According to documents in the case, the charge involves a check given to an employee of Gloss Mtn Outfitters in Cherokee. The check for $750 was

drawn on Midfirst Bank and was returned showing the account did not have sufficient funds on deposit with the bank for payment of the check. The charge was filed on March 8.

March 15 is the last day to assess personal property Woods County Assessor Monica Schmidt would like to remind everyone that March 15 is the last day to assess farm equipment, business personal property and mobile homes without penalty. Also, March 15 is the deadline to apply for homestead exemptions and additional exemptions for the 2013 tax year.

One may also apply for an additional homestead exemption if the total gross household income, from all sources, was under $20,000. One may apply for a valuation freeze on homestead property if age 65 or older and if the total gross household income, from all sources, was under $60,500.

Sufficient proof of gross income MUST accompany each application to substantiate the validity of the application. Finally, any 100-percent-disabled veteran who has not already done so must bring their VA letter to the office and fill out the proper paperwork by March 15.

GOP budget takes aim again at Obamacare, Medicaid By Andrew Taylor WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans unveiled their latest budget outline on Tuesday, sticking to their plans to try to repeal so-called Obamacare, cut domestic programs ranging from Medicaid to college grants and require future Medicare patients to bear more of the program’s cost. The GOP plan came as President The Alva Review-Courier / Newsgram is published Wednesday by Martin Broadcasting Corp. 620 Choctaw St. Alva, Oklahoma 73717 Lynn L. Martin, President Telephone Numbers: Alva Review-Courier 580-327-2200 Newsgram 580-327-1510 FAX 580-327-2454 www.alvareviewcourier.com E-Mail: manager @alvareviewcourier.net news@alvareviewcourier.net Entire Contents Copyright 2013 Members of: Associated Press Oklahoma Press Association

Barack Obama traveled to Capitol Hill to meet with Senate Democrats on the budget and a broad range of other proposals that are part of his second-term agenda. The president has launched a new outreach to rank-and-file Republicans, and his Hill visit is one of several planned with lawmakers of both parties this week. The fiscal blueprint released Tuesday by Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., will be dead on arrival with the White House and Democrats controlling the Senate. But the point is to prove it’s possible to balance the budget within 10 years by simply cutting spending and avoiding further tax hikes. The latest Ryan plan generally resembles prior ones, relying on higher tax revenues enacted in January and improved Medicare cost estimates — along with somewhat sharper spending cuts — to promise balance. Senate Democrats plan to offer a counterproposal on Wednesday with higher spending on domestic programs

and additional tax hikes on top of the higher rates imposed on top-bracket earners in January. That plan will, in turn, arrive as a dead letter in the GOPcontrolled House. Aides familiar with the Senate Democratic plan said it would curb deficits by $1.85 trillion over the coming decade, with $975 billion coming from new revenues and $975 billion coming from new spending cuts. The aides required anonymity because the budget is not public but said the plan would generate $275 billion in health care savings not made through cutting benefits. At issue on Tuesday and beyond is the arcane and partisan congressional budget process, one that is unlikely to illustrate a path forward in a gridlocked Washington. At stake are so-called budget resolutions, which are nonbinding measures that have the potential to stake out parameters for follow-up legislation cutting spending and rewriting the complex U.S. tax code. See Budget Page 40


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South Barber upgrades security, technology, class schedules, building improvements By Yvonne Miller South Barber’s Board of Education addressed many subjects at their March meeting Monday night, ranging from going to a semester class schedule at the high school for 2013-14 to increasing surveillance to enhance safety and security at both school sites. Board President Kent Swartz presided over the meeting with all members present: Jeff Black, Deb Helfrich, Bob Schrock, Dana Roark, Janet Robison and Michael Anderson, along with Superintendent Brad Morris and deputy board clerk Mary Lynn Meyers. Superintendent Morris Reports on Security, Technology, Grade School Project Video surveillance cameras are installed at the high school and ordered for the grade school, Superintendent Morris said. Those cameras are there to protect the safety, security and welfare of students, staff and district facilities and also maintain discipline. Morris said that besides school buildings, the cameras are in place in district route buses. The board approved the District Video Surveillance Policy with suggested wording changes. The superintendent said doorbell entrances are installed at both buildings. This allows each building to lock the front doors. Visitors buzz and a school official inside opens the door for them.

Regarding technology, Morris said Air Fiber is being installed this week. This will increase the school’s network speed between buildings by 10 times, he said. Systems on the network include email, videos and all files. Air Fiber eliminates fiber lines such as the copper wire transition method and instead transmits with use of a fixed wireless platform. Morris said Air Fiber gives the school more options in adding new technology. The board hired P1 Group to make improvements at the grade school, such as new windows and HVAC units. Morris said two P1 representatives reviewed the grade school last week and are finalizing plans to proceed with the improvements. P1 is in the bid process and should receive bids back by April 3. They plan to give a final design review to the board at their April meeting. P1 plans to mobilize to the site mid-May. Morris reminded the board that school will be held the Monday after Easter, which is April 1. That’s due to snow days. There will be no school on Good Friday, March 29. Shaffer on Semester Class Schedule The board approved a semester class schedule for high school students beginning with the 2013-14 school year. That’s a change from the yearly class schedule currently in place. When asked about the change by

the Newsgram after the meeting, South Barber High School (SBHS) Principal Brent Shaffer said that students will receive a final grade in a particular subject at the end of each semester. If the student passes that subject both semesters, they receive a full credit. If the student passes that class only one semester, they receive a half credit. Shaffer said the greatest benefit of the semester scheduling is the flexibility it allows students who want to take different classes. For example, that student might want to take economics one semester and a different class the next – possibly an elective or maybe a collegelevel or concurrent enrollment on-line class. The principal said this schedule also benefits transfer students. Overall, Shaffer said students will see little change with the new schedule, just more flexibility if interested. No Action to be Taken at this Time on Drug Testing Policy The agenda called for discussion and possible board action on SBHS’ andom drug testing policy that’s the board has been considering for more than a year. President Swartz said it is the opinion of the committee formed last month (comprised of him, board member Anderson, Morris and Shaffer) not to proceed at this time. Swartz said the committee suggests the board table the issue a few months until the new board members are in place, which would be July. Roark said, “I thought we decided to proceed at the last meeting.” Swartz said, “I don’t think it would pass right now.” Roark replied, “It was 5-1 last month to proceed” when the board took an informal vote while at the board table. At the public meeting regarding the drug policy held in February prior to the board meeting, the general consensus of the near 20 patrons attending was for the board to proceed. The school’s site council spent months researching drug policies at the request of the school board. Helfrich said she realized the board See S.

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Mars rover shows planet could have supported life By Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Curiosity rover has answered a key question about Mars: The red planet in the past had some of the right ingredients needed to support primitive life. The evidence comes from a chemical analysis by Curiosity, which last month flexed its robotic arm to drill into a fine-grained, veiny rock and then test the powder. Curiosity is the first spacecraft sent to Mars that could collect a sample from deep inside a rock, and scientist said Tuesday that they hit pay dirt with that first rock. “We have found a habitable environment that is so benign and supportive of life that probably if this water was around and you had been on the planet, you would have been able to drink it,” said chief scientist John Grotzinger of the California Institute of Technology. The rover made a dramatic “sevenminutes-of-terror” landing last August near the planet’s equator. A key task: Find out if ancient Mars ever had conditions favorable for microscopic organisms.

The car-size rover is not equipped to detect microbes, living or extinct. It can only use its onboard laboratories to examine Martian rocks to determine the kind of environment they might have lived in. The analysis showed the rock contained clay minerals that formed in a watery environment. It also had traces of sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and simple carbon — essential chemical ingredients for life. Unlike some places on Mars, scientists said the ancient water at the site appeared to be neutral and not too salty. Curiosity previously found a hint of the site’s watery past — an old streambed that the six-wheel rover crossed to get to the flat bedrock. Curiosity has yet to turn up evidence of complex carbon compounds, considered life’s chemical building blocks. Scientists said a priority is to search for a place where organics might be preserved. The drilled rock isn’t far from Curiosity’s landing spot in Gale Crater; the rover is ultimately headed to a mountain in the crater’s middle. Images from space spied signs of clay layers at the

base of the mountain. It has been slow going as engineers learn to handle the rover, which is far more tech-savvy than anything that has landed before on the red planet. Over the years, Mars spacecraft in orbit and on the surface have beamed back a wealth of information about the planet’s geology. They’ve also been able to study rocks from Mars that have occasionally landed on Earth. Several places on Mars — now a frigid desert — have shown evidence of a warmer and wetter environment early in the planet’s history though not necessarily friendly for life. Scientists said they still intend to drive Curiosity to the mountain but not until it drills into another rock at its current location. Since flight controllers on Earth will be out of touch with Mars spacecraft for most of next month due to a planetary alignment, the second drilling won’t get under way until May. In the meantime, engineers are troubleshooting a computer problem on Curiosity, which has not been able to perform science experiments for days. *** Online: NASA: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/index.html *** Follow Alicia Chang at http://twitter.com/SciWriAlicia


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Lynn Says

Is Internet addiction a mental illness or social problem By Lynn L. Martin This article was sent to me by an internet friend. I am reprinting it because I have views that the attention span of our youth (adults, too) are dwindling because of the constant need to check email or social media. Here is the reprint. Mira is just a year old; with the latest smart phones and gaming consoles available in the market, her parents devote less time to taking care of her and more time to playing video games online or socializing with friends on Facebook. There are times when Mia’s parents forget that they have a daughter who is in need of their care. They feed her only once a day; on multiple occasions they have even forgotten to feed her. One day when Mia’s mother walked into her daughter’s room, she found the little girl had died. Do you think this is just a story? If yes, then maybe you ought to think again. A three-month-old child died in South Korea in 2010 when her parents, obsessed with marathon online gaming sessions, fed her only once a day leaving her to die a slow death. This incident is only one of the many negative consequences of internet addiction. When the Bible of mental disorders – the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or DSM-IV – decided that internet addiction needs to be designated as a serious mental illness in its May 2013 edition, a controversial de-

bate sparked off across the globe. While researchers state the need for more research into the ways and means of accurately diagnosing internet addiction, the American Psychiatric Association is already comparing the symptoms of Internet Use Disorder (IUD) to substance abuse. Psychologists are also pushing for broadening the diagnosis of IUD to include much more than online gaming addictions. Web addiction, indeed, affects the white matter of the brain that contains nerve fibres. Researchers have found that excessive internet use does affect the fibres impacting a person’s emotions, self-control and decision-making abilities. As told to BBC by Dr. Henrietta Bowden-Jones, “White matter abnormalities in the orbito-frontal cortex and other truly significant brain areas are present not only in addictions where substances are involved but also in behavioral ones such as internet addiction”. World over, kids obsessed with internet games and social media are slowly and steadily distancing themselves from the real world. Without access to their email even for a few minutes, these children experience frustration, anxiety, depression and irritability. According to psychologists, these are deemed withdrawal symptoms. the same as those observed in substance abuse. Nearly 70 percent of the kids being treated at addiction-treatment clinics in Sydney are unable to focus without their smart phones. They struggle to pry themselves away from their IPads and their tablet computers. Are these the children who

will be the leaders of tomorrow? For children in South Korea, sleeping with a smart phone instead of a teddy bear is not a new phenomenon. Nearly 160,000 children between the ages of five and nine are addicted to the internet. In the race to be constantly ‘wired in,’ children forget to eat lunch, ignore sports and other physical activities, forgo going to the toilet and end up being nervous and distracted when their smart devices are taken away from them. With digital and web addiction affecting nearly 2.55 million people in South Korea, medical practitioners are calling for the categorization of IUD as a mental illness and they are certainly right in doing so. With children as young as the age of three being addicted to the internet and technology, the inclusion of IUD in the DSM – IV is justified. Internet use needs to be monitored and the youth must learn to balance technology with other activities. When the darker side of internet addiction is exposed through display of violence, tantrums and outrage then it becomes a serious problem; it can even be termed as a mental illness. In the last couple of years, we have been exposed to situations where the line between addiction and insanity has been blurred. In 2009, a boy in Ohio shot his mother and gravely injured his father when his parents prevented him from playing an online game because they were afraid that he was becoming obsessed with it. He was only a teenager who probably would have been sent to a juvenile home but if the same happens with an adult then he will be tried for manslaughter. If internet addiction is deemed a mental illness and there are no amendments made to the criminal justice system then it’s quite possible that the defendant will be let off on an insanity plea and may be offered a community sentence rather than a jail term. This will prove to be a serious disadvantage of including internet addiction as a mental disorder, especially in a country like the U.S. where guns are freely available on sale in stores such as Wal-Mart. A teenager who is addicted See Says Page 19


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Burns – Nighswonger announce engagement Lindsey Burns and Tyler Nighswonger are pleased to announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. They plan to be married on Saturday, May 18, in Guthrie. Parents of the engaged couple are Dwayne Burns of Pine Bluff, Ark.; Gwyn Burns of Big Spring, Texas; and Tom and Cynthia Nighswonger of Alva. Lindsey is a 2011 graduate of Benton High School in Arkansas and is currently a nursing major at Northwestern Oklahoma State University in Alva. She plans to graduate in May 2015. She is the granddaughter of Adeline Burns and the late Delmore Burns of Hope, Ark.; Don and Sue Noel of Big Spring, Texas; and Ruby Noel of Austin, Texas. Tyler is a 2007 graduate of Alva High School and a 2012 graduate of Northwestern Oklahoma State University with a degree in Agri-Business. He is actively employed in farming and ranching in the Alva area. Tyler is the grandson of Dr. Paul and Elaine Nighswonger of Alva, Landis and Geneva Trekell, and the late Betty Trekell, Alva.

Lindsey Burns and Tyler Nighswonger


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Make sure Prescription Insurance Information is Correct Holder Drug presents the senior citizen nutrition center menu. This is not served at Holder Drug, but rather one block west. Citizens age 60 and over are eligible to eat for only a small donation, typically $3.00. Please join us as the more people eating helps our funding.

Wednesday Mar 13

Ham & Beans, Tomato Spoon Relish, Cornbread, White Cake w/icing

Thursday Mar 14

Beef Pot Pie, Biscuit, Pineapple, Chocolate cake

Holder Drug handles insurance filings for virtually all insurance companies. There are hundreds! If you have been told there is an insurance company we don’t serve, drop by, and let us test your insurance card in our huge system. We will be very surprised if we can’t handle it.

An Even Larger Selection of Melissa and Doug Toys

Friday Mar 15

Krispy Fish Fillet, Broccoli w/cheese sauce French Fries, Cheese Biscuit, Sugar cookies Monday Mar 18

Homestyle Chili, Coleslaw, Roll Tinted Pears

Tuesday Mar 19

Polish Sausage w/Kraut, Fried Potatoes, Bread, and Peach Whip

Wednesday Mar 20

Chicken and Noodles, Sugar Snap Peas, Orange Pineapple cup, Biscuit, and Lemon Delight

Thursday Mar 21

Taco Salad, Refried Beans, Apricots & Cinnamon Roll

Friday Mar 22

Chicken Fry, Mashed Potatoes w/brown gravy, Green beans, Bread, Chocolate Chip Cookie

Monday Mar 25

Ham & Macaroni & Cheese, Peas, Sweetened Plums Brownie

Easter Party Supplies and decorations

Tuesday Mar 26

Shepherds Pie, Green Salad Bread Pudding

Holder Drug 513 Barnes - Alva - (580) 327-3332

OU, OSU, Ranger, Goldbugs & Ladybug goodies


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Let's support the Runnymede Facilities for Club Meetings Wedding and Infant Showers Family Reunions Call 327-2467

ALVA STATE BANK & TRUST COMPANY 518 College Ave. - Alva, OK 73717 580-327-3300


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LynnMartin.com Sitting Fee $1/per shot You control how much we shoot!

If you subscribe on-line, you can read earlier editions by merely clicking on the cover.

If you have an electronic subscription, you can click on any Alva Review Courier cover and search for any word. There are two rates: add an electronic subscription to your existing print subscription for just $2.00 per month. Or if you want to go only electronic, it is $6.00 per month for a year.

580-327-1686 Alva Review Courier


March 13, 2013

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Says to the internet and at the same time is charged with murder, which is actually premeditated, can plead to insanity as internet-addiction is a mental illness. This means that he could be given only a community sentence; is that fair to the murder victims? The inclusion of internet-addiction in the DSM-V could actually be misused. To avoid this, there will need to be reforms and amendments to the existing laws of a country. Only then is it feasible to classify internet addiction as a mental illness. Many of us use the internet, especially social media, to stay updated on current news and world stories. Often, we check our email more than 30 times per hour. Are we all mentally ill patients? When someone tries to pry me away from Facebook or LinkedIn, I get upset but not violent. Am I suffering from a mental illness? As I was randomly searching the Internet, I came across an internet addiction test that includes some very familiar questions: How often do you find that you stay online longer than you intended? How often do you neglect household chores to spend more time online? How often do you snap, yell or act annoyed if someone bothers you while you are online? I answered ‘frequently’ to these questions. Does this mean I am suffering from a mental illness called internet-use disorder? In such cases that I am sure most of us find resonance with, it becomes imperative to accurately define the conditions and symptoms of IUD. As the debate rages on among researchers, medical practitioners, health officials and the millions of users, we need to understand that only classifying IUD as a mental illness is not enough. We need to amend laws and conduct indepth research into the symptoms and extent of IUD. Once research shows that IUD can indeed be classified as a mental illness and laws are amended to incorporate IUD and its consequences, we must take steps to include IUD in the next edition of the DSM. Technology and the internet is taking over our lives rapidly and we need to control them before everything is destroyed – humanity, emotions and societal structure.

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County agrees to split cost of new library roof By Roger McKenzie A bid for a new roof for the Cherokee City-County Library was approved by the Alfalfa County commissioners during their meeting Monday morning. Under an agreement worked out by Library Director Star Baker, the $17,708 cost of the roof will be split equally between the Friends of the Library, the City of Cherokee and Alfalfa County. The lowest bid that met bid requirements was accepted. It came from Cherokee’s John Austin of JMA Roofing. The new roof will fix a leak and it includes wrapping a chimney belonging to someone else on the adjoining roof that has also contributed to the leak. The new roof will carry an eight-year warranty on materials. A request from the Alfalfa County Sheriff’s Department to trade in two older vehicles for two storage boxes was approved by commissioners. Under-sheriff Dennis Frisk made the request, which would swap a 2002 Ford Crown Victoria and a 2004 Chevrolet Impala for the boxes that are used to store equipment. Frisk said the vehicles had an estimated

value of $350, while the boxes retailed for anywhere from $1,000 to $2,500. The commissioners also returned the title to a 1980 American Motors General 6 x 6 firetruck to the Amorita/Byron Rescue and Fire Department. The truck, which has been out of circulation, and was referred to a “junker,” will be sold. A transfer of $16,612 was approved. The money will go from the account collecting fees from road crossing permits to a fund for repairing roads. District 3 will use the money to repair damages caused by some road crossing work. This week, 23 road crossing permits were approved. The total of fees generated was $21,750. District 1 had 8.5 permits ($4,000); District 2 had 12.5 permits ($14,750) and District 3 had two permits ($3,000). An update of all of the county’s requisitioning and receiving officers was given the okay by commissioners. In other business, the commissioners approved minutes of their previous meeting, maintenance and operations warrants, blanket purchase orders and monthly officers reports.


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8 sentenced in Oklahoma Obituary human trafficking case By Justin Juozapavicius TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Eight people have been sentenced to prison terms for their roles in a widespread human trafficking case that spanned several cities, federal agents in Tulsa announced Tuesday. U.S. Attorney Danny C. Williams said six people were sentenced Monday and Tuesday. Two other people connected with the case were sentenced last year. The investigation, dubbed “Operation Poker Chip,” got its name from the poker chips that were given to customers who paid a middleman to have sex with a sex trafficking victim. The customer turned the chip into the victim, and the chips were collected at the end of every day so the sex traffickers could keep track of how many customers they had, investigators said. “Make no doubt about it, human trafficking is modern slavery,” Williams said at a news conference Tuesday afternoon announcing the sentences. “In this case, it was forced labor of the most despicable kind.” Their sentences come after a woman was smuggled into the U.S. from Mexico more than eight years ago, lured with a promise of steady work waiting tables at a restaurant and the possibility of sending home some of what she earned. Instead, she was yelled at, beaten and drugged by her captors and moved around the country at a frantic pace so she could be forced into having sex with paying customers, federal officials said. She managed to contact authorities, who raided brothels operating out of barred-up apartments in east Tulsa. Investigators discovered that the operation stretched from Tulsa to Houston, Atlanta

and other major cities. The United States is both a major destination and source of trafficking victims. And Oklahoma remains a top stop for traffickers thanks to its high drug use, poverty and the crossroads of three major interstate highways in its capital city. Statistics for human trafficking are virtually impossible to track, but law enforcement officials and trafficking experts say the transport and exploitation of children, men and women for labor or sex work is one of the world’s largest and fastest growing criminal enterprises, claiming millions of victims and billions of dollars for traffickers. “Human trafficking is an abhorrent crime and the victims are targeted because they’re vulnerable and easy to exploit,” said James Finch, the Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oklahoma. “These victims are usually deprived of basic human rights, they are beaten, starved and forced into prostitution.” Those sentenced include: —Juan Rosales Garza —the leader of the brothel ring— who was sentenced Monday to prison for more than 11 years. —Sermaias Samuel Sanchez Ajin, who was sentenced Monday to time served — about 13 months. —Antonio Felix Velasquez-Lopez, who was sentenced Monday to prison for more than 7 years. —Israel Velasquez-Ramirez, who was sentenced Tuesday to an 18-month prison term. —Piedad Garcia, who was sentenced Tuesday to 2 years in prison. —Gloria N. Giammalva, who was sentenced Tuesday to nearly 2 years in prison. —Ignacio Ijom-Brito, who was sentenced in December to 14 months in prison.  —Alberto Lagunes, who was sentenced in August to 4 years in prison.

JOHN DEE MYERS KIOWA – John Dee Myers, 82, passed away March 10 at the Kiowa Hospital District Manor. Graveside service will be Thursday, March 14, at 1 p.m. at the Hardtner-Elwood Cemetery. Arrangements are by Lanman Funeral Home, Inc. Condolences may be shared with the family at www.lanmanmemorials.com John was born on Nov. 4, 1930, to Harry and Cleta Yates Myers in Hardtner, Kan. He attended and graduated from Kiowa High School with the class of 1950. He served with the United States Coast Guard from 1951-1954. He and Kay Pierce were united in marriage. To this union two children were born: Larry and Shelly. John attended barber school and cut hair for 50 years, drove a semi truck for 20 years and owned a retail liquor store for many years. On August 20, 1981, he and Joan E. Verrill Sternberger were united in marriage. He was a member of the VFW. He was preceded in death by his parents; four brothers Forrest Myers, Donald Myers, Dick Myers and Bethel Myers; foster parents Arvey and Etta Yates; first wife Kay Myers and mother-in-law Evelyn Verrill. He is survived by his wife Joan Myers; two children Larry Myers and Shelly Koblitz and husband Justin; two step-sons David Whitfill and wife Joleen, and Michael Whitfill and wife Anna; brother Charley Yates; two sisters Hazel Case and Virginia Hicks; eight grandchildren Nathan Smith, Dane Myers, Kady Myers, Morgan, Paige and Jarrett Koblitz, Brett Whitfill and Jessica Whitfill. Memorials may be made to the National MPS Society in honor of his grandson, Jarrett, or Monty Thompson Continuing Education Fund and given to the funeral home. Visitation will be Wednesday, March 13, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m


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Southern Plains drought summit Recent snows and rain showers may have provided moisture to the surface of southern Plains soils, but the persistent drought conditions of the past two years will continue to affect agriculture for the foreseeable future. To aid those involved in agriculture who must make decisions about how to survive this historic drought, K-Sate Research & Extension will host the Southern Plains Drought Summit on Wednesday, March 27, at the Pratt Area 4-H Center on the Pratt County Fairgrounds. For more information and to register for the full-day conference or to RSVP contact the Barber County Extension Office at 620-886-3971 or tmarshal@ ksu.edu. The day will begin with registration at 9:30 a.m., and the program will start at 10 a.m. Presentation topics and speakers include: • Crop Assessment Tools and Tech-

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niques and Options for Drought-Stressed Crops or Planting Another Crop – Jim Shroyer, K-State Research and Extension crop production extension specialist; • Insurance Considerations for Crop Producers and Overview of the Pasture, Rangeland and Forage Insurance Program – Rebecca Davis, director, Risk Management Agency regional office, Topeka, Kan..; • Crops Q & A – Jim Shroyer and Rebecca Davis; • Drought Management Economic Considerations – Gregg Ibendahl, associate professor, K-State Department of Agricultural Economics; • Use of Rumensin in Cow Herds – Katie Kueser, Elanco Animal Health Sales Representative; • Using Production Benchmarks to Troubleshoot Problems or Monitor Performance – John Jaeger, associate pro-

fessor, beef scientist, K- State Ag Research Center – Hays; • Drought Adjustments for Range and Pasture – Keith Harmoney, professor, range scientist, K-State Ag Research Center – Hays; • Supplementation and Mineral Considerations During Drought – Justin Waggoner, associate professor, K-State Southwest Area extension beef specialist; • Symptoms and Treatments: Water Quality and Poisonous Plant Issues and Herd Health and Early Weaning Considerations – Larry Hollis, K- State Extension specialist, beef production medicine; and • Drought Data and Climate Prediction Resources and Weather Predictions for 2013 and Beyond – Jeff Hutton, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Weather Service, Dodge City, Kan.

S. Barber

first needs to find an attorney who will handle the drug policy, since the Kansas Association of School Boards (KASB) attorney will not. “I don’t think we should let it go,” Helfrich said. She said at the very least she wants to see drug dog searches increased at the high school. Roark agreed. Other Board Action Current bills totaling $220,406.29 received board approval for payment. PK-6 Principal Marcia Cantrell gave an update on the site council. She said one of the topics of discussion was the school’s attendance policy. An executive session to discuss nonelected personnel matters lasted about 10 minutes. No action was taken upon return to open session. Giving a report of the South Central Kansas Special Education Cooperative, Swartz, who is also president of that organization, said the cooperative “will face budgetary restraints in special edu-

cation.” He said they are looking at some $400,000 in additional expenses. Swartz and Helfrich gave reports of KASB meetings they attended. Swartz commented on House Bill 2027, calling it “a sad state of affairs.” The bill reportedly reduces the number of items from 30 to only five that teachers can use in negotiations with their local school boards. Helfrich said after hearing Kansas Senator Steve Abrams (for District 32, which includes the South Barber area) speak, she said, “He is not for education.” Student Achievements and Upcoming Events Shaffer listed numerous student achievements. In Forensics, coach Meagan Masters reported a very successful start with the following results: Samantha Fulcher – first in Humorous at Medicine Lodge; Lane Hess – first in Extemp at Oxford; Reiley Courson – second in Extemp at Oxford; Santana Reeves and Paige Lambert – second in Duet at Oxford; Team – third at Medicine Lodge; Team – second at Oxford. At the HOPL High School Music

Contest, vocal teacher Kiley Feely said the women’s glee group received a I (Superior) rating; mixed choir got a II (Excellent) rating. Numerous soloists received I and II ratings. The new South Barber Junior High Tornado Cheerleaders are: eighth graders Kacee Hostetler and Taylor McGlothlin; seventh graders Morgan Polson, Hayley Drake, Taylor Pollock and Katie Holcomb. High school cheer tryouts will be Thursday at 3:10 p.m. The season for Junior/senior high track and high school boys tennis started Monday. Check southbarber.com for schedules. Cantrell said the elementary school had 96 percent attendance at parent/ teacher conferences. Shaffer said the junior/senior high had less than 50 percent, which is not uncommon for the second conference of the year. Cantrell said Red Wheel (food items) Kick-off is March 13. Delivery and pickup of ordered items is April 10 from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Kindergarten screening is March 14. Pre-K Screening is April 11 from 9 a.m., to 3 p.m., at the Kiowa United Methodist Church.


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Pentagon forming cyber teams to prevent attacks By Richard Lardner WASHINGTON (AP) — The Defense Department is establishing a series of cyber teams charged with carrying out offensive operations to combat the threat of an electronic assault on the United States that could cause major damage and disruption to the country’s vital infrastructure, a senior military official said Tuesday. Gen. Keith Alexander, the top officer at U.S. Cyber Command, warned during testimony that the potential for an attack against the nation’s electric grid and other essential systems is real and more aggressive steps need to be taken by the federal government and the private sector in order to improve digital defenses. Alexander told the Senate Armed Services Committee that foreign leaders are deterred from launching cyberattacks on the United States because they know such a strike could be traced to its source and would generate a robust response. But the country is not preventing what Alexander called “low-level harassment of private and public websites, property and information by other states.” He did not mention any specific countries, even though the Obama administration is escalating its criticism of cyber thefts by China that have become intolerable to the international community. Offensive cyber weapons are growing and evolving, Alexander said,

and it is only a matter of time before tools developed by other nations wind up in the hands of extremist groups or even individuals who could do significant harm. Alexander said 13 cyber teams are being formed for the mission of guarding the nation in cyberspace. He described them as “defend-the-nation” teams but stressed their role would be offensive. In comments to reporters after the hearing, Alexander likened the teams’ duties to knocking an incoming missile out of the sky before it hits a target. He also said the teams would work outside the United States, but he did not say where. He also said another 27 cyber teams are being established to support the military’s warfighting commands while others will protect Defense Department’s computer systems and data. But even as Alexander detailed these moves, he pushed lawmakers to pass cybersecurity legislation that would make it easier for the government and the private sector — which controls critical infrastructure such as the electric grid, banking systems, chemical facilities and water treatment systems — to share detailed information about who is getting hacked and what to do about it. President Barack Obama signed an executive order last month that relies heavily on participation from U.S. industry in creating new voluntary standards for protecting information and expands the government’s effort to provide companies with threat data. But the order doesn’t do enough to address the threat, administration

officials said. Unresolved issues include the legal liability facing companies if they divulge information, and whether companies should be compelled to meet certain security standards. The general also told the committee that there needs to be a clear consensus on how the nation is organized to protect critical infrastructure from cyberattacks. “It takes a team to operate in cyberspace,” Alexander said. “But at times I think in talking about the team approach, we’re not clear on who’s in charge when.” Another issue that still needs to be settled is what constitutes an act of war in cyberspace, Alexander said. He does not consider cyberespionage and the theft of a corporation’s intellectual property to be acts of war. But Alexander said, “I think you’ve crossed the line” if the intent is to disrupt or destroy U.S. infrastructure. Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., the committee’s chairman, noted that Obama recently issued a classified policy directive to govern cyber operations. The Pentagon also has developed a list of procedures on how to respond in “cyber crisis” situations, he added, and the Pentagon is expected to issue cyber rules of engagement for military commanders. “The fact that these foundational policy frameworks and planning actions are just now taking shape serves as a stark illustration of how immature and complex this warfare domain remains,” Levin said. Alexander said the private sector maintains varying degrees of security See Cyber Page 26


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Report: More youth use smartphones as route to Web By Martha Irvine CHICAGO (AP) — Keep computers in a common area so you can monitor what your kids are doing. It’s a longstanding directive for online safety — but one that’s quickly becoming moot as more young people have mobile devices, often with Internet access. A new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project finds that 78 percent of young people, ages 12 to 17, now have cell phones. Nearly half of those are smartphones, a share that’s increasing steadily — and that’s having a big effect on how, and where, many young people are accessing the Web. The survey, released Wednesday, finds that one in four young people say they are “cell-mostly” Internet users, a percentage that increases to about half when the phone is a smartphone. In comparison, just 15 percent of adults said they access the Internet mostly by cell phone. “It’s just part of life now,” says Donald Conkey, a high school sophomore in Wilmette, Ill., just north of Chicago, who is among the many teens who have smartphones. “Everyone’s about the same now when it comes to their phones — they’re on them a lot.” He and other teens say that if you add up all the time they spend using apps and searching for info, texting and downloading music and videos, they’re on their phones for at least a couple hours each day — and that time is only increasing, they say. “The occasional day where my phone isn’t charged or I leave it behind, it feels almost as though I’m naked in public,” says Michael Weller, a senior at New Trier High School, where Conkey also

attends. “I really need to have that connection and that attachment to my phone all the time.” According to the survey, older teen girls, ages 14 to 17, were among the most likely to say their phones were the primary way they access the Web. And while young people in low-income households were still somewhat less likely to use the Internet, those who had phones were just as likely — and in some cases, more likely — to use their cell phones as the main way they access the Web. It means that, as this young generation of “mobile surfers” grows and comes of age, the way corporations do business and marketers advertise will only continue to evolve, as will the way mobile devices are monitored. Already, many smartphones have restriction menus that allow parents to block certain phone functions, or mature content. Cell phone providers have services that allow parents to see a log of their children’s texts. And there are a growing number of smartphone applications that at least claim to give parents some level of control on a phone’s Web browser, though many tech experts agree that these applications can be hitor-miss. Despite the ability to monitor some phone activity, some tech and communication experts question whether surveillance, alone, is the best response to the trend. Some parents take a hard line on limits. Others, not so much, says Mary Madden, a senior researcher at Pew who co-authored the report. “It seems like there are two extremes. The parents who are really locking down

and monitoring everything — or the ones who are throwing up their hands and saying, ‘I’m so overwhelmed,’” Madden says. She says past research also has found that many parents hesitate to confiscate phones as punishment because they want their kids to stay in contact with them. “Adults are still trying to work out the appropriate rules for themselves, let alone their children,” Madden says. “It’s a difficult time to be a parent.” And a seemingly difficult time for them to say “no” to a phone, even for kids in elementary school, where the high-tech bling has become a status symbol. Sherry Budziak, a mom in Vernon Hills, Ill., says her 6-year-old daughter has friends her age who are texting by using applications on the iPod Touch, a media player that has no phone but that has Internet access. She draws the line there. But she did get her 11-year-old daughter an older model iPhone last fall, so she can stay in touch with her. Budziak, who works in the tech field and understands the ins and outs of the phone, set it so that the sixth-grader can text, make and receive phone calls and play games that her parents download for her. “So we’re on the conservative side, by far,” she says. Budziak also tells her daughter and her daughter’s friends that it’s Mom’s phone, not her daughter’s. It means that she and her husband monitor texts on the phone any time they like. Does their daughter protest about all the restrictions? Occasionally. “But she wants a phone so badly that it doesn’t matter right now,” Budziak says. “Having a phone was better than having no phone at all.” Mark Tremayne, an assistant professor of communication at the University of Texas at Arlington, says he and his wife put off getting their son a smartphone longer than most— until his 13th birthday, which is quickly approaching. They plan to monitor it, having already discovered a few “surprises” when checking the Web surfing history on his iPod Touch. See Report Page 38


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American says it has ‘concern’ about small knives DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines has “concern” over letting passengers carry small knives on planes, but it’s stopping short of opposing the idea. American’s senior vice president for government affairs, Will Ris, said Tuesday that government officials should “reassess” changes to the banned-items list so that airlines and airline employees can review new rules that take effect April 25. Ris explained American’s position in a letter to John Pistole, administrator of the Transportation Security Administration. Flight attendants’ groups, pilots’ groups and Delta Air Lines oppose the

TSA’s plan, which would also let passengers carry hockey sticks, two golf clubs and other sporting gear currently banned from plane cabins. Some safety experts say that passengers with small knives could not bring down an airplane because cockpits were made more secure after 2001, when terrorists armed with box cutters hijacked and crashed two American Airlines and two United Airlines planes. But opposition to the TSA’s proposal appears to be growing. Delta CEO Richard Anderson told Pistole last week that he shared flight attendants’ “legitimate concerns” about passengers carrying small knives, which he said would create “additional

risk for our cabin staff and customers.” On Monday US Airways CEO Doug Parker asked TSA to reconsider its decision, saying knives “might place our flight attendants’ safety at risk.” He said that TSA might have reached a “more thoughtful” approach to security if it had talked to airlines and flight crews first. On Tuesday U.S. Rep. Edward Markey, D-Mass., held a news conference at Boston’s Logan Airport to say he would introduce legislation to block changes in the banned-items list. And Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has said he wants to hold hearings on the TSA’s decision.


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Report

On one hand, Tremayne says it’s the sort of stuff he used to look up in books and magazines when he was 13. “It’s pretty clear that kids will do what kids will do,” he says. But he acknowledges that having a mobile device can make it that much easier to access. The key, he says, is to talk to his son about it, and that’s what many other tech and communication experts also advise. “I don’t think the technology itself is bad. The benefits vastly outweigh the risks. But parents do need to be aware,” says Daniel Castro, a senior analyst with the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a research and education think tank based in Washington, D.C. “Part of it is simply asking, ‘What are you doing, and why?’” Too often, he and others say, adults don’t fully understand how the smartphones work — or how their kids might use them differently than they do. So guidance from parents, teachers and other adults can be lacking, says Danah Boyd, a senior researcher at Microsoft Research who specializes in teens and their tech-driven communication. “For the last decade, too much of the online safety conversation has focused on surveillance. Surveillance will not help in a world of handhelds, but conversation will,” says Boyd, who’s also a research assistant professor of media, culture and communication at New York University. She points to research by Henry Jenkins, the director of the Comparative Media Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has long encouraged parents, schools and after-school programs to focus on how to navigate the online world — from developing judgment about credible online

sources to using high-tech skills to help build community and pool collective knowledge. At the Conkey household in suburban Chicago, brothers Donald and Harry know their parents track the music they buy and might look at their Web surfing history when borrowing their sons’ laptops. Mom Brooke Conkey acknowledges that she also may glance at the occasional text. “Oh yeah, she’ll look over our shoulders and she’ll want to know who we’re talking to — and that’s to be expected,” says Harry Conkey, a high school senior. “It’s a parent. It’s natural to want to know who your kids are talking to.” His parents don’t use filters of any kind because, while there’s been the occasional “mistake” when downloading or surfing on their phones or laptops, Mom and Dad think that’s just part of learning and growing up. That may change, however, with their 6-year-old son Peter. “I think that things will get trickier as time goes on,” Brooke Conkey says. “And I think things will be easier to get to — the naughty things. So I think I probably would be more proactive than I was with the older boys.” It’s a balance, she says, because she and other parents also realize that smartphones and other mobile devices are only likely to become an even more integral part of life and learning. At least at the college level, some schools are seeing the benefit of mobile surfing, and encouraging it, too. Last fall, Stephen Groening, a film and media studies professor at George Mason University in Virginia, taught a class that examined “cell phone cultures.” Students did much of the class work using phones — creating video essays, taking pictures, texting and tweet-

ing. “I’ve had students tell me that they bring their cell phones in the shower with them. They sleep with them,” Groening says, noting that he never knew a student attached to a laptop in that way In New Jersey, Seton Hall University gives incoming freshman a free smartphone for the first semester. Among other things, they use them to help them navigate campus, connect with other students and follow campus news that streams on the SHUmobile app. Kyle Packnick, a freshman at Seton Hall, liked having one of the phones and said they’re particularly helpful for students who don’t come to school with a smartphone. But he also thinks people his age could do a better job setting their own limits with technology — and is grateful that his parents didn’t even allow him to text on his cell phone when he was in high school. He was only allowed to make phone calls. “At the time, I definitely wasn’t happy about it,” the 19-year-old says. But now he feels he’s less dependent on his phone than his peers. Pew’s findings are based on a nationally representative phone survey of 802 young people, ages 12 to 17, and their parents. The report, a joint project with the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, was conducted between July and September last year. The margin of error was plus-or-minus 4.5 percentage points. *** On the Internet: Pew: http://www.pewinternet.org *** Martha Irvine is an AP national writer. She can be reached at mirvine(at) ap.org or at http://twitter.com/irvineap


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Budget

But this year’s dueling GOP and Democratic budget proposals are more about defining political differences — as if last year’s elections didn’t do enough of that — than charting a path forward toward a solution. Congressional budgets often simply state party positions, and invariably are partisan endeavors. Ryan, who became a national GOP figure as the losing vice presidential nominee last year, has for now settled back into his wonkish role as Budget Committee chairman and chief tutor for dozens of relatively junior Republicans. He’s also armed with a full battery of budget bromides. “You cannot continue to kick the can down the road,” Ryan said Tuesday. “You cannot continue to spend money we just don’t have.” “On the current path, we’ll spend $46 trillion over the next 10 years. Under our proposal, we’ll spend $41 trillion,” Ryan said in an op-ed in the Wall St. Journal. “On the current path, spending will increase by 5 percent each year. Under our proposal, it will increase by 3.4 percent.” Ryan’s plan promises to cut the deficit from $845 billion this year to $528 billion in the 2014 budget year that starts in October. It would drop to $125 billion in 2015 and hover pretty much near balance for several years before registering a $7 billion surplus in 2023. The White House weighed in against the Ryan plan, saying it would turn Medicare into a voucher program and protect the wealthy from tax increases. “While the House Republican budget aims to reduce the deficit, the math just doesn’t add up,” said White House Press Secretary Jay Carney. “Deficit

reduction that asks nothing from the wealthiest Americans has serious consequences for the middle class.” The House Budget Committee has scheduled a vote on the measure Wednesday, and the Senate Budget panel is slated to vote Thursday on rival legislation by new Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray, DWash., who promises new tax revenues but few cuts from domestic programs like Medicare and Medicaid. Murray outlined her own budget plan at a closed-door meeting of the rank and file during the day. According to officials familiar with the details, it calls for $1.95 trillion in deficit savings over a decade, $975 billion from unspecified higher taxes, $735 billion in reduced spending and $240 billion in lower interest costs. It also recommends $100 billion in new spending for job training, water and sewer construction and other public works projects. Medicare would be in line for $265 billion in savings over a decade, and another $10 billion would come from Medicaid. Farm programs would take a cut of $23 billion over a decade. As part of the overall savings, the budget would also eliminate the acrossthe-board spending cuts that recently took effect, and replace them with a blend of tax increases and spending cuts. “We are working towards fair and balanced, which is what the American public has said time and time again that they want,” Murray said. “We need to make sure that everybody participates in getting us to a budget that deals with our debt and our deficit responsibly.” For his part, Ryan has resurrected a controversial Medicare proposal that

replaces traditional Medicare for those currently under 55 with a government subsidy to buy health insurance on the open market. Critics of the plan say the subsidies won’t grow with inflation fast enough and would shove thousands of dollars in higher premiums onto seniors before very long. The House GOP plan again proposes sharp cuts to the Medicaid health program for the poor, tighter food stamp eligibility rules and claims $1.8 trillion in savings over a decade by repealing Obama’s signature overhaul of the U.S. health care system. It generally seeks to preserve the Pentagon budget, but only at the expense of proposing dramatic cuts to domestic agency budgets that may prove too low for GOP moderates and the pragmatists atop the Appropriations Committee responsible for guiding them into law. A document released Tuesday offers few specifics on the proposed cuts to domestic programs, but it generally appears to incorporate spending levels for day-to-day agency operations significantly below levels called for by controversial automatic spending cuts. They are just starting to take effect though their bite has yet to cause broad-based pain. Even as it proposes repealing Obamacare, the Ryan plan preserves more than $700 billion in the health care law’s cuts to Medicare providers over a decade — just as more than $600 billion in tax hikes on the wealthy enacted in January make it easier for Ryan’s budget to predict balance. Ryan also proposes overhauling the tax code by eliminating many or most tax deductions and using the savings to lower income tax rates, with a top rate of 25 percent instead of 39.6 percent.


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Texas boy, 11, dies in ATV crash in Oklahoma

UTICA, Okla. (AP) — The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says an 11-yearold Texas boy was killed in an all-terrain vehicle accident in southern Oklahoma. The highway patrol says Colton Chreene of Flower Mound was driving

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an ATV Monday night when he made a left turn into a ravine and crashed. Authorities say the boy was taken to a hospital in Durant, where he was pronounced dead. Authorities say the crash happened

in rural Utica in southeastern Bryan County. The highway patrol says the boy suffered head and neck injuries. A preliminary report says he was not wearing a helmet.

Cyber

over its computer systems. The financial industry typically is more secure than companies that operate the electric grid. Still, he said, banks are vulnerable to being disrupted by what are called denial of service attacks, a technique that works by overloading a website with traffic. “The issue that we’re weighing is, when does a nuisance become a real problem?” Alexander said. “And when are you prepared to step in for that? And that’s the work that, I think, the administration is going through right now in highlighting that.” Alexander’s testimony comes a day after Obama’s national security

adviser called for “serious steps” by China to stop cyber theft that has become intolerable to the international community. The remarks on Monday by Tom Donilon before the Asia Society in New York underscore the growing concern in Washington over the security risks posed by cyber thefts and intrusions and the economic costs to U.S. businesses. American companies are being more vocal about cyber theft emanating from China “on a very large scale.” He said Beijing “should take serious steps to investigate and put a stop to these activities” and recognize the risk to international trade and to U.S.-China relations. The Obama administration last month announced new efforts, including a new diplomatic push to discourage intellectual property theft abroad, to fight the growing theft of American trade secrets following the release of a report that linked China’s military to the electronic theft of corporate trade secrets and U.S. government data. After analyzing breaches that compromised more than 140 companies, the private security firm Mandiant has concluded that they can be linked to the

People’s Liberation Army’s Unit 61398, a secret Chinese military organization based in Shanghai. The Chinese government denied being involved in cyber theft, with China’s defense minister calling the Mandiant report deeply flawed. China’s Foreign Ministry said that country has also been a victim of hacking, much of it traced to the United States. Levin asked Alexander if U.S. intelligence agencies can determine not only which Chinese government organizations are stealing U.S. intellectual property, but also what Chinese companies may be receiving that intellectual property and using it to compete against U.S. firms. But Alexander declined to be specific in open setting, saying only that the intelligence agencies have increased their capabilities in this area significantly over the last several years. After the hearing, Alexander said he saw no reason to amplify Donilon’s remarks. “I agree with what Tom Donilon has put out there,” he said. “I think it is absolutely on mark.” *** Follow Richard Lardner on Twitter: https://twitter.com/rplardner


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Barber County Cattlemen’s Man indicted Association annual meeting in Texas for alleged Obama threat By Tim Marshall The Barber County Cattlemen’s Association will hold their Annual Meeting on Monday, March 18, 6:30 p.m., at the United Methodist Church, Medicine Lodge, Kan. The evening will include

the Annual Meeting, a steak supper and a presentation from Dr. Clint Rusk, Animal Science Department Head at Oklahoma State University. Please RSVP to the Barber County Extension Office by 5 p.m. on Friday, March 15, by calling 620-886-3971. This event is open to both current and potential members of the Barber County Cattlemen’s Association, as well as any members of the community who are interested in the beef industry. For further information on the Annual Meeting, please contact Tim at the Barber County Extension Office at 620886-3971 or tmarshal@ksu.edu.

EL PASO, Texas (AP) — A federal grand jury in West Texas has indicted a 20-year-old man who allegedly threatened to shoot President Barack Obama during his inauguration. The El Paso Times (http://bit.ly/ Y7RHyD ) reported Tuesday that William Mose Tucker of El Paso remains in custody without bond. His next court date is March 28. An attorney for Tucker seeks bond — saying his client doesn’t own any weapons or ammunition and there’s no evidence he planned to carry out the alleged threat. Documents show Tucker last September told someone he planned to shoot Obama. Tucker was indicted Jan. 16 on a charge of making a threat against the president. He was arrested four days later in Lawton, Okla., while selling magazines. Obama’s inauguration was the next day. Details weren’t released on who reported Tucker. *** Information from: El Paso Times, http://www.elpasotimes.com


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Alfalfa County Court Filings According to the affidavits and petitions on file, the following individuals have been charged. An individual is innocent of any charges listed below until proven guilty in a court of law. All information is a matter of public record and may be obtained by anyone during regular hours at the Alfalfa County Courthouse. The Alva Review-Courier will not intentionally alter or delete any of this information. If it appears in the courthouse public records, it will appear in this newspaper. Criminal Filings Jennifer Lowe, 26, Woodward: Obtaining cash and/or merchandise by bogus check ($288.70). Misdemeanor Filings Joshua Paul Buller, 33, Cherokee: Unlawful possession of paraphernalia ($296.50). Aeon Dale Riggs, 49, Carmen: Public intoxication ($296.50). Amy L. York, 42, Nash: Obtaining cash and/or merchandise by bogus check ($304). Irene Pullen, 57, Shawnee: Obtaining cash and/or merchandise by bogus check ($304). Garry Wayne Hays, 66, Enid: Obtaining cash and/or merchandise by bo-

gus check ($304). Stacy E. Dickens, 32, no address listed: Obtaining cash and/or merchandise by bogus check ($304). Civil Filings NCEP LLC vs. Jerry A. Gumaer: Indebtedness for an amount of $14,011.65 ($205.70). Divorce Filings Charity Dawn Pippin vs. Allen Scott Pippin: Divorce ($198.70). Brittany N. Wade vs. Rodney Jay Wade: Divorce ($193.70). Marriage Filings Forest Edward Golbek Jr., 23, Alva and Della Marie Case, 18, Alva: Marriage license ($50). Protective Order Filings Mary Ellen OClair vs. Steven Sarver Jr. ($218). Traffic Filings Bryan Shan Lile, 51, McLoud: Operating vehicle with width exceeding 102 inches ($211.50). Christopher Pembrook, 33, Enid: Violating terms of special permit ($211.50). Christopher Pembrook, 33, Enid: Violating terms of special permit ($211.50). Christopher Pembrook, 33, Enid: Violating terms of special permit

($211.50). Christopher Pembrook, 33, Enid: Failure to prevent load from dropping, sifting, leaking or blowing ($211.50). Velinda Guadalupe Acosta, 43, Aline: Failure to carry insurance verification (state dismissed without fine or costs). Allen Andrew Jenlink, 17, Jet: Violation of license restriction ($50). Randy Dale Miller II, 33, Broken Arrow: Failure to yield right of way from stop sign ($211.50). Randy Dale Miller II, 33, Broken Arrow: Violation of license restriction ($211.50). Chad Jason Lyons, 35, Kiowa, Kan.: Transporting open container of beer ($316). James Cody Peters, 19, Woodward: Failure to carry insurance verification ($231.50). Velinda Guadalupe Acosta, 43, Aline: Operating a motor vehicle without a valid driver’s license ($256.50). Bobby Joe Scott, 50, Liberal, Kan.: Operating a motor vehicle in a manner not reasonable and proper ($256.50). Jacob Tyler Reasor, 23, Broken ArSee Court Page 52

Alfalfa County Real Estate Transactions Start Book 706, page 849 Real Estate Transfers • Leonard C. Shelite and Patricia Shelite to Monty R. Shelite and Linda J. Shelite: an undivided one-half interest in the Southeast Quarter of Section 9, Township 23 North, Range 12 WIM; warranty deed. • John E. Thompson and EINora (sic) J. Thompson to John E. Thompson and EINora Thompson, Co-Trustees of the John E. Thompson Revocable Trust dated Dec. 13, 2012, and EINora J. Thompson and John E. Thompson, Co-Trustees of the EINora J. Thompson Revocable Trust dated Dec. 13, 2012: an undivided one-half interest to each trust the surface only in and to (1) the Northeast Quarter of Section 8, Township 24 North, Range 10 WIM; and (2) the Northwest Quarter of Section 7, Township 24 North, Range 10 WIM; quit claim deed. • Kenneth Mark Schmidt, Delores Elaine Rosfeld and Melvin Roy Ros-

fied, and Darlene Jane Koehn to Jackie J. Amrine and Charlotte A. Amrine: Lots 21, 22, 23 and 24, in Block 71 in the Town of Goltry; warranty deed. • Robbin Campbell to Arno Lee Blanchard and Darlene Blanchard: Lots 13 and 14 in Block 15, First Addition to the Town of Aline; quit claim deed. • Eddie B. Tucker, individually, as the surviving spouse of Carolie Tucker, and Co-Trustee of the Carolie Tucker Revocable Trust dated Aug. 3, 2000, to Alan C. Wright aka Alan Charles Wright: the East three-quarters of the Southwest Quarter of Section 3, Township 24 North, Range 9 WIM; quit claim deed. • Helen S. Jack to Sydnee Denise Jack: the West Half of the North 60 acres of the Southeast Quarter of Section 32, Township 29 North, Range 10 WIM; warranty deed (reserving life estate). • Helen S. Jack to Kathryn Michelle White: the East Half of the North 60

acres of the Southeast Quarter of Section 32, Township 29 North, Range 10 WIM; warranty deed (reserving life estate). • Michael J. Werner to Timberlake Trussworks LLC: a tract of land as described containing 3.49 acres more or less in the South Half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 4, Township 24 North, Range 10 WIM; warranty deed. • Larry L. Brune to Larry L. Brune, Trustee of the Larry L. Brune Revocable Trust dated Dec. 19, 2012: the East Half of the Tract 2 and the West 54 feet of Tract 3, Bradley Suburban Addition, City of Cherokee; warranty deed. • Larry L. Brune to Larry L. Brune, Trustee of the Larry L. Brune Revocable Trust dated Dec. 19, 2012: the Southwest Quarter of Section 2, Township 26 North, Range 12 WIM; warranty deed. • Eldon R. Burlie and Sherill J. Burlie to Dawn M. McMurtrey: the North See Real

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Court

row: Failure to stop at stop sign ($211.50). Micheal Samuel Stone, 39, Aline: Transporting open container of beer ($316). Micheal Aaron Ramsey, 28, Rustberg, Va.: Improper backing ($211.50). Ronald Lee McDaneld, 41, Guymon: Failure to stop at stop sign ($211.50). Ronald Lee McDaneld, 41, Guymon: Transporting load without permit ($211.50). The following individuals received a citation for speeding: Kory Wade Hoffman, 29, Norman: 11-14 over ($226.50); Karen Sue Lewis, 36, Carmen: 1-10 over ($188.50); Michael Dean Hawley, 39, Cherokee: construction 16-20 over (state dismissed without fine or costs); Chance Lee Castonguay, 24, Kingfisher: 1-10 over ($188.50); Jacob Paul McElhaney, 29, Norman: 1-10 over ($188.50); Terry Lee Castonguay, 44, Kingfisher: 1-10 over ($188.50); Donnie L. Griffin, 39, Lovington, N.M.: 1-10 over ($188.50); Armin Martinez, 25, Woodward: 16-20 over ($241.50). The following individuals received a citation for failure to wear seatbelt ($20 fine): Cecelia Loretta Norman, 18, Oklahoma City; Daniel Wayne Wymore, 22, Hennessey; Andrew Jason Tiger Jr., 19, Oklahoma City; Ariel P. Cormier, 18, Enid; Chad Jason Lyons, 35, Kiowa, Kan.

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Alfalfa County Sheriff’s Log March 1, 2013 12:17 a.m. Truck in ditch 5 ½ miles west of four-way stop, another truck was across the highway trying to pull him out, could not pull it out, went to get a winch, advised winch truck will not get truck out, so it is going to remain until morning for wrecker, county is going to try tomorrow to get something to get it out. 4:43 a.m. Ex-husband showed up at her house wanting to see his son, asked him why he is here so early, said he was headed to work, he is parked behind her boyfriend’s pickup, he has been to prison for arson in Enid and Garber, deputy advised, report taken by phone. 6:59 a.m. Debris in roadway 1 mile south of Buds Salvage, a lot of tire debris on the highway, people are swerving to miss it, advised ODOT. 3:43 p.m. Reckless driver on Highway 8, subject driving black Chevy pickup, ran respondent off the road, subject headed to Carmen and is young, Alfalfa County Sheriff’s Office (ACSO) advised deputies. 4:38 p.m. Two pickups in roadway at intersection of highways 8 and 11, one was a construction truck, could not see anyone inside, the other pickup had a man sitting in it but didn’t know what had happened or if they needed assistance, deputy en route. 8:09 p.m. Possible fire east and south of Highway 8 at Buds Salvage, there was a glow in the sky, was wondering if there was a fire reported, no controlled burn was reported, could not see anything. 8:45 p.m. Disturbance at 700 block of Walnut, niece came at him with a knife, hit him in the mouth, broke a window and left, needed officer as soon as possible but not life threatening, deputy hollered for assistance in back room, helped to handcuff her and carry her to holding cell, they proceeded to take her boots and belt. March 2, 2013 7:57 a.m. Reckless driver south of Cherokee, red one-ton flatbed was all over the road, headed northbound, deputy advised and en route. 11:54 a.m. Locked keys in car in Carmen, wanted an officer to help, advised deputy. 7:28 p.m. Semi jack-knifed 2 miles east of McWillie on SH45, OHP advised their trooper was in Major Coun-

ty, asked if deputy could go check things out until he can get there, deputy advised and will be en route. March 4, 2013 12:32 p.m. Stuck 1 mile south of Highway 64 on CR 590, on a dirt road, deputy advised man is unstuck. 3:25 p.m. Truck jack-knifed on Highway 11 and Burlington blacktop, deputy advised they had a track hoe there trying to get the truck out, truck off roadway. 3:33 p.m. City truck did not yield at junction of highways 11 and 58, respondent was doing 65 mph and a county truck did not yield, she had to slam on her breaks to keep from hitting him, were other cars coming so couldn’t go around, deputy advised to call county commissioner. 3:35 p.m. Truck in roadway 2 miles east of Burlington, rock truck in road with no one in it, deputy checking it out to see what was going on. 10:35 p.m. Blown tire 5 miles east of four-way stop, had a blow out but was okay, needed someone to call his mother in Alva and have her come get him or call someone to fix the flat, advised him his mother or Triple A was coming, advised OHP. March 5, 2013 10:17 a.m. Traffic jam west on Fifth, Woods County advised of 15 to 18 gravel trucks sitting in the middle of the road causing traffic problems, deputy advised one truck was stuck, traffic flowing now. 2:31 p.m. Missing cattle from Helena, has had 37 head missing since the storm, mostly black, 800-pound steers with blue ear tag right ear, advised several deputies. 3:10 p.m. Wasted man in her yard tearing things up in Carmen, he is trying to get into her house, ran him off, deputy advised and en route, prisoner in custody one white male. 3:50 p.m. Cattle out at 720 and McClain, advised possible owner, could not find any cattle at that location. March 6, 2013 9:50 a.m. Accident at CR 550 and Ellis, the man is walking out to Lambert blacktop, request an officer meet him, he hit a pole, will need report, deputy advised he has been picked up by someone, will meet officer on blacktop. 11:50 a.m. Someone shooting BBs at the Jiffy Trip in Jet, someone across

the highway shooting, there are people there, deputy advised and en route. March 7, 2013 6:04 a.m. Speeding trucks on Highway 11 eastbound, two white Dodge four-wheel drive pickups, one did not have headlights on but they both were running with flashers on, advised Grant County and OHP. 7:46 a.m. Request check by RR tracks in Goltry, there is a red and black generator in the ditch on the south side of the tracks, deputy advised and en route, checked around, unable to locate. 11:39 a.m. Bull out on Highway 58 and Bryan, advised possible owner, bull back in. 12:43 p.m. Injury accident 3 miles north of Highway 11 on Highway 8 south of Kansas line, paged Burlington F&R, Barber County and other deputies advised, ambulance is already on scene, road is not blocked, notify DOT of bridge damage. 1:59 p.m. Suspicious vehicle east of Jet, a camper he has never seen is on the dirt road east of Jet driving around, deputy advised and en route, unable to find vehicle. 2:36 p.m. Keys locked in car at post office, deputy advised and en route. 3:51 p.m. Need officer to 300 block of S. Sixth in Carmen, need to report items stolen from two vehicles at their house, deputy advised and en route, checked Woods County on individual, advised the party is in Alva. 5:20 p.m. Electric line down at 8 and 45 junction to McWillie, electric line is lying in between two poles, line is not on highway, lying on ground, advised AEC. March 8, 2013 7:50 a.m. Suspicious camper parked on Highway 58 on west side of road 2 ½ miles north of Ringwood, advised Major County. 3:35 p.m. Gates down at Salt Plains Crystal Dig, black iron gates were torn down, was advised to call refuge, refuge said they would send someone out there. 7:42 p.m. Fire east of Driftwood right before the bridge, was a controlled burn but the wind changed direction and the fire split, worried that embers will set fire to tank that had gas coming out of it, A&B advised they have a See Sheriff Page 56


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March 13, 2013

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Barber County Sheriff’s Log 03-04-13 Kiowa Ambulance transported patient from Fifth Street to Kiowa Hospital. 03-04-13 Shiloh Brown, Mooreland, Okla., driving a 2012 Dodge truck, overturned a trailer on the Gyp Hill Road about 8 ½ miles south of U160. Over $1,000 damage, no injury, accident investigated by Deputy English. 03-05-13 Medicine Lodge Ambulance transported patient from Fremont Street to Medicine Lodge Hospital. 03-05-13 Kiowa Ambulance transported patient from Robinson Street to Kiowa Hospital. 03-06-13 Kiowa Ambulance transported patient from Fourth Street to Anthony Hospital.

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03-06-13 Medicine Lodge Ambulance transported patient from Second Street to Medicine Lodge Hospital. 03-07-13 Harold Flores Jr, Oklahoma City, Okla., driving a 1998 Peterbilt, overturned at the west junction of U160 and U281. Over $1,000 damage, unknown injuries to driver, accident worked by Sheriff Rugg and MLPD Officer Small, assisted by Medicine Lodge Rural Rescue Squad and Medicine Lodge Ambulance. 03-07-13 Kiowa Ambulance assisted Alfalfa County Officers at an injury south of Kiowa. 03-08-13 Kiowa Ambulance transferred patient from Kiowa Manor to Kiowa Hospital and back.

During the week officers received two reports of cattle out; six reports of goats out; performed 19 Public Assists; and assisted seven other agencies. Arrests 03-04-13 Arthur L. Webb, Midwest City, Okla., W/M, 22. Arrest by BASO. Charge: Agg Indecent Solicitation of a Child two Counts. 03-06-13 Robert W. Horn, Wichita, W/M, 25. Arrest by BASO. Charge: Failure to Appear. Released 03-06-13 on $1,500 Surety Bond. 03-09-13 Johnny C. Briseno, Protection, W/M, 42. Arrest by MLPD. Charge: Criminal Damage to Property. Released 03-10-13 on $1,000 Surety Bond.

Sheriff

brush rig out there, everything was now receiving well. March 9, 2013 7:33 a.m. Power out in home east of Cleo Springs, neighbours’ went out too but theirs came back on, his didn’t, AEC advised they already had a technician headed out there to check it out. 7:40 a.m. Keys locked in truck at Carmen Jiffy Trip at the gas pump, wanted to know if a deputy could come unlock him, deputy advised and en route. 8:10 a.m. Possible fire in Burlington, respondent’s friend called her saying her chimney is on fire, wanted the fire department to come check it for her, paged out Burlington Fire Department. 9:56 a.m. Someone stole his bike from 600 block of N. Fifth in Carmen, black with chrome fenders, deputy

would be out there shortly to take a report. 3:40 p.m. Keys locked in pickup at Lariat Yard behind Chap Apts, advised deputy. 6:28 p.m. Disturbance in Aline, respondent called to report woman living with her brother, she gets violent while intoxicated, she punched him last night in the chest, she is not there tonight but is afraid she will return, advised her to call ACSO if she did return. 10:45 p.m. Lost friend in Carmen, her friend was in a black Chevy blazer, had been pulled over north of Carmen, she was confused, she had been given a ticket and been asked to have someone come pick her up, her phone was dead and could not find her. 11:06 p.m. Trailer on the road on Highway 8 1 mile south of McWillie

turnoff, big flat-bed trailer on the white line, he almost hit it, wanted to know if someone could get some reflectors so no one hits it or call owner, deputy advised and is going to check it out. March 10, 2013 5:00 a.m. Accident in Byron, a guy rolled his semi around the curve from the country store, he is complaining of his head hurting, advised CPD, A&B FD, OHP and Med, deputy en route, need to shut the curve down and do traffic control, need another officer to help, contacted ODOT about oil leaking from the trailer and to get clean up started, Med enroute to Bass code 3. 3:22 p.m. Stop sign down in Byron at the corner of 58 at the curve, advised ODOT. 6:06 p.m. Cattle out at 64 and 58 junction west of construction, advised possible owner, no cattle found. 9:34 p.m. Civil in Aline, respondent was notified by CPS to move out of current residence, the other residents of the home are not allowing her to get her belongings, asked for deputy to assist her, it is taken care of for this evening. 11:35 p.m. Civil in Aline, individual has the pickup keys and won’t give them to her, she is having the pickup towed in the morning, has to have the keys to it, deputy advised respondent got the keys, everything is good.


March 13, 2013

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Specialty Sandwiches & Soup

Animals and Pets

For Sale

Must Sell

‘11 Mobile Suite 36 ft. A true four seasons trailer. This is a hard Gentle, broke horses. Great loaded unit. Stack Washer/Dryer, 4-H or family project! Teaches 40 inch flat panel TV, 4 slides, 16 discipline and responsibility. ply tires. 316-207-6708 Priced to move immediately. Phone 620-296-4449 For Sale Total Package Bull Sale

‘11 Ford F150 XLT Crewcab. Eco Boost. 56,000 miles. Asking Registered Angus Bulls. March $26,500 or call with a good offer. 25, 2013 at 1pm. Selling 80 580-307-5244 call or text Fall Bulls and 60 Spring Bulls. Freedom, OK. Ky Luddington For Sale 580-327-7127. Konnie 620-239‘90 Chevrolet 2500 HD PU 350/ 4185 or 620-886-2081 (cell) Auto, loaded, Tow Package, good For Sale work truck $2500. Alva 316-8330606 Angus Bulls. David Scherich. Call 580-327-3109 or 580-307For Sale 4596 ‘94 Playmor TT 29.5 ft Bumper Free to Good Home Pull, new tires, good cond $4500. Alva 316-833-0606 4 month Aussie F puppy. 580748-0309 Lonely Cars Lost Dog

My junkers want some new friends. Make my cars and your Australian Shepherd, no collar, pocket book both happy. Sell us tan & white. Last seen with 2 your car, truck, tractors, misc other dogs (F) with collars, N of metals. 1208 Fair St. Alva. 580Waynoka. 405-826-0215 327-1313 Automotive Business Services For Sale For Your Const Needs ‘08 Ford Explorer, 67K miles, From A-Z, New Construction, one owner. 580-430-1414. Roofing, Additions, Remodeling, For Sale Siding, Windows, Int/Ext, Painting, All Work Guaranteed. ‘97 WW 6x16 Covered Stock Improve the value of your home. Trailer, good cond $2500. Alva Call 580-732-1028 316-833-0606

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Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Crooked Oak

Guns-Buy-Sell-Trade

Bed & Breakfast, Your Home Glen’s Gun Shop. New in stockAway From Home. 580-430- Savage. 243, 22-250, 7mm 6052 Mag, 17 HMR Ruger-10/22 blue Tauras-380, .45 Stoeger Clean & Tidy .40, 2 1911 .22, AR-15 & M-1. Cleaning Services. Residential, Remington R15. Rueger 10/22 Commercial & Oilfield. Call Stainless Steel SS Take Down. 620-562-0622 Salvage 10 with 308.Winchester 70 22/250. 580-430-5400 AJP Drain Cleaning Tree Service Sewer Cleanouts, Unclog Drains, etc. Free Estimates. 580-748- Tree Trimming, Removal, Stump 2090 Grinding. Have Bucket Truck, Skid Steer & Stump Grinder. Quilt Retreat Pesky trees due to drought, limbs March 22, 23, 24. Cherokee over house, etc, give us a call. Fairgrounds Exhibit Building. Work Guaranteed. Customer $90 for 3 days, meals included, Satisfaction is our goal. No job stay overnight $110. For details too big or small. Free Estimates. call Vicki Logsdon 580-327- Contact Terry at 580-922-0165 0906, vicki_logsdon@hotmail. Winter Heating Bills com or Roberta Davis 580-8523819 Your winter heating expenses could be as low as the temperature CC Construction outside. WFM Total Construction, Interior-Exterior improvements. LLC. 580-327-7935. www. Room additions. Plaster Repair wfmtotalconstruction.com & Painting. Handicap. Structural Professional Upholstery & Non Structural Concrete. Will also accommodate Farm & will all types of furniture. Over Ranch. 580-307-4598 or 620- 55 years experience. Goltry, OK. 580-496-2351 825-4285 No!!!!

Conceal Carry

Busy B is NOT going out of business (but we are looking for an available building so that we can continue to provide you with name brand clothing at awesome prices!) Busy B 524 Flynn

Conceal or Unconceal your choice one day class in Cherokee, OK Sat Mar 16. Call for Registration 580-541-7425

Spring Forward Time to get your Sewing Machine or Serger serviced. For Spring Sewing, Fast Turn-a-Round call today for your appointment. Alva Sewing Center. 415 Barnes Street. 580-327-3312

Massages by Vanna Schedule your therapeutic massage & foot detox appt.today at The Heatwave! Couples/Friend detox $40 ($20 savings) Come detox and relax together! Students receive $15 off massages. Like us on Facebook. Massages by Vanna 580-727-5209

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March 13, 2013

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Depot Bar & Grill

Tiny Blessings Daycare

Wed Lunch Special-Roast Beef, Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Creamy Brussels Sprouts, Strawberry Cake. Thur-Southwest Enchiladas, Rice, Refried Beans, Apple Pie. Fri-Chicken Fried Steak, Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Corn Roll, Chocolate Cake. Full Menu Every Day. Carry-Out avail. 580-327-2212

in Kiowa, KS is taking applications for Full-Time or Part-Time Childcare Providers. Ability to pass background check required. Call 620-213-9011 Now Taking Applications

All clothing & shoes are 50-75% off Wed. & Thurs. this week from 10a-5p and a Sack Sale Fri. and Sat. 10a-5p. Only at Busy B! 524 Flynn.

Vantage Plane Plastics would like to hire dependable, selfmotivated individuals for our production department. Benefits: paid holidays, vacation & sick time, life, medical, dental & vision insurance, flex plan, 401K & ESOP. Come by and pick up an application at 3161 College Blvd. Alva. South end of the Airport

Need New Sidewalks?

Beadles Nursing Home

Driveway perhaps, we do all types of concrete work. Stamp and Colors also avail. Give us a call for estimates. 580-732-1028

Taking applications for housekeeping/laundry and dietary. Print off app at beadlesnursinghome.com or pick up in person at 916 Noble. EOE

Best Sale Ever!

Bob’s Repairs

Help Needed! at 310 1/2 College can be reached at 580-748-3548. New Tillers The Honeywheat Cafe in and Chainsaws for Sale. Also Waynoka, OK is looking for used Lawnmowers for sale kitchen help - experience is preferred. Also need waiter/ Premium Firewood Avail waitress. Call 580-430-9122. Black Jack & White Oak. Also Coming to Alva! quality Firewood Racks. Will stack & deliver. 580-922-1256 NAPA Auto Parts Store - looking for a full time counter person. New Releases Call 580-256-3355. New on Blu-Ray and DVD this Help Wanted week at Rialto Video, “Life of Pi” “Hitchcock” and “Rise of the Dozer/Grader Operator. Must have CDL and pass Drug Test. Guardians” $18 per hour. 405-742-2795 Employment Help Wanted Help Wanted Family Farming & Cattle Share Medical Center seeks a Operation near Alva, need part-time surgery tech and partmechanical skills, good driving time/PRN physical therapy tech record, home & utilities paid. at the hospital. Please call 580580-829-2543 430-3390

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Help Wanted

Final Sale Days

Looking to Lease

Depot Bar & Grill. Night Bartender & Lunch Waitress. Pick-Up application at 3 N college. 580-327-7011

Sewing Notions, Elegant Dining Glassware, Easter Decor, Pottery/China. Lots of Estate items left. 1525 Murray Dr. Fri & Sat 8am-2pm

Private & Professional person looking to lease 500 to 1000 acres for Deer Hunting for 5 years. This is not an outfitter. Please call 772-221-8500 or Fax info 772-2218502

Help Wanted Looking for CDL Driver in Alva area. 501-499-3338 Farm Supplies Double ‘C’ Welding and Fencing. Call 580-541-3148 or 580-871-2364 Garage Sales Lutheran Rummage Sale Thurs and Fri 12pm-4pm and Sat 10am2pm.Everything new! 212 Maple. Garage Sale Front of TJ’s Grill, 221 N Main, Carmen. Fri afternoon till Sunday afternoon Moving Sale 804 S Kansas in Cherokee. Fri & Sat 8:30am-4:30pm. Glassware, American Fostoria, Sofa, Recliner, Beds, Dressers, Desk, Haywood Wakefield Table & Chairs, Antique Furniture, Large Rugs, Books, Jewelry, Dolls, Tools, Safe & much more. Sale by Jan’s Collectibles. 580-829-3062

MURROW

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION

580-327-1998

www.murrowlandandhome.com www.murrowrealestateandauction.com

Miscellaneous Spring Break Matinees Starting Friday we will run Matinees everyday at 1:30 on “Oz the Great and Powerful” and “Jack the Giant Slayer.” Both in 3D at the Rialto Got Pallets We will pick up empty Pallets, any shape, size and condition. Call Tony 580-5966119 For Sale Wrought iron patio table, 6 chair $150. Cherry wood coffee table $30. Heavy iron bbq grill $60. Call 903-408-7540. Real Estate For Rent 1 bdrm Apt. $600/Month. All Bills Paid. 580-430-6052 For Rent New & Replacement Carports, Portable Buildings rental & sales. 580-430-6052

For Rent Small 2bdrm Trailer. No pets. 580-4306807 For Sale Beautiful 2-3 Bedroom Custom Built 2126 Sqft home located on 10 acres SE of Waynoka. By owner 580-430-1972 For Sale 110 Barnes $95,000. 515 Park $49,500. 606 E Barnes $96,000. 230 Santa Fe $55,000. UC/Kohlrus Real Estate. 580327-4007. www.kohlrus.com For Rent 2 bdrm, 1 bth, furnished. bills paid except for Cable & Internet. 580-732-0014


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March 13, 2013

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Community Calendar Wednesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Show and Tell for Seniors will be held at 12:30 p.m. Senior Citizens are encouraged to show and share information about hobbies and interests. Noon Alva Kiwanis Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 1-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Alva Moose Lodge men’s meeting is held every Wednesday. Thursday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is

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open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Noon Alva Rotary Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 1-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 3-6 p.m. Food distribution every Thursday, Alva Wesleyan Food Bank, 818 Lane St. 8 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous will meet at 1027 8th (Wesley House) in Alva every Monday and Thursday. Friday 8 a.m. Alva Community Coffee and Legislative Update will be held at Merle Norman. 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is

open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Amanda Schroeder from the Cherokee Strip Museum will speak. 11:30 a.m. Legislative Update with Sen. Patrick Anderson and Rep. Jeff Hickman will be held at James Crabtree Correctional Center in Helena. Bring your brown bag lunch. Everyone welcome. 1-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 6:30 p.m. Singles Night with a covered dish dinner will be held at the Woods County Senior Citizens Center, Alva. 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets every Friday at the Senior Citizen Center, 122 1/2 E. Second, Cherokee.

Real Estate

Half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 15, Township 26 North, Range 1 WIM, as described; quit claim deed. • Clifford W. Richter, Trustee of the Clifford W. Richter 1998 Revocable Trust dated June 3, 1998, to C. William Richter: (1) Lots 3, 4 and 5 and the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 6, Township 25 North, Range 10 WIM, also described as the Northwest Quarter of Section 6, Township 25 North, Range 10 WIM; (2) Lots 6 and 7 and the East Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 6, Township 25 North, Range 10 WIM, also described as the Southwest Quarter of

Section 6, Township 25 North, Range 10 WIM; trustee’s deed. • Doy Collins and Velma Collins to Jack R. Crissup: a tract of land in the West Half of the Northwest Quarter of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 9 WIM; warranty deed. • Bruce Adams and Sherri Adams to Curtis Newlin and Jennifer Newlin: the East Half of the Southwest Quarter, and the West Half of the Southeast Quarter, all in Section 9, Township 27 North, Range 11 WIM; warranty deed. • Blake Adams and Patricia Adams to Curtis Newlin and Jennifer Newlin: the East Half of the Southwest Quarter,

and the West Half of the Southeast Quarter, all in Section 9, Township 27 North, Range 11 WIM; warranty deed. • Lisa Adams to Curtis Newlin and Jennifer Newlin: the East Half of the Southwest Quarter, and the West Half of the Southeast Quarter, all in Section 9, Township 27 North, Range 11 WIM; warranty deed. Mortgages • Curtis John Newlin and Jennifer D. Newlin to High Plains Bank (Alva): the East Half of the Southwest Quarter, and the West Half of the Southeast Quarter, all in Section 9, Township 27 North, Range 11 WIM; $138,000.


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Three camera video of the NWOSU China Concert available at the newspaper office.

$20.00

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram (580) 327-1686

We usually can recover erased photos. No Image Found

If your camera says this . . .

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Typically 25 cents per image with minimum charge of $20.00. Recovered images are written to CD. We need the card soon after the loss.

Lynn Martin Photography 618 Barnes Ave. - Alva, OK 73717 - 580-327-1686 or lynn@lynnmartin.net



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