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SEREHPS loohcswen n g i s e d l a u n n a

published published by:by: newschool newschool ofof architecture architecture + design + design 1249 1249 f street, f street, san san diego, diego, california california 92101 92101 copyright copyright newschool newschool ofof architecture architecture + design + design 2013 2013


volume 1

SPHERES is NewSchool’s first Design Annual, a collection of selected student work from all levels and various programs completed in 2011 and 2012.


SPHERES newschool of architecture + design


table of contents

SPHERES...

three-dimensional bodies differing in scale and composition pulling at each other maintaining systemic balance a deus ex machina diverse, interdependent, harmonious, dynamic, rhythmic, synchronous and vicissitudinal


selected design work 2011 - 2012

message from the editor graduate architecture

1 - 109

international studios

110 - 133

undergraduate architecture

134 - 227

design village

228 - 239

digital media arts

240 - 265

multi-media

266 - 275

about newschool

276 - 277


kurt hunker editor


As I write these comments, I have transitioned to a new role at NewSchool after almost 15 months as Acting Provost. The work you see in this book was accomplished during those 15 months, and I am proud of the students and faculty who did it and proud to be associated with it. 2011-12 marked the most successful school year our students have ever had in design competitions. Among the winners were teams competing in the Cal Poly Design Village competition, the US Steel program and the International Mock Firm contest (first place and two out of five finalists). One of our graduate students, Erin Costino, was named the AIA’s Academy of Architecture for Justice Research Scholar for 2012. Our faculty also excelled. Several were involved in exhibitions and conferences. We had design award winners as well. Our Construction Management Program Chair, Dr. Linda Thomas-Mobley, was named “Educator of the Year” by the National Association of Women in Construction. And our alumni made their mark, too. In what may be a first for any US school of architecture and design, NewSchool alums were voted AIA “Young Architect of the Year” at the local level (Ben White, Class of 2001, San Diego Chapter), state level (Bruce Fallon, Class of 2000, AIA Utah) and the national level (Dr. Shari Grant, Class of 1999)—all in the same year, 2012. NewSchool is refining its identity and defining its future through four “Institutional Pillars.” They are: • Preparation for Practice – as we have since the beginning, we educate students to contribute successfully and creatively to the world of practice. • International Reach – NewSchool is committed to making available to every student a significant study-abroad opportunity as part of his or her degree program, and to bringing a healthy cohort of foreign students to San Diego to study with us. • Sustainability as a Core Principle – all of our course work is situated within a broader context of environmental awareness. • Urban Engagement – NewSchool has provided community outreach through its 30-year old Design Clinic and its urban studios. As we continue to strengthen these pillars, and engage the design disciplines in the dynamic and changeable nature of contemporary practice, we will introduce new programs, seek new relationships and seize new opportunities. This book is full of good things; there are lots more yet to come. Kurt C. Hunker, FAIA, NCARB Director of Graduate Programs May, 2012


master of architecture program level coordinators adam grove don mirkovich chuck crawford


vuslat demircay graduate architecture program chair


Architectural education is a unique process all its own with implications in a range of related disciplines from engineering to philosophy. Our M.Arch program curriculum equips graduate students with knowledge of theoretical, social, technical, economic, geographic and professional contexts of architecture; contemporary social and environmental awareness on a global scale; theoretical conceptualizations of design decisions and skill in hands-on operational design strategies. Our graduates are expected to possess a critical position on current paradigms, issues, values and themes of present day architectural debates and the ability to generate new knowledge to make a direct contribution to the profession. Each studio is one of the keystones of our graduate curriculum and every single project in each studio is a valuable contribution to the graduate program that is constantly nurturing the design culture at NewSchool and the greater architectural community. In the following pages you will find a selected collection of studio work created by the students of the Graduate Architecture program in the academic years 2011 and 2012. As a selection, it does not promote an architectural approach and methodology but shows a diversity of approaches to design that addresses complex and engaging projects. The collection of explored concepts, ideas, bold experimentations, inspirations, and creative solutions address some of the most important challenges confronting society. The act of learning through design has been achievable only by the guidance and mentoring of our passionate graduate faculty. Adam Grove, Don Mirkovich, and Chuck Crawford have led the faculty who began in the fall of 2011 to weave their teaching around our mission, to leverage student creativity, imagination, and knowledge in their journey towards inventing the future through investigating the past and present. Vuslat Demircay, Ph.D. Acting Architecture Graduate Program Chair, 2011-2012

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graduate AR700 studios studio faculty adam grove adriana cuellar richard molina

Establishing architecture as a discipline, not solely a professional endeavor, is the fundamental platform of the first year graduate curriculum at the NewSchool of Architecture + Design. Considering architecture in this manner requires faculty to cross-pollinate architectural teachings with outside sources. These sources may touch on current events, scholarly research, industrial methods of both global and regional significance; based on this rationale the education becomes immersive and tightly bound with substantive matters both in and outside the immediate practice of architecture. Furthermore, a strong emphasis is placed on making, and the cognitive dimension of this act. Students engage many modes of drawing and modeling, digital and analog, conscious of feedback between these processes while simultaneously understanding these are tools for deciphering and enhancing their ideas. Students are strongly encouraged to engage their existing frames of reference to enhance individual methods and intuition; concurrently, faculty set conditions for students to access, acquire and capitalize on new knowledge. Through a combination of interdisciplinary inquiry, making, historical exposure and intuitive engagement an underlying territory is formed for students to develop academically and professionally. Adam Grove, Level Coordinator


trenton szakall


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

AR701 studio The focus of this introductory studio, Fundamentals of Design and Representation I, is on the process of design, and the visual, graphic, and verbal literacy required for communicating ideas. This course introduces the tools, skills, and principles of design through the application of a basic "thinking through making" methodology that intimately connects craft and form-making to the processes of critical thinking and representation. Design exercises deal with the translation from conceptual and critical approaches to the processes of formation and their subsequent critical representation. The course is complemented by the development of fundamental orthographic representation and visualization techniques. Theoretical, practical, and philosophical issues pertinent to the design process and its consequences are discussed in class, and are essential to the development of the work. The studio engages a range of materials and focuses on making through assembly, casting and drawing. The connection between space in a model and space in a drawing is tightly bound. Emphasis is also given to using the appropriate tool for the task at hand. This course breaks notions of the "precious object" as students will have to systematically graft or dismember the models and drawings they are working with. At the close of the quarter they are equipped with the fundamental tools for testing and evaluating a broad range of formal and spatial conditions, while also being able to explore and capitalize on potentials and anomalies in their work. 1. scott hook 2. sara pittenger 3. tyler hamil 4. trenton szakall

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AR702 studio This studio continues the logic introduced in Fundamentals of Design and Representation I, and expands the application of the “thinking through making� methodology. The programmatic focus of this second quarter is the study and design of a unit of occupation. The site becomes the source of all conceptual, functional, programmatic and formal relationships. The course progresses through the development of fundamental and specific two and three-dimensional representation and visualization techniques. In this studio, graphic and modeling techniques become more specifically centered on standards of architectural representation.

alex gilmore


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

alex gilmore

6 7


christine do


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

Students are introduced to ideas of internal logics vs. external logics of organization vis-a-vis bottom-up and top-down approaches to design. The studio engages ordering systems, recognizing architecture's preoccupation, through the last several centuries, with a priori knowledge and topdown understanding of order in terms of space and structure. While the studio will acknowledge the merits of top-down organization systems it also emphasizes the place of emergent systems in contemporary global culture as strategies for bottom-up approaches to design, privileging the emergence of unforeseen orders. Students will be asked to understand the limits of top-down and bottom-up approaches simultaneously developing a rationale to justify the limits of these systems and an understanding of where the feedback between the two approaches is productive. The layered nature of exchange between these poles will lend itself to the analysis of self-organizing systems exposing formal and spatial possibilities through emergent patterns.

christine do

8 9


scott hook


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

scott hook

10 11


Section D : water fall 1/4”=1’

tanya estrela


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

tanya estrela

12 13


AR703 studio This studio, third part in the first year sequence, continues and expands the process of inquiry into the issues of siting and tectonics. The term’s focus is on the study of the relationship among land, landscape, and architecture, with a strong ritual and experience-oriented program. A heightened level of programmatic complexity is introduce combined with an analytical phase of phenomenological vocation to generate an architecture based on site-specific tectonics and ambiance. Architectural representation is advanced by the introduction of digital imaging tools that are combined with expanded manual techniques. This produces complex representational systems appropriate to the level of analysis. The resulting architectural design stresses the relationships of meaning between an architecture of conceptual and programmatic complexity and the specific conditions of its site.

jackie mcdowell


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

jackie mcdowell

14 15


kate hamby


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

kate hamby

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AR704 studio This studio, the fourth and final part of the first year sequence, directs its focus and inquires towards the city, utilizing as programmatic vehicle and methodological backbone the design of an urban project of cultural significance. Exercises dwell on the study of the formant forces of architecture in relation to program, tectonics, and to the larger context of the urban realm and its infrastructure, materialized through techniques that use emergent form generation, field conditions and system analysis. A compressed level of programmatic complexity is followed, combined with a continuous dialogue between conceptual abstractions, representational techniques and reality-based analysis. Representational techniques are advanced by the further introduction of hybrid manual/digital tools used as the basis of an analytical process for the generation of form and relationships.

kate hamby


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

kate hamby

18 19


The summer studio, is the second of a two-studio sequence in which students continue to develop the prior quarter's Tijuana or Buenos Aires project. At the close of this quarter students will be expected to have a highly developed project consisting of but not limited to a strong understanding of program, the sequence of archi-tectonic elements as they provide for a strong interrelationship between, program/spatial volume/spatial sequence/circulation, provisional integration of a structural system, development of a skin system, introduction to ADA, and highly developed graphic material in the form of drawings/ models/renderings/to effectively communicate one’s own understanding of their project. Through the use of typological case studies and broad interrogation of political, economic, cultural and ecologic concerns reflected in the formation of the city students will be able to develop a set of tools used as a tactical aid for developing a critical position on the city. This critical position will launch the work of programmatic and formal resolution for the designated project.

kirstin berquist


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

kirstin berquist

20 21


quinn mccarron


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

tijuana, the city without memory: reconstructing the cultural landscape quinn mccarron The urban landscape of Tijuana manifests at a glance the overall challenges of Latin American traditions and processes revolving around international trade, contrasting ideologies of conservative thinking vis-à-vis the strong desires for progress and modernization. This city confronts an extremely unique infrastructural, geographic, demographic and environmental challenge. As Tijuana makes visible the transactions of international exchanges, a series of non-conventionalities become uncovered through cultures of illegality, violence, drug cartels and informality. Paired to this image of the city, emergent counter-cultures have been appearing at different times; from music, architectural ruins, cinema, to food and play. Counter-cultures compensate for the absence of some academic and cultural institutions, expanding an artistic practice beyond traditional establishments, an urban practice that redefines and questions the challenges and opportunities of Tijuana’s paradoxical fabric. With the recent move of the cartels to the south, Tijuana is recovering from a previous renaissance of artist and young professionals embracing this young city and its idiosyncrasies for re-inventing itself. While this potential for reinvention is often exploited by wealthy entrepreneurs, the city has been going through a period of demolition of important buildings, favoring new economies over its physical memory. Parallel with the study of Buenos Aires, this studio researches and develops a critical position towards Tijuana within the context of Latin America, and particularly focuses on the studies of emergent arts, culture, politics and economies palpable to this region. Similarly, we look at Mexican cinema and address the disparities of cultures defined by the border. We construct a kaleidoscopic lens of Tijuana, which becomes the material to speculate and strategically intervene in the current transformation–or erasure processes–or a city without memory.

quinn mccarron

22 23


situation + thrust, buenos aires sara pittenger With the discovery of vast oil deposits in the waters among the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) and in neighboring Argentine waters, Argentina stands to confront a form of wealth not yet understood in its history. What will

this mean for a nation of roughly 36 million and Buenos Aires, where roughly one-third of the country's population resides? How may the physical manifestation of the city shift as it did from colonial plan to an adaptation of Haussmann’s principles in Paris during the 19th century? It shifts again relative to the presence of localized clean water infrastructure and later acts as a canvas support-

ing substantial infill during the tumultuous years of the mid- 20th century. Buenos Aires, now ten years removed from a series of coups lasting nearly two decades, has stabilized under the current leadership, and has begun to mend. The economy has stabilized, and cultural dimensions once


graduate architecture | AR700 design studio

again flourish – film in particular. Using the rich cinematic history of Buenos Aires as a point of departure we explore the relationship of how Haussmann’s urban plan and logic is systematically compromised by political and spatial dimensions of Argentine cinema. Argentine cinema regularly uses Haussmann’s plan as a set, however, revealing its less celebrated and more idiosyncratic

or seedy assets. How does this form of cultural production and indexing of urban space become material for addressing the urban transformation of Buenos Aires parallel to its newly discovered mineral wealth?

sara pittenger

24 25


graduate AR800 studios studio faculty don mirkovich daniela deutsch jeremy joyce mitra kanaani caitlin kelley megan willis

The Second Year Graduate Studio is structured around an innovative critical thinking process that encompasses a philosophical inquiry of architectural thought through an engaged faculty/student relationship. Components of the three-quarter studio course objectives are derived from the knowledge acquired from earlier completed coursework which is reinforced, expanded upon and applied within the Second Year Studio environment. Student-generated theoretical ideas and pragmatic challenges merge throughout the year beginning in the Fall, followed by Winter and synthesizing into a Spring quarter comprehensive building design outcome, satisfying an array of defined course objectives, illustrating the integration of site and building systems. In preparation for their thesis in the Third Year Graduate Studio, students are expected to develop, articulate, and incorporate their own personal understanding of architecture and its role in the greater societal and global dialogue. Assignments and projects are structured so that students research areas of interest and establish an architectural critical position, develop building programs and engage in both self-directed and collaborative opportunities in problem identification and problem-solving. Don Mirkovich, Level Coordinator


water life museum anthony j baker IV In "America’s Finest City", who can say where the best location is? Many would agree that the inner harbor of downtown San Diego provides the most fascination as it combines all the unique elements that make Southern California great. Positioned right on the Grape Street Pier, the Water Life Museum will expose natural surroundings to local residents and tourists alike in a unique display of oceanography. Connecting with life under water is something most people enjoy when provided the experience. The Water Life Museum contains observation points that are submerged throughout the site providing educational opportunities above and below sea level alike. Combining the research of local labs and facilities, the engagement of nearby communities will further promote water life awareness and hopefully help reduce future aquatic problems in the region and world.

anthony baker


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

28 29


anthony baker


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

anthony baker

anthony baker

30 31


museum of special interest daniel kwak & pedro tavares The main concept of the pier project is to minimize the interference of the public access to the pier and introduce an "event-inducing" design. Due to the special nature of the project site being above the water and on the pier, the design was approached with two main volumes to each side of the pier with a piercing gallery space running through the center. Circulation played an important role in the overall design. The main outdoor circulation through the top of the structure is to remain open while the place is closed down, so the public would have uninterrupted access through the pier. The design impact is minimized in terms of environmental intrusion. All levels are connected through the circulation paths from the existing pier both horizontally and vertically. The two main volumes are oriented at an angle according to the ideal position to the sun path. It is truly form-driven from the site analysis and hierarchical order of programs and functions. The center gallery space that punctures the two structures astride the pier allows natural ventilation and ambient natural lighting through the entire space without any direct sun striking the exhibition materials and objects.

daniel kwak & pedro tavares


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

32 33


ac-ca contemporary art museum competition, buenos aires david loewenstein & philip auchettl The building itself forms a freestanding sculpture in contrast to the buildings surrounding it. The galleries are held within a volume that reacts to a continuous shell. The museum is organized to demonstrate the combination of urban life and nature; much like the Puerto Madero River that is located in the thriving heart of Buenos Aires. As one walks through the plaza, he/she has a full unobstructed view of the Harbor with a fantastic feeling of openness and space while being protected by the canopy above. By capturing a part of the harbor and integrating it into the site, water is exhibited for the life that it is. The proposal not only looks at the museum as a building, but also creates a new addition of public space to expand the growing urban life of the harbor. This double-skinned shell encases the bathrooms as well as the circulation, including the elevators and the ramps that connect the different gallery spaces. The ramps are disconnected from the walls of the shell for the most part, creating bridges that highlight the vast openness on both sides; this allows one to view the levels of both above and below. Slits are then introduced into the shell, optimizing daylight, ventilation, framing views and access points. As one circulates, the slits begin to create previews of what is held within the galleries.

david loewenstein & philip auchettl


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

david loewenstein & philip auchettl

34 35


david loewenstein & philip auchettl


graduate graduatearchitecture architecture | AR800 design studio

david loewenstein & philip auchettl

36 37


shoreline academy lilian atunzu Shoreline Academy is a performing arts center that encompasses various genres of music. It is located in the heart of Coney Island, New York, the “playground of the World.” Coney Island remains a historical district and is considered by some to be the world’s greatest amusement area. In keeping with the preservation of the historical district, Shoreline Academy is a revamping of the existing Shoreline Theatre; the location is iconic. Shoreline Academy embraces the old architectural structure by exploring the spatial qualities through compression. The design of the exterior architecture was inspired by the subtle movements of a ballet dancer. The existing fabric of the Shore Theater creates an architectural edge to the Academy. The bending and folding of interior spaces celebrates the cavity of voided space. The quality of the interior and how it interacts with the people is what defines the architecture.

lilian atunzu


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

lilian atunzu

38 39


arianna brugh


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

dance academy: royal sweden ballet school arianna brugh Dance in Sweden is at a constant state of flux and regional interest in the art form is growing among audiences and cultures. The Royal Swedish Ballet is one of the oldest ballet companies in Europe. With the expansion of the Swedish Ballet Company, this project creates a Ballet Theater located on the Stockholm waterfront in the hub of culture and activity within the country’s capital. This site was chosen because it is at the dividing line between the historic architecture and the contemporary. The treatment of light was introduced through a careful placement of the glass elements with opaque transparent and translucent multi-layered glass panels of varying heights, intensities and thicknesses. The architecture is permeable, multifunctional, and light. The envelope, a glass facade, features suspended dance studios in order to see the dancer’s feet at any point from ground floor space with a palette of semi-translucent polycarbonate shades. The theater is a long span structure as the roof extends 140 feet. The open foyer looks up towards the hovering dance spaces as well as the performance space containing a three level floating amphitheater. arianna brugh

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grape street pier botanical abelardo gutierrez The driving force for the building’s design is the creation of a self-sustained environment that functions autonomously, the fabrication of a social gathering space designed for the collaboration of user and natural environment. The building functions as a museum with the qualities of a public park; indoor and outdoor spaces are merged together to form a continuous strip of gallery space. A flexible open plan scheme is achieved via a modular floor system that permits the rearrangement of space to suit any exhibition. The project was conceived as part of a master plan that reclaims Grape Street as a green belt that intersects downtown San Diego and connects Balboa Park with the proposed County Building Park. This new corridor would provide the city with valuable green space and park areas as well as a new place for commerce, leisure, and recreation. Connections to trolley and train lines are already located along the corridor; these would function as major transportation hubs linking Grape Street with the Gaslamp Quarter.

abelardo gutierrez


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

boston concert hall, boston chris tisdell The intent of the concert hall design is to heighten the visitor's awareness and understanding of music through architecture utilizing elements prevalent in the minimalist form of music: repetition (constant harmony) / pattern / balance / phase shifting / gradual transformation / additive / subtractive. The user can gradually experience the music from visualization and listening to warm-up sessions of live concert performances. An emphasis was placed, in the design process, on acoustical research into concert hall designs in order to provide the user with an enhanced musical experience. A perforated skin (perforation pattern based on minimalist music) along the southeast and southwest facing facades provides necessary shading during peak hours of sun exposure.

chris tisdell

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grape street pier philip auchettl This building is located on the Grape Street Pier in Little Italy; it receives plenty of natural light as well as the western breeze from the ocean. After an in-depth site analysis it was discovered that more than thirteen thou-

sand white sea bass were released from the pier adjacent to Grape Street. This operation was conducted as part of several Port environmental projects to preserve and enhance the bay and to contribute to the recovery of this native species. This important environmental issue served as inspiration for this museum and the site was dedicated to the rejuvenation of the San Diego

Bay. The museum has a minimal footprint on the water's surface and the existing pier was preserved with an extension of ponds on both sides, covering a total of 9872 square feet worth of cultivation. Plant and marine life will be grown and released with this process being open to the public as an educational experience.


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

philip auchettl

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The notion of a “thesis” project -- whether undergraduate or graduate – has been a subject of debate tracing back to at least my fifth year at Cal Poly, SLO, when, as I entered my final year, the title of my studio was changed from “thesis” to “final project.”

graduate AR900 studio thesis studio faculty chuck crawford howard blackson robin brisebois raul diáz kurt hunker mitra kanaani john linton gabriel morales-olivares jorge ozorno leslie ryan

In the sciences a “Masters Thesis” can indeed prove or disprove a proposition. In architecture, proof can only really come after construction and a period of occupancy. Therefore, we rely on building an argument of sufficient strength able to convince an audience of our peers that our line of reasoning is valid and our proposed solution has merit. To address this, NSAD has instituted the Design Research Project (DRP), allowing the student to pursue an independent line of architectural study in rigorous detail in which a typological choice is explored to advance the design discourse in relation to a perceived problem, critical position, theory, methodology, philosophic and/ or social position. The project is composed of one quarter of research followed by two quarters of studio. The DRP does not seek to invent new knowledge but rather to build upon existing knowledge. The first quarter involves research into the issue(s) framed via a non-studio course focusing on literature reviews, case studies, site selection and analysis, code and zoning analysis and programing and space adjacency studies, as appropriate. In the winter quarter studio a schematic design is developed with the spring studio serving as a period of design development and presentation documentation. In the DPR the student is expected to be self-directed, self-motivated and self-scheduled while faculty serve the roles of advisor and critic, not instructor. Chuck Crawford, Level Coordinator


ramona redefined cody osborne The County of San Diego town of Ramona (population 36,000) has been reconfiguring its decades-old zoning ordinance for the past two years. The Community Planning Group grew frustrated with the placeless suburban buildings being approved and built within their 100-year old historic Town Center. This studio was tasked with working with local citizens and the local context to redefine the architectural "character" of Ramona. The students undertook extensive context studies, explored existing conflicts and defined a process to propose options to the city. They vetted their design in community forums, culminating in a final presentation at the historic Ramona Town Hall. In the project shown here, Cody Osborne took on the issue of crossing a state highway (Main Street) to allow neighborhoods to access a new library in the Town Center. Taking cues from the public realm and utilizing his civil engineering and landscape architecture background, Cody defined an architectural language that expresses the character of Ramona. cody osborne


RAMONA

graduate architecture | AR900 thesis studio

cody osborne

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cody osborne


graduate architecture | AR900 thesis studio

cody osborne

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design for convertibility within the urban setting san diego, ca caitlin smith Our expectations for a building’s usefulness seem to have become less ambitious. As user needs change rapidly, buildings often outlive their intended use. Buildings that are purpose-built are more difficult to adapt, and are costly to renovate; conventional construction methods yield results that are too permanent. As we interpret future construction demands, constructability and flexibility, ease of disassembly and assembly, adaptability and convertibility, building elements become more important. Demolition and new construction is costly, time consuming, and often detrimental to the environment. Therefore, Design for Disassembly (DfD) provides greater efficiency, cutting waste and on-site construction time, and offering greater opportunities for adapting users’ needs over a period of time. Nowadays, buildings - like the neighborhoods they occupy - are expected to be adaptively reusable and adjustable to remain attractive, safe and useful. Buildings must be planned and constructed differently to adapt for changing functions, standards of use and modification. The aim of this project is to offer a potential design solution that demonstrates the benefits of using steel with bolted connections, integrating off-site fabrication techniques, and focusing on minimal alterations to the site using a convertible and transportable design strategy.

caitlin smith


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

caitlin smith

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To revitalize the space, the three typologies -- live/work, gallery, and performance -- are developed and broken into six separate components that are easily adaptable. These interventions evolve from a series of modular conceptualizations that facilitate the needs of the differing typologies through the materials and parameters that are imposed for urban infill while meeting the requirements for simple transportability.

caitlin smith


graduate architecture | AR800 design studio

caitlin smith

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the gap project norman gray There is a growing need for affordable housing and for the increased use of urban land currently in limbo. Increasing populations and decreasing wealth call for a more affective use of land and resources. The GAP (Growing Adaptable Pods) project aims to provide a solution for housing people at lower costs using removable housing for urban spaces. By putting livable units on unused or underused urban land, a place is provided for people to live near city centers while generating revenue for property owners. The units are designed to be stacked six units high in one day and can be as long as desired or appropriate for the site. The units can be removed in one day freeing up the property for the owner on short notice. The 300- square-feet units have all amenities for a comfortable place to live. They also come in double wide and double high 600-square-foot models. Units may be added or removed as required for programmatic or resident needs. These units are designed to fill urban voids both large and small. The GAP project allows people to live, work, and play near urban centers where one may access resources and facilities efficiently without the need for increasing infrastructure, commuter congestion, and wasting energy or time. These prefabricated unites will reduce construction time, material waste, and construction costs. Units will be able to be broken down and stored off site until needed or moved directly from one site to another. norman gray


graduate architecture | AR900 thesis studio

norman gray

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graduate architecture | AR900 thesis studio

b street pier redevelopment shaun lynch This thesis presents a study improving connectivity through Through this thesis, a program was developed to enhance adaptive reuses of private land into open public space. The the connectivity and public interaction with the commufocus of the study is on B Street Pier in the San Diego Bay. nity. Using methods of case studies, literature reviews and Port of San Diego meetings, a framework and process There is disconnection from the city and the bay. B Street were derived to establish the greatest means of connecPier is isolated and cut off from the community, and with tivity for the public. The development of a new maritime a declining cruise ship industry this space remains poorly museum, San Diego Symphony outdoor venue, commermaintained and underutilized. Through reprogramming cial/restaurant spaces, and a 9.4-acre public park will exand redevelopment, the pier becomes a place of commu- tend the urban fabric into the bay and establish this much nity gathering, enhancing public life. needed connection. The disconnect between the city and the bay began at the beginning of the 20th century, when urban developers favored smoke stacks and industry over public parks and gardens. Since then, the city has yet to reclaim what is rightfully ours, and zoning designations still favor industry over community. shaun lynch

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shaun lynch


graduate architecture | AR900 thesis studio

shaun lynch

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open architecture: a study in open collaboration paul taylor The term “open source” was introduced in the 1980’s to describe a non-linear, self-organizing, heterarchical model with the specific intent to engineer software in a new distributed way. Since its emergence on the public stage, this movement has revolutionized the private and commercial sectors of software and hardware development and networking, while providing affordable and easily

paul taylor

obtainable alternatives to designs developed using traditional, hierarchical, capitalist business models. The distributed model that the open source methodology provides allows for end-users of the product to contribute, modify, and in some cases (where licenses allow) redistribute the modified work. This methodology allows for many brains to work on a problem in parallel. Through the study of open design methodologies, research has evolved to focus on the open development of the oldest typology in architecture, housing. For thousands of years

prior to the 1920’s manufactured housing paradigm, knowledge about housing and construction methods was passed down from generation to generation intrinsically embedded within the cultures of civilizations. This project seeks to reconnect culture and housing typological development through open networks and the re-emerging "maker" culture of today. This connection happens by providing guidelines and tools to allow mass (bottom-up) customization in housing rather than mass (top-down) production.


graduate architecture | AR900 thesis studio

paul taylor

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paul taylor


graduate architecture | AR900 thesis studio

paul taylor

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rainforest regeneration: hold your ground matthew arrigo In an effort to expand the relationship between architecture and its environment, this study explores the possibility of a building to play an active role in the regeneration and maintenance of its site. This project aims to redirect the definition of sustainability in architecture away from hesitant sensitivity and towards active and informed engagement. By doing so, the proposed architecture will achieve a symbiotic relationship between building, site, and local inhabitants based on a mutual exchange of resources and benefit. Since the 1950’s, sixty percent of the Costa Rican rainforest has been cleared for cattle ranching. The resulting barren slopes speed the descent of rainwater, preventing it from permeating the soil, depleting the aquifers and promoting erosion, restarting the cycle. This has provided a spectrum of deleterious results including compromised infrastructure, decreased local agriculture, and a depletion of native species. The tourism industry has provided Costa Rica with nearly $2 billion per year due largely to the biodiversity found in its few federally protected rainforests. By utilizing this resource, a hotel to draw eco-tourists to the mountains outside of the national park will assist with the local economy as well as provide an infrastructure to begin reforestation. Due to the chronic erosion that plagues the surrounding lands, any architectural intervention must primarily address and respond with an appropriate understanding of implications and subsequent solutions. Every building relies on its surroundings; through appropriate design, a building can also give back.

matthew arrigo


graduate architecture | AR900 thesis studio

horton plaza bus rapid transit station and plaza steven schroeder San Diego must take a new look at mass transit possibilities and the immense benefits it can have on the region. The method of which the problem has been studied started with research of mass transit types on the national level then moved to study transit stations and how they can improve their immediate surroundings. This research led to a site at Horton Plaza Park, due to its central location in the “Gaslamp District�, its historical significance, and its proximity to proposed transit networks. From this study emerge several key principles: a thriving public space depends on people; people want to be where people are; people-watching possibilities, integrated seating, well defined and connected circulation, views, water and shade are what make a populated public plaza. Circulation, way-finding and information delivery emerge as key factors in design of the station. Urban public plaza space and transit stations may thus become drivers for positive change. steven schroeder

66 67


AR900 special topics studio: tall buildings studio faculty kurt hunker raul dIáz

This Tall Building Topic Studio was a graduate thirdyear advanced course option investigating the current state of the art of high-rise design. Working from concepts developed by Professor Hunker in his recent essay, “The Spectacle of the Technical” (republished in eVolo #4 as “The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered: Critical Events Since 9/11”), each student created a tall building design focused on one of four key themes: Extreme Iconography, Structural Daring, Materiality or Change and Adaptation. The project site, located two blocks from NewSchool in downtown San Diego, is currently occupied by the historic Main Post Office. Students were required to retain this WPA-Classical gem and creatively incorporate it into their proposals. This challenge and a supporting program of 400 units of marketrate housing were factors for an actual skyscraper planned for the site. (The project was later abandoned). Much interest was generated by the students’ responses. The San Diego Union-Tribune featured the studio and its high-rise projects in an article entitled, “Sky’s the Limit to Grad Students.” Kurt Hunker + Raul Diáz, Critics

It has been said that in order to house the great migration from the hinterlands to the cities, China must build 10,000 new skyscrapers in the next ten years.


master of architecture | AR903 special topics | tall building studio

10 | 11


post oscillation zachary alan smith Postal Oscillation takes its design cues from climate. The twisting form of the building, modeled in a wind tunnel built for the project, responds optimally to breezes. It captures and funnels prevailing offshore currents to its rooftop wind turbines. The helical turbines themselves become iconic markers for the 60-story tower. Structurally, a series of radiating concrete “fins� carry building loads through the shifting geometry of the overall form. zachary alan smith


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | tall buildings

zachary alan smith

70 71


dean sartain


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | tall buildings

curve tower dean sartain The 630-foot tall Curve Tower was conceived by rotating and extruding two typical propeller-shaped floor plates at a constant value of 2.5 degrees. As the building rises, its form weaves in and out of itself, bringing to mind two dancers in embrace. The dramatic verticality of the overall form is countered by the expression of each horizontal floor slab on the exterior skin. Dual service cores allow the building to separate completely into two distinct towers for much of its height.

dean sartain

72 73


dean sartain


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | tall buildings

dean sartain

74 75


adisak archwuth


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | tall buildings

P.O.R.T. adisak archwuth This design proposes a simple tower slab concept with twin cores, open at its middle to create a grand exterior communal space high above the surrounding streets. The carefully proportioned structure sits well back of the old post office’s main façade and defers to the historic building at the ground plane. Single and double-height living units are created within a consistent grid that orders the entire composition. adisak archwuth

76 77


san diego post office residential tower john lombardi The notion of the simple slab tower block is pushed to its conceptual limits in this proposal. Two massive vertical frames provide the armature onto which floors and units are constructed. Open space takes the form of large outdoor decks along the narrow edges of the slab and within its center. The core functions are distributed to service zones at the vertical frames.

john lombardi


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | tall buildings

john lombardi

78 79


post office residential tower (P.O.R.T.) ryan fleetwood This 70-story Post Office Residential Tower (P.O.R.T.) brings open space to high-rise living. Selected units have “back yards�, private green spaces that spiral up the exterior of the tower and give the project its distinctive appearance. Communal gardens at the 26th and 44th floors provide recreational space for all occupants. The building footprint has been carefully configured to nest comfortably within the rear area of the old post office.

ryan fleetwood


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | tall buildings

ryan fleetwood

80 81


torsion andrew sisson This proposal, named Torsion, rotates a rectilinear floor plate to create its distinctive external form. A radial elevator core cleverly provides service to every floor, despite the constant shift. Vertical structure is accommodated in steel columns formed to follow the building’s turns and anchored back to the center core. The ground floor plan creates a commercial center within the walls of the old post office’s distribution area.

andrew sisson


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | tall buildings

andrew sisson

82 83


tri-grid tower roberto bassi The Tri-Grid Tower employs a modular 3-D grid as a means of ordering its plan, section and elevation. A key challenge to the proposal lies in the creation of three-towerswithin-one, with all the ramification such a move has for core functions and circulation. The resulting structure offers desirable views for all occupants. A large cantilevered “skypark” provides green space, pool and jogging track—200 feet above the street.

roberto bassi


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | tall buildings

roberto bassi

84 85


tony hawk’s two-faced tower trevor satrom Tony Hawk’s Two-Faced Tower proposes the truly audacious: a vertical skatepark. Within a thick “shell” of residential units lies the project’s conceptual centerpiece, a system of skateboard-accessible ramps that interacts with the tower’s normal circulation paths, open to the elements. Thus the high-rise offers itself as an icon with regional roots, gesturing to the skate culture of SoCal and the idyllic weather within which it occurs.

trevor satrom


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | tall buildings

critical mass xyz alex gutierrez Critical Mass XYZ rethinks conventional attitudes towards property development—vertically. An efficient and structurally stable square floor plate is carved away throughout the building’s height, resulting in a dynamic sequence of public spaces linked by circulation. Some of these areas are open to the elements, others enclosed. The result is a contribution to the development of interesting contemporary “vertical urban morphologies.”

alex gutierrez

86 87


AR900 special topic studio: computational design studio faculty gabriel morales-olivares

beyond modern ++ frameworks 2011 - 2012 "Release 1.0 reSearch Agenda//Initial Setup Behaviors and Constraints: Towards an architectural wetware: Matter, Energy and Information meet as Proto Synthetic (biomachanic) Ecologies." When the architectural technium met with the constraints of biological systems as a way of escaping the modernist vision-standardization and repetition upon new production technologies ‘ad infinitum’, it systematically began the study of symbiont forms of technology based upon these new parameters as the set of rules that governed what could be new behaviors within the technium. Computa-

tion was first overtaken by the architectural technium because, looking at complex biological models, the first parameter required is that of information -all biological systems are methods for copying information with some degree of variation. The basic principle of computation (computation at the same time a core function of all systems) - input-processing-output - derived the digital avant-garde of the late 1990’s within the design technium. The follow-up constraint was matter both as relevance - space/field at an architectural scale- and materialization - physical matter - which opened the door for studies of fabrication, machines, and the extraction of rules from material systems. More recent studies are being done on energy, again as a double front dealing with both the energy crisis, but also as a new system of ‘flows’ that is highly differentiated from the one studied in the early 2000’s. In the current maker generation - as defined by Chris Anderson from Wired and DIY Drones - the ideas of actually making things through open codes and protocols cheaply has spread like wildfire in terms of fabrication logic-machanic instructions, digital tectonics, emergent setups, real world integration-sensors, all done with hacker idea(l)s. Taking a step forward, the aim of this first agenda is to understand that the behavior that uses components from matter, energy and information is basically a madebiology, or what can be referenced to as the first steps towards synthetic biology through design research. The focus within the framework of Synthetic Ecologies at this stage will be how rule-based systems can articulate large and complex assemblies of agents across different sets of codes (matter, energy, information) and functions (biology, space/field, design). Gabriel Morales-Olivares, Critic

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AR900 special topic studio: computational design studio faculty gabriel morales-olivares

beyond modern ++ frameworks 2011 - 2012 "Release 1.0 reSearch Agenda//Initial Setup Behaviors and Constraints: Towards an architectural wetware: Matter, Energy and Information meet as Proto Synthetic (biomachanic) Ecologies." When the architectural technium met with the constraints of biological systems as a way of escaping the modernist vision-standardization and repetition upon new production technologies ‘ad infinitum’, it systematically began the study of symbiont forms of technology based upon these new parameters as the set of rules that governed what could be new behaviors within the technium. Computa-

tion was first overtaken by the architectural technium because, looking at complex biological models, the first parameter required is that of information -all biological systems are methods for copying information with some degree of variation. The basic principle of computation (computation at the same time a core function of all systems) - input-processing-output - derived the digital avant-garde of the late 1990’s within the design technium. The follow-up constraint was matter both as relevance - space/field at an architectural scale- and materialization - physical matter - which opened the door for studies of fabrication, machines, and the extraction of rules from material systems. More recent studies are being done on energy, again as a double front dealing with both the energy crisis, but also as a new system of ‘flows’ that is highly differentiated from the one studied in the early 2000’s. In the current maker generation - as defined by Chris Anderson from Wired and DIY Drones - the ideas of actually making things through open codes and protocols cheaply has spread like wildfire in terms of fabrication logic-machanic instructions, digital tectonics, emergent setups, real world integration-sensors, all done with hacker idea(l)s. Taking a step forward, the aim of this first agenda is to understand that the behavior that uses components from matter, energy and information is basically a madebiology, or what can be referenced to as the first steps towards synthetic biology through design research. The focus within the framework of Synthetic Ecologies at this stage will be how rule-based systems can articulate large and complex assemblies of agents across different sets of codes (matter, energy, information) and functions (biology, space/field, design). Gabriel Morales-Olivares, Critic


fluid agent interjection matthew martensen Fluid forms should not be actualized by a non-fluid system. In the application of a compound material the objective is to design without the use of a traditional framework commonly used in traditional applications of fluid materials, maintaining fluid material's ability to seamlessly and continuously build upon itself. This thesis is the process of investigating the possibilities of design through the use of a single material and how that specific material can be implemented into architectural design. The material used is a cross-linked polymer that will be the focus within this design process. Here, the process breaks away from the traditionally static systems used within conventional architecture to consider a more dynamic system of design. Conventional architectural methods seek stasis by minimizing variety in structural elements, spatial models, and material quality. They emphasize repetition, symmetry and continuity, generating form as a way of responding to a specific behavior. In this traditional method of design

matthew martensen


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

90 91


architects look at a specific behavior and then predetermine an architectural form that responds to that specific behavior. However, these processes of developing form result in an architecture that is static and incapable of variable change within the surrounding environment. Again, this project addresses the method of material agency which seeks to embody difference in degree among its parts of the same kind, in order to emphasize variation across the interrelated parts of a whole. Separating from the traditional methods of form generation, this work ultimately seeks to reveal a rich network of interactions generating forms that exhibit adaptation, differentiation, variation, complexity and customization.

matthew martensen


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

92 93


adaptive computational ecologies clayton madrid This thesis questions the role of designers in the future and how we might begin to rethink the approach to design of habitable spaces in an environment of emerging complexities. To meet the demands of the public for the creation of customizable space, the designer must seek out alternative methods of process which have the potential for yielding dynamic results. The masscustomization of habitable space must be directly influenced by user input and it is the role of the designer to develop a platform in which the general public can intuitively generate personalized space. This platform for design can be seen as the generation of software, developed for specific conditions related to the needs and wants of the user. This project begins the development of a digital interface that generates space based on specific site and societal conditions. The creation of this applet provided a tool in which to rethink the typical residential unit through the active manipulation of design parameters and constraints. The system for the creation of space via a digital interface is based on computational agency. The use of autonomous agents designed to make decisions at local levels results in formations of space derived from complexity, adaptation, and heterogeneity. Simple rules were tested, adapted and altered or dismissed through the initial processes of system exploration. The typical residential unit has evolved into a dynamic system of spatial consideration capable of meeting the demands of mass-customization, complexity, adaptation, and heterogeneity. clayton madrid


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

94 95


con-plex gometries zachary alan smith graduate program design award winner Concrete has traditionally been a popular material within architecture owing to its strength, temperature control, abundance, and cost-effectiveness. However, there are also features of concrete that make it an ideal material for building more contemporary digital forms that have traditionally eluded the transition from digital to physical form. As software allows us to design forms, shapes, and concepts that defy flat plane geometries, concrete carries the potential to respond to these dimensions while also maintaining its structural integrity. Concrete is an ideal candidate for a cost-effective, widely available material that has seen improvements in its structural properties for the past 10-20 years. It is the evolution of concrete as a building material that makes it ideal for pushing forward modern architecture in realizing structures that have previously only been ephemeral conceptions.

zachary alan smith


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

zachary alan smith

96 97


zachary alan smith


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

zachary alan smith

98 99


An adaptive and reusable formwork upgrades conventional concrete fabrication. As drawing and design become predominantly digital, architects are exploring forms and shapes that challenge traditional architectural structural notions. Consequently, these new forms are pushing the boundaries of traditional building materials and what can actually be built. Conveniently, however, we likely do not need novel materials to produce these newer digital forms—we can instead look to new applications of a material we have used for centuries. Similar to how many newer 3D modeling programs break down complex curvature into polygonal meshes in order to create both accuracy and infinite flexibility, we can pixelate a curved form into several rigid polygonal plates and connect them with a flexible membrane to generate complex molds. Then, glass fiber reinforced (GFR) concrete—with its increased strength, rapid cure times and spray application—will allow the molds to be very thin and thus highly flexible compared to traditional concrete forming methods. Furthermore, these molds are both inexpensive to produce and can be re-used to create a large variety of curved forms and shapes.

zachary alan smith


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

zachary alan smith

100 101


zachary alan smith


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

zachary alan smith

102 103


zachary alan smith


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

zachary alan smith

104 105


zachary alan smith


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

zachary alan smith

106 107


zachary alan smith


graduate architecture | AR900 special topic studio | computation

zachary alan smith

108 109


This section highlights selected work created as part of student involvement in international studio and design opportunities. Four kinds of exhibits are included:

international studios rome studio adriana cuellar marcel sanchez-prieto artfest 2012 bruce matthes gaby guerin tri-continental masters michael stepner frank wolden ramiro losada (UEM)

Student work from the 2012 Rome Studio, a summer course in Italy led by Rome Prize winner and NewSchool adjunct Adriana Cuellar and her husband Marcel Sanchez. The studio focused on the Baroque Rome of Michelangelo, Borromini and their contemporaries. Students analyzed significant works of architecture in context and developed infill design projects meant to provoke a dialogue with these monuments of the Roman past. ArtFest 2012, a Laureate-sponsored design event held at Santa Fe University of Art and Design in July. NewSchool instructors Bruce Matthes and Gaby Guerin led a vertical studio on “The Myth of the City: Build Your Own” for students from Mexico and South America. Presentations by Tri-Continental graduate students from the Universidad Europea de Madrid (UEM), a sister school. This class, co-taught by NewSchool faculty members Mike Stepner and Frank Wolden, was the third and final studio of the new “Tri-Continental Masters” program created by UEM. Students develop urban projects as they move quarterly from Madrid to Shanghai to, finally, San Diego.

mock firms competition raul diaz daniela deutsch

The 2012 International Mock Firm Competition first place submittal. Of the five international finalist teams, two came from NewSchool. The undergraduate architecture team won the competition with its compelling high-rise design for a site near the 2008 Olympic venue in Beijing. Students worked on the designs in San Diego and presented their work to a Chicago jury of design professionals.


study abroad rome studio summer 2012 studio faculty adriana cuellar marcel sanchez-prieto scott hook

The Rome Studio looks at architecture and urbanism in Rome, with supporting study trips to Florence and Naples using the Baroque period as a platform to discover the urban intricacies of each of the cities. Students study the city through the lens of architectural typologies such as chapels, churches, piazzas, faรงades, sculptures, perspective mock-ups, stairs, gardens and palaces; they review the theory and practice of Baroque architecture and urban space-making during the Sixtus V period; and develop these studies into potential innovative approaches that relate to contemporary creations of design work.

The program, five years running, has been growing in content and student outcomes, benefiting from its evolving continuous research: from studying trajectories and cartographic analysis of the structure of movement in Rome, to presently examining specific architectural Baroque pieces. Recent projects consist of proposals in key sites throughout Rome, dealing with the duality between history and contemporary interventions, addressing the everyday needs of urban living within the milieu of culture and architectural masterpieces of the past.


international studios | study abroad | rome

deformed projections / piazza san pietro scott hook Deformed Projections is a two-fold project: it is first based on the research into geometric complexities and exuberant effects defined by Baroque structures, in this case on Borromini’s masterpiece San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane. Second, these studies are translated onto an intervention in St. Peter’s square, a symbolic public space highly charged by history and critical periods of transformation. This project takes the challenge of articulating the threshold between Bernini’s colonnade and Mussolini’s intervention of the Via della Conciliazione. The design embraces this space as a new voluminous gate; a well-defined threshold that at moments appears monumental and at others is dematerialized by an array of perspective funnels. The freestanding structures hold program at the upper levels, providing services for visitors and information on the history of the square. The viewer is absorbed by the deformed projections of interstitial deep spaces containing the square that Bernini imagined, and re-discovers its history through the continuity of exemplary engagements of civic space.

scott hook

112 113


scott hook


international studios | study abroad | rome

scott hook

114 115


Borromini’s mastery of geometry and resulting voluminous effects established the platform to study the principles of deformed projections, an analytical dissemination of Borromini’s San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane that combined technical drawings measuring the control of a single point projection onto regular and irregular surfaces, resulting in tangible, intangible and temporal material deformations. This study steps beyond the typical description of a case study, and instead proposes, speculates and suggests new forms of architectural experimentation that inform conditions of movement, spatial perception and the appropriation of space as instruments to engage new design projects.

scott hook


international studios | study abroad | rome

scott hook

116 117


faรงade interface / campo fiori tyler patrick hamil Within the everyday dynamic activities of Campo dei Fiori, this project seeks to transcend and reconfigure the space of the faรงade as a three-dimensional articulation of the piazza. The project appropriates the faรงade of the Farnese Theater and extends it through the design of a staircase, a result of a layered interpolation of the geometry of the piazza, expanding interior- exterior trajectories to provide endless opportunities for viewing and living the spectacle of this exceptional public space.

tyler hamil


international studios | study abroad | rome

tyler hamil

118 119


transmitted exuberance: the economy of the column / piazza san pietro alison downton This project is an investigation of the column, a single architectural element capable of transmitting not only structural support, but also spatial organization and material effects. There are two main aspects to the design: first, the economy of the column as a conduit of matter, space, scale, and program, and second the space between the columns able to bundle and deviate linearity onto a network of spaces and activities. The deployment of columns into the site follows the unbuilt plan of Bernini’s colonnade. With calibrated variations of column diameters, the space of the square is transmitted and defined as a three-dimensional "intermezzo", reorienting the viewer towards the cupola of Michelangelo, the colonnade and the projected street onto the Tiber river.

alison downton


international studios | study abroad | rome

alison downton

120 121


artfest 2012 myth of the city studio faculty bruce matthes gaby guerin


international studios | artfest 2012

In the summer of 2012, NSAD faculty participated in Artfest, an international and interdisciplinary event hosted by Santa Fe University of Art & Design. Instructors Bruce Matthes (humanities, GE Chair) and Gabrielle Guerin (architecture) co-taught a three week studio structured around the concept, "Myth of the City". The studio was attended by twenty architecture students from Mexico, Brazil, and Chile. Working in international teams, students explored the mythological and symbolic nature of place by designing imaginary cities with hopes of demonstrating their sensitivity for basic human needs. They created symbols, wrote stories, sketched diagrams, and built physical models explaining how human interaction with place forms programmatic design decisions. The outcomes were inspiring and each team presented their city to visiting architects who contributed cross-cultural critiques. Themes ranged from a hanging city suspended across the cavernous walls of a wide canyon to a futuristic city that contemplated biospheric habitation on Mars. On the last day of the event there was a public gallery opening attended by notable local artists and designers. Yet it was the day-to-day interactions among students and faculty that seemed to best capture the key learning moments and discoveries. It was during those exchanges that Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, and English were spoken and ideas were openly shared. Sometimes this is how the poetry of exchange begins and how conversation gets expanded. Whatever it was, soon the word was out. BBQ’s were planned. Multi-cuisinal pot lucks sprang up. Business cards were traded. Facebook™ friends added. And on it went. Whether in the form of a newly discovered text, a studio visit from a scholar in another discipline, or the practical sharing of a pedagogical approach, each cultural exchange contributed to the next day’s studio. Reflecting on the experience may suggest something about the approach to teaching design and the pedagogic role of the studio and project based learning. Since the aggregate of influence is always in process, perhaps the sharing one’s passions, in new environments, outside the studio or classroom environment, is what contributes the most. Matthes and Guerin were interviewed by Adobe Airstream about the goals of their studio: http://adobeairstream.com/design/myth-of-the-city-asks-participants-to-create-better-ones/

11 12210 |123


tri-continental masters studio faculty mike stepner frank wolden

marcia jorge cerda ingles

ramiro losada (UEM)

the tri-continental masters program NewSchool's sister school in Madrid, Spain began a new program in 2011/2012 in conjunction with NSAD. Students participate in a unique three-quarter master's degree program on three different continents. The first quarter is spent in Madrid at the Universidad Europea de Madrid where the students study theory and urban development and pursue special topics in architecture and urban design. The second quarter is spent in Shanghai where the students gain professional skills working in architectural offices as a complement to continuing studies.

The third quarter is held at NewSchool, where the students bring the work of the previous two quarters together and apply it to a San Diego project. The Tri-Continental students together with NSAD students worked with the developers of the IDEA District [Innovation,Design,Education and Arts] to create a vision of what the components of the IDEA District could be.


international studios | tri-continental masters

marcia jorge cerda ingles

124 125


marcia jorge cerda ingles


international studios | tri-continental masters

S.E.A. & S.U.N. how should a city like san diego work? macia jorge cerda ingles

This project is based on energy conservation and the environment and bringing them together as "value added" for East Village. How can you turn the trees into mini-forests to provide shade, reduce cooling costs during the summer and soften the hard edges of the built environment providing an urban respite. Leftover and vacant plots become pocket parks and public plazas. Larger parcels and land adjacent to the freeway are proposed for community gardens. This as the creation of a "gastro" district. The centerpeice of the project is a community market building which will also act as a solar collector providing energy to East Village.

marcia jorge cerda ingles

126 127


01

MILLION EYES /T R AIL

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NATURE TRAILS

O R TS SP

BALBOA SPORTS CENTER

BA

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balboa park observation tower - "million eyes"

TRAI LS

C EN TE R

SAN DIEGO ZOO

andres trevillo

CANYON / TRAILS

AIRPORT / THE PRADO

THE PRADO

ROSE GARDEN LF O G

This student focused on Balboa Park. His observations as a visitor found the park somewhat inward looking. How can visitors see and know other parts of the park? How can they see how the park fits into the city? The project proposes a 150-foot tower at the end of the Prado and the edge of Florida Canyon. The tower provides views of and from the park that were celebrated by early park planners before the introduction of buildings and the growth of the landscaping.

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HORTON PLAZA

CORONADO BRIDGE

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GASLAMP QUARTER

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CORONADO / BAY

FUTURE FOOBALL STADIUM PETCO PARK

CONVENTION CENTER

SAN DIEGO BAY

TRI-CONTINENTAL MASTER'S DEGREE IN ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

andres trevillo

MADRID - SHANGHAI - SAN DIEGO

PLACES VIEWS TODAY LOST VIEWS ANDRES TREVIテ前


international studios | tri-continental masters

andres trevillo

128 129


andres trevillo


international studios | tri-continental masters

andres trevillo

130 131


international mock firms competition

2012 international mock firms competition faculty advisor raul diaz daniela deutsch special advisor ellyn lester

first place Capsule Architecture honorable mention Team S.A.L.T

Collegiate teams participating in this competition were charged with forming a "mock" firm and preparing a project proposal for a skyscraper based on the competition's theme of "versatility", which the sponsors define as "varied uses and adaptability". The site for the conceptual project was Beijing, China. As part of the final competition the teams pitched their design concepts directly to design/build professionals for feedback and critique. NSAD had two teams entered in the short list of six finalists. Team Capsule Architecture Lab Team members were undergraduate students Monika Banakaite, Wilfred Briones, Brandon Nash, Lam Thanh Nguyen and Carlos Sandoval. The team's Advisor was Raul Diaz. Team SALT [Sustainable: Architecture: Landscape: Technology] members were graduate students Ann Capinguian, Kevin Colbert, Daniel Kawk and Rodrigo Villalon. The team's Advisor was Daniela Deutsch.


international studios | mock firms competition

monika banakaite wilfred briones brandon nash lam thanh nguyen carlos sandoval 132 133


bachelor of architecture program

study abroad rome level coordinators alan rosenblum luisa schultz philipp bosshart

faculty adriana cuellar


len zegarski undergraduate architecture program chair


The NewSchool of Architecture + Design is minutes from the busiest international border crossing in the world. Located in San Diego, California, at the intersection of natural and man-made boundaries, our unique setting in the southwest corner of the United States offers students an urban laboratory in which to research problems confronting a globalized society while examining the ever changing role of architecture within one of the most ecologically diverse and environmentally sensitive areas of North America. Growing population densities within urban environments; diminished natural resources; increasing demands for clean energy; limited open space and a lack of developable lands; food production for large urban centers; environmental degradation and atmospheric pollution are but a few of the challenges our students investigate and, as the next generation of architects, will need to solve as their professional careers mature regardless of where they practice globally. NewSchool welcomes this responsibility as the foundation of our academic mission, training architects for active participation and engagement at the local and international scale by addressing sustainable urbanism through a progressive curriculum grounded in a culture of critical reasoning, professional engagement, and ethical behavior. We nurture design minded students to become socially responsible leaders who act as agents of change within society. Our undergraduate curriculum is structured around the following sequences of study: DESIGN + RESEARCH is the core subject throughout all five years of undergraduate study. The design studio, focused on projectbased learning, is the cornerstone of our curriculum grounding students in problem solving methodologies that question and scrutinize the means and methods of spatial production. HISTORY + THEORY provides the social, political, and economic understanding through precedent studies allowing students to “stand on the shoulders of those before us� to shape world views without forgetting our past. It’s a portal from which to investigate opportunistic solutions to problems of today and tomorrow. TECHNOLOGY establishes structural, environmental, and building systems as the basic foundation needed to insure design decisions are grounded in a process encouraging open investigation into smart materials, innovative technologies, new production techniques, and constantly evolving systems of design practice. ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE introduces the necessary financial, management, and social communication skills critical for effective leadership within an evolving entrepreneurial and internationalized economy while responding to the changing dynamics of learning, living, and being in a local yet globalized community.

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undergraduate AR100 studio studio faculty alan rosenblum sofia koutsenko charles miller david white

• Establishment of an elemental disciplinary ethos, by immersion into a culture of commitment to work and critical inquiry, a key component of the design process and project based learning. • Introduction and application of a basic disciplinary skill set, covering fundamental 2D and 3D graphic and making techniques as avenues of a generative design process grounded in critical thinking. • Development of a design intelligence based on informed criticality, curiosity and incessant process. History, culture and elements of design theory are incorporated into the process of inquiry as critical elements of design. • Introduction to spatial observation, analysis and design, beginning with the human body and progressively advancing through the sequence in scale and complexity to arrive at the design of architecture.

• Introduction to a variety of manual and computeraided representation methods and techniques for The central mission of the first and second years of the the development of basic projective thought. Bachelor of Architecture Program, the Foundation Studios, is to establish the groundwork for learning that is • Introduction to the analysis of contextual and prointroducing the student to the culture of design and the grammatic conditions, ranging from experiential techniques and methods that enable the learning and to environmental, as fundamental forces impactpractice of the discipline of architecture. The pursuit of ing the design of architecture. this mission unfolds through a sequence of seven quarters over two years of study; its foundational principles Alan Rosenblum, Level Coordinator are enumerated as follows:


victoria tulyaganova


AR161 representation The theme is seeing as the initiator of representation and spatial thought. A stationary observation drawing is geometrically abstracted. The resulting geometry is extruded in a model, following criteria that involve perspectival information and volumetric deconstruction. The resulting extrusion is the basis of a series of orthogonal and oblique projections, as well as single and two-point perspectives: drawing as active seeing. A simple action is recorded in video, one frame extracted at regular intervals. From the resulting sequence of stills, the movement is mapped by connecting points of inflection and following their trajectory of motion.

2.

1.

1.

2.

2.

1. ruben gomez 2. stefano carrillo


undergraduate architecture | AR100 design studio

Diagrams resulting from sequence one are cut out in cardstock and stacked; spaced regularly. Voids are connected by rays. This extrusion is then drawn unfolded. 1. stefano carrillo 2. stephanie ibarra 3. brennen st. clair 4. ruben bravo

1. 2.

3.

4.

| 11 14010 141


The unfolded drawings are re-folded to produce a final volume; modeled, cast, or sculpted.

1.

2. 1.

1. stephanie ibarra 2. barrak darweesh


undergraduate architecture | AR100 design studio

AR141 representation Seeing as the initiator of representation and spatial thought. A stationary observation drawing is geometrically abstracted. The resulting geometry is extruded in a model, following criteria that involve perspectival information and volumetric deconstruction. The resulting extrusion is basis of a series of orthogonal and oblique projections, as well as single and two-point perspectives: drawing as active seeing.

1. ruben bravo 2. brennen st. clair

1.

1. 1.

2.

| 11 14210 143


AR101 studio The body as site becomes the theme of the first design studio. Geometric systems are studied and applied; from a geometric primitive, a polyhedral tessellated pattern is identified and developed in folded paper to construct a Body Device. The process introduces the notion of making as research, intertwined with heuristic methods.

1. 2.

3.

1. joshua nunnally 2. sebastian beingolea 3. nicholas wilson


undergraduate architecture | AR100 design studio

1. sebastian beingolea 2. araceli narvaez 3. victoria tulyaganova 4. joshua nunnally

1.

2.

3.

4. | 11 14410 145


4.

1. 2.

2. 3.

1. jason la rocca 2. nicholas wilson 3. joshua nunnally 4. sebastian beingolea


undergraduate architecture | AR100 design studio

1. yvonne martinez 2. joshua nunnally 3. ana montalvo 4. matthew dahlman

1.

2. 3.

4.

| 11 14610 147


AR102 studio The study is centered on an object in context. Perception and place are mapped. Mapping reveals the confluence of forces and dimensions of a site. The body moves through the site; its movement is recorded, extrapolated and modeled to produce a small architecture. The representation sequence uses imaging as a process of spatial discovery, a heuristic method that layers the found and the extracted.

1. 1. 3.

2. 2.

team 1: stephen gonzalez daniel maldonado tran pham brian zenz

team 2: hugo aguilar sara alanezi itgelt nyamsuren nancy vasquez

3 team: miguel escobar-evans ruszanne londonio austin richards jose villamizar


undergraduate architecture | AR100 design studio

1. sara alanezi 2. miguel escobar-evans 3. itgelt nyamsuren 4. austin richards

1. 1. 1. 3. 2. 2. 2. 4. | 11 14810 149


"Constructed Mental Polaroids" are “shot� at specified intervals, and set spatial sequences and forms in relatioship to specific geographical form, site phenomena and forces. As an extension of drawing, mental Polaroids act as petri dish snapshots, or dioramas of spatial junctures along a promenade.

1. 1.

2. 2. 3.

3. 3. 3.

1. miguel escobar-evans 2. daniel maldonaldo 3. tran pham


undergraduate architecture | AR100 design studio

1. miguel escobar-evans 2. austin richards

1. 1. 1.

2. 2. | 11 15010 151


AR103 studio "Fields, Systems and Networks" is the title of this studio. The use of simple logarithmic drawings establishes the thinking logic. Part-to-part and part-to-whole relationships are studied in abstract generative relationships. Indeterminacy and emergence drive the process of construction of three-dimensional systems in a closed-loop logic. Notation diagrams are designed to articulate the algorithmic thought. The process culminates in a common project; students design small architectures as part of a whole. Each connects and responds to its neighbors. The site is an abstracted grid in a futuristic setting. The context is defined by a relationship of connection developed though scenarios.

1.

2.

3.

1. matthew dahlman 2. miguel escobar-evans 3. morgan blaydes


undergraduate architecture | AR100 design studio

1. jesus ortiz 2. victoria rossin 3. joshua nunnally 4. emmanuel roumeliotis

1.

2. 3.

4.

| 11 15210 153


1.

2.

3.

4.

1. morgan blaydes 2. victoria rossin 3. jesus ortiz 4. victoria tulyaganova


undergraduate architecture | AR100 design studio

Network City 3012, an AR103 group project.

group project

| 11 15410 155


Principles • Advancement of a studio culture of critical dialog and shared intellectual curiosity.

undergraduate AR200 studio studio faculty mark clowdus jonathan heckert eric johnson

• Focus on tectonics and materiality. • Development of complex critical/analytical representation techniques. • Emphasis on relational deployment of learning avenues. • Deployment of contemporary tools that interface manual making and CG-assisted fabrication. Process

casey mahon keith muller hector perez michael riggin patrick shields

The final three quarters of the Foundations Studios are defined by the exploration of tectonics and assemblies within the logic of increasing scales of programmatic agenda. This basic agenda is constructed around an understanding of singular, multiple, and mixed habitations which define programmatic issues and scales. The studio is divided into sections, where each instructor’s approach to the curriculum differs, in an attempt to expose different points of view on representation and making. The feedback loop created in the first year expands to include an increased understanding of the tectonic conditions of architecture, both physically and computationally. Alan Rosenblum, Level Coordinator


AR201 studio By attaching a programmatic condition to the node understanding of representation and its relationship to the tectonic, the method reveals relationships between forces, forms and assemblies. Singular inhabitation provides an opportunity for meditation on the understanding and meaning of notions of habitat and habitation in an experiential manner. By focusing on individual "habitat" units, nodes are introduced as additional layers in understanding the fields, systems, and networks previously explored.

david harrison


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

david harrison

| 11 15810 159


david harrison


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

david harrison

| 11 16010 161


AR202 studio The multiple in architecture; objects, users, programs, etc., are explored as abstract process-based thinking begins to inform the relationship between representation and tectonic forces. Diverse approaches, methodologies, and agendas are explored through the lens of engaging multiple bodies in mixed spatial experiences. Spatial/ tectonic arrangements are explored at the scale of systems as well as of individuals. Prototypes of these habitat units are developed and constructed as one-to-one scale studies exposing the polemics between how one draws what is to be made and how one makes what is drawn. The prototypes of each studio were presented in a group show at PUBLIC in Barrio Logan; selected representatives traveled to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo to represent the program in the annual Design Village showcase, winning the Most Adaptable Design award in 2012.

1. 2.

2.

1. david harrison 2. design village projects


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

david harrison

| 11 16210 163


david harrison


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

david harrison

| 11 16410 165


olivia thall


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

olivia thall

| 11 16610 167


AR203 studio Various studies were conducted in the individual studio sections focusing on the mixture of avenues of projection in the urban context. From topographic site manipulations to geometric casting explorations, the studios mixed content, programs, process, and students with the intention of engaging a rich multi-faceted understanding of the potentials for architecture to engage the urban context. Using San Diego as a developmental laboratory, the studio explored repurposed surface parking conditions retrofits as urban zoos, infill interventions, and food carts/trucks as mobile kitchens.

michelle willis


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

michelle willis

| 11 16810 169


undergraduate AR300 studio studio faculty luisa schultz andrew duncan francisco garcia hussein munaim leigh pfeiffer ruediger thierhoff

The central mission of the third and fourth years of the Bachelor of Architecture Program, the Core Studios, is the development of advanced design thinking and making skills along with the application of integrated building practices and architectural leadership skills that expand learning and practice within the discipline of architecture and ready the student for the internship experience. The pursuit of this mission unfolds through a sequence of six quarters in two years. Throughout the third year students expand their ability to develop a rational and creative design process while integrating knowledge of structural, environmental and building systems in a critical way that informs decision making. Students are provided tools and programmatic requirements that develop their abilities to synthesize program and site development, structural and environmental analysis and system selection and application for projects that bring tangible and transformational results within an emphasis on site and building tectonics. The studios are intended to implicate a multi-disciplinary paradigm and demonstrate the exploration of design via investigative research and critical inquiry. Third year provides an understanding of the divergent roles within the profession and fosters generation of well-developed critical positions and design directions from which students can initiate further research into the current architectural discourse. Luisa Schultz, Level Coordinator


Camden Wade Tan Pham


velux competition igor kitsen, henry chi + jared barrios Light of Tomorrow is the overall theme of the International VELUX Award. The award seeks to challenge the future of daylight in the built environment with an open-minded and experimental approach. Therefore, the competition seeks to widen the boundaries of daylight in architecture, including aesthetics, functionality, sustainability, and the interaction between buildings and environment.

igor kitsen henry chi jared barrios


undergraduate architecture | AR300 design studio

igor kitsen henry chi jared barrios | 11 17210 173


performance center - elapsed movement steven cornelius + forrest agnew Accommodating arts, performance, and training activities, this dynamic site will interconnect the present and future residents of the East Village neighborhood of San Diego and provide them a destination. It is intended to create an urban and artistic continuity with the richly historic Jazz District, newly developed sports facilities and a diverse urban context. Ideal existing infrastructure, proximity to various transportation systems, and panoramic views allow for communicative design and synergistic, integrative, and sustainable approaches. Separating the program into different buildings and taking advantage of the entire site allows for interstitial moments of circulation and movement. The separation also allows for individual programmatic growth as it becomes necessary. Over time, the expansion of these different elements will result in a changing and moving architecture. That elapsed movement makes the site flexible to an ever-changing contextual style.

steven cornelius forrest agnew


undergraduate architecture | AR300 design studio

steven cornelius forrest agnew

| 11 17410 175


performance center - art-centric kevin leon The sweeping motion of the high-rise resembles the graceful curves and motion of a dancer bringing awareness to the existing fault line that runs through the property. The lines represent the seismic motion of the earth, both horizontal and vertical. The structure is reinforced concrete with curtain-wall glazing.

kevin leon


undergraduate architecture | AR300 design studio

performance center - dynamic kelly macdonald + diana zora The first four floors of the tower are dedicated to the educational space that consists of a training gym, set and stage-making room, classrooms, indoor and outdoor practice rooms, a medical facility and a day-care center. They gym, set, and stage-making space have a storefront wall to engage the community and interact with the environment. The tower consists of 96 residential lofts that vary from 900 to 1,300 sq ft for the performers and students. Performers who are traveling back and forth will stay in the tower while they are training or performing. The tower also has outdoor balconies and gardens along its exterior pathways.

kelly macdonald diana zora

| 11 17610 177


performance center - shear jawad alkowaiz + jared ramirez Through initial project research it was apparent that there are many educational institutions that do not have adequate student housing. Four different college campuses are close to the site suggesting their students live in common housing. Proximity to their respective schools reduces the use of automobiles and encourages walking, benefitting the environment by reducing the use of natural recourses and encouraging healthy exercise among students. The four schools have different academic focuses allowing students to exchange new ideas and broaden their horizon. Mixing the programmatic components in a high-rise building provides a dynamic way of living and forces the students who inhabit the Shear to intermingle. Including a performance center in the structure also allows the public to interact with the residents, making for a strong sense of community.

jawad alkowaiz jared ramirez


undergraduate architecture | AR300 design studio

jawad alkowaiz jared ramirez

| 11 17810 179


reconnect - nature and self, point loma, ca igor kitsen The focus of this project was to investigate and explore the interrelationship between the built and unbuilt environment of the personal and public realm through the design of a place for the practice of “being” and “becoming”, a place that challenges and transforms our connections and supports searching, studying, enjoying and the development of a healthier life-process.

igor kitsen


undergraduate architecture | AR300 design studio

reconnect jared barrios This small residential project challenges one to engage with the design of a house, located anywhere on the planet based on a concept which integrates shelter, globalization and concepts from the ideology described in the book: Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things. In 2004 C2C sponsored a housing competition with similar idea: "The transformation of human industry through ecologically intelligent design, from a system that takes, makes, and wastes to one that celebrates natural, economic, and cultural abundance", integrates shelter, globalization and concepts from the ideology described in the book: Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things. In 2004 C2C sponsored a housing competition with a similar idea: "The transformation of human industry through ecologically intelligent design, from a system that takes, makes, and wastes to one that celebrates natural, economic, and cultural abundance".

jared barrios

| 11 18010 181


henry chi


undergraduate architecture | AR300 design studio

reconnect - urban escape henri chi Designing a wellness center near the core of downtown San Diego can be a challenge when taking into consideration the elements of an urban lifestyle: fast-pace, deadlines, stress, and rush hour. Urban Escape is a direct response to what the local community needs and deires. The building concept is wrapped in a highly practical exercise in San Diego: yoga. Taking the elements of the child's pose, the idea of stretching and circulating was adopted. Urban Escape stretches across the entire urban city block while adapting to the context through topography. The circulation in and out of the building is continual movement. A greenspace allows people to not only circulate within the building but also on top of it. This creates an opportunity for more exterior and green space in the urban environment.

henry chi

| 11 18210 183


mixed use marco unlo + jonathan barrio This project continues the dialogue between architecture and the new economic, political, ecological and cultural geographies. Is it possible to reconfigure neighborhoods with recognizable spatial configurations defined by social differences by "stitching" them together with green urban strategies?

marco unlo jonathan barrio


undergraduate architecture | AR300 design studio

marco unlo jonathan barrio

| 11 18410 185


single residential project marco unlo This small residential project challenges one to engage with the design of a house, located anywhere on the planet based on a concept which integrates shelter, globalization and concepts from the ideology described in the book: Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things.

marco unlo


undergraduate architecture | AR300 design studio

steel competition - the core ashley evans, mellisa vaughn + francisco nunez The challenge for architecture students was to design a Culinary Arts College in an urban setting. Steel construction offers students great benefits in this endeavor, as it is ideal for covering long-spans without sacrificing flexibility and aesthetic lightness. Steel's quick delivery and assembly is ideal in congested urban environments. The intention was to create a continuous structural skin that not only appears on the exterior, but melted into interior spaces connecting the structural core to the floor plates. The main issue and environmental factor this program presented is the heat generated by the kitchens. The overall occupancy and cooking conditions that produce heat contributed to the thermal gain of the building aided and abetted by the exposed steel. The concept of this building is an "oven" because the program itself and the material being used act as a giant heat generator.

ashley evans mellisa vaughn francisco nunez | 11 18610 187


steel competition - the culinary art institute of san diego michael knowlton , forest agnew + daniel botten

michael knowlton forest agnew daniel botten

The Culinary Art Institute of San Diego is where students can learn, interact, create, and grow as culinary masters through experiencing cooked and uncooked food. The bay-view bar and grill located on the top floor of the building symbolize a student's goal of becoming a top chef through education. There are three levels of new teaching kitchens, each


undergraduate architecture | AR300 design studio

level bringing them closer to their goal of cooking, creating, an collaborating in a real life kitchen environment. The structure has a double skin consisting of steel structural systems, translucent curtain wall facades, and an 8� perforated copper skin. Skin placement was carefully located throughout the exterior facades to shade the interior spaces

from a harsh southern sun; skin placements that still allow for natural light to penetrate the building while providing a 216-degree panoramic view-shed of a surrounding dense urban environment.

| 11 18810 189


undergraduate AR400 studio studio faculty mike stepner drew aitken linda bui diego velasco barbara rhys frank wolden

The AR400 studios introduce urbanism, urban design and urban planning into the architectural vocabularly. The role of the architect in the city and the context of the city beyond the building site are emphasized. The urban context becomes the laboratory for student exploration of broad architectural concepts such as sense of place and urban fabric. This may take the form of a focused study area or master plan. The project areas are selected from requests made annually by municipal agencies, community organizations, or non-governmental organizations. The students work in teams and individually and collaborate with representatives of the study areas who are the clients for the projects. They become aware of the involvement of citizen groups and government agencies as part of the design process. As a framework for the studio project the students explore city shaping topics such as Smart Growth, Landscape Urbanism, Sustainable Design, and other topics that have become the planning framework for city building across the world. The AR400 studios are closley tied with two fourth year undergraduate required co-requisites; AR481, Urban History and AR482, Urban Issues. Mike Stepner, Level Coordinator


andres trevi単o

| 11 19010 191


AR400 urban design + planning During the 2011/2012 academic year the students in the fourth year studio worked in three project areas; Southeastern San Diego, Mission Valley/Qualcomm Stadium and North University City/University Town Center. Three very different areas: a diverse older community, mostly low income, undergoing both major revitalization and continuing disinvestment; a 1970's commercial area prime for infill and reuse of older shopping centers and which includes the city's football stadium which may be relocated; and a community that also developed in the 1970's along with the growth of the University of California San Diego, undergoing change due to university expansion and new development that intensifies the area and makes it less auto-centric. The images on the following pages depict the work done in the North University City/University Town Center community. The students investigated existing conditions, development trends that are impacting the area and potential strategies to implement the adopted community plan which calls for the area to be a "Compact Urban Node". The students proposed changes to the community included making the commercial areas less of an island and more connected to the adjacent residential neighborhoods and office parks. This included reuse of large surface parking lots for housing, expansion of the university and putting the streets on a "road diet".

group project


undergraduate undergraduatearchitecture architecture | AR400 design studio

group project

| 11 19210 193


group project


undergraduate architecture | AR400 design studio

southeastern san diego group project The experience for this studio section was intended to develop an urban project along Euclid Gateway Corridor, a commercial/mixed used corridor. Students will focus on developing a design for an urban project that fits within the context of the armature developed in the Winter Quarter AR402 Studio. This may include a building and/or an urban open space design (park, plaza, creek, or streetscape). Students submit a 1-page project proposal along with an outline of the program and a site map for the first week of class. It has been said that the symbolic qualities of urban designs are vital in establishing a sense of belonging to a place and its inhabitants’ pride in it. One of the major difficulties is to decide on whose values and needs take precedence. Is it to be those of children or their elders, tourists or habituÊs, men or women, the middle classes or the poor? The list of actors in the city is endless. In many places it has historically been religious and civic buildings that have been the most important foreground buildings. Today, it is often the buildings of commerce. group project team members: scott bales katherine butters laura dayao harsh jain brandon nash dinara usmankhodjaeva

julia wong daniel ordonez carla wijaya tim hoffman alejandra montalvo christopher gonzalez

group project

194 195


south crest : center for the arts wilfred briones The Southcrest masterplan is organized into seven distinct phases: Psychological Change, Stitching the Grid, Reconstructing Mobility, Creek Design, Community Green Spaces, Changing Ground, and Reestablishing the 252 Corridor. This project focuses on Chollas Creek and community green spaces. While some cities seem to be neglected by socio-political involvement, the contemporary approach to the Southcrest masterplan proposes an augmented modality of innovative solutions to the many problems that plague the comunity today. The conceptual plan integrates the idea of holistically connecting the community together and connecting to other communities. The design expresses an axial convergence that connects the bisected north and south. It promotes a dynamic experience of walkability and pedestrian oriented activities that radiates through the day. Most residents may wish to keep the creek off limits and segregated from the community, while some consider it to be unusable; however, it has potential. There is also potential for a project that will provide gathering spaces and walkable communities throughout Southcrest and other communities, the Center for the Arts.

wilfred briones


undergraduate architecture | AR400 design studio

wilfred briones

| 11 19610 197


Education Corridor

education corridor raymond vuong This Corridor is about educating the community, specifically its children. They are the up coming generation that will instigate the betterment of Southeast San Diego. The library is a major connection from Horton Elementary School to the Jacobs Center within the Education Corridor. The goal in the design of this library was to provide the children and community with a pleasant place to learn, be engaged and have fun. The design builds on the strong essence of the original Malcolm X Library, giving it more space and a new look.

Improving the existing strengths such as the Horton Elementary School, Jacobs Center, and Malcolm X Library A major barrier seperating these resources is the steep topography. This inspired the Platforms and play in landscape as an aesthetic element and solution to the problem. The manipulation of the land will activate the community to thrive.

Malcolm X Library 2.0

This Corridor is all about educating the community, specifically the children. They are the up coming generation that will start the betterment of Souteast San Diego.

New Location, New Look, Same “Help The Community� Attitude

The library is a major connection from Horton Elementary School to the Jacobs Center within the Education Corridor. The goal in the design of this library is to provide the children and community with a pleasant place to learn, be engaged and have fun. I am taking all strong essence of the original Malcolm X Library and giving it more space and a new look.

Horton Eelementary School A B

Physical Connection with secondary connections Experiences along the connection

Ge

Ext

Guymon St.

Recreation Center B

Market St. Childrens Park

Colaboration Garden

Recreaction Center Swimming

A

Jacobs Center

raymond vuong

Raymond Vuong AR403 Spring 2012


undergraduate architecture | AR400 design studio

Horton Elementary School

Main LIbrary

Guymon St.

East Section Cut Education Corridor

0’

10’

20’

Overflow

Event Center

Parking

Collaboration Garden

Market St.

Jacobs Center

Trolley

30’

Gallery Space

Community Event Space

OverFlow Space

Front Desk Stacks Lecture Room 2 Audio Stacks

Lecture Room 1

Tier 1: Verbal Two lecture rooms Audio Collection

Group Tutoring

Private Tutoring

Public Desks Stacks

Private Tutoring

Tier 2: Directional Private turoing rooms Group tutoring room Main stacks

Local Cafe

Tier 3: Visual

Section Cut Overflow Space

0’

15’ 5’

10’

Overflow Space

Gallery Space

Gallery Space Local Cafe

Courtyard

Overflow Space

Overflow Space

spill outs for gallery, cafe, event space and multi-purpose room

Event Center

Multi-Purpose Room

Community Event Space

Community event space Multipurpose room

Community Event Center

Floor Plan Malcolm X Library

40

0’

20’

Malcolm X Library

Courtyard

raymond vuong

| 11 19810 199


sdsu school of art and theatre carla wijaya The idea of redeveloping the Qualcomm Stadium site was to restore and rehabilitate San Diego's riverside. This project proposed to create a more pedestrian-friendly environment by increasing connections between people and spaces. The school encourages and supports arts as a vital part of the community's character and identity. By having the school as a transition from the river to the proposed development, the project provides an art-oriented experience (from street art, music and outdoor theatre) that increases public engagement. The theatrical aspect of this master plan will emphasis Qualcomm's original mission; "A place to gather", bringing nature back into Mission Valley to revive its identity, characteristic and personality that has long since disappeared.

carla wijaya


undergraduate architecture | AR400 design studio

carla wijaya

| 11 20010 201


or

Family Center that is currently there. This site was chosen because it is close to the trolley and bus stops across the street. It is also down the street from the Food 4 Less, locating the site within a close proximity of the shopping center. The Market

Objectives

and Euclid intersection is a high traffic area and is know by many as the center of southeast San Diego. This location will allow the the proposed site to be visible by the public and will be seen as a symbol of heath awareness for the community.

• Promote Public Health • Provide Local Food • Provide Income • Create Gateway a community • growing Introduce Walkability

Seattle’s Urban Gardens • • • • • •

jenny yniguez

Creating Green Space Network Local Activism & Support “Victory Gardens” Created in Phases Local Food Banks Jump Start Program- Bussiness, non-profit, city funding Horton Elementary School

The vision for Southeast San Diego was to restore Chollas Creek and the Encanto neighborhood by establishing elements of walkability and accessibility in a safe and inspiring environment. The project focused along the creek corridor south of Market Street and east of Euclid Avenue. The objective was to create an edge along the creek that would present the creek as a valued amenity and support public heath in the community. The plan established opportunities to create a healthier community while promoting community pride.

Growing A Community Southeast San Diego Food Co-op & Urban Farm Glass Atrium

Natural Ventilation

Office Space

Two Story Green House

Market & Event Market Space

Natural Wood Facade

Terrace

Market

Cafe

South Sun PVLight Panels

Wood P.V. Panels Trellis for cafe For Shade

Office Space

Market & Event Market Space

Jacobs Center

Natural Air Ventilation Throughout Market Space

Terrace

Market

Hot Air Leave Through Atrium Atrium Green House

P.V. Panels for Co-op cafe West Elevation

Green Wall Fins on west side provides shade.

Aerial Site Perspective

Food Food Less 44 Less

North-South Section

Two Story Green House

Bryco Business Park

Trolley Line

South Sun Light Natural Ventilation

Site

Transit Stop

Atrium allows light in and lets hot air out.

Bike Storage

Malcom X Library

MARKET ST.

With Trees

Atrium allows light in Roof Terrace “Green” Shade Finsand lets hot air out.

Street Trees

Elementary Institute Of Science

EUCLID AVE.

Planters For Natural Cooling

Rite-Aid Development

N

Neighborhood Site Scale: 1” = 100’

North-South Section Green Steps

Street trees reduce heat island effect.

Market Green House

Multi-use Space

Green Steps

East-West Cross Section jenny yniguez

Market Multi-use Space

East-West Cross Section

Design Ideas

North-South Site Section

East-West Cross Section Scale: 1”=10’

Entrance Percpective


undergraduate architecture | AR400 design studio

warm, natural

relaxing atmosphere

roof top garden

open bar seating open to courtyard

enhance - multi housing

Site Layout Concept street trees create outdoor room courtyard open to street, open corner entrance

gary lewis

The ‘S’ shaped layout allows for an organic flow of circulation to happen throughout the site while the circles act as ‘elbows’ to connect the linear park and the street

earth toned

The project's urban design goals included connecting the housing and restaurant into the urban environment by allowing today’s private residential mentality to open up and foster a sense of real community within the units and the neighborhood. The units create housing for young adults and their children and/or young adults looking for shared living units in a new type of community. People are tired of commuting and seek lower cost urban living, evidenced by growing migration to urban areas such as this.

material & landscape precedent imagery| materiality and ambiance

atmosphere

1 Front of townhouse and linear park

integrated parking design/

for the people atmosphere

material & landscape

roof top garden

relaxing,natural dining

corten steel

Natural Ventilation

The unit layouts and space given in the back of the units allows for cross ventilation to occur

set back entrance

]

[S][

set back entrance defines entrance and makes public to private transition

Townhouse section A-A

[W

3 Restaurant on the river, boardwalk, and park

A

A

[W

]

A

[S

][E ]

2 Back of townhouse/parking

E]

living room opens up to front patio

W W

E

]

][E

[S

5

Sunlight

]

[W

1 Front of townhouse and linear park

warm, natural

1

2

1 2

A 2 Back of townhouse/parking 0

10’

A 3 Restaurant on the river, boardwalk, and park N

30’

0

Rooftop Floor Plan

1 Bedroom 1 2 Bedroom 2 3 Closet 4 Bathroom 5 Reading/Sun Nook

1 Rooftop Garden 2 Solar Panels

N

30’

softened edge and defined edge

open bar seating open to courtyard

Second Floor Plan

permeable ground not hardscaped

Site Layout Concept street trees create outdoor room courtyard open to street, open corner entrance

0

10’

Automobile Access

wood awning on north or east side covers whole face to make a more private bedroom above

The residential streets on the Northeast and Southwest sides of the site allow for easy access to the residences without taking a large area of the site for cars. On grade parking allows for the access way to become a residential street and the low cost allows for more to be put into the rest of the design

The ‘S’ shaped layout allows for an organic flow of circulation to happen throughout the site while the circles act as ‘elbows’ to connect the linear park and the street

A

Townhouse section A-A

10’

front patio

roof top garden

another option for roof garden that articulates the form

30’

4

3 Street

Townhouse

Townhouse

Linear Park

30’

Street

1

50’

set back entrance defines entrance and makes public to private transition

2

TH

TH

RST

Positive/Built Space The overall layout of the positive spaces allows for the residences to to enter and interact with what is going on around them while still having a degree of privacy. The food kiosk, in front facing the street, will allow for a small spirt of interaction to occur during lunch and dinner and provides a small buffer from the road to the units behind and creates a small trail like buffer in front of the residences in that location

2

][E ]

10’

TH TH TH

[S

0

The unit layouts and space given in the back of the units allows for cross ventilation to occur

living room opens up to front patio

3

Section A-A

TH

TH

Natural Ventilation set back entrance

]

Townhouse

R

TH

[S][ E

Townhouse

TH

corten steel

[W

Townhouse

TH

TH

TH TH

TH

relaxing,natural dining

5 4

TH

TH

roof top garden

TH

earth toned

material & landscape precedent imagery| materiality and ambiance

5

TH

A

atmosphere

A

]

A

TH

TH

N

relaxing atmosphere

First Floor Plan

entrance to unit

OF C

2

20

integrated parking design/

TH

material & landscape

3

for the people atmosphere

3

1 Front patio 2 Living room 3 Kitchen/ bar seating 4 Storage/pantry 5 Carport

S

steel awning creates outdoor room and shades

4

1

Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. corten steel

5 4

The spacing between the row of units and a ‘cut’ through the middle (seen in section) allows for each unit to have natural lighting

[W

]

1 2

W W

E

]

][E

[S

Bath

Bedroom

Townhouse

First Floor Plan Storage

1

Front patio Parking Living1Room 2 Living room 3 Kitchen/ bar seating 4 Storage/pantry 5 Carport

Street

Section B-B N

0

A

10’

0

30’

0

10’

Rooftop Floor Plan

1 Bedroom 1 2 Bedroom 2 3 Closet 4 Bathroom 5 Reading/Sun Nook

A N

30’

Second Floor Plan

Boardwalk 20

50’

10’

Townhouse

Entrance Patio Pedestrian/Parking Street

]

[W

Restaurant corten steel

steel awning creates outdoor room and shades

The spacing between the row of units and a ‘cut’ through the middle (seen in section) allows for each unit to have natural lighting

S

A 0

entrance to unit 10’

30’

Negative/Open Space The linear park down the middle of the site is a continuation of the linear park that is to the northwest of the site; this is also the end of this linear park. The end consists of an ‘amphitheater’ (northeast corner) that allows for movie nights to occur for the residences and public to enjoy. On the boardwalk, at the end of the linear park, is a restaurant that faces out to the river.

San Diego River

N

30’

1 Rooftop Garden 2 Solar Panels Outdoor Seating

Outdoor Seating

Sunlight

front patio softened edge and defined edge permeable ground not hardscaped

gary lewis wood awning on north or east side covers whole face to make a more private bedroom above

Townhouse Street

Section A-A

0

10’

Townhouse

Townhouse

Townhouse Linear Park

30’

50’

Townhouse Street another option for roof garden that articulates the

Automobile Access The residential streets on the Northeast and Southwest sides of the site allow for easy access to the residences without taking a large area of the site for cars. On grade parking allows for the access way to become a residential street and the low cost allows for more to be put into the rest of the design

| 11 20210 203


“Architecture is viewed as a comprehensive process bringing together the social/ cultural, urban/environmental and building- specific factors that shape and mold what should be built.”

VICINITY MAP

Typology Identification The location I have chosen for my building type acts as the tip of a funnel because it is located in the Living Building District which is surrounded by the SDSU Extension, museums, transit, plazas, and other services; everything flows out to this site. I want to establish and reinforce the connection between those services . It is zoned as mixed use with student housing, vertical farming, and retail/commercial space. It also has a river running through it; by framing buildings parallel to the river, it allows for a great experience while celebrating the natural element. I believe a mixed use building in that district will flourish and create opportunities for innovation. My vision is to develop a mixed use building that consists of retail/commercial (1-2 stories), housing (2-4 stories), and a community gardens. I believe buildings should be created to be self sustaining and adaptive.

N

Urban Design Goals The building should be self sustaining: economically, efficiently, and environmentally friendly. The community farming will beneficial to the users economically and efficiently because it gives them access to fruits and vegetables without having to drive far to buy them. Designing within the context and responding to it will allow me to take into consideration the culture of the area, surrounding programs, and really create a site specific project. For example using light, wind, local materials, etc. to their fullest potential and thinking of how they can be used after its lifespan will make it environmentally friendly. The building should be adaptable from day to night, season to season, and constantly evolving because like nature everything is dynamic. I want the form of this building to be program, performance, and experience driven.

0 100’

400’ SITE

CALIFORNIA

SAN DIEGO

A MIXED USE COMMUNITY

VICINITY MAP

N

the ground plane

HOME

Circulation is a huge issue that controls how one gets from one space to another. It also is the main stimulus to how an experience can be hightened.

In this concept diagram, I tried to layout the programs by using circulation inspired by the flow of water, because it is next to the canal. Therefore, the user is able to experience two different types of circulation: one along the boardwalk and one through the site.

The project is surrounded by the SDSU Extension, museums, transit, plazas, and other services; everything grows from the site. The design intent was to establish and reinforce the connection between those services. A mixed-use building in that district will flourish and create opportunities for innovation. The vision was to develop a 0 100’ 400’ VICINITY MAP mixed use building that consists of retail/commercial (1-2 stories), housing (2-4 stories) and community gardens. Buildings should be created to be self sustaining and adaptive. The form of this building was derived from program, performance, and experience. SITE

400’

TOWN

Circulation is a huge issue that controls how one gets from one space to another. It also is the main stimulus to how an experience can be hightened.

julia wong

0 100’

In this concept diagram, I tried to layout the programs by using circulation inspired by the flow of water, because it is next to the canal. Therefore, the user is able to experience two different types of circulation: one along the boardwalk and one through the site.

The bridge across the two sides of the building are also inspired by how it would feel to cross a river. Having another walk through experience allows for more ventilation through the building as well as better use of light.

The bridge across the two sides of the building are also inspired by how it would feel to cross a river. Having another walk through experience allows for more ventilation through the building as well as better use of light.

TOWN HOME

COMMUNITY

GARDENS

Unfortunately, having the parking over is not an efficient way of taking advantage of the sunlight.

Unfortunately, having the parking over is not an efficient way of taking advantage of the sunlight.

N

The way I approached redefining the experience in a midrise was by finding the three main issues users deal with on a day to day basis: the super block, lighting, and circulation.

Circulation is a huge issue that controls how one gets from one space to another. It also is the main stimulus to how an experience can be hightened.

With those three issues, I began finding ways through diagrams to design spaces that were the best possible solutions. After developing the three concept diagrams, I found one key ingredient that could tie all of them together: the ground plane. Living/working in a midrise or even highrise is a complete different experience than working in a one story building.

In this concept diagram, I tried to layout the programs by using circulation inspired by the flow of water, because it is next to the canal. Therefore, the user is able to experience two different types of circulation: one along the boardwalk and one through the site.

By creating a parking structure in the center that allows for the other programs to form around it, I am able to create an experience that allows for great circulation, an upper plaza that serves the community as well as the users, spaces that take advantage of the light, and break up the masses that make it a human scale experience.

CIRCULATION PROCESS DIAGRAM The bridge across the two sides of the building are also inspired by how it would feel to cross a river. Having another walk through experience allows for more ventilation through the building as well as better use of light. Unfortunately, having the parking over is not an efficient way of taking advantage of the sunlight.

5

CIRCULATION PROCESS DIAGRAM

SITE PLAN

0 30’ 60’ N

120’

PARTI SKETCH

3 4 For this section diagram, lighting and parking was the main consideration. The idea was to have the parking be available at the ground level to the tenants and make it encloses so that it is not seen to the public.

The way I approached redefining the experience in a midrise was by finding the three main issues users deal with on a day to day basis: the super block, lighting, and circulation.

Lighting plays its role by having the units positioned in a longitudinal manner facing east-west to allow for morning and afternoon functions. Taking into consideration the angle of the sun as well as the wind is what gave influence to the building’s disposition.

With those three issues, I began finding ways through diagrams to design spaces that were the best possible solutions.

CIRCULATION PROCESS DIAGRAM

The way I approached redefining the experience in a midrise was by finding the three main issues users deal with on a day to day basis: the super block, lighting, and circulation. With those three issues, I began finding ways through diagrams to design spaces that were the best possible solutions. After developing the three concept diagrams, I found one key ingredient that could tie all of them together: the ground plane. Living/working in a midrise or even highrise is a complete different experience than working in a one story building.

By creating a parking structure in the center that allows for the other programs to form around it, I am able to create an experience that allows for great circulation, an upper plaza that serves the community as well as the users, spaces that take advantage of the light, and break up the masses that make it a human scale experience.

julia wong

0 30’ 60’

By creating a parking structure in the center that allows for the other programs to form around it, I am able to create an experience

After developing the three concept diagrams, I found one key ingredient that could tie all of them together: the ground plane. Living/working in a midrise or even highrise is a complete different experience than working in a one story building.

120’

PARTI SKETCH

3 LIVE/WORK LOFT SECTION PERSPECTIVE [SUN+WIND]


undergraduate architecture | AR400 design studio

EAST-WEST SECTION

0

15’

30’

90’

3

Many b street w their bu creates when th up the m facades ence wh

This exp program wide di facing t experie courtya that ser the tena outdoo private ence.

UP

7 2

7

DN

4

6 UP

UP

UP

1

UP

3

5 TOTAL SQ. FOOTAGE: 1,200

4.5’

9’

18’

N

LIVE/WORK LOFT PLAN

0

BREAKING UP THE MASSES DIAGRAM + PROGRAM 6

2

1

UP

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

OFFICE KITCHEN + DINE LIVING RM/ DEN ROOM ROOM OUTDOOR GARDEN BATHRM

3

UP

4

2

TOTAL SQ. FOOTAGE: 850

5

0

6.25’

NORTH-SOUTH SECTION

EAST-WEST SECTION

25’

0

0

1

12.5’

N

ROW HOME PLAN

15’

30’

15’

30’

1 2 3 4 5 6

KITCHEN + DINE LIVING RM OFFICE ROOM PATIO BATHRM

90’

90’

Many buildings take advantage of using the street wall as a way to maximize the area of their building. What is not realized is that it creates a very non human scale experience when the building is 5-10 stories. By breaking up the masses and ungulating the building’s facades, it creates a more people scale experience when walking down a street or visually.

julia wong

This exploded axonometric shows a mixture of program used along the street edge and a wide displacement of smaller housing units facing the boardwalk to create a different experience walking. There is also a central courtyard located above the parking garage that serves the users of the offices as well as the tenants. This creates two different types of outdoor spaces for the users to enjoy: the private courtyard and the boardwalk experience.

| 11 20410 205


Flat roof Building 1

Building 2

Wood roof structure

Steel Columns 15’

CMU Construction

South East San Diego

125’

3.5’

Concrete foundation 80’

Post Office

Existing Building 2

Master Plan

Floor Plan & Dimensions

Wood structure roof with steel columns

Tilt-up concrete construction

125’

Steel Columns

Existing Alley on East side

80’

MARKET CREEK

50’

Existing Building 2

CANYON

PATH

MARKET ST

6’

26’

25’

Concrete loading dock

CANYON 15’

10’

SECTION A

Ground Floor Plan

Retail

Retail

26’

35’

10’

Ground Floor Plan

25’

POST OFFICE PARKING

35’

7TH BUILDING SECTION STUDY

HEALTHY MARKET ANCHOR SUPPORTING RETAIL AROUND PLAZA SUPPORTING ENTREPRENEURIAL BUSINESS DIVERSE DENSE RESIDENTIAL WITH IN SITE DIVERSE RESIDENTIAL ENCOMPASSING SITE PUBLIC AND ALTERNATE TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS Second CIVIC CORE PUBLIC SPACE Ramp

Retail

Restaurant

Retail

15’

Floor Plan

25’

110’

30’

15’

35’

Office

Office

40’

10’

5’

MARKET ST.

10’

TROLLEY STATION

RESIDENTIAL UNIT

12’

OFFICE UNIT

5’

10’ 10’

12’ 8’

8’

15’ 10’

BIO SWALE PATH PLANTER

TROLLEY TRACK 12’

20’

12’

PLANTER

POST OFFICE PARKING

SECTION C

60’

20’

6TH BUILDING ELEVATION SECTION STUDY

joao costa tim smith

ENCANTO CANYON

35’ POST OFFICE

SECTION D

8’

8’

BIO SWALE

10’

RETAIL UNIT

PATH PLANTER

12’

7’

20’

10’

Open Green Space

5’

Section C

Community Vegetable Roof Garden

Loading Dock

Cafe

Roof Parking

Section D Jacobs Street 40’

20’

11’

58’

6’

11’

7’

12’

MARKET ST.

5’

Light Rail Station

40’

20’

10’

5’

RESIDENTIAL UNIT

10’

RESIDENTIAL UNIT

10’

PLAZA

TROLLEY STATION

HEALTH MARKET

TROLLEY STATION

OFFICE UNIT

ENCANTO CANYON 15’

RESTAURANT UNIT

15’

12’

30’

10’

Encanto Creek

18’

18’

RETAIL

22’

MARKET

CAFE

18’

CAFE

18’

4’

7TH BUILDING SECTION STUDY

58’

Tow

Anchor Retail

14’ 12’

18’

Healthy Market

36’

RESIDENTIAL UNIT

10’

LIVE / WORK LOFTS

12’

Retail

Transit Station

Roof Plaza

Office

35’

CANYON

Ramp

Retail

Townhomes

Boost Community Moral Increase Community Art Create Social Atmosphere Increase Community Health Awareness Increase Walkability Strengthen Social Fabric Lower Crime

Economic Diversity Boost Local Economy Foster Entrepreneurial Startup Added Residential Density Added Professional Jobs Increased Land Value

LIVE / WORK LOFTS

Restaurant

Patio

Birds Eye Perspective

Office

Social

Loading Dock

20’

Retail

Retail

Main Plaza Communal Commercial Space

Economic Cafe

Retail

Ramp

Townhomes

Anchor Retail

Main Plaza

Retail

POST OFFICE PARKING

Drought Tolerant Roof Garden

Environmental

Retail

TROLLEY TRACK

75’

Office

Healthy Market

Adaptive Reuse Natural Landscaping NetJacobs ZeroStreetBuilding Attain LEED Certification Water Reclamation Light Rail Station Alternate Transportation

Light Rail Station

Removed and reused to widen street

18’

SMALL LOCAL ANCHOR LIGHT LOCAL RETAIL LOOSE AND DENSE RESIDENTIAL AUTO ORIENTED DECENT PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION CONNECTIVITY ISSUES NO CIVIC BUILDING NO OR LITTLE PUBLIC SPACE NO OR LITTLE LANDSCAPING

45’

Retail

Transit Station

Open Green Space

East Bound

Cafe

Main Plaza Removed and reused to make room for public plaza

40’

Patio

Market Street

10’

SECTION B

TROLLEY TRACK

Retail

Healthy Market

7’

OUR DESIGN “TOOLS”

East Bound

Retail

6’

18’

125’

105’

West Bound

4’

3’

EXISTING RETAIL ANCHOR SUPPORTING RETAIL EXPENSIVE RETAIL SPACE LOOSE RESIDENTIAL SURROUNDING SITE LOW TO MID DENSITY Market Street NO HOUSING ON SITE West Bound AUTO AND TRANSIT ORIENTED STRONG CIVIC CORE ISOLATED PUBLIC SPACE Market Street

45’

MARKET ST

25’

5’

6TH BUILDING ELEVATION SECTION STUDY

PATH

35’

Market Street

Encanto Canyon

10,000 SF Total Floor Space 35’

25’

Town Homes

170’

60’

12’ 10’

125’

Parking

20,000 SF Total Floor Space

Trolley Side

Floor Plan & Dimensions

3’ TROLLEY TRACK

Site Plan

Concrete foundation

62ND ST. COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT

ENCANTO VALLEY

Concrete loading dock

Existing Building

18’ 25’

105’

Floor Plan & Dimensions

110’

Tilt-up Concrete Construction Concrete foundation

Trolley Side

15’ 5’

45’

Offices/Civic

CMU Construction 125’

35’

10’

70’

Wood roof structure

15’

26’

SECTION A 6TH BUILDING ELEVATION SECTION STUDY

Wood roof structure

Steel Columns

10,000 SF Total Floor Space

MARKET ST

10’

Encanto Creek 80’ 40’

Existing Materials

6’

Apartments

Concrete foundation

Existing Building

20’ 25’

Flat roof

3.5’

PATH

12’

Flat roof

Concept & Goals

Concrete loading dock

Existing Building

Section B

CANYON

80’

Existing Materials

Trolley Side

Spatial Programming

Concrete foundation

Wood structure roof with steel columns

CMU construction

Existing Building

Section A

10,000 SF

~ 6,150 SF

Existing Building 1

7’

11’

6’

42’

11’

7’

12’

35’

32’

TROLLEY TRACK

3’

110’

36’

18’

5’

11’

10’

11’

5’

40’

TROLLEY TRACK 12’

20’

10’

12’

12’

20’

PLANTER 20’

18’

12’

POST OFFICE

POST OFFICE

BIO SWALE

POST OFFICE PARKING 12’

20’

60’

POST OFFICE PARKING 60’

SECTION D 7TH BUILDING SECTION STUDY


Existing Materials

25’ Velasco Professor Diego

Flat roof

70’

Flat roof

Wood roof structure Steel Columns

125’

Steel Columns

Existing Alley on East side

Town Homes undergraduate architecture | AR400 design studio

Offices/Civic

Wood roof structure

Floor Plan & Dimensions

110’

Parking

20,000 SF Total Floor Space

CMU Construction

Tilt-up Concrete Construction

170’

Healthy Market

Concrete foundation

daptation & Transformation

Concrete foundation

Concrete loading dock

50’

iversity and Health

Existing Building 2

canto Mixed Use Light Rail Station

Floor Plan & Dimensions

03 - Spring 2012 - Joao Costa Tim Smith ssor Diego Velasco

25’

Concrete loading dock

Removed and reused to make room for public plaza

Trolley Side 60’

10,000 SF Total Floor Space CANYON

PATH

MARKET ST

6’

26’

18’

15’

25’

South Side Apartment Floor Plan Sketch

18’

10’

3’

SECTION B

TROLLEY TRACK 125’

25’

POST OFFICE PARKING

35’

Light Rail Station

7’

35’

Preserving the businesses and light industry already incubating in Southeast San Diego influenced the implementation of this concept. It provided for the integration of diverse employment options, as a guiding principle to develop the built environment. Places where chance encounters could arise and people could socialize were designed. A variety of ideas were methodically weaved together to create three major nodes that draw people through the site by foot, bicycle, or public transportation. This is a place where one could partake in everything needed for daily living.

TROLLEY TRACK

7TH BUILDING SECTION STUDY

45’

75’

25’

110’

15’

30’

POST OFFICE PARKING

35’

North Side Apartment Floor Plan Sketch

joao costa and tim smith

4’

10’

Removed and reused to widen street

Cafe Main Plaza adaptation and transformation

West Facade Sketch

Schematic Apartment Plans

Birds Eye Perspective Second Floor Plan Ramp

Retail

Ramp Office

Retail

Office

Office

Townhomes

Office

Residential Courtyard

Drought Tolerant Roof Garden

Townhomes Main Transit & Retail Plaza

Communal Commercial Space

Roof Parking

Roof Plaza

Office

Community Vegetable Roof Garden

in Transit & Retail Plaza

Apartments

16 Units 24 Bedrooms 6,400 SF Footprint 14.6% of an Acre 301 People per Acre

Townhomes

Apart

5 Units 15 Bedrooms 3,750 SF Footprint 8.6% of an Acre 159 People per Acre

* Used SD average 2.75 people per unit 2010 Cen

Apartment Interior Courtyard

Loading Dock

Cafe

Market Street

Green Space

Main Plaza

Edge Uses 40’

20’

10’

40’

5’

20’

10’

5’

Local Anchor

Small Entrepreneur

Light Rail Station

Transit Corridor Retail

MARKET ST.

Vertical Circulation

HEALTH MARKET

Light Rail Station

TROLLEY STATION Market Street West

Restaurant

Healthy Market

Movable Seating for Restaurant & People Watching

LIVE / WORK LOFTS

Transportation Lockers & Bike Racks

Vibrant Market Entrance & Patio

Tranquil Fixed Seating

Restaurant

Cafe

Plaza Arrival Point & Main Circulation

Retail

Vertical Circulation

Jacobs Street

10’ West Bound Light Rail Station

ENCANTO CANYON

MultiPurpose Green Space

Light Rail Line

East Bound Light Rail Station

loped to Drain

POST OFFICE

To Post Office

Plaza Diagram

40’

12’

20’

BIO SWALE

10’

5’

8’

8’

Healthy Market

Movable Seating for Restaurant & People Watching

Light Rail Station Elevation

Vibrant Market Entrance & Patio

PATH PLANTER

Retail

Retail

Transportation Lockers & Bike Racks

14’

Tranquil Fixed Seating

15’

Market & CafeRETAIL Concept Sketch

Cafe

Plaza ArrivalTolerant & Environmentally Conscious Plants & Trees Drought Point & Main Circulation

Interactive Building Edge with Retail Space & Market Street Condition

Retail

18’

18’

Mark

Retail

Healthy Market Anchor Market Street East

MultiPurpose Green Space

Diverse Retail Community

Market Street Retail

Paralell Parking

nsit Corridor

Retail

CAFE

18’Sketch North Facade Concept

POST OFFICE

Jacobs Street

SECTION D 7TH BUILDING SECTION STUDY

TROLLEY TRACK West Bound Light Rail Station

58’

12’

7’

11’

6’

11’

7’

12’

35’

110’

40’

5’

11’

10’

12’

20’

POST OFFICE PARKING 12’

20’

60’

Light Rail Line

East Bound Light Rail Station

To Post Office

Plaza Diagram

Light Rail Station Elevation 40’

20’

10’

5’

Drought Tolerant & Environmentally Conscious Plants & Trees

Market & Cafe Concept Sketch

joao costa tim smith

| 11 20610 207


The central mission of the Thesis Design Studio, the heart of the fifth year of the Bachelor of Architecture Program, is to establish a series of open source collaborative studios over three quarters; each designated for rigorous research, discussion, and response to existing platforms and modes of architectural investigations.

undergraduate AR500 thesis studio studio faculty philipp bosshart gil cooke raul diaz mozhdeh matin goyo ortiz-munoz eric szemeczko doug wiganoske

This collaborative studio is driven by critical conversation that is supported by the development of deliverable assets. All intentions are focused towards the critical evaluation of one’s own work and its place within the contemporary discourse of architecture. With the culmination of the undergraduate thesis year, it is expected that the students have the ability to solidify arguments and produce critical and rigorous architecture. In keeping with methods of applied learning, a student’s specific argument is pitted against a series of architectural ideas and arguments that reside within a varied and expansive conversation about architecture and its role in contemporary society. Thesis Design Studio is structured to position students to explore architectural projects that are not bound by a specific ideology, program, site, ethos, or theme; yet this approach is established to explore ideas across a gradient of architectural possibilities. The only definitive that remains is that these self-directed arguments require exploration via architecture in order to understand the full range of possibilities and capacities, as well as their limits. The extent of the individual thesis is developed and defined by each student and is supported by complementary methods that are documented in a Thesis Manual which forms the basis for design investigations culminating in a juried presentation and submittal of a written Thesis Document. Philipp Bosshart, Level Coordinator


brendan p. coen


distil brendan coen undergraduate program design award winner Quality of life is derived through a circuitous evolution where experiences inform the relationship of sincere values and future decisions; which again inform experiences. This process is naturally distilled through decisions. In other words, the formation of maximum value is gained through the extraction of essential elements. The project is a symbiotic expansion chamber for the neighborhood of Barrio Logan. It is an opportunity to test experiential qualities which will inform future decisions eventually leading to efficiency and quality of life. The application is for a significantly scaled assemblage serving as a preservation element of the authentic community. Located beneath the Coronado Bridge, the site is returned to the public realm by adopting the waterfront, then preserving and protecting the land. This is achieved by lifting the community above the ground plane creating an industrial forest in the native parkland and esplanade below. This urban graft embraces the endangered "dirty live/work" artisans through principles of "make it happen with what is available" while questioning contemporary lifestyles and creating an ad hoc environment. Occupants and resident fabricators excercise selfsufficient and self-yielding strategies generating expansion of what is needed, as it is needed, and no more. Construction maintains relationships with local fabrication specialists and purges the industrial community of excess/unused materials. Relationships create unorthodox gestures and volumes enhancing experiential qialities of residents and visitors. The design blends multifunctionality and experiential efficiences while maintaining stewardship and allegiance to the roots of a disappearing community.

brendan p. coen


undergraduate architecture | AR500 thesis studio

brendan p. coen

| 11 21010 211


brendan p. coen


undergraduate architecture | AR500 thesis studio

brendan p. coen

| 11 21210 213


live share grow: a residential farm tower brandon martella With population growth, food production in the United States is reaching maximum capacity. Current trends in development create a struggle between farming and living. These two practices are modeled for their own benefit and are soon to clash in a disastrous agglomeration. The 30,000 plus residents of San Diego’s central urban context consume 21,231,000 pounds of produce each year. A new type of residential tower needs to come forth. Utilizing vertical farming, a new model of urban living can be tested in a dense community. The residential/farm tower located in a vertical community of tourist resources and developer condominiums will provide fresh produce daily to celebrate a direct injection of local goods from farm to market. It proposes a new level of social interface and engagement of the community from farm to market from community to education; let's Live, Share, and Grow within our city. This project was published in the San Diego UnionTribune and has been selected for future exhibition.

brandon martella


undergraduate architecture | AR500 thesis studio

brandon martella

| 11 21410 215


brandon martella


undergraduate architecture | AR500 thesis studio

brandon martella

| 11 21610 217


[inter]action michael wilby This thesis focused on creating an elementary school that puts priority on group learning and collaborative education. This will create students who are more confident in themselves and their ability to think creatively. By forcing interaction through circulation, children will begin to relearn basic social skills and reinforce positive interaction between peers. This may reinforce more positive and community based social skills that will help them succeed in the future.

michael wilby


undergraduate architecture | AR500 thesis studio

michael wilby

| 11 21810 219


phenomenal sequences of movement sarah vargas The experience of a space can only be perceived through fragmented and incomplete partial views through a built environment. Architecture is static until one passes through and creates perpetual movement where geometries are always changing. Although perception cannot be broken down into a simple collection of geometries, activities or sensations, it can be disassembled into elements that can be studied individually during the design process. These elements are what merge to create a final condition of perception. Because of this, it is integral to see the urban fabric as a flowing continuum, constantly altering one’s perception. Several cinematic qualities, techniques and processes can be applied to architecture to study the movement and improve our understanding of transition through space. Capturing specific spatial events and reconfiguring their sequential order may generate a systematic coherent pattern of spatial experiences that reflects the complexities of the contemporary urban condition.

sarah vargas


undergraduate architecture | AR500 thesis studio

sarah vargas

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ecotourism: development to operation sarah harris Ecotourism is not a new field. Within the past few decades, there has been a surge in the popularity of tourism that focuses on nature and natural areas. Ecotourism, as a part of nature tourism is said to account for 25% of worldwide tourism today. However, the ecotourism industry suffers from disjointedness caused by hundreds of sources defining ecotourism hundreds of different ways. Future development needs to focus on improving the economy, environment and sociocultural conditions in affected areas, but still provide fun and relaxation to guests as a necessary component of a capitalist tourism operation. The goal of this thesis was to use the principles of ecotourism and sustainability to create a policy that will guide the development of ecotourism endeavors with the aim of improving the local environmental, economic and sociocultural conditions.

sarah harris


undergraduate architecture | AR500 thesis studio

sarah harris

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design installation zachary horneman Place, program, and typology govern the way a college is perceived, acknowledged, and experienced not only by the students and faculty, but also to visitors and the public. Architecture schools as a typology have not always adequately addressed successful qualities for a productive and engaging academia at its highest output in relation to a community or place that surrounds and supports a formula for a thriving architectural school includes systems, program, spatial relationships, learning types, and above all, community involvement. A community or society should be at the forefront of the goals and objectives set by institution and a college should be able to benefit the community while also altering its surrounding society’s interpretation of the built environment while relieving specific feelings of animosity.

zachary horneman


undergraduate architecture | AR500 thesis studio

zachary horneman

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natural [un]familiarities matt woltering The urban environment is often monotonous. Apathetic cities bounded by rectilinear parameters create an urban anxiety that requires a spatial relief. Architecture, in relationship to the natural, has ignored the complex connection of man to place and resorted to simplistic organizations of the right angle. How can a single city block impose a momentary urban severance through movement and sequence of spaces? Orthogonal movement and gridded spaces provide a disconnection from the genuine rootedness of our being. The tension established within the urban environment demands moments of relief through the introduction of a natural entity within the limits of a city block. The manipulation of geometry generated from these moments in space will lead to formal resemblances of a natural inspiration. How can the method of generative thinking and design reinterpret the essence of man, nature, and architecture through non-literal familiarities?

matt woltering


undergraduate architecture | AR500 thesis studio

matt woltering

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design village faculty advisor hussein munaim studio instructors michael riggin patrick shields keith muller mark clowdus hector perez casey mahon

The design village competition challenges students to develop structures that are not only unique, but that are also portable and habitable - a task requiring a mastery of form and function that is emphasized throughout the curriculum. Students developed their designs during the end of winter quarter under the guidance of NewSchool instructors, incorporating the competition's theme for the year: 2012's was "Metamorphosis", with an emphasis on adaptable architecture and flexibility in design. Top school-wide winners were selected to participate in the design village competition. The competition awarded titles in five categories and listed five honorable mentions. An NSAD team won the award for "Most Adaptable Structure". The second year student team included Luis Valdovinos. Ramiro Martinez, Gonzalo Hernandez and Antonio Barragan. This was the fifth time in the past six years that NSAD teams re-

turned with one of the top prizes. Faculty advisor Hussein Munaim notes the school's winning tradition goes back much further. Munaim first got NSAD students involved in the competition in 1995; they consistently take at least one top title every year. In 2012, five NSAD teams attended the competition with Munaim. A second NSAD team received an honorable mention for their bamboo structure: Daniel Romo, Mohamed Jarrar, Nelson Martinez, William N. Dustan III and Fernando Gomez comprised the team. As a condition of the competition, students must carry their structure three-quarters of a mile, build it on site, and then live in it for three days and two nights. A team: tony salamone, arnulfo rodriguez, jonathan chau and ramiro martinez B team: heather collins, fabio campanaro, autumn hillis and samantha wellnitz C team: luis valdovinos, ramiro martinez, gonzalo hernandez and antonio barragan D team: charles wilson, aaron rockefeller, michel fregosa and frixton abata E team: ramiro martinez and titus dimson F team: timothy fan, ronnie byrd, angelic torres and damian roman G team: daniel romo, mohamed jarrar, nelson martinez, william n. dunstan III and fernando gomez H team: jack lanphere, geoff curzon and ricardo sanchez


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

10 | 11


The award-winning "Most Adaptable Structure" was built with 65 panels made of Masonite. Each was hand-sewn with hemp and had asymmetrical sides in the shape of diamonds, squares, triangles and shields. Plastic bands were used to link blocks. The concept was that with these combinations one could build this structure in many different ways depending on the need and site characteristics.

A team


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

B team

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C team


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

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D team


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

E team

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E team


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

F team

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1. 2.

2.

1. all teams 2. H team


undergraduate architecture | AR200 design studio

1. all teams 2. H team

1. 2.

2. | 11 23810 239


digital media arts program program chair avery caldwell faculty joe c. nicholson soudabeh memarzadeh kiduck kim


Today, more than ever, we share complex information, exchange ideas, and build knowledge with the use of technology - on our own terms, wherever we are, while using our preferred devices. Satellite delivery systems and broadcast systems encircle our planet. Unquestionably, the digital revolution continues to transform society. The result is a dramatic impact on those who create art and cultural assests. The Digital Media Arts program empowers students with opprtunities to invent new forms and genres, to pioneer creative approaches, and to engineer innovative dialogs with cultural constituencies. Its goal is to prepare students with the knowledge and skill needed to evolve complex concepts incorporating visual imagery and illustration, motion graphics, typography, 3D graphics and animation into creative forms of communication delivered and experiences through print, web, mobile and interactive environments. This collection of student projects range from personal interest to global concern and emphasize the understanding of modern society itself. In either case, students were asked to synthesize their design briefs into cogent design solutions while demonstrating their mastery of the digital tools. Their work explores non-traditional methods of production including digital fabrication as an integral part of the attainment of critical, creative and technical proficiencies related to cultural products of mass communication across print media, the internet, and mobile communication devices. Avery Caldwell, Digital Media Arts Department Chair

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amanda schoepflin


digital media arts | graphic design

typography Typography is the art and technique of arranging type. The arrangement of type involves the selection of typefaces, point size, line length, leading (line spacing), adjusting the spaces between groups of letters (tracking) and adjusting the space between pairs of letters (kerning). Students in Typography class are required to build a project utilizing material, color, form and space. All the works are crafted in the Materials Lab at NewSchool. Students work in groups or as individuals. The design and fabrication process is an important component of this assignment.

amanda schoepflin

| 11 24210 243


armando roman


digital media arts | graphic design

armando roman

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adi archwuth


digital media arts | digital imaging

image editing Utilizing Photoshop, students create typography-driven imagery. The process includes using layers and brush tools in Photoshop to create an impactful visual experience. 1. sharina menke 2. adi archwuth

1.

2.

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1.

2.

1. yvette abdelmeseh 2. adi archwuth


digital media arts | digital imaging

Student utilized Photoshop to create this work by merging three images together.

adi archwuth

| 11 24810 249


1 1.

2.

1. juanita almeida 2. armando roman


digital media arts | digital imaging

With Photoshop students create imagery and paint texture recreations driven from imagery.

1. adi archwuth 2. tara avery

1.

2.

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environmental graphic design The Wayfinding Studio identifies and analyzes sites, creates strategies for a variety of media, develops message content for target audiences, establishes a hierarchy for message typologies, creates prototypes for graphic and media designs and provides scaled documents for fabrication.

armando roman


environmental graphic design | wayfinding & information systems

armando roman

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armando roman


environmental graphic design | wayfinding & information systems

armando roman

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Environmental Graphic Design’s (EGD) User Interface Design and Form, Interaction and the Human Body Studios use design thinking techniques while exploring traditional and emerging technologies and new materials in product and environmental design. Interface and interactivity lead the way as these technologies respond more and more to human presence recognition.

armando roman


environmental graphic design | form, interaction and the human body

armando roman

| 11 25610 257


alberto rodriguez


digital media arts | user interface design

interface design The User Interface Design Studio focuses on in-depth analyses of demographics and target audience profiles. These analyses take advantage of behavioral studies, human development, cultural and gender studies, physical limitations, economic profiles and the personal preferences of social groups regarding product selection. With the interactive menu project, students identify their target audience, brand, architectural environment, interior design, method of product delivery, menu items, health-related information, fixtures and furnishings, furniture, ordering method, technology and user interface; in this example, a computer screen located at each booth or table. Students create the "look and feel" for computer interfaces while being mindful of perpetuating the brand through logo, type selection, layout, color scheme and food selection. These projects seek to redesign a menu for a very popular Spanish restaurant that is both a self-serve restaurant and a place where young people, especially students, spend hours socializing. The following pages show a similar menu for an upscale restaurant and nightclub. Dynamic interactive pages continually upgrade the cost of user selections while keeping account of calories and other health-related information. alberto rodriguez

| 11 25810 259


alejandra ramos


digital media arts | user interface design

alejandra ramos

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digital fabrication As an outcome of a quarter-long exploration of digital fabrication, students’ investigation of complex geometry in 3ds Max and its material application were showcased at a Fall 2012 exhibition. The investigation aimed at bridging the digital design process and the tactile fabrication process. It started with the introduction of smart 3D modeling technique in 3ds Max, whose modeling algorithm layers various modifiers in similar ways as Adobe Photoshop handles layers. This enabled students to produce iterations quickly with an immediate access to the history of those layered modifiers. They examined various techniques of digital fabrication through a series of fabrication vocabularies such as aggregation, panelization, stacking, notching, and sculpting. Selection of an optimal material and fabrication method were derived from inherent nature of the geometries with the aid of the Vray rendering engine for instant visualization. Computer-aided-design/ computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) tools such as the CNC router and full-sized bed laser cutter played a major role in the process of final fabrication.

justin hoody


digital media arts | 3D visualization

justin hoody tara avery

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razan almohasen


digital media arts | 3D visualization

1. tara avery 2. lam nguyen 3. meghan putnam 4. tom weimer

1. 1. 2.

1. 3.

4.

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Traditional hand-drawing, delineation and rendering courses are coupled with two and three-dimensional CAD courses to provide the visualization tools necessary for the exploration and explanation of design concepts for digital media and environmental design students.

multi-media

Vector-based drawing programs are augmented with raster-based and compositing software to round out the tools students require for professional looking visual presentations. Courses such as Multi-Media focus on graphic design, image-editing, animation, content development and narrative to augment a student’s abilities in the visualization of design or artistic ideas. In some cases these expressions become prototypes for discussion and critique and in other contexts, the artwork becomes an end unto itself. As CAD-based architectural program publishers move into the areas of entertainment and media, software publishers in the areas of entertainment and media have moved into the world of three dimensions with motion graphics, 3D animations, 3D digital sculpting and special-effects. The two and three-dimensional worlds are merging in virtual space irrespective of design discipline. Complex presentations require the student’s ability to navigate from program to program and platform to platform using software to its best advantage while being knowledgeable in each digital space. jason yang

Graphic panels, books, portfolios, videos, web design, fly-throughs, branding, animations, sound, special-effects, interactive displays and exhibits all require these visualization skills.


clint carlton

shelley ann jules-plag


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

1. carlos jimenez 2. jisun kwon 3. emmanuel favela 4. christopher yanes 5. alex rojas 6. chris carpenter


visualization | multi-media

The Arcimboldo Project is a study in photo-editing with an eye toward narrative and self-discovery. Using remnants of their own image beginning with a high-contrast photographic self-portrait, students collect detrita that have become part of their everyday lives: golf tees, motorcycle parts, sea-life, writing instruments, golf balls, computer parts and even munitions. Using these elements, students explore the transforming tools of image-editing software to blend and morph original forms into mutant forms that retain their original identity yet transition into another reality: a duality. Hoses beome faces; golf tees become hair; golf gloves become skin; computer wire becomes hair as do bullets; transparent water mutates into a translucent skin shielding sea-life representing a human’s vital organs. Lettuce becomes a radiant hairdo while spaghetti defines the muscular and bone structure of a face; tomatoes become ruby-red lips and cloves become earrings. The criteria for success are high. Each found object must retain its original identity while transforming itself into an autobiographical feature. And, in the end, the self-portrait must look like the student it portrays while having yet another personality: an alter ego.

7. matt woltering 8. jared basler 9. rodrigo rosas 10. ryan thornton

7.

8.

9.

10. | 11 26810 269


The abilities to delineate and render are vital to any convincing representation. With this project, students learn about scale, point-of-view, line weights and detail. A two-dimensional measured drawing is extrapolated into a three-dimensional rendered object and placed into a predetermined contextual setting.

1.

2. 3.

1. surgio murguia 2. johnny castanenda 3. javier camarillo


visualization | multi-media

shelley ann jules-plag

| 11 27010 271


Multi-Media's rendering project takes students from a scaled 2-dimensional wire drawing to a 3-dimensional model and then to a rendering placed in context with other objects. The goal is to create an object that is seamless with the pictorial enviroment into which it is inserted. It is imperative that the rendered object have

sarah vargas

the same lighting, shadow and reflection attributes as those already existing in the photograph. The subtext of the project requires knowledge of a variety of hardware, software, photographic and digital media.


visualization | multi-media

matt woltering

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1.

3.

2.

3.

1. ryan thornton 2. peter pedilla 3. johnny castanenda


visualization | multi-media

1. josafina felix 2. surgio murguia

1 1.

2 2.

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newschool of architecture + design

about newschool

NewSchool of Architecture and Design is an accredited, private university located in the East Village neighborhood of downtown San Diego, California. The school was founded 33 years ago by Richard Welsh, a local community college design teacher who felt San Diegans should be able to pursue a professional education in architecture in their own community. From the start, the school established a strong practitioner orientation through its recruitment of practicing architects as teachers, by creation of a Design Clinic and through afternoon and evening course scheduling that permitted students to earn their degrees while employed. The practitioner orientation has remained one of the school’s hallmarks. In 1988 the school moved to its present location just east of the Gaslamp District. From its humble beginnings, NewSchool has grown. With almost 600 students, it now ranks as the fourth largest architecture school in California and its student demographic is said to be the most diverse. Architecture students comprise 90% of the current school population, with approximately two-thirds in the B. Arch. program and one-third in the graduate program. In addition to architecture, NewSchool enrolls students in Construction Management and Digital Media Arts. New programs are being introduced in Interior Design and other related design disciplines. Through its association with Laureate Education, NewSchool offers an expanding array of study-abroad options around the world. The ongoing development of NewSchool rests on four foundational “pillars” (see additional comments on the pillars in the Message at the front of this book): • • • •

The growth of international programs and educational opportunities A commitment to sustainability throughout curricula Leveraging of San Diego as an urban laboratory and a focus of community outreach Preparation for professional practice and the changing nature of the design professions

and on its mission: The mission of NewSchool is to nurture and inspire design-minded students. Our graduates demonstrate a firm foundation of critical thinking, ethical behavior, and a culture of professional practice on their way to becoming socially responsible leaders of change for our global society.


graduate architecture program

digital media arts program

Introduced in 1994, the graduate programs in architecture offer multiple options to almost 150 students. The largest enrollment occurs in the three-year (“4+3”) program that builds upon undergraduate work in an area outside of architecture. For students possessing a pre-professional four-year architecture degree, a two-year (“4+2”) option exists. One-year degree programs include the Master of Science, the post-professional “5+1” Masters and the Executive Master of Architecture, a weekend-format curriculum created especially for practicing professionals that is unique in the country.

The Digital Media Arts (DMA) program focuses on producing well-trained digital artists able to address the challenging needs of society through innovative design, technology and communication. The Bachelor of Science degree is structured in both three-year and four-year plans emphasizing illustration, typography, 3D graphics, animation, motion graphics and other critical content areas. Students select one of two concentrations in pursuit of the degree, Design Visualization or Environmental Graphic Design.

undergraduate architecture program The oldest and largest of NewSchool’s programs is that offering the five-year Bachelor of Architecture degree. Its 350-student body represents a diversity of backgrounds, coming from Southern California, the American Southwest, Mexico, Latin and South America and the Pacific Rim. Many graduates have become respected practitioners in the field. A four-year Bachelor of Arts in Architecture degree is also available. Course work includes design, theory/history, building systems, professional practice and other subject matter culminating in a thesis year.

contruction management program The construction management program educates students to become leaders in the 21st century construction industry. The four-year Bachelor of Science program includes course work in design and graphics as well as construction-related topics ranging from micro-economics to project delivery systems. The Master of Construction Management program, introduced in 2011, is a four-quarter curriculum delivered entirely online. It is based upon an interdisciplinary foundation of science, architecture, business management and engineering.

landscape architecture program NewSchool has offered a three-year Master of Landscape Architecture degree since 2010. Currently, the school is not accepting new students into the program.

laureate education Since 2008 NewSchool has become part of the Laureate International Universities network, which provides undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree programs to more than 780,000 students around the world through more than 70 accredited campusbased and online universities. Global design education collaborations are being undertaken between NewSchool and network universities Domus Academy in Milan, Italy and Media Design School in Auckland, New Zealand to prepare students for designrelated careers in an increasingly diverse and global society.

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HUM361 evolution of surfing

from left to right: kristian gustavson, instructor siah afrasiabi, student stephen cornelius, student ocean experience surf school instructor travis garcia, student


credits credits editor: editor: kurt kurt hunker, hunker, director director ofof graduate graduate programs programs graphic graphic design: design: joejoe c. c. nicholson, nicholson, professor professor and and carla carla wijaya, wijaya, design design assistant assistant


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Design annual 2013  

Spheres is NewSchool's first Design Annual, a collection of selected student work from all levels and various programs.

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