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S ACRAMENTO MUS IC AWARD S

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Sacramento shoe collectors are turning a cult for athletic kicks into big business By Bansky Gonzalez

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Sac musician hosts PBS show 20

Cali politics: 10 hot topics voters need to know 14 Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

Taco the town 23 |

Volume 29, iSSue 39

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thurSday, january

11, 2018

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jaNuaRy 11, 2018 | Vol. 29, ISSue 39

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35 Design Manager Christopher Terrazas Creative Director Serene Lusano Art Director Margaret Larkin Designers Kyle Shine, Maria Ratinova Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Web Design & Strategy Intern Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Contributing Photographers Karlos Rene Ayala, Scott Duncan Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Eric Johnson News Editor Raheem F. Hosseini Arts & Culture Editor Rebecca Huval Associate Editor Mozes Zarate Staff Reporter Scott Thomas Anderson Calendar Editor Kate Gonzales Contributors Daniel Barnes, Ngaio Bealum, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Aaron Carnes, Jim Carnes, Willie Clark, John Flynn, Joey Garcia, Jeff Hudson, Matt Kramer, Jim Lane, Michael Mott, Luis Gael Jimenez, Rachel Leibrock, Kate Paloy, Patti Roberts, Steph Rodriguez, Ann Martin Rolke, Shoka, Bev Sykes

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“Just talking period, Which probably drives my husband nuts.”

asked aT Marconi and FuLTon avenues:

What is your greatest vice?

Linda Teixeir a grocery clerk

I love red wine. I usually go with a zinfandel. After my first child, I decided I would like a glass of wine. I was 36 years old. I never drank much before. I said: “I need some momma juice.” It helps me relax and deal with the kids and the husband. I like the way it tastes.

cHrisTina LisToe unemployed

My greatest vice would be watching way too much Netflix. I am a binge watcher by nature. I used to binge books. When Netflix came out, then that was the end of that. I love all of the shows and need to stay caught up. I really love Grace and Frankie.

cL audia newMan catering business owner

I cannot live without communication. Just talking period, which probably drives my husband nuts … When I talk to people, they will say to me, “Hey, I never would have thought of that.” Don’t text me a book, call me. Let’s have a conversation.

Marcus sT. aubin retired

Coffee. When I was in college, I drank 30 cups of coffee a day, six entire pots. I got up to 288 pounds, because I ate with my coffee. I did lose all of that weight. I abused coffee for so long, I now drink one cup a day. I didn’t burn holes in my stomach lining. I love trucker’s coffee with cream.

Terry McHaiL

vanessa Henderson assistant manager

business owner

Cheese. I love cheese, all kinds of cheese. I have to eat some kind of melted cheese everyday. I crave it. Smoked Gouda is the favorite.

Procrastination. I am always looking to do it tomorrow. I can rest today and do it tomorrow. I have to work well under pressure. I would like to change it. It would calm me down. Everybody says [I need] a calendar. Eventually I will get a to-do list.

01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   5


BUILDING A

HEALTHY S A C R A M E N T O

The Flip Side of Revitalization BY E D G A R S A N C H E Z

M

arie Camacho wept as she watched “City Rising,” a new documentary about California’s housing crisis and its impact on the poor.

The film contrasts gleaming new buildings — such as mighty skyscrapers in downtown Long Beach — with dilapidated nearby neighborhoods begging for investments.

Why the tears?

In Sacramento, “City Rising” interviews former Mayor Kevin Johnson, who proudly says he had a hand in launching the $557 million Golden 1 Center and Oak Park’s ongoing rejuvenation.

Because like one of the desperate families in the film, Camacho and her 4-year-old son, Julian, face eviction. She must vacate their apartment in Sacramento’s Oak Park by Valentine’s Day so her landlord can renovate it and charge higher rent she cannot afford.

“IF I CAN’T FIND AN AFFORDABLE PLACE, I MAY HAVE TO LIVE IN A CAR. I DON’T WANT MY SON TO BE HOMELESS.”

“I was a little teary,” Camacho, 31, said recently, after she and 125 other people watched the hourlong documentary at Sacramento’s Crest Theater (the film is also available to watch online at kcet. org). “I felt emotional when the lady with all those kids was evicted (in Santa Ana), with nowhere to go. I am going through the same situation.”

Marie Camacho, Oak Park renter

City Rising was produced by KCET, an educational TV station in Los Angeles, in partnership with The California Endowment. It spotlights the history of gentrification, suggesting it began in the 19th century, when Americans believed they had a divine right to expand across North America under “manifest destiny.” Just as Native Americans were displaced in the 1850s, poor families today are being forced to abandon their neighborhoods, as old dwellings are replaced by new buildings with sky-high rents. While examining discriminatory laws and practices that helped shape gentrification, “City Rising” follows impacted families in various cities, from Sacramento to Los Angeles.

But Tanya Faison of Black Lives Matter Sacramento was filmed saying the Oak Park improvements forced black families to leave the neighborhood. Camacho, a Sacramento native, may soon move, too. After the screening at the Crest, Camacho told her story to the moviegoers. She was on a post-movie panel that included Darryl Rutherford, executive director of the Sacramento Housing Alliance, who said luxury-apartment developers should be required to set aside some of their units for people of modest means. According to experts, Sacramento County needs 62,000 new affordable homes to meet current

Marie Camacho at Oak Park’s main intersection, ground zero for the sector’s ongoing revitalization. Her Oak Park landlord is seeking to evict her, so he can renovate and collect higher rent. Photo by Edgar Sanchez

housing demands. At present, the county has an estimated 3,600 homeless. Camacho volunteers for the nonprofit Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (acceaction.org). An excellent tenant, she is taking no chances. She recently sent Julian to live with relatives in Mexico. “If I can’t find an affordable place, I may have to live in a car,” Camacho said. “I don’t want my son to be homeless.”

Your ZIP code shouldn’t predict how long you’ll live – but it does. Staying healthy requires much more than doctors and diets. Every day, our surroundings and activities affect how long – and how well – we’ll live. Health Happens in Neighborhoods. Health Happens in Schools. Health Happens with Prevention.

PAID WITH A GRANT FROM THE CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT 6   |   SN&R   |   01.11.18

BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES In 2010, The California Endowment launched a 10-year, $1 billion plan to improve the health of 14 challenged communities across the state. Over the 10 years, residents, communitybased organizations and public institutions will work together to address the socioeconomic and environmental challenges contributing to the poor health of their communities.

To watch City Rising, visit KCET.org, click on “Shows” at the top, then go to City Rising.

www.SacBHC.org


Email lEttErs to sactolEttErs@nEwsrEviEw.com

A real, good movie Re The Greatest Showman review by Jim Lane (Film,  January 4): The dancing was real. If you don’t believe it, watch  the behind-the-scenes stuff. Just because the movie had a lot of CGI  doesn’t mean the dancing looked remotely fake. Everyone there was  a professional dancer for the most part. They selected some of the  best in the world. Plus, Hugh Jackman’s dancing was fantastic and  very real. Zendaya even did her own trapeze stunts. The songs were  amazing. Count yourself in the minority for people who did not like the  songs. The soundtrack is now No. 1 the Billboard charts, and the movie  plus soundtrack have an incredibly high rating by audiences. 

ThereSa a t l a nt a , g a

How do you rate? Re The Greatest Showman review by Jim Lane (Film, January 4): I have rarely read a review so off track... I’m not sure what your qualifications are to be a movie critic, but it’s pretty safe

to say that you have become so cynical and unfeeling that nothing good, clean or entertaining will appeal to you. You make Archie Bunker look happy. This was a fabulous movie with great dancing (like you’re Len Goodman and would know good dancing if you saw it or

not), catchy show tunes and a really good story. I think old P.T. would be proud to have his name associated with it. You need to go for an elephant ride and get your head in the right place (instead of up your backside). Jayme Swanberg T ra fa l g a r, I n

Sacramento needs homes Re: “Mayor’s report: Year one� by Jeff vonKaenel (News, January 4): The story on the mayor is a perfect example of the b.s. the politicians use to get elected and stay elected. He goes on and on about evictions, homeless and lack of housing. How he gets all this tax money from heaven to fix things sometime in the future while the city he runs is busy destroying housing for everybody not rich.

All those rundown buildings in your [feature] story are examples. The problem is the city is sticking it to anybody who wants to improve or build. Here is the estimate of fee costs to build a 2,500-squarefoot house. Total fees could be $20,000 in certain areas, plus school fees of $7,425, and you have not turned a spade of earth or built a single thing. That is why the county and city are way behind in affordable housing. It simply is impossible to build and make money. If the mayor was serious he would be firing at least half the help which is driving up the costs and doing the job of building code enforcement for a fraction of what the bureaucracy currently demands. Then people could fix up their properties, keep the rents lower, and build affordable housing. mIchael FellIon ca r mic h a e l

Sour note Re “Sac Music Festival is over� by Gregg Wager (News, January 4): If you want to know what killed it, personal message me. I was on their board of directors, their first jazz scholarship winner and a musician life member (Gold card) until I mailed it back to them when I saw how widespread their corruption was. bIll bua v ia Fa c e b o o k

read more letters online at www.newsreview .com/sacramento.

@SacNewsReview

Facebook.com/ SacNewsReview

@SacNewsReview

Jazz is dead Re “Sac Music Festival is over� by Gregg Wager (News, January 4): Was it because you can hear “When the Saints Go Marching In� played only so many times before you finally burn out? naThan gIlberT v ia Fa c e b o o k

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sneakers with him, Jones offered to sell Gibson every size-14 pair at a discounted rate. “He had like 165 pairs of the rarest stuff—Yeezys, Galaxy Foamposites, everything brand new,” Gibson said. Gibson bought them all, and was back in business. Now, years later, she’s in California and on her second store—Authentic Sole in Elk Grove. The hometown venture puts Gibson smack dab in the middle of a cultural uprising in the Sacramento area, where sneaker collectors sell entire collections for thousands of dollars, and bankroll weddings or home purchases with little more than flashy lumps of rubber, foam and canvas sewn in factories a world away.

Kicx Unlimited coowners Adam Rey Delos Reyes, left, and Johnny Szeto, at their downtown location. Photo by Karlos rene ayala

Sneaker attack Sacramento shoe collectors are turning a cult  for athletic kicks into big business by Bansky Gonzalez

Ashtyn Gibson remembers when she first fell in love. It was around 1997, and the 31-yearold Sacramento woman was in fifth grade. The object of her affection had an elegant profile, athletic curves and smooth complexion. And cost $170. “I remember my first pair of expensive shoes,” Gibson told SN&R. “It was a pair of Pearl Nike Air Foamposite Pro. And from there, it was an infatuation. My mom was like ‘You’re a lady, you’re going to grow out of that.’ And I was like, ‘OK, we’ll see.’” 8   |   SN&R   |   01.11.18

As much as her mother might have thought otherwise, Gibson’s affections never waned. She stayed a faithful sneakerhead—in good times and bad. She first started selling extra pairs of athletic shoewear to help pay for medical school, then decided she loved what she was doing to support her education more than the education itself. Four years ago, Gibson dropped out of Clark Atlanta University to open her own sneaker boutique. Then, just days before the grand opening, someone broke into her store and cleaned it out of $100,000

worth of shoes. Her entire stock. Well, almost. “I was left with one pair,” she recalled. Her dream on the cusp of unraveling like a weathered lace, Gibson says she received a windfall from a fellow sneakerhead and sometimes trading partner: former Sacramento Kings shooting guard Dahntay Jones. Jones was playing for the Atlanta Falcons at the time, but getting ready to move to New York. Rather than tote his large collection of mint-condition

Like other sneaker aficionados, Duy Nguyen remembers the pair that hooked him. The year was 1999 and basketball shoes were still mostly all about one guy—Chicago Bulls legend Michael Jordan. “The very first pair of Jordan[s] I got was the Jordan 4 Retro,” Nguyen said. “They came in the silver box, with the Retro card, and it was the playground picture, where he was dunking.” Thus began a lifelong pursuit for Nguyen, who used to sell candy bars as a teenager to help support his habit. Eventually, he used his sneaker expertise to land a job at Foot Locker. Nearly two decades later, like Gibson before him, Nguyen has taken an obsessive hobby and turned it into a business venture. Along with Tuan Nguyen (no relation), a friend from his Foot Locker days, Nguyen opened 91Kix on December 2 on Elk Grove Boulevard, which sells sneakers on consignment and offers shoe cleaning and restoration on site. 91Kix is now the third sneaker store of note in town. The longest tenured boutique is Kicx Unlimited, which sits a stone’s throw from the Golden 1 Center. Shops like 91Kix, Kicx Unlimited and Authentic Sole rely on the so-called sneaker community—a large network of enthusiasts and collectors that occupy online forums and local Facebook groups like Sneakerheads Of Sacramento, which claims a membership of nearly 10,000. It’s a cult that breeds young


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business owners and unites people of all races, genders and backgrounds. At the center of this ecosystem is the reseller, who buys the most desirable shoes and sells them back to consumers at a hefty markup. Resellers are just another stitch in the fabric of the community, and part of the reason the local sneaker market has soared. When the rarer brands don’t turn up in local chain stores, they generally end up in the hands of resellers like 31-yearold Eugene Shauf, a well-known reseller in the local community and a former Foot Locker employee who estimates he used to make $30,000-$40,000 a year reselling sneakers before he took a fulltime job at Tesla. “It’s crazy how it’s evolved, man,” Shauf said. “I remember you could count the resellers; it was like five, 10 resellers that really resold. Now there’s thousands; everybody is a reseller. You’ve got people’s moms and dads reselling shoes.” Shauf’s exploits have sent him on frequent trips to Portland to visit Nike’s headquarters. He recently helped spread word that 91Kix acquired more than three dozen pairs of LeBron James’ first signature sneaker, the Nike Air Zoom Generation, a week before they actually hit retailers. Thanks to the network he’s built up over two decades in the sneaker community, the shoes sold out in hours. But resellers also come between the shoes and eager consumers. That middleman interference, along with limited editions of the most prestigious sneakers, create a seemingly unfixable problem— not enough shoes and too much inflation. To help get the shoes back into the hands of actual customers, stores like Foot Locker and Champs Sports unveiled raffle systems nationwide in 2012, and have fine-tuned the systems over the years. Now, those stores, and brands like Nike and Adidas, host smartphone apps through which raffles are held for each high-end release. “I personally like the raffles,” said Kicx Unlimited co-owner Johnny Szeto. “It’s not perfect, but it helps organize releases, so at least you know the stores and brands are trying. I do know a lot of people that win at the mall, so at least I know it’s not completely rigged. If I was a parent, I’d rather have raffles than have my kid wait outside all night for a pair of Jordans.”

The reasons have more to do with safety than convenience.

On a sunny Saturday afternoon in December, 91Kix is quiet, save for a Street Fighter II arcade machine that in 2013, an aBc News report estimated has been redecorated with the famous 1,200 people die over sneakers each gray-and-black “cement” print from the year, a stat utilized, controversially so, Jordan 3, and the store’s black, white in a recent GQ documentary on sneaker and green logo. The shop has been open culture titled Sneakerheadz. More just a week, and Nguyen is excited about recently, a Washington, D.C., teenager its prospects. So much so, he’s a few was killed days before Christmas, allegweeks away from quitting his day job edly over a pair of the shiny, with the state to dedicate his red “Win Like 96” Jordan life to sneakers full time. 11s. And in November, Though Nguyen has a 14-year-old boy turned the business survived after being of sneakers into shot twice outside his livelihood, his Arden-area his passion isn’t home trying to sell all about profits. a pair of shoes, Sneakers are more according to a than just leather and report from CBS 13. lace wrapped around Arden Fair mall his feet, he says. For Eugene Shauf security declined to him, the shoes have an former sneaker trader comment on the raffle aspirational quality. system, or safety issues in “When you see a shoe the past, but the mall’s stores that you want so bad on a agree the online raffles are better than computer screen, and then eventually the alternative. fast forward and get it in your hands and “It’s much safer than the first-come, actually wear it and enjoy it, that’s part first-served system from before with the of the science of achievement,” Nguyen long line outside,” said Champs Sports contended. “You can do that with your assistant manager Corina Tacardon. life. Everything in life.” “Yes, we still get a long line in the store Including buying a home. after the raffle, and it’s just as much Victor Topete began collecting shoes as work for us, but it’s safer. It’s better than a high schooler in the 1980s. Then, when risking getting shot over your shoes.” he was old enough to think about having Much of the violence surrounding kids, he says he started collecting for two. high-end sneakers happens at the raucous “I got married in 1998 and I got releases where consumers wait overnight this idea in my head that I wanted my for the chance to purchase the shoes. eventual sons to become a part of that The raffle systems are meant to rectify culture as well,” Topete explained. “So that situation. But police also encourage I would buy doubles of every single pair buyers and sellers to meet in public that I bought.” locations like police stations to complete A few years after his divorce, and their online deals. after his sons didn’t take to the same “We have a safe-exchange space, footwear as him, the 43-year-old an area in front [of the] Franklin and Sacramento native decided to cash in his Fruitridge police station that is well-lit collection to help make a down payment and video recorded 24-7,” said Detective on a house. Topete took a trip down to Edward MacCaulay, a spokesman for the Kicx; 15 minutes and 47 pairs later, he Sacramento Police Department. was about $10,000 richer. Boutiques like 91Kix and Kicx Topete got the home and says he has Unlimited loan their own spaces for no regrets about liquidating his life’s meet-ups, secondary market sales and work. But the lifelong sneakerhead in trades. him will always question his priorities. “We want to make it like a commu“It was definitely a cash thing, nity,” Szeto said. “We want people to do because I still have that passion for deals at Kicx, because we have a security sneakers,” Topete said. Then, with a hint system and we have cameras. We want of wistfulness, he added, “There’s a few people to be safe.” pairs that I wish I would have kept.” Ω

“You’ve got people’s moms and dads reselling shoes.”

Construction on the California High-Speed Rail project continues with an eye toward sustainability and small-business inclusion. Sacramento firms have already seen dividends for jumping on board. Karen Massie, Information Officer for the California High Speed Rail Authority, said there are currently “17 active construction sites stretching between Madera and Kern counties, [with] more sites expected to come on line this year as construction moves south to Bakersfield.” In 2008, the High-Speed Rail’s board of directors committed to running the system on clean, electric renewable energy, making it a boon for California’s lofty climate goals.

construction hasn’t been bad for california small businesses either. “Hundreds of California small businesses are planning, designing and constructing the high-speed rail system,” Massie noted. “Our Small Business Program has an aggressive 30 percent participation goal by small businesses… Since implementing those goals in 2012, we’ve paid more than $250 million to certified small businesses who have joined the project.” In Sacramento, two such businesses are Blackburn Consulting Firm, which handles geotechnical and geo-environmental work for the project, and Laura Garwood, who subcontracts as a technical writer and editor for Westervelt Ecological Services. Both businesses say they’ve seen measurable rewards as a result of their participation in the project. “The high speed rail contracts were instrumental in opening up our Fresno office and providing workload for the employees there” says Ashley Lokteff of Blackburn consulting, “We’ve hired two full time and three part time staff in Fresno.” For Garwood, the high speed rail project has not only been a steady source of income but a great opportunity for exposure. “I’m a newbie business owner, so anyone saying, ‘Hey there’s someone who does this kind of work,’ definitely helps expand my visibility.” (Hillary Knouse)

Bootleg aNd tHe Beast Xavier Johnson just pleaded guilty to disrupting commerce inside the Magic Kingdom, and now he’s about to see a whole new world in federal prison. According to prosecutors, between 2008 and 2011 Johnson and his co-conspirators ran an elaborate DVD counterfeiting operation out of a house in Elk Grove, taking pirated videos from China and selling them through a string of sham web domains that Johnson set up, including TimelessDisney.com, DisneyDVDVault.com and Disneyclassics.com. But it was a circle of lies. “Contrary to representations by the defendants, the DVDs shipped to customers were not legitimate Disney movies,” the U.S. Attorneys Office wrote in its indictment of Johnson. “To avoid detection, the defendants recruited and paid third parties in the Eastern District to receive the DVDs [from China].” Evidence presented in court indicates Johnson’s activities netted tens of thousands of dollars. This counterfeiting house of mouse might have seemed like the happiest place on earth, but the FBI decided the operation had to be frozen. A joint investigation with the U.S. Postal Inspection Service brought an end to Johnson peddling his bunk merch to poor unfortunate souls. Johnson pleaded guilty to criminal trademark infringement. In December, he was sentenced to two years and six months in prison. According to a 2015 study by Michigan State University, some 80 percent of trademark infringement directed at US companies involves China. (Scott Thomas Anderson)

01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   9


life. The longtime labor supporter says he doesn’t stand in self-checkout lines at the grocery store, preferring instead to give his money to companies that preserve local jobs over cost-cutting automation. When jetting around Sacramento, Brown always tries to use a union taxicab over Uber and Lyft, though he admits that’s becoming harder and harder now. The changing employment landscape in Sacramento is something the council needs to plan for, Brown says. “The gig economy is a race to the bottom,” he says. “There is no infrastructure there for the longevity of the person Tristan Brown hangs out as an employee.” in the Pocket of District 7. Brown believes the City Council needs to be pushing for every educational and Photo by Scott thomaS anderSon vocational training advantage it can bring to the region, along with lowering the cost of living any way that it can. From his perspective, the cost of parking is an obvious place to start. “I think it’s an unfair policy that, until City Council challenger talks housing crisis, rent control,  10 p.m., even a mile-and-half away from the arena—even if there’s no game— economics and a monk-like approach to politics there’s these predatory parking guys patrolling,” he says. “Nothing against the sc o tta @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m public servants themselves, but it’s a huge by Scott thomaS anderSon bummer to want to go out in Midtown, and be part of that economy, and just be constantly worried about it.” policies, particularly around housing. Tristan Brown is looking to tackle a members have expressed a range of skeptiBrown’s clarification about not throwBrown stresses that the council’s 2014 former NFL player, but given that he’s a cism and resistance to a new grassroots ing Sacramento’s meter-readers under Buddhist, it will be on the field of ideas for decision to abandon its rule requiring campaign for rent control. the bus over a Council decision seems developers to make 15 percent of any resiSacramento’s future. Brown is in favor of the idea, even to hint at the Buddhist approach he’s dential project affordable units—replacing Brown’s entering the contest for the though representatives from Sacramento’s bringing to the race. The 2014 contest that mandate with a low fee earmarked for District 7 City Council seat matched real estate industry have already warned between Jennings and retired against former Oakland Raiders Superbowl the underperforming housing trust fund— him that saying so means losing fire chief Julius Cherry got was clearly detrimental to Sacramento. champ and Sacramento Vice Mayor Rick their deep-pocketed support. heated indeed, with “I think we used to be a model for Jennings. Brown is a young Berniecrat, “I think it’s someJennings’ supporters inclusionary housing,” Brown says. “And often smiling and preternaturally excited thing we’re going decrying Cherry as ‘I know there’s a we said goodbye to that. I look at [the new by policy talk, a zen practitioner who to have to have in a public-pension fear that, if we have fee strategy] as a form of trickle-down, draws a stark contrast with Jennings the future—in the abuser, and supply-side theory, which says we’ll build in his views on Sacramento’s housing immediate future,” [rent control], they’re Jennings himself this great monolith, and it will create jobs, crisis. He’s also a rare voice around the Brown says of telling SN&R not going to build here. Well, and it will all work out, but I’ve never seen rent control. “I capital—warning about how an unchecked that Cherry was they’re not building here that genuinely be the truth.” “gig economy” can permanently harm know there’s a portraying him as “Rents have gone up 13 percent, while working-class people. fear that, if we anyway.’ Kevin Johnson’s wages have gone down—the spending The District 7 race is Brown’s first have it, they’re not “bitch.” Tristan Brown power has gone down,” he says. “It’s just time as a candidate for public office, going to build here. “I don’t think District 7 City Council candidate not working, and I’d rather us return to our but the legislative representative for the Well, they’re not that really helped old policies.” California Federation of Teachers is hardly building here anyway. anyone,” Brown says Brown also distinguishes himself from an amateur. He’s Director Emeritus of I’d rather look back and of the ugly turn the last the City Council on another housing quesSacramento’s New Leaders Council, Vice say, ‘I protected folks who District 7 race took. “I don’t tion: The city of Sacramento reportedly Chair of the Center for Workers Rights, needed a roof, rather than landed have anything against Rick, personally experienced the highest year-to-year rent a volunteer for the Sacramento Buddhist some shiny new thing.’ That’s my higher … Some people have asked me, ‘Why increase in the nation in 2016, and a recent Church and Habitat for Humanity, and priority, getting people to live with dignity. are you trying to get Rick fired?’ Well, SN&R analysis of county records revealed a co-founder of the new Organize, Win, And if we lose a skyscraper, we lose a the term’s up, so I look at it as we’re both that tens of the thousands of locals have Legislate Democratic Club. skyscraper.” applying for the same job—and democbeen forcibly evicted from their homes in Beyond Brown’s multifront organizing That sort of “real-people-above-theracy requires a choice.” Ω the last three years. Despite these developefforts, he says he truly has a platform really-privledged” mentality is something ments, Sacramento’s mayor and council that challenges some of the City Council’s Brown tries to incorporate in his daily

The zen of District 7

10   |   SN&R   |   01.11.18


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Housing policy for dummies by jeff vonkaenel

je ffv @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

neighborhood of 10,000 more dwelling Sacramento is having a housing crisis. units a year. The number of homeless is skyrocketing. Do not forget, we also need houses Rents are skyrocketing. Housing prices for the people building the houses. are skyrocketing. The problem is getting Do we need more low-income housworse and worse. ing? Yes. Do we need more expensive And housing policy is complicated. housing so rich people move out of their Very complicated. But this is a “Housing current, possibly less expensive housing? policy for dummies” column. What do Yes. Do we need to build tiny houses, we need to solve the housing problem many houses to a lot? More high-rise in Sacramento? Either more houses or apartments? More suburban tract housfewer people. And what will make the ing? More student housing? Yes. housing problem worse? Continuing to Do we need to increase housing have more people moving here while density? Yes. Do we need to building no more houses for them. support people building Let me provide a few granny houses in their numbers. According to backyards? Yes. Do the U.S. Department Should judges we need to allow of Housing and people with big Urban Development require rich people to McMansion (HUD), the go homeless for several houses to split Sacramento weeks before they are them so several region, containing allowed to file NIMBY families can live Sacramento, Yolo, there? Yes. Do Placer and El lawsuits to prevent we need to allow Dorado counties, has housing development? HMO health plans roughly 2.2 million to invest in housing people. According because it is cheaper to HUD, between 2010 to pay for housing than to to 2015, this area has been pay for extra health care costs? growing at a rate of 20,000 people a year. With the economy booming, we are Yes. Should SMUD provide no cost or low cost energy saving equipment for probably growing even faster now. affordable housing units? Yes. Should But, again according to HUD, we we create more construction training have not been building enough housing. programs like the building trades apprenTo maintain a housing balance, HUD ticeship program? Yes. estimates that our region needed to Do we need to reform Proposition build 13,800 houses and 6,925 rental 13 to move away from a system that units between April 1, 2015 and April rewards longtime property owners at 1, 2018. However, during that period, the expense of new owners and renters? according to HUD, we had only 1,540 Yes. Do we need to raise taxes to support houses and 1,180 rental units under more housing for our citizens? Yes. construction. This equals a shortfall of Should judges require rich people to 18,005 dwelling units. go homeless for several weeks before If, in a three year period, we add they are allowed to file NIMBY lawsuits 60,000 people but only build 2,600 more to prevent needed housing development? housing units, guess what? We are going I’ll let you be the judge of that. to have a housing crisis. A big crisis. So The housing crisis can be solved with either we need to move people to the a three letter word. “Yes.” Ω Rust Belt, where they have an abundance of housing and a shortage of people, or we need to build more houses and Jeff vonKaenel is the president, CEO and majority apartments. We need to build lots more owner of the News & Review. houses and apartments, somewhere in the


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According to the New York Times, more than  1,000 people may have died in Puerto Rico as a  result of the landfall of Hurricane Maria, a natural disaster that the country’s officials have  accused the Trump Administration of failing to  handle sufficiently. Although the island’s largest  city, San Juan, had most electricity restored,  suburban and rural areas still lack it. And so  on January 3, sMUd announced they’ll be sending personnel, equipment and 15 utility trucks to help  turn the lights back on for folks who have gone  without since September. Goodness gracious.  Imagine four months without electricity. Help’s  coming not a moment too soon.

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CALmatters.org is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media venture explaining California policies and politics.

California

politiCs: by Ben Christopher

2018

10 hot topics that will shape the state’s future The 2018 elections are coming—and those of you who don’t spend your waking hours monitoring the secretary of state’s website may have some questions. Questions like: Wait, there’s an election next year? And: Didn’t we just have an election? And: Is Governor Jerry Brown running again? Yes, yes, and no, but you may hear a lot from the current governor between now and the elections. In fact, expect to hear more political chatter of all kinds as Californians gear up to select a new

Two Californias Our state’s gross domestic product may dwarf those of most countries. We may host some of the world’s fastest growing industries and the country’s wealthiest zip codes. But it remains, as ever, the economy, stupid. Just ask voters. In a fall poll from the Public Policy Institute of California, more respondents chose “jobs and the economy” as the state’s most pressing issue. “Particularly as it relates to the uneven growth of the economy in California, that is a hugely important factor,” says Mark Baldassare, the institute’s president. “It’s what people are referring to as ‘the two Californias.’” Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, who remains the frontrunner in the governor’s race

despite some recent tightening in the polls, will be quick to take some credit for state’s low unemployment rate. It’s been bumping around 5 percent this year, the lowest level since 2007. He is also pushing for progressive palliatives like state-funded universal health insurance, a preschool-for-all program (as are all Democratic hopefuls) and an expanded earned-income tax credit, which provides a boost to the wages of low-earners. But you can’t take credit without inviting some blame. Antonio Villaraigosa, the former Los Angeles mayor currently trailing Newsom, has framed his campaign around the tale-of-two-states theme. “This focus on economic issues, particularly the stark divide between a few booming cities and the rest of California, distinguishes the candidates,” Villaraigosa

1

California PoliTiCs: 2018 14   |   SN&R   |   1.11.18

governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and other statewide constitutional officers. Every assemblymember and half of the Senate will face an opponent; members of Congress including a U.S. senator; and a yet-to-be-determined number of ballot propositions that may claim to remedy the housing crisis, fix health care policy and repeal the new gas tax, for starters. Here’s a quick primer for anyone resolving to enter 2018 as a more informed citizen:

spokesman Luis Vizcaino said in a statement. “As Mayor Villaraigosa travels to the many forgotten corners and communities of our state, he clearly hears from Californians that they want an economy that creates opportunity for everyone.” Villaraigosa has paired that anti-elitist rhetoric with a politically moderate antipoverty plan, lambasting Newsom’s “pie in the sky” thinking on health care and calling for a revamping of California’s “Byzantine and bureaucratic regulatory framework” to help small businesses. That’s also proven to be a useful attack for the two Republican gubernatorial candidates, Assemblyman Travis Allen of Huntington Beach and millionaire John Cox of San Diego. Why have the state’s inland and northern areas stagnated while the coastal cities have boomed? Why does uber-progressive California have the nation’s highest poverty rate once you account for the cost of housing? Tough questions for any incumbent party.


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Why does uber-progressive California have the nation’s highest poverty rate once you account for the cost of housing?

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Cali is BurninG Bye-Bye, prop. 13? Proposition 13 has long been considered sacrosanct—but this election season the 40-year-old tax law may finally get an overhaul. On one side, the California Association of Realtors is currently gathering signatures for a ballot initiative that would allow seniors and disabled Californians to preserve their lower tax rates even if they move. Under Prop. 13, homeowners pay property taxes equal to 1 percent of a home’s price at the time of purchase. Increases are limited to 2 percent each year, no matter how fast a home’s value increases. The proposed initiative would eliminate the penalty most longtime homeowners now pay when they move, which the Realtors say would encourage aging empty nesters to clear out of their large homes and make room for younger families. But it would come at a cost. The Legislature’s nonpartisan fiscal scorekeeper has said the proposal would eventually cost local governments upwards of a billion dollars each year. On the flipside, another proposed initiative would weaken Prop. 13 by exempting commercial property owners. Already some of the gubernatorial candidates are on board. Democrat contender Delaine Eastin, former state schools superintendent, has said that the extra revenue generated by taxing commercial property owners more could fund school improvements. Villaraigosa has also said he would be willing to reexamine Prop. 13. “I’m not interested in Prop. 13 in isolation,” Newsom recently told an audience in San Francisco. Instead, he advocated a more comprehensive approach to make the California budget less dependent on the volatile income of top earners. Otherwise, he warned, “When we catch a cold, our budget is going to catch the flu.” That’s a concern that all gubernatorial candidates have nodded at, though details on how to actually boost the budget’s immune system have been scant.

If the smoldering moonscapes of Ojai and Napa don’t spark some talk of climate and environmental policy on the campaign trail this year, a round of upcoming green-themed legislation offers a conversation-starter. Last year, Democratic Senate leader Kevin de León of Los Angeles introduced a bill mandating that 100 percent of California’s electricity come from renewable sources by 2045. That will be back this year. Likewise, Democratic Assemblymember Phil Ting of San Francisco will introduce a bill to ban new gas-powered cars by 2040. Gov. Brown has positioned himself as a global leader on climate change—hence his recent trip to Europe. None of the Democrats seeking to replace him are climate skeptics. But they do depart from him in substance and style. Take Villaraigosa, who says the environmental movement needs to be less narrowly focused on greenhouse gas emissions and should better address local pollution and its impact on low-income communities of color. Or Eastin, who frequently notes that she is the only candidate calling for a ban on fracking. And while all of the Democratic candidates are broadly supportive of Brown’s high speed rail project, all have expressed varying degrees of opposition to the governor’s twin-tunnels water plan: Villaraigosa says cities need to conserve more, Chiang has raised concerns about the Delta ecosystem, Eastin calls the project “nonsense,” and Newsom has wondered whether one tunnel wouldn’t do just as well. And then there are those fires. As the Central Coast and North Bay rush to house the newly homeless and grapple with the bigger question of if, how, and where to re-build in a state that seems increasingly prone to going up in flames, expect to see some of that grappling on the campaign trail.

Too feW roofs Didn’t the Legislature already fix the housing issue? Sadly, no. Despite California lawmakers’ best efforts to tweak regulations and channel more money into low-income housing construction with a series of bills last August, California is still projected to fall woefully short of affordable places to live. Newsom has said he would like the state to set a goal of building 3.5 million new homes by 2025—a proposal that walks the line between bold and delusional. More recently, , current state treasurer and the gubernatorial candidate most likely to issue a white paper, released his own detailed plan: more funding for low-income housing subsidies and more carrots and sticks to entice or compel local governments to allow more residential development. Voters will also be asked to sign off on lawmakers’ plans to borrow $4 billion to

build more affordable housing and subsidize the rent of veterans. Depending on how the signature gathering goes, they may also see a ballot measure that could repeal California’s restrictions on rent control—local laws that cap how much landlords can charge tenants. Democratic Assemblyman Richard Bloom from Santa Monica will introduce a similar proposal in the Legislature. Finally, there’s the $1.5 trillion question mark that is the recent rewrite of the federal tax code. As the California housing market adjusts to the newly slashed corporate tax rate and the reduced deductibility of property taxes and mortgage interest, expect to hear more.

The ‘GasTaxTrophe’ With President Trump’s approval numbers in the low 30s among likely voters and the majority of California voters unable to name the GOP’s two leading gubernatorial candidates (again, that would be Allen and Cox), California Republicans don’t have much to feel optimistic about, statewide. But they do have the gas tax. Early this year, Democratic supermajorities in the state Senate and Assembly narrowly passed a transportation funding package that included a 12-cent hike to the gas tax and additional vehicle fees. Taxing drivers isn’t considered best practice for winning future elections in California. It’s a testament to the Democrats’ political confidence—and the sorry state of the California road system— that they were willing to push this through.

10 hot topics that will shape the state’s future

Now, the Republicans are itching for political payback. Allen has sponsored one of two proposed ballot measures that would rescind the fee hike. San Diego antitax Republican Carl DeMaio is funding a recall effort against freshman state Senator Josh Newman, a Democrat from Fullerton, allegedly for supporting the tax. Party leaders are hoping that their rallying cry of “GasTaxtrophe” will stick. They may be onto something. In a recent survey, nearly 3 in 4 likely voters said that repealing the gas tax is important to them. But whether that’s enough to energize the Republican base and flip undecided voters red is an open question.

5

continued on page 17

01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   15


DOJ Ends Obama-era Directives on Cannabis Prosecutions CAN THIS ADMINISTRATION TURN BACK THE CLOCK ON LEGAL CANNABIS? by Ken Magri

J

ust when things began to look normal for the future of legal cannabis, police raids and asset forfeitures could be back on the horizon. On Jan. 4, Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded four Obama-era directives that instructed U.S. attorneys to stay away from cannabis prosecutions in states where it is legal. Directing federal prosecutors to use “previously established prosecutorial principles,” the Department of Justice will now leave it to the discretion of the nation’s 94 U.S. attorneys. “The previous issuance of guidance undermines the rule of law,” said Sessions, “and the ability of our local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement partners to carry out this mission.” Hours later, White House spokesperson Sarah Huckabee Sanders said, “The President strongly believes that we should enforce federal law,” adding that prosecutors needed to go after “large distributors.” As a candidate, Trump’s position was to “leave it up to the states,” but President Trump now backs his Attorney General.

“We expect the federal government to respect the rights of states and the votes of millions of people across America and if they won’t, Congress should act.” Lori Ajax, California Cannabis Bureau Chief The reaction against Sessions’ move was widespread. On Twitter, Republican U.S. Senator Corey Gardner of Colorado threatened to hold up all Department of Justice nominees, “until the Attorney General lives up to the commitment he made to me prior to his confirmation.” New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand said, “Attorney General Sessions’ decision is a direct attack on patients.” Seattle mayor and former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan said, “I hope we don’t have a backlash, but we’re ready for it.” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra responded, “In California, we decided it was best to regulate, not criminalize, cannabis.” And Lori Ajax, California’s Bureau of Cannabis Control chief, stated, “The administration is conferring with the California Attorney General and other states in response to this action. We expect the federal government to respect the rights of states and the votes of millions of people across America and if they won’t, Congress should act.”

The White House is appearing to support Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ Jan. 4 decision to rescind Obama-era directives that supported states with legal marijuana use. Now, the nation’s 94 U.S. attorneys will have the backing of the U.S. Department of Justice to enforce federal laws prohibiting marijuana. Photo courtesy of Istockphoto.

Northern California prosecutions fall under the jurisdiction of U.S. Attorney Brian Stretch, a holdover from the Obama era, who resigned on the same day as Sessions’ announcement. Until Stretch’s replacement is named and confirmed, there will be no U.S. Attorney to direct new cannabis prosecutions. In the meantime, Sacramento’s cannabis czar, Joe Devlin, said the city continues to follow the “regulatory framework in compliance with state law.”

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Gavin Newsom (D) is the Lieutenant Governor of California, former mayor of San Francisco

John Chiang (D) is the current California State Treasurer

the he candidates split into two camps, ewsom and with newsom Eastin unreservedly calling for a statefunded insurance program that would cover all Californians, and Villaraigosa and Chiang calling single-payer a nice idea, but wondering where the money would come from.

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7

6 Call it nEwsomCarE In the first two Democratic gubernatorial debates, no issue dominated quite like single-payer health care—if only because it was one of the few questions on which there was discernible friction. The candidates split into two camps, with Newsom and Eastin unreservedly calling for a state-funded insurance program that would cover all Californians, and Villaraigosa and Chiang calling singlepayer a nice idea, but wondering where the money would come from. It’s a debate likely to echo in bluetinged districts across the state. In June, the state senate passed a bill that would have offered comprehensive health insurance to all, but lacked a funding source. Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon put the plan on hold, which many progressives, led by the California Nurses Association, characterized as a knife in the back. In some legislative districts, single payer is likely to be a progressive litmus test —and yet another opportunity to relitigate the California Democratic Party’s ferocious leadership battle last May, and before that, the 2016 primary. But as the White House and Republicans in Congress continue to tinker with the Affordable Care Act next year, lawmakers and candidates may have more immediate concerns.

sChools’ suPE who? Almost half of the state’s discretionary funding goes to education. The campaign for Superintendent of Public Instruction—perhaps the most hotly, and expensively, contested race you’ve never heard of—is likely to resemble the 2014 campaign, when current superintendent Tom Torlakson was challenged by Marshall Tuck, a charter school administrator. The contest between the union-backed incumbent and the chartersupporting challenger took on symbolic importance. Torlakson ultimately won, but by a hair. This time around, Tuck will be squaring off against Assemblyman Tony Thurmond of Richmond, who, like Torlakson, will have the support of the California Teachers Association—but not the benefit of being an incumbent. That ideological battle has already spilled over into the governor’s race, where the CTA has endorsed Newsom, and Villaraigosa has come out as the lone Democrat to back changes to teacher tenure laws and charter schools. Still, there isn’t much light between the four Democrats on other education issues. They all oppose for-profit charters and, broadly speaking, support Gov. Brown’s local control formula for funding schools. They all advocate publicly funded universal preschool, something Brown has rejected. Some have also mentioned supporting infant and child care programs, but so far, the candidates have been light on specifics.

Antonio Villaraigosa (D) is the former Los Angeles mayor currently trailing Newsom

California PolitiCs: 2018

10 hot topics that will shape the state’s future

continued on page 18

01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   17


continued from page 17

sen. connie leyva, a democrat from chino, has promised to introduce legislation to ban confidential settlement agreements in cases of alleged sexual assault and harassment.

9 8 Public retirees rule California Republicans have never shied away from making the state’s rising debt to its retired employees a central political issue. “This is the Sword of Damocles hanging over the California economy,” gubernatorial candidate John Cox recently told a crowd in San Francisco. In keeping with Gov. Brown, who had taken modest steps to roll back pension obligations, some of the Democratic candidates have at least alluded to the issue. As treasurer, Chiang helped spearhead an effort to pay down some of the state’s pension obligations by diverting money from a separate state account. But for progressive politicians, who count on the support of public sector unions and who aren’t ideologically inclined to cut benefits to retirees anyway, it’s a tough circle to square. This year, the California Supreme Court is likely to take up a challenge to the so-called “California Rule,” the legal standard which holds that the benefits promised to retired government workers are binding contracts that cannot be retroactively reduced. If the state’s highest court breaks from that half-century-old precedent, it could trigger a wave of pension reductions across the state—and plenty of debate on the campaign trail.

Jails and bail California voters are not always predictable when it comes to crime. In 2014, the majority of voters approved Proposition 47, which reclassified many nonviolent property and drug crimes as misdemeanors and released thousands of inmates from state prisons. But two years later, voters took a tough-on-crime approach, making it easier to execute death-row inmates while rejecting a proposition that would have abolished the death penalty. This year’s major justice battle is likely to center around bail. In October, a working group put together by California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye recommended that California’s cash bail system be replaced by one in which defendants would be released from custody before trial based not on their ability to pay, but on the assessed danger that they pose to public safety. Democrats in the Legislature have pledged to take up the measure, and they have the backing of the governor. It’s an issue that’s also attracted a degree of celebrity and quasi-celebrity attention, with the rapper Common advocating for reform and reality TV star Duane Chapman (aka “Dog the Bounty Hunter”) taking the opposite position. Republicans welcome that debate. After years of decline, California recently saw an uptick in the violent crime rate— something the GOP has taken to blame on reform proposals like Prop. 47 and earlier Brown-backed inmate population reduction efforts on. Thus far, researchers haven’t found that connection.

california Politics: 2018 18   |   SN&R   |   01.11.18


Connie Leyva (D)

You should be

10 #WeSaidenough Even if you don’t follow California politics closely, you’ve probably heard about this: Last October, two weeks after allegations of sexual assault by film producer Harvey Weinstein were published in the New York Times, more than 140 women working in and around Sacramento— lawmakers, legislative staff members, consultants and lobbyists—wrote an open letter demanding an end to a culture of harassment and abuse in Sacramento. This was the Capitol’s own “Me Too” movement: “We Said Enough.” Since then, two state lawmakers stepped down in the wake of accusations of sexual harassment or abuse, which they nonetheless contested. In purely political terms, the two vacancies have, for now, cost the Democrats their supermajority in the Assembly and forced two special elections this summer. But the allegations have also put the Democratic leadership in Sacramento in the spotlight. Last week, Sen. Pat Bates of Laguna Niguel, the Republican leader in the Senate, called on Speaker Rendon and Sen. de León to rescind any non-disclosure agreements that victims of sexual harassment or whistleblowers have signed with either chamber. Sen. Connie Leyva, a Democrat from Chino, has also promised to introduce legislation to ban confidential settlement agreements in cases of alleged sexual assault and harassment. So far, de León has responded by hiring two law firms to investigate allegations against senators and to set up a confidential hotline for victims to report harassment and abuse. It’s also a potentially uncomfortable moment for some of the candidates running for governor. When he was mayor of San Francisco, Newsom admitted to having an affair with his appointments secretary, the wife of his campaign manager. Villaraigosa also had a highprofile extramarital affair, though not with a subordinate or colleague. There were no

getting it allegations of illegal activity in either case, but it’s not a fortuitous time to be a male politician with a history sexual misconduct of any kind. The other candidates have been more vocal on the subject. Chiang, true to form, released a 12-point proposal on how to prevent and address sexual harassment, which includes disclosing data about reported sexual harassment around Sacramento, setting up a confidential hotline and beefing up training. Eastin, the only woman running for governor, has denounced the Legislature’s practice of paying off victims of sexual harassment and asking claimants to remain anonymous. “We should not be protecting predators and paying off evildoers,” she said. “It blows my mind.”

And that’s it? Well, that’s a whole lot of it anyway. California is a big, complicated state and listicles can only be so long. Plus, a lot can change in 11 months—or, depending on the president’s late night Twitter habits, 11 hours. So consider this a rough guide to the electioneering season to come—one that will help you sort the substantive debate from the fun, but forgettable, mudslinging. and hey, at the very least, now you know Jerry isn’t running again. Ω

10 hot topics that will shape the state’s future

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By AAron CArneS

T HE

Tender TALK SHOW

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Photo by karlos rene ayala

With PBS talk show host Dinorah, guests open up over dinner

D

inorah Klinger and Raquela Mejia spend the 15 minutes leading up to the filming of their travel-food show Dinorah Desde in totally opposite ways. Host Dinorah, 47, who goes by her first name—like Madonna—is quietly watching videos on her phone, preparing questions for guest José Hernandez, one of the first dozen Latino astronauts to go into space. Meanwhile, producer and creator Mejia, 58, frantically runs around, working with her crew of two to make sure that the lights, cameras and sound are set up properly.

That day, they filmed the 12th episode of their 13-episode premiere season, which will air on PBS in 2018. They are set up in Nena’s, a Mexican restaurant inside of the historic Waterfront Warehouse in Stockton, California. All around them, diners eat lunch like nothing unusual is happening. Dinorah and Mejia take a break to discuss the upcoming interview. “I’m going to ask him what the Earth looked like from space,” Dinorah tells Mejia. “I would have cried.” Mejia is visibly excited to be meeting Hernandez, an idol of hers who’s recently been featured in a Modelo commercial.


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Dinorah can‘t stop smiling about her show.

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Hernandez said that Hollywood producers have shown interest in taking his life story to the big screen: The son of migrant workers, he didn’t learn English until 12. He eventually earned a master’s in electrical and computer engineering and then traveled through space to the International Space Station. “There’s no celebrities on this show,” Mejia says to me. “Everyone wants to interview celebrities. This is about inspirational people, people that are making a difference in the world.” Once Hernandez shows up, the filming begins. He and Dinorah chat like old friends over lunch. They talk a lot less about being in space, and a lot more about what it took for him to get there. “You were 10 years old when you knew what you wanted, and that never changed?” Dinorah asks. He tells her that he was rejected by NASA 11 times before being accepted. Hernandez attributes his success to the overwhelming support of his family. Another peculiar aspect about the interview? They talk about the food they’re eating in detail. The owner of the restaurant, Maria Elena “Nena” Salcedo, shows up with dishes partway through the conversation, interrupting Hernandez’s story. Hernandez has the chicken mole. Dinorah has the carne asada with green enchiladas. “It’s a food show, and it’s a people show,” Mejia explains. Mejia first conceived of the idea a few years ago after thinking about the dinner parties she and her husband would host. “You invite someone over for dinner, you bring some wine, you have a good meal,” Mejia says. “It’s so magical. People start talking. You just open up.” The focus, she explains, is equally on the people and their life stories of overcoming obstacles, and the food at the restaurants that

the guests choose. episodes, Mejia found herself watching Hernandez picked PBS and wondered: Why can’t my show Nena’s because be on PBS? She reached out and showed it was the place the network some clips. The producers were that catered his really taken with Dinorah. wedding. Other “They said, ‘We want to meet you, and guests have included we want to meet your host. Is she really that Vivian Stancil, a bubbly?’ Cause they saw a clip where she’s senior Olympic laughing and hugging,” Mejia says. “Yep, swimmer who’s that’s pretty much what she is. They loved legally blind, and her. They loved her charisma.” The show was Vivian Romero, picked up in August of 2017. Montebello’s first Dinorah and Mejia met when Dinorah openly gay mayor. was relatively new in Sacramento. Dinorah “They all have a story to tell,” Mejia says. was playing music at Zocalo during brunch, “I don’t think stories like this are being told and Mejia was visiting town. Mejia had her enough. They’re such simple people, but they 50th birthday party scheduled later that night, have such a beautiful story. And I love that and was so taken by Dinorah’s talent that myself. I get teary-eyed when I see stories she hired her to come play for her birthday like that.’Cause there’s heroes amongst us.” party that night. From then on, the two have The first season of the show has been remained friends. filmed up and down California, and not “She’s very openhearted,” Mejia says. really past that, mostly due to its shoestring “When she interviews, she really feels budget, but also because it’s where Dinorah the passion coming from the people. So, and Mejia live, and it’s the world they know I thought, she’d be perfect for the show. I and love. know a lot of people in this industry, but none Most folks in Sacramento know Dinorah of them have the charm that she has. For me, for her music. She’s lived in Sacramento for it was important that we have that conneca decade playing parties, weddings tion with our guests.” and regular gigs around town, I am also struck with like at Mesa Mercado, Dinorah’s passion for where she plays solo people. When we talk every Thursday (starting after her episode with again in February). At Hernandez, all she Mango’s, she plays can think about is every second and his life story and fourth Saturday of everything that the month with her amazed her about band Dinorah and him. In particular, Raquela Mejia Crosswinds. She she hones in on mixes traditional his parents. Creator and producer, Mexican music with “Look at how Dinorah Desde rock ’n’ roll. Being a important the role of PBS TV host is a totally the father is,” Dinorah new gig for her, and she tells me. “He says, ‘I’m seems quite comfortable at it. telling you as your father, Mejia has lived in Los Angeles you will be an astronaut if you for most of her life, but grew up in do what I say.’ And he believed his Sacramento, and got her start in the music father. This is a child of a farm family. Poor industry, not unlike Dinorah. In fact, when as heck. What really saved this kid, not only she met Dinorah 10 years ago, she saw a lot saved him, but took him wherever he went: of herself in Dinorah, and had even played The love of his family. That’s it.” restaurants like Dinorah when she was Dinorah is only partially surprised that younger. It’s this connection that has led to a she’s quickly become so comfortable in her wonderful collaboration for the show. new position as host. As a musician, she’s Even though Dinorah Desde was been singing in front of people since was 3 conceived by Mejia, it might not have been years old. picked up by PBS were it not for Dinorah’s She started playing guitar at age 9. She involvement. After they had shot a few grew up in Mexico City, and moved to Los

’’ There’s heroes amongst us.’’

Angeles when she was 26, then Michigan, then Colorado, before making her home in Sacramento 10 years ago. She’s got two albums under her belt. She’s expecting to release her third—all salsa music—in early 2018. She’s also planning to release a line of salsas (the edible type) in early 2018 as well. It’ll be called Flame of Love. Still, when Mejia invited Dinorah to host her show, she was shocked. It was out of left field. “I could not picture myself as a host,” Dinorah says. “I am not a journalist. I didn’t study to do this, but I love people, and I like to hear what they have to say. I am a really curious person. I think that helps me. My nature is friendly. I make friends very easily. I am a hugger. I’m Latina, of course we’re going to have a lot of hugs.” The mix of Mejia’s vision and Dinorah’s charisma makes for a nice combo. Mejia recalls a time when she was managing the musician Dwayne Verheyden, and how superficial some of the reporters’ interviews of Verheyden were. She prefers Dinorah’s personable approach. As an example, Dinorah, at one point, tells me about her heartfelt interview with senior Olympic swimmer Stancil. “That night I cried,” Dinorah says. “I cried with her. We hugged and I told her how much I felt bad for all the suffering that she had to go through. These interviews are not just: ‘So tell me about your awards.’ It’s way deeper. I’ve seen other interviews. And there’s information you can find on Wikipedia. What year they graduated, what year they started working on this. All that information, I like to go deeper.” Mejia was particularly proud of scoring Hernandez. When she got the deal with PBS, she had two people in mind: Hernandez and Anthony Bourdain. Now that she’s got Hernandez, she hopes the show does well enough that PBS will give her a higher budget for the second season that can afford to send them to New York to do a segment with Bourdain. But even if she does start flying out of state to shoot the show, she wants to continue to highlight people in Sacramento, the town she grew up in and loves dearly. “Hopefully there’ll be more opportunity to showcase interesting people in this area,” Mejia says. “Sacramento is my favorite city in the world.” Ω

Dinorah Desde airs on Pbs in 2018. learn more at dinorahdesde.com.

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These shrimp and fish tacos are the bomb.

A new Indian restaurant has opened where there was previously a dearth—Rosemont. On its long menu, two orange-colored items stood out: The mango lassi smacks of fruity flavor, and the tandoori seafood platter ($15.95) sizzles with tumeric, chili powder and other bold spices. The salmon flaked apart with tenderness, the shrimp sopped up all that tandoori seasoning and the onions set it off with a bright lemony sourness. Order the platter with one of the fun-flavored naans (goat cheese, garlic and basil, chili cheese) for a memorable pairing. 8865 Folsom Boulevard in Rosemont; (916) 226-9188.

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the pork-forward, lightly tangy chile verde and the juicy, dark-meat chicken are the standouts. Each taco comes with West African, East Sacramento a light smattering of cilantro and onion, all accompanied by Mexican, Florin $$$ the same tart, mild salsa. The masa for the fish and shrimp tacos ($2.75) takes a dip in the fryer until puffed fat and larded with a chipotle Taco Fresco Burgers & Fries (check that multicultural mayo sauce. They’re rightfully popular and in evidence on name!) first came on my radar when it was featured in a almost every table. July post by delicious Instagrammer @southsacramento. Not to be seen anywhere was a burger, despite the name Here was a puffy masa shell stuffed with plump, pink of the joint, which confused me until I ordered one ($4.50) shrimp, bathed in the natural light that social media on my third visit and realized that they are served on a influencers crave. I made a mental note to make a visit. bolillo. I had been mistaking them for tortas on multiple I panicked a bit once I saw the limited hours— tables. I like a simple burger, but there’s simple and Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.—but I found then there’s boring, and the thin slab of dry gray a free Saturday right before Christmas. I settled meat topped with unmelted American came in for my long winter’s nap because the food garnished only with shredded iceberg and It’s really took so darned long to arrive, for good reason orange tomato. It cried out for onion, pickles, all about the though: The place was completely packed, sauce or heck, just go with the torta vibe and not a spare seat. At least half of the custommade-to-order, add a shmear of beans or some salsa. ers had ordered tacos, the tortillas of which That same crisp-grilled bolillo was much steaming are made from fresh masa, adding minutes better when it encased the ultra-crispy steak tortillas. onto each order. in the milanesa torta ($7.99). I’ve never had The wait gave me plenty of time to crunch like this on milanesa. It resembled panko contemplate the interior, which has natural light in in texture and was a pleasing counterpoint to the abundance and not much else. It’s a simple rectangle, cheap, gummy hot dog and ham. glassed on three sides with the open grill in the back behind For some reason, the tortillas for the mulitas ($2.75) the cash register. You get a clear view of the hustling, were packaged ones rather than fresh, and the chile verde sweating crew, whirling and dodging and frying with was overpowered by a blanket of bland cheese. Order the exemplary efficiency. The vibe is spare edging into stark chile verde taco instead. and does not invite a lingering lunch. I’ll confess a made a fourth visit because I was craving But the tacos ($1.95) are so tasty you won’t need to the shrimp taco again. Let’s say I was researching the linger. It’s really all about the made-to-order, steaming consistency, and now I can say with confidence that they tortillas. Of the standard assortment of available meats, are the bomb. Ω Good for: Shrimp tacos, chile verde tacos, chicken tacos… mainly the tacos

January always seems like the bleakest month of the year, with the holidays behind us and spring sunshine months ahead. So we should take comfort wherever we can get it: fuzzy socks, a warm fire or a big, sexy cup of Ginger Elizabeth’s European Sipping Chocolate ($5-$7) complete with housemade marshmallows melting into a creamy layer on top. Valrhona couverture is melted into a rich, intoxicating drink, thinned with just enough Strauss milk to make it sippable. This is hot cocoa for grown-ups. 1801 L Street, Suite 60; https://gingerelizabeth.com.

—StepHanie Stiavetti

New green resolution Kale I’ve been sneering at the kale worshipers for years, but they’ve started to wear me down. It really is a nutritional powerhouse and extremely versatile for cooking. It’s a member of the cruciferous cabbage family—and a significant source of vitamins A and C, fiber, calcium and iron. Kale is alleged to have antiinflammatory as well as cholesterol-lowering and cancer-fighting super powers. To get all these benefits, though, you need to eat it regularly. Fortunately, that’s easy: Puree it into smoothies, massage it into salads, cook it into stews and soups and bake it into chips. There. Resolutions sorted.

—ann Martin rolKe

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said he fell 30 feet from a tower at Burning Man and “destroyed” his back. Laid up in a body brace for the better part of a year, the son of Sacramento restaurateurs Matt and Yvette Woolston needed something that he could do in bed. So he decided to plan his family’s next business, the aptly named Backbone Cafe (729 J Street) that’s decorated with splendid murals and offers vegan, paleo and gluten-free health food with an attention to detail. “There’s so much extra stuff being done to the food that people coming in don’t know about,” Woolston said about his meticulous cooking. “All they know is it tastes good.” Before the grand opening “sometime” in February, he said he’d like to decorate the walls with infographics featuring bits of cooking-geek knowledge: how dehydrating nuts gives them a “cooked” flavor without damaging any delicate oils

and how cooling his boiled potatoes fully before cooking with them increases their resistant starch that’s critical for a healthy balance of bacteria in the gut. After being raised in his parents’ restaurants—Matteo’s Pizza & Bistro in Carmichael (5132 Arden Way) and the Crocker Cafe by Supper Club in the Crocker Art Museum (216 O Street)—Woolston said he and his younger brother Tomas want to establish Backbone as a healthful brand and possibly expand in the future. But only diehards will eat nutritious food if it doesn’t taste good. And that’s where Woolston’s finicky food preparation comes in: He cures his zucchini noodles ($13) in salt overnight to remove the dreaded watery nature of the dish. Then he dresses it in basil-avocado pesto and tops it with oregano, chilis and sauteed mushrooms and onions—to give it a “pizza-y” taste, he said. Woolston makes vegan carnitas

with oyster mushrooms braised for hours in avocado oil with peppers and onions. Then, he adds a dollop of mashed potatoes; the starch makes the fungus stick together in a satisfying facsimile of the real deal. And Backbone isn’t just serving veggies. The restaurant offers grassfed beef bone marrow with bacon jam and toasted sourdough ($11.00) and True Fat Fries ($6.00) cooked in pork lard and beef tallow that’s rendered in-house. Woolston said he also aims to open a bone broth bar that people can customize with options like rice noodles, curried coconut milk and fresh herbs from a soon-to-be implemented apothecary. And—wait a second—Burning Man, health food, an apothecary. Hmm. If California ever loosens its regulations, would Backbone Cafe be open to offering the state’s recently recreationalized medicinal plant? “Oh,” Woolston said. “Definitely.” Ω


Q:

Remembering a regular The late Tony Rodriguez was “just a good ol’ dude who everybody loved around here,” according to Daniel Delagnes, the owner of the Round Corner (2333 S Street). Sadly, Rodriguez passed after winning the popular vote at the first chili contest at the tavern. In his memory, Rodriguez’s name got added to the title: The Tony Rodriguez Memorial Chili Cook Off is now in its third year at Round Corner. On January 13 at noon, contestants will pay $25 to enter their chili, while taste-testers pay $5 for a sampling of each steaming pot. Winners will be chosen by a popular vote, and judges include Drian Perez, the Round Corner’s chef. Some of the proceeds will go to the Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Sacramento Area, an organization that Delagnes said made a large difference in his life after his own father passed at a young age. At the cook-off, expect to see a variety of chili, including a vegetarian option that, Delagnes joked, has “no chance of winning.”

—John Flynn

WHAT IS

? A:

Also legal? Hemp milk. by Shoka Hemp milk is ridiculously easy to make. And ridiculously healthy, since hemp seeds are loaded with antioxidants (vitamins A and E), omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and calcium for good skin, brain function and bones, respectively—but no CBD (cannabidiol). Plus, making it at home doesn’t require any additives to make it shelf-stable and reduces packaging waste, so it’s ludicrous not to DIY. Just blend a 1/2 cup of hemp seeds, 4 cups of water and a pinch of salt in a high-speed

blender for two minutes. Strain it in a thin cloth, refrigerate. To sweeten the deal, add two Medjool dates or a tablespoon of maple syrup. Add vanilla extract if you’re feeling fancy or a couple of tablespoons of cacao powder for chocolatey results. Another variation: Add a teaspoon of turmeric, 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon, a pinch of black pepper and cayenne, and 1/4 teaspoon of ginger to 2 cups of hemp milk to go full anti-inflammatory turmericmilk cult.

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A toast to Broadway by Jim Carnes

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The Musical of Musicals: The Musical!

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the Musical of Musicals: the Musical! thu 7pm, Fri 8pm, Sat 2pm & 8pm, Sun 2pm & 7pm, Wed 7pm. through February 11; $38; Sacramento theatre Company Pollock Stage, 1419 h Street; (916) 443-6722; www.sactheatre.org.

The Musical of Musicals: The Musical! is an unabashed love letter to Broadway. It’s full of the themes and personalities of musical theatre, performed by a spunky cast of five who give the material a loving, satirical touch. Brad Bong, Michael RJ Campbell, Kelly Ann Dunn, David Taylor Gomes and Martha Omiyo Kight sing and dance their hearts out. Directed by Michael Laun, with music and book by Eric Rockwell and lyrics and book by Joanne Bogart, the play takes place in a theater that is about to be closed because its resident troupe can’t pay the rent. The company members gather for one last pitch to the landlord: Let them stay if they can come up with a surefire hit.

What follows is a series of five possibilities, each “in the style of” famous Broadway composers, including Rodgers and Hammerstein, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jerry Herman, Stephen Sondheim, and John Kander and Fred Ebb. All are good, witty homages. And several will really delight musical theatre mavens. Some, though, may be a bit esoteric for “regular” theatre-goers. Most rewarding, perhaps because of wider mainstream acceptance, are the satires on Lloyd Webber’s many hits (Evita, Starlight Express, Phantom of the Opera and Jesus Christ Superstar among them) and the Kander and Ebb Speakeasy, which marries Cabaret and Chicago most effectively. Ω


Fri 8pm, sat 8pm, sun 2pm. through 1/28; $14-$18; Davis musical theater company, 607 Pena Drive in Davis; (530) 756-3682; http://dmtc.org.

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Acme Theater Company is presenting The White Rose by Lillian Garret Groag, which tells the story of five students dedicated to denouncing the Nazi regime who are arrested for distributing treasonous leaflets. Over five days, the members are interrogated and ultimately executed. Eleanor Richter as Sophie Scholl (one of the students) and Gracelyn Watkins as police chief Robert Mohr give strong, emotional performances, while Grey Turner as Nazi Anton Mahler gets more and more snide and nasty as the play progresses. Given today’s political climate, this is a play more people should see, and Acme does an excellent job with it. Thu 8pm, Fri 8pm, Sat 8pm, Sun 4pm. Through 1/21; $10-$12; Pamela Trokanski Dance Theater, 2720 Del Rio Place in Davis; (530) 401-6688; www.acmetheatre.net.

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The Davis Musical Theater Company traces King Arthur’s search for the holy grail in Spamalot: two hours of nothing but cheap shots, fart jokes and lowbrow humor based on Monty Python and the Holy Grail. The devoted audience loved it. The Historian (Steven O’Shea) sets the scene with the precision of a weatherman, recounting where in the country there is a plague (“a 50 percent chance of pestilence and famine coming out of the Northeast at twelve miles per hour.”) Following his announcement that this is “England,” the stage is, of course, filled with brightly costumed dancers singing about Finland and hitting each other with fish in the delightful “Finland/Fisch Schlapping Dance,” until the historian reminds them that it is England, whereupon they leave the stage, disappointed. The real story begins with the entrance of Arthur (Scott Minor), who announces his search for knights for his Round Table, with the assistance of sidekick Patsy (Tomas Eredia). They encounter ridiculous setbacks along the way, riding nonexistent horses and using coconuts to make the noise of the clopping hoofbeats. Python fans won’t be disappointed—typical Python gags are there: the Knights of Ni, Not Dead Fred, sirs Lancelot, Robin and Dennis Galahad and the Lady of the Lake, the diva of the piece. It all ends with a community song of “The Bright Side of Life” and chuckles continue as the audience shuffles out into the parking lot.

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4 Spamalot

—Bev SykeS

01.11.18

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27


Grin and bear it

Paddington 2 Chiquita banana bear.

01.24.18

5

feature length without leaving any awkward or unsightly stretch marks. Paddington’s happy life with Every once in a while in the flood of disposable (even the Brown family (Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins, downright awful) movies trying to separate children Madeleine Harris and Samuel Joslin) is disrupted from their parents’ money, one comes along that when he’s convicted of stealing a priceless pop-up redeems them all. In 2014, Paddington, from Michael book of London landmarks from his friend Mr. Bond’s Paddington Bear children’s books, was one Gruber (Jim Broadbent). But the real culprit is their of those. Writer-director Paul King showed the people neighbor, has-been actor Phoenix Buchanan (a behind Ferdinand, The Nut Job, Ice Age et al. hilariously hammy Hugh Grant, sinking just… how… it’s… done. In Paddington 2, his teeth into villainy with the same he shows them again. No. 1 was a delightrelish Nicole Kidman showed Writerful surprise; No. 2 may be less surprisin Paddington 1), who knows ing, but it’s just as delightful, and it director Paul the book is actually a treasure proves the first one was no fluke. King showed the map and connives to follow First a word about Ben its clues to a lost fortune. people behind Ferdinand, Whishaw, who voices the CGI In prison, Paddington’s Paddington. Whishaw is a perfectly The Nut Job, Ice Age et al. goodness wins over a mob acceptable actor who has done just… how… it’s… done. In of hard-case inmates, led by perfectly acceptable work in movies the snarling cook Knuckles Paddington 2, he shows like Skyfall, Brideshead Revisited McGinty (Brendan Gleeson, and The Danish Girl without ever them again. as hilarious as Grant but more being particularly distinguished. But quietly), and before long they’re voicing an animated character can be all swooning over marmalade almost mystically liberating for an actor. sandwiches and promising to help clear Has Tim Allen done anything else as lively as Buzz Paddington’s name. Lightyear? Or Joan Cusack as cowgirl Jessie? So it is The border between silly-ass folderol and with Whishaw; his Paddington has a placid, openhearted sweetness more indelible than anything he’s done before, delightful nonsense may be razor-thin, but you’d never know it from King’s script and direction; and maybe more than he’ll ever do again. Paddington 2 never puts a foot wrong. Like its Giving due credit, Whishaw gets a lot of help from predecessor, it’s brimming with irresistible charm, the movie’s five credited art directors (supervised by the kind of movie that could give “sweetness and Patrick Rolfe) and hundreds of animation and visual light” a good name. effects techies, not to mention Erik Wilson’s sparkling I can hardly wait for Paddington 3. As long as candy-box cinematography. Paul King stays on board. Ω But all these production values wouldn’t come to much if the story couldn’t carry them, and that’s where Paul King and co-writer Simon Farnaby come in. As King and Hamish McColl did the first time, they expand the gentle, fragile whimsy of Bond’s short books to

28   |   SN&R   |   01.11.18

by Jim Lane

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

excellent


fiLm CLiPS

3

All the Money in the World

Ridley Scott directs this entertaining  but uneven true-life drama about the  1973 kidnapping of John Paul Getty III, a situation that dragged on for months when the  teenager’s billionaire grandfather refused to  pay his ransom. All the Money in the World is  impeccably mounted but dramatically  disjointed, a production design triumph with  a shortage of substance, and only strong  performances keep the film from falling  apart. By this point, the onscreen story of All  the Money in the World has been overshadowed by the offscreen drama, which saw  disgraced actor Kevin Spacey’s scenes as  the elder J. Paul Getty hastily reshot with  Christopher Plummer. If only Plummer  could have also replaced Mark Wahlberg as  Fletcher Davis, the ex-CIA agent and Getty  employee who oversaw the ransom negotiations. It feels like a functional supporting role  got beefed up to attract a star, which only  distracts attention from the characters that  really matter. D.B.

2

BY DANIEL BARNES & JIM LANE

Darkest Hour

Gary Oldman blubbers and bellows  from under wads of makeup as Winston Churchill in this lifeless biopic by director Joe Wright (Atonement), portraying the  embattled British prime minister during the  tumultuous weeks between his 1940 appointment and the rescue mission at Dunkirk.   Despite his abrasive nature and alcoholsoaked diet, Churchill was a compromise  choice intended to unite Britain’s rival political parties against the Nazi threat, although  his saber-rattling rhetoric quickly proved  divisive.  While Oldman chomps on the scenery in a sweat-stained awards grab, much of  the action is filtered through his secretary  (Lily James), whom Churchill treats with  a borderline Weinstein-ian overfamiliarity  (bad year to heroize handsy bosses in bathrobes).  After Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk    and Their Finest, this is the third 2017 release  to touch on the Dunkirk evacuation, although  Darkest Hour  stops short at Churchill’s “we  shall fight on the beaches” speech, as if to  underline its own pointlessness. D.B.

2

The Greatest Showman

2

I, Tonya

Hugh Jackman stars as 19th century  impresario P.T. Barnum—a fascinating  character whose real life and career are of  scant interest in the movie as written by  Jenny Bicks and Bill Condon and directed  by the unready Michael Gracey. Then again,  Barnum made his fortune peddling hoaxes to  a gullible public, and he might be amused by  how the movie runs the same scam. Jackman’s musical chops are real enough—ditto  those of Zac Efron, Zendaya and others—but  you can’t make a first-rate musical with  third-rate songs, and these (by Benj Pasek  and Justin Paul, way off their game) are  utterly humdrum. Any real dancing is undermined by glitzy CGI; we don’t know what’s  real and what’s phony, so we assume it’s all  faked. A miscast and unappealing Rebecca  Ferguson as soprano Jenny Lind sinks the  movie even further. J.L.

Winston Churchill said that the price  of greatness is responsibility, but  for cinephiles, the price of great auteurs is  homage.  For every Paul Thomas Anderson that Martin Scorsese has influenced,  there are hundreds of Craig Brewers,  middling tracers who vapidly incorporate  Scorsese-ian elements devoid of context or  impact. Brewer (Million Dollar Arm) takes a  crack at Goodfellas-esque multi-narrator  storytelling and kinetic style with I, Tonya,  an unnecessary biopic about figure skater  Tonya Harding. Margot Robbie plays Harding  over the course of several decades, and  although Robbie is a lock to win the Best  Actress Oscar, she only delivers more of the  vacuum-sealed charisma that she brought  to Suicide Squad (she has screen presence, but not screen substance). I, Tonya  works hard to make Harding sympathetic, 

we’re

HIrING! Last sequel, pitches.

1

Pitch Perfect 3

The Bellas reunite for a USO tour. This franchise ran out of steam  halfway through the credit crawl on the first movie, and there’s been  nothing but garbage-in-garbage-out since then. Director Trish Sie and writers  Kay Cannon and Mike White seem determined to see how much non-story, lame  dialogue, fuzzy cinematography (Matthew Clark), sloppy editing (Craig Alpert  and Colin Patton) and vapid songs they can cram into 93 minutes and still make  $100 million. The charms of stars Anna Kendrick and Hailee Steinfeld are hardly  powerful enough to carry this junk, especially when they’re teamed with the  insufferable Rebel Wilson, who can ruin any movie with 10 minutes of screen  time (and take John Lithgow, as her ne’er-do-well father, down with her). “Last  call, pitches!” scream the movie’s posters. If only. J.L.

especially compared to her abusive husband  (Sebastian Stan) and monstrous mother (a  costume-y Allison Janney), but I just felt bad  for Nancy Kerrigan all over again. D.B.

4

The Post

After a three-year break following  Lincoln, Steven Spielberg has cranked  out three mature and understated genre films  in three years, culminating with his latest  release, The Post. The BFG was an undervalued  children’s fantasy, but spy flick Bridge of Spies  and newspaper movie The Post use their respective genres to make august, auburn-tinged  commentaries on American institutions, past  and present. Set in the 1970s, The Post centers  on the leak and publication of the Pentagon  Papers, the classified documents that proved  the government lied about the then-raging  Vietnam War. The Post was written by Josh  Singer, the Oscar-winning co-screenwriter of  Tom McCarthy’s forgettable awards magnet  Spotlight. Both The Post and Spotlight are  process movies about real-life journalists  and their groundbreaking scoops, and they  both trace over similar issues regarding the  freedoms and responsibilities of the press. It’s  as if Spielberg watched Spotlight and thought it  might make a good movie someday. D.B.

3

John Developer

The Shape of Water

Guillermo del Toro directs this beautifully designed but clumsily arranged  sci-fi love story about a mute janitor (Sally  Hawkins) who falls for a magical creature  (a motion-captured Doug Jones).  Hawkins’  plucky Eliza pushes a mop at a mysterious research laboratory overseen by a  teeth-gnashing sadist (Michael Shannon, of  course), but the arrival of a fishlike   humanoid from the Amazon sparks something inside her soul.  Eliza enlists the help  of her kindly co-worker (Octavia Spencer)  and her closeted gay neighbor (Richard  Jenkins) to free the beast, with Russian spies  in pursuit while an unlikely romance blooms.   Although set in an unofficially segregated  1960s Baltimore, The Shape of Water drips  with Amelie-like whimsy, right down to Alex-

Kate Calendar Editor

andre Desplat’s concertina-heavy score. The  film has great pieces that rarely fit together,  and the binary connections that del Toro  makes between real-life civil rights struggles  and merman love are fairly insulting. D.B.

3

Star Wars: The Last Jedi

2

Wonder Wheel

The galactic civil war goes on, with the  Resistance on the run under Gen. Leia  Organa (Carrie Fisher, who finished shooting  shortly before her death last year) and the  Force-savant Rey (Daisy Ridley) seeking to  recruit the reclusive Luke Skywalker (Mark  Hamill) back into the struggle. Writerdirector Rian Johnson falters a bit, missing  the gee-whiz thrill J.J. Abrams gave The  Force Awakens—and where Abrams left us  eager for more, Johnson leaves us sated and  willing to wait a couple of years for the next  episode. Still, there’s plenty of fun to be had,  and the series faithful won’t be disappointed.  Oscar Isaac, John Boyega, Adam Driver,  Domhnall Gleeson and Andy Serkis round  out the returning cast, with some promising  new characters in the form of Laura Dern,  Benicio del Toro and Kelly Marie Tran. J.L.

The In 1950s Coney Island, a young  woman (Juno Temple) shows up on  the doorstep of her estranged father (Jim  Belushi) and his second wife (Kate Winslet),  fleeing from her mobster ex-husband after  turning state’s evidence. Writer/director  Woody Allen is near the top of his game  in terms of the performances he draws  from his cast, especially Temple (someone  to watch) and Winslet (never sharper or  braver), and including Justin Timberlake as  a lifeguard attracted to Temple while having  an affair with Winslet. But the acting and  Vittorio Storaro’s sun-splashed photography can’t compensate for Allen’s tiresome  return to his most distasteful theme: having  inconvenient people murdered and getting  away with it—Crimes and Misdemeanors,  Match Point and now this. It’s well done, but  unpleasant and unsatisfying.. J.L.

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Cumbia with a twist La Mera Candelaria rejects the status  quo—with danceable beats by Steph RodRiguez

Photo by harmony Gerber/Photo Graffiti

fault, who can help me?) / Yo tambien soy sobreviviente (I, too, am a survivor) / Yo tambien soy fuerte y valiente (I, too, am strong and brave).” Candelaria formed La Mera Candelaria shortly after relocating to Los Angeles in 2015. She recruited a group of musicians who use percussive instruments like congas, tambora, claves and güira with bass and cuatro-style guitars to create the band’s fusion of genres: They collide the steady, danceable beats of cumbia with the more laid-back and buoyant vibes of Son Cubano. “It’s not strictly cumbia that you would hear on the radio,” Candelaria says. “It’s cumbia with a very Caribbean style and instruments that you wouldn’t typically find in a cumbia band, and I think it really gives us some good edge, especially in LA where there are more than 200 cumbia bands.” Candelaria says she always wanted to start a band of her own, even when she fronted the popular Bay Area alternative Latin group La Misa Negra for a stint. She longed to perform her original songs that Longing for a stage. explore themes of feminism and the place of women in the music industry, especially within the Latin community. La Mera Candelaria’s first self-titled album— Latina singer-songwriter Stephani Candelaria released last August—includes songs that put fondly remembers sleeping backstage at the age of women at the forefront as they pursue men without 5 inside the clubs where her mother, a salsa singer, the veil of shame or lament the loss of friends. would perform well into the night. Candelaria, In the band’s upcoming album due in February, now 27, credits her mother as one of her biggest Candelaria says she sings with skepticism inspirations for her own musical ambitions, about the norms of Latin music: motivating her to move from the small Instead of restricting her lyrical California mission town of San themes to the typical heartbreak Juan Bautista into the Bay Area to “My songs are scenario or romantic love with pursue music at 19. men, Candelaria writes from about things that “It was definitely not your her gut and challenges what you don’t typically hear average childhood, and there Latina singer-songwriters are pros and cons to having women, especially Latinas, depict within the industry. that,” Candelaria says in a recent “My songs are about singing about.” phone interview with SN&R. things that you don’t typiStephani Candelaria “But I would not change it for the cally hear women, especially singer-songwriter world because I don’t think I’d be Latinas, singing about,” here making music if it hadn’t been Candelaria says. “Being able to for those experiences of watching my say things that women think without family give everything to their craft.” shame and talk about the reality of life Now, Candelaria has formed her own Los for a lot of Latinas today and to show that it’s Angeles-based band that challenges the norms of OK for women to be sexual and open and dynamic cumbia and the Latin music industry at large: La and beautiful—and not be pinned down as this or Mera Candelaria (translation: The Mere Candelaria). that. I want to bring those topics up in a fun and Next Friday, they’re coming to Old Ironsides, danceable way.” Ω where they plan to unveil a new single titled “Yo Tambien”—a response to the #MeToo movement. Candelaria sings: “Yo soy la trabajadora, que no puede ni hablar (I am the worker who can’t even Dance along with La mera Candelaria at old ironsides (1901 10th Street) on friday, January 19. the show starts at 9 p.m. and tickets are $10 at the speak) / Porque si el jefe es el culpable, quien me door. www.lameracandelaria.com. puede ayudar? (Because if the boss is the one at

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inDepenDent JournalismFunD .org 30   |   SN&R   |   01.11.18


foR the WeeK of JANUARY 11

by KATE GONZALES

PoST eVenTS onLine FoR FRee aT

www.newsreview.com/sacramento

SToRYTeLLeRS eVeninG: In celebration of the  50-year anniversary of Johnny Cash’s  Folsom Prison concert, performers  with Poets & Pioneers artists provide  entertainment, along with other musicians.  Hear stories from the Carter family and  close friends about life on the road with  Johnny Cash.  4pm, $100.  604 Sutter St.   in Folsom.

TommY emmanUeL: With J.D. Simo.  8pm,

$32.50-$42.50.  Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.

WHiSkeY anD STiTcHeS: Irishpalooza features  Whiskey and Stitches, One Eyed Reilly, The  Pikeys, The McKeever School of Irish Dance.  5:30pm, $8-$10.  Harlow’s, 2708 J St.

ZePPaReLLa: Led Zeppelin tribute band  PHOTO cOurTesy Of mlk365

15 mon

Last year’s marchers.

performs with Keep Smilin’.  7pm, $18-$20.   Auburn Event Center, 145 Elm Ave. in Auburn.

suNDAy, 1/14 JameS GaRneR’S TRiBUTe To JoHnnY caSH: 

See event listing on 1/13.  7:30pm, $23-$48.   Harris Center, 10 College Parkway in Folsom.

kaLi maSi: With VVomen, Freature.   8pm, $8.   Cafe Colonial, 3520 Stockton Blvd.

Take the steps

moD SUn: With Call Me Karizma, Austin Cain,  Angel White, Forget Brennan, DJ Daghe. 

5pm, $15-$20.  Harlow’s, 2708 J St.

Sacramento city college, 9 a.m., no cover

mONDAy, 1/15 HeaRTS Like LionS: With VIS, Lost Things, 

Each year on Martin Luther King Jr. Day,  hundreds of thousands of people follow in  his footsteps to march in  Take acTion support of racial justice.  Join your community in the March for the  Dream, an annual trek that this year takes  marchers from Oak Park to Land Park and  into downtown to answer King’s call to  “walk with me.” Organized by MLK365, the  march kicks off with The Extra Mile at Oak  Park Community Center, the ceremonial  start for community leaders committed to  civil rights. The official start of the march, 

where everyone is encouraged to take  part, will be at 9 a.m. at Sacramento City  College. It will conclude with a reviewing  stand—a chance to see and appreciate the  diverse crowd of participants—outside  the Sacramento Convention Center. The  celebration continues inside, with a Diversity Expo that will have health screenings,  robotics demonstrations, guests like Code  for Hood and musical and spoken word  performances. Help keep the dream alive  in 2018. 3835 Freeport Boulevard, http:// marchforthedream.org.

Mourning Mountains, Shpwrck, Cvltvre.  7:30pm, $10. Cafe Colonial, 3520 Stockton  Blvd.

WeDNesDAy, 1/17 LaiTH aL-SaaDi: With Special Guests.  5:30pm, $25-$30.  Harlow’s, 2708 J St.

THe LUckY LoSeRS: With Phil Berkowitz, Cathy  Lemons.  6:30pm, $8.  Momo Lounge, 2708  J St.

fesTIVAls frIDAy, 1/12 FRienDS oF aRDen-Dimick LiBRaRY Book SaLe: 

musIc THursDAy, 1/11 $5 THURSDaY SHoWcaSe: A local showcase  with Roman Pilot, Chaos Mantra, Rebel  Holocrons, California Child, Lucky/You.  6:30pm, $5. Holy Diver, 1517 21st St.

frIDAy, 1/12 an eVeninG WiTH Lee RiTenoUR: Grammy 

Award-winning guitarist.  8pm, $25-$45.   Harris Center, 10 College Parkway in Folsom.

emo niGHT anniVeRSaRY PaRTY: Celebrate Emo  Night’s one-year anniversary party with a  Dance Gavin Dance DJ set, and Eugene Ugly  and With Wolves covering emo favorites.  Prizes and giveaways!  7:30pm, $8.  Holy  Diver, 1517 21st St.

kaHaLi: With Ill Root.  9:30pm, $10.  Harlow’s,  2708 J St.

LUiS coRoneL: Latin musician out of Arizona.  With Banda los Recoditos, La Adictiva, Jorge  Almir.  7pm, $40.  Cal Expo, 1600 Exposition  Blvd.

mankY: With Worthy Goat, Noah Nelson.  8pm, $5.  Luna’s Cafe & Juice Bar, 1414 16th St.

oZomaTLi: With Sol Peligro.  7:30pm, $30$45. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.

PUBLic ScHooL: With Enso Anima, Roman  Pilot, Mercedes Avenue, LindaMar, Zach  Golub.  7pm, $10. Cafe Colonial, 3520  Stockton Blvd.

sATurDAy, 1/13 THe enGLiSH BeaT: With La Noche Oskura, DJ Dr.  Wood.  7pm, $29.29. Ace Of Spades, 1417 R St.

iDeaTeam: A nine-piece ensemble.  10pm, $10.   Momo Lounge, 2708 J St.

inSTaGon: With Bad Mother Nature.  8pm, $7.   Shine, 1400 E St.

JameS GaRneR’S TRiBUTe To JoHnnY caSH:  Nearly 50 years after the famed Folsom  Prison Concert, Garner and his band  capture the essence of the Man in Black.  7:30pm, $23-$48.  Harris Center, 10 College  Parkway in Folsom.

mike SToUT BeneFiT SHoW: Kill the Precedent,  Sowers of Dissent, Frack!, Dolores 5000,  Tha Fruitbat.  5pm, $10.  Blue Lamp, 1400  Alhambra Blvd.

mR. HooPeR: With Mr. P Chill, One Lost MC, DJ 

Mike Colossal.  9pm, $8.  Old Ironsides, 1901  10th St.

THe o’mULLiGanS: With Short Trip, Knockout, 

Landline.  6pm, $5.  The Silver Orange, 922  57th St.

A two-day book sale with hundreds of books  available at low prices. Proceeds benefit  library programs and materials.  1pm, no cover.  Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Ave.

sATurDAy, 1/13 FRienDS oF aRDen-Dimick LiBRaRY Book SaLe:  See event listing on 1/12.  1pm, no cover.   Arden-Dimick Library, 891 Watt Ave.

snr c a le nd a r @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

Online listings will be considered for print. Print listings are edited for space and accuracy. Deadline for print listings is 5 p.m. Wednesday. Deadline for Nightlife listings is midnight sunday. send photos and reference materials to calendar editor kate Gonzales at snrcalendar@newsreview.com.

SacRamenTo anTiQUe FaiRe: Vendors from  California, Nevada and neighboring states  sell antiques and collectibles no younger  than 20 years old. Shop for vintage clothing,  military antiques, art, jewelry, toys and  more.  6:30am, $3.  21st & X Streets, 2350  21st St.

fOOD & DrINk frIDAy, 1/12 Dine DoWnToWn ReSTaURanT Week: Explore top  restaurants in the downtown and midtown  area, as 32 restaurants serve three-course  meals for $35. The 10-day dining event ends  1/21.  4pm, $35. Various restaurants.

sATurDAy, 1/13 coFFee BReWinG SeminaR: A discussion of  the variables that affect the cup of coffee  you drink each morning, including water  temperature and grind size. Participants  will also get a tasting of one specifically  prepared cup.  12pm, no cover.  Insight  Coffee Roasters, 1901 8th St.

La FeTe DeS RoiS: Celebrate Kings Day and look  for the bean in the cake. Sparkling wine will  also be served.  4:30pm, $5-$15.  Alliance  Française de Sacramento, 2420 N St.

RaRe BeeR WiTH 21ST amenDmenT: An all-day  event for rare treats from 21st Amendment. 

11am, no cover.  Capitol Beer and Taproom,  2222 Fair Oaks Blvd.

TonY RoDRiGUeZ memoRiaL cHiLi cook oFF:  Enter your finest chili recipe in the contest  or spend the day tasting.  noon, $5-$25.   Round Corner Tavern, 2333 S St.

WHiSkeY TaSTinG: An afternoon of music,  poetry, trivia and more, all related to  Scottish poet Robert Burns. Whiskey  tastings and other refreshments.  1pm, $15$30.  Oak Point Events, 4366 Auburn Blvd.

suNDAy, 1/14 BaRkHaPPY SacRamenTo YeaR oF THe DoG: A  Year of the Dog Brunch benefiting Chako  Pitbull Rescue and Advocacy. Dog social  time and a treat-eating competition. Free  goodies for everyone who attends.  1pm, $10-$12.  Two Rivers Cider Company, 4311  Attawa Ave.

WeDNesDAy, 1/17 Women in BUSineSS: A networking dinner  and discussion featuring a diverse panel  of women.  6pm, $75-$750.  Studio 817, 817  16th St.

THe miDToWn BiZaRRe: Shop for locally made  decor, fashion, accessories and body care  items.  10am, no cover.  Identity Coffees,  1430 28th St.

suNDAy, 1/14 BRiDaL SHoW: Get ideas for your wedding  with vendors specializing in gowns and  formalwear, food and cake, photography,  videography and more. Hourly fashion  shows and thousands of dollars in prizes  and contests.  10am, no cover-$15.  Cal Expo,  1600 Exposition Blvd.

fIlm THursDAy, 1/11 WiLD & Scenic FiLm FeSTiVaL—oPeninG aRT RecePTion: The Wild & Scenic Film Festival 

kicks off with a free art reception.  4:30pm,

caLenDaR LiSTinGS conTinUeD on PaGe 34

01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   31


H a l l   o f   fa m e A Lot Like Birds Agent Ribbons Dinorah and Crosswinds Forever Goldrush Humble Wolf Kill The Precedent The New Humans Some Fear None Way Out West

artist of tHe year

SAC RAM E N TO M U S I C AWA R DS

Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω

2018 nominees

v

irtually every year in the 26 years since the first  sacramento area music awards, an sn&r editor has  written in this space about how the music scene has  evolved. for last year’s silver anniversary event, rachel  leibrock reached back to 1992, “when grunge and college  rock dominated the airwaves,” and pointed to the many  categories that have been added to the sammies list.

Blues Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω

(as it happens, making certain that every band lands  in the correct category can be tricky. is that heavy  blues-rock band a blues band or a rock band? is this  reggae or world music? jazz or jam? We try to reach  out to each artist to help us decide, but with 209 finalist  nominees in 30 categories, that can be … daunting.) this is the first year that i get the honor of participating in this celebration of the sacramento music  scene, and it is already a blast. like so much else here  in sac, the quality, variety and depth blows me away. 

Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω

so now, the contest begins. go to sammies.com to  cast your vote.

32   |   SN&R   |   01.11.18

Amanda Gray Ariel Jean Band The Cripple Creek Band The Golden Cadillacs JonEmery Loose Engines Me & You Sactown Playboys The Nickel Slots Bonanza King Band

C o v e r   B a n d / t r i B u t e  Band

- eric johnson, editor

sammies.com

Dana Moret & Mr. December Kyle Rowland Blues Band Matt Rainey and the Dippin’ Sauce Michael Ray Midtown Creepers Ranell Carpenter Band The Christian DeWild Band The Jeff Watson Band The Zach Waters Band Working Man Blues Band

C o u n t r y/a m e r i C a n a / a lt- C o u n t r y

Big news this year: the number of finalists is almost  double last year’s list—our readers, local experts and  staff offered up that much talent for consideration. and  trust me: some of the artists who received preliminary  nominations but did not make the final cut here could  win a music award in some other city.

go oNliNe Now to vote foR youR favoRite SacRameNto aRtiStS!

CHRCH Cities You Wish You Were From Exiled From Grace Hobo Johnson House of Mary Island of Black and White Jessica Malone Kennedy Wrose So Much Light SpaceWalker Sparks Across Darkness Tk StayRokkin

!

VOTING ENDS 02/26/2018

Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω

Apple Z Cover Me Badd Heartless Just Like Heaven REMIX Sheastie Boys Steelin’ Dan The Lucky Seven Thunder Cover Total Recall Whoville

C r e at i v e  a C H i e v e m e n t   i n  s u p p o r t   o f   t H e  musiC sCene Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω

Danielle Vincent Fame By The Flame Girls Rock Sacramento High House The Red Museum Sol Collective The Colonial Complex

d e e j ay Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω

DJ Billy Lane DJ Eddie Z DJ Epik DJ Essence DJ Hektor S DJ Nocturnal DJ Rated R DJ Zephyr

eleCtroniCa/ e x p e r i m e n ta l Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω

Doombird Gentleman Surfer Instagon Petaluma Pregnant Separate Spines So Much Light SpaceWalker Tel Cairo Trophii Write Or Die

emCee Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω

Alex Salveson Aye Tee Bru Lei Charlie Muscle Mozzy Optimiztiq Soosh*e! Sparks Across Darkness Tavis

folk/Bluegrass Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω Ω

According to Bazooka Dandelion Massacre Inland Manzanita Marty Cohen & The Sidekicks Pine Street Ramblers Red Dirt Ruckus


Funk ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

BigΩStickyΩMess GeorgeΩNapp Ideateam JoyΩandΩMadness LaTour TheΩNibblers

Hard rock ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

AmongΩTheΩFirst CaliforniaΩRiotΩAct Control KoreanΩFireΩDrill ShotgunΩSawyer SomeΩFearΩNone Trikome

Hardcore/ I n d u s t r I a l / P o s tHardcore ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

CrossΩClass EnsoΩAnima Anima HOODS Horseneck KillΩTheΩPrecedent Precedent Couture KillerΩCouture Heartfelt SomethingΩHeartfelt Subtlety HANX XTOMΩHANX

HIP-HoP P/ r a P ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

DeadΩTillΩMonday Monday DLRN eRRth HoboΩJohnson illΩImperial Wrose KennedyΩWrose LilΩDarrion POORΩMajesty TheΩMyNorities TkΩStayRokkin

IndIe ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

ArtsΩ&ΩLeisure BoyΩRomeo DeathΩPartyΩAtΩTheΩBeach FlightΩMongoose HouseΩofΩMary JulietΩCompany LifeΩinΩ24ΩFrames PierceΩandΩTheΩGals TheΩPolyorchids Vasas VinnieΩGuideraΩ&ΩTheΩDeadΩBirds WorthyΩGoat

!

Jazz ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

TheΩAlexΩJenkinsΩTrio CityΩofΩTreesΩBrassΩBand ElementΩBrassΩBand Band HotΩCity Jacam Manricks JacamΩManricks Peter Petty PeterΩPetty PRVLGS ShawnΩThwaitesΩRebelΩQuartet SwitchbladeΩTrio TheΩMindful

lIve PerFormer ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

DrugΩApts. Drug HoboΩJohnson JesusΩ&ΩtheΩDinosaurs Vaughnn LeighΩVaughnn Frames LifeΩinΩ24ΩFrames Petty PeterΩPetty Screature SpaceWalker Across Darkness SparksΩAcrossΩDarkness StayRokkin TkΩStayRokkin Guidera & The Dead VinnieΩGuideraΩ&ΩTheΩDeadΩBirds

m e ta l ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

CHRCH ChromeΩGhost ExiledΩFromΩGrace Graveshadow HeatΩOfΩDamage NovaΩSutro Restrayned Wastewalker WithΩWolves Zeroclient

musIc vIdeo ΩΩ B Ω urningΩLandscapes:Ω“SheΩWasΩMyΩ Vessel” ΩΩ ExiledΩFromΩGrace:Ω“Saint” ΩΩ Hi,ΩMom!:Ω“LeaveΩTheΩLightΩOn” ΩΩ HoboΩJohnson:Ω“SexΩinΩtheΩCity” ΩΩ ΩKennedyΩWrose:Ω“Can’tΩSaveΩMyself”Ω (feat.ΩTreiΩKnoxx) ΩΩ LeighΩVaughnn:Ω“Cupcake” ΩΩ MahtieΩBush:Ω“ReturnΩOfΩThe...”Ω ΩΩ TheΩPolyorchids:Ω“Popgun” ΩΩ Zeroclient:Ω“Parasite”

new artIst ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

AlexΩSalveson Alex Salveson AmongΩTheΩFirst Among The First CitiesΩYouΩWishΩYouΩWereΩFrom Cities You Wish You Were LeighΩVaughnn Vaughnn MeΩ&ΩYou TheΩGoldΩSouls

P r o d u c e r   o F   t H e  Year ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

ChrisΩWoodhouse Chris Woodhouse Ira Skinner IraΩSkinner JoeΩJohnston MattΩThomas PatrickΩHills SeanΩStack

P u n k / P o s t- P u n k ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

¡LasΩPulgas! AtΩBothΩEnds CaptainΩCutiepie DestroyΩBoys DrugΩApts. HotBods Pets Screature SoΩStressed MOANS theΩMOANS O’Mulligans TheΩO’Mulligans

r&B/soul ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

BrandyΩRobinson Brandy Robinson CarlaΩFleming Carla Fleming CashΩCampain Campain J.ΩBlack LeighΩVaughnn LeviΩMoses TheΩGoldΩSouls

r e g g a e /J a m ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

ArdenΩParkΩRoots DrunkenΩKungΩFu ElementΩofΩSoul Element IslandΩofΩBlackΩandΩWhite Island of Black MINDΩX MIND X Riotmaker SactoΩStorytellers TheΩScratchΩOuts TwoΩPeace

rock ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

BlueΩOaks BurningΩLandscapes CitiesΩYouΩWishΩYouΩWereΩFrom DropΩDeadΩRedΩ HumbleΩWolf SurvivingΩtheΩEra TheΩGhostΩTownΩRebellion

r o c k a B I l lY ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

FrankieΩAndΩTheΩDefenders And The Defenders TheΩInfamousΩSwanks The Infamous Swanks TheΩCantaliers The Cantaliers TheΩTwilightΩDrifters

release oF tHe Year ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

AΩLotΩLikeΩBirds:ΩDIVISI ArtsΩ&ΩLeisure:ΩRescuedΩObjects BlueΩOaks:ΩToΩBeΩKindΩisΩSin BoyΩRomeo:ΩBoyΩRomeo ΩTheΩChristianΩDeWildΩBand:ΩΩ LittleΩDevil ChristopherΩFairman:Ω#OAKLAND ΩCitiesΩYouΩWishΩYouΩWereΩFrom:Ω CYWYWF DeathΩPartyΩAtΩTheΩBeach:ΩAbsence Death HouseΩofΩMary:ΩClout House JessicaΩMalone:Ω Jessica Malone: MilesΩLeftΩtoΩWalk KennedyΩWrose:Ω Kennedy Wrose: B.A.E.Ω LeighΩVaughnn:Ω Vaughnn: Birthright Mr.ΩHooper:Ω Hooper: Auto AutoΩReverse NancyΩNorthrup:Ω Northrup: HigherΩMountain ΩPeterΩPettyΩAndΩHisΩTerpsichoreans:Ω Petty And Ready,ΩPetty,ΩGo! Petty, Go! ΩSeparateΩSpines:Ω Spines: Cut CutΩUpΩTheΩ Rainbow SoΩMuchΩLight:ΩOh, Oh,ΩYuck Yuck ΩSpaceWalker:ΩFolktronica: Folktronica:ΩΩ DivinityΩ&ΩBeyond! TkΩStayRokkin:ΩGolden GoldenΩYear Year

s I n g e r - s o n gw r I t e r ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

AndrewΩCastro ChristopherΩFairman Fairman HannahΩJaneΩKile JaysonΩAngove JessicaΩMalone KevinΩSeconds NancyΩNorthrup Swanfeldt SandraΩDoloresΩSwanfeldt WilliamΩMylar Xochitl

teen ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

DestroyΩBoys Boys ExiledΩFromΩGrace From Grace FreeΩCandy Candy Knockout Lucky/You Nezumi Onna NezumiΩOnna URD-OM

world musIc ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ ΩΩ

DinorahΩandΩCrosswinds DonGatoΩLatinΩBand LaΩNocheΩOskura Nagual SwimmingΩinΩBengal WorldΩHood YoloΩMamboΩBand

For uP-to-date InFormatIon, votIng, and more go to sammIes.com

01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   33


See More eventS and SubMit your own at newSreview.COm/SaCramentO/Calendar

tHurSday, 1/11-mOnday, 1/15

daviS MuSical tHeatre coMpany: Monty Python’s Spamalot. Ripped off from the comedy Monty Python and the Holy Grail, this show retells the legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table, and features a bevy of beautiful show girls, cows, killer rabbits and French people. through 1/28. $16-$18. 607 Pena Drive, Suite 10 in Davis.

wild & Scenic film festival Grass Valley and neVada City Venues, Various times, $8-$375

green valley tHeatre: The Magic of Ryan Kane. Magician and comedian who honed his craft as a teen performer in Old Sacramento returns to his hometown. 8pm friday, 1/12. $12. 3823 V St.

paMela troKanSKi dance worKSHop and perforMance art center: Acme Theatre

Practicing environmentalPHOtO COurteSy Of Blue ventureS ism can be inaccessible for many of us. It’s unrealistic to expect those struggling to put food on the table to make filM sure that food is organic, or has a low impact. Nationally, the lack of political will to face climate change is disheartening. In the Wild & Scenic Film Festival, we find hope. For 16 years, the South Yuba River Citizens League has presented environmental documentaries—and the activists and celebrities behind them—in Nevada City and Grass Valley. More than 135 films over five days of screenings will tell the inspiring stories of people putting the environment first. Special events like activism workshops, family activities and discussions with filmmakers round out the weekend of opportunities to see how we can help change the world. Headquartered at 315 Commercial Street in Nevada City, www. wildandscenicfilmfestival.org.

calendar liStingS continued froM page 31

Comedian out of New York discusses his family, heritage and dating life. With Mike Betancourt. through 1/14. $10. Comics Without Boundaries. Hosted by Tristan Johnson, with headliner Insane Wayne and featuring Eric Mee and Braden Murphy. 8pm wednesday, 1/17. $10-$15. 1207 Front St.

no cover. Union Square, 151 Union Square in Grass Valley.

friday, 1/12 wild & Scenic filM feStival: See event

highlight above. 7pm, $8-$375. Nevada Theatre, 401 Broad St. in Nevada City.

MoMo lounge: Comedy Burger. With Ngaio

Bealum. 7pm Sunday, 1/14. $10-$25. 2708 J St.

puncH line: Sacramento Comedy Showcase. Some of the top stand-up comics in town showcase their best material. 8pm thursday, 1/11. $10. Iliza Live. See event highlight on page 36. through 1/12. $30$60. Key Lewis: Half Black, Half White, Looks Mexican. Comedian Key Lewis performs for a live DVD recording. 8pm, 10pm, Sunday, 1/14. $15-$25. Cards Against Humanity. Bring your filthiest-minded friends to drink, play and laugh. 7pm wednesday, 1/17. no cover. 2100 Arden Way

Saturday, 1/13 tHe african aMericanS: Many riverS to croSS: The first screening of this six-hour series by Henry Louis Gates Jr. that covers centuries of African-American history. Includes interviews with people on the front line of school integration, former Black Panther members and politicians. RSVP required. 5pm, no cover. SF Johnson Foundation, 6720 Fair Oaks Blvd., Suite 103 in Carmichael.

A blend of stand-up and improv. 8pm friday, 1/12. $8-$15. The Gateway Show. Stand up comedians tell their best jokes, get way too high, then try to tell more jokes. 8pm Sunday, 1/14. $12-$15. 1050 20th St., Suite 130.

a place called SacraMento: If you missed Access Sacramento’s annual film festival in October, this is your chance to see the 10 winning short films. 6:30pm, $5. Coloma Community Center, 4623 T St.

On StaGe cHautauQua playHouSe: The Regifters. A holiday comedy about a re-gifted item that’s worth more than expected. through

cSZ SacraMento: The Council—Improv Comedy. A lively improvisational discussion of current events and pop culture topics suggested by the audience. 10pm Saturday, 1/13. $8. 2230 Arden Way, Suite B.

1/14. $19-$22. 5325 Engle Road in Carmichael.

creSt tHeatre: Poets and Pioneers: The Birth

laugHS unliMited coMedy club: O.J. the Jokeman’s Live Album Recording. Hosted by Anderi Bailey, featuring Wendy Lewis. 8pm thursday, 1/11. $10. Luke Ashlocke.

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SacraMento ballet: Second Saturday— Giselle. A story of love, betrayal and redemption. 4pm Saturday, 1/13. no cover. 2420 N St.

StreetS pub and grub: Sac Science Idol. Early-career scientists compete to give the best science talk. Participants give threeminute talks based on their research, work or scientific concept. No slides, but props encouraged. 6pm wednesday, 1/17. 1804 J St.

art artiStS’ collaborative gallery: Mike Patterson. Sacramento-based oil painter displays pieces that largely depict the recognizable landscapes and urban scenes of Northern California. reception at 2pm Saturday, 1/13. no cover. 129 K St.

J. Michael Killey Retrospective. Second Saturday Reception Saturday, 1/13. through 2/6. no cover. 1931 L St.

leave your MarK Sac: Pieces of Dreams. Features new art from Lord Pawn. Opening reception at 6pm Saturday, 1/13. through 1/31, no cover. 2627 J St.

pence gallery: Kurt Fishback—Portraits of Women Artists. More than 70 California artists photographed in their studios. through 1/14. no cover. 212 D St. in Davis.

SacraMento fine artS center: Animal House. The 13th edition of this exhibit of animalthemed art, will open January 3. Mediums include painting, drawing, photography and sculpture, all media was submitted. through 1/28. no cover. 5330B Gibbons Drive in Carmichael.

tHe artery: The CHAA Collective Exhibit. Artists and art educators who are members of the Contemporary Humanitarian Artists Association display a range of work. through 1/29. 207 G St. in Davis.

union Hall gallery: Homecoming A Retrospective Exhibition. Features works by George Esquibel, Jahn Kloss, Tricia Talle and others. reception at 6pm Saturday, 1/13. no cover. 2126 K St.

verge center for tHe artS: SPACE AND PLACE by Black Salt Collective. An exhibit of multimedia works, including video, sound, collage, performance and painting, that highlights the culture and work of black, brown and indigenous women. through 3/18. no cover. 625 S St.

muSeumS

beatniK StudioS: Dana & Satterlee’s Intersection at Beatnik Studios. The two longtime artists and friends show individual and collaborative works. through 1/25. no cover. 723 S St.

cK art: A Sense of Place. Artwork inspired by a sense of place, including landscapes, abstracts, sculptures and conceptual art. Second Saturday Reception at 6pm Saturday, 1/13. through 1/31. no cover. 1115 E St.

gallery 1855: Solo Exhibition of Cathie Robison. Work by the local mixed-media artist. through 1/31. no cover. Davis Cemetery District 820 Pole Line Road in Davis.

california autoMobile MuSeuM: Shasta Minis. On display as part of the Car Club Cavalcade. through 2/4. 2200 Front St.

california MuSeuM: Beauty and the Beast: California Wildflowers and Climate Change. Images by San Francisco Bay Area-based photographers Rob Badger and Nita Winter reveal the effects of climate change on a universal symbol of beauty: the wildflower. through 1/28. $9. 1020 O St.

california State arcHiveS: California Memoirs: The William M. McCarthy Photograph Collection. William and Grace McCarthy shared a passion for photography

and travel for years, resulting in nearly 3,000 photos that document their early-20th century travels. through 1/30. no cover. 1020 O St., Fourth Floor.

california State railroad MuSeuM: Off The Clock. An exhibit focused on the sports, clubs, teams and competitions that Southern Pacific participated in to pass the time. through 6/1. $10-$15. 111 I St.

crocKer art MuSeuM: ARTMIX | MASQUERADE. Join this modern-day masquerade for an evening of magic, mystery, music and mayhem. Entertainment by DJ Stylus and violinist Sasha Tkacheff. 6pm thursday, 1/11. $10. 216 O St.

uc daviS deSign MuSeuM, crueSS Hall: It’s Bugged: Insects’ Role in Design. An exploration of the creative relationship between people and insects through this vibrant art and design installation. through 4/20. Free. 1 Shields Ave. in Davis.

all aGeS tHurSday, 1/11 art SpotS wingding: A festive, threedimensional art experience for young children to interact with and learn about the basic elements of art through play, experimentation and collaboration. 10am, no cover. Crocker Art Museum, 216 O St.

StorytiMe: Babies, toddlers, preschoolers and their caregivers can join in on songs, rhymes and stories that help build early literacy skills. A playtime with ageappropriate toys follows the program. 2pm, no cover. Sacramento Public Library—North Sacramento-Hagginwood Library, 2109 Del Paso Blvd.

friday, 1/12 lego Mania: A family program that allows kids to build with LEGO bricks. Arrive early to enjoy the children’s area, with toys, books, computer games and more. 3:30pm, no cover. McKinley Library, 601 Alhambra Blvd.

Saturday, 1/13 MuSic togetHer free preview claSS: A preview of Music Together 916 classes, research-based classes that nurture a child’s natural musicality in a playful, rich learning environment. 10am, no cover.

SacraMento coMedy Spot: Comedy Exchange.

wedneSday, 1/17

COmedy

Company’s The White Rose. A story about student Nazi resisters in 1942 Germany. through 1/21. $10-$12. 2720 Del Rio Place in Davis.

Kennedy art gallery: The Guilded Era:

01.11.18

of American Country Music. A country roots journey in celebration of American music. Showcases the Carter family with a guest appearance by Lorie Carter Bennett and other artists. 6:30pm Sunday, 1/14. $15$25. 1013 K St.

Saturday, 1/13

Suzanne Santo Harlow’s, 9:30 pm, $12-$14

As the frontwoman and fiddle-player for HoneyHoney, Suzanne Santo has brought a soulful sound to the Americana charts for a decade. Not long MuSic after returning to her native Los Angeles from Nashville, she began work on a solo project produced by the Grammy-nominated country rocker Butch Walker. On “Ghost in my Bed,” Santo unleashes a piece of work that Walker calls “so fucking sexy I can’t deal.” She’s touring with a hot band and getting raves. 2708 J Street, www.harlows.com. – Eric Johnson PHOtO COurteSy Of marina CHavez


supp rt

real

news

Saturday, 1/13

Watch the Skies Megagame Howe park, 5 p.M., $45

Who says grownups can’t play pretend? In this “megagame,”  you can be an alien with a mysterious interest in the Earth, a  government official trying to balance peace  Role Play and security or a member of the press trying  to uncover the real story. This day-long megagame lets participants inhabit roles they never would in the real world, as  they work together to solve the challenges of a possible alien  invasion. Hosted by West Coast Megagames, each megagame  takes on a different theme. An American Revolutions-themed  megagame is scheduled for July. Maybe Watch the Skies will  make you feel powerful, or maybe you’ll feel like a character in  The Twilight Zone. 2201 Cottage Way, www.wcmgames.com.

Donate to ’s InDepenDent JournalIsm FunD:

InDepenDentJournalIsmFunD.org

PHOtO COurtESy OF PatrICK duNKErLy

Bellissima European Dance Academy, 9911  Kent St., Suite 1 in Elk Grove.

SaCRaMeNTo FaSHIoN WeeK RUNWay CaSTING:  The annual Sacramento Fashion Week seeks  models. Includes sessions for adult models  (16 to 28 years old) and casting for kids’  wear (4 to 7 years old).  11am, no cover.   Arden Fair, 1689 Arden Way, Suite 1167.

SuNday, 1/14 JUNIoR ReC: Kids ages 8 through 17 of any  gender can learn the basics of derby in  this eight-week course with a scrimmage.  Participants encouraged to bring their  own gear, as the supply of loaner gear is  limited.  1pm, $10 per class. 1501 N. C St.

MONday, 1/15 lITTle PeePS aT THe SaCRaMeNTo Zoo: Classes  for children ages 3 to 5 (accompanied by a  caregiver), with a mini-lesson, fun craft,  activities like stories and songs and a visit  by an animal ambassador.  9:30am, $30-$35.   Sacramento Zoo, 3930 W Land Park Drive.

10am, $10-$20. Sacramento Convention  Center, 1400 J St.

eCHo laKe SNoWSHoe HIKe: A moderately  strenuous, 4-mile snowshoe hike led by  an experienced snowshoer.  8am, $10-$15.   Echo Lake off Highway 50.

WaTCH THe SKIeS MeGaGaMe: See event 

highlight below.   9am, $45.  Howe Park, 2201  Cottage Way.

SuNday, 1/14 eMBoDy yoGa IN THe PaRK: A Hatha-inspired  practice combining guided breathing,  yoga asana with modifications and guided  relaxation.  10am, no cover. Curtis Park, 3349  W. Curtis Drive.

yoGa WITH THe KINGS: A yoga class on the  Kings court, the the opportunity to practice  yoga next to the Kings Dancers and  Slamson.  1pm, 2:45pm, $20.  Golden 1 Center,  500 David J Stern Walk

MONday, 1/15 50 BIKeS FoR 50 KIDS: A community effort 

SPOrtS & OutdOOrS tHurSday, 1/11 GalaPaGoS ISlaNDS—BIRTHPlaCe oF SPeCIeS aND eVolUTIoNaRy THoUGHTS: Naturalist  John Kipping leads an exploration of the  regions that have served as isolated  laboratories in the development of many  species of tortoises, finches, cacti and lava  lizards. Marine bird life will be emphasized.  Contact American River Conservancy for  exact location (in the Coloma area).  6pm, $5-$10. American River Conservancy, 348  State Highway 49 in Coloma (contact for  exact location).

SaCRaMeNTo aMaZoNS RUGBy: Practices are  game play mixed with fitness. New players  welcome.  7pm, contact for cover. Sam and  Bonnie Pannell, 2524 Meadowview Road.

to match 50 children with teams of  volunteers to assemble a bike for each  child. Volunteers give local youth the gift  of healthy recreation that encourages  sustainable transportation and a better  future. Volunteers must register in  advance.  7:30am, no cover. Natomas Middle  School, 3200 North Park Drive.

HaRleM GloBeTRoTTeRS: Basketball 

entertainment for the family.  1pm, 6pm, $15-$135.  Golden 1 Center, 500 David J Stern  Walk.

SaCRaMeNTo RolleR DeRBy WoMeN’S ReC leaGUe SeSSIoN: An eight-week session for  beginners to learn more about roller derby.  Learn the basics of roller derby, like safety,  stops, skating form, rules and endurance.  6pm, $10 per week.  Sacramento City Roller  Derby, 1501 N. C St.

LGBtQ

THRoWBaCK To THe ’70S Day: Dress in your best  1970s attire and listen to tunes from the  decade while ice skating.  6pm. Through 1/11. $6-$12. 701 K St.

Saturday, 1/13 eaSyRIDeRS BIKe SHoW: A touring motorcycle  show with live entertainment comes to Sac. 

SuNday, 1/14 PaNSeXUal PaNCaKe BReaKFaST: If you’re  pansexual, love pancakes and looking to  build community, this is the place.  11am, $5 donation.  The Sacramento LGBT Community  Center, 1927 L St.

taKE aCtION tHurSday, 1/11 CWa’S yoUTH@WoRK CoNFeReNCe: A conference  for those individuals and organizations  that provide education, training or other  employment services to young people  ages 16 to 24. The conference will address  key workforce issues and highlight best  practices in serving youth who have  barriers to employment.  8am, $360-$655.   Sheraton Grand Sacramento, 1230 J St.

JoURNalISM IN THe eRa oF FaKe NeWS: A  discussion among three influential California  journalists. RSVP required.  5:30pm, no cover. Sterling Hotel Sacramento, 1300 H St.

MaRIJUaNa CUlTIVaTIoN oRDINaNCe MeeTING:  Take part in a discussion about Yolo  County’s rules around marijuana, including  whether to allow outdoor cultivation and  public safety.  6pm, no cover. El Macero  Country Club, 44571 Clubhouse Drive in El  Macero.

Saturday, 1/13 KNoW yoUR RIGHTS WHIle BeING BlaCK PaRT 1:  Training for Black citizens to safely live their  lives at home, in their cars, on the streets  and how to interact with police.  6pm, no cover.  Sacramento Public Library—Belle  Cooledge, 5600 South Land Park Drive.

MONday, 1/15 aNNUal ReClaIM MlK THIS IS NoT THe DReaM!:  Commemorate the radical sentiment of Dr.  Martin Luther King Jr. with groups including  ANSWER Sacramento, Black Lives Matter  Sacramento, Gender Health Center and  many more.  9:30am, no cover.  Safeway, 1025  Alhambra Blvd.

MaRCH FoR THe DReaM: See event description 

on page 31.  9am, no cover.  Sacramento City  College, Hughes Stadium, 3835 Freeport Blvd.

tuESday, 1/16 NeW MooN CeReMoNy: Join the Decolonization  Project for a communal prayer to honor the  sacred systems of life. Bring water from  your closest watershed to release back into  the river and pray for Earth’s healing.  6pm,

CaleNDaR lISTINGS CoNTINUeD oN PaGe 36

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CALeNdAR LISTINGS CoNTINUed FRom PAGe 35 no cover. The Washington Neighborhood Center, 400 16th St.

SPeAK oUT ePISode 8: REDEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING: A performance about the effects of redevelopment in Sacramento, followed by a discussion of the history and impacts of recent developments. 6:30pm, no cover. Pieces Pizza by the Slice, 1309 21st St.

claSSeS tHurSday, 1/11 JoB CoACH: Meet one-on-one with a trained

ALL DAY. EVERY DAY.

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SILK SCReeN CLASS: A two-day silkscreen printmaking class where students can take the screen and equipment home. Put together your screen, learn about your kit and add the photo-emulsion onto your screen. In the second class, students learn how to burn their design onto their screens and make prints. 6:30pm, $155. Verge Center for the Arts, 625 S St.

Friday, 1/12 SeASoNAL LANdSCAPe IN ACRyLIC PAINT: A series of first Friday classes (second Friday in January) that gives students step-by-step instructions to create a seasonal landscape. All levels of experience welcome. 10:30am, $125-$600. Verge Center for the Arts, 625 S St.

Saturday, 1/13 dIVoRCe oPTIoNS WoRKSHoP: Gain a greater understanding of the overwhelming divorce process with the help of trained legal, financial and mental health professionals. 8:30am, $40-$45. Staybridge Suites, 1745 Cavitt Drive in Folsom.

herbalist course on the basics of Western Herbology, integrated with traditional Chinese medicine. This six-month course will include making medicines, identifying plants, treating acute ailments and harvesting local herbs. 10am, $525. Soil Born Farms American River Ranch, 2140 Chase Drive in Rancho Cordova.

INTRo To WoodSHoP PART 1: Learn to use power tools with this class focused on safety and accuracy. A prerequisite for anyone who wants to use the power tools in the woodshop at the Midtown HackerLab. 2pm, contact for cover. Hacker Lab, 1715 I St..

KNIFe mAKING: Customize your own knife with tools like a scroll saw, drum and spindle sander and drill press. Students will cut, sand and install scales. 1pm, $40. Rockler Woodworking and Hardware, 6648 Lonetree Blvd. in Rocklin.

PRUNING WITH PURPoSe WoRKSHoP: Local arborists lead a class on protecting and shaping trees to optimize health and beauty. Students will practice basic tree pruning techniques and learn about cutting tools. 10am, $6-$8. Roseville Utility Exploration Center, 1501 Pleasant Grove Blvd. in Roseville.

SILK SCReeN CLASS: A two-day silkscreen printmaking class where students can take the screen and equipment home. Put together your screen, learn about your kit and add the photo-emulsion onto your screen. In the second class, students learn how to burn their design onto their screens and make prints. 10am, $155. Verge Center for the Arts, 625 S St.

WedneSday, 1/17 SING To FReedom—mUSIC oF THe UNdeRGRoUNd RAILRoAd: Teachers and teaching artists can learn songwriting strategies to update period songs and compose new songs with freedom themes. This participatory workshop helps teachers decode traditional songs used during the time of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. 4pm, $10. 300 Richards Blvd., 300 Richards Blvd., Room 221.

Friday, 1/12 & Saturday, 1/13 Iliza Live Punch Line, various times, $30-$60

SPORTS BAR @

50 HIGHWAY 50 STATELINE, NV 89449

job coach for help with your resume, job searching techniques and interviewing skills. Reservation required. 4pm, no cover. Sacramento Public Library, 6700 Auburn Blvd. in Citrus Heights.

FAmILy HeRBALIST CoURSe: A beginning

You probably recognize Iliza Schlesinger. Maybe you’ve followed her career since she was the youngest winner of NBC’s Last Comic Standing back in 2008. Perhaps you’ve snagged dating tips from her alter-ego, the Party Goblin. Or maybe you’ve caught one of her three Netflix comedy specials or her Comedy web series, Forever 31, and still can’t get enough. If that’s the case, you’re in luck! See Schlesinger perform this weekend at the Punch Line and maybe, just maybe, catch a glimpse of that Party Goblin. 2100 Arden Way, www.punchlinesac.com. PHOtO cOurteSy OF debOraH FeingOld

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JOB #: HRT-10567 AD TITLE: CHECK 123 AD COLOR INFO: 4C

PUBLICATION: NEWS REVIEW


subMit yOur calendar listings fOr free at newsreview.cOM/sacraMentO/calendar THursday 1/11

friday 1/12

saTurday 1/13

sunday 1/14

MOnday-wednesday 1/15-17

Songwriters Jonathan Beach, Dylan 10271 fairway driVe, rOseVille, (916) 412-8739 Crawford, Brandy Robinson, 7pm, $5

Young Ladies Performance Night, 6:30pm, $5

Songs of the Gold Country, 7pm, $10

Asante, 3pm, no cover

Open-Mic, 6:30pm, W, no cover

Badlands

Outword Magazine’s Liquid Therapy Happy Hour, 5pm, no cover

Spectacular Saturday, 8pm, call for cover

Sunday Beer Bust, 4pm, no cover

Half-Off Mondays, 8pm, M, no cover; Trapacana, 10pm, W, no cover

BaR 101

Live Music (TBA), 9:30pm, no cover

Braden Scott, 9:30pm, no cover

Blue lamp

Mark Chrisler, 7pm, $10

Mike Stout Benefit w/Kill the Precedent and more, 5pm, $10

The acousTic den cafe

PopRockz ’90s Night, 9pm, no cover

2003 k sT., (916) 448-8790 101 Main sT., rOseVille, (916) 774-0505 1400 alHaMbra blVd., (916) 455-3400

Trivia, 6:30pm, M, no cover; Open-Mic, 7:30pm, W, no cover Jezebelle’s Army: A Drag King Burlesque & Variety Show, 7:15pm, T, $10

stoic. and more, 8pm, $8

The BoaRdwalk

The Color Wild, Stickup Kid and more, 7pm, W, $14

9426 Greenback ln., OranGeVale, (916) 358-9116

PHOTO cOurTesy Of cynTHia Perez

Ozomatli with Sol Peligro 7:30pm Friday, $30-$45 Crest Theatre Latin pop

capiTol GaRaGe

Capitol Fridays, 10pm, no cover before 10:30pm

Dinner and a Drag Show, 7:30pm, $5-$25

The cenTeR foR The aRTs

Wild & Scenic Film Festival, 7pm, $15-$150

Wild & Scenic Film Festival, 10:30am, 1:30pm, 7:30pm, $15-$150

Wild & Scenic Film Festival Award Winners, 7:30pm, $30 Sunday Funday, 3pm, call for cover

1500 k sT., (916) 444-3633 314 w. Main sT., Grass Valley, (530) 274-8384

faces

Dragon with Vickie Vo, 10pm, $10

Absolut Fridays, 9pm, no cover

Decades, 7pm, call for cover

faTheR paddY’s iRish puBlic house

Lucy’s Bone, 6pm, no cover

One Eyed Reilly, 7pm, no cover

Caherseeven, 7pm, no cover

fox & Goose

Michael B. Justis, 8pm, no cover

Storytellers, Honey B & The Cultivation and more, 9pm, $5

SpaceWalker, CTRL-Z, Big Ethel, 9pm, $5

Golden 1 cenTeR

Clippers v. Kings, 7pm, $20-$260

halfTime BaR & GRill

College Night, 9pm, no cover

2000 k sT., (916) 448-7798 435 Main sT., wOOdland, (530) 668-1044 1001 r sT., (916) 443-8825 500 daVid J sTern walk, (888) 915-4647 5681 lOneTree blVd., rOcklin, (916) 626-3600 2708 J sT., (916) 441-4693

hideawaY BaR & GRill

Latin Touch, 9pm, $5

Journey’s Edge (Journey Tribute), 9pm, $7

Kahali and Ill Root, 9:30pm, $10

Irishpalooza, 5:30pm, $8-$10; Suzanne Santo, 9:30pm, $-12-$14

Benefit for Mike Stout with Atombomb, MDL, 8pm, call for cover

2565 franklin blVd., (916) 455-1331

hiGhwaTeR

All Vinyl Wednesdays with DJ AAKnuff, 8pm, W, no cover Harlem Globetrotters, 1pm, 6pm, M, $15-$135

haRlow’s

PHOTO cOurTesy Of nicOle fOwler

Let’s Get Quizzical Trivia Game Show, 7pm, T, no cover Mod Sun, Call Me Karizma and more, 5pm, $15-$20

Laith Al-Saadi, 5:30pm, W, $25-$30

Paint Party, 1pm, $45

Karaoke, 8pm, M, no cover; Cactus Pete, 8pm, T, no cover; Trivia, 8pm, W, no cover

The Trivia Factory, 7pm, M, no cover; Tussle, 10pm, T, no cover

Punk/Rock ’n’ Roll, 10pm, no cover

1910 Q sT., (916) 706-2465

Mr. Hooper

holY diVeR

Local Showcase with Roman Pilot, Chaos Mantra, 6:30pm, $5

Emo Night 1-Year Anniversary, 8pm, $8

L.A. Guns, Anarchy Lace, Fallout Kings, Dave Friday, 7pm, SOLD OUT

That 1 Guy, 7pm, $10-$12

with Mr. P Chill 9pm Saturday, $8 Old Ironsides Hip-hop

1517 21sT sT.

kupRos

Stephen Yerkey, 9:30pm, no cover

The Inside Story, 9:30pm, no cover

Hot City, 9:30pm, no cover

Kupros Quiz, 7:30pm, no cover

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

Worthy Goat, Noah Nelson, Manky, 8pm, $5

April Walker, Cody Feiler, 8pm, call for cover

1217 21sT sT., (916) 440-0401

luna’s cafe & Juice BaR 1414 16TH sT., (916) 737-5770

Q: WHAT IS ?

2708 J Street

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm, M, $10; Open-Mic Comedy, 7:30pm, T, no cover

COMING SOON

www.momosacramento.com 1/14 5PM $15ADV

1/12 9:30PM $10

MOD SUN

KAHALI X ILL ROOT

DISCOVER THURSDAY: THE MINDFUL, IN THE KNOW TRIO

CALL ME KARIZMA, AUSTIN CAIN (ALL AGES)

1/13 10PM $10ADV

offers gift certificates and tickets to the best businesses, restaurants, theaters and venues in town up to 75% OFF!

IDEATEAM

1/14 6:30PM $10

COMEDY BURGER HOSTED BY NGAIO BEALUM 1/17 5:30PM $8

THE LUCKY LOSERS FEATURING PHIL BERKOWITZ & CATHY LEMONS 1/18 8PM FREE

DISCOVER THURSDAY: MINO YANCI, GEORGE NAPP SACRAMENTO’S FAVORITE DJS EVERY FRI AT 10PM

snrsweetdeals.newsreview.com

For booking inquiries, email Robert@momosacramento.com

Open-Mic Nights, 7pm, T, no cover; Ross Hammond, 7:30pm, W, no cover

2708 J Street Sacramento, CA 916.441.4693 www.harlows.com

1/11 8PM FREE

A:

Noche Latina, 9pm, T, no cover; Purgatory, 9pm, W, no cover

1/13 5:30PM $8ADV

IRISHPALOOZA FEAT. WHISKEY AND STITCHES

1/17 5:30PM $25ADV

LAITH AL-SAADI

ONE EYED REILLY, THE PIKEYS (ALL AGES)

(ALL AGES)

1/13 9:30PM $12ADV

SUZANNE SANTO OF HONEYHONEY MAPACHE

1/18 5:30PM $15ADV

JOCELYN & CHRIS ARNDT

01/19 Dustbowl Revival 01/20 Flesheaters 01/21 Xavier Wulf 01/22 Alex Skolnick Trio 01/23 Mild High Club 01/25 Lee Scratch Perry 01/26 W. Kamau Bell 01/28 Tommy Guerrero meets Mattson 2 01/30 Howard Jones (SOLD OUT) 01/31 Johnny A. 02/01 Dave East 02/03 New Kingston 02/9-10 Tainted Love 02/11 Ghostemane 02/14 Chali 2NA & House of Vibe 02/15 The Main Squeeze 02/16 The Purple Ones 02/17 Loose Ends 02/20 The Blasters 02/23 ALO 1.11.18

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submit your cAlendAr listings for free At newsreview.com/sAcrAmento/cAlendAr thurSDaY 1/11

friDaY 1/12

Ideateam, 10pm, $10

The Lucky Losers, 5:30pm, W, $8

Nerd Night, 7:30pm, $10

Halcones, The Machetes and more, 9pm, $6

Mr. Hooper, Mr. P. Chill, One Lost M.C., 8:30pm, $8

on tHe Y

Open-Mic Comedy, 8pm, no cover

Honest Iago, The Newports and more, 9pm, $10

The Phur Soles, Sum Wat III and more, 9:30pm, $10

670 fulton ave., (916) 487-3731

Palms PlaYHouse

Moody Slough, The Polyorchids, 8pm, $15

13 Main St., WinterS, (530) 795-1825

PlacervIlle PublIc House

414 Main St., Placerville, (530) 303-3792

Barrel-Aged Beer Tasting, 6pm, no cover; Trivia, 6:30pm, no cover

PowerHouse Pub

with Eugene Ugly 8pm Friday, $8 Holy Diver Emo cover set

MonDaY-WeDneSDaY 1/15-17

Comedy Burger with Ngaio Bealum, 6:30pm, $10-$25

old IronsIdes

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504

with wolves

SunDaY 1/14

The Mindful, In the Know Trio, 8pm, $5

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693

Photo courteSY of Daniel Dare

SaturDaY 1/13

momo sacramento

Wiz Kids, 10pm, $10

614 Sutter St., folSoM, (916) 355-8586

tHe Press club

2030 P St., (916) 444-7914

Mighty Tiki’s Mighty Rock-A-Thon, 8pm, $7-$10

sHadY ladY

Arlyn Anderson, 9pm, no cover

1409 r St., (916) 231-9121

socIal nIgHtclub

1000 K St., (916) 947-0434

stoneY’s rockIn rodeo

1320 Del PaSo BlvD., (916) 927-6023

Jessica Malone, 8pm, no cover

Country Thunder Thursdays, 8pm, no cover for 21+, $5 cover for 18-21

Uncommon Ground, 8pm, no cover

Just Bill, 1:30pm, no cover

Soul Kitchen, 10pm, $10

Noxin Band, 3pm, $10; Elvis Monroe Band, 8pm, $20 Church (Sunday Night Dance Party), 9pm, no cover

Humble Wolf, 9pm, no cover

George Napp, 9pm, no cover

DJ Mez, 10pm, no cover before 11pm

DJ Elements, 10pm, no cover before 10:30pm, $5 after

Country Dancing and Karaoke, 6pm, call for cover

Hot Country Saturdays, 7pm, $5

Karaoke, 9pm, T, no cover; Jukebox and Movie Night, 6pm, W, no cover

Pregnant and more, 8pm, M, $7-$10; Reggae Night, 9pm, T, no cover

Massive Delicious, 9pm, no cover

Sunday Funday, 9pm, $2-$10

College Wednesdays, 9pm, W, call for cover

Legends of Motown Tribute Show, 7pm, SOLD OUT

1200 athenS ave., lincoln

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

8-Ball Open Pool Tournament, 7:30pm, $5 buy-in John McCutcheon, 7pm, $25

tHunder valleY casIno tHe torcH club

Heath Williamson, 5:30pm, M, no cover; Karaoke, 9pm, T, no cover

Matt Rainey and Dippin Sauce, 9pm, $6

Night Animals, 9pm, $10

Jake Nielsen and the Triple Threat, 9pm, $10

You Front the Band Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

Andrew Little and the Enablers, 8pm, T, no cover; The Risky Biscuits, 9pm, W, $5

Kali Masi, VVomen and more, 8pm, call for cover

Hearts Like Lions, 7:30pm, M, $10;

Needs, Seemway and more, 7pm, $8

Avoid, Shorelines and more, 7pm, T, $10

All ages, all the time ace of sPades

Arnie States, 7pm, $19-$29

1417 r St., (916) 930-0220

cafe colonIal Photo courteSY of DannY Secretion

3520 StocKton BlvD., (916) 718-7055

the o’mulligans

tHe colonY

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You’re the moon It’s taken me eight years to get my bachelor’s degree because I had to keep dropping out to work more so I could continue my education. Before I started college, I promised myself that once I graduated I would enter the Peace Corps or get a job teaching English overseas. I wanted out of Sacramento! But now I’m in the best relationship I’ve ever been in. So I’m confused about my next step. Should I let go of my dream of living overseas? I’ve had that dream for so long! But I can’t imagine giving up my relationship. I don’t think I will find another relationship as good as this. Advice?

Skype, find an apartment, update your passport, etc. Do everything required to make the overseas dream a reality. As you progress, you will discover skills, talents, fears and resilience you did not know existed within you. Remember that you are not locked into moving abroad. You are immersing yourself in a dream life and deciding what it really means to you. So it’s fine to be in an interview with a company and realize that you can’t wait to take flight into teaching English. It’s also fine to be offered a job overseas and opt out because your mind, heart and spirit align to choose the relationship you’re in. Either way, you have done nothing wrong. It doesn’t matter if family and friends appear to be judging you for changing your mind. It doesn’t matter if you judge yourself for changing your mind. What matters is this: You wake up each day grateful to be on this planet and spend your days engaged in carrying that joy into the world. That’s a new moon, one that shines amid many, many other moons and countless stars. Ω

If you’re still not certain what to do, keep going.

The dream of living overseas provided stamina for the grueling task of staying employed while putting yourself through college. Be grateful for your mind’s skill in designing a prize that your ego found worthy of striving for. But now that you can see the finish line, extra motivation is unnecessary. You’ve got this. So why can’t you shake off your North Star and reorient yourself to a new life with a true love? There’s a Buddhist analogy that fits here: Don’t confuse the moon with the finger pointing at the moon. Let me interpret it with an Ask Joey twist: Teaching English overseas might be your personal life mission or just the escape hatch you needed to push yourself to complete a goal. Developing a habit of completion is a key life skill and a mark of maturity. Adulting is difficult for some people because they don’t want to be responsible for themselves. You, however, repeatedly make choices that signal your willingness to take charge of your own life. Celebrate that! And this: You are the moon. College is an experience on the journey to the moon. Self-awareness is the true goal beneath any goal. If you’re still not certain what to do, keep going. Here’s what that looks like: Research companies to work for overseas, apply for jobs, schedule information sessions and interviews by

MEdItAtIon of thE WEEk “For last year’s words belong to last year’s language. And next year’s words await another voice,” wrote T.S. Eliot. Whose voice do you hear when you speak?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 1360; or email askjoey@newsreview.com.


SN&R’s

What’s inside: The 420 45 Product Review 47

For more cannabis news, deals and listings, visit www.capitalcannabisguide.com & sign up for the newsletter.

01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   41


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recreational welcome

21+ only no doctors rec required

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SN&R’s

License n o : A10-17-0000092-TeMP 44   |   SN&R   |    01.11.18


High, Ngaio! Happy New Year. I have questions: 1. What’s a standard dose again? (Edibles seem to have one and flowers do not?) 2. I got too high and now I don’t feel good. What do I do? 3. Can everybody tell when I’m stoned? Am I just being paranoid? 4. What’s going to be the most fun way (gray market options?) to re-up in the new year?

To get the latest info, coupons & deals

Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@newsreview.com.

text weed to 42828

Try singing a verse or two of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat.”

sign up now!

—N. Kwizza Tiv Happy New Year to you as well. These are all very good questions. Let’s jump right in: 1. Everyone is different. For most folks, a good rule of thumb is 10 milligrams of THC per 100 pounds body weight. As always, you should err on the side of caution. Try 5 to 10 milligrams and wait an hour or so to see how you feel. You can always eat more pot, but you can’t un-eat it if you have too much. Well, I suppose you could, but that would be gross. 2. This happens. Just remember that the effects should wear off in a few hours. Stay hydrated. Have a few snacks. Listen to a good song. Take a nap. You will be fine. Tim Leary would recommend that people feeling uncomfortably high try singing a verse or two of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” because it is soothing and comforting, and by the time you get to “Life is but a dream,” you have to be on a different train of thought. Try it and see if it works for you. 3. You are most likely being paranoid. I mean, unless you are walking around with your eyes all super bloodshot and taking like 10 minutes to answer a simple question like “Would you like fries with that?”, no one really knows or cares if you are stoned or not. I am assuming you aren’t getting high before you show up to drive the school bus or perform brain surgery. Don’t do that. But sometimes watching someone that is super baked navigate the straight world is hilarious. Also, if they do notice, so what? You aren’t doing anything wrong. Being stoned isn’t against the law. Just giggle at them and offer them some of your snacks. 4. I am guessing the weedman will never stop being a thing. Also, farmers markets like Orbit will still exist, but as strict Proposition 215-compliant events. So, make sure to keep your medical card current. By the way, if you take the time to go stand in line and pay the extra few bucks to get a county-issued medical cannabis patient card (all counties offer this service, it’s a state law deal. Check your county’s website for more info), you won’t have to pay the state tax on your cannabis purchases. As we jump into the new year, I just want to thank all of my editors for their patience and general grooviness, and all the readers and cannabis supporters that ask good questions (even the bad ones) and follow this column. Stay high. Stay safe. Bong hei fat choy! Ω

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Can they tell I’m high?

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SN&R’s

p a c $10 f o s m a r g l l A h on s a h / r e flow s m a Gr 3 $ t a g n i t star s e c n u O 5 7 $ jack juicy

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Photo by Anne StokeS

District Edibles Indica Blue Raspberry Gummies

W E’R E O P E N Fo r A

se U t l du

S TA R T I N G

J A N U A R Y 1ST

Out Of the Blue District Edibles Indica Blue Raspberry Gummies

Still accepting medical patients with CA I.D. over the age of 18 with valid doctor’s recommendation.

Review

by DAniel bArneS

ConTenT: 25 mg THC per piece PriCe: $15 (8 pieces) Uses: Relaxation; sleep; anxiety reduction Pros: A fast-acting body-high effect; foil-wrapped to ensure freshness Cons: The rubbery texture wasn’t particularly satisfying

O

ne question that has vexed people for as long as blue-raspberryflavored candies, popsicles and ICEEs have been staining tongues azure: What the heck is a blue raspberry? Created in the 1970s, the tart flavoring known as blue raspberry is in fact derived from the white bark raspberry, a shrub with ripe fruit colored blackish purple instead of blue. The blue hue was originally created using food dyes, but while the gummy candies made by District Edibles arrive in a bright aquamarine color, the package only lists “natural flavor and color” in the ingredients. District Edibles Indica Blue Raspberry Gummies come in eight individually foilwrapped pieces, with each gummy carrying a payload of 25 mg of THC (although the doses apparently vary by package, as an additional label attached to the back informs us that the payload is in fact 27.5 mg per piece).

Now accepting new “Adult Use” members with government issued I.D. over the age of 21.

District Edibles candies, an “artisan crafted” line that also includes gums, suckers and chocolates, all come shaped like a cross, which makes it easy for slow starters to nibble off a low-dose prong. The candies carry that unnatural yet enticing blue raspberry smell, albeit with a slightly medicinal overtone. There is little hint of the cannabis contents in the flavor, which is extremely restrained, and the texture is a little rubbery.

• All products are lab tested for potency and purity. • Herbs, Topicals, Tinctures, Oils, Edibles, Concentrate, Plants • Educated, Experienced and Compassionate Staff

[They] come shaped like a cross, which makes it easy for slow starters to nibble off a low-dose prong. However, the only thing that matters is that the stuff works — the drowsing, body-high effects of the indica strain kicked in within minutes, making this an excellent product for the overanxious and sleep-deprived.

Produced by N&R Publications, a division of News & Review.

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01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   47


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48   |   SN&R   |    01.11.18


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01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   51


SN&R’s

You can now live the dream. Recreational is here!

52   |   SN&R   |    01.11.18


01.11.18    |   SN&R   |   53


SN&R’s

54   |   SN&R   |    01.11.18


FRee will aStRology

by JAmes RAiA

by ROb bRezsny

FOR ThE WEEk OF JANUARy 11, 2018 ARIES (March 21-April 19): I’m happy to inform

you that life is giving you permission to be extra demanding in the coming weeks—as long as you’re not petty, brusque, or unreasonable. Here are a few examples that will pass the test: “I demand that you join me in getting drunk on the truth;” “I demand to receive rewards commensurate with my contributions;” “I demand that we collaborate to outsmart and escape the karmic conundrums we’ve gotten ourselves mixed up in.” On the other hand, Aries, ultimatums like these are not admissible: “I demand treasure and tribute, you fools;” “I demand the right to cheat in order to get my way;” “I demand that the river flow backwards.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Are you familiar with the phrase “Open sesame?” In the old folk tale, “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,” it’s a magical command that the hero uses to open a blocked cave where treasure is hidden. I invite you to try it out. It just may work to give you entrance to an off-limits or previously inaccessible place where you want and need to go. At the very least, speaking those words will put you in a playful, experimental frame of mind as you contemplate the strategies you could use to gain entrance. And that alone may provide just the leverage you need.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): While thumping

around the internet, I came across pointed counsel from an anonymous source. “Don’t enter into a long-term connection with someone until you’ve seen them stuck in traffic,” it declared. “Don’t get too deeply involved with them until you’ve witnessed them drunk, waiting for food in a restaurant for entirely too long, or searching for their phone or car keys in a panic. Before you say yes to a deeper bond, make sure you see them angry, stressed, or scared.” I recommend that you take this advice in the coming weeks. It’ll be a good time to deepen your commitment to people who express their challenging emotions in non-abusive, non-psychotic ways.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): My high school

history teacher Marjorie Margolies is now Chelsea Clinton’s mother-in-law. She shares two grandchildren with Hillary Clinton. Is that something I should brag about? Does it add to my cachet or my happiness? Will it influence you to love me more? No, nah, and nope. In the big scheme of things, it’s mildly interesting but utterly irrelevant. The coming weeks will be a good time for Cancerians like you and me to renounce any desire we might have to capitalize on fake ego points like this. We Crabs should be honing our identity and self-image so they’re free of superficial measures of worth. What’s authentically valuable about you?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If I were your mentor or

your guide, I’d declare this the Leo Makeover Season. First I’d hire a masseuse or masseur to knead you firmly and tenderly. I’d send you to the nutritionist, stylist, dream interpreter, trainer and life coach. I’d brainstorm with the people who know you best to come up with suggestions for how to help free you from your illusions and infuse your daily rhythm with twenty percent more happiness. I’d try to talk you out of continuing your association with anyone or anything that’s no damn good for you. In conclusion, I’d be thorough as I worked to get you unlocked, debugged and retooled.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “It takes an extraor-

dinary person to carry themselves as if they do not live in hell,” says writer D. Bunyavong. In accordance with the astrological omens, I nominate you Virgos to fit that description in the coming weeks. You are, in my estimation, as far away from hell as you’ve been in a long time. If anyone can seduce, coax or compel heaven to come all the way down to earth for a while, it’s you. Here’s a good way to get the party started: Gaze into the mirror until you spy the eternal part of yourself.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to move the furniture around. If you feel inspired, you might even want to move some of that old stuff right out the door and haul it to the dump or the thrift store. Hopefully, this will get you in the mood to launch a sweeping purge of anything else that

lowers the morale and élan around the house: dusty mementos, unflattering mirrors, threadbare rugs, chipped dishes and numbing symbols. The time is ripe, my dear homies, to free your home of deadweight.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When he was 16

years old and living in New York, Ralph Lifshitz changed his name to Ralph Lauren. That was probably an important factor in his success. Would he have eventually become a famous fashion designer worth $5.8 billion dollars if he had retained a name with “shitz” in it? The rebranding made it easier for clients and customers to take him seriously. With Ralph’s foresight as your inspiration, Scorpio, consider making a change in yourself that will enhance your ability to get what you want.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1956, the

prolific Spanish poet Juan Ramón Jiménez was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature. The award committee praised his “high spirit and artistic purity.” The honor was based on his last 13 books, however, and not on his first two. Waterlilies and Souls of Violet were works he wrote while young and still ripening. As he aged, he grew so embarrassed by their sentimentality that he ultimately tried to track down and eradicate every copy. I bring this to your attention, Sagittarius, because I think it’s a favorable time for you to purge or renounce or atone for anything from your past that you no longer want to be defined by.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Three centuries

ago, Capricorn genius Isaac Newton formulated principles that have ever since been fundamental to scientists’ understanding of the physical universe. He was also a pioneer in mathematics, optics and astronomy. And yet he also expended huge amounts of time and energy on the fruitless attempt to employ alchemy to transform base metals into solid gold. Those efforts may have been interesting to him, but they yielded no lasting benefits. You Capricorns face a comparable split. In 2018, you could bless us with extraordinary gifts or else you could get consumed in projects that aren’t the most productive use of your energy. The coming weeks may be crucial in determining which way you’ll go.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A rite of passage

lies ahead. It could and should usher you into a more soulful way of living. I’m pleased to report that this transition won’t require you to endure torment, confusion or passive-aggressive manipulation. In fact, I suspect it could turn out to be among the most graceful ordeals you’ve ever experienced—and a prototype for the type of breakthrough that I hope will become standard in the months and years to come. Imagine being able to learn valuable lessons and make crucial transitions without the prod of woe and gloom. Imagine being able to say, as musician P.J. Harvey said about herself, “When I’m contented, I’m more open to receiving inspiration. I’m most creative when I feel safe and happy.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The Kalevala is a

19th-century book of poetry that conveys the important mythology and folklore of the Finnish people. It was a wellspring of inspiration for English writer J.R.R. Tolkien as he composed his epic fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. To enhance his ability to steal ideas from The Kalevala, Tolkien even studied the Finnish language. He said it was like “entering a complete wine-cellar filled with bottles of an amazing wine of a kind and flavor never tasted before.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Pisces, in 2018 you will have the potential of discovering a source that’s as rich for you as Finnish and The Kalevala were for Tolkien.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

The Autodidact Carly Starr graduated from UCLA  with a degree in history. It’s been a  handy tool, particularly during the  past five years. Starr is the curator

of the 30-year-old, 72,000 square-foot California Automobile Museum. It’s the  downtown Sacramento shrine to  the history and restoration of cars  and trucks, automotive racing and  the humans who go along for the  ride. Starr, 30, raised in Rocklin,  lives with her husband about five  minutes from the museum. With  little knowledge of the industry, she  has immersed herself in the history  of all things automotive. She knows  the varied array of vehicles on  display at the museum with serious expertise. Starr’s career has  included marketing, administration  and specialty museum training. She  was also a docent at the California  State Railroad Museum.

What is your background with cars? Do you have a long family history with cars? I don’t have much of a background with cars at all. My background is much more in history and museums. I worked at a Historic House Museum before I came here. But the transition from what I love about historic houses to what I love about historic cars was amazingly easy. I have a pretty good mechanical brain, so I’m very lucky with that. My dad did have a ’64 Chevy panel truck that I loved playing in as a kid. My mom had a Karmann Ghia.

The California Automobile Museum is rare in that it has permanent displays, rotating exhibits and cars for sale. Is that unique among auto museums? There a couple of other museums like it in the country, but we have to be very careful to keep the for-sale cars separate from our other displays for ethical reasons within the museum, but also for some legal DMV regulations. But it is a really fun component that adds to our museum. It can be a great financial support. It also helps bring in a fresh rotation of cars.

Throughout its legacy, the museum has had different names and the building has had leaking problems. Can you talk about that? This is the first winter we’ve had a new roof. It’s amazing how we’ve had to use no buckets at all. It’s a miracle. There’s been a history of dark and dank areas, but the previous board made great strides to take the museum into a more stable environment. The current board is working hard

PHOTO BY JAMES RAIA

to make the museum a more engaging place to visit.

Is there a car you’d like to get for the museum? One of my personal favorites, which I hope the committee will support, is a mid-1980s Dodge Caravan, hopefully with the wood paneling. It was one of the first minivans, and it really set the stage for how Americans drove in the ’80s and ’90s. Anybody out there who knows someone with a Dodge Caravan, please contact us.

What do you like about cars? We’re not so much about flashy cars, although we love them, too. We really love to tell the heart and soul of what makes cars important. The memories of cars. Everyone has their own memories of the cars they grew up with or the first car they bought. Whatever it is, those are the kinds of stories I absolutely love.

Does the museum get called up to have its cars participate in parades and other historical events around town? We have about 12 cars that are part of [the] road crew program. It’s an outreach program where we take the museum out into the community, into nonprofits or schools. We do a lot of parades. My favorite is when we take cars into the educational arena with kids.

Is there a particular car the museum likes to take to the public?

Our 1938 Buick is a great one. It’s a four-door sedan. It’s great to drive people around in. Not so much in parades. It’s not a convertible. But it was the first car donated to the foundation in the early ’80s. It has a nice life cycle, and it’s a very hardworking, good-driving car.

There’s a 1966 Shelby Cobra 427 on display. That’s a rare car. What’s its story? This Cobra has a unique story. It was originally owned by Tony Hogg, who was an editor of Road & Track Magazine and was really well-known in the automotive community. It wasn’t a racing Cobra, but one of the original street Cobras. It’s aluminum. It’s not a kit car. The family still owns it, and Hogg’s son still comes to work on it and drives it from time to time to give it some exercise.

What’s on the horizon for the museum in 2018? We just opened a display on the people of Northern California and the racing scene. It’s called Norcal’s Fastest. It’s running into early March. We will have special events to meet and greet some of those great people to talk about the area’s car culture. Ω

The California Automobile Museum is located at 2200 Front Street. (916) 442-6802, www.calautomuseum.org.

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