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08 Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

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26 Volume 29, iSSue 21

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EditoR’S NotE

SEptEmbER 07, 2017 | Vol. 29, iSSuE 21

27 32 Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Eric Johnson News Editor Raheem F. Hosseini Arts & Culture Editor Rebecca Huval Associate Editor Mozes Zarate Staff Reporter Scott Thomas Anderson Calendar Editor Kate Gonzales Intern Kainoa Lowman Contributing Editor Rachel Leibrock Contributors Daniel Barnes, Ngaio Bealum, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Aaron Carnes, Jim Carnes, Willie Clark, John Flynn, Joey Garcia, Lovelle Harris, Jeff Hudson, Dave Kempa, Matt Kramer, Jim Lane, Michael Mott, Luis Gael Jimenez, Kate Paloy, Patti Roberts, Steph Rodriguez, Ann Martin Rolke, Shoka, Bev Sykes

39 Design Manager Christopher Terrazas Creative Director Serene Lusano Art Director Margaret Larkin Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Designers Kyle Shine, Maria Ratinova Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Web Design & Strategy Intern Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Contributing Photographers Lisa Baetz, Evan Duran, Adam Emelio, Lucas Fitzgerald, Jon Hermison, Kris Hooks, Gavin McIntyre, Michael Mott, Shoka, Lauran Fayne Thompson Advertising Manager Michael Gelbman Senior Advertising Consultants Justin Cunningham, Rosemarie Messina, Kelsi White Advertising Consultants Matt Kjar, Paul McGuinness, Michael Nero, Wendy Russell Sweetdeals Coordinator Hannah Williams Facilities Coordinator & Sales Assistant David Lindsay Director of First Impressions Skyler Morris Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Beatriz Aguirre, Kimberly Bordenkircher, Daniel Bowen, Gypsy Andrews,

63 Heather Brinkley, Kelly Hopkins, Mike Cleary, Lydia Comer, Renee Cruz, Tom Downing , Rob Dunnica, Richard Eckert, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Joanna Gonzalez-Brown, Lori Lovell, Greg Meyers, Sam Niver, Lloyd Rongley, Lolu Sholotan, Steve Stewart, Eric Umeda, Zang Yang N&R Associate Editor Laura Hiller N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultant Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Ken Cross President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Nuts & Bolts Ninja Leslie Giovanini Executive Coordinator Carlyn Asuncion Director of People & Culture David Stogner Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Director of Dollars & Sense Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Dargitz Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Developer John Bisignano, Jonathan Schultz System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins

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STREETALK LETTERS NEwS + BEATs gREENLighT ScoREKEEpER FEATuRE SToRy DiSh STAgE FiLm muSic cALENDAR ASK joEy ThE 420 15 miNuTES

covER DESigN AND phoTo by SERENE LuSANo

1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Fax (916) 498-7910 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? sactonewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Want to Advertise? Fax (916) 498-7910 or snradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (916) 498-1234, ext. 5 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to SN&R? sactosubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: opinions expressed in sn&r are those of the authors and not of chico community Publishing, inc. contact the editor for permissions to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. sn&r is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to snrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. sn&r is printed at Bay Area news Group on recycled newsprint. circulation of sn&r is verified by the circulation Verification council. sn&r is a member of sacramento Metro chamber of commerce, cnPA, AAn and AWn.

The Report on the deported Two years ago, one of my best friends,  a longtime journalist, took a job with  the Latin America division of Human  Rights Watch. For the past week, he  has been in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas,  Mexico, just across the Rio Grande  from Laredo, Texas, at a migrant reception center. I got an email from him  on Friday—before either of us knew  that Donald Trump would repeal DACA  three days later.  An excerpt:  “We spent a lot of time last week  sitting around the migrant reception center, waiting for [ICE] to  pull a bus up to the northern end  of the long footbridge that crosses  the Rio, remove cuffs and shackles  from the wrists and ankles of the  deportees, and shoo them south  onto the bridge.  Every few hours,  about thirty deportees, mostly men,  suddenly showed up, most clutching  white plastic garbage bags full of  belongings in one hand and holding  up their pants with the other (ICE  takes their belts and shoelaces to  prevent suicides). Often they looked  a little stunned; some had woken  that morning in their own beds next  to their wives, made breakfast for  their kids, failed to signal before  changing lanes on their way to work,  and here they were. … For some, this  was their first time in Mexico since  their parents carried them north as  toddlers three decades ago. If the  media reported that a judge somewhere was punishing small-time  thieves and traffic violators with  immediate and indefinite separation  from their children, most Americans  would be outraged. …Yet it happens  so often in the United States that it’s  not even news.” I was already outraged Friday.  Today, I’m disgusted.

—Eric Johnson ericj@newsreview.com

09.07.17    |   SN&R   |  3


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4   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17


“Then We all have To deal WiTh The sTank.”

aSked at Broadway and 59 th StreetS:

What annoys you most on an airplane?

Perl a Sal a zar server

Honestly, it’s when people feel comfortable enough to take a number two in the bathroom, and then we all have to deal with the stank. I mean, if you’re gonna do it, please carry around your own poo-pourri.

erin Moody student

When people try to talk to me, like the person next to you tries to talk to you, and you have your headphones in. Somebody did it to me and tried to talk to me the entire flight.

erik Molina management trainee

When the people next to me spread, not just their legs, but their arms too, and they don’t share the arm space and the leg space. Especially when they sleep, because you can’t ask them to move.

a xel eStr ada high school student

The most annoying thing on a plane is the space. I wouldn’t say I’d take advantage of the space, but I’ve had a phobia since I was small, and I don’t like compact little spaces.

Jon nee

Je an Bennet t

video editor

medical student

My no. 1 pet peeve is the security—having to take off my shoes, take out my laptop. Now I hear you have to take out your iPad and put them all in separate bins. It’s just a hassle to get through it. I hate that part.

When people are disrespectful to the flight attendants or airline personnel. In the middle of stressful travel, we forget how difficult their jobs are and how much they deal with. We’d all do well to show more kindness and patience to our fellow human beings who keep us safe.

09.07.17

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SN&R

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5


building a

HealtHy S a c r a m e n t o

Concert Draws thousands to ‘Imagine Justice’ by e d g a r s a n c h e z

F

irst, there was a total solar eclipse — only partial in California.

Later that day, Sacramento beheld an “Imagine Justice” concert that eclipsed the Capitol Mall with thousands of peaceful attendees who were ready to imagine a better future. A crowd estimated by police at 23,000 gathered August 21 for the free concert. It featured Oscar-winning rapper Common and other hip-hop artists such as J. Cole and Goapele, all advocating for criminal justice reform. Reflecting the city’s diversity, the attendees represented all races — and they all got along, dancing, swaying and pointing their fingers at the sky in tune to the beat. “There were no public safety issues,” city police spokesman Eddie Macaulay said. “The event was successful ... Everybody worked together.” Common organized the concert to raise awareness about “the mass incarceration” of black people and others. It all begins with the schools-to-prison pipeline, in which students of color are set up for failure by being unfairly suspended, making them more likely to offend. California has plenty of room for juvenile and adult offenders: Since 1980, the state has built 22 prisons but only one University of California campus. With his back to the gleaming Capitol, the seat of state government where the bills’ fate will be decided, the Chicago-born Common said:

“When we see an injustice ... we have to stand up for each other. It’s going to take black people standing up, Latino people, white people, Asian people, Native American people, Jewish people, Christian people, LGBT people.”

“When We see an injustice ... We have to stand up for each other. it’s going to take black people standing up, latino people, White people, asian people, native american people, jeWish people, christian people, lgbt people.” Common Rapper and criminal justice reform advocate

The California Endowment co-sponsored the concert along with the Anti-Recidivism Coalition. “We should be giving more money to schools, not prisons,” said Jennie Quan, 37, of Land Park. She attended with her wife Samantha, 31, and their 6-month-old son, Sheppard, who wore noise-cancelling headphones.

Jennie Quan, left, and wife Samantha Quan attended the Imagine Justice concert on Capitol mall together with 6-monthold Sheppard. “We need a justice system that is more about rehabilitation than punishment,” Samantha Quan said. Photo by Edgar Sanchez

Jennie hopes her son will attend schools that will be renowned for their arts/music programs, not for calling police. For Lorreen Pryor, 38, who works in the Capitol and is president of Sacramento’s Black Youth Leadership Project, the concert was “historic.” She summarized part of its message: “We can’t [be in] the business of throwing people away for mistakes they made as children.”

your zIP code shouldn’t predict how long you’ll live – but it does. Staying healthy requires much more than doctors and diets. Every day, our surroundings and activities affect how long – and how well – we’ll live.

BuIldIng HEalTHy COmmunITIES In 2010, The California Endowment launched a 10-year, $1 billion plan to improve the health of 14 challenged communities across the state. Over the 10 years, residents, communitybased organizations and public institutions will work together to address the socioeconomic and environmental challenges contributing to the poor health of their communities.

#schoolsnotPrisons

Health Happens in neighborhoods. Health Happens in Schools. Health Happens with Prevention.

paid with a grant from the california endowment 6   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17

www.SacBHC.org


Email lEttErs to sactolEttErs@nEwsrEviEw.com

Quid pro know Re “Why save the Delta?” by Scott Thomas Anderson  (Feature, August 31):   Great article—better late than never, I guess. I  would like to see a  part-two going into more detail about who will  benefit from the twin tunnels (Westlands Water District, the Resnicks,  et al). Everyone demonizes the L.A. residents for taking our water, but  they have actually been great at conservation. Follow the money! But  please write and publish it quick! It also amazes me how few people in  Sacramento have even been to the Delta.

Dan henas s a c ra m e nt o v i a n ew s r e v i e w . c o m

Fooled by farmers? Re “Why save the Delta?” by  Scott Thomas Anderson (Feature,  August 31):  Ugh, might as well be titled,  “Why save the environment?” The  level of ignorance regarding this  public works project is astounding. Farmers are paying big 

money to make sure this project  never happens as it would result  in the delta returning to the  natural salinity levels it should be  at. This kills the greedy farmer  whose sat on precious water  rights for 50 to 100-plus years,  relying on fresh water from the  delta to grow crops (their land  value would tank). So far they’ve 

successfully prevented plans to  fix the delta since the mid ’60s.  Don’t let them fool you into thinking they’re the victim here when  really it’s the whole state slowly  losing one of its most precious  natural resources.

Dustin natov

s a c ra m e nt o v i a ne w s re v i e w . c o m

Don’t arrest the victims Re “Dear johns,” by Raheem F.  Hosseini (News, August 31): Typical. Go after the woman  and not the perverted men  who are running the sex trafficking, or the men buying sex  in exchange for money. WTG  Sacramento! 

sunshine Jenkins via Facebook

This happens everywhere. I’m  trying to get a place in Montana  and the same 3x requirement is  hounding me. 

Juli oates

v ia Fa c e b o o k

Kids deserve a safe park Re “Poor people crackdown”  by Raheem F. Hosseini (News,  August 31): I can walk to the American  River from my house, so I’m there  a lot and I can’t even tell you how  many times I’ve seen mounds of  garbage and used needles thrown  on the banks literally feet away  from an empty garbage can. I  may be heartless, but my kids being able to play at the river is significantly more important to me  than these people having a place  to leave trash and biohazards. 

Cyclists deserve a safe trail Re “Poor people crackdown”  by Raheem F. Hosseini (News,  August 31): I’m a fan of SN&R. However,  I am a cyclist and would like to  have a safe place to ride. 

read more letters online at www.newsreview .com/sacramento.

@SacNewsReview

DaviD herman v ia Fa c e b o o k

A second opinion Re “Poor people crackdown”  by Raheem F. Hosseini (News,  August 31): I’m also a long time cyclist on  the ARBT, since the ‘70s, and I can  honestly say I never felt threatened by a homeless person.  

Facebook.com/ SacNewsReview

@SacNewsReview

Dave herson v ia Fa c e b o o k

heather roDriguez

A bigger problem

v ia Fa c e b o o k

Re “Renters’ disability tax” by  Amy Yanello (Essay, August 31): 

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Pastor Les Simmons stands in front of a crowd in Meadowview Park in the wake of five people being shot there. Photo by Scott thomaS anderSon

Shadow of the gun A vigil, a debate and a new approach drive  response to community violence by Scott thomaS anderSon

Ernie Cadena’s little daughter stood in the afternoon heat, wearing a long shirt adorned with a photograph of him smiling at her side. The child glanced out at Meadowview Park as she walked past the spot where her father was murdered. Monica Robinson, a member of Blessed Kingdom Builder’s Ministry, came over to offer the girl into a supportive embrace. “Everything your dad taught you, no one can ever take that from you,” Robinson whispered. “You have the time the two of you spent together, and that’s yours forever. You hang onto it.” 8   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17

Cadena’s daughter nodded silently. A few feet away, Sacramento police Sgt. Sameer Sood shook hands with community members who arrived under the glaring sun. It was 101 degrees, but that didn’t stop one pastor after another from climbing out of the line of cars parked along the sidewalk. The gathering was in reaction to five people being shot here on August 27—a blur of violence that left four wounded and a girl without her father. Now, leaders from teh area’s houses of faith were uniting with neighbors to send a message.

sc o tta @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

“We want the people of Meadowview to know they’re not by themselves,” Robinson told SN&R. Police Chief Daniel Hahn knelt at the makeshift memorial for Cadena to read the goodbye messages. In the coming hours, Hahn would stand in front of two different crowds, trying to offer reassurances to each in the wake of tragedy. Three names would continue to ring out during the evening: Cadena, reportedly shot dead by gang members, county sheriff’s Deputy Robert French, gunned down the day before by a career

criminal (See “Officer down,” News, page 10), and Joseph Mann, a mentally ill homeless man killed by police officers the previous summer. Each story has its own community of mourners. And through the tears, anger and exasperation voiced at separate meetings held in Meadowview Park and Curtis Park on August last Thursday, the only common denominator was the social scarring of gun violence, and the ways it continues to bring people together—and split them apart. The Meadowview show of solidarity was organized by Pastor Les Simmons of South Sacramento Christian Center in Valley Hi, and Jackie Rose, CEO of Focus on Family Foundation. “We’re all here together because violence knows no ZIP code, it has no address,” Simmons told the gathering. “We want peace in our community.” Two of the key speakers were Mayor Darrell Steinberg and Councilman Larry Carr, who represents Meadowview. Just two nights before, Steinberg and Carr played


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daCa dump critical roles in bringing the controalso expressed doubts about the “messy” versial Advanced Peace program to contract process. Sacramento. Both men cited the shootSteinberg and Ashby argued at the ings in Meadowview, which capped dais for nearly 30 minutes before Council a summer of gun-related murders Members Eric Guerra and Steve Hansen around the capital city, as evidence spoke up strongly in favor of the program. leaders needed to act. Councilman Rick Jennings According to Khaalid and Chief Hahn had also Muttaqi, director of the expressed support. It “When city’s Gang Prevention ultimately passed. something like and Intervention Task Standing in front this happens, it’s not Force, Sacramento of the gathering at experienced a 54 Meadowview Park, just the person who was percent increase in Steinberg alluded to shot. The whole community homicides and a the political drama is impacted.” 47 percent increase around Advanced in firearm assaults Peace. “It was the Larry Carr in 2015. Homicides right thing to do,” the District 8 representative, climbed another mayor said. “I care a Sacramento City Council 12 percent last year. lot less about messes at Muttaqi urged the City City Hall than I do about Council to make Sacramento the lives of people in our one of two new test cities in neighborhoods.” California for the Advanced Peace Carr was more forceful in his remarks, program. The youth intervention initiaalmost shouting, “We’re not going to cower tive targets a small group of individuals in our houses, and we’re not going to most likely to engage in gun violence hide—we’ve come too far to go back now.” and attempts to put them on a new path. If participants meet positive goals over an hour later, a crowd began assembling time, they can get financial assistance in the Sierra 2 Center in Curtis Park for through the program. a forum on policing, race and justice in Advanced Peace was first developed the Trump era. The event was hosted by in the city of Richmond, where it’s credOrganize Win Legislate and its panel ited with reducing both homicides and featured Hahn, Simmons, Hansen and a firearm assaults by 50 percent. host of experts, activists and organizers. During the council meeting, Carr Before any discussion started, Liah noted that misinformation about the Burnley, chair of OWL’s Committee on program was swirling through his Race & Justice Equity, addressed the district. A number of residents had murder of Deputy French. “My heart is called his office saying they’d heard so heavy tonight knowing that one of Advanced Peace was essentially about our officers was just killed yesterday,” paying dangerous criminals to behave Burnley said. “And to know that he was themselves. killed in the line of duty.” “They’re not getting paid to be doing Deputy District Attorney Noah right, they’re getting paid to map out a Phillips, a member of the panel, soon life plan that will take them from where spoke about working with French, whose they are, to somewhere that’s more moniker was “Mr. North” for the amount productive,” Carr stressed. of time he spent patrolling the north “The community of Meadowview is county. Phillips recalled one case he’d traumatized,” he added. “When something prosecuted that involved a woman who like this happens, it’s not just the person was being “tortured” by her husband, but who was shot. The whole community is was too terrified to reach out for help. impacted.” Phillips said it was French who broke Approving the pilot iniaitive met through to her and made an arrest happen. initial resistance from Councilwoman “He ultimately saved that woman’s Angelique Ashby. The District 1 represen- life,” Phillips said. tative criticized the nonprofit’s contract While some in the audience apprecias vague and poorly written, claiming ated the reflections, Phillips quickly it left the city financially vulnerable. found himself under fire from other panel Advanced Peace has offered to put up members, including Simmons and Voice $1.5 million in matching funds, but Ashby of the Youth founder Berry Accius, both isn’t convinced the contribution will of whom demanded answers for why actually happen. Councilman Jeff Harris the district attorney’s hadn’t prosecuted

police officers John Tennis and Randy Lozoya for the killing of Joseph Mann in July 2016. Simmons and Accius repeatedly challenged Phillips about why Mann’s slaying wasn’t considered murder by his office, with both men alluding to audio recordings of Tennis and Lozoya making threatening comments seconds before they gunned Mann down. Simmons insisted there would be no real police oversight until the DA’s office stopped giving law enforcement preferential treatment during homicide investigations. For his part, Hahn attempted to tell the audience about the efforts his police department is making to establish trust in neighborhoods leery or afraid of its officers. Yet much of Hahn’s approach—like having officers work as youth mentors through sports, attend community gatherings in challenged areas and partner more closely with social services providers—was attacked by panelist Claire White, a regional defense attorney. White told the crowd that, in her view, law enforcement had perpetrated so many abuses against communities of color that its officers should stay out of their neighborhoods and schools altogether. “They shouldn’t be on schools near your kids,” she challenged. “I’ve never met anyone, in all my years of doing this, who doesn’t think they need police in their neighborhoods,” a stunned Hahn observed. “I’ve met plenty of people who think the police should behave differently, or engage in a different way, but I’ve never met one person who’s told me they don’t want cops in their neighborhood at all.” Pausing, the chief glanced over at White and admitted, “Well, I guess I’ve finally met one tonight.” At one point, the forum descended into shouting matches between Accius and a handful of audience members reacting to his claim that even modern law enforcement agencies are protectors and perpetrators of institutionalized racism. Simmons, who works with the Sacramento police on community improvement efforts while simultaneously calling for better oversight and accountability of its officers, stayed calm throughout the emotional torrents. The pastor returned to a similar note he’d struck earlier in the evening, when speaking about the shootings in Meadowview, reminding the crowd, “This is about, ‘What is the code that we want to live by as Sacramentans.’” Ω

Angela Velazquez feels like she should have been better prepared. After all, the 28-year-old Sacramento resident never believed President Donald Trump had softened his stance on undocumented immigrants like her, who were brought to this country as children and later came forward as adults because they trusted the american government—their government—to keep its word. But even with all the bellwethers indicating that Trump would strike down yet another Obama-era policy, known as deferred action for Childhood arrivals, or DACA, Velazquez says she couldn’t resist not thinking about the inevitable. “I wanted one normal week before it’s gone,” Velazquez said Tuesday, hours after Trump made the inevitable the official. On September 5, the erratic leader of the free world kept a promise to his base by announcing an end to a policy that granted protections to 800,000 undocumented immigrants who held up their side of an agreement with the U.S. government. The Trump administration started a six-month countdown in the process. Republican lawmakers claim the delay is meant to create urgency for Congress to finally pass immigration reform. But Democratic lawmakers blasted that narrative as insincere and Trump’s action as heartless. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Tuesday that DACA recipients won’t be the target of immigration enforcement once their statuses expire, but this administration has made those paper promises before. “We’ve heard so many things from this administration, saying they’re only going to go after those ‘bad hombres’ or whatever, but yet, we see all of our community members around us being deported,” Velazquez said. “I don’t trust it.” U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, stepped up its arrests of non-criminal aliens by 50 percent since Trump expanded the agency’s scope earlier this year. Velazquez’s DACA status expired last month, but she’s not one of the 240,000 California recipients in danger. She’s applied for permanent residency, which she’s confident she will receive—at some point. “Once I receive my permanent residency, it won’t affect me anymore. But it still hurts just as much, because I still remember what it was like before DACA and all the opportunities I received because of it,” she said. “And now, a lot of my own personal friends, people I care about, they’re going to find themselves affected.” (Raheem F. Hosseini)

seTTlinG for The fuTure Four of the five defendants in the uC davis picnic day case last week accepted a plea agreement that means they’ll be convicted of misdemeanor battery and felony charges of resisting a peace officer. In exchange, they’ve been granted an opportunity to participate in a unique restorative justice program that will allow them to earn the dismissal of the most serious charges. According to a release from the Yolo County District Attorney’s office, Angelica Reyes, Alexander Craver, Iszir Price and Elijah Williams took a deal that includes one year of probation and requires that they participate in a county-sponsored restorative justice program. The fifth defendant, Antwoine Perry, was removed from the original preliminary hearing after he dismissed his attorney, but is expected to receive the same deal. The incident in question, dubbed the “Picnic Day brawl” by local media, involved an April street fight between a crowd of partygoers and three police officers in an unmarked vehicle, which caused local activists to accuse the officers of racial bias, since every defendant in the case is either black or Latino. (Bert Johnson)

09.07.17    |   SN&R   |   9


Thomas Daniel Littlecloud, center right, allegedly shot sacramento County sheriff’s Deputy Robert French, bottom right, while attempting to escape from a second-floor balcony of the Ramada inn. The motel room’s registered occupant, Priscilla Prendez, is charged with vehicle theft. Photo by Raheem F. hosseini

Bravery under fire Deputy Robert French continued providing cover for  fellow officers after being shot in the heart by Raheem F. hosseini

The Bay Area fugitive who killed Sacramento County sheriff’s Deputy Robert French unloaded 34 rounds from an automatic rifle and blasted nine more shots from a handgun before authorities stopped him last week, sheriff’s officials revealed on Tuesday. And while an autopsy was pending at the time of this report, Sheriff Scott Jones said he believes the shot that may have ended Thomas Daniel Littlecloud’s reign of terror came from the sidearm of the deputy who gave his life to the job. “There is a possibility that the round that ultimately caused the suspect’s demise was fired by Deputy French,” Jones told reporters on Tuesday. The September 7 press conference offered the clearest picture yet of the chain of events that culminated in a deadly series 10   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17

of gunbattles at a motel near the Arden Arcade neighborhood of Sacramento on August 30. The dead suspect’s self-described girlfriend is in custody on vehicle theft charges and two undercover California Highway Patrol officers are on the mend. But it was the intersecting paths of a veteran patrolman and a career criminal that Jones said revealed the true character of an officer who continued to fight even after he absorbed a bullet to the heart. “Even though he was mortally wounded, he continued to engage and pin down the suspect as best he could,” Jones said. “More than we ever could have asked of any officer.” Law enforcement officers didn’t expect a firefight when they tracked a stolen

r a h e e mh @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

BMW to a Ramada Inn parking lot last Wednesday. Sheriff’s Sgt. Paul Belli of the Homicide Bureau said that members of the Sacramento County Auto Theft Task Force were investigating a car theft reported earlier that morning. The CHP-led task force is made up of investigators from the CHP and county Sheriff’s and Probation departments. Chief Probation Officer Lee Seale said he believes members of the task force were at the Ramada Inn because they had “identified one or more targets at that location in advance.” “The motel was the original site of their attention,” added Seale, who has one deputy probation officer assigned to the task force. “They were watching it. The hotel is where they began.” When investigators saw two women

enter the stolen car, the task force decided to split up, with some members tailing the BMW while others stayed behind, Seale told SN&R. Officers attempted to stop the stolen vehicle at the motel, said sheriff’s spokesman Sgt. Tony Turnbull, but were led on a roughly 20-mile pursuit that ended in Elk Grove, where officers arrested Priscilla Prendez, 23, of Oakland, and questioned and released another woman. Prendez was on probation for auto theft out of the Bay Area and registered to a second-floor room on the south side of the motel. She later told investigators she was Littlecloud’s girlfriend, Belli said. When members of the task force announced themselves outside of Prendez’s room, gunfire punched through the walls and door into the internal hallway, injuring two undercover CHP officers, who returned fire. The suspect, later identified as Littlecloud, stole to the room’s rear balcony, and fired on a deputy who was positioned on the ground below. Littlecloud then dropped from the balcony onto a back lot, went around the side and positioned himself behind a planter, where he opened fire for the third time on an arriving officer, the 52-year-old French. Jones said French took cover behind his vehicle with a CHP officer and returned fire, laying down cover for his fellow officers. It was during this exchange that Jones said a round from the suspect’s weapon pierced the back of French’s patrol car, deflecting a piece into the deputy’s shoulder, bypassing his vest and sinking through soft tissue until it reached his heart. “Even though it was a fatal round, Deputy French, exhibiting extraordinary and conspicuous bravery, still continued to engage the suspect,” Jones said. Littlecloud attempted to flee in a nearby Dodge Challenger that authorities say was stolen from a Bay Area car rental business, driving through a barrage of officer gunfire onto Fulton Avenue, where he drew officers on a brief chase. When Littlecloud was slowed by traffic on Watt and El Camino avenues, Belli said a deputy exited his vehicle and fired on the suspect. Littlecloud then jumped the curb, but would soon crash into a telphone pole. He died September 2. Methamphetamine and a second nine-millimeter pistol were found back at the moel room. Asked Tuesday how French’s family was doing, Jones replied, “As you would expect.” “We’ll never quite get over it, as you can see,” he added in a room adorned with the faces of other fallen officers. “It never gets any easier, but we honor our own and we heal as a community.” Ω


To expand public transit to the  masses, Sacramento leaders need  to make a $2.4 billion investment

the best Live Music venue ?

Big bucks for buses by Glenda Marsh

ON STANDS

September 21

We need a few more “yes” votes Sacramento Regional Transit has from the STA board to fund a real boldly crafted a budget for the future countywide transit system, likely of mass transit in our county, which through future county sales tax revenues clearly states what we need to invest so that could be proposed by our local mass transit can meet our quality of life, jurisdictions. While the STA board isn’t mobility, economic and environmental scheduled to vote on anything now, it goals here. could be asked to consider a new sales SacRT is asking the Sacramento tax measure for transportation projects, Transportation Authority to invest $82 including transit funding, next spring. million per year over 30 years through Demand our elected officials get on future county sales tax revenues, as has board. been done in other cities and counties in Local elected officials, well-heeled California and around the nation. business groups and developers with This investment isn’t optional; the a sweet tooth must stop treating RT’s STA Board of Directors needs to make budget like a candy store. They are the it happen. ones making cavities in RT’s budget, I am calling on the public, our local diverting millions of dollars from media and elected officials on weekend and evening routes, the STA board to make affordable fares and the investment in mass Our transfers, more frequent transportation we community’s service, clean and must have. You see, walkable bus stops, our local cities and health and future walk-on/ride-on six-county region climate depend no-steps light-rail have quality of life on having public cars, decongested goals that depend on freeways, and protecta higher level of mass transportation ing our air quality from transit service and use. available. vehicle emissions. Our community’s health This is the story that and future climate depend must be talked about all the on having public transportation time. available. Every member of the RT board, made Over the last year, I led a communityup of elected officials from Sacramento based collaboration initiated by our local County and the cities of Citrus Heights, climate protection organization, 350 Elk Grove, Folsom, Rancho Cordova and Sacramento, to learn about our transit Sacramento, must step up and show that system, its deficiencies, what community they believe in the services and benefits members and riders want it to be like, of RT to their constituents. And right and how much it will cost. now, voters must tell the STA board they We need Sacramento County’s want it. cities and suburbs to hum with clean, Let’s all ask every RT board member green buses and light rail to get around to go full throttle campaigning for a real town—to get to your job, your school, public transportation system. RT board your doctor, your date. Boomers are members did that for Measure A 20 getting older and can’t drive as much, years ago. Will they step up again? Ω and Millennials don’t want the expense. Many people can’t afford a car. But we all still need to get places to shop, dine, work, go somewhere you haven’t been Glenda Marsh is the transportation team leader for before. This is what we should be talking 350 Sacramento. about and making happen.

’17

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Political theater with a purpose by jeff vonkaenel

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je ffv @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

homelessness in Sacramento. It will I enjoy good political theater. And the take all hands on deck to achieve this August 23 Sacramento Area goal, because the solutions will not be Congregations Together community easy. It may require raising taxes to fund meeting on homelessness held at St. solutions, moving money away from Mark’s United Methodist Church was jails into housing and locating places political theater at its finest. A packed for supportive housing despite strong church with more than 300 focused neighborhood opposition. and passionate people, plus a pinch of Social change starts with vision and preaching and a bucket of data, equals passion. Both were there on August sophisticated pressure put on elected 23 at St. Mark’s. The dean of Trinity officials. It does not get much better than Cathedral, Brian Baker, asked the audithat. ence to imagine a few years in the future Other political players such as busiwith no homelessness in Sacramento. ness groups and unions have a fiduciary Chantay White, an Air Force veteran, responsibility to their constituencies, told a hushed crowd how she was able causing them to have a narrow focus, to overcome sexual assault, drug such as getting a tax break or a addiction and homelessness. wage increase. Conversely, Sacramento Mayor Darrell ACT is comprised of 56 The ACT Steinberg, Sacramento different religious and County Supervisor Don neighborhood groups, presentation Nottoli, and Sacramento representing 60,000 was part sermon City Council Member families, and therefore and part poli-sci Jeff Harris all publicly can take on big societal signed a pledge to end issues such as reforming lecture homelessness. the criminal justice system But, equally important, or ending homelessness. there was a reasonably Not only does it focus on well-thought-out explanation of the the big, important issues, ACT’s problem. The ACT presentation was part connection with religious organizations sermon and part poli-sci lecture. And such as the Roman Catholic Diocese of there was an actual plan of action. Sacramento, Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, ACT’s plan recommends emergency Congregation B’nai Israel and St. Mark’s shelter capacity and supportive services United Methodist Church brings a moral force to their position as well as bodies to sufficient to care for all homeless people. It advocates for exploring and fill the pews and the City Council meetimplementing all possible avenues for ings. The end result is brilliant political permanent supportive housing. And it organizing, which has a real impact. recommends creating a comprehensive ACT was instrumental in putting plan for ending homelessness, with pressure on the Sacramento City Council benchmarks and measurements. to re-examine its police practices after You can go to the ACT website for recent media coverage of police brutality more details. Or even better, you can join and shootings. This helped lead to the ACT’s efforts to end homelessness in hiring of a reformer police chief, Daniel Sacramento. Hahn. ACT also advocates for immigraThis form of political theater requires tion reform, increasing mental health audience participation. Ω services, utilizing restorative justice in schools and numerous other critical issues. With the backing of faith organizations and strong labor connections, Jeff vonKaenel is the president, CEO and majority ACT is the natural organization to owner of the News & Review. lead a community-wide effort to solve


’S mento SacraerS and winn S—with loSer ry pointS ra arbit

hn by jo

flyn

on sacramento

ADVENtURES

n

So Hot rigHt now Labor Day weekend marked the unofficial end of summer, but Sacramento’s most formidable season didn’t leave without one final display of its power—a straight week of triple-digit heat, topping out above 110 degrees, after a record-breaking July where temperatures never dipped below 90. But the end of scorching days also means the end of Scorekeeper’s favorite weather event: the summer evenings when the Delta breeze swings through town.

+100 StiPended StraigHt Following five shootings that have been tied to a beef involving Sacramento rappers C-Bo, Lavish D and the increasingly ascendant Mozzy, the City Council unanimously voted on August 29 to approve the Advance Peace program, which offers stipends and mentorship to about 50 young men believed to be central in the gang-related conflicts. The program aims to reform those who can use their credibility among younger generations to put an end to the vicious cycle of retaliation. Locking away anyone with tangential gang ties has failed miserably, so Scorekeeper applauds this novel effort and is encouraged to see the city offer an innovative approach to gun violence so early into the tenure of new police Chief Daniel Hahn.

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Soon, the stretch of U.S. Highway 50 that bifurcates Sacramento and runs out to Watt Avenue will receive more than $278 million in repairs, by far the largest of 32 “fix-it first” projects authorized by the California Transportation Commission. The freeway’s placement has long been Sacramento’s least attractive feature, but at least the concrete overhang for the Sunday farmers market won’t crumble.

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Twenty delicious mixed drinks for sipping and snapping

W

“The cocktail climate has really changed where your consumers photo by @_s3r3n3 at your bars are really educated on

spirits and social media.” Joe Anthony Savala co-founder of Sacramento Cocktail Week

@SacnewSr eview:

#JunglebiR d #S nR c oc k ta i lw eek

hen did Sacramento’s cocktail scene arrive? Was it when Lou Bustamonte wrote that “Sacramento was built for cocktails” in the San Francisco Chronicle this August? When Cocktail Week launched in 2008? Or when Paragary’s opened in 1983? Joe Anthony Savala, co-founder of Sacramento Cocktail Week, says the industry leveled up when our best bartenders stopped moving to larger markets—and instead honed their craft here. He cites Jayson Wilde, who worked at Shady Lady, ventured to San Francisco to manage the renowned bar at Bourbon & Branch, then moved back to open Bottle & Barlow in 2015. “The biggest thing that has changed is that bartenders are staying in Sacramento and developing the cocktail scene, which rivals Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles,” Savala says. Sacramento has its advantages, including camaraderie and local produce for garden-to-glass creations. “Bartenders call each other for ideas,” Savala says. “It’s not like that in other cities. The information is proprietary and they keep things to themselves like it’s a secret. Sacramento isn’t like that.” Though the bartender scene has long been cozy, it hadn’t always locally sourced its ingredients. Savala remembers switching over to using fresh lime juice in margaritas at Zócalo in the mid-aughts. Other bartenders were taken aback. “They would taste the fresh juice and the light would kick off: ‘I can make a cocktail with a fresh juice— and the juice changes everything,’” he recalls. Many cocktails use a sour element, and crisp produce enlivens the interplay between sour fruit and bitter alcohol. These days, bartenders are responding to a superficial trend: Instagram. Wacky glasses or elaborate garnishes vie to become social-media sensations. And some of them are. The Jungle Bird’s tiki glasses and luau decor have inspired 159 Instagram location-tagged posts in the month of August alone,

to cHeck out tHe Full lineup oF SacRamento cocktail week eventS, SeptembeR 10-16, go to HttpS://SacRamento cocktailweek.com FoR ticketS and a calendaR.

starting with the image of a lone man behind a $100 bucket of booze that’s shaped like a giant flamingo. There’s a plus side to the Instamadness: Consumers know their Luxardo from their Amaretto. “The cocktail climate has really changed where your consumers at your bars are really educated on spirits and social media,” Savala says. “Bartenders have to be extremely well-versed because customers have educated themselves. The game has really changed.” If anything, Savala would like to see Sacramento consumers become more knowledgeable and adventurous. Don’t just order a whiskey soda—say you like brown liquors and ask the bartender for their suggestions, he says. Curious patrons enable mixologists to broaden their skills and earn a living all at once. That’s where Cocktail Week comes in. This September 10-16, liquor lovers can attend a packed lineup of free and ticketed events, including watching a documentary on Peruvian pisco and its ties to California while sipping on pisco sours, or sampling an amuse boucheand-cocktail pairing inspired by a David Garibaldi painting. “Cocktail week isn’t about going out and being irresponsible,” Savala says. “It’s the art of the cocktail and being educated.” For more inspiration for your urbane imbibing and—let’s be honest—social-media posts, we’ve snapped 20 of the best and most visually arresting cocktails around town. Pinkies up, cameras out. —Rebecca Huval

woRdS and pHotoS by by Scott tHomaS andeRSon, Juli boggS, JoHn Flynn, becky gRunewald, Rebecca Huval, eRic JoHnSon, RacHel leibRock, StepH RodRiguez, antHony Siino, mozeS zaRate

continued on page 16

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@SacnewSreview:

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Serpentine Fox Prohibition Grille

$11

2645 El Camino Avenue, www.serpentinefox.com.

This old bartender’s trick creates a mist of caramelized lemon zest that lands gently on the surface of a Perfect Manhattan ($11). Joseph Crowder of the #SerpentineFox knows the trick. #bulleitrye #halfsweethalfdryvermouth #bitters #twistnocherry #ardenarcade

p e r f e c t m a n h at ta n

#twistnocherry

- @E.J.

Empress Tavern

Steamboat Landing

Seafood House Quan Oc

1013 K Street, www.empresstavern.com.

12414 State Highway 160 in Courtland, www.steamboatlanding.com.

6741 Stockton Boulevard.

$10

$11

$12 Located beneath the Crest Theatre, Empress Tavern is a dimly lit cavern of meaty excess—which just makes its Pocket Square cocktail ($11) all the more surprisingly light and refreshing. Made with Meletti, an Italian liqueur, bubbly prosecco and vodka, any cloying sweetness is offset by hints of grapefruit, cucumber and lime. Served in a tall, cut crystal glass with tons of ice and a festive blackand-white paper straw, its #gardenparty vibe makes for the perfect #endofsummer cocktail. - @R.L.

The north Delta’s newest restaurant is nestled between the Sacramento River, a winding slide-slough and a 300-acre fruit farm. Dubbed Steamboat Landing, this Courtland eatery is owned by the Neuharth family and gazes out on its sprawling, legacy pear orchard. In addition to its riverside barbecuing, Steamboat Landing debuted with a special drink, the Pear Prosecco Float ($12), which combines a cold cup of sparkly with two huge scoops of organic pear sorbet made fresh from the orchard. It’s a crisp, icy shot of farm sweetness. - @STA

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The jewel of the Lychee Martini ($10) is the tropical fruit drowning in the glass. Imagine a vodka martini livened up slightly with triple sec and the flavor of the submerged lychee permeating the alcohol. Lychees taste similarly to pears, only hyper-sweet like a kiwi. #NoOlive -@M.Z.


Iron Horse Tavern 1800 15th Street, www.ironhorsetavern.net.

The Pocket Club Sail Inn Grotto & Bar

5043 Freeport Boulevard.

1522 Jefferson Boulevard in West Sacramento, www.sailinngrotto.com.

$10

$4

$3.95 #nonalcoholic A little break from happy hour cocktails doesn’t have to be tasteless or boring, so give that liver a rest with #mocktails. In the Strawberry Lemonade ($3.95), fresh fruit and bubbles tickle the palate. Muddled lemons and sparkling soda are garnished with fresh strawberries, and the mix of sweet-and-sour makes for a delicious bevy without the alcoholic kicker. #farmtococktail S.R.

When you’re tired of the Midtown cocktail scene and its preciously concocted and pricey drinks, pull up a stool for a stiff one at The Pocket Club. Straight-talking bartenders Janet or Loretta can mix up a whiskey sour with a benevolent pour of George Dickel Rye for all of $4. Shaken with lemon juice and just a whisper of sugar, the only frill here is a maraschino cherry. #cocktailswithnofilter #stiffnotsweet #noURL. - @R.H.

This West Sacramento dive-bar-slash-rum-grotto is a perfect spot to hide from the midday sun while sucking down slushie-based cocktails and tiki-bar classics. The OG Mai Tai ($10)—served up with amber rum, orgeat and fresh pineapple—is best enjoyed on the patio paired with a #deltabreeze. - @J.B.

Magpie Cafe 1601 16th Street, www.magpiecafe.com.

Florez Bar & Grill Kasbah Lounge

5900 S. Land Park Drive, www.florezbarandgrill.com.

2115 J Street, www.kasbahlounge.com.

$10 $8

$11

j a m a i c a n m a r g a r i ta t h e z a h r a c o c k ta i l Maybe alcoholic drinks shouldn’t remind us of our #childhood but Magpie Cafe’s Cherry Whiskey Sour ($11) tastes like a boozy pink lemonade if ever there was a thing. Made with Four Roses bourbon, cherry liqueur and lemon juice, it’s shaken with simple syrup and aquafaba. The latter is chickpea brine and is used as a #vegan substitute for raw egg whites to give the drink fun, frothy texture. The overall flavor vibe is lightly tart and lightly sweet. It’s garnished with a lemon twist and the cutest, tiniest cherry ever, and it makes for 100 percent #summertimethrowback fun. - @R.L.

The Zahra cocktail ($10) is named after the Arabic word with the double meaning of “beautiful” and “flower blossom.” Co-owner Debbie Wu desired to create a cocktail that evoked the smell of springtime blossoms; it combines Lebanese lebneh, orange blossom water, housemade jasmine tea syrup, cognac and a dusting of tart sumac into an unusually floral, creamy cocktail with a punch. #sacramentospring #almondblossoms #orangeblossoms #badassfemalebartender

It’s happy hour all day at Florez Bar & Grill. So why not sip on one or two margaritas to kick off the work week? A customer fav is the Jamaican Margarita ($8) with its salty and spicy Tajín rim and deep ruby color from the use of #hibiscus. - @S.R.

continued on page 19

- @B.G.

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@SacnewSreview:

i ns ta gra m -w orthy c oc k ta i l s # s n r c o c k ta i lwe e k

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Arthur Henry’s Supper Club & Ruby Room 3406 Broadway, http://www.arthurhenrys.net.

“this bird gets me where i need to go.”

$10

On paper, Queen Anne’s Revenge ($10) looks unnecessarily complicated. Like #GameofThrones who-did-what-to-whom-now complicated. In the glass and on the taste buds, however, it is lovely. Bacardi Superior rum and gunpowder green tea syrup are imbued with zingy ginger liqueur, citrusy blood orange and lime juice for a fruity smooth delight. If this is what #winteriscoming tastes like, pile on those fake fur animal skins, we’re ready.

photo by @_s3r3n3

The Jungle Bird 2516 J Street, http://thejunglebird.com.

The Red Rabbit 2718 J Street, https://theredrabbit.net.

$10

- @R.L.

$11

Bottle & Barlow 1120 R Street, https://bottleandbarlow.com.

$10

Often a supporting actor in savory dishes, rosemary stars as a garnish and muddled herb in Black Sheep ($10), a tart cocktail built on gin and blackberry juice. With a little bit of amaro montenegró thrown in for good measure, this refreshing top-seller’s bouquet of floral and herby flavors goes down easiest during a warm evening on the patio. - @J.F.

The Dead Penguin ($11) is far more pleasant than a bird corpse. This cocktail tastefully balances the smoky musk of mezcal against the herbed sweetness of Yellow Chartreuse, the vanilla touch of Luxardo amaretto, a sugary tinge of sweet vermouth and a touch of bitters to create a complex cocktail for those who want it both fancy and vicious. It’s served in a very small glass with a curved bit of lemon rind that makes you wish you were tuxing it up like a penguin. If you’re carelessly gulping, it runs the risk of making you feel like you’re dead to match. Gentle sips, pinky out.

I hear the soundtrack to Disneyland’s Enchanted Tiki Room whenever I enter this restaurant that’s strewn with parrots on perches. That said, what better to drink from than a macaw? The Jungle Bird ($10) comes in a made-for-Instagram ceramic parrot. Corumba Dark Jamaican Rum, simple syrup and pineapple juice establish a foundation of sweetness, while lime adds a note of acid. Campari dominates it all with bitterness like the truth: These birds won’t sing like the ones at Disney, but the drink’s strong enough to prompt you to coo #InTheTikiTikiTikiRoom. - @R.H.

continued on page 21

- @A.S.

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@ S a c n e wS r e vie w : continued from page 1 9

in s ta g r a m- w o rt h y c o c k ta il s

Gracianos’s Chicago Deep Dish Pizza & Speakeasy 1023 Front Street.

The Shady Lady Saloon 1409 R Street, www.shadyladybar.com.

Midtown’s Cantina Alley 2320 Jazz Alley, https://cantinaalley.com.

$8

$9 $7 $8

More refreshing than a Bloody Mary, the Michelada Puerca ($7) at Midtown’s Cantina Alley is a sip-from-thebartop-only type of drink. The behemoth features strips of chicharrónes, a liberally salted rim and a housemade spice mix serving as a literal counterbalance to a drink garnished with a full bottle of Corona. #unomás - @J.B.

Even though it’s unlisted on the menu, the best drink at this modern speakeasy might be the New York Sour ($9). Underneath an eggwhite froth, the triple-layered concoction layers some cabernet above a bed of bourbon, simple syrup and freshly squeezed lemon juice. It’s a time-consuming creation, so sip slowly and tip generously. - @J.F.

Echoing its ’20s and ’30s theme, Graciano’s names some of its cocktails after famous criminals from the publicenemy era. Based on the bank-robbing couple, Bonnie ($8) is equal parts sour and sweet, mixing raspberry vodka and apple pucker with cranberry and Sprite. Clyde ($8) is a long Island iced tea—vodka, gin, rum, triple sec—with an added kick of tequila, elderflower liquor and ginger ale fizz, all naturally tangy with orange juice. The cocktails are worth ordering as a pair for the contrast. They did die together. #togetherforever - @M.Z.

Back Door Lounge

Hook & Ladder Manufacturing Co. 1630 S Street, https://hookandladder916.com.

La Islita

1112 Firehouse Alley.

2236 Northgate Blvd.

$6

$8

metiche michelada

No need to choose between caffeine and a brunch cocktail—Jump Start ($8) covers both bases. Creamy housemade coffee liqueur meets the almond-sweetness of Luxardo amaretto and the richness of Camellia Coffee Roasters’ cold brew. It’s all topped off with (pink!) whipped cream made with Angostura bitters and a dusting of fresh nutmeg. With its dual-personality, the picturesque drink says: “Good morning, now relax.” - @R.H.

Let’s be clear, you go to the Back Door Lounge not for the artisanal cocktails. You go for the experience and divey #nostalgia. Overly sweet Old-Fashioned ($6)? Whatever, it’s strong isn’t it? Sip slowly, take in the red and gold flocked wallpaper and gaze admiringly at yourself in the mirrored ceiling. Eavesdrop on the lazy, late night chit-chat via the bar’s only other couple and soak up the sounds of Cheap Trick, Fleetwood Mac or whatever else strikes your fancy on the jukebox. Order another and relax, this is #asgoodasitgets, my friend. - @R.L.

The Metiche (Curious) Michelada at this muy auténtico seafood restaurant was inspired by a photograph. Some friends of co-owner Juan Medrano, visiting Sinaloa, snapped a shot and sent it to him. “Can your mom [La Isita’s master chef] make one like this?” Rimmed with a half-dozen shrimp and sliced cucumbers, spiced, iced and served with an upside-down Pacifico, it is hot-weather perfection. #mariscos #Northgate #Mariachi - @E.J.

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s o ñ A 34

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inspired me to create mixed drinks and they all turned out bad by Raheem F. hosseini

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22   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17

f I’m being totally honest, I would never have had the idea if not for the massive, animatronic dildo standing on a glass shelf inside of a sex shop on Auburn Boulevard. Allow me to explain. I was a freelance writer on assignment, back when SN&R included a “Sex & Love” section in its Best of Sacramento editions. Popping into a sex shop seemed like a good idea to drum up ideas. As I neared a corner display, the mighty scabbard stopped me cold. It was impressive. Aside from the gratuitous level of detail that some craftsman—nay, artist— nay, HERO—devoted to this rubber sculpture, the vibrator also boasted technology that pushed it to the edge of sex-toy neorealism. Scanning the box, I saw that there was a small hatch in the base of this thing where you could funnel a tiny amount of liquid. What for? I read on. Once the battery-powered phallus was activated, rattling and frothing like some undead baby arm, the liquid would work its way up the central nervous system and erupt from the tip. There was even a recipe, so the lucky owner could whip up a milky white concoction made to resemble, well, you know.

As I stood there, waiting to see if it flinched, I forgot all about my assignment and started plotting a bachelorette-themed birthday party for my brother. A prank and bacchanal in one demented package. This accidental art installation would be the centerpiece. Guests would sip spirits from its fleshcolored chalice. There would be a contest to see who could drink without spilling. Then I glanced down at the price tag: Ninety-nine dollars?! Plan B: Make my own suggestive cocktails. Sometimes, this is how inspiration works. The friend who tagged along convinced me to buy up a bunch of cheap favors—plastic penis straws, plastic Zorro masks with penis noses that looked more like pig snouts. My accomplice handled the bachelorette-themed decorations and appetizers, a friend’s girlfriend called dibs on baking the penisshaped cake (she already had the pan—long story), allowing me to focus on the drink menu. This was about seven years ago, so my memory is a little fogged by time and shame. But as far as I remember, the names came first.


Drink No. 1:

Whiskey

Dick

Made up of equal parts Bushmills Irish Whiskey and Mountain Dew—a perfectly good hooch befouled by my childish need to land a joke: I don’t know if this rumor is still plaguing middle schools, but when I was a little snot, word was that doing the Dew shrunk a gentleman’s peas and carrots to the size of mere seedlings. We didn’t know if this was a permanent state or just temporary—we had not yet learned the empirical method—and so we avoided the syrupy swill altogether. As for the boys who threw caution to the wind, legends were written. Anyway, the Whiskey Dick was a putrid beverage and no one drank it. I gave it the old college try, but then hallucinated a vision of my 11-year-old self screaming at me about what I was doing to “our nards.” I put the glass down and backed away.

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Pink (Get your mind out of the gutter, it was named after a friend.) One-third Stolichnaya vodka, one-third pink lemonade and one-third strawberry-kiwi-flavored Capri Sun, this beverage was unobjectionable and unmemorable.

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Drink No. 3:

One-third Sailor Jerry rum and twothirds A&W Root Beer. I honestly can’t remember what this drink was named. A friend who was there says it tasted the best. Considering the alternatives, that’s tepid praise. If there’s a moral here, it’s to leave the fancy recipes to the professional mixologists. And never get your ideas from a rubber mallet.

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illustrAtions By sArAh hAnsel

A better doughnut? leMon poppyseed donut, conscious creAMery

Pastrami sandwich and potato salad at Oakhaus

A potentially controversial opinion: Vegan doughnuts are superior to regular doughnuts. The lightweight, dairy-free and baked dough of Conscious Creamery’s lemon poppyseed doughnut won’t weigh you down for the rest of the day. A smooth glaze of citrus cracks as you bite into it, and a jaunty wedge of dried lemon adds visual flair. Poppyseeds dot the moist cake for a fun pop. If you’re more of a chocolate person, try their almond chocolate doughnut—a fudgelike ring studded with crunchy nuts. Find it at Identity Coffees (1430 28th Street) or pop-up locations around town.www.consciouscreamery.com.

—rebeccA huvAl

Photo By scott DuncAn

Invasion of the brats Oakhaus 3413 Broadway, (916) 376-7694 Good for: German food with an American twist, like kraut balls

$$$

German, Oak Park

Restaurants are often seen as harbingers of gentrification. Whether at the unfortunately named Local’s Corner in San Francisco or Summerhill in Brooklyn, the telltale marker is slick graphic design at odds with the neighborhood. Similarly, Sacramento native Tom Schnetz has created trendy design stories for his two Oak Park restaurants, the Mexican La Venadita and German Oakhaus. The hofbrau opened in June looking like Germany viewed through an Instagram filter: spearmint walls and forested cuckoo clocks, a slab bar and wooden shelves full of bric-a-brac. Director Wes Anderson would approve. In fact, there’s a Mendl’s pastry box from the fictional bakery in Anderson’s film The Grand Budapest Hotel. Likewise, the food is one-third Germanic and two-thirds Americana hipster. It has the spirit of LowBrau, but the a la carte style of Sam’s Hof Brau. Yes, there are brats and schnitzel and a boiled-and-baked pretzel and stone-ground mustard. Several beers from Germany are on draft. Dishes that were once seen as dowdy and Midwestern—meatloaf, potato salad—regain their it-factor in the context of their German origins. Too bad the food tastes like it’s checking off boxes: flavor-mashing aioli (lemon sage), check; thick clusters of sea salt, check. Schentz owns a few Mexican restaurants in the Bay Area, so he’s familiar with current tropes. He brings those cliches to Oakhaus’ menu with sandwiches,

by Rebecca Huval

re b e c c a h @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

snacks and entrees that are often delicious, but occasionally feel halfhearted. The successes are worth a visit on their own: Brussel sprouts ($4.25) with perfectly charred frills that lock in the oil and pancetta. Bratwurst on a roll ($9.50 with potato salad) that’s juicy, porky and perky as you bite into it, as if it has nothing to hide—you might even want to see how the sausage is made. German chocolate cupcake ($3.95) with surprisingly moist cake, subtle coconut and icing as darkly lush as the Black Forest. A clever item on the menu mixes a Southern staple (hush puppies) with Germanic ingredients: kraut balls ($3.75). And boy, are they good. An interior of fermented onions warmly oozes from a playful exterior of crushed pretzels. The lightly sour and soft sauerkraut harmonizes with the savory crunch on the outside. But the missteps are head-scratchers. The deviled eggs taste too pungently of mustard. Likewise, the pickles are funk-forward. The pastrami sandwich offers a mouthful of housemade rye—aromatically seeded and sweet like maple—with a serving of meat fit for a baguette, which is to say, not much. We get it, the bread is delicious, but please don’t take away our meat because of it. The neighborhood seems wary of the restaurant; each time I went, it was nearly empty. Yelp user Fatima C. wrote, “Considering the gentrification rate in Oak Park, I’m curious to know what efforts this business is making to hire original Oak Park residents?” Oakhaus has merged German and American fare with mixed results. It remains to be seen how it’ll mingle with the community. Ω

The sake of beers kyoto White yuzu, binchoyAki To meet Sacramento’s ever-mounting beer demands, Binchoyaki has found its niche by offering a slate of craft beer imported from Japan. Perhaps the most novel among its selection is the Kizakura Sake Brewing Co.’s first craft malt beverage, the Kyoto White Yuzu ($9). Per the title, the crisp ale contains a hint of yuzu, a Japanese citrus similar to grapefruit. And the beer’s yeast contributes a cloudy body as well as some fruity flavors that land closest to apple. If you’re tired of getting smacked in the face with hops, this sake-maker’s brew provides a far gentler alternative. 2226 10th Street, http://binchoyaki.com.

—John Flynn

Whorls of fiber brussels sprouts Long before the tiny-food trend hit restaurants, Brussels sprouts have looked like doll-sized veggies. As mini members of the cabbage family, they have lots of fiber and vitamin C. After a summer break, Brussels sprouts begin appearing in markets again for fall. Look for whole stalks with eye-catching whorls of sprouts. Slice them off and separate the leaves to make salads with toasted hazelnuts and pomegranate molasses. Or try them the classic way: richly caramelized in a pan with bacon and onions. Some chefs like to deep-fry them for a semi-healthy (hey—it’s fiber!) snack.

—Ann MArtin rolke

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THE

Thai Food & gluten free options On T

10 beers on tap • full menu Happy Hour 4:30-6pm beers & appetizers as low as $3 – available at botH locations – 1110 T ST. SacramenTo, ca 95811 | 916-822-4665

rent

tHe same but Diffe

IllustratIon by Mark stIvers

Six flavors for $6

drunken noodle •Midtown•

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2 beer

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all day

6 beers on tap 2502 J St. Sacramento, CA • 916.447.1855 www.drunkenthai.com or find us on Yelp

Check Yelp for Daily $2 beer specials 26   |   SN&R   |    09.07.17

by Rebecca Huval

Street (read: cheap) eats: Sacramento has made a name for itself with outstanding Vietnamese food in Little Saigon and elsewhere, but we haven’t had Vietnamese restaurants that specifically focus on street food— until now. Restaurateur Huan Pham says he wants to recreate the energy and free-for-all deliciousness of the Saigon markets of his youth at Saigon Street Eats (1827 Broadway), which had its grand opening September 1. In Vietnam’s big cities, vendors cook their wares in the open air and compete against one another on bustling streets. This Land Park restaurant only has one vendor, but Pham has revitalized the formerly bland space of Pho Bac Hoa Viet by adorning the ceiling with colorful umbrellas and paper lanterns. Plus, the new business emphasizes cheap eats at around $6 to $10. “The best thing about street food is it’s fresh,” he says. “People that sell it on the street, they don’t have a freezer. It’s cheaper, and whatever they prepare, they sell that day.”

The menu includes Vietnamese staples found elsewhere—pho, banh mi, vermicelli bowls—as well as some less common dishes, like lotus root and green papaya salads ($9), periwinkle and ham sausage ($6 for sea snails and ham “wrapped in lemon grass and ginger”) and a bo bia roll ($6). This last treat—with its shredded jicama, carrots, basil, eggs, shrimp and Chinese sausage served with peanut sauce—was one of Pham’s favorites growing up, when he would save up coins to buy one snack on the way to school. “Bo Bia is my favorite; when you’re a child, and you don’t have a lot of money and you don’t eat well, any time you get to buy some street food it’s a treat,” he says. “If you are lucky enough to grab the right bite into your mouth, the flavor will explode: sour, bitter, salty, sweet, crunchy. Everything explodes together.” Unlucky cafe: Last week was a tough one for any Sacramento diners who

treasure our storied greasy spoons. Though Lucky Cafe (1111 21st Street) lacked polish, that was also part of its charm that earned the breakfast joint a cult following during its 55 years in that location. And yet, an eviction notice was posted on its door last week. RIP Lucky Cafe. Now, get thee to Pancake Circus while this other slice of kitschy old-school Sacramento is still serving up greasy omelets among a zoo of wacky clowns. Fusion pie: Pizza Porch found its porch this July, when it graduated from a food truck to a stable kitchen inside Republic Bar & Grill (908 15th Street). The business still dishes out classic pizzas along with the BBQ Chicken and Bacon ($12.90) and the Chicken Tikka ($12.90). This last one is the most popular pie, according to owner Gary Dhillon. “Naan has been around for centuries, so we knew the combination of bread and the savory Indian fusion sauces would go well with our in-house, fresh dough.” Ω


Comida cyclone Rapper Baby Bash lorded over the mid-2000s, releasing three certified bangers, “Cyclone,” “Baby, I’m Back” and “Suga Suga.” Although he tapped into the rap-crooning that’s everywhere nowadays, his career slackened as hip-hop artists started wearing tighter pants. But that minor fall-off means he’s available to headline events like Tamales, Tacos & Touchdowns put on by KSFM 102.5 in Cesar Chavez Plaza on September 10 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at your local Dimple Records for $5 before prices double at the gate. At the event, in addition to a “zone” centered around America’s most dangerous sport, there will be a bunch of local Mexican food vendors, including Cantina Azteca, Tina’s Tacos, Xochimilco Restaurant and Yolanda’s Tamales. Before Baby Bash takes the stage, live music will be played by Solsa, Maya’s Taqueria and Mariachi Los Gallos. The cherry on top: piñatas, which one can only hope Baby Bash will help a baby to bash.

where’s the best burger?

where’st the besn korea food?

ON

STANDS

—John Flynn

SEPTEMBER 21

get more, spend less.

Catching a pop-up by Shoka outdoor kitchen at Kingbird Farms, located at 8869 Orr Road in Galt. Usually, Adam Thigpen—Kingbird proprietor, farmer and cook—collaborates with local culinary talent for the farm’s seasonal dinners, but Thigpen is handing the reins over to Spoon chef Sylvanna Mislang, where she will use the farm’s summer harvest for the ultimate farm-to-fork, multicourse vegan meal. It begins at 6:30 p.m. and tickets are $44-$46. Go to www.kingbirdfarms.com for more info.

snrsweetdeals.newsreview.com

On August 3, The Roaming Spoon announced on Twitter that it’s moving to the North Bay—“Catch us while you can.” One opportunity to catch its pop-up vegan dinner is a fourcourse meal on Friday, September 8, at the Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op’s Cooking School & Community Learning Center at 2820 R Street. It starts at 6 p.m. and ends with tomato and coconut mousse. Tickets are $55-$65 at https://sacfood. coop. Then on Sunday, September 10, Roaming Spoon will take over the

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meet the owners

with Mike Hess Brewing friday september 8

Crooked Lane will celebrate its first anniversary Sept. 15 and 16 with a special release of The Wobblor.

sour beer event

for CCBA Craft Beer Summit saturday september 9

courtesy photo

1217 21st St • 916.440.0401 www.KuprosCrafthouse.com

67

THE BREWERY YOU SHOULD KNOW ty of Our Brew mast er team has craf ted a varie rs of Aubu rn exem plar y beer s infu sed with the flavo

A Crooked YeAr Auburn brewery reflects on the supply and demand curve for its beers

536 Grass Valley Hwy • Auburn, CA • 530-878-5232

7

by DanieL barneS

n the last year, the Auburn beer scene has blossomed from an occasional daytrip excursion to a legitimate beer tourist destination. With Auburn Alehouse, Knee Deep, Moonraker, Crooked Lane, Final Gravity and more, it’s virtually impossible to take in the entire Auburn experience in a single day without seriously impairing your ability to drive back down the mountain. And yet for all the national attention devoted to breweries like Knee Deep and Moonraker, Crooked Lane is probably the most popular spot with the locals, largely due to their glorious tasting room and highly approachable beers. On Sept. 15 and 16, Crooked Lane will celebrate its first anniversary with live bands, games, German costumes and a couple of special releases. Paul Schilling Ever since The Wobblor Owner, Crooked Lane doppelbock took the silver medal for Best in Show at the California State Fair Commercial Craft Beer Competition, customers have been pestering owner Paul Schilling about its availability. “It’s a daily thing, people are always asking when we are going to have it on,” says Schilling. “It’s been brewed, it’s been kegged, and it gets better with time, but we will offer some that weekend.”

I

Speaking of getting better with time, Crooked Lane will also release 750-mL bottles of Gnarly Goat, a version of The Wobblor aged in bourbon barrels for six months. Still, Schilling says their most popular beer remains SR-16, their West-Coast-style double IPA. “We have over 80 accounts right now, bars and restaurants throughout the region, and that one is the one we move the most.” Crooked Lane’s initial plans to expand slowly were foiled by their own popularity. “We learned that if you make good beer, you’ve got to make a lot of it,” says Schilling. To that end, Crooked Lane recently increased production by adding two 30-barrel tanks and hiring more production staff. In year number two, Crooked Lane plans to install a canning line and to brew collaboration beers whenever time permits. “I know that we will be growing our barrel-aged program as well,” says Schilling. “We’ve already increased it from eight barrels starting in the late fall, and right now we have 20 in our taproom that are all filled.” If you can’t make it on Friday or Saturday, Crooked Lane will start opening at 10 a.m. on Sundays during football season, with games showing on all five of their big-screen TVs.

“Welearned thatifyoumake goodbeer, you’vegotto makealotofit.”

craft beer local sa wines tur music by day, norman & the boys

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5-10pm • purchase tickets online at www.landparktoberfest.com

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Taste among the

barrels www.dunloebrewing.com 1606 Olive Dr. | Davis, CA

09.07.17    |   SN&R   |  29


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ReviewS

Race and discomfort Photo courtesy of caPital stage

916 554-6471 2000 16th St Sacramento M-F 7:30-5:30 Sat 8-4 sacsmog.com

by Bev SykeS

Use your smart phone QR reader for more specials

An Octoroon boasts an inspired cast led by David Everett Moore in white face, Matt K. Miller in red face and Willem Long in black face. Lexy Fridell gives an absolutely inspired performance as the stereotypical Southern belle. Carissa Meagher adds a note of calmness as the octoroon, while slaves Taylor Vaughan, Tiffanie Mack and Alexandra Barthel play to stereotypes of AfricanAmerican identity. Juan Chavez steals the show as Br’er Rabbit. This play is provocative and unsettling, uncomfortable, but also hilariously funny. Audiences will either love it or hate it–but they won’t forget it.

(6284)

4 Celebration Arts seeks  new space Bun in the oven, bread in the basket.

An Octoroon

4

7 p.m.thursday, 8 p.m. friday 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. saturday, 2 p.m. sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday. $28-$40. capital stage, 2215 J street; (916) 995-5464; http://capstage.org. through october 1.

Mexican Food

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30   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17

3721 47th Ave, SAcrAmento

open M-T, 10-9 | F-S, 10-10 | Sun cloSed

Capital Stage opened its 2017-18 season last month with An Octoroon, by African-American playwright Branden Jacob-Jenkins. The playwright’s skin color is important to any critique because the play itself is a postmodern adaptation of a 19th century anti-slavery melodrama written by Irish playwright Dion Boucicault, and it is anything but politically correct. The plot is typical melodrama: A plantation is under threat of foreclosure following the death of the owner. The heir (who comes from post-slavery Ireland) doesn’t know what he’s doing. A bad guy plans to take over the plantation, sell the slaves and ravage the plantation’s so-called “octoroon”— i.e., a beautiful woman who is one-eighth black, but raised white. At the end, they discover the document that will save the plantation and the slaves. But it’s the dialogue here that will cause uneasiness among the basically white audience and conversations long afterward about the meaning of identity, continuing black-white division in the post-civil rights era, and what’s proper for the stage in today’s politically correct environment.

After 23 years in the same location, the staff at Celebration Arts is now homeless and anxiously looking for a place to land so that the company can carry on as a self-described “multi-cultural, multidiscipline performing arts organization.” According to Artistic Director James Wheatley, Celebration Arts lost its lease last month when the adjoining business decided to expand. And that’s left Wheatley scrambling to find another location where he can continue teaching and producing dance and theater that recognizes and celebrates African-American history and culture. Ever the optimist, Wheatley says he’s “a bit anxious, and quite excited about the opportunity to grow.” The theater’s current East Sacramento location is a bit off the beaten track for theater-goers, making it hard for people to find. “There was no question in our minds about the need to continue our work,” Wheatley said. “The [company’s] board [of directors] was unanimous that we must continue. And that decision is supported by our participants and patrons.” But facing high rent and few options, Wheatley admits, “Relocation is very challenging because it was not something we were planning to do. “There was no time for long-range planning and fundraising,” he says. The move will inevitably be expensive but Wheatley says he’s mindful of not passing along too many expenses to audiences. “Though our costs will increase, we still need to keep our programs and productions accessible as stated in our mission,” he said. “We’ve proven that we are here to stay, and we hope that we can greatly grow support for the organization.” For more information on ways to help call (916) 455-2787 or email celebrationarts@att.net. —Patti RobeRts


Now playiNg

5

Bloomsday

Time bends Steven  Dietz’s tale of love  found, lost and remembered as a young American  meets an Irish “Joyce Tour”  leader who changes his life.  Elisabeth Nunziato directs  an outstanding cast of four. 

Th, F 8pm, Sa 5pm and 9pm, Su 2pm, Tu 6:30pm, W 2pm and 6:30pm. Through 9/10. $27-$39.  B Street Theatre Mainstage,  2711 B Street; (916) 443-5300;   www.streettheatre.org. J.C.

3

Detroit ’67

It’s eerie how much  of the dialogue  and plot points in Detroit  ’67 resonate during these  turbulent times. Dominique  Morisseau’s play takes  place in a Detroit basement  during the city’s late ’60s  civil unrest—though the  story is basically about  siblings trying to cope  with changes in finances  and family. The plot can be  gripping, but sometimes  is overburdened with too  many issues and convenient  plot lines. The cast is a mix  of veterans and comingups, all committed to their  characters and the story. 

Th, F, Sa 8pm, Su 2pm. Through 9/17. $10-$15. Celebration 

Arts, 1721 25th Street; 4469  D Street, (916) 455-2787,  www.celebrationarts. net. P.R.

3

SHREW! A Jazz Age Musical Romp

This original musical  transfers Shakespeare’s The  Taming of the Shrew to 1930s  Paris with all the attendant  fashion, financial dealings— and, of course, romantic  intrigue.  F-Su 8pm. Through 9/17. $6-$18. Veterans  Memorial Amphitheatre, 7991  California Avenue; (916) 9663683; www.fairoakstheatre  festival.com. J.C.

3

The Old Musketeers

What has happened  to three “mature” actors who, in their prime,  portrayed the Three  Musketeers on film? In  Rodger Hoopman’s original  script, now getting its world  premiere at Chautauqua  Playhouse, we catch them  at a time when age and  experience are not so  highly praised as they  might be—until a one-off  stage reunion garners an  unexpected reception. Warren Harrison directs, with  Hoopman, Philip Pittman 

and John Haine starring. F, Sa 8pm, Su 2pm. Through 10/1.  $21. Chautauqua Playhouse  in the La Sierra Community  Center, 5325 Engle Road in  Carmichael, (916) 489-7529,  www.cplayhouse.org. J.C.

4

Water by the Spoonful

In this installment  in a trilogy by Quiara Alegría  Hudes, we’re introduced to  Elliot Ortiz, a young Marine  who returns stateside shadowed by war ghosts. The  play then flashes to an online  Alcoholics Anonymous group.  The plot-twist reason for the  seemingly separate groups  can be frustrating to grasp,  but once it all gels, there’s  a satisfying payoff. Th, Fr, Sa 8pm. Through 9/9. $12-$22. Big  Idea Theatre, 1616 Del Paso  Boulevard; (916) 960-3036;  www.bigidea  theatre.org. P.R.

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Take a pair of dueling poets, a gaggle of rapturous ladies,  a platoon of frustrated Dragoon guards and a feisty, independent milk maid and you end up with the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, Patience, presented by Light Opera Theatre  of Sacramento. Here, Bunthorne, the aesthetic poet, meets  his rival in Archibald Grosvenor, an idyllic poe. Watch the  feathers fly. This rarely performed examination of British  aestheticism is one of Gilbert & Sullivan’s funniest. 8 p.m.  Friday, September 8 and Saturday, September 9; 2 p.m.  Sunday, September 10. $15-$20. 24th Street Theatre, 2791  24th Street; (800) 838-2006; www.lots.company.

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09.07.17    |   SN&R   |   31


Another bubble bursts

Tulip Fever The collar prevents him from scratching.

3

by Jim Lane

jiml@ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

peekaboo nudity as Gwyneth Paltrow and Joseph Fiennes in Shakespeare in Love. Parallel to this is an earthier affair between Sophia’s servant Maria (Holliday Grainger) and Tulip Fever has finally whimpered its way into the fishmonger Willem (Jack O’Connell)—with theaters, after a gestation that became the stuff of more chemistry than Vikander and DeHaan. Both snickering legend. The Weinstein Company optioned stories play out against the background of the Deborah Moggach’s novel in 1999 (with, it’s said, Dutch “tulip mania” of 1636 over the recently visions of another Shakespeare in Love). It almost introduced flower (before the bubble burst in early went into production in 2004 with Shakespeare’s John 1637). The fortunes of all four lovers ride this Madden directing, but it was another ten years before boom-and-bust wave. the cameras rolled; by now the director was Justin When Maria becomes pregnant, she and Sophia Chadwick, with a script by Moggach and Shakespeare’s embark on an elaborate charade, pretending that Tom Stoppard. Its release was repeatedly announced Sophia’s the one who’s expecting. Cornelis, not and postponed. Rumors of desperate recutting having noticed that his wife is cheating circulated. Clearly, after all that, here was on him, swallows the hoax, making us a movie that would have to be superb wonder how he ever made a go of Sophia is just to be OK. his spice-import company. Things Now it’s here, and it’s … OK. a dutiful wife, become increasingly garbled in Alicia Vikander plays Sophia, a obligingly pliant the last act, suggesting that either convent orphan married to Cornelis director Chadwick (on the set) or whenever he climbs Sandvoort (Christoph Waltz), a the Weinsteins and editor Rick middle-aged Dutch merchant and aboard with his Russell (in the three years followwidower in the market for a son ‘little soldier’ ing) kept losing the thread of the and heir. In return for Sophia’s hand, story. he offers to send her younger siblings In the end, for all its handsome for a fresh start in New Amsterdam, and sets (Simon Elliott), costumes (Michael for their sakes Sophia agrees. Cornelis is a bit O’Connor) and photography (Eigil Bryld), and stodgy but he’s a decent sort, and Sophia is a dutiful for all its pedigreed cast (Cara Delevigne, Kevin wife, obligingly pliant whenever he climbs aboard with McKidd, Zach Galifianakis and Dame Judi Dench) his “little soldier,” and she lies there no doubt thinking Tulip Fever just sort of lies there like a table full of about her sisters off in America. wonderful ingredients waiting for the master chef to After three years the union remains childless. enter the kitchen and whip up either a hearty meal Cornelis, opting for another form of immortality than or a luscious confection. siring progeny, commissions a conjugal portrait of the No master chef ever shows up, though there two of them from a promising young painter, Jan Van may have been too many cooks. Ω Loos (DeHaan). One look and Sophia and Jan are smitten with each other. Before long they’re strewn across the bed in his garret, arranged in the same sort of artful

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

32   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17

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fiLm CLiPS

3

All Saints

5

Good Time

BY DANIEL BARNES & JIM LANE

An Episcopal pastor (John Corbett), sent  to close down a failing church in Tennessee, finds himself faced with an influx of dozens  of Christian refugees from Myanmar (Burma);  he decides to keep the church open as a haven,  turning the property into a farm that will provide a livelihood for the refugees and an income  to pay off the church’s debts. Steve Armour’s  script seems to presume that we’ve read the  nonfiction book by Michael Spurlock and Jeanette Windle on which it is based, and that we  can fill in all the holes. Steve Gomer’s direction  and Eduardo Enrique Mayén’s cinematography  are just serviceable, and some supporting performances are stilted. Acting at the top saves  the day—by Corbett, old pro Barry Corbin as  the town curmudgeon, and (especially) Nelson  Lee as the leader of the refugees. J.L

To his credit, Robert Pattinson has  made some bold decisions in the last  few years, choosing to work with outsider  directors instead of cashing in on his Twilight  fame. Unfortunately, even when working with  the likes of David Cronenberg, James Gray and  Werner Herzog, Pattinson continued to exude  a low-energy indifference that felt all too  reminiscent of his days as a sleepy-eyed teen  idol. That all ends with Pattinson’s ferociously  brilliant turn as Connie, the morally screwy  criminal at the center of Josh and Benny  Safdie’s outrageous New York City nightmare  Good Time. After a bank robbery gone wrong  lands his developmentally disabled brother  Nick (co-director Benny Safdie) in jail, bottleblonde con man Connie schemes to acquire his  bail money by any means necessary. Good Time  matches the do-anything relentlessness of  its lead character, making for one of the most  visceral and exciting movie experiences of the  year. D.B.

2

The Hitman’s Bodyguard

A bodyguard who’s fallen on hard times  since losing an important client to  assassination (Ryan Reynolds) gets a chance  to redeem himself by escorting a notorious  killer (Samuel L. Jackson) to testify in the  Hague against an international criminal (Gary  Oldman). Tom O’Connor’s script doesn’t know  when to quit (half an hour earlier would have  been smart); Jake Roberts’ editing is sloppy;  and director Patrick Hughes seems just along  for the ride. But Reynolds and Jackson deliver  the goods; their chemistry is strong, and their  scenes crackle, even when O’Connor gives them  nothing to say but empty profanity. And you  have to hand it to Jackson, he looks terrific for  68; he’s like an African-American Cary Grant  without the savoir faire. Elodie Yung adds  sex appeal as Reynolds’ ex-lover and fellow  bodyguard. J.L.

2

Ingrid Goes West

A lonely, mentally unstable young woman  (Aubrey Plaza), fresh out of the asylum  after cyber-stalking an Instagram acquaintance, takes all her money out of the bank,  moves to California, and starts doing it all over  again with another victim (Elizabeth Olsen). The  acting is good, but this wannabe black-comedy  riff on the dangers of social media (written by  David Branson Smith and director Matt Spicer)  misfires by breaking the first rule of comedy;  the protagonist is utterly unsympathetic. Plaza  is helpless to make her anything but a liar, a  user and an awful person. We know that all  this isn’t going to end well, and we just want to  have it over with so we can get away from this  psycho. The upbeat ending rings false because  (1) it feels tacked-on, and (2) the movie hasn’t  shown us someone who deserves it. J.L.

1

Leap!

In 19th century France, an orphan waif  (voiced by Elle Fanning) escapes from  her country orphanage with her best friend,  an aspiring inventor (Nat Wolff in the U.S., Dane  DeHaan elsewhere), to become a dancer with  the Paris Ballet. Splat! would have been a better  title; this dreary, lifeless little Canadian animated feature falls flat on its face time and again. 

DMV or couple’s therapy?

1

I Do… Until I Don’t

Oh, wow, no. Writer/director/producer/lead actress Lake Bell follows  up her underwhelming but affable 2013 debut In a World… with this  shockingly unfunny romantic comedy. The plot revolves around three utterly  revolting couples—Bell and Ed Helms as a childless duo who have lost the spark;  Mary Steenburgen and Paul Reiser as her parents, hostile and hurtling towards  divorce; and Amber Heard and Wyatt Cenac as self-identified swingers coming  to terms with their monogamy. They’re all distinctly unlikable characters with  the shrill performances to match, but none of them compares to Dolly Wells as  Vivian, a determined documentary filmmaker who manipulates the couples to  prove a point about abolishing marriage. Right down to that insipid, cutesy-poo  title, I Do…Until I Don’t plays like a succession of bullet-point clichés about love  and sex and marriage that no one ever bothered to develop, connect together  or base in any kind of reality. D.B

Writers Éric Summer (who also directed with  Éric Warin), Laurent Zeitoun and Carol Noble  haul out all the moldy clichés of the Follow Your  Dream Movie (Pre-Teen Division), cobwebs and  all, and combine them with a total lack of story  sense and an appalling grasp of history. The  result is a sort of Flashdance for the Teletubbies  set, not as obnoxiously atrocious as The Nut Job  2 (let’s hope that record stands for a while), but  really no better. J.L.

3

Menashe

Documentarian Joshua Z. Weinstein  co-writes and directs this intimate but  drab family drama set in Brooklyn’s insulated  Orthodox Jewish community. In a story largely  based on his own life, newcomer Menashe  Lustig stars as the title character, a recently  widowed shop clerk who struggles to meet the  personal and religious expectations of his family.  A consummate loser, Menashe is confronted  with his inadequacy at every turn—his boss  routinely humiliates him in front of customers and co-workers, his piously contemptuous  brother refuses to lend him any more money  and he’s not even allowed to host his own wife’s  memorial. Compounding these routine humiliations, Menashe’s son has been removed from his  home until he remarries. The Yiddish-language  Menashe wants to highlight the universality  of thorny family dynamics, but it’s better at  highlighting the universality of drearily wellintentioned Sundance drama clichés. D.B.

4

The Only Living Boy in New York

A college grad (Callum Turner) slouches  around lower Manhattan, scorning his  privileged Park Avenue upbringing and wondering what to do with his life; when he learns that  his father (Pierce Brosnan) has a mistress, he  shadows the woman (Kate Beckinsale)—but  she confronts him and virtually invites him to  seduce her, which he does. Observing it all is  the young man’s rumpled, boozy neighbor (Jeff  Bridges). Echoes of 1967’s The Graduate and the  works of Bob Dylan, Woody Allen, and Sundance  TV abound, but Allan Loeb’s script still has a few  surprises for us, and Loeb synthesizes all those  elements into a personality of its own. Marc  Webb’s direction is crisp and knowing, drawing 

fine performances all around—including from  Kiersey Clemons as Turner’s best friend and  Cynthia Nixon as his doting mother. J.L.

3

Patti Cake$

5

Wind River

This debut film from writer-director  Geremy Jasper stars Australian actress  Danielle Macdonald as the Jersey-bred Patti,  aka Killer P, an ample twenty-something   woman who works two go-nowhere jobs and  still lives with her alcoholic train wreck of a  mother (Bridget Everett), yet dreams about  meeting her hero and attaining hip-hop superstardom. The film essentially sutures the story  arc and milieu of 8 Mile onto the character details and chintzy dream sequences of Precious.  For a generous portion of its running time,  Patti Cake$ is a colorful and irresistible entertainment, driven by Macdonald’s magnetic  lead performance, a likeable ensemble cast and  a credible sense of place. But about halfway  through, the film abandons any pretense of  authenticity to become an aggressive crowdpleaser. At least Macdonald’s Patti makes the  sort of Rocky-esque underdog that rallies  audience sympathy, and a strong rooting interest carries us through when the film’s integrity  starts to crumble. D.B.

Taylor Sheridan makes his directorial  debut with Wind River, a dour murdermystery set on the desolate Wind River Indian  Reservation in Wyoming. Jeremy Renner gives  a perfunctory lead performance as Cory  Lambert, a grieving father employed by the U.S.  Fish and Wildlife Service as a predator hunter  on the reservation. While tracking a family  of mountain lions in the snow, Cory stumbles  across the frozen body of a dead Native American girl, a discovery that rekindles repressed  memories of his own deceased daughter. Cory  assists the woefully unprepared FBI agent  (Elizabeth Olsen) who gets sent to investigate,  but he may be harboring his own vigilante  agenda. Wind River builds slowly, and a little of  Sheridan’s klutzy predator-prey symbolism  goes a long way, but he also shows a genuine  knack for steadily building tension, finally allowing it to explode in an excellent final act. D.B.

09.07.17    |   SN&R   |   33


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Uptempo melancholy Chris Fairman lays down artistic sincerity  with latest album #OAKLAND by Matt KraMer

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layers of longing in his voice as it swims in a gentle stream of instrumentation. Fairman explores themes of love and personal insecurity openly in his lyrics. For instance, on the fourth track “Walls,” he opines: “I hide behind these walls, / I don’t want you to see me fall, / and I fall down all the time.” In his writing, Fairman said he tries to allow the creative spark to catch fire naturally. “I learned a long time ago not to push myself too much, and to a Mouseketeers shirt is only ironic if you wear it with a lack trust myself,” Fairman explained of enthusiasm. of his songwriting process. “It kind of comes in flows.” Fairman creates art, whether it be music or paintDreamy guitar filters and painfully real lyrics ing, as the mood strikes him. His latest album’s title mark Christopher Fairman’s new album #OAKLAND. draws on Fairman’s sense of humor—and his love for It shows what he does best: soul searching lyrics and the Bay Area. haunting melodies. “I just thought it was a funny, silly thing to have Fairman, 32, a native Sacramento resident, said a hashtag in the album title. I’d never seen it before,” he doesn’t have any specific expectations or agenda Fairman said, and added that the cover photo for the for his music—to him, the most important thing is album drew inspiration from a ’90s hip-hop vibe. creation. Of all the songs on #OAKLAND, Fairman said “I kind of had an epiphany about two years ago that only the final track, “Stuck in The about music,” Fairman said. “I’ve been doing Middle,” was actually new. it since I was 16 and always wanted to “Most of the songs are older be some kind of rock star or whatever, songs that I’ve maybe recorded “I learned but I really don’t care about that before but didn’t like how they a long time ago anymore. I’m just trying to make turned out,” Fairman explained. good art.” not to push myself “I didn’t put them out for a Having worked with critically reason, I guess. The last song too much, and to trust acclaimed artists like Chelsea was the only real new song, myself.” Wolfe and recorded in a studio run [and] I finished that song … on by indie musician John Vanderslice, the way to the studio.” Christopher Fairman it appears Fairman’s rock star dreams After three days of recording local indie artist were realized on a level that most only at Tiny Telephone, #OAKLAND dream of—even if that’s not his goal was the result. anymore. His other goal, to make good art, is Though the band’s plans for a tour realized on #OAKLAND. are hampered by their other jobs—and the fact that Recorded at Vanderslice’s Tiny Telephone all three members live in different cities around recording studio in San Francisco, #OAKLAND is a California—they aren’t stopping at the release show. six-song atmospheric indie-dreamwave pop record— Fairman and the band plan to make a music video for and it delivers. The songs and musical style resemble each song on #OAKLAND and are planning a one-off indie-outfits British Sea Power or O’Brother in their show in Los Angeles later in the year. Ω melancholy yet upbeat pace. He carries it all with solid songwriting chops. Fairman’s sound on #OAKLAND seems perfected. Check out Christopher fairman monday, september 11 at harlow’s. the Chalk it up to the studio or to his chemistry with #oaKlanD debut show will start at 7 p.m., costs $10, and is all ages. more bandmates Christopher Vogel (bass, synth and piano) information and fairman’s music can be found at and Andy Miller (guitar and drums). Fairman’s vocal https://christopherfairman.bandcamp.com. and guitar work shine on #OAKLAND, blending


foR the week of SeptembeR 07

by KATE GONZALES

snr c a le nd a r @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

online listings will be considered for print. Print listings are edited for space and accuracy. Deadline for print listings is 5 p.m. Wednesday. Deadline for Nightlife listings is midnight sunday. send photos and reference materials to calendar editor Kate Gonzales at snrcalendar@newsreview.com.

POST EVENTS ONLINE FOR FREE AT

www.newsreview.com/sacramento

WORTHY GOAT: With The Phantom Jets, Doctor  Striker, Hits and Misses 800   8pm, $7  Old  Ironsides, 1901 10th St.

8pm, $20-$25.  Harlow’s Restaurant &  Nightclub, 2708 J St.

TRASH ROCK AT THE PRESS CLUB: DJs play their  favorite trash.   9pm, no cover.  The Press  Club, 2030 P St.

sAturDAy, 9/9 27 OUTLAWS: Northern California country band.  9pm, Free.  Sauced BBQ & Spirits, 1028 7th St.

SUN VALLEY GUN CLUB: With 50 Watt Heavy, The  Mutineers.  9pm, $7.  Old Ironsides, 1901  10th St.

XOCHITL: Singer-songwriter and guitarist  performs as part of Sac State UNIQUE  Program’s Wednesday Nooner concert  series.  12pm, no cover.  Serna Plaza at  Sacramento State, 6000 J St.

V101’S BIG BLOCK PARTY: Keith Sweat,  Blackstreet, Bobby Brown. Music, fashion,  food, drink and contests.   5:30pm, $49-$66.   Thunder Valley Casino, 1200 Athens Ave. in  Lincoln.

CALIFORNIA VIBES: Celebrating Sacramento 

SAT

Photo courtesy of Nicolle clemetsoN

09

Watch amateurs have sex on the big screen.

A pornographic buffet Crest theatre, 8 P.M., $20-$30 The film festival that is changing what it  means to look like a porn star is cumming— ahem, coming—back to Sacramento. Dan  Savage’s HUMP! Film Festival brings  FILM homemade dirty little films to the  big screen in a celebration of diversity and  sex positivity. And they are little—the films.  Less than five minutes each, all submitted by nonprofessionals. This showcase of 

talent with live sets from That Kid Raja &  Charm The Riot, Sparks Across Darkness and  Kennedy Wrose.  8pm, $8.  Shine, 1400 E St.

THE CRIPPLE CREEK BAND: Country rock.  10pm,

$10. Powerhouse Pub, 614 Sutter St. in Folsom.

JA’NET MILLER: Sacramento native and longtime  singer/writer.  8pm, no cover.  WHIRED Wine,  410 L St.

KANSAS: LEFTOVERTURE 40TH ANNIVERSARY 

TOUR: Classic rock.   7:30pm, $75-$150.  Bob  Hope Theatre, 242 E. Main St. in Stockton.

THE MAGPIE SALUTE: Rock band formed by  former Black Crowes guitarist Rich Robinson  7pm, $30.  Ace Of Spades, 1417 R St.

THE SCRATCH OUTS: With Sacto Storytellers, 

The Inciters, Celestions.   8:30pm, $10.  Blue  Lamp, 1400 Alhambra Blvd.

amateurs and wannabees is curated to show  audiences a diversity of backgrounds, body  types, genders and kinks. If buxom blondes  and beefcake dudes are the McDonald’s of  porn, HUMP! delivers a buffet for all kinds  of sexual appetites. But don’t worry, you’ll  still get your beefcake. Yummy. 1013 K Street,  https://humpfilmfest.com.

SECOND SATURDAY CONCERT: Arts & Leisure,  The Aerosols, VASAS. Purple Pig Eats will sell  California soul food. Proceeds from beer  sales go to Sacramento Bicycle Kitchen.  6pm, no cover.  Sacramento Bicycle Kitchen,  1915 I St.

THIS IS MIDTOWN SUMMER FINALE: Say so long  to summer ’17 with music from Blu J, Casino  Gold, Shaun Slaughter and more. Beer  garden, vendors, comedy, art.  4pm, no cover.   MARRS Building, 1050 20th St.

LALAH HATHAWAY: Soul and jazz vocalist/pianist 

thursDAy, 9/7 DINORAH SOLO CONCERT: SAMMIE Awardwinner sings and plays guitar renditions  of traditional Latin, American and  contemporary music.  6pm, Free.  Mesa  Mercado Restaurant, 6241 Fair Oaks Blvd,  Suite B in Carmichael.

EMO NIGHT SACRAMENTO LIVE!: Three bands  play 20 emo hits, in this live version of the  monthly Emo Night party. Night ends with DJ  sets. Bring your tissues.  8pm, $7.  The Press  Club, 2030 P St.

JONATHAN BUTLER: With Jonathan Butler. 

7:30pm, $45-$79. McClellan Conference Center, 5411 Luce Ave. in McClellan.

FOLSOM LAKE SYMPHONY: The final show of  this year’s Live on the Boulevard Thursday  Evening Concerts series.  6:30pm, no cover.  

El Dorado Hills Town Center, 4364 Town  Center Blvd. in El Dorado Hills.

MARTY COHEN AND THE SIDEKICKS: English pub  presents the trio on the first Thursday of  each month.  8pm, no cover.  Fox & Goose,  1001 R St.

MINUS THE BEAR: Seattle indie rock band.  7pm, $25.  Ace Of Spades, 1417 R St.

MOON BOOTS: Brooklyn producer on tour for his  debut album, First Landing.  10pm, no cover.   District 30, 1022 K St.

NASH BROTHERS: Portland-based country 

group.  9pm, no cover.  Powerhouse, 614  Sutter St. in Folsom.

PINE STREET RAMBLERS: With Micha Shnabel.  9pm, $6.  Torch Club, 904 15th St.

MARIA MULDAUR & HER RED HOT BLUESIANA BAND: The blues and R&B queen and her band  kick off the Thursday Night Live at the Plaza  September Summer Concert Series.  7pm,

no cover.  Heritage Plaza, 701 Main St. in  Woodland.

friDAy, 9/8 BLU & EXILE: Hip-hop duo celebrate a decade  since releasing their debut album, in the  Below the Heavens 10 Year Anniversary Tour.  7pm, $15-$20.  Momo Lounge, 2708 J St.

JETHRO TULL’S MARTIN BARRE BAND: Longtime  Jethro Tull guitarist and Grammy winner  Martin Barre’s band performs.  8pm, $30-35.   Harlow’s, 2708 J St.

MURDERBURGERS: With City Mouse, At Both 

Ends and Day Labor.  8pm.  Cafe Colonial,  3520 Stockton Blvd.

QUIET RIOT: With Roswell and Anarchy 

Lace.  7pm, $22. Ace Of Spades, 1417 R St.

ROCKOLOGY: Classic rock tribute band.   10pm, $10.  Powerhouse Pub, 614 Sutter St. in 

Folsom.

sAturDAy, 9/9 12AVO FESTIVAL DE LA COMIDA PERUANA: Sample  cuisine from Peru along with music, dancing  and more in this family-friendly festival  hosted by Club Peru of Sacramento.  11am, $3.  Ben Ali Shriners Center, 3262 Marysville  Blvd.

CRAWFISH & CATFISH FESTIVAL: Enjoy two days  of down-home food, fun, music and dancing  Louisiana style.  11am. $7.50-$15.  Yolo County  County Fairgrounds, 1250 East Gum Ave. in  Woodland.

POLISH AMERICAN FESTIVAL: Enjoy the taste of  Poland and the sights and sounds of Polish  and Ukrainian folk dancing, polka bands  and more. Hosted by The Polish American  Group of Greater Sacramento.  Noon, no cover.  The Polish American Group of Greater  Sacramento, 327 Main St. in Roseville.

RUSSIAN FESTIVAL: Experience Russian culture  with traditional food, dance, music, art  and activities for children. Pick up Russian  souvenirs and literature. $3-$5.  11am. Holy  Ascension Church, 714 13th St.

VIDEO GAME EXTRAVAGANZA: Celebrate National  Video Game Day (Sept. 12) with retro  arcade games, tournaments, developer  demonstrations and more.  11am. $5-$10.   Square One Clubs, 9342 Tech Center Drive.

suNDAy, 9/10 CRAWFISH & CATFISH FESTIVAL: See festival 

DUSK: With Cherry Death, Andrew Diamond 

Henderson.   5pm.  The Press Club, 2030 P St.

music

festiVAls

and songwriter performs.  8pm, $26-$99.   Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.

description on 9/9.   11am. $7.50-$15.  Yolo  County County Fairgrounds, 1250 East Gum  Ave. in Woodland.

SACRAMENTO ANTIQUE FAIRE: Browse through 

SZA: R&B songwriter and performer with a 

special guest.   7pm, $27-$87.  Ace Of Spades,  1417 R St.

tuesDAy, 9/12

vintage clothes, art, jewelry, furniture and  more until you make a unique discovery.  300 vendors from California, Nevada and  neighboring states.  6:30am. $3.  2350 21st  Street.

40TH ANNUAL JEWISH FOOD FAIRE: Spend the day 

AGAINST ME!: Punk band performs with 

Bleached and The Dirty Nil.  6:30pm, $23.  Ace  Of Spades, 1417 R St.

THE CHURCH: Australian alternative rock band.  8pm, $22.50-$99.  Harlow’s, 2708 J St.

THE VIBRATORS: 1970s U.K. punk band. With Black  Saddle Hookers, Jesus & The Dinosaurs. 

enjoying music and dancing, perusing arts  and crafts vendors and of course, eating all  the modern and traditional Jewish cuisine  you can handle! Feast on corned beef or  pastrami sandwiches, lox and bagels, latkes,  a selection of breads and more.  9am, no cover.  Congregation Beth Shalom, 4746 El  Camino Ave. in Carmichael.

7pm, $10.  Blue Lamp, 1400 Alhambra Blvd.

WeDNesDAy, 9/13 MARSHALL CRENSHAW Y LOS STRAIGHTJACKETS:  Co-headliners with special guest RJ Bloke. 

CALENDAR LISTINGS CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

09.07.17    |   SN&R   |   35


see more events and submit your own at newsreview.com/sacramento/calendar

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CaLendar ListinGs Continued From PaGe 35

Food & drinK thursday, 9/7 Ca CraFt beer summit: See event highlight  at right.  10am, $99-$299.  Sacramento  Convention Center Complex, 1400 J St.

urban roots CoLLaboration reLease Party: 

University Art

A new Sacramento brewery, Urban Roots  Brewing, is opening this fall. Until then, sip  on three collaboration beers between Urban  Roots head brewer Peter Hoey and Alvarado  Street, Three Weavers and Cellarmaker  brewing companies. Ticket includes limited  Empress Tavern menu options.  6pm, $34.50.   Empress Tavern, 1013 K St.

Friday, 9/8 CaLiFornia CraFt beer summit: See 

Back to School NOW THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30TH

GREAT SAVINGS on all the art supplies you need! pant, brushes, pencils, markers, journals, pads, notebooks, scissors & more!

event highlight at right.  9am, $99$299. Sacramento Convention Center  Complex, 1400 J St.

saturday, 9/9 Ca CraFt beer summit beer FestivaL: Craft  brewers from around the Golden State will  pour tastings of more beers than you can  fit into one afternoon. But you can still try.  Summit Beer Festival closes out the CA Craft  Beer Summit.  11:45am, $60.  Capitol Mall.

Farm to every Fork 2017: See event highlight 

on page 38.  5pm, $150.  St. John’s Lutheran  Church, 1701 L St.

oto’s marketPLaCe 50tH anniversary CeLebration: The popular Japanese  marketplace hosts a two-day anniversary  party with live music and dancing, food  tastings and demonstrates, special sales and  more.  10am, no cover.  Oto’s Marketplace,  4990 Freeport Blvd.

10am, no cover.  Oto’s Marketplace, 4990 

Freeport Blvd.

tuesday, 9/12

Universityart.com

Los autentiCos—tHe “reaL” meXiCan Food movement: Monthly “Food for Thought”  series organizes discussions with those who  keep us fed. This month’s talk on Mexican  cuisine features restaurateur panelists Art  Aguilar and Max Archuleta (Cantina Alley),  Ernesto Delgado (La Cosecha, Tequila Museo  Mayahuel), Lisandro Madrigal, (Chando’s  Tacos, Chando’s Cantina).  5:30pm, $10.  Casa  de Español, 1101 R St.

veGan Curries: Learn to create vegan curries  and accompanying dishes. Ticket price  includes glass of wine for students 21+.  6pm,

36   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17

Cooking School, 2820 R St.

wednesday, 9/13 unHomed: a beneFit For tHe Humans oF saCramento: Enjoy a rooftop garden  party with food, music and drinks while  supporting Sacramento’s residents who  live without food and shelter. Ticket sales  benefit organizations serving the homeless  population, Next Move and Francis House.  6:30pm, $50-$60.  Rooftop Garden at the  Emerald Tower, 300 Capital Mall.

Film tamPoPo: This Japanese homage to ramen told 

oto’s marketPLaCe 50tH anniversary CeLebration: See event description on 9/9. 

Redwood City San Jose Sacramento

$45-$55.  Community Learning Center & 

GrandParents’ PiCniC: Celebrate  Grandparents Day outside at the 2017  Grandparents’ Picnic. Bring your family and  a picnic lunch, and enjoy games and activities  sponsored by Generation Bridge and City of  West Sacramento Parks & Recreation.  11am, no cover.  Linden Park, 2601 Summerfield  Drive in West Sacramento.

Photo By anne stoKes

Think you know everything about craft beer? Think again! The California  Craft Beer Summit is the place to deepen your knowledge and appreciation of craft beer, as top brewers and others gather to educate  beer lovers. The three-day celebration of craft  Food & drink beer includes food and beer pairings, educational  sessions on topics like cannabis and beer and opportunities to learn  from the industry’s best. Maybe you’ll be there when the next great  collaboration is born. The weekend ends with the Summit Beer Festival,  the largest beer festival on the West Coast with more than 160 breweries providing endless pours between the Capitol and Tower Bridge. It’s a  beer-lover’s dream and the perfect way to bid summer farewell. 1400 J  Street, www.californiacraftbeer.com.

thursday, 9/7

Sacramento’s most experienced bartenders  compete in this event that kicks off  Sacramento Cocktail Week. Whiskey drink  specials.  2pm, no cover.  Old Ironsides, 1901  10th St.

916-443-5721

Ca Craft beer summit & beer Festival SACRAMENTO CONVENTION CENTER, $60-$299

sunday, 9/10

tHe masters bartendinG ComPetition: 

2601 J Street Sacramento

thursday, 9/7 through saturday, 9/9

in a series of funny vignettes has been called  “one of the best food movies of all time.”  Part of Crocker Art Museum’s Foreign Fall  Film Series. Noodle-making demonstration  before the film.  6:30pm, $6-$18.  Crocker  Art Museum, 216 O St.

Friday, 9/8 nevada City FiLm FestivaL: Celebrate 17 years  of indie film in the Gold Country with this  popular festival called “the Sundance of  the Sierra.” The seven-day festival kicks  off Thursday with a screening of A Trip to  the Moon, and officially opens Friday with  Gimme Danger, a film and music tribute to  Iggy Pop. More than 100 short and feature  films, comedy, interactive experiences and  parties through 9/15.  times vary. $10-$89.   Locations vary.

saturday, 9/9 dan savaGe’s HumP! FiLm FestivaL: See event  highlight on page 35. 8pm. $25-$30.  Crest  Theatre, 1013 K St.

movies in tHe Park: GHostbusters: Gather  with neighbors for this free screening of  the 2016 version of Ghostbusters. Popcorn,  drinks, food and beer will be available for  sale, benefiting the Front Street Animal  Shelter.  7:30pm, no cover.  Southside Park,  2115 6th St.

nevada City FiLm FestivaL: See event 

description on 9/8.  times vary. $10-$89.   Locations vary.

sunday, 9/10 nevada City FiLm FestivaL: See event 

description on 9/8.  times vary. $10-$89.   Locations vary.

monday, 9/11 nevada City FiLm FestivaL: See event 

description on 9/8.  times vary. $10-$89.   Locations vary.

tuesday, 9/12 tHe vietnam war: KVIE Public Television hosts  a preview screening of Ken Burns’ and  Lynn Novick’s war documentary. Includes  a reception with light refreshments and  a panel discussion after the screening.  5:30pm, no cover.  KVIE Public Television, 2030  West El Camino Ave.

wednesday, 9/13 run4saLmon saCramento ConCert: Live  musical performances and a screening of the  film, The Salmon Will Run. Concert supports  the Winnemem Wintu tribe’s salmon  protection efforts.  6:30pm, $15-$20.  Crest  Sacramento, 1013 K St.

tHe vietnam war: See event description on 

9/12.  6pm, no cover.  Janet Leigh Theatre,  3601 Pacific Ave. in Stockton.

comedy bLaCktoP Comedy: Game Night: Improv for  Everyone. Say “yes” and develop characters  in games fashioned after the show Whose  Line Is It Anyway?.  7pm, 9/7. $10. Diego  Cruel Live Album Recording. The stand-up  comic performs for the recording of his  live album.   8pm Friday, 9/8. Through 9/9.  $12.      3101 Sunset Blvd., Suite 6A in Rocklin.

CsZ saCramento: ComedySportz Improv.  Hilarious, spontaneous, interactive improv  comedy for all ages.   8pm Friday, 9/8. $10$12. 2230 Arden Way, Suite B. Dual Duel  Improv Comedy Tournament. Two 12-person  improv teams compete for laughs. Round 


Comedy SPoT: Comedy Exchange. The perfect  blend of stand-up and improv, hosted by  Melissa McGillicuddy.   8pm Friday, 9/8. Through 1/11. $8.50. The Friday Show — The  Premiere! Variety show with stand-up, music  and an improv segment where scenes are  created from reviews and posts on websites  like Craigslist.   9pm Friday, 9/8. $12.   1050  20th St., Suite 130.

HARLoW’S: A Night of Stand-up with Martín  Moreno. Discover how this comic defines  “soul mate” and more about his personal life  through his stand-up act.   9pm Thursday, 9/7. $17-$30. 2708 J St.

LAUGHS UNLImITed Comedy CLUB: There Goes  the Neighborhood Comedy Jam. Featuring  Cisco Duran.   8pm Thursday, 9/7. $15. Mark  G @ Laughs Unlimited. With Sterling  Scott.   10:30pm Friday, 9/8. $20.   SF Comedy  Competition — Preliminary Round. Week one  of the 42nd Annual San Francisco Comedy  Competition makes a stop in Sacramento,  bringing 15 of the next possible comic legends  to compete.   8pm Friday, 9/8. $20.   JR. De  Guzman. With Sterling Scott. For special  fundraiser pricing for Stephen Reese  Fundraiser show on Sunday at 7pm, use  promo code “Donato.”    8pm Saturday, 9/9. Through 9/10. $20.  1207 Front St. 

momo LoUNGe: Comedy Burger. With Ngaio 

Bealum.   7pm Sunday, 9/10. $12.50. 2708 J St.

PUNCH LINe: Josh Blue.   8pm Thursday, 9/7.

Through 9/9. $25. The Durst Case Scenario.  Celebrated comic and political satirist Will  Durst explores a changing America during  the “time of Trump.”   7pm Sunday, 9/10. $18.50.   Deaf Puppies Comedy Night. The Deaf  Puppies are a comedy collective who mix  stand up and sketch.  8pm Wednesday, 9/13. $15.   2100 Arden Way.

THe UNIVeRSITy UNIoN: Comedy Night With Joel  Kim Booster & Friends. See event highlight  below.  7:30pm Thursday, 9/7. No cover. The  University Union at Sacramento State  University, 6000 J St.

Tommy T’S Comedy CLUB: Entertainer and 

comic Carlos Mencia.  7:30pm, 9/8. Through 9/10. $40. 12401 Folsom Blvd. in Rancho  Cordova.

916 INK: Hot Literary Nights. An evening of  entertainment, word, whimsy and wine.  Features a combination of music and poetry  from local spoken word artists The Soft  Offs, Anna Marie and Lawrence E Dinkins Jr.,  a reading by Sacramento’s Poet Laureate  Indigo Moor, literary-inspired cakes and  cocktails and more. Ticket sales benefit 916  Ink, which promotes literacy and helps young  people become confident writers.   6:30pm Saturday, 9/9. $45. 3301 37th Ave.

ARdeN-dImICK LIBRARy: Pete Seeger: How  Can I Keep from Singing? In this one-man  performance, Tim Holt portrays Pete Seeger  as he tells his life story and sings songs from  the chapters in his life.  3pm Saturday, 9/9. No cover. 891 Watt Ave.

B STReeT THeATRe: The Absolute Brightness  of Leonard Pelkey. A Jersey Shore mystery  unravels due to the efforts of a dogged  yet peculiar detective.  Through 9/7. $27$39. Bloomsday. In Steven Dietz’s new love  story, time travel and James Joyce help  illuminate the lives of Robbie and Cat, who  meet in Ireland.   Through 9/10. $32-$39.   2711  B St.

CLARA — SACRAmeNTo BALLeT: Nutcracker  auditions. Be a part of Sacramento’s crown  jewel of holiday entertainment.   8:30am. Through 9/10. No cover. 2420 N Street. www. eventbrite.com

CALIFoRNIA STAGe ComPLeX: The Tempest.  considered one of Shakespeare’s greatest  works, this lyrical play tells the story of  Prospero, an exiled duke who reigns over  an enchanted island where fantastical  creatures, mystery, music and romance  abound. Produced and performed by by  the Actor’s Workshop of Sacramento at the  California Stage Complex.   Through 10/8. $20. 1721 25th St.

where’s the best trivia night ?

4.   10pm Friday, 9/8. Through 9/22. $8.   2230  Arden Way, Ste B., 916-243-8541. 

CAPITAL STAGe: An Octoroon. The award-

INGREDIENTS:

winning play by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins  is an adaptation of Dion Boucicault’s The  Octoroon, a melodrama on slavery.   Through 10/1. $17.50-$40. 2215 J St.

ORGANIC TOBACCO ORGANIC MENTHOL

dAVIS mUSICAL THeATRe ComPANy: Jekyll &  Hyde. Based on Robert Louis Stevenson’s  classic thriller, this gripping tale chronicles a  brilliant gone horrifically awry, set to a poprock score.   Through 9/8. $14-$18. 607 Pena  Dr, # 10 in Davis

VISIT AMERICANSPIRIT.COM OR CALL 1-800-435-5515 PROMO CODE 96726

LIGHT oPeRA THeATRe oF SACRAmeNTo: 

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Patience. Wit, humor and beautiful music  come together in this short comedic opera  that makes light of the aesthetic movement 

CIGARETTES

2509 R ST- THRee PeNNy THeATRe: Fool for  Love/A Poster of the Cosmos. Two one-act  plays.  Through 9/23. $10. 2509 R St.

Comedy Night with Joel Kim Booster & Friends SACRAMENTO STATE UNIVERSITY UNION BALLROOM, 7:30 P.M., NO COVER

Born in South Korea, raised in Chicago and claimed by Brooklyn, Joel  PhOTO COurTEsy MINdy TuCKEr Kim Booster comes to Sacramento  State this week. He jokes about dating and growing up gay and Asian in a  white American household as he performs with local comComedy ics Ngaio Bealum and Daniel Humbarger. What might be most  charming is his humility in the wake of appearing on Conan. It may be your  only chance to see Joel Kim Booster free before he blows up on the comedy  scene. 6000 J St, ihatejoelkim.com.

ON STANDS

Thursday, 9/7

September 21

CALeNdAR LISTINGS CoNTINUed oN PAGe 38

©2017 SFNTC (3)

*Plus applicable sales tax

Offer for one “1 for $3” Gift Certificate good for any Natural American Spirit cigarette product (excludes RYO pouches and 150g tins). Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. Offer and website restricted to U.S. smokers 21 years of age and older. Limit one offer per person per 12 month period. Offer void in MA and where prohibited. Other restrictions may apply. Offer expires 12/31/17.

’17

Sacramento’S newS and entertainment weekly. on StandS every thurSday. Sacramento News and Review 07-06-17_09-07-17.indd 1

09.07.17    |   SN&R   |   37 6/26/17 10:24 AM


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SATURDAY, 9/9 CALENDAR LISTINGS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

of the late 19th-century England. Through

9/8. $15-$20. 2791 24th St.

THEATRE IN THE HEIGHTS: A Thousand Clowns. Centered on the unemployed bachelor uncle Murray Burns as he tries to rear his precocious nephew in New York City. Through 9/17. $15. 8215 Auburn Blvd., Suite G Citrus Heights.

VETERAN’S MEMORIAL AMPHITHEATRE: SHREW!

BUY 1 GET 1 1/2 OFF Buy any dinner entree at regular price, get the second for HALF OFF! Must present coupon, cannot combine with other discounts. One per table. Valid Mon-Thu only. Expires 09/13/17.

A Jazz Age Musical Romp. An original adaptation of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, set in 1930s Paris against a backdrop of competing fashion houses and swing jazz. Through 9/17. $12-$18. 7991 California Ave. in Fair Oaks.

and Sally Baker team up around an Asian theme. 6pm Saturday, 9/9. No cover. Gang of 5 Studio. Shirley Hazlett featured. Through 10/1. No cover. 1021 R St.

Happy Hour

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38

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Sacramento has made a name for itself as the America’s Farm to Fork capital. But if PHOTO cOURTESY OF DEBBIE cUNNINGHAM we’re going to do it right, we need to make sure all of our neighbors have a seat at FOOD & DRINK the dinner table. This community dinner makes that possible. Tickets include hors d’oeuvres, drinks and a healthy meal not only for the paid attendee, but for a second guest who is experiencing poverty or homelessness. Feed your soul when you help feed others during this dinner, which benefits Oak Park Sol, Angels of the Fields and the Sacramento Homeless Organizing Committee. 1701 L St., www.farmtoeveryfork.org.

ART ARTHOUSE: Asian Inspired. Taylor Gutermute

Voted “Best of Sacramento” 3 years in a row!

Farm to Every Fork Community Dinner ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH, 5 P.M., $150

CALIFORNIA MUSEUM: Art & Advocacy. An exhibit of original works by developmentally disabled artists who live across California. Marks the 40th anniversary of the Lanterman Act (AB 846), the law giving developmentally ddisabled Californians the right to services and supports needed to live independently. Through 9/17. $9. 1020 O St.

CROCKER ART MUSEUM: Full Spectrum Paintings by Raimonds Staprans. Latvian-born painter whose works reflect more than six decades in Northern California. Through 10/8. $5-$10. Kingsley Art club Evaluation Day. Bring in your antiques to see what they’re worth! Call 916-808-7752 to schedule an appointment. 10am Tuesday, 9/12. $12-$55. 216 O St.

SACRAMENTO STATE LIBRARY GALLERY: Last Words. A memorial to our final words, by installation artist Julia Couzens. All the quotes are anonymous, with some from famous people, and others from those known only by family and friends. Special reception 5-8 p.m. Sept. 7, and a lecture 3-5 p.m. Thur. Oct. 12, in the gallery. Opening reception 5pm Thursday, 9/7. Through 12/15. No cover. 6000 J St.., 916-278-4189.

TIM COLLOM GALLERY: New Works by Tim

Collom. Through 9/9. No cover. 915 20th St.

VERGE CENTER FOR THE ARTS: Sac Open Studios Launch Party + Guerrilla Girls Opening. Sac Open Studios kicks off with a free launch party at the gallery, with local food and beverages, activities for kids and live art and music. 6pm Thursday, 9/7. No cover. 625 S St.

WILLIAM JAMES STEWART GALLERY: Second Saturday. Inaugural William James Stewart Gallery reception and open house, with paintings by Ellen McMahill. 5:30pm. Through 7/14. No cover. 1809 19th St.

ARTSPACE1616: Lynn Criswell and Michael Bishop Exhibit. Second Saturday artist reception. 6pm Saturday, 9/9. Through 10/28. No cover. 1616 Del Paso Blvd.

MUSEUMS CALIFORNIA AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM: Classic Car Appreciation Weekend. Enjoy a leisurely endof-summer celebration looking at classic

cars. 10am. Through 9/10. $5-$10. Fly Brave Fashion Show/Silent Auction. Thirty models with developmental disabilities strut down the catwalk in outfits they created to reflect who they are. 4pm Saturday, 9/10. $20. 2200 Front St.

CALIFORNIA MUSEUM: Light & Noir Exiles & Émigrés in Hollywood, 1933-1950. Highlights the history of émigres in the American film industry who fled Europe as refugees of Nazi persecution and their legacy in American cinema through the film noir genre. The exhibit features rare artifacts and memorabilia from 16 iconic films. Through 10/15. $9. Patient No More: People with Disabilities Securing Civil Rights. Chronicles the lives and legacies of Californians whose activism launched the American disability rights movement. Through 11/5. $9. 1020 O St.

CALIFORNIA STATE RAILROAD MUSEUM: Off The Clock. This playful exhibit focuses on the variety of sports clubs, teams and athletic competitions that attracted Southern Pacific employees in the early- to mid1900s. Through 6/1. $10-$15. 111 I St.

SACRAMENTO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Cultural Connections. A weekly class exploring cultures from all over the world. This week’s topic is German castles. 10am. Through 11/10. 2701 Prospect Park Drive, Suite 120 in Rancho Cordova.

STANFORD GALLERY: Volunteer Open House. California State Parks, the California State Railroad Museum & Foundation and Old Sacramento State Historic Park recruit adult volunteers. 1pm Saturday, 9/9. No cover. 111 I St.

SPORTS & OUTDOORS FRIDAY, 9/8 BUBBLEMANIA: Bubble snakes, bouncing bubbles, huge bubbles and bubble volcanoes—this fun family event has it all! 3:30pm, no cover. McKinley Library, 601 Alhambra Blvd.

SATURDAY, 9/9 2017 COYOTE CRAWL FUN RUN FAMILY AND COMMUNITY EVENT: Whether you participate in the 100-yard dash, half mile or full mile fun run/walk, there will be cheers and good times at the finish line! 8am, $12. Korematsu Elementary, 3100 Loyola Drive in Davis.

BLACKLIGHT SLIDE: See event highlight on

page TKTKTKTK. 4pm, $50. Raley Field, 400 Ballpark Drive in West Sacramento.

CHALLENGE FAILURE 2017 5K & 10K: Runners and walkers of all ages and abilities welcome to this fundraiser for Challenge Failure, a nonprofit committed to preventing heart failure. 8am, $30. William Land Park, Sutterville Road and 19th St.

MOVE WITH PURPOSE LAUNCH PARTY: Come celebrate the launch of Move With Purpose at McKinley Park! Family-friendly event with bounce houses, games, music and food provided by Burgess Brothers. Donations go to Move With Purpose, an organization that opens up dance opportunities to people with special needs. 1pm, $20-$30. McKinley Park, 601 Alhambra Blvd.

SACRAMENTO PLAY SUMMIT: Celebrate the act of playing — the most important work of childhood that sets the foundation for physical, emotional and cognitive well-being. The 5th annual Sacramento Play Summit welcomes adults who work with children to learn to incorporate play into daily and school life. 9am, $50-$60. Fairytale Town, 3901 Land Park Dr.

WRIGHTS LAKE TO TWIN LAKES HIKE: Beat the late summer heat and make new hiking buddies on an 8-mile guided Sierra hike, with an approximately 1,000-foot elevation gain. 8am, $5-$10. American River Conservancy, 348 Hwy. 49 in Coloma.

SUNDAY, 9/10 9/11 RUN TO REMEMBER 5K: This Sept. 11 memorial run gives those who vowed to “never forget” an opportunity to exercise that vow. 7:30am, $25-$35. Capitol Mall, 4th and Capitol.

RIDE THE PARKWAY: Get on your bike and ride! With routes for different types of bikes and ability levels, and a post-ride festival with a barbecue lunch, live music, and a beer and wine garden, this ride is a fun way to support the American River Parkway Foundation. 7am, $40-$125. William B. Pond Recreation Area, 5700 Arden Way in Carmichael.

LGBTQ THURSDAY, 9/7 20 SOMETHINGS GROUP: Youth Group for those

age 20-29. 8pm, no cover. The Sacramento LGBT Community Center, 1927 L St.


IN THE KNOW QPOC GROUP: Queer People of Color  discussion group. Staff use only: Annette  Melvin  6pm, no cover.  The Sacramento LGBT  Community Center, 1927 L St.

OUTWORD MAGAZINES LIQUID THERAPY MONTHLY HAPPY HOUR MIXER:   12pm, no cover.   Badlands, 2003 K St.

SUNDAY, 9/10 PANSEXUAL PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Are you  Pansexual? Do you love pancakes? Perfect!  Breakfast held every second Sunday, with  $5 donations welcomed.  11am, $5.  The  Sacramento LGBT Community Center, 1927  L St.

TAKE ACTION THURSDAY, 9/7 TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGES AND CLIMATE ADAPTATION WORKSHOP: Hear  from Tribal representatives about their  work addressing climate impacts using  Traditional Ecological Knowledges. They’ll  also discuss current challenges and barriers  to implementation and opportunities to  collaborate. Hosted by the Capital Region  Climate Readiness Collaborative and the  Environmental Justice Coalition for Water.  1pm, no cover.  West Sacramento Community  Center, 1075 West Capitol Ave. in West  Sacramento.

SHOW UP FOR IMMIGRANTS AND CA VALUES ACT:  Join ICE Out of California coalition to support  Senate Bill 54, CA Values Act, which fights  against deportations and ensures public  services and institutions are accessible to all  Californians.  9am, no cover.  California State  Capitol, 1315 10th St.

SATURDAY, 9/9 15TH ANNUAL CONGRESS OF AFRICAN PEOPLES’ CONVENING: Speakers, panel discussions and  conversations centered on the 2017 theme,  “Advancing Our Agenda by Organizing for  Empowerment.”  9am, $5-$15.  Fruitridge  Community Collaborative, 4625 44th St.

MARCH AGAINST MASS INCARCERATION: 

SACTRU (SACRAMENTO TRANSIT UNION) WEEKLY MEETING: Get engaged with the effort to  improve public transit in Sacramento County  and beyond.   1pm, no cover.  Organize  Sacramento, 1714 Broadway.

TAKE BACK OUR STREETS: COMMUNITY ALTERNATIVES TO POLICE: Help build  alternative structures for safety that  protect all members of the community.  Hosted by Black Lives Matter Sacramento.  6pm, no cover.  Colonial Heights Library, 4799  Stockton Blvd.

SUNDAY, 9/10 PRISONER SOLIDARITY NIGHT: LETTER WRITING: Support those behind bars and explore  alternatives to incarceration in this weekly  gathering of folks who write letters to people  in prison. Supplies provided, but guests are  encouraged to bring food, extra stamps and  related reading materials.  6pm, no cover.   Lavender Library, 1414 21st St.

MONDAY, 9/11 SACTENANTS BIMONTHLY MEETING: Organize  around issues like housing as a human  right, the lack of rentals and the link to  homelessness, rising rents and more.  Postponed from 9/4 meeting.  6pm, no cover.   Organize Sacramento, 1714 Broadway.

Join us for

Happy Hour Mon-Fri • 4:30-6:00pm

TUESDAY, 9/12 HEALTHCARE WORKING GROUP MEETING: Join the  effort for single payer healthcare for all in  California (SB 562). Help plan canvassing,  business and social media outreach and  other events.  5:30pm, no cover.  Old Soul at  40 Acres, 3434 Broadway.

CLASSES THURSDAY, 9/7 TEEN RUBIK’S CUBE CLASSES: Have you ever  wondered if there was a method to the  madness of solving the Rubik’s Cube? Cube  master Will Morris would say it’s just a  simple algorithym, and he’s happy to teach it  to you in his ongoing Thursday classes.  5pm, $3.50-$7.  The Silver Orange, 922 57th St.

you want to take concrete action to resist 

SATURDAY, 9/9

Blacklight Slide Raley Field, 4 P.M., $50

Act like a kid and make a mess  of yourself as you shoot down  the adult slip ’n’ slide that is the  Blacklight Slide. Grab your white  T-shirt that will show off glowing  neon paint, a pool tube to get  PHOTO COURTESY BLACKLIGHT SLIDE your best slide, take a running start and GO. Then go again.  The night includes unlimited rides on the slide,  SPORTS & OUTDOORS a donation to a local charity and admission to  the Blacklight Slide after-party with live music. 400 Ballpark Drive in West  Sacramento, www.blacklightslide.com/sacramento.

ON STANDS

RAPID RESPONSE TO ICE EVENTS TRAINING: If 

September 21

September 9th, 2017 marks one year since  the largest prison strike in American history.  Join Answer Coalition, Brown Berets de  Califas, NorCal Resist, HELLA and Sac Justice  League to march in solidarity with those  behind bars.  Noon, no cover.  Southside  Park, 2115 6th St.

Immigrant and Customs Enforcement  events in your region? Learn to document  occurrences involving ICE, to connect  families with attorneys and more.  1pm, no cover.  Yuba County Library, 303 2nd St. in  Marysville.

where’s the best music venue ?

FRIDAY, 9/8

’17

Sacramento’S newS and entertainment weekly. on StandS every thurSday.

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Please call for reservations Banquet Rooms Available

604 Sutter Street • Downtown Historic Folsom • (916) 351–9100 Parking garage available • www.sutterstreetsteakhouse.com

09.07.17    |   SN&R   |   39


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40   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17

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Tommy & Marion Acoustic Show, 10271 fAiRWAY DRiVE, ROSEVillE, (916) 412-8739 6:30pm, call for cover

Debbie Wolfe & Halfmoon Highway w/ Billy Buckman and friends, 6pm, $10

The Icarus Account, 4pm, $10; Sunday Iris, Manzanita, 7pm, $5

Uke Jam, 11am, no cover

Open-Mic, 6:30pm, W, no cover

Badlands

Outword Magazine’s Liquid Therapy Monthly Happy Hour, 5pm, call for cover

Spectacular Saturdays , 6pm, call for cover

Sunday Tea Dance & Beer Bust, 4pm, call for cover

Half-off Mondays, 8pm, M, call for cover; Trapacana, 10pm, W, call for cover

The acousTic den cafe 2003 k ST., (916) 448-8790

#Turntup Thursdays College Night, 8pm, call for cover

BaR 101

Trivia & Pint Night, M, 5pm, no cover; Open-Mic, 7pm, no cover

101 mAin ST., ROSEVillE, (916) 774-0505

Blue lamp

1400 AlHAmbRA blVD., (916) 455-3400

Arkaik, Alterbeast, Inanimate Existence and more, 7pm, $10

The Inciters, The Scratch Outs, Celestions, Sacto Storytellers, 8:30pm, $10

The Vibrators, 8pm, Tu, $10; Skippa Da Flippa, 9pm, W, $20

The BoaRdwalk

J. Stalin, 8:30pm, $20

MC Lars, Big O, Dead Till Monday and more, 7:30pm, $13

Kublai Khan, No Zodiac, I Am and more, 6pm, M, $12

9426 GREEnbACk ln., ORAnGEVAlE, (916) 358-9116

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314 W. mAin ST., GRASS VAllEY, (530) 274-8384

In Conversation with Alice Waters, 8pm, $67-$70

counTRy cluB saloon

Gethen Jenkins, Unchained, 7pm, $10

The Kenny Frye Band, 7pm, call for cover

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

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Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Sunday Funday Pool Parties, 3pm, call for cover

Every Damn Monday, 7pm, M, no cover; Noche Latina, 9pm, Tu, call for cover

4007 TAYlOR ROAD, lOOmiS, (916) 652-4007

7pm Sunday, $27-$87. Ace of Spades Alt R&B

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Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

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Moon Boots, 10pm, no cover

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Dragon, 10pm, $10

Absolut Fridays, all night, call for cover

Decades, 7pm, call for cover

faTheR paddy’s iRish puBlic house

Lucy’s Bones, 6pm, no cover

One Eyed Reilly CD release party, 7pm, no cover

The Bottom Dwellers, 7pm, no cover

Marty Cohen & The Sidekicks, 8pm, no cover

Kevin & Allyson Seconds, Natalie Cortez, 9pm, $5

Fem Dom Com (Female Dominated Comedy) 9pm, $5

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, 7:30pm, $120

Mayweather vs. McGregor Watch Party, 6pm, $40

2107 l ST., (916) 443-8815 1022 k ST., (916) 737-5770 2000 k ST., (916) 448-7798 435 mAin ST., WOODlAnD, (530) 668-1044

fox & Goose

1001 R ST., (916) 443-8825

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500 DAViD J STERn WAlk, (888) 915-4647

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Ana Popovic, 7pm, $15

The Nickel Slots, 7pm, $10

halfTime BaR & GRill

Karaoke Happy Hour, 8:30pm, call for cover

Auto Reverse, 9pm, call for cover

The Usual Haunts, 9pm, $5

haRlow’s

A Night of Stand-Up with Martín Moreno, 9pm, $17-$30

Jethro Tull’s Martin Barre Band, 8pm, $30-$35

Joel the Band, 6:30pm, $10-$12

No Chill, 9pm, call for cover

SUGAR Dance Party, 10pm, $5

1630 J ST., (916) 476-5076 PHOTO COURTESY Of ElmER mARTinEz

Sun Valley Gun Club

5681 lOnETREE blVD., ROCklin, (916) 626-3600 2708 J ST., (916) 441-4693

with 50 Watt Heavy, The Mutineers 9pm Saturday, $7. Old Ironsides Alt Rock

Indigo Girls, 8pm, (sold out)

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1910 Q ST., (916) 706-2465

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ON

STANDS SEPTEMBER 21

“Let’s Get Quzzical” Trivia Game Show Experience, 7pm, Tu, no cover Overnight Success: An Evening with Danielle Moné Truitt, 7pm, $20-$30

The Trivia Factory, 7pm, M, no cover

Thursday, Sept. 7th • 7-11pm

LIVE MUSIC Sept 08 JASON WEEKS Sept 09 CHRISTIAN DEWILD Sept 15 TODD MORGAN Sept 16 DYLAN CRAWFORD Sept 22 ANIMALS IN THE ATTIC Sept 23 HAYEZ Sept 29 STEPHEN YERKEY Sept 30 FOX & BONES

33 BEERS ON DRAFT

MONDAY PINT NIGHT 5-8 PM, TRIVIA @ 6:30 PM TACO TUESDAY $1.25 TACOS NOON - CLOSE WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC – SIGN-UPS @ 7:30 PM 101 MAIN STREET, ROSEVILLE 916-774-0505 · LUNCH/DINNER 7 DAYS A WEEK FRI & SAT 9:30PM - CLOSE 21+

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Christopher Fairman, 7pm, M, $10; The Church, 7pm, Tu, $22.50-$25

Comedy Burger with Ngaio Bealum, 7pm, $10-$25

Blu & Exile, 7pm, $15-$20

2708 J ST., (916) 441-4693

Open Mic, 7:30pm, M, no cover; Pub Quiz, 7pm, Tu, no cover

GETHEN JENKINS

Outlaw Country in the back 40 Amphitheatre Friday, Sept. 8th • 7-11pm

THE RIP OFFS

in the back 40 Amphitheatre Saturday, Sept. 9th • 7-11pm

NomiNated best daNce club 2017

sept 9

Whey Jennings grandson of Waylon Jennings

sept 16

stoneys end of summer bash

sept 23

stoneys fundraiser for braesons fight

KENNY FRYE

f r i o c t 2 7 & s at o c t 2 8

Thursday, Sept. 14th

stoneys 10th anniversary bash

in the back 40 Amphitheatre

MIDGET WRESTLING

doors open @ 7:00pm • $10 cover "Biggest "little" show you will ever see"

FOLLOW US ON: 21+ Venue

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nashville country artist craig cambell Free dance lessons nightly 9pm weeknights, 8pm Fri/sat karaoke nightly up Front amazing Food and drink specials nightly stoneys has been voted best dance club oF sacramento 2016!

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09.07.17

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916.402.2407

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submit your calendar listings for free at newsreview.com/sacramento/calendar Old IrOnsIdes

1901 10TH ST., (916) 442-3504

On THe Y

THURSDaY 09/7

FRiDaY 09/8

SaTURDaY 09/9

SUnDaY 09/10

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Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Worthy Goat, the Phantom Jets and more, 8pm, $7

Sun Valley Gun Club, 50 Watt Heavy, The Mutineers, 9pm, $7

The Masters Bartending Competition, 2pm, no cover

Karaoke 9pm, Tu, no cover; Open-Mic Night, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Open 8-Ball Pool Tournament, 7:30pm, $5 buy-in

Karaoke, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover; Movie Night, 7pm, W, no cover

Open-Mic Stand-up Comedy, 8pm, no cover

670 FUlTOn avE., (916) 487-3731

Palms PlaYHOuse

Patsy Cline Birthday Bash with The Carolyn Sills Combo, 8pm, $15

Golden State Lone Star Revue, 8pm, $20

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Pint & Flight with Oskar Blues, 6pm, no cover

One Leg Chuck, 8:30pm, no cover

Remedy, 8:30pm, no cover

Tiffani Shiro, 1:30pm, no cover

POwerHOuse Pub

Nash Brothers, 9:30pm, call for cover

Rockology, 10pm, call for cover

Cripple Creek, 10pm, call for cover

Catfish Copeland, 3pm, call for cover

THe Press club

Emo Night Sacramento Live! 8pm, $7

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE vibRaTORS

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Element Brass Band, 9pm, no cover

Jane Thompson Trio, 9pm, no cover

DJ JB, 10pm, no cover before 11, $5 afterward until midnight

Romeo Reyes, 10pm, no cover before 10:30pm, $5 afterward until midnight

Country Dancing & Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

Whey Jennings & The Unwanted, 9pm, $5-$10

Sunday Funday, 8pm, no cover

Night Moves (Bob Segar tribute), 6pm, $10

Larisa Barsky, 5pm, call for cover; Bump City Reunion, 7pm, $15

The Beer Dawgs, 3pm, $10

The Nibblers, 9pm, $12

Diego’s Umbrella, Mind X, 9pm, $12

Blues Jam, 4pm, no cover; You Front The Band, 8pm, call for cover

Johnny Mojo Band, 9pm, W, $5 Whiskey on the Wood, 6pm, $40

College Wednesdays, 8pm, W, no cover

Ryan Hernandez, 7pm, no cover

Jayson Angrove, 7pm, no cover

Skyler Michael, 7pm, no cover

YOlO brewIng cOmPanY

Rod Stinson, 6pm, no cover

The Pikeys, 6pm, no cover

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Yolo and Yoga, 11am, no cover; Alex Trujillo, 2pm, no cover

Taco and Trivia Tuesdays, 6pm, Tu, no cover; Cornhole, 4pm, W, no cover

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Minus The Bear, The Velvet Teen, 7pm, $25

Quiet Riot, Roswell, Anarchy Lace, 7pm, $22

The Magpie Salute, 7pm, $30

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Jazz Jam, 8pm, no cover

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Run it Back, 9pm, M, no cover; Teenage Dirtbag, 8pm, W, $5

Billy Walsh, Aaron Gayden & friends, 1pm, no cover

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Live Band Karaoke, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

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Questionable Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover; Naked Narratives, 7pm, W, no cover

COMING SOON

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9/11 6:30PM $10

CHRISTOPHER FAIRMAN 9/8 7PM $30ADV

JETHRO TULL’S MARTIN BARRE BAND

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. . . T I H T X E N R YOU

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VISIT WWW.CAPITALCANNABISGUIDE.COM • NEW FEATURES ADDED 46   |   SN&R   |   09.07.17


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09.07.17    |   SN&R   |   47


where’s the best place to buy sexy-time stuff?

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www.megamates.com Related links18+ Related Stories

Respect yourself

A drink or two is fun. But getting drunk means placing our life in the hands of whomever is around us. (Word count 500-575) DESIGN & EDITING INFO

REAL PEOPLE, REAL DESIRE, REAL FUN.

Got a problem? Write, email or leave a message for Joey at News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential.

Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@newsreview.com.

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Respect Yourself I’m a 19-year-old au pair overseas. I met a gorgeous DJ, but after kissing on the beach, learned he’s 30 years old with a girlfriend and daughter, so I rejected him. Then a guy I wasn’t interested in asked me out. After drinks at a bar he owns, I felt sick. My memory is hazy, but I know he raped me. The next day I went back to his bar. We talked until he leaned close and unzipped my jeans. I told him to stop. He made me a margarita, I drank it and felt sick. He followed me to the bathroom and raped me. I spent the week drunk and letting guys use me. The DJ FaceTimed me. I told him everything. I called my parents and told them, too. I felt the DJ understood me, so I texted him the address of the home where I was working as an au pair so we could have sex. He bragged about it. The family heard the gossip, confronted me and no longer believed I was raped. The DJ won’t see me. I alternate between exhilaration at the beauty here and crushing depression. Please help.

A question to ask yourself: Do I want a life of peace or chaos? Bringing a stranger into the home of the family you live with without permission was disrespectful to them, but also to you if you value serenity and happiness. If you value being cherished, you won’t hookup with a guy who has a girlfriend. If you’re a feminist, you won’t help a guy cheat on his girlfriend. Do you see? Choose actions based on values. Pick three values as guiding stars—your operating instructions for a better life. Don’t torture yourself by replaying the traumas in your mind. Don’t judge yourself for hooking up with other guys after the assaults, either. But in therapy (and you must go to therapy), work toward giving yourself healthy attention so you don’t crave it from men. Desire is fleeting. But only a conscious heart cherishes and loves others. Construct a conscious heart in yourself by growing in self-awareness and selfcare, so you can recognize a conscious heart in a man. Ω

Ask yourself: Do I want a life of peace or chaos?

You’ve experienced a lot of trauma, so feeling overwhelmed is normal. It would be worrisome if you felt no grief in response to your losses. The ability to recognize beauty around you and yet mourn the girl you no longer are is normal, too, at least in cases of spiritual depression. I trust that you have already consulted the appropriate authorities regarding the assaults, so let’s discuss what it means to be free. A drink or two is fun. But getting drunk means placing our life in the hands of whomever is around us. When we do, we are no longer free. We are slaves to their whims. Don’t use this insight to blame yourself for what happened; that’s not kind or helpful. It was not your fault. Rather, choose accordingly from here forward. Trauma is a terrible wound but can also be a doorway to profound wisdom about ourselves and the kind of life we wish to create.

MeDITATIon oF THe Week “Bending over backwards does  not bring you the love and  attention you crave, but having  your own life, your own goals  and a backbone will,” writes  Sherry Argov. Who stands up  for you?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 1360; or email askjoey@newsreview.com.


SN&R’s

What’s inside: The 420 53 Product Review 57 Capital Cannabis Map 61 For More deals, updates & Listings Visit

and the at newsreview.com

09.07.17    |   SN&R   |   49


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Heat, turpines and spliffs Hey man. This hot weather is freaking out my plants. What should I do? —Heath Stroke Say word. Hot weather is rough on everyone, and cannabis plants are no exception. Just like people, cannabis plants need extra water during heat waves, so make sure your plants stay well hydrated. Another thing to worry about is pests. In the past two years, I have heard from growers all over California about russet mites being a huge problem. Russet mites are hella small and hard to spot, and if they aren’t caught early, they can spread to your whole garden. Russet mites love hot days. It makes them horny AF. In cooler weather, they lay eggs once a week or so, When it is hot like this, russet mites lay eggs every one or two days. I have heard good things about the organic pesticide known at AG Plus. It’s expensive, but it is full of ingredients that aren’t harmful to humans, and it is designed to suffocate the little buggers as opposed to poisoning them, so you don’t have to worry about the mites developing a resistance. You can get some more info here at growweedeasy. com. The price of good weed is eternal vigilance. Stay hydrated. Is there a way to tell if a strain is more body buzz or mind buzz based strictly on percentages? —@ScottmayBstoned (via twitter) I think you probably could. You would have to know the terpene numbers more than the THC count. As we have discussed before, different terpenes have different effects. Linalool (found in the strains known as Lavender and in LA Confidential) will probably make you The price sleepy. Pinene (smells like Trainwreck) is known of good weed for alertness. Most clubs don’t really test for terp profile as is eternal much as they test for THC content and pesticides. vigilance. Fortunately, most terpenes have distinctive smells. Point your browser to “Leafly terpene chart” and follow your nose. Dear Ngaio: Why are spliffs so popular in some European countries? 2nd question: Can I hit that? —@logrusZed (via twitter) Who knows? Probably because it used to be hella hard to find good weed in Europe but easy to find hash. Hash is a pain to smoke by itself (OGs will remember “hash under glass” or the “two hot knives” methods), so rolling a “spliff” (a marijuana joint mit eine kleine tabak) is a good and easy way to get your buzz on. Also, as anyone who has ever smoked a blunt can tell you, combining THC with nicotine creates a different and way more powerful buzz than just smoking weed alone. Tobacco is not great for your health, so I recommend you roll those Eurotrash spliffs on special occasions. Like when your European friends come over and you don’t want to get them too stoned on your hella potent California weed. As to your second question: Hell yes. Come over. Bring snacks. Ω Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@newsreview.com.

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FRee will aStRology

by Luis GaeL Jimenez

by ROb bRezsny

FOR THE WEEk OF SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’re half-intoxicated by your puzzling adventures—and half-bewildered, as well. Sometimes you’re spinning out fancy moves, sweet tricks, and surprising gambits. On other occasions you’re stumbling and bumbling and mumbling. Are you really going to keep up this rhythm? I hope so, because your persistence in navigating through the challenging fun could generate big rewards. Like what, for example? Like the redemptive transformation of a mess into an asset.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Free your mind

and your ass will follow,” sings funk pioneer George Clinton in his song “Good Thoughts, Bad Thoughts.” And what’s the best way to free your mind? Clinton advises you to “Be careful of the thought-seeds you plant in the garden of your mind.” That’s because the ideas you obsess on will eventually grow into the experiences you attract into your life. “Good thoughts bring forth good fruit,” he croons, while “Bullshit thoughts rot your meat.” Any questions, Taurus? According to my astrological analysis, this is the best possible counsel for you to receive right now.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): James Loewen

wrote a book called Lies My Teacher Told  Me: Everything Your American History  Textbook Got Wrong. He said, for instance, that during the Europeans’ invasion and conquest of the continent, it wasn’t true that Native Americans scalped white settlers. In fact, it was mostly the other way around: Whites scalped Indians. Here’s another example: The famous blind and deaf person, Helen Keller, was not a sentimental spokesperson for sweetness and light, but rather a radical feminist and socialist who advocated revolution. I invite you to apply Loewen’s investigative approach to your personal past, Gemini. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to uncover hidden, incomplete, and distorted versions of your history, and correct them.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Roger Hodge writes

books now, but when he worked for Harper’s Magazine, he had an unusual specialty. He gathered heaps of quirky facts and assembled several at a time into long sentences that had a nutty poetic grace. Here’s an example: “British cattle have regional accents, elephants mourn their dead, nicotine sobers drunk rats, scientists have concluded that teenagers are physically incapable of being considerate, and clinical trials of an ‘orgasmatron’ are underway in North Carolina.” I’m offering Hodge as a worthy role model for you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Be curious, miscellaneous, and free-flowing. Let your mind wander luxuriantly as you make unexpected connections. Capitalize on the potential blessings that appear through zesty twists and tangy turns.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In Japan you can buy a

brand of candy that’s called The Great Buddha’s Nose Snot. Each piece consists of a rice puff that resembles the Buddha’s nose filled with bits of brown sugar that symbolize the snot. The candymaking company assures customers that eating this treat brings them good luck. I invite you to be equally earthy and irreverent about your own spiritual values in the coming days. You’re in a prime position to humanize your relationship with divine influences … to develop a more visceral passion for your holiest ideals … to translate your noblest aspirations into practical, enjoyable actions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Will a routine trip to

carry out an errand take you on a detour to the suburbs of the promised land? Will you worry you’re turning into a monster, only to find the freakishness is just a phase that you had to pass through on your way to unveiling some of your dormant beauty? Will a provocative figure from the past lead you on a productive wild-goose chase into the future? These are some of the possible storylines I’ll be monitoring as I follow your progress in the coming weeks.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Let’s meet in the

woods after midnight and tell each other stories about our origins, revealing the secrets we almost forgot we had. Let’s sing the songs that electrified our emotions all those years ago when

we first fell in love with our lives. Starlight will glow on our ancient faces. The fragrance of loam will seep into our voices like rainwater feeding the trees’ roots. We’ll feel the earth turning on its axis, and sense the rumble of future memories coming to greet us. We’ll join hands, gaze into the dreams in each other’s eyes, and dive as deep as we need to go to find hidden treasures.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I don’t usually

recommend giving gifts with strings attached. On the contrary, I advise you to offer your blessings without having any expectations at all. Generosity often works best when the recipients are free to use it any way they see fit. In the coming weeks, however, I’m making an exception to my rule. According to my reading of the omens, now is a time to be specific and forceful about the way you’d like your gifts to be used. As an example of how not to proceed, consider the venture capitalist who donated $25,000 to the University of Colorado. All he got in return was a restroom in a campus building named after him. If you give away $25,000, Scorpio, make sure you at least get a whole building named after you.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Now that

you’re getting a taste of what life would be like if you ruled the world, I’ll recommend a manual. It’s called How To Start Your Own Country, by Erwin Strauss. (Get a free peek here: tinyurl. com/YouSovereign.) You could study it for tips on how to obtain national sovereignty, how to recruit new citizens, and how to avoid paying taxes to yourself. (P.S.: You can make dramatic strides toward being the boss of yourself and your destiny even without forming your own nation.)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There was a

time when not even the most ambitious explorers climbed mountains. In the western world, the first time it happened was in 1492, when a Frenchman named Antoine de Ville ascended to the top of Mont Aiguille, using ladders, ropes, and other props. I see you as having a kinship with de Ville in the coming weeks, Capricorn. I’d love to see you embark on a big adventure that would involve you trying on the role of a pioneer. This feat wouldn’t necessarily require strenuous training and physical courage. It might be more about daring creativity and moral courage.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Science fiction

proposes that there are alternate worlds alongside the visible one—hidden, yes, but perhaps accessible with the right knowledge or luck. In recent years, maverick physicists have given the idea more credibility, theorizing that parallel universes exist right next to ours. Even if these hypothetical places aren’t literally real, they serve as an excellent metaphor. Most of us are so thoroughly embedded in our own chosen niche that we are oblivious to the realities that other people inhabit. I bring these thoughts to your attention, Aquarius, because it’s a favorable time to tap into those alternate, parallel, secret, unknown, or unofficial realms. Wake up to the rich sources that have been so close to you, but so far away.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m always in favor

of you cultivating a robust relationship with your primal longings. But I’ll be rooting extra hard for you to do that during the next eleven months. I hope you will dig deep to identify your primal longings, and I hope you will revere them as the wellspring of your life energy, and I hope you will figure out all the tricks and strategies you will need to fulfill them. Here’s a hint about how to achieve the best results as you do this noble work: Define your primal longings with as much precision as you can, so that you will never pursue passing fancies that bear just a superficial resemblance to the real things.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. and don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

The love factory Gina Knepp took over the Front Street Animal Shelter in 2011. She was  given three months to close down  the books and prepare the transition of the city’s animal control department to a private corporation.  Even though Knepp had more than  25 years of law enforcement   training and management under her  belt, she had no idea what she was  walking into. “I couldn’t even tell  you a Shih Tzu from a Pomeranian,”  she says. The three months hadn’t even  elapsed before Knepp put in a call to  the city manager asking if she could  have one year to try and turn the  facility around. It’s been six years since that  phone call. And in those six years,  Knepp has gotten the center from  a 27 percent “live release” rate in  2011 to 84 percent in 2016. According to Front Street’s self-reported  records, Knepp and her staff have  saved the lives of 38,798 dogs and  cats in the past six years and raised  over $2.8 million from donations and  fundraisers.

So you’ve saved a lot of puppy and kitty lives, it looks like. That’s not just what we do here. We create love affairs between people and animals. That’s what we do. We just had a story where an older woman walked in, and wanted to meet the oldest, most unadoptable dog we had. Her husband had just died, and then her dog of 15 years died. She got her dog, and that’s what we do: We lift up hearts here.

How bad was the shelter before you got here? It was in pretty bad shape. My boss called and said, “We’re going to get out of the sheltering business because we’re not good at it.” I got here and my motivation was, well, 31 people were going to lose their jobs, and that bothered me. And then, I just kind of lost my mind. I love a good challenge. I love to win.

So did you ever see yourself running an animal shelter? No, no, God no. Growing up, we didn’t have pets. But I fell in love with this place. I knew we could turn it around. And I hate to brag, but I have to brag, we have been no. 1 [in live-release rate] in Sacramento for several years now. And it’s not a competition between centers. A lot of Sacramento shelters are doing much better—but I think when you switch up the game and start

Luis GaeL Jimenez

doing things differently, it makes other organizations take notice and [up] their game.

I read that one of your goals was to switch the reputation this shelter had as a killhouse into a place people actually hoped their lost pets would end up. Do you think you’ve done that? I think I’ve come a long way. Do I think I’m done, no. We’re close but we’re not there yet. There are still people out there that call us the “pound” or that think we kill everything that comes in through the door.

What are you doing that’s different than other shelters with higher kill rates? We’re very fortunate that we have a nonprofit. We are able to fundraise, which allows us to do more than our budget allows … When I first got here, we were spaying and neutering in a trailer. Thanks to donations, we now have an entire medical building.

So what’s your biggest goal then? Well, I’m at the end of my career. I’m in what they call “The Three Day Club.” Three bad days, and I’ll just retire. (Laughs.) My goals are too big to say I just have one. But my big hairy audacious goal is to get a new shelter for the city of Sacramento in a new location. I mean, look at where we are. You’ve got to come down here on purpose. We’ve done a great job drawing crowds here, but shelters need to be out in places where there are high levels of traffic. The shelter of today needs to be a retail space, it needs to be fun, it needs to be beautiful. It doesn’t need to look like a pound.

Look—and I don’t like the word pound, but call it whatever you want, just support it. If the word pound makes you happy, fine, but still give me a donation, still volunteer, still adopt. Maybe I need to work on making “pound” sexy. (Laughs.)

What’s something you think is important for the public to know about how ‘the pound” operates? Well people don’t realize that some of the dogs I have are guard dogs from backyard marijuana grows. There’s this expectation by the no-kill community that I save them all, but there’s a real challenge sometimes in saving an animal that’s completely unsocialized. The fact that we’re saving 84 percent of the dogs that come in here regardless of how we got them, and what lives they had before they got here, is pretty damn amazing. Also, I don’t report my data the same as most agencies. The numbers [we publish], those are cats and dogs that came in and cats and dogs that came out, regardless of why I got them or the condition they were in.

What does that mean exactly? Let’s say an owner brings in an 18-year-old cat that can’t walk and isn’t eating anymore and needs to be euthanized. I count that against me. I am not pulling anything out. I don’t want to be accused of cooking my numbers. I wish other agencies would do the same. Ω

The Front street animal shelter’s annual gala, Paws to Party, takes place on October 13, 6 p.m. at the California automobile museum.

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