Issuu on Google+

is it ok to fart in front of your lover? see streetalk, page 5

what’s in city-council candidates’ wallets? see Midtown&Down, page 12

an th na r Jo efe ne by Ki La Jim

&

WitcHy, Watery

1 ge pa

WoMen see arts&culture, page 22

8

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Abandon All Ships The World Alive & Born of Osiris The Dark Side Motion City Soundtrack Miss May I Some Fear None Minus The Bear The Faint Halestorm Pierce The Veil Woe, is Me Twiztid Trapt The Acacia Strain & Veil Of Maya 7 Seconds Streetlight Manifesto Motionless in White NOFX Blood On The Dance Floor The English Beat X (All Original Members)

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202 2   |   SN&R   |   10.11.12

Bust the drudgery I was beginning to think summer would never end. And not in a fun, the good-times-are-forever sense, but more in a brutish, suffocatingheat sort of way. Even as the river outings and backyard barbecues faded from the calendar, the hot weather lingered. So too did a sense of malaise—a listless exhaustion brought upon by the 24-hour news cycle, relentless economic woes and endless election fatigue. It seemed, to me at least, that we were stuck on a hamster’s wheel of hot drudgery. That is, until the weather finally broke this week. Now there’s that nip in the air, the turning of leaves from green to amber and, accordingly, a cheery sense of renewed optimism. Or at least a reminder to bust the drudgery and have a little fun already. This issue’s guide to the best, worst and weirdest fall films (see page 18) is yet another reminder to do just that. Each week, SN&R film critics Jonathan Kiefer and Jim Lane watch a lot of movies—more than the average person can handle, really; there are only so many movies starring Keira Knightley and Tyler Perry one should ever have to endure, after all. Then again, Kiefer and Lane aren’t average moviegoers: They’re expert critics with decades’ worth of experience between them, a genuine passion for film and the ability to write with intelligence, depth, humor and style. And, in an era in which many daily papers, including The Sacramento Bee, have long shifted from relying on a voice of record in favor of nationally syndicated reviews, we’re proud to not just have one film critic to call our own, but two. Gas prices are still high, and the candidates are still squabbling, but fall is finally here, so treat yourself to some good times. Kick back, order some popcorn (extra salt, please) and enjoy the show. —Rachel Leibrock

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STREETALK LETTERS NEWS gREEN DAyS OPINION FEATuRE STORy ARTS&CuLTuRE SECOND SATuRDAy NIgHT&DAy DISH ASK JOEy STAgE FILM MuSIC 15 MINuTES cover design by Hayley dosHay

17 Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Co-editors Rachel Leibrock, Nick Miller Staff Writer Raheem F. Hosseini Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Calendar Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Kel Munger Contributing Editor Cosmo Garvin Proofreader Deena Drewis Editor-at-large Melinda Welsh Contributors Sasha Abramsky, Christopher Arns, Ngaio Bealum, Rob Brezsny, Joey Garcia, Becky Grunewald, Mark Halverson, Jeff Hudson, Jonathan Kiefer,

rac he ll@ n ews r ev i ew . com

BEFORE

OCTOBER 11, 2012 | Vol. 24, Issue 26

FRONTLINES

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F E AT U R E

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44

Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Patti Roberts, Steph Rodriguez, Seth Sandronsky, Amy Yannello

Sales Coordinators Shawn Barnum, Rachel Rosin Director of First Impressions Jeff Chinn

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Brennan Collins, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Art Directors-at-large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Contributing Photographers Steven Chea, Wes Davis, Ryan Donahue, Taras Garcia, William Leung, Salvador Ochoa, Shoka, Justin Short, Anne Stokes

Distribution Manager Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert

Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising Consultants Rosemary Babich, Josh Burke, Vince Garcia, Dusty Hamilton, April Houser, Cathy Kleckner, Dave Nettles, Kelsi White Senior Inside Sales Consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services Coordinator Melissa Bernard Operations Manager Will Niespodzinski Client Publications Managing Editor Kendall Fields Client Publications Writer/Copy Editor Mike Blount

STORY

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Sales Fax (916) 498-7910 Editorial Fax (916) 498-7920 Website www.newsreview.com SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Nicholas Babcock, Walt Best, Daniel Bowen, Nina Castro, Danny Cladianos, Jack Clifford, Robert Cvach, Lob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Wendell Powell, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Lolu Sholotan, Jack Thorne President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234

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4   |   SN&R   |   10.11.12

“Let her rip!”

Asked at Old Fair Oaks Village:

How long until it’s OK to fart in front of your lover?

Michael Morrow retired

That’s pretty wild. I would say keep looking over your shoulder if you have a mate. If you are with somebody, they are special to ya: You treat them like a queen. Never.

BEFORE

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David Hill shop owner

I don’t recall doing it while dating, unless it was an accident. Perhaps after you’re married.

  FRONTLINES  

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Chris Fowler

Jeremy Chew

stay-at-home mom

That’s one of the most natural things to do. If your date can’t handle a fart on the first date, then get on with life, and find somebody else.

  F E A T U R E S T O R Y   | 

waiter

If you like them, the first date. … OK, a second date. If you like them enough to have a second date, then you should be comfortable enough.

Deborah Hall

Jenney Smith

hairstylist

Let her rip! If they don’t like it, well, that’s just the way it is, ya know? I mean, what are you going to do?

A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R

stay-at-home mom

Personally, I would say never. But if you are with someone and you are pregnant, it is kinda hard to … not [fart]! (Laughs.)

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  SN&R    

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  5

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6   |   SN&R   |   10.11.12

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LETTERS

Visit us at www.newsreview.com or email sactoletters @ newsreview.com

Get a wax job and a thong

FIRST SHOT SN&R photo of the week PHOTO BY ROBERT JENSEN

Re “Diamonds, cash and tats” by Matthew W. Urner (SN&R 15 Minutes, September 27): Wow. Just when you think our culture couldn’t get any dumber, along comes Irish Cash to prove it’s actually hit rock bottom. This guy takes the cake. As a woman, I couldn’t be more repulsed, not by his body art, but by his frighteningly shallow mentality, which includes the complete objectivity of women. His ego, which LETTER OF obviously rules him, is driven by the need to prove his manliness in THE WEEK no uncertain terms. I’m somewhat relieved to read that he drops his “professional” persona while raising his son, but concerned for his son as he matures into his own person. What if his son discovers he’d rather love other men and do hair for a living? If so, I wonder if it might be an expression of a part of his father that the latter has worked so hard to repress and hide. For Halloween, I suggest Irish get a Brazilian wax job and wear a gold lamé thong to get in touch with his exploited female side. Susan McKinney Nevada City

Progressive case against Measure U Re “The $28-million question” by Nick Miller (SN&R Frontlines, October 4): It’s not just anti-tax and chamber-ofcommerce types that oppose Measure U. Progressives should, too. Measure U is a regressive sales tax. That means that poor and middle-income families will pay the same rate as Sacramento’s wealthiest citizens, essentially subsidizing the rich for services that we all receive. According to Citizens for Tax Justice, since seniors, students and low-income families spend most of their money on essentials, a sales tax hits them the hardest. Measure U will cost these families hundreds of dollars and require a larger chunk of their income than it does of the rich. It’s a reverse-Robin Hood policy. And it’s why none of the statewide ballot measures that seek to increase school funding is exclusively a sales-tax hike. The governor’s proposal (Proposition 30) to balance the budget relies heavily on progressive taxation (where the wealthy pay a higher percentage). I would like to think that most of Sacramento’s city council members know this. They just chose to ignore it. Instead, they spent $40,000 of taxpayer money on a political poll to tell them which type of tax was the easiest to pass—not which tax was the fairest or would produce the most stable level of revenue for the city, just the one that would sell at the polls. Furthermore, this tax increase—which would make Sacramento’s sales tax the highest in the region—does not guarantee more human services, more funding for programs to reduce homelessness or even more community safety. The $28 million in additional revenue (which, at best, is a huge guess given that retail sales will likely be driven out of the city because of its high tax rate) can be put toward anything that the city council wants, whether it be arena studies or pay increases for city management. Voters should scrap Measure U. It’s time we sent a message to the city council BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

that Sacramento citizens want accountability and responsibility in tax policy and budgeting. Steven Maviglio Sacramento

Breton and soup Re “Blown away” by Cosmo Garvin (SN&R Bites, October 4): If [The Sacramento Bee] put up a notice (or more likely, in the Bee’s case, a pop-up) on their pay-wall page that said the money will be used to fire Marcos Breton and make sure he becomes homeless so that he will now be in the homeless population’s “unforgiving sights,” I think the Bee’s online subscriptions would skyrocket. I like the line “afflicting the afflicted and comforting the comfortable.” I wonder how I could turn those words into a poster? Or maybe that should be Breton’s voicemail message? The only thing that makes me sicker than Campbell’s Soup is now knowing that they didn’t pay property taxes. Thanks, city of Sacramento. Looks like the soup isn’t the only thing going down the drain.

Rise and shine last Tuesday morning on K Street Mall—soon to be called “The Kay”? (See page 12.)

Thank you for your brilliant essay! Einstein said [that] insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result—like voting for a Republicrat, again. On to empire. More bread and circuses, please. Steven Wood Roseville

Higher metaphors Re “Name calling” by Ngaio Bealum (SN&R The 420, October 4): Really enjoyed the apples-to-cannabis metaphor.

Noah Kameyer Sacramento

Problem was play, not production

Re “Yes on 30!” (SN&R Editorial, October 4): Simply put, I’m voting against Proposition 30, because we are already taxed too much sales tax. Yes, there is a valid argument for an income-tax increase for the higher earners, but that should have been a separate voting measure.

More of the same Re “Undivided” by Todd Walton (SN&R Essay, October 4): Spot-on! Most people have a frail grasp on the big picture and support the status quo, I’m afraid. FEATURE

STORY

POET’S CORNER

Re “Creepy as hell” by Maxwell McKee (SN&R Stage, September 20): As a writer, I found flaws with the story rather than the acting. I believe that to properly critique any piece of work, you need to focus more on craft, not content. If you can’t properly separate the two, then you shouldn’t try giving criticism, because it won’t be helpful to the actors, director, etc. The content of this play was intense, dark and layered. But the way in which the director and the playwright have tackled the subject matter should be commended. The challenge of portraying a pedophile comes in making him human

Herbert Holeman Carmichael

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Have a great photo? Email it to firstshot@ newsreview.com. Please include your full name and phone number. File size must not exceed 10 MB.

Sarah Boutwell Sacramento

Alyse Yerby via email

Taxed too much already

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enough for the audience to empathize with. Not an easy task for an actor or audience member to relate to a story like this, but the director did a good job of slowing it down so I could process it. Losing sympathy for the main character makes it hard to continue with that character for the rest of the story. I consider this a fault in the storytelling, not the directing. Yet, this play made me really ponder the humanity of the people we as a society consider monsters. And I’m glad I went to see it, because it’s always interesting to see what the other side has to say.

The old clock He motions at me: I want to show you something … Slowly climbing the stairs, Every time we met. He points. … This clock. It’s … He struggles for the words. … I know, Dad. Like faded photos, Those days are behind us. The clock now sits On my mantle, Some days I want to take it down and smash it. —Drew Lawson

AFTER

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FRONTLINES Reflections of a mayor Anne Rudin chats with SN&R on the Kings, Romney vs. Obama, using email in her 80s and strong mayor Anne Rudin is 88 years old and busy. The former mayor of Sacramento has been out of by office for 20 years, but in many ways, she James Raia still thrives in mayor mode. She answers my email promptly, for instance, and uses her given name, Anna. She’s still passionately involved with city issues and invites political candidates seeking her endorsement to her Land Park-area home, where she’s lived for nearly 60 years, and interviews them during lunch. The mother of four children and now a great-grandmother, Rudin is still recognized often at the gym she frequents three times a week. And several passersby said hello during a recent SN&R interview while Rudin sipped ice tea at an outdoor table of a restaurant a few blocks from her home.

Do you think the job of mayor has changed since you were in office? I don’t think it has. When I was mayor, I had to do everything. There were a lot of issues. In fact, several of my friends recently asked me what I did when I was mayor. They’re kind of concerned the present mayor feels he doesn’t have the power to do the things that a mayor should do. So I made a list and I brought a copy, and I will give it to you [writer’s note: She did]. I took initiative on things. I introduced ordinances. I got laws passed. I made a lot of changes. So, there’s no excuse for saying you have to give the mayor more power in the city charter so he or she can get more done. He or she can get more done right now, because I know that’s what I did. Think Big Sacramento is a nice, catchy slogan, but I don’t know what it means.

You look like you are in good health. How do you spend your time? I have a lot of activities, but not as many as I used to. I’m trying to stay away from organizational activities. I don’t want to be on any more boards. I don’t want to

BEFORE

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Former Sacramento Mayor Anne Rudin, now 88, checks email every day and probably goes to the gym more than most Sacramentans (three times a week, if you must know).

have long-range responsibility. But I am involved in a lot of issues. I am supporting candidates, working on campaigns. I have to. I have to make sure we get the right people in City Hall.

backs up to the levee have fences and locked gates up there so people can’t come through. That is illegal. We are in the process of opening it up, and little by little, we are going to get it done.

Is there an issue you’re most passionate about?

What else is important to you?

When I got out of public office, I got invited to join any number of organizations. At one point, I was on 14 boards. That’s when I wore myself out and said, “I’m not going to do this anymore. I’m going to have to be a little more selective.” I can’t remember all of the boards I was on. Now, I take on issues.

“There’s no excuse for saying you have to give the mayor more power in the city charter so he or she can get more done.” Anne Rudin Right now, the current issue I’m dealing with is one I’ve been involved with since I was mayor. It has to do with improving the levee trail along the Sacramento River so that people can have access to the levee. People whose property

FEATURE

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In 1992, you opted not to run for re-election for mayor after two terms. Is that right?

Local nonpartisan politics. The local politicians are very important. They’re running the day-to-day operations of our city, the things that affect us most directly. Secondly, they are the ones who want to move up. I want to make sure we have the right ones who transition from the local to the state level. I am supporting Joe Yee for city council, and there are other good candidates. I am supporting Joe Yee because he has more experience than the other candidate who won the primary.

Mayor Kevin Johnson has close connections with the NBA and has spent a lot of time on the arena issue. Do you have an opinion about the best way to resolve the Sacramento Kings situation? I think sports are very important. I felt that way when the arena was built and we were trying to get the Kings. It’s not the foremost issue, but it is important. It’s entertainment. I’ve gone to the Kings games, and I’ve gone to the River Cats games. I was so glad when they got that team over in West Sacramento. I had been approached by representatives of several major sports when I was mayor. We had other opportunities in Sacramento.

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It was after serving two terms and one year and, before that, three terms on the city council, so I was tired by then. I had put in full time. I just felt, “Well, I just know Joe [Serna is] waiting his turn. I know Joe Serna was waiting for me to leave office.” But I didn’t do it for that reason.

Recently, Campbell Soup Company announced it is shutting down its Sacramento plant, and just before that Comcast announced it is closing Sacramento-area call centers. Combined, it’s about 1,000 lost jobs. Do you have an opinion about the local job situation? I feel so sorry for people who are losing their jobs, but when I was mayor, and for years before that, I was on a board that tried to entice businesses to come to Sacramento. We were told that businesses weren’t concerned about the cost of doing business here. They were concerned about other things, like what kind of clientele they were going to get here. Sacramento was at the crossroads between Interstate 5 and [highways] 50 and 99, and there was good public transportation. It was those other factors that wanted to make them stay here. I thought about that when I heard Campbell was

“REFLECTIONS” continued on page 11

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Debate to the death Poll numbers reveal underwhelming support to ban death penalty Over the past decade, the death penalty has grown increasingly unpopular. In 2011, 43 inmates were executed nationwide. by In 1999, Texas alone executed more Joaquin Palomino than twice that number. In California, executions have been halted since 2006, after the lethal-injection protocol was declared unconstitutional. And this November, supporters for Proposition 34 hope to extend that moratorium indefinitely. Prop. 34 proposes replacing the death penalty with life without possibility of parole. It would also earmark $100 million for investigating unsolved murders and rapes, and would force killers to work in prison to help pay restitution to victims. The debate is as impassioned as it is divisive, and a recent Los Angeles Times poll showed only 38 percent support for the measure. Since 1977, 750 people have been sentenced to death in California state courts, but only 13 have been executed, while 77 have died of natural causes or committed suicide. Despite its infrequent use, capital punishment has cost state taxpayers at least $4 billion in the past three decades.

“Capital punishment is very judiciously reviewed and applied.” Ron Cottingham president Peace Officers Research Association of California “We have spent all of this money pretending that people are going to be executed,” said Jeanne Woodford, an ex-warden at San Quentin State Prison and a backer of Prop. 34. Woodford also contends that California has gotten little back in return. “The death penalty does not improve public safety at all,” she said. “It is not a deterrent. It does nothing to better our lives in any way.” Another reason law-enforcement types support Prop. 34 is the death penalty’s cost. If it were repealed, California could save $180 million a year, according to a Loyola Law School Los Angeles study. However, while many major police departments desperately need more funds, there is still strong opposition to Prop. 34 from lawenforcement agencies. 10

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Ron Cottingham, president of the Sacramento-based Peace Officers Research Association of California, is one of the measure’s biggest critics. He contends that the arguments made against the death penalty are deceptive and exaggerated. “Capital punishment is very judiciously reviewed and applied,” he argued. “It’s only the worst-of-theworst cases that are actually charged with a capital offense across California.” Cottingham believes that the problem lies in the exhaustive appeals process. Once sentenced to death, convicts are entitled to a number of appeals under the law. The first is automatic, and it typically takes about a decade to run through the Supreme Court of California. After that, there are both state and federal habeas corpus appeals. It’s normally another 12 years before that process concludes, at which point it isn’t uncommon for the federal court to send the case back to the state level, thereby repeating the process. As a result, the average time for a death-penalty case to go from trial to execution is 25 years, and in 2010, the appeals alone cost taxpayers $58 million. Backers of Prop. 34 agree that this appeals process is dysfunctional. Along with the huge price tag, the lengthy process takes a toll on crime victims. As many death-row cases are appealed multiple times, the victims’ families often has to return to court over and over again. “It’s emotionally draining, it’s financially draining, it’s psychologically draining,” said Deldelp Medina, the Northern California victims-outreach coordinator for Death Penalty Focus, a group that supports Prop. 34. “It’s not a process that helps anyone heal in any way, shape or form.” Opponents of the measure, however, believe that if the appeals process were fixed, the death penalty would work in California. Many point to Texas and Virginia as examples of how capital punishment can work. Both states run capital murder cases through the legal system quickly, resulting in a shorter duration between sentencing and execution. However, this shortened judicial process has led to numerous questionable executions. Also, in both Texas and Virginia, a death-penalty sentence continues to cost notably more than that of life without the possibility of parole. Ω

“REFLECTIONS” continued from page 9

leaving. It’s always been a very friendly town for businesses.

Do you use the Internet a lot, and are you involved in social media? Well, when it serves my needs I am. I have a lot of activities. I get up in the morning, and I turn on my computer. I usually find that there are 15-20 [emails] that came at night, or even after I’ve already checked my email. I find it’s an easy way to communicate.

It’s delightful to know people still remember me. It’s nice that they have good recollections of what I did. They may not all be close friends, but they remember things that I did, and that makes me feel good. So, I never complain about being recognized.

You were against development of Natomas, right? Yes, I believe [former city Councilwoman] Lynn Robie and I were the two votes against it. It was kind of tough, because I knew I was going to be criticized for it. I thought we were going into it too fast, and we were doing it for reasons other than the good reason for growth. We had areas in the city that needed to be filled in. We have a lot of communities that should either be improved or renovated before we go out and take farmland. But the farmers wanted to get rid of their lands. They knew they were going to get a lot of money for it. I also knew it was the wrong thing to do when plans I voted against required something like 50 mitigation measures to make it developable.

There’s a contentious election coming up to determine our next president. What are your thoughts? I always admired the Romneys, because we bought two Ramblers [editor’s note: Gov. Mitt Romney’s father was president of American Motors for eight years]. As the governor of Massachusetts, it sounded like [Mitt Romney] was doing a lot of good things in health care, but I don’t really know if he really was doing good things for health care. I don’t think he made it possible for more people to afford health care. I am all for President [Barack] Obama. I think he should be treated with more respect than he is getting from his opponent. That is

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“I am all for President [Barack] Obama. I think he should be treated with more respect than he is.” Anne Rudin

Perhaps it’s premature, but there’s a pretty prevalent thought that Hilary Clinton will be a presidential candidate in 2016. Do you have an opinion? I supported her before, and I would support her even more now. I think she is the most intelligent woman in our country. I admire her greatly. When I hear her talk and I see her making an appearance, she understands the foreign situation. I don’t think we could find a better person to be president. I would support her all the way.

THINK FREE.

How do feel when you are recognized?

something I don’t like about politics, when they start hammering on each other. He is the president: I may not agree with everything he is doing, but I think he is doing the best he can, given all the obstacles he has to try to get changed. I think he could have gone further with the health issues, and I think he felt he did what he could, although I don’t know what obstacles he ran into. I think his intentions are good, and I will support him again.

You will be 89 next January. You look terrific. Can you pinpoint the things that have allowed you to be so healthy and allowed you to be so active? Good genes. I haven’t outlived my father’s age. He lived until he was 98. I had to fight with an insurance company to buy a policy as an investment because of my age. I finally got them to do it because I pulled every string I could. I let them know I am healthy. I go to the gym three times a week. I do the treadmill, and I do work with weights. I do exercises to increase my upper-body strength. I’ve been doing it for eight years. I feel very good about it. I have to get used to the fact that we all have to go sometime. But right now, I am enjoying life as it is. Ω

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Mmmkay? Nope. Cheesy nicknames for grid hot spots, big cheddar for city-council hopefuls Remember a few years back when the Midtown Business Association forked over tens of thousands of bucks to a local ad firm to come up with a new slogan for Midtown? And remember when all the ad firm did was bite off a Fleetwood Mac lyric and unveiled “Midtown: Go Your Own Way” on posters and window stickers? The accepted wisdom R E behind this no-doubt sage L IL M K by NIC 2010 investment was to brand the neighborhood as some nickam@newsreview.com modern sanctuary for the cultivated Sacramento dabbler. A destination for the kind of person who eats, shops, plays—then stumbles drunkenly, raucously back to their car after midnight through the neighborhoods—without a damn to give. I go my own way, got it? Now where’s my free MBA T-shirt? Fast-forward two years later: Whatever happened to that slogan? All those logo-emblazoned coffee mugs the MBA hoped would catch fire in Midtown nooks and kitchens? Not so much.

Why muck up a really good thing with some silly name like “The Kay”? The lesson here is that these groaner attempts to brand neighborhoods seldom work. For locals, they’re sigh-inducing marketing campaigns that make people wish they’d moved to Hollywood Park. And for outof-towners, they never rebrand districts in a meaningful way. So, I couldn’t help but roll my eyes when the Downtown Sacramento Partnership announced the latest attempt to rebrand the K Street Mall: The group is changing K Street’s name to “The Kay.” A plan is in the works to post new street signs between Seventh and 13th streets that proclaim this new name. A spokesperson from DSP explained to Jared Goyette of the Sacramento Press that the goal is to return to K Street’s roots—like J Street, the block was once spelled “K-A-Y”—and, as part of a larger campaign, better market the strip’s new businesses and restaurants. Let me first say that I’m all for getting fresh blood excited about new downtown spots such as Broadacre Coffee and Blackbird Kitchen & Bar. 12

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These young entrepreneurs and others have smart ideas about food and drink, and they’re changing the K Street milieu in an encouraging way. Why muck up a really good thing with some silly name like “The Kay”? People always do branding backward. It’s not what you project onto consumers—you’re not going to convert locals to adopt such hokey vernacular as “The Kay.” Branding is what people perceive. And the perception of the K Street Mall is, for the first time in decades, trending upward. So take that marketing budget and instead put it back into the businesses, with more bike racks or discounted parking. Mmmkay? Perhaps in the future, architect Joe Yee or attorney Steve Hansen will spare Midtown and downtown of such tacky nomenclature. The two are in the final legs of a tight race to become the first city council member for the entire grid. Expect lots of unexpected knocks on the door and junk mail in the coming weeks, because successful electioneering is all about shameless invasion of neighborly space. Oh, and thick wads of cash. Speaking of which: The city released third-quarter campaignfinance reports for both candidates last week. Hansen’s pulled ahead in this battle for cushier coffers. He raised $71,085 in cash and nonmonetary contributions from 212 donors between June and September, including a handful of big gives, such as more than $10,000 from the Sacramento Police Officers Association and the Sacramento Area Fire Fighters Local 522. Hansen’s raked in more

than $166,000 to date. Yee took in $59,430 during this same period from 120 checkbooks. Local labor paved the way for nearly half of these donations, approximately $26,000, and the Sacramento City Teachers Association also chipped in $1,500. Yee’s raised nearly $129,000 this year. The take-home? Hansen boasts a more robust “grassroots” donor base, but still has blue-chip interests. He also has twice as much cash on hand than Yee—which he’ll need to make inroads with presumably Yee-friendly Land Park voters. Ω

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Dial M, not for money Sacramento charter commission less of a distraction than Allen Warren’s campaign finances Sacramento City Council District 2 candidate Allen Warren has loaned $121,000 to his own election campaign. Warren gave himself $17,000 in August, and another $50,000 at the end of September, according to the latest campaign-finance reports. His opponent, Rob Kerth, won the primary but is slipping behind in the money race. Kerth raised nearly $58,000 in the last period, bringARVIN ing his total for the year to about $155,000. by COSMO G With Warren’s small fortune and smaller cosmog@newsreview.com chunk of contributions from supporters, the developer-turned-candidate has raised $237,000 this year. Warren has the personal wealth to finance his own election campaign despite owing hundreds of thousands of dollars in unpaid property taxes (see “North by northeast” SN&R Frontlines, May 10), and despite being bogged down in lawsuits with creditors, who are suing him for unpaid bills (see “Justice and Warren” by Nick Miller, SN&R Frontlines, September 20.) Regular readers know that SN&R has, from time to time, raised questions about Warren’s financial and legal troubles. That’s because this sort of thing seems to be relevant when considering a man’s qualifications for public office—after all, Warren wants to help hold the city’s purse strings. But Warren dismisses questions about his money messes by saying that SN&R reporters and editors just don’t know anything about how business works. True enough. Probably don’t understand politics, either. Because the more Bites sees of Warren’s financial history and his candidacy, the less any of it makes sense. Last weekend Bites ran into Efren Gutierrez, candidate for the Sacramento charter commission. He summed up why you should vote for the charter-commission ballot question, Measure M. “You have [The Sacramento] Bee, the mayor, the fire department and police department all saying no [on Measure M]. What a group of fellows! When they get together, you’ve got to wonder what’s going on.” What’s going on is that particular group of fellows didn’t get the vote they wanted on strong mayor. At the same time, some of the unions don’t like Measure M because the charter works fine for them now—what with binding arbitration and the like—why mess with a good thing? Same with the Sacramento Metro Chamber. SN&R editors are against it because, well, Bites doesn’t really know why. They’ve gone all Bee-lite on this one. Both editorial boards complain that the charter commission will be a “distraction.” These busy editors have more important things to think about, apparently, than our city’s constitution: Please don’t distract them. They also say the process will be dominated by special-interestbacked candidates with their special-interest-backed agendas.

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Maybe. Let’s see. Here’s all of the specialinterest money flowing into the charter-commission campaign in its entirety, according to the last campaign filings: The Metro Chamber made a $1,500 donation to Phyllis Newton and gave $3,000 to Shane Singh. It also gave $600 each to Bernard Bowler, Brock Littlejohn and Greg Anderson. The Associated Builders and Contractors and Western Electrical Contractors Association, both of which fight against union-friendly policies like project labor agreements, gave $1,500 to Littlejohn and Anderson, and $600 to John Hodgson. Hodgson also pulled in $1,500 from the Associated Builders, as did Bowler. Singh and Newton also scored $1,200 and $600, respectively, from another business, the Sacramento Region Builders PAC.

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Those are your business-flavored specialinterest candidates. Maybe union influence is more your cup of tea. The Sacramento Building Trades Council poured $1,500 each on Susan Patterson, Tamie A. Dramer, Alan LoFaso, Terry Schanz and Anna Molander. Two sheet-metal workers unions gave $2,000 to Dennis Canevari. Finally, Sacramento City Unified School District board member and Democratic mover Patrick Kennedy donated $600 to Dramer and Patterson, and another $1,000 to Catherine Lopez. That’s it. That’s less than Allen Warren blew at Julius clothing while his own business was going down the tubes. (No, really. It is.) Out of 54 candidates for charter commission, only 20 have raised any money at all. Many of those used a personal credit card to pay for their ballot statements or raised a handful of small donations. About a dozen got money from big labor or business PACs—and those typically got just enough to cover the cost of their ballot statements. Feel free to not vote for them if you think that money make them union stooges or whatever. Most candidates are forgoing ballot statements and relying on Facebook or word-of-mouth campaigns. Not exactly the special-interest slugfest we were warned about by the hand-wringing editorial boards. Don’t worry, though. When Measure M is defeated and strong mayor is on the ballot, the special-interest money will really start flowing. Hopefully, that won’t be too distracting. Ω

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Teaching compassion Homeboy Industries offers   hope to former gang members Standing at the Carmichael Presbyterian Church podium in front of 300 people, Los Angeles Jesuit priest Gregory Boyle was planning to read the text on his phone to demonstrate how gang members have taught him many life lessons—including how to text. He had set up the sight gag well, picking up his phone to read the message. Unfortunately, there was a new text on his phone. l by Jeff VonKaene Angel, the younger brother of a former employee of j e ffv @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m Homeboy Industries, had just been killed. Still shaken, Boyle went ahead with his speech. After all, that is what he has been doing for the last 25 years—going on, despite setbacks and tragedies, while serving as a priest in a Catholic parish in a tough L.A. neighborhood and then as the founder of Homeboy Industries, the largest gang-intervention project in the country. Boyle told the Sacramento audience heartfelt story after heartfelt story of how hardened gang members were able to turn their lives around when given a chance. He told us how once these former rival gang members started working side The fear of death or by side, it was hard for them to continue hating each other. prison means little These individual stories pointed to a bigger story. At to one who cannot birth, no one is part of a gang. imagine a future. Only individuals who have lost hope are interested in gangs. The fear of death or prison means little to one who cannot imagine a future without death or prison. So, the solution to the problem of 120,000 gang members in Los Angeles is not more effective police enforcement, stiffer penalties and more prisons: The solution is to create a new path. Boyle’s Homeboy Industries offers such a path. This The Rev. Gregory starts with day care, better schools and real job opportuniBoyle’s Tattoos ties. In any given month, up to 1,000 former gang members on the Heart: The Power of Boundless and recently incarcerated men and women come through the Compassion is a doors, seeking services including free tattoo removal, job series of essays training, parenting classes, GED tutoring, legal assistance that illustrate his and substance-abuse counseling. work with former Speaking at the Carmichael Presbyterian Church speakgang members. The audio book is read ers’ series and at his sermons the next day, Boyle talked by Boyle. about expanding our circle of compassion. Recognizing that people naturally have compassion for those in their circle, yet find it hard to feel compassion for strangers, he believes that his work is to expand that circle of compassion until no one is left out. Listening to Boyle, I was deeply moved. There are and always will be people who make bad choices. But if we respond to them with contempt, marginalizing and incarcerating them, their choices will always be limited. But Jeff vonKaenel is the president, if we can find the compassion in our hearts to provide some CEO and options or a path to a better future for them, we may find majority owner of that people with hope make better choices. I do not know if the News & Review compassion alone would have meant that Boyle would not newspapers in Sacramento, have received such a devastating text message, but I believe Ω Chico and Reno. we should try to find out.

A valley between

by Auntie Ruth

Don’t be a yokel

Sierra Club says Dan Lungren’s Hetch Hetchy love is far removed from his terrible environmental record The Sierra Club is spending $625,000 to defeat a Republican lawmaker who has championed one of the environmental organization’s most cherished goals: draining by Lance Williams the Hetch Hetchy reservoir in Yosemite National Park. Campaign-finance reports show that in September, the Sierra Club Independent Action super PAC made several expenditures targeting U.S. Rep. Dan Lungren of Gold River, who is locked in a tight race against Elk Grove Democrat Dr. Ami Bera. The club is paying for a hard-edged series of TV commercials and mailers here in the Sacramento area. The ads accuse Lungren of “selling out California” and practicing “oily politics,” claiming he favors tax breaks for oil companies and offshore oil drilling. Oddly, Lungren is one of a handful of officials who has backed “Though [Dan] the Sierra Club’s long campaign to Lungren is on breach the O’Shaughnessy Dam on the Tuolumne River and restore the the right side on Hetch Hetchy Valley in the Sierra Hetch Hetchy, on Nevada. Sierra Club founder John wrote that the 8-mile-long nearly every other Muir alpine valley was almost as beautiful issue he’s with big as Yosemite itself. It was inundated polluters.” 89 years ago to provide water and hydroelectric power for San Cathy Duvall Francisco. Sierra Club For decades, the Sierra Club has lobbied to restore Hetch Hetchy. The Sierra Club believes that Lungren’s support for restoring Hetch Hetchy is outweighed by his support for “the toxic agenda of the big polluters,” national political director Cathy Duvall Lance Williams is a said in a statement. writer at California “Though Lungren is on the right side on Hetch Watch. Read more Hetchy, on nearly every other issue he’s with big stories at polluters,” she wrote. www.california watch.org. Lungren campaign manager Jeff Wyly called the club’s campaign against the lawmaker misleading and unfair. Pop quiz: Take “The Josh Wolf, Bera’s campaign manager, said the Dan Lungren trivia Sierra Club had sized up Lungren correctly. challenge!” by Melinda Welsh, a recent “His environmental record is terrible, and they feature story, at know that,” he said. www.newsreview.com. Lungren became interested in restoring Hetch Hetchy while serving in Congress during the Reagan administration. In 1987, then-Interior Secretary Donald Hodel Green Days is on the proposed studying the idea, saying he hoped to create lookout for innovative a priceless “second Yosemite” for the nation. sustainable projects throughout the Then and now, the idea was bitterly opposed by Sacramento region. San Francisco’s Democratic political leadership. Turn us on at Officials including Sen. Dianne Feinstein and House sactonewstips@ Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi have warned that drainnewsreview.com. ing the reservoir would result in blackouts and water shortages. Some environmentalists suspect that Hodel and other Republicans who promote breaching the dam hoped to stir up trouble between Northern California BEFORE

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Choose your cliché:

Hetch Hetchy, a reservoir for the Bay Area since 1923, is one thing the Sierra Club and Congressman Dan Lungren can agree on.

Democrats and the environmental groups with whom they often are allied. At any rate, Lungren has raised the idea of reclaiming the mountain valley repeatedly over his political career. Lungren is sincere, Mike Marshall, executive director of the Restore Hetch Hetchy environmental organization, told California Watch earlier this year. “Yosemite has a big place in his heart,” Marshall said at the time; he declined to comment for this story. Depending on what happens elsewhere in the country, control of Congress could turn on whether Lungren holds onto his seat. According to data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics, more than a dozen committees—liberal and conservative— are running independent expenditure campaigns in the race. By law, these committees can collect and spend unlimited amounts of campaign cash as long as they don’t coordinate their efforts with any candidate. The biggest independent campaign to beat Lungren is run by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees union, which has spent $800,000. Other anti-Lungren expenditures include the Service Employees International Union (about $203,000), the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (about $314,000), and two liberal super PACs: the House Majority PAC (about $270,000) and Friends of Democracy (about $180,000). Campaigns to defeat Bera are being run by the National Republican Congressional Committee (nearly $638,000) and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce ($490,000). The National Journal’s Hotline on Call political blog has reported that the U.S. Chamber intends to pump another $484,000 into the race. Ω

How I love the little things you do. Half of life is just showing up. The sum is greater than its parts. That said, eco-warriors, what the hell are you doing on behalf of Mama Earth these days? There’s arsenic in rice. Charbroiled burgers create more air pollution than diesel trucks. What does it matter? If you are Brian May from Queen, you’re trying to get England to stop killing badgers. If you are the Seattle Mariners, you gave 5,000 baseball fans their very own bag of gardening soil—composted from old napkins and last season’s hot dogs. If you are Tim DeChristopher, you are back in jail. (Convicted of civil disobedience for bidding on parcels of public land—many near national parks—in an effort to stop their development for oil and gas; his appeal was recently overturned.) If you’re Mayim Bialik, you are vegan all the way down to your nail polish. And so on, and so on, and Vote! scooby, dooby, dooby. You do what you can: recycle, reuse, reduce; drive your bike a little more; change your routines; try to be good. Only so many hours in the day. I’ll sleep when I’m dead. It is what it is. But do this: Stop dithering about. Vote for Obama. Whatever your reservations, be they revolutionary, anarchistic, indie-metal rocker, I’m-so-left-I-think-I’ll-light-myself-on-fire, a tragically Republican childhood, how you admire your beautiful politics in the mirror when you comb your hair—whatever. Environmentally speaking, the choice is clear, your vote is important and nothing is simple anymore. Mitt Romney doesn’t think carbon pollution is a threat. President Barack Obama issued the first-ever carbon-pollution rules for power plants. Romney is against fuel-efficiency standards. Obama has already set standards requiring cars to average 54 mpg by 2025. Romney endorses Paul Ryan’s budget, which gives a 60 percent funding increase to coal, oil and natural gas and decreases research on solar projects and loans for fuel-efficient cars. Obama “will not walk away from the promise of clean energy.” Romney has repeatedly called green We bet your aunts aren’t as cool as ours. jobs fake. Obama has achieved a historic level of Friend Auntie Ruth investment in clean energy (according to Grist). on Facebook Vote for Obama. Get your friends to vote and let’s hang out. for Obama, especially the eco-aware types who somehow think it doesn’t matter. It does. And, oh, while you’re at it, vote Ami Bera for Congress. If you think Romney is bad, ditto the local yokel Dan Lungren. Ω

Supercharged sedan Tesla Motors’ Model S, an all-electric sedan, was a big hit when it shipped this summer—receiving praise from electric-vehicle enthusiasts and car magazines alike. Last month, Tesla announced another exciting product for Model S drivers: the Supercharger network. The network, which was developed and installed secretly in six California cities—including Folsom, Gilroy and Lebec—is solar powered, and each station can fully charge the Model S in an hour. The six Supercharger locations allow for drivers to make it all the way from Northern California to Southern California within range of a charger. More are planned throughout the country.

Tesla Motors’ Model S.

—Jonathan Mendick

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A new me? What the FBI did to my self-image as a subversive After recently reviewing Seth Rosenfeld’s book, Subversives: The FBI’s War on Student Radicals, and Reagan’s Rise to Power, I by Jay Feldman decided it was time to make a Freedom of a Davis author and Information Act request for my own FBI file. occasional contributor That the bureau had a file on me was a to SN&R foregone conclusion. After all, my credentials as a bona fide subversive—at least what the FBI would consider as such—were impeccable. Or so I thought. I started my subversive career early on as a red-diaper baby, growing up in a Communist family in New York in the 1940s and ’50s, when the fearmongers were conducting a frenzied search for subversives under every rock, when FBI agents made visits to our home, when people we knew went to jail for no other reason than their ideas and beliefs. In college, I carried on my family’s “subversive” tradition, marching in civil-rights demonstrations and picketing Woolworths department stores. I supported the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy and participated in demonstrations against the New York City air-raid drills that required citizens to hole up like rats in civil-defense shelters. After college, I engaged in more subversion. In fall of 1964, I was beginning my second year of graduate school at UC Berkeley when all hell broke loose on campus. From the outset, I was right in the middle of it, an active participant in the Free Speech Movement and one of some 800 students arrested in the historic December 2 Sproul Hall sit-in. During my years at Berkeley, I also participated in many protests against the war in Vietnam. The civil-rights, anti-nuclear, anti-Vietnam War and student movements were all crawling with FBI agents and informants, in accordance with longtime bureau director J. Edgar Hoover’s conviction that anyone critical of the status quo had to be a dangerous subversive. In the mid-’80s, I founded and directed Baseball for Peace, a grassroots effort to create understanding between the people of the United States and Nicaragua based on our common national pastime. Under the aegis of the Sandinista government’s official agricultural union, we took groups of The paperback American citizens to Nicaragua to play ball edition of Jay and distribute equipment, even as the Reagan Feldman’s Manufacturing administration was funding the contra war to Hysteria: A History topple the Sandinista government. of Scapegoating, More recently, in my last book, Surveillance, and Manufacturing Hysteria: A History of Secrecy in Modern America will be Scapegoating, Surveillance, and Secrecy in released in November. Modern America, I documented just how sinister and widespread FBI surveillance of civilians has been, going back to the original Bureau of Investigation, created in 1908. By 1958, 20 percent of all Americans—14 million people— had been investigated for one reason or another.

After the book was published, I wrote an op-ed piece for The Sacramento Bee, criticizing the FBI’s revised Domestic Investigations and Operations Guide. The original DIOG had been controversial in its own right and had alarmed many privacy advocates; the new guide grants agents significantly broader powers of surveillance and investigation. So, then, given my long career of “subvervise” activities, I was eager to see what my FBI file looked like. As noted, I never doubted that they had one on me. I filled out the FOIA request form, and several weeks later received an answer from the FBI, stating that it was “unable to identify main file records” pertaining to me. Say what? But there must be some mistake. No FBI file? A certified subversive like me? I mean, I knew Mario Savio. I visited Pete Seeger at his Beacon, N.Y., home. I met top Sandinista officials in Nicaragua. How could I have slipped through the cracks?

I started my subversive career early on as a red-diaper baby, growing up in a Communist family in New York in the 1940s and ’50s, when the fearmongers were conducting a frenzied search for subversives under every rock. OK, I wasn’t expecting a thick file. Except for Baseball for Peace, I never had much of a leadership role. A small file would have satisfied me. But not even having been on its radar? Now, that’s a real blow to my self-image. But, let’s face it, the FBI has never been the most efficient agency. So, I guess while it was investigating other dangerous “subversives” like the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Satchel Paige, Albert Einstein, Eleanor Roosevelt, Steve Allen and countless others, the bureau must have missed me. Not that I was ever in the class of King, Paige, Einstein, Roosevelt or Allen. But damnit, I was sure I was a subversive. Now, though, without an FBI file to prove it, I’m going to have to figure out who I am all over again. Ω

ThiS ModErn World

by tom tomorrow

Yes on T and U Less piles of yard waste on the city of Sacramento’s streets, more piles of cash in City Hall’s coffers. That’s the hoped-for endgame if voters approve Measure T and Measure U, both of which SN&R endorses. Measure T specifically would repeal 1977’s Measure A, which prohibited the city from requiring yard-waste containers. The city hopes to curb illegal yard-waste dumping and also make the roads safer for pedestrians and cyclists. A yes vote on Measure T does not, however, mean the end of Sacto’s “claw”; the city will still send the claw out to pick up loose leaves and incidental waste to keep storm drains clear. A yes vote on Measure U, meanwhile, will help pay for these services. Measure U, called the Essential Services Protection Measure, will raise the city’s sales tax by half a percent—from 7.75 percent to 8.25 percent—over six years. We’re not thrilled about a regressive tax, but city services—police, fire, solid waste and libraries—have experienced unprecedented cuts over the past five years. And the estimated $28 million in added revenue from Measure U will go a long way to ensuring that Sacramento’s fundamental services are preserved. Last week, the city council approved a special committee to oversee how Measure U funds are spent. This is encouraging—but we also hope leadership continues to look at ways to cut spending and improve efficiency at City Hall. Ω

Why the secret donors?

Vote Dr. Ami Bera

If you are a television viewer living anywhere within 20 clicks of Sacramento, you too have been bombarded with Congressman Dan Lungren and Dr. Ami Bera Michelle Rhee’s StudentsFirst, a nonprofit and tax-exempt Rhee’s group aims to split public-school teachers attack and counterattack ads this past month. Guess education-reform group that operates in 34 states from pupils and their families. what? It’s not going to end until Election Day, since with a national headquarters in Sacramento, StudentsFirst is busy at the California state an avalanche of money continues to pour in. What’s raises money in secrecy to do political advocacy. Capitol and at state houses nationwide, calling at stake is a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. The group raised $4.6 million in 2010-2011 for for new rules for public schools. Why? Rhee’s And, despite our distaste for the ads, SN&R’s its 501(c)(4) nonprofit activities, according to the group blames public-school teachers and their clear choice is to endorse Bera to represent the 7th Internal Revenue Service. labor unions for a lack of accountability to Congressional District. StudentsFirst does not have to share donors’ parents and students. First off, there is Lungren. A career politician, he names and none are on the IRS’s Form 990 that While U.S. public schools try to educate has been ultraconservative for decades, long before the group filed for the tax year ending July 31, all youth—both the officially poor and scores the country stewed and spoiled in political division 2011. IRS policy gives of others whose families by as it now does. Lungren has voted to oppose abortion barely make ends meet—the Seth Sandronsky StudentsFirst a legal and stem-cell research; supported offshore oil drilling; Michelle Rhee’s shield for donor secrecy. teacher-accountability a freelance journalist voted no on enforcing limits on carbon emissions and In this respect, Rhee’s narrative of StudentsFirst in Sacramento group blames publicon tax credits for renewable energy; blocked efforts group resembles GOP sidesteps the concrete fact school teachers at campaign-finance reform; and fought initiatives to strategist Karl Rove’s of economic inequality. This better regulate the financial sector. Crossroads Grassroots trend weakens public funding and their labor Lungren is just far too conservative to represent a Policy Strategies, a of education. It’s part of an district that incorporates huge swaths of Sacramento 501(c)(4) nonprofit. Rove unions for a lack of anti-union agenda sweeping County. aims, of course, to boost the land. accountability to For more information By contrast, Bera will be a bright, solid congressthe ranks of Republican The goal of StudentsFirst parents and students. is to raise $1 billion in five on the political record man—a Democrat willing to think outside the box. By officeholders this of Congressman dan trade, he’s a physician and medical administrator—not November. years, which will not come lungren, find “The a politician or a lawyer—so he will enter Congress Rhee is a Democrat, at least nominally. Her from the 99 percent, but from the wealthy. dan lungren trivia challenge!” by Melinda with a business-not-as-usual bias. In addition to undereducation-reform agenda includes upending In mid-July, the IRS announced that it would Have a comment? Welsh (Sn&r Feature standing health care inside and out, Bera has shown teacher tenure, establishing teacher merit pay, review its tax policy for 501(c)(4) nonprofits. Express your views Story, September 27) he will stick up for the rights and futures of women, Donor transparency can move StudentsFirst in 350 words on increasing publicly funded charter and online at www.news the poor and the middle class. He’ll be a strong envia local topic schools, and expanding standardized testing. out of the shadows and onto the public’s radar review.com. of interest. The annual math and reading test scores of ronmental advocate and ally to those in Congress who screen. The main secret donors to Rhee’s Send an email to are working to combine job growth with lower carbon group are likely the 1 percent who also rent our editorial@ public-school students as the lead measure of emissions. politicians. newsreview.com. their classroom achievement looms large in Join us in supporting Bera in the 7th Congressional the education reform agenda of StudentsFirst. Sunlight boosts democracy. Let it shine. Ω District. Ω B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |  A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |    10.11.12     |   SN&R     |   17

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JIM LANE to JONATHAN KIEFER: Looking over the list of movies, my first impulse is to pick one or two from each month that I’m really looking forward to. I don’t mean the way I’m looking forward to, say, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn—Part 2 (November 16) as the end of a series that’s already droned on years too long. I mean “looking forward to” as in “want to see.”

ovie critic. 

It seems  like such  a kick-ass  job—free film screenings,  first looks at the biggest  Hollywood blockbusters,  more popcorn than you can  shake a can of salt at. Yet  for every Academy Awardworthy flick or sidesplitting  comedy, there’s a Kevin  James film about some  janitor who moonlights as a  break-dancing martial-arts  superhero. Oh. Joy. Luckily for SN&R film  critics Jonathan Kiefer  and Jim Lane, they usually  18   |   SN&R   |   10.11.12

employ  roshambo to decide  who’ll have to endure, say,  the next Tyler Perry flick.  And, even then, the guys  can always sneak out for  popcorn refills and a   quick break. Speaking of which: Mmm,  popcorn. Who doesn’t love  its salty, buttery crunch?  But did you know that  mixing equal parts popcorn  “butter” and Diet Coke  creates crystallized fat  particles? It’s true, try it! Anyway, here at SN&R,  our Popcorn Guy is transfat free and 100-percent  natural. Just like, uh,  Kiefer and Lane’s cinema  advice. It’s just all in a 

day’s work—and whether  they’re puzzling over Daniel  Day-Lewis as Abraham  Lincoln or bemoaning the  insufferable Kiera Knightly,  the SN&R team doesn’t  just eat, drink and sleep  film: They actually talk,  text and instant message it  24-seven. Really: The guys left  their laptop browsers open  during a recent screening,  so, of course, we snagged  them, downloaded a few  messages—and, voilà,  turned the exchanges into  SN&R’s fall movie preview. Grab some popcorn, sit  back and enjoy.

JONATHAN KIEFER to JIM LANE: Wait. Do you mean to tell me that you’re not looking forward to Here Comes the Boom (October 12), with Kevin James as a high-school biology teacher who, for some reason, takes up mixed-martial arts in order to keep his music-teacher colleague, played by Henry Winkler, from getting laid off? No? Right, me neither.

LANE to KIEFER: I am tantalized by Cloud Atlas (October 26). Not so much for the Wachowski brothers (one of whom is now actually a sister)—didn’t they kind of fizzle after The Matrix? But they’re partnering with the German ace Tom Tykwer on this one, adapting David Mitchell’s complex episodic novel with a great cast: Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Hugo Weaving, Jim Broadbent, et al—all in multiple roles. The buzz when the book was published in 2004 was that it was unfilmable, so kudos to the Wachowskis and Tykwer for having the guts to tackle it. I found the trailer dazzling and alluring. Hard not to get your hopes up.

KIEFER to LANE: I don’t know about Cloud Atlas. Not because they said it was unfilmable—they said Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis was unfilmable, and … oh, actually, yeah, it was—but because to me, those shallow, callow Wachowskis seem like no match for the substantive postmodern stylist Mitchell. I mean, honestly, didn’t they kind of fizzle during The Matrix? Tykwer might help, or make matters worse (for me, the trailer’s slickness teeters into silliness), but you’re right that the guy’s got guts. He managed to direct Krzysztof Kieślowski’s Heaven after the great master died and couldn’t do it himself, and to adapt Patrick Süskind’s also allegedly unfilmable novel Perfume without scorching too much earth. For that, I’ll give Cloud Atlas a go. But for now, I’m just saying I don’t know.

LANE to KIEFER: My hopes were also up for Lincoln

(November 16). Still are, I guess—Daniel Day-Lewis in the title role, Steven Spielberg directing, based on one of the indispensable Civil War books (Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln). But this time, the trailer gives me pause. The credits say it’s only “based in part” on Goodwin’s book. Not sure I quite trust writer Tony Kushner to fill in the other parts; the few snatches of dialogue in the trailer sound pretty magniloquent. In fact, the whole trailer strikes me as too solemn and self-important.

KIEFER to LANE: I never was a Kushner fan. I once was a Spielberg fan, but now it seems like long ago. And I know from Munich that collaboration between them means a tendency to congratulate themselves and each other. Accordingly, maybe that first teaser trailer really is a bore. But the movie will be an event, and not only due to the never-disappointing Day-Lewis. Just as surely as the sap will ooze from John Williams’ score and Sally Field’s eyes, I think we can count on political-commentssection sludge oozing all across the Internet.

KIEFER to LANE: Like with Cloud Atlas, the Life of Pi trailer worries me a little. It has that same desperate-seeming computery varnish, which so often tends to leech out any real wonder. What I enjoyed about Yann Martel’s novel wasn’t just its fabulist vitality, but also its humor and nonchalance. And while I’ve admired Ang Lee—even enough to allow a soft spot for his misfire of Marvel’s Hulk—I can’t say “effortless” or “funny” are the first words his name brings to mind. Back in 2001, when the book came out, my automatic suggestion for turning it into a movie would have been to try with animation. Well, no such luck, but what are you gonna do? Admittedly, I do feel a tad possessive about Hitchcock (in limited release November 21; in Sacramento who knows when), as is any film buff’s prerogative. From Anvil: The Story of Anvil director Sacha Gervasi and Stephen Rebello’s book Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho, here we have Anthony Hopkins back in impersonation mode. Will it do him or Hitchcock any favors? Hopkins made an oddly compelling Richard Nixon, and at least with Hitch he’ll have an easier accent to fake. Helen Mirren plays his wife Alma, with Scarlett Johansson as Janet Leigh (well, fine, I guess) and James D’Arcy as Anthony Perkins (I’d have voted for Andrew Garfield). Could be fun, all told.

When it comes to doomy, throbbing-hearted self-interrogation, who but Keira Knightley will do? LANE to KIEFER: High hopes, too, for Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (December 14). After The Lord of the Rings trilogy, who can doubt Jackson’s vision? I’m not sure Tolkien’s prequel warrants two movies (second half, The Desolation of Smaug, coming next year). Is this really necessary or just a marketing ploy to pad the box office? Or—perish the thought!—will Jackson do what he did with King Kong, inflating the 1933 original out past the three-hour mark? Ah, well, Jackson knows the ground; I’m inclined to trust him. And, musical-theater buff that I am, I expect Cameron Mackintosh’s long-deferred movie of his opera-lite phenomenon Les Misérables (December 25) to be a milestone movie musical, nothing less. A beloved show to two generations of fans, lavishly produced with a brilliant cast that you’d never see on any stage—Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Anne Hathaway, Amanda Seyfried, Sacha Baron Cohen, Helena Bonham Carter, Eddie Redmayne, Colm Wilkinson—all singing live on the set instead of lip-synching to canned playback. If this turns out a turkey, director Tom Hooper (The King’s Speech) will deserve never to work again. I don’t know what the hell to expect from Life of Pi (November 21): An Indian youth, a zebra, a hyena, an orangutan and a tiger adrift together after a shipwreck sounds like a tough sell, but I’ll follow director Ang Lee almost anywhere.

LANE to KIEFER: Sir Anthony may not look that much like Sir Alfred, but Hitchcock does sound like a hoot, doesn’t it? Telling the backstory of Psycho is certainly a better idea that Gus Van Sant’s ill-advised and misbegotten 1998 remake. I’m OK with most of the casting, too—especially Helen Mirren, whose presence promises to offer overdue recognition of Alma Reville Hitchcock as a powerful influence behind the throne. Also, the umpteenth filming of Anna Karenina (November 16) shows promise, with writer Tom Stoppard, director Joe Wright (Atonement), and actors Keira Knightley, Jude Law, Emily Watson and Kelly Macdonald all onboard.

LANE to KIEFER: That first trailer is a pompous bore, sure enough—a phrase that could be applied to Spielberg at his worst, and maybe even to Kushner’s whole career. But you know, another thing niggles at the back of my mind. It sounds silly to mention it, I know, but it seems to me that Daniel Day-Lewis looks almost too much like Lincoln. Is it just a terrific makeup job? Or has the CGI crew gone beyond merely creating Civil War Washington and the burning of Richmond? I hope not. It’s one thing to turn Andy Serkis into Gollum or a genius chimpanzee, but if the techie geeks are being allowed to touch up the work of an artist like Day-Lewis, it may be time to shorten the leash.

KIEFER to LANE: Not silly at all, now that you have

mentioned it. Now I too begin to wonder: After morphing Jamie Bell into a pixel-polished Tintin, what’s to stop Spielberg from trying out a photographic cheat of old Honest Abe? This rich philosophical question should at least give us something to scrutinize during the dull talky bits. Someday, it might be fun to make a study of evolving audience credulity where biopics are concerned. Meanwhile, I’ll at least take it on faith that the integrity of Day-Lewis defies touching up.

“POPPIN’ FRESH FLICKS” continued on page 20

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Ang Lee’s take on the Yann Martel novel Life of Pi should better than his attempt at bringing Hulk back to life. Right?

“POPPIN’ FRESH FLICKS” continued from page 19

KIEFER to LANE: I seem to recall the Anna Karenina trailer saying something about a “bold new vision” and then showing some boilerplate period-drama set piece. Hey, Focus Features, no need to be ashamed that Tolstoy’s novel is just one of those durable tales that’s been made into movies ever since movies began. But how will this one rate? I do wonder if the prestigious director Joe Wright is actually just a heavy-handed hack— technician enough to mount that single-shot Dunkirk scene in Atonement, yet dullard enough to dilute Beethoven into a screen saver for The Soloist. Stoppard’s script might be his saving grace here. And yes, when it comes to doomy, throbbing-hearted self-interrogation, who but Keira Knightley will do? LANE to KIEFER: Frankly, Keira Knightley, with her hungry-shark grin, isn’t quite my picture of Anna. A better choice, I think, would have been Kate Beckinsale—if she hadn’t wrecked her reputation as an actress on the rocks of the Underworld franchise. Beyond that, what else? Well, Daniel Craig is back as James Bond in Skyfall (November 9), the latest installment in The Movie Series Even Roger Moore Couldn’t Kill. Robert Zemeckis returns to live-action filmmaking for the first time in a decade (but still as much in love with CGI as ever) with Flight (November 2), starring Denzel Washington as an is-he-or-isn’t-he-a-hero airline pilot. Plus, a trio of Quentin Tarantino and/or Guy Ritchie clones: Seven Psychopaths (October 12, with Colin Farrell, Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell and Christopher Walken), The

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Man With the Iron Fists (November 2, with Russell Crowe and Lucy Liu) and Killing Them Softly (November 30, with Brad Pitt, Richard Jenkins, James Gandolfini, Ray Liotta and Sam Shepard). All three have trailers that promise plenty of bang (and slash and kick and stab) for the buck. Whether they deliver anything more, time will tell.

Daniel Craig is back as James Bond in Skyfall, the latest installment in the movie series even Roger Moore couldn’t kill.

slave-and-bounty-hunter buddy movie (starring Jamie Foxx and Christoph Waltz) with which Quentin Tarantino appears to remain a clone of himself. LANE to KIEFER: Like you, I expect Seven Psychopaths to have its wacky whacky pleasures and a real sense of humor. Clone or no, Quentin can hold your attention, and I’m curious to see if he’ll be as free and easy with history as he was on Inglourious Basterds. KIEFER TO LANE: December also delivers Zero

Dark Thirty (December 19), director Kathryn Bigelow’s nail-biter about the Navy SEALs who tracked down and took out Osama Bin Laden. I believe that title derives from military code, and as such, it’s quite effective: I have no idea what time that is. LANE to KIEFER: I understand the title is military speak that translates roughly as “the middle of the night in the middle of nowhere.” KIEFER TO LANE: There’s more, of course. What

are we forgetting? LANE to KIEFER: Ha! You mean what are we

ignoring? KIEFER TO LANE: Ah, touché.

KIEFER to LANE: At least Seven Psychopaths has the virtue of coming to us from writer-director Martin McDonagh, who also made the 2008 charmer In Bruges and produced his brother John Michael McDonagh’s 2011 charmer The Guard. Tell you what: It appeals to me more than Django Unchained (December 25), the

LANE to KIEFER: We’re ignoring plenty, actually. Here Comes the Boom would be a prime example, except that you did have to go and bring it up. So let’s take a deep breath and gingerly pick our way down that alley. There’s Paranormal Activity 4 (October 19). I thought the first one was good, the second

better, but unwilling to push my luck, I decided to skip No. 3. Now Paramount Pictures has turned Oren Peli’s modest, effective little chiller into a demonic family saga, and I’m pretty much dreading it—but not in the way Paramount would like. Besides, as a general rule of thumb, any sequel with 4 in the title is probably best avoided. (I’m willing to make an exception for Toy Story 4, but that’s a ways off.) And take (please!) This Is 40 (December 21). Have audiences really been clamoring for a sequel to Knocked Up? Or is Judd Apatow running out of fresh ideas? Already halfway to my kitsch file is the Red Dawn remake (November 21). Whose bright idea was this and why? Did somebody note Chris Hemsworth’s passing resemblance to Patrick Swayze and think, “Why not?” (If so, thank God they didn’t opt for Road House or Next of Kin.) Still, as dumb ideas go, this one sticks out: A Soviet invasion was a semicredible stretch in 1984. North Korea in 2012, not so much. A pair of animated features will also come and go; we’ll see if they leave more than fleeting harmless ripples. There’s Wreck-It Ralph from Disney, which looks like a kind of kiddie Tron for the Super Mario Bros. set; and Rise of the Guardians, which at least has a literary pedigree, based on William Joyce’s Guardians of Childhood books—plus a gen-you-wine Pulitzer Prize winner, David Lindsay-Abaire, doing the script. KIEFER TO LANE: How that old kitsch file bulges.

Some films are, shall we say, forgettable, even sight unseen. Take Red Dawn, for instance: I can’t help but see it as a stateof-the-industry yardstick. Not because it’s yet another rehash of the pop monoculture

that poisoned my mind as a boy (yes, see also Wreck-It Ralph, with its 8-bit nostalgia and its two-bit concept), but rather for what it reveals of the craven Hollywood urge toward overseas-market-revenue dredging. Note that the villainous invading army used to be Chinese but reportedly was reconfigured in post-production as North Korean. Racist? Xenophobic? Well, sure, but mostly just a matter of which country’s box-office cash we really can’t do without. Not even a semicredible stretch, indeed. Speaking of weird box-office math, there’s also Alex Cross (October 19), with Tyler Perry in the movie version of a James Patterson potboiler, which looks like one of those calculations where the lowered common denominator becomes a revenue multiplier. But who knows? With Matthew Fox as the bad guy and Giancarlo Esposito in there somewhere, maybe it’ll be a good ride. At any rate, one does yearn for hearty alternative fare. And, on that front, for this season at least, it’s hard to stay optimistic. Another limited release is Silver Linings Playbook (November 21), a Toronto International Film Festival prizewinner from director David O. Russell (and from Matthew Quick’s novel), with Bradley Cooper coming out of a mental hospital to fall in love with Jennifer Lawrence. Having barely read a thing about it, I know I shouldn’t get so reactionary, but even the title grates. For me, it evokes 2010’s It’s Kind of a Funny Story and that woeful subgenre, the never-quite-blackenough comedy of mental illness—which is usually just fodder for pseudo-edgy schmaltz. LANE to KIEFER: I do think we’ve overlooked at least one winner. I caught an early screening of The Sessions (October 19), and I think it’s one of the best movies of the year. It certainly walks one of the highest and thinnest tightropes, telling as it does of the late Mark O’Brien’s quest to lose his virginity at age 38, despite being a quadriplegic confined to an iron lung. For such a dicey-sounding premise, it’s a movie brimming with warmth and wit. John Hawkes

is Oscar bait, no error, as is O’Brien; and Helen Hunt as the sexual surrogate he consults has never been more serenely appealing. How’s that for hearty alternative fare?

Have audiences really been clamoring for a sequel to Knocked Up? Or is Judd Apatow running out of fresh ideas?

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KIEFER TO LANE: Glad to hear it; given its premise,

I feared it’d be one of those films in which the defiance of self-pity becomes its own kind of mawkishness, with no able-bodied onlooker wanting to say a disparaging word. I do recall finding much to admire in O’Brien’s memoir How I Became a Human Being, and I know he already was the subject of the Oscar-winning documentary Breathing Lessons. (I can see why The Sessions had its original title, The Surrogate, revised, but I wish they’d gone with Sex Lessons.) Anyway, Hawkes is an actor I trust, and as for the grander theme of liberation from terrible confinement, that’s what movies are all about. Also, you’ve given me an idea for a biography, although I don’t know if it should be a book or a Lifetime special: Serenely Appealing: The Helen Hunt Story. Or maybe it’ll end up a movie, and we’ll be talking about it next year. Ω

Halle Berry (left) and Keith David try to shoot some life into Cloud Atlas, a new film by Tom Tykwer with Andy and Lana Wachowski.

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ARTS&CULTURE COU RTE AT I CRE RUN KO LT F OF SY O

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L O O T O IN HE P T s’ n o ti m a e Cr ar To n u g ry R e o t T n i KOL g of V he his ater in n t en, w af t g o a st akes om chcr c i t ep of w d w i t an

Kelley Ogden isn’t afraid of risk—rather, she embraces it.

“It’s either live big or go home,” she said, explaining what very well could be the motto for the reach-grasp conundrum that her theater company, KOLT Run Creations, set up for its final show of the 2012 season. KOLT Run, formed in 2005 by Ogden and her business partner and spouse, Lisa Thew, closes its first full season with Caryl Churchill’s Vinegar Tom in a production that adds layer upon layer of theatricality, musical and sound experiments, and women’s history—both local and global. The play itself is complex enough. Here, Churchill frames the story of a witch hunt in 17th-century England, with contemporary

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songs provided as interludes—a theatrical device aimed to help the audience better situate the tale of women’s lives as both changed and unchanging in the intervening centuries. But KOLT Run is adding even more to the show. For starters, it has enlisted a trio of local artists—Patrick Claypool, Martha Omiyo Kight and Andrea Thorpe—to create original music for the lyrics Churchill provides in the play’s text. The company also partnered with a San Francisco-based media firm to create an interactive online video in which a contemporary woman explores her ancestor’s role as one of the “witches” in the period described in Vinegar Tom. The work is also being staged as sitespecific theater—an edgy style of production gaining popularity in Europe and on the East Coast.

Ogden and Thew weren’t sure the Ooley Theatre on 28th Street, their usual home, would be large enough to fit their vision of the play, so they scoped out alternative venues. Specifically, Vinegar Tom will be performed, for all intents and purposes, beneath the city. “The space happened very organically,” Thew said. “We were looking at alternate venues.” In its search for a larger space, KOLT Run associate artist Kellie Yvonne Raines noticed that Rail Bridge Cellars had a sign up advertising event space available in the Elks Tower downtown. The initial spaces they surveyed, however, weren’t quite suitable and eventually, a tour led them to the building’s basement—and its long-neglected swimming pool.

The location couldn’t be more fitting for the play in which the character of Ellen, the cunning woman, muses on her chances for surviving the town’s witch hunt: “I could ask to be swum. They think the water won’t keep a witch in it, for Christ’sbaptism sake, so if a woman floats, she’s a witch. And if she sinks, they have to let her go,” Ellen speculates. “I could sink. Any fool can sink. It’s how to sink without drowning. It’s whether they get you out. No, why should I ask to be half-drowned? I’ve done nothing.” The swimming pool itself possesses an interesting history: For years, women were forbidden to swim in it. Of course, it wasn’t uncommon for women to be banned from entering men’s public spaces—some clubs and dining rooms, not to mention bars and saloons—across the country through the 1970s. Gradually, these male spaces, which

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were often where business was done and political decisions made, opened up to women, though not always without protest and clamor. (And, of course, this isn’t just a bit of history or a chauvinistic relic. Georgia’s Augusta National Golf Club, for instance, didn’t offer green membership jackets to women until August of this year.) At the Elks Tower, while women weren’t allowed in the pool, they were permitted to lounge in an observation area, elevated for a good view, from where they could watch the men engage in swimming contests. As such, it makes for an interesting spot for some site-specific theater. The practice of moving theatrical productions off the stage and into the “real” world has a long political history—Ogden cites the guerrilla theater of Abbie Hoffman, for instance, as a 1960s version of site-specific theater. But a real necessity is that the work and the site complement each other; that the site works to actually bring some element of the play to the forefront. In the case of Vinegar Tom, the swimming pool works to reinforce the play’s central plot and themes. “There’s so much water imagery in Vinegar Tom,” said Ogden. There is, of course, Ellen, the herbal healer who theorizes about being tested by water—a risky proposition, since the only way to be proven innocent is to sink in hopes of getting hauled out before drowning. There’s also a song in the play, “If You Float,” which addresses the sort of aquatic

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Catch-22 involved in not just the water test, but all of the tests to which suspected witches were put to at the time. The pool is “perfect for this particular show,” Thew said. “Churchill writes in representational theater. It’s an epic show. It’s making the audience aware that they are always watching a play. And it’s a very presentational style that works well for a broader audience.”

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“One of the components of epic style is a minimal use of set and props,” said Thew. “What we’re doing is allowing our actors to create their own set and props.” “[That] means that the actors that are not a part of the action still remain in the stage area, and they support the action through their own vocalization of sounds,” Thew said.

The practice of moving theatrical productions off the stage and into the “real” world has a long political history. The production’s structure is also set up to make good use of the pool. For instance, the trio of musicians will be above the pool, lit so that they can easily be seen, for the musical interludes. The audience will be seated— approximately 50 people at a performance—in the shallow end, with stairs that allow them to enter and exit safely, and a few poolside seats available for those who need more accessibility. And the actors? They’ll be in the deep end, of course. The company is adding yet another interesting element to the production: the use of all the players to create space and sound environments for each scene.

“[They’ll] create an outside environment to let us know where we’re at, or support an onstage action through a sound effect,” she added. “In addition to that, then the actors onstage are utilizing space to create their own props.” But don’t mistake it for mime. Please. There’s none of that silent, white makeup stuff that invites parody. “Miming is about creating something that’s not there, and space work is indicating something that is there but unseen,” Ogden said. “The total effect is to create a give-and-take between the actors who are in the scene and the actors who are on the side, giving it a fully ensemble effect.”

Going, going, gone See 15 MINUTES

55

For example, in one scene, a couple in a barn tries to understand why so many bad things keep happening to them: butter that won’t thicken, sick calves, unexplainable pains. “All throughout the scene, they’re hearing the sounds of their barn, which is where the scene takes place,” said Ogden. “At this turn, those animal sounds die away and become the sounds of a growing storm. As the players move into the accusation, the sound creators are working off of them in creating that growing storm.” Done well, sound environments and space work create a multiple opportunities for collaboration between the performers, and also invite a more participatory attitude from the audience. Watching a production like this is an invitation to use one’s own imagination along with the creative work of the actors: It’s not all spelled out for the viewers, but instead invites them to lean forward, pay close attention, and think carefully about what’s occurring onstage. “It forces all of us to be very present,” said Ogden. And paying close attention is a very good idea—especially when one is in the deep end of the pool. Ω Vinegar Tom, 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday; $15-$30; in the basement pool room at the Elks Tower, 921 11th Street; (916) 454-1500; www.koltruncreations.com. VIP tickets include post-show wine tasting in Rail Bridge Cellars’ penthouse tasting room. Through November 3. PHOTO BY SHOKA

No floatation devices are necessary for KOLT Run Creations’ swimming-pool production of Vinegar Tom. BEFORE

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SACRAMENTO STATE

ART MIX 5)634%":t0$50#&3 5 – 9 PM

DANCE SITES 2012 FACULTY DANCE CONCERT

OCTOBER 17-21, 2012 U N I V E R S I T Y T H E AT R E

This month’s Art Mix celebrates the harvest with food, art, and funk.

Directed by LORELEI BAYNE Lighting Design by RON REISNER

Live music by rock-soul phenomenon The Nibblers. Mini Farmers’ Market. Tasting table. Fruit carving. Art making. Tours.

Choreographed by Faculty of Theatre and Dance and special guest artist Lori Bryhni

Every Second Thursday the Crocker cuts loose with Art Mix—a creative mix of art, music, cocktails, and you. For tickets, call (916) 278-4323, or order on-line at www.csus.edu/sfsc.ticket office

MEL RAMOS: 50 YEARS OF SUPERHEROES, NUDES, AND OTHER POP DELIGHTS LAST CHANCE $-04&446/%":t0$50#&3

Treat yourself to 70 playful, sexy, provocative works of art by internationally acclaimed, Sacramento BSUJTU.FM3BNPT

To ďŹ nd out more visit crockerartmuseum.org.

([RWLF3ODQWV WK$QQLYHUVDU\%ORZ2XW6DOH Through October

25% Off Everything! Plants , Pots , Art etc.! no double discounts some exclusions apply

SALES . RENTAL . MAINTENANCE . SERVICE . WEDDINGS & EVENTS

916-922-4769

1833 Howe Avenue, Sacramento, CA 95825

/crockerart

/crockerart

24   |   SN&R   |   10.11.12

www.exoticplantsltd.com

October picks by SHOKA

Silent elegy

“Searching for Wabi Sabi #34” by Bruce MacDougall, photograph.

Geek love The flier for the Best of Geeky Sacramento Comic Book & Pop Art Showcase mimics the opening crawl of the Star Wars backstory. God, that is so geeky— not that there is anything wrong with that. No, indeed, because if we’ve learned anything from the ’70s and ’80s—Apple, Revenge of the Nerds—it’s that the geeks shall inherit the Earth. So, if you can’t beat ’em (’cause they’re smarter than you), join ’em this Saturday at a Sac Geeks Community “Brush With Anger, Starring Agent Ian Anger” Calendar (www.sac by Chris Wisnia; from an upcoming graphic novel. geeks.com) event to vote on art that’s nominated for the organization’s “Best of Geeky Sacramento Comic Book Writer or Graphic Artist,” including, but not limited to, Junior Bruce, Chris Wisnia, Jared Konopitski and Jeremy Rathbone. Plus, Drewski’s Hot Rod Kitchen will be there providing sustenance, so enjoy and geek out, friends.

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Where: Viewpoint Photographic Art Center, 2015 J Street, Suite 101; (916) 441-2341; www.viewpointgallery.org. Artist’s reception: Friday, October 12; 5:30-8:30 p.m. Second Saturday reception: October 13, 5:30-9 p.m. Through November 3. Hours: Tuesday through Thursday, noon-6 p.m.

“Jackie” by GayLynn Ribeira, oil on canvas.

The stories in their eyes Where: Gallery 2110, 2110 K Street; (916) 476-5500; http://gallery2110.com. Preview: Thursday, October 11, 6-8 p.m. Second Saturday reception: October 13, 5-9 p.m. Through November 2. Hours: Wednesday through Friday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Sacramento-based artist GayLynn Ribeira was inspired by half of the people on the planet for her latest series, Stages: women. As the title of the show implies, the figure painter depicts the female of the species in different phases of life, from childhood to senior citizenhood, in order to “examine both the beautiful and unpleasant stages of their lives and to see the stories written in their eyes.”

Where: The Urban Hive, 1931 H Street; www.meetup.com/sacgeeks/events/83491172. Second Saturday reception: October 13, 4-9 p.m.

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FEATURE

The worst thing that could happen to a parent happened to Bruce MacDougall. In 2010, his 31-year-old daughter was murdered. “My handling of that horrible event is documented photographically in the portfolio ‘Searching for Wabi Sabi; Discovering Molly,’” the Massachusetts-based artist wrote on his website. “I believe this is the theme that will be preeminent in my photographic endeavors.” He described wabi-sabi as “a Japanese aesthetic that values objects and images reflecting the transience and imperfection that characterize our existence; it eschews the idealized, the formal, the ornate. … Nothing is permanent; nothing is finished; nothing is perfect.” The starkness of his minimal, black-and-white nature—with the rarest blushes of color, hinting hope—photographs in this series achieve that delicate elegance of Japanese aesthetics, and in the often solemn negative space or soft undulations of the water or sand, there is necessary room for meditation. This, plus the absence of color and the stillness of the images, suggests a kind of introspection and numbness, too, which, considering MacDougall’s circumstances, is fitting. These are the images of a man who, after a shattering heartbreak, is trying to find the beauty again in life. And he has turned to nature, and he has captured it beautifully in this silent elegy. “I look at the world now with much different eyes and see many different things. In my search for wabi sabi I am discovering my lost daughter.”

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sunday oCtober 14th 300 vendors! vintage holiday deCor! The 2 nd Sunday of every MonTh | 6:30aM – 3pM Food • Free Parking • $3 admission Furniture • textiles • ColleCtibles • art Vintage Clothing • and More!

21st and X St.• Midtown (under the “W/X” Freeway)

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ART MAP MIDTOWN 1 ALEX BULT GALLERY 1114 21st St.,

8 BLUE LAMP 1400 Alhambra Blvd.,

(916) 476-5540, www.alexbultgallery.com Michaelangelo’s; (916) 444-2233

3 ARTFOX GALLERY 2213 N St., Ste. B; (916) 835-1718; www.artfox.us

4 AXIS GALLERY 1517 19th St., (916) 443-9900, www.axisgallery.org

5 B. SAKATA GARO 923 20th St., (916) 447-4276, www.bsakatagaro.com

6 BARTON GALLERY 1723 I St., (916) 443-4025, www.sacartz.com

(916) 470-9959, www.deepartandyoga.com

14 ELLIOTT FOUTS GALLERY 1831 P St., (916) 446-1786, www.efgallery.com

15 GALLERY 2110 2110 K St., (916) 501-3455, www.gallery2110.com

16 INTEGRATE 1529 28th St., (916) 594-9579, http://integrateservicessacramento. blogspot.com

17 KENNEDY GALLERY 1114 20th St., (916) 446-1522, www.kennedygallerysac.com

7 BEATNIK STUDIOS 2421 17th St.,

2 ART STUDIOS 1727 I St., behind

13 DEEP ART AND YOGA 2030 H St.,

(916) 443-5808, www.beatnik-studios.com (916) 455-3400, www.bluelamp.com

9 BOWS & ARROWS 1815 19th St., (916) 822-5668, www.bowscollective.com

10 CAPITAL ARTWORKS 1215 21st St., Ste. B; (916) 207-3787; www.capital-artworks.com

11 CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, SACRAMENTO 1519 19th St., (916) 498-9811, www.ccasac.org

12 CUFFS 2523 J St., (916) 443-2881, www.shopcuffs.com

18 LITTLE RELICS 908 21st St., (916) 716-2319, www.littlerelics.com

19 MIDTOWN FRAMING & GALLERY 1005 22nd St., (916) 447-7558, www.midtownframing.com

20 OLD SOUL CO. 1716 L St., (916) 443-7685, www.oldsoulco.com

21 PHONO SELECT 2312 K St., (916) 400-3164, www.phonoselect.com

22 SACRAMENTO ART COMPLEX 2110 K St., Ste. 4; (916) 501-3455; www.sacramentoartcomplex.com

DON’T MISS E ST.

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Every Friday except 3rd Fridays 7:00 - 8:30 pm · Free admission Sacramento Yoga Center @ Sierra II Community Center 2791 24th Street, Sacramento Parking in back

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Sacramento Vedanta Reading Group

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23 SACRAMENTO GAY & LESBIAN CENTER 1927 L St., (916) 442-0185, http://saccenter.org

33 ART FOUNDRY GALLERY 1025 R St., (916) 444-2787

24 SHIMO CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2117 28th St., (916) 706-1162, www.shimogallery.com

25 SHINY NICKEL ART GALLERY 1518 21st St., (916) 224-7051

26 TIM COLLOM GALLERY 915 20th St., (916) 247-8048, www.timcollomgallery.com

27 UNION HALL GALLERY 2126 K St., (916) 448-2452

34 ARTHOUSE UPSTAIRS 1021 R St., (530) 979-1611

(916) 443-5721, www.universityart.com

29 THE URBAN HIVE 1931 H St., (916) 585-4483, www.theurbanhive.com

30 VIEWPOINT PHOTOGRAPHIC ART CENTER 2015 J St., (916) 441-2341, www.viewpointgallery.org

St., (916) 444-7125, www.artcollab.com

36 CROCKER ART MUSEUM 216 O St., (916) 808-7000, www.crockerartmuseum.org

37 E STREET GALLERY AND STUDIOS 1115 E St., (916) 505-7264 2700 Front St., (916) 446-5133, www.larazagaleriaposada.org

39 SMITH GALLERY 1020 11th St., Ste. 100; (916) 446-4444; www.smithgallery.com

40 TEMPLE COFFEE 1010 Ninth St., (916) 443-4960, www.templecoffee.com

31 ZANZIBAR GALLERY 1731 L St., (916) 443-5601, www.zanzibartrading.com

DOWNTOWN/OLD SAC

41 VERGE CENTER FOR THE ARTS 625 S St., (916) 448-2985, http://vergeart.com

42 VOX SACRAMENTO 1818 11th St., www.voxsac.com

44 COFFEE WORKS 3418 Folsom Blvd., (916) 452-1086, www.coffeeworks.com

45 FE GALLERY & IRON ART STUDIO 1100 65th St., (916) 456-4455, www.fegallery.com

46 GALLERY 14 3960 60th St., (916) 456-1058, www.gallery14.net

47 JAYJAY 5520 Elvas Ave., (916) 453-2999, www.jayjayart.com

OFF MAP ARTISTIC EDGE 1880 Fulton Ave., (916) 482-2787; http://artisticedgeframing.com

EVOLVE THE GALLERY 2907 35th St., (916) 572-5123, www.evolvethegallery.com

OLD CITY ART GALLERY 2512 Franklin Blvd., (916) 952-4810 1616 Del Paso Blvd, (916) 921-1224, http://stcgallery.webs.com

www.appelgallery.com

FRONTLINES

43 ARCHIVAL FRAMING 3223 Folsom Blvd.,

SACRAMENTO TEMPORARY CONTEMPORARY

32 APPEL GALLERY 931 T St., (916) 442-6014,

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EAST SAC (916) 923-6204, www.archivalframe.com

35 ARTISTS’ COLLABORATIVE GALLERY 129 K

38 LA RAZA GALERÍA POSADA

28 UNIVERSITY ART 2601 J St.,

BEFORE

The whole world is your own. — Sri Sarada Devi

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List your event!

#SAMMIES2012

NIGHT&DAY

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

FORUM ON WOMEN IN BUSINESS: Lunchtime get-togethers provide a platform for interested young professionals to discuss topics facing women in business. Speakers include Debi Hammon, Founder and CEO of Merlot Marketing and Rhonda Stanley Brooks, President and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sister of Greater Sacramento. Th, 10/11, 11:30am-2pm. $25. Sacramento Metro Chamber, 1 Capitol Mall Dr., Ste. 300; (916) 319-4261; http://metroedge.org /event/edgeucational-forumwomen-workplace-2.

GRAND OPENING: Capsity opens its doors to the Sacramento community. Celebrate as they showcase their partners, neighbors and new building. The event features demonstration, speakers, entertainment and light refreshments provided by Midtown Village Cafe, Pachamama Coffee and more. Th, 10/11, 6pm. Free. Capsity Offices, 2572 21st St.; (916) 776-6006.

CAMPAIGN FOR LANGUAGE: This lecture is focused on creative writing, whether it’s a play, poem, story or something else. Poet and author of two volumes of poetry, Indigo Moor, takes from his thesis topic and delivers this lecture. All writers of any background, will enjoy and appreciate this special event. Th, 10/11, 7:30pm. $10. Sacramento Poetry Center, 1719 25th St.; (916) 606-4303; http://sacramentopoetry center.org.

Literary Events READING & SIGNING WITH BRUCE HOLBERT: Time Tested Books presents a reading and signing with Bruce Holbert, whose debut novel Lonesome Animals has been receiving praise for

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She’s finally legal! At last, she can chug a cold beer. And maybe some shots. And then some more. That’ll be a scene! Yes, watching Sammie cut loose will be the top reason to attend the main event this Friday at Ace of Spades. But here are 20 more, anyway, because you can only make fun of drunk people for so long:

Special Events

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10. 11.12

Balloons! It may be illegal to bring

balloons to City Hall (it’s true, look it up) but Sammies be goin’ helium nuts this year.

IT’S SAMMIES’ 21ST BIRTHDAY.

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reinventing the Western novel, the crime novel and the noir novel. Th, 10/11, 7pm. Free. Time Tested Books, 1114 21st St.; (916) 447-5696.

12FRI

DON’T MISS! THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW: Take part in a classic

film experience on a wide screen with a live shadow cast. This event welcomes audience participation, call backs, props and dressing as your favorite RHPS characters. It’s also the opening night of the 6th Annual Sacramento Horror Film Festival. This event is included with a festival pass. F, 10/12, 9pm. $15. Colonial Theatre, 3522 Stockton Blvd.; (916) 869-8954; www.sachorrorfilmfest.com.

Special Events MOON LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS JAY BAKKER: Hear a lecture by Jay Bakker, the younger of two children born to televangelists Jim Bakker and Tammy Faye Bakker Messner. He is a cofounder of Revolution Church, which holds services at the nightclub Pete’s Candy Store, in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn. Much of Jay’s story was retold in a documentary on Sundance Channel called One Punk Under God: The Prodigal Son of Jim and Tammy Faye. F, 10/12, 7:30pm. $25. St. Marks United Methodist Church, 2391 St. Mark’s Way; (916) 475-8554; www.stmarksumc.com/ upcomingmoon.

Art Galleries BLUE LINE GALLERY: Lottery for the Arts, a fundraising event that provides art collectors with an opportunity to acquire original works of fine art, while

supporting a non-profit organization and community of artists. F, 10/12, 6-8pm. $150 for a pair of tickets and one lottery ticket. 405 Vernon St. in Roseville; (916) 783-4117.

JOHN NATSOULAS GALLERY: Lyrical Vision Exhibition, celebrating figurative abstraction in the tradition of Bay Area artists such as Elmer Bischoff, James Weeks and Clayton Pinkerton. F, 10/12, 7-10pm. Free. 521 First St. in Davis; (530) 756-3938; www.natsoulas.com.

Comedy IMPROVISED COMEDY: TEEN SLASHER: This show brings you bloody and funny improv comedy. It looks to horror films for inspiration and theatrical blood will likely hit the first row of the audience. Come ready to get messy. F, 8-9:45pm through 10/31; W, 10/31, 8-9:45pm. $10. Blacktop Comedy, 7311 Galilee Rd. 150 in Roseville; (916) 749-3100; www.blacktopcomedy.com.

13SAT

DON’T MISS! 2ND ANNUAL SACRAMENTO ALOHA FESTIVAL: The 2nd

Annual Sacramento Aloha Festival will feature Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander exhibits, workshops, presentations, arts and crafts, merchandise, food, performances, music and more. Sa, 10/13, 10am6pm. Free with donation of a non-perishable food item. Cal Expo, 1600 Exposition Blvd.; (877) 225-3976; www.sacalohafest.org.

Special Events SOULS OF THE CITY: This series of events celebrates the Day of the Dead traditions of Mexico,

showcased by friends and families building elaborate altars to honor loved ones who have died. This is a chance to participate in hands-on workshops and attend special activities to learn more about this cultural tradition. Sa, 10/13, 11am-2pm;

Sa, 10/20, 11am-2pm; Th, 10/25, 68pm; Sa, 10/27, 11am-11pm; F, 11/2, 4, 6 & 8pm-midnight; Sa, 11/3, 4 & 6pm. Call for pricing.

Sacramento History Museum, 101 I St.; (916) 264-7057.

FALL FESTIVAL EVENT: Enjoy live music, food from some of the best food trucks in Sacramento, pumpkins, plants and games and face painting for kids. Food is provided by Krush Burger and Chando’s Tacos starting at 11 a.m. Music starts at 3 p.m. Sa, 10/13, 10am5pm. Free. Green Acres Nursery & Supply, 8501 Jackson Rd.; (916) 673-9290; www.idiggreenacres.com.

I AM A QUEEN CONFERENCE FOR WOMEN: This conference will address topics such as accepting the challenges of life, being a virtuous woman and finding balance. Guest speakers include Sonya Jones, Ilesha Graham and Aurellia Anderson. Sa, 10/13, 12-2pm. $7-$10. Sekou’s BBQ, 455 Bercut Dr.; (916) 208-7638; http://queen3.eventbrite.com.

RIVER CITY SPARKLE: Celebrate transgender unity and experience an elegant evening of dinner, dancing, prizes and entertainment for the whole transgender community at the fifth annual River City Sparkle. Sa, 10/13, 6pm-midnight. $50$60. Red Lion Sacramento Inn, 1401 Arden Way; (916) 220-1637; www.rivercitysparkle.org.

ROMEO & JULIET’S RENAISSANCE PARTY: Join for food, drink and festivities. Renaissance period attire required (it wouldn’t be a Renaissance party without costumes). Sa, 10/13, 7pm. $65. Palazzo de La Dolce Vita, 5560 Palm Ave.; (916) 552-5800 ext. 2.

U-N-I-T-Y. This night is the only time

each year when every nook, cranny, clique and scene in the Sacramento music world comes together. And this year, it will not be outdoors, but under one roof. Could be scary, could be awesome.

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The Sammies Shooter. Just order one at the bar (sorry, kiddos).

Collaborations. There are dozens of

performers this year, many of which you’ve surely seen before around town. But tonight, the gigs will be special collaborations between bands and artists. So special.

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Ace of Spades. Everyone’s fave cen-

tral-city venue (really—voted by SN&R readers as 2012’s Best Place to See Live Music) hosts the Sammies for the first time. Show Spades who’s ace.

WILDLIFE REFUGE CELEBRATION: The Delevan National Wildlife Refuge is celebrating its 50th anniversary in Sacramento. Come for family activities, demonstrations, wildlife observation and bird-watching tours. Sa, 10/13, 10am-4pm. Free. Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, 752 County Rd. 99 in Willows; (530) 934-2801; http://fws.gov/ sacramentovalleyrefuges.

WALDORF HARVEST FAIRE: This annual harvest fair includes activities for children, live performances, food booths, vendors and more. Classrooms are transformed into a variety of stores and displays. Sa, 10/13, 10am-4pm. Free. Sacramento Waldorf School, 3750 Bannister Rd. in Fair Oaks; (916) 961-3900; www.sacwaldorf.org/ festivals-celebrations.html.

WOMEN TAKE BACK THE NIGHT: Join the 33rd Annual Sacramento Women Take Back the Night Rally and March, an evening of remembrance, celebration and action to stand against all forms of violence against women and children. A resource fair will open at 5pm, the rally will kick-off at 6pm and the program will culminate with Sacramento Taiko Dan at 8pm—after which participants will take to the streets in protest. Sa, 10/13, 5:30-8pm. $5-$25. Sacramento Native American Health Center, 2020 J St.; (916) 341-0575.

TERRY NATHAN PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW: View landscape photographs by UC Davis professor of art, science and photography. The exhibition includes his fascinating creative images of curling smoke. Sa, 10/13, 6-9pm. Free. Sacramento Poetry Center, 1719 25th St.; (916) 606-4303; http://sacramento poetrycenter.org.

Art Galleries ARCHIVAL FRAMING: New Artwork, Check out new artwork from Sean Royal, Bob Androvich and

Gregorio di Masi. Refreshments will be served. Sa, 10/13, 7-9pm. Free. 3223 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 923-6204; www.archivalframe.com.

CREATIVE IMPRESSIONS GALLERY: Oil paintings by California impressionist, Cherie Landon. Sa, 10/13, 6-9pm. Free. 917 7th St.; (916) 600-6980.

SACRAMENTO GAY & LESBIAN CENTER: THEshow, THEshow’s mission is to showcase both emerging and established artists of the Sacramento region in an environment of creativity, love and acceptance.

Second Sa of every month, 5-9pm through 12/8. Free. 1927 L St.; (916) 442-0185.

SO CAL SPEED SHOP: Speed Equipped, parody paintings by Bruce Gossett feature surreal and wacky hot-rod themed worlds. Sa, 10/13, 5pm. Free. 1715 Del Paso Blvd.; (877) 487-3871.

UNION HALL GALLERY: Destruction and Construction, an exhibition featuring Wayne Olts’ black and white photography, including images from the devastating fire that engulfed the Oakland Hills in October of 1991. Sa, 10/13, 6-9pm. Free. 2126 K St.; (916) 448-2452.

THE URBAN HIVE: Best of Geeky Sacramento, SacGeeks.com members have nominated their choices for the best local comic book and pop artists in the area, and now Sacgeeks.com has partnered with The Urban Hive to showcase the nominees. Sa, 10/13, 4-9pm. Free. 1931 H St.; (916) 390-9506; www.theurbanhive.com.

Classes TREE TOUR: Celebrate fall and explore the City of Trees on a guided tour with the Sacramento Tree Foundation. The tour happens rain or shine. Wear comfortable walking shoes for lawn and street walking. It’s also recommend you bring water and a camera.

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Hosts with da mosts. Andy Hawk of 98

14

Hot brass. Watch as the Elements

Rock (KRXQ 98.5 FM) and Casey Lewis of KKDO Radio 94.7 FM will master these ceremonies—get your heckling one-liners primed.

Brass Band does its thing with hiphop troupe Live Manikins, Sleeprockers and Random Abiladeze.

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And a very loud special guest. We hear

the Grant Union High School Drumline will be drum rolling in to make some noise. Boom.

Beats and jams. Host Lewis will sit at

the kit as Inkdup with legendary local rocker and producer Z Rokk and members of Overwatch for a very special jam.

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Arden Park Roots’ Hall of Fame set. That’s

right, APR won too many Sammies over the years, so we had to retire them into the HOF. Don’t miss this year’s special guest appearances during the band’s end-of-theshow set.

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Grimey after-party. Shows always

end—but don’t bail on DJ Whores’ after-party set with his Grimey friends, who’ll be laying down beats until midnight.

9 8

Special Sammies show beers. For only a

few bucks, courtesy of Blue Moon Brewing Company.

Big indie-love circle. Sharing the stage will

be Autumn Sky, the Bell Boys, Musical Charis, James Cavern, Project4Trees and more. Bonus: Rumored cover of a Dr. Dre jam.

7

All your friends will be there. Including

dozens of presenters from the 916 and 530 music scenes. Watch them get nervous and say something dumb!

6 5

Danger sun. Or Latin party starters Sol

Peligro, who won too many Sammies, too, and join the HOF this year.

Guest deejays all night.

3

Induction of more HOFers. Jazz talent and

2

Half-price tickets. The early bird

1

Winners. Thousands of local musicians

Including DJ Oasis, DJ Roger Carpio and Tha Fruitbat (who’s a HOFer, BTW).

promoter Ross Hammond and emcee Random Abiladeze.

will find the discounted worm at SN&R Sweetdeals website (http://snrsweetdeals.newsreview.com).

were nominated in 38 categories this year. Who’ll bring home the hardware? Better be there. —SN&R staff

Cameo by SN&R office pug Leroy. Actually,

he’s been eighty-sixed from Ace of Spades (crowd surfing, if you must know).

4

Pity the fool who misses the 21st annual Sammies Festival and Music Awards this Friday, October 12, at Ace of Spades, 1417 R Street; 6:30 p.m. doors, 7 p.m. show; after-party until midnight, with DJ Whores and his Grimey friends; $5; all ages; www.aceofspadessac.com. Follow Sammies online on Twitter (@SacNewsReview, #Sammies2012), Facebook (www.facebook.com/sacnewsreview) and Instagram.

Meet on the north steps of the State Capitol. Sa, 10/13, 10amnoon. Free. State Capitol, 11th and L streets; (916) 974-4304; www.sactree.com.

Museums CALIFORNIA STATE INDIAN MUSEUM: Acorn Day, Get ready for the new autumn season by visiting the State Indian Museum during an educational and fun-filled Acorn Day that celebrates the acorn, a traditional dietary staple of California Indians. Sa, 10/13, 10am-2pm. Call for pricing. 2618 K St.; (916) 324-0971; www.parks.ca.gov/ indianmuseum.

Poetry CELEBRATE POET LAUREATE BOB STANLEY: This event is for all those who wish to thank Bob Stanley for his service as Poet Laureate of Sacramento. The event will include the release of Stanley’s last project as Poet Laureate, The Sacramento Anthology. The book includes the writing of numerous Sacramento area poets and is edited by the former poet laureate. Sa, 10/13, 6-9pm. Free. Sacramento Poetry Center, 1719 25th St.; (916) 606-4303; http://sacramentopoetry center.org.

Sports & Recreation SACRED CITY DERBY GIRLS: Join the Sacred City Derby Girls in a double header. The Sacrificers will be taking on the Bay Area Derby Girls and the Disciples will be taking on the Resurrection Roller Girls. Sa, 10/13, 6pm. $20-$25. Memorial Auditorium, 1515 J St.; (888) 588-7234; www.sacredcity derbygirls.com.

Volunteer Cosumnes River Preserve invites the public to help out with restoration work. These

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Concerts BILLY JOE SHAVER: Waylon

Concerts

in California’s past: the 1906 Election. The California State Capitol will be turned back to 1906 with costumed docents dressed as the four gubernatorial candidates: Theodore Bell (Democrat), James Gillett (Republican), William Langdon (Independence League) and Austin Lewis (Socialist). Su, 10/14, 10:30am-3:45pm. Free. California State Capitol Museum, 1315 10th St.; (916) 324-2088; www.capitolmuseum.ca.gov.

AUTUMN SHINDIG HARVEST FESTIVAL: For the last seven years, the Autumn Shindig on the San Juan Ridge has been a reliable harbinger of fall. An annual event to benefit the North Columbia Schoolhouse Cultural Center, this fun and family-friendly festival features live music, local crafts, games for kids and adults alike and various contests. Su, 10/14, 12-7pm. Free. North Columbia Schoolhouse Cultural Center, 179894 Tyler Foote Rd. in Nevada City; (530) 265-2826; www.northcolumbiaschool house.org.

DELTA FALL HARVEST FALL: Join an

Jennings’ album Honky Tonk Heroes was heralded as the start of Outlaw Country, but what folks didn’t know is Billy Joe Shaver was the man behind the songs. Everyone from Elvis to Widespread Panic has covered his songs. Shaver brings in his band for a special night of music. Sa, 10/13, 7pm-midnight. $20-$25. Auburn Event Center, 145 Elm Ave. in Auburn; (530) 823-8310; www.keep smilinpromotions.com.

14SUN

DON’T MISS! OCTOBER DREAMS FASHION SHOW: Local and bay Area

designers are participating in this year’s production. See new designs from James Macabago, Kathy Vang, SheLuxe Couture, Ajiale Couture and more. Couture Press is known for orchestrating a medley of artistic mediums that tell a story and transition into runway segments. Su, 10/14, 4-7pm. $20-$30. Country Club Event Center, 2600 Watt Ave.; (916) 488-7545.

event for the whole family sponsored by Yelp. It features hay rides, a mini pumpkin patch, barrel room tours, a photo booth, grape stomp food, music and vendors galore. Su, 10/14, 11am-5pm. Free. Scribner Bends Vineyards, 9051 River Rd.; (916) 744-1803; http://scribnerbend.com.

CELEBRATION OF LIFE WITH AMY X. NEUBURG: This event features the intriguing cutting-edge music and spoken word assemblage of performance artist Amy X. Neuburg, the poetry of UC Davis professor Dr. Andy Jones and a variety of local visual artists. Su, 10/14, 1-4pm. Free. Gallery 1855, 820 Pole Line Rd. in Davis; (530) 756-7807; www.gallery1855.weebly.com.

PUT YOUR BEST PAW FORWARD: Join the eighth annual Put Your Best Paw Forward feral cat walk, sponsored by the Coalition for Community Cats, an all-volunteer group that provides low-cost spaying and neutering. Registration starts at 8 am and the 5k walk begins at 9 am. Su, 10/14, 8am. $20. California Automobile Museum, 2200 Front St.; (916) 452-9046; www.coalition4cats.org.

HOME CNC MACHINING WITH LINUX: Computer Numerical Control mills and lathes can be built relatively inexpensively by hobbyists. These machines can machine aluminum, steel, brass, plastic, and other materials. They can engrave aluminum or plastic. This meeting will demonstrate actual machining, describe the electronics, and show how to install and use free opensource software under Linux. M, 10/15, 7pm. Free. Yolo County Library Davis Branch, 315 East 14th St. in Davis; (530) 757-5593.

Concerts SAC STATE CONCERT BAND: The Concert Band of Sacramento State performs at 7:30 pm in the Music Recital Hall on campus. Tickets are available at the University Ticket Office. M, 10/15, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Sacramento State Music Recital Hall, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5191; www.csus.edu/music.

DON’T MISS! action to advocate, educate and promote the National Latino Aids Awareness Day. View live media presentations and performances by Carlos Lastra, Roxana Damas and Folklorico Los Altenos. Music will be provided by DJ Bobby D and Rory Castillio will present a fashion show. M, 10/15, 5:30pm. Call for pricing. Fusion International Arts Center, 501 Arden Way; (916) 538-4008.

evening of funny and inspiring stories from the world travels of Rosemary Dukelow. In April 2010, at the age of 53, Dukelow travelled through 30 countries and six continents for about a year without a plan and with very little money. She will be sharing some of her best stories, accompanied by photos. Su, 10/14, 7pm. $1. Blacktop Comedy, 7311 Galilee Rd. 150 in Roseville; (530) 713-5269; www.rosemarydukelow.com.

FRONTLINES

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Bonham, son of late Led Zeppelin Drummer John Bonham, recreates the feel of a Led Zeppelin show with his own band. The group performs from Zeppelin’s celebrated catalog and Bonham recalls stories about his father. Tu, 10/16, 8pm. $29-$125. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (916) 442-7378.

AFTER

panel of scholars and nonpartisan activists will explain details of the 2012 California ballot measures. The potential impact, pros and cons, endorsements and campaign financing for each initiative will be discussed. Attendees are asked to bring a sample ballot. W, 10/17, 6pm. Free. Sacramento Public Library (Central Branch), 828 I St.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Wait, there’s more! Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

THE INVISIBLE WAR: View The Invisible War, a groundbreaking investigative documentary about the epidemic of rape within the United States military, followed by a discussion. W, 10/17, noon. Free. Sacramento State Student Union, Redwood Room, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-6267.

REGIONAL ACTION SUMMIT: Join for

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INITIATIVES DEMYSTIFIED: A

Film

Special Events

A RT S & C U LT U R E

DON’T MISS!

choreographers guide students through their first performance of the year in Dance Sites 2012: Faculty Dance Concert. The annual evening of dance features a wide range of music and dance styles. W, 10/17. $5-$12. Sacramento State University Theatre, 6000 J St. in Shasta Hall; (916) 278-6368; www.csus.edu/dram.

an evening of election education as organizers gather

STORY

17WED

DANCE SITES: Faculty and guest

JASON BONHAM’S LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE: Jason

California’s history. This event recreates an important event

political consultants, journalists and academics to provide an overview of regional issues that are sure to be hot topics this election season. Tu, 10/16, 5:30-8:30pm. $20-$35. The California Museum, 1020 O St.; (916) 319-4261, http://metro-edge.org.

Dance

DON’T MISS!

SAC LATINO AIDS AWARENESS DAY: This event is a call to

ABROAD, STORIES FROM A WOMAN ON THE ROAD: Join for an

1906 ELECTION DAY LIVING HISTORY EVENT: Get a glimpse into

Meetings & Groups

15MON 16TUES

Comedy

Special Events

HABITAT RESTORATION: The

BEFORE

workdays are a great way to connect with the local environment and are ideal for individuals seeking service learning hours. Wear: closedtoed shoes, long-sleeve shirts, long pants, hats and work gloves. Bring: lunch, snacks and a reusable water bottle. Sa, 10/13, 9am-3:30pm. Free. Cosumnes River Preserve Barn, 6500 Desmond Rd. in Galt; (916) 870-4317; www.cosumnes.org.

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and find us at these Great Events!

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La Victoria Mercado y Carniceria No. 2 6830 Stockton Boulevard, (916) 427-1745 If you breakfast or lunch on a weekend at La Victoria Mercado y Carniceria No. 2, a little Mexican taqueria tucked inside a grocery and butcher by shop, you’re likely to encounter parties of Becky bleary-eyed men conversing boisterously over Grunewald large bowls of menudo and hair-of-the-dog cans of Modelo Especial. Menudo is famously a hangover cure, but on a recent visit, I’d awakened from a night as designated driver and was feeling frisky and fine. Besides, you really have to grow up eating menudo to crave a morning mountain of stinky tripe. Rating: But that’s OK. Victoria has plenty of other ★★★ dishes on offer: breakfast plates, chile verde and roja, tacos and tortas. The most unusual Breakfast or lunch for one: dish on its menu is tacos de sesos, or cow $5 - $10 brain. They look more solid than I expect, with the humps and furrows typical of a gyrencephalic (or wrinkly) brain—a configuration that we share with our bovine friends. The flavor, besides a hint of liverishness, is almost absent. The only strange aftereffect I experienced after eating sesos was a strong desire to munch on some grass. Still, like ★ menudo, brain is an acquired taste. POOR Victoria has other soups besides menudo, ★★ including pozole and birria. The food here in FAIR general has a reliable mid-level heat, and these ★★★ soups are no exception. The bone-in pork in GOOD the pozole is dry, and there are scant grains of ★★★★ hominy—it can’t touch the pozole being EXCELLENT offered a short distance away at Alonzo’s ★★★★★ Coffee Shop (5649 Stockton Boulevard). The EXTRAORDINARY birria is a mix of goat and beef, and it comes with house-made tortillas on the side so you can roll your own. It has an abundant portion of meat, but the broth isn’t spicy or rich enough. If Victoria hasn’t quite mastered soup, however, it distinguishes itself with its “normal” tacos, especially the cow-based ones: cabeza, lengua and asada. Sometimes I marvel at the range of textures and tastes beef tongue can cover, from tough to jiggly and Still hungry? soft, and from gamy to beefy as a steak. This Search SN&R’s lengua is on the tender-and-beefy side of the “Dining Directory” to spectrum, happily—as is the head meat in the find local restaurants by name or by type of other taco. The asada again demonstrates Victoria’s food. Sushi, Mexican, Indian, Italian— mastery of the cow: fatty, well-salted steak discover it all in the with a hint of garlic. They are served on (not “Dining” section at www.newsreview.com. house-made) tortillas fried in oil—which just adds to the decadence of the piled-up tacos. The al pastor is rather undistinguished and lacking both pineapple and chipotle flavor. Here’s a riddle: How do you make (pork) carnitas taste like (beef) brisket? Answer: I don’t know, but it makes for an interesting taco. The carnitas shreds are lightly pink, as if smoked, and taste surprisingly like corned beef. My mind says no, but my palate says yes, yes. BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

The tacos come for the street-taco price of merely $1.25, served with cilantro, red salsa and onion. Or opt for the deluxe version with guacamole for an extra quarter. Since it’s an election year, I’d like to draw a strong distinction between myself and my opponent by declaring that I have a strong anti-guacamole policy when it comes to tacos. It’s like putting lipstick on a pig—a beautiful pig.

You really have to grow up eating menudo to crave a morning mountain of stinky tripe. There is also an assortment of lunch plates that come with beans and rice; a plate of chile verde costs only $4.99. It’s billed as “pork loin,” but it’s clearly shoulder. The tomatillo sauce isn’t quite thick and tangy enough, but the slow-burning heat is nice, and you can’t beat the price. Around 2 in the afternoon, Victoria moves the party outdoors, and the menu switches to one that’s only tacos, fried on a portable stovetop outdoors. The music is cranked, and it contributes to the rockin’ atmosphere of this grungy strip mall, which has possibly the most harrowing parking lot in all of Sacramento. Brave it for the beef. Ω

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THE V WORD Compassionate as a pig “Pig Saves Baby Goat From Drowning, Dubbed a ‘Hero’”—that was a headline in The Huffington Post a few weeks ago, and if you were one of the 6 million viewers to watch the accompanying YouTube clip of this feat, your heart likely burst when a Babe look-alike jumped into a creek to free a bleating kid from a watery demise. What a compassionate pig. So, Sacramentans, are you as compassionate as a pig? Prove it by hoofing it for goats and pigs and the other barnyard critters at Farm Sanctuary’s Walk for Farm Animals. Join or create a team for the 3-mile walk on Saturday, October 20, at 10 a.m., at Southside Park (Sixth and T streets), or be a hero from home and donate at http://events.walk forfarmanimals.org/event/sacramento. —Shoka STORY

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DISH

marble tables and light wooden chairs, there’s an airy atmosphere, casual and cozy. Estelle’s offers an espresso bar and a wide assortment of teas and muffins and rolls for the breakfast crowd as well as sweets, including DayGlo macarons. For the lunch-inclined, there are soups, salads, sandwiches and meat or meatless quiche. One of the authentic touches is the spare use of condiments. The smoked salmon is enlivened by dill and the flavor of its croissant. Its tomato bisque is thick and richly flavored, and, in a nice touch, a puff pastry floats in the tureen as accompaniment. Everything is surprisingly reasonable. Half a sandwich and soup is $7.25. A caprese baguette is $5.25. Ham and cheese is $5.75. There’s a lot to like about Estelle’s—except dinner. Doors close at 6pm. French. 901 K St., (916) 551-1500. Meal for one: $5-$10. ★★★1⁄2 G.L.

Midtown

Firestone Public House A sports bar with a focus on craft beer isn’t exactly a groundbreaking concept, but two local and prominent

The Porch The Porch is light and white with a vibe that suggests the airy sweep of an antebellum Charleston eatery. One can only envy the extensive on-site research conducted by chef Jon Clemens and business partners John Lopez and Jerry Mitchell, creators of Capitol Garage. The most enjoyable menu selections are salads or seafood sandwiches or entrees. Slaw on the barbecue pork sandwich elevates its status, and its pickled vegetables are sweet and tart, adding an additional dimension. The shrimp and grits dish, while laden with cheddar and gravy, is a synergistic mélange—perhaps The Porch’s trademark dish. Also in the running is the purloo, the low country’s version of jambalaya, with andouille, crunchy crawfish

The Red Rabbit Kitchen & Bar Resistance is futile when it comes to Red Rabbit’s desserts. The berryinfused ice-cream sandwich is bright and refreshing with a chewy shell that dovetails neatly with the smooth fruity interior. But there’s less effusiveness for the entrees. The Bastard Banh Mi doesn’t improve on the original. A number of items from the “Farm to Plate,” “Tasty Snacks” and “Buns” sections of the menu land high in the plus column, however. Any place that

BEST THAI

Shady Lady Saloon

So many bars try to do bar snacks, and so many fail. Shady Lady, however, nails it. The fried green tomatoes are punched up with a tarragon rémoulade and the huge charcuterie board is more like a groaning board, stocked with abundant regional meats and cheeses. The pickle plate looks like Peter Rabbit’s dream, all teeny turnips and tangy carrot chunks.

Generally excellent, the saloon’s cocktail list veers from the classics with a list of bartender-created drinks with unusual, but wisely considered flavor combinations: cilantro and tequila, blackberry and thyme, and the surprisingly sublime mixture of celery and pineapple. American. 1409 R St., (916) 231-9121.$10-$20. ★★★1⁄2 B.G.

East Sac

Juno’s Kitchen & Delicatessen To quote Gov. Jerry Brown from his first iteration as California’s chief executive more than 30 years ago: “Small is beautiful.” Juno’s proves this axiom in

Wrong track

OFF THE

MUST DRINK:

I’ve long considered Karl Strauss Brewing Company the “Disney brewery,” as its tepid and unchallenging brews have been dispensed in the California Adventure Park at the Disneyland Resort since 2002. In recent months, Karl Strauss has expanded into the “big, bold” beer market, creating and distributing doubled-up versions of its standby beers and other more muscular styles. Off the Rails is an imperial version of its Red Trolley Ale, and it pours a peach-jam orange with a moderate but persistent cream-colored head. The nose contains sugary caramel and sweet citrus, and although there’s some breadiness on the palate, it quickly gives way to more syrupsoaked citrus. It makes a strong impression on the tongue, finishing off with some dusky hop bitterness—but the sticky, stewed-fruit flavor borders on gross. $7.99 for a 22-ounce bottle at Taylor’s Market, 2900 Freeport Boulevard; (916) 443-6881.

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spades. The menu is fairly compact and slanted more toward lunch than dinner. Juno’s macaroni and cheese, which comes with rock shrimp on rigatoni, a Grana Padano, Gruyère and cheddar trio and a dusting of paprika, is a creative take on a comfort-food classic. In the traditional-sandwich realm, all start out with the advantage of Juno’s homemade sour— but not sourdough—bread with its crunchy crust and soft interior. In the soppressata salami sandwich, the bread amplifies the tartness of the pepperoncini while the turkey sandwich with provolone, tomato, arugula and pesto requires several napkins as the oil in the pesto seeps

BREW THE RIGHT THING

REDT R O L L E Y ALE

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US AMONG THE TOP THREE RESTAURANTS SERVING

offers chimichurri rocks hard. Here it enlivens the Farm Animal Lollipops snack—particularly the lamb—and the mayor-of-Munchkin-Citysized lamb bocadillas. American. 2718 J St., (916) 706-2275. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★1⁄2 G.L.

916-457-5600 www.cl arkscornerbar.com

Beer: Jackalope Imperial Pumpkin Porter Brewer: Beer Valley Brewing Company Where: Flaming Grill Cafe,

2319 El Camino Avenue; (916) 359-0840; www.flaminggrillcafe.com

Beer: Black Butte Porter Brewer: Deschutes Brewery Where: Raley Field’s beer garden, 400 Ballpark

Drive in West Sacramento; (916) 376-4700; www.raleyfield.com

Beer: Of Love & Regret (spiced Belgian) Brewer: Stillwater Artisanal Where: Pangaea Two Brews Cafe,

2743 Franklin Boulevard; (916) 454-4942; www.pangaeatwobrews.com

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

Estelle’s Patisserie With its

appendages, and the same sautéed bell peppers and onions that also appear in the grits. Southern. 1815 K St., (916) 444-2423. Dinner for one: $20-$30. ★★★ G.L.

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

Downtown

DO SH AY N BY HAYL EY

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Becky Grunewald and Greg Lucas, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

restaurant families, the Wongs and the DeVere Whites, know what Sacramento wants: good beer; solid pub grub; and a casual, unpretentious atmosphere. Here, the bar is the centerpiece with a full stock of liquor and 60 beers on draught. The menu features savory appetizers—the tortilla soup with poached chicken, avocado and tomato is particularly noteworthy—and a selection of sandwiches and pizzas, including a simple pie with fresh mozzarella and tomato sauce. American. 1132 16th St., (916) 446-0888. Dinner for one: $15-$20. ★★★ B.G.

ILLUSTR AT IO

Where to eat?

Mamma Susanna’s Ristorante Italiano Most commonly referred to by its patrons as the neighborhood restaurant, there is no shortage of options on the menu with nearly a dozen or so pastas, even more types of pizzas, a smattering of salads and various entrees, including the piccata chicken or veal dish that Mamma Susanna’s counts as one of her specialties. Of the pastas and pizzas, the norcina tastes like and looks like an orangey vodka sauce with roasted red-pepper slices and sausage rounds tossed in a bed of penne. While the menu claims spicy, some red chili flakes do the trick. Italian. 5487 Carlson Dr., (916) 452-7465. Dinner for one: $12-$20. ★★★ G.L..

North Sac

Asian Café serves both Thai and Lao food, but go for the Lao specialties, which rely on flavoring staples such as fish sauce, lime juice, galangal and lemongrass, lots of herbs, and chilies. One of the most common dishes in Lao cuisine is larb, a dish of chopped meat laced with herbs, chilies and lime. At Asian Café, it adds optional offal add-ons—various organ meats, entrails, et al—to three versions of the dish: beef with tripe, chicken with gizzards, or pork with pork skin. The beef salad offers a gentle respite from aggressive flavors, consisting of medium-thick chewy slices of eye of round with red bell pepper, chopped iceberg and hot

raw jalapeño. The single best dish here is the nam kao tod, a crispy entree with ground pork that’s baked on the bottom of the pan with rice, then stirred and fried up fresh the next day with dried Thai chilies and scallions. Thai and Lao. 2827 Norwood Ave., (916) 641-5890. Dinner for one: $10-$15. ★★★★ B.G.

South Sac

Giò Cha Duc Huong Sandwiches With banh mi, it’s

daikon, carrot, crunchy garlic chips and peanutss and served with sweet fish sauce dressing. A beef with lemon salad, with thin slices of eye of round “cured” in lemon juice, is coated with sesame oil, herbs and chili flakes and is meant to be piled on rice crackers studded with black sesame seeds. It’s an incredible dish, and one you won’t find on a menu very often. Vietnamese. 6830 Stockton Blvd., (916) 395-9244. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★ B.G.

the bread that sets the tone. Giò Cha Duc Huong Sandwiches goes against the grain with bread that’s more football shaped than submarine shaped, garlic bread, and a selection of premade graband-go sandwiches right by the counter. And, with its substitution of butter for mayonnaise and the emphasis on pâté, Duc Huong shows a stronger than usual French influence.These details may seem trivial, but with banh mi, such small variations make all the difference. The small menu is limited to eight sandwiches (mostly pork) and two soups: chicken curry soup and a beef stew called bo kho banh mi, which comes with bread. There’s a thick float of chili oil on top of the yellow, turmeric and lemongrass-laced curry soup, which, at first, is off-putting until you realize it can be dipped into the yeasty, crusty, fluffy bread. Vietnamese.6825 Stockton Blvd., Ste. 200; (916) 428-1188. Dinner for one: $5-$10. ★★★1⁄2 B.G.

Tacos & Beer This is one of the area’s best Michoacán restaurants. Of its regional dishes, the enchiladas Apatzingán are unusual, filled with only a smattering of sharp cheese and diced onion, soaked in a vinegary sauce, and smothered in very lightly pickled, shredded cabbage with raw hunks of radish and avocado slices. Another specialty is the morisqueta—the ultimate comfort dish due to the unique texture of the white rice, which is as soft as an angel’s buttock. Diners also have the option to order hand-shaped, griddled-to-order tortillas. They are warm, soft, taste like corn and barely resemble those cardboard things you get at the store. Mexican. 5701 Franklin Blvd., (916) 428-7844. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★1⁄2 B.G.

Pho King 2 Pho King 2 takes din-

large sushi menu, made up of both the steroidal Americanized rolls and traditional nigiri, but it also changes seasonally and features some uncommon offerings: Kinpira

ers on a trip to crazy-delicious town with its salads, including one off-the-menu salad featuring cold, pink tendon smothered in pickled

ILLUSTRATION BY MARK STIVERS

inexorably through the airy bread slices. American. 3675 J St., (916) 456-4522. Dinner for one: $5-$10. ★★★★ G.L.

gobo with renkon (braised lotus and burdock-root salad) comprises matchstick-sized fibrous pieces of burdock root and juicy slices of lotus in a sweet mirin soy sauce. It also features inventive desserts. The “uji kintoki parfait” (it translates roughly to “Best. Dessert. Ever.”) is served in a sundae glass filled with layers of green-tea ice cream and sweet red beans, and it’s topped with whipped cream, chocolate Pocky candy, salty sesame crackers, peanut clusters, and warm, soft squares of mochi. Sushi. 132 E Street in Davis, (530) 753-0154. Dinner for one: $10-$25. ★★★ 1⁄2 B.G.

Nevada City

The Willo The Willo’s menu is simple, centered on a slab of meat and starchy sides—although the restaurant has added a veggie burger to its lineup. While the thick, smoky pork chop and the tender, butterflied half-chicken suffice, here it’s really all about the New York strip steak offered in small, medium and large portions. If you’re not the designated driver, slip into the bar for a shot to lull you during the long drive home. The sassy bartender will fix you right up as you take in the curving walls of this prefab structure from a long-gone era, the E Clampus Vitus plaques and the regulars’ birthdays listed on the wall. American. 16898 State Hwy. 49 in Nevada City, (530) 265-9902. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★★★ B.G.

Davis

Zen Toro Japanese Bistro & Sushi Bar Zen Toro features a

Eat more, give more If there’s a more quintessentially Sacramento pairing than bike riding and food trucks, it remains to be found. The two come together from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. this Saturday, October 13, at the Truckin’ on the River event at William B. Pond Park (5700 Arden Way in Carmichael). More than a dozen vendors will congregate to raise money for the American River Parkway Foundation. Entry fees—$5 presale online or $8 at the event— go toward the foundation’s efforts to maintain and improve the parkway. Vendors include OMG Burger, Fuzion Eatz, The Squeeze Inn, Java 2u-Mobile Espresso, Pizza Box, Kombucha Kulture, Wicked ’Wich, Willie’s Burgers, Leila’s Lumpia, Mama Kim Cooks, Om Karmabile, Papa Dale’s Drivin’ Diner, Miz Shirley Marie’s Cuisine on Wheels and California Love Truck. The Bell Boys, Musical Charis, Kepi Ghoulie, and KB & the Slingtones provide the tunes. It’s simple, really: Eat a burger and help make the river area a more beautiful place. Find info and tickets at www.arpf.org/truckin. —Jonathan Mendick

www.newsreview.com

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A BENEFIT CONCERT

Honoring the Journey of Women Warrior Veterans To give hope for healing, for peace of mind & for a way home to hearts & spirits

Proceeds support FREE services for victims of abuse & trauma

FIND OF THE WEEK

Mary Youngblood Native American Flutist & two-time Grammy Winner

FRIDAY OCTOBER 19TH, 2012 7pm – 9pm (doors open at 6pm)

TICKETS AVAILABLE: tickets.com

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Gambler’s hope a nation of DeaDbeatS Why do we forget the financial lessons of the past? Probably because we’ve got a built-in “this time it will be different” gambler’s hope that the next BOOK speculation will both succeed and be the one in which we find ourselves among the suddenly enriched. Unlike most rather dull economic histories, in A Nation of Deadbeats: An Uncommon History of America’s Financial Disasters (Knopf, $27.95), Scott Reynolds Nelson has gone after the big bust, and he’s got a somewhat snarky sense of humor that makes it very fun for readers. America’s always been the land of the something-for-nothing, lottery-playing, get-rich-quick folks. As this book makes clear, the underwater homeowners of this last bust are in very good historical company. —Kel Munger

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Chute Lightweight bag

Are we seeing the return of the parachute pants? Probably not. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t other garments—or accessories—where the parachute trend can’t make a comeback. Online retailer The Future Perfect is selling lightweight, collapsible parachute bags for $82.50, which might seem like a lot of money at first glance, but Michael Pappas designed this bag with some pretty cool features. It has a rip cord that can be quickly and easily pulled to BAG collapse the bag. The bag also has lightweight carbon fibers along the bottom so that it collapses the same way every time—in a nice, neat square. No more stuffing wrinkled bags in the closet again. http://tinyurl.com/chutebag. —Aaron Carnes

Fire in your belly taKo Korean bbQ’S SpiCy porK taCoS When you’re about to hit the bar scene, there is nothing better than tacos to fuel you for a long night of drinking. If you are in the mood FOOD for something different that will still put fire in your belly, try the spicy pork tacos from Tako Korean BBQ. The tender meat is simmered in some of the spiciest sauce around. Topped with shredded cabbage and a sweet Korean salsa, this taco twist will melt your heart and burn your lips. 3030 T Street, (916) 346-4933, www.sactako.com. —Lory Gil

Animal collective DawnKathrynStuDio maSKS There are only a few weeks left until Halloween, which means, naturally, that I’m starting to panic. The task of figuring out a costume is, simply put, completely headache inducing. Do I need to buy an entire outfit? A wig? New shoes? Props? Will it itch? Make me miserable by the end of the FASHION night? Worse, will all that effort (and money spent) eventually just end up in a thrift-store bound bag? For such Halloween misers, of course, there are other options: Head to the party without a costume and be the lifeless grump of the party. Or stay at home and pass out candy to a legion of sugar-fueled rug rats. How depressing. Better yet, you could choose the cute and simple route with DawnKathrynStudio’s adorable animal masks. Designed by Bay Area artist Dawn Diskowski and available via her Etsy shop or locally at Bows & Arrows, these colorful felt owl, bat and fox masks cost $22 and can be worn on All Hallows’ Eve or to any masquerade ball. Or, you know, wear one whenever: to brunch, to the market, to the movies or to bed. Really, what activity wouldn’t be more fun while wearing a sweet little owl mask? 1815 19th Street, www.etsy.com/shop/ DawnKathrynStudio. —Rachel Leibrock

Love, work style My girlfriend (we’ve lived together for 10 years) is really close to this guy she works with. When I confronted her about cheating, she said they are just friends, and that he is her “work husband.” I’ve asked her for years to marry me, but she won’t. Do you think she is involved with this guy? Yes and no. Obviously, she has an emotional connection with this man, but that doesn’t mean by Joey ga their relationship is a threat. A rcia “work spouse” is a co-worker a s kj oey @ ne wsreview.c om who is invested in your career but is not a part of your life outside the office. Work spouses are committed to helping each other Joey advance in their chosen professions. recommends The pair tends to be within a few Chinglish at Berkeley years of each other in age and Repertory Theatre. at similar places in their careers. The relationship is closest to peer mentoring; each person alternates the coaching role in order to guide the other safely through office politics.

Platonic friendships do exist between adults who might be partners if one or both are not already committed.

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

If the idea of a work spouse bothers you, investigate why. Do you question whether adults can have friendships outside of their primary relationship? Here’s the reality: It’s rare but possible. Platonic friendships do exist between adults who might be partners if one or both are not already committed. But, honestly, what many people call a “platonic friendship” is a cover for an attraction in embryo. Another question: Do you trust your partner to be mature enough to respect appropriate boundaries regarding emotional intimacy? It’s true, work-spouse relationships can be gateways into affairs. However, that doesn’t happen if the work spouses maintain the devotion to their romantic partners. After all, anyone who is intent on having an affair will do so. An affair is not about opportunity. Affairs result from an attachment to dishonesty. People who are dissatisfied with themselves and their current relationships but lack the backbone to admit it and change are at risk for an affair. Does that situation fit your girlfriend?

Your girlfriend’s unwillingness to wed does mean that she struggles with trust and commitment. That is a greater threat to your future and long-term happiness together than a work spouse. If marriage is the lifestyle choice you desire, accept that she is not the woman for you. As painful as it may become, either ditch your dream of marriage or dump your girlfriend. Find a woman capable of saying yes when invited to share your life. I made the list of qualities I want in a soul mate, but I have not met any man remotely close to what I am looking for. What am I doing wrong? I was attending a training given by Carolyn Curtis, executive director of the Relationship Skills Center, when she described her process, years prior, of listing qualities she wanted in a husband. Carolyn tucked the list in a drawer and forgot it. Much later, while moving, she discovered her list. Now married, she showed it to her husband. “You wrote this after you met me,” he said. She assured him that the list was written long before their first date. He couldn’t believe it. “This describes me perfectly,” he said. After that, one of Carolyn’s friends, intent on finding a soul mate, concocted a list. It didn’t work. Carolyn looked at her friend’s list and said, “You have qualities here that are in conflict with each other.” With this in mind, review your list. And reconsider your thoughts, too. Believing that you did something wrong perpetuates inner conflict. What if you did everything right and it’s just time to be patient? You are worth waiting for, right? So, is your soul mate worth waiting for, too? Dear Readers: Tune in to www.1musicnetwork. com and catch my new show Love and Reality on the Today’s Talk channel. Ω

Meditation of the Week: The California Museum hosts  Creating Freedom: The Art & Poetry  of Domestic Violence Survivors. It’s  a stunning testament to our human  will to thrive despite all obstacles. In  “Broken and Beautiful,” Lacie Carlisle  writes, “You and only you have the  power to create your reality, piece  by piece.” Can you live that truth?

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B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

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joIN ouR AweSome

SALeS teAm! SN&R IS LookINg FoR AN AdveRtISINg CoNSuLtANt Do you love to network and meet new people? Are you actively involved in either the Chamber or Rotary? Do you love the News & Review?

STAGE Ozzie, Harriet and meds Next to Normal Next to Normal is an extraordinary piece of theater. The play, a rock musical about a depressed, delusional, bipolar housewife and the family by she loves and torments by her misery, won Jim Carnes three Tony Awards and the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. It’s just the right blend of intimate and edgy that is the hallmark of the New Helvetia Theatre.

5

SN&R is now seeking to hire a talented, experienced, self-motivated, ambitious and independent person for an advertising sales position.

Next to Normal, 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday; $20-$30. New Helvetia Theatre at the Studio Theatre, 1028 R Street; (916) 469-9850; www.newhelvetia.org. Through October 27.

The ideal candidate must possess superior sales skills, a proven track record, and be a self-starter with the discipline to work in the field and in the office. You must have experience with prospecting/lead generation, business-to-business cold calling and superb closing skills.

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Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work with them to create marketing campaigns that increase their business.

FoR moRe INFoRmAtIoN, vISIt www.NewSRevIew.Com/jobS.

“The best part of working at SN&R is bridging the gap between our readers and everything rad happening in the Sacramento region. And let’s be honest, I get a ton of perks working here.” –April advertising consultant

“When you said you had an electric personality, I thought you’d keep it to yourself.”

1 FOUL

2 FAIR

3 by

GOOD

4 WELL-DONE

5 SUBLIME-DON’T MISS

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lighting design illuminates the stage and the performances equally well. And what performances they are: Matthew Schneider directs an outstanding cast of six, equally adept at singing and acting. Melinda Parrett stars as Diana, well-matched with Michael Hunsaker as her husband, Dan. Casey Canino brings teenage angst and energy to daughter Natalie, while Garrett Bruce is mesmerizing as Gabe—their duet, “Superboy and the Invisible Girl,” is a highlight. Matthew Provencal plays Henry, Natalie’s new boyfriend, and Mike Yee takes on dual roles as two of Diana’s therapists. Ω

With music by Tom Kitt and book and lyrics by Brian Yorkey, the play centers around Diana Goodman and her seemingly allAmerican family—husband Dan and teenage offspring Gabe and Natalie. It isn’t long, however, before it becomes clear that something is wrong. Diana exhibits unexpected ups and downs, from euphoric sensuality to manic sandwich-making on the floor. Diana’s countless trips to therapists and pills by the bottles-full haven’t brought her anywhere near normal, or near coping with a tragedy that occurred 16 years ago. As her family begins to fray, Diana consents to shock therapy. Despite its serious subject matter, the play is smart and funny. It references both One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and The Sound of Music (“These are a few of my favorite pills”). This production—the first play in NHT’s new home at the Studio Theatre at 10th and R streets—is exceptional in every way, starting with set designer Brian Watson’s staging for the action. A series of steps and structures suggesting the sloped roofs of suburbia, the set is as functional as it is stunning. Sally Slocum’s

You must go home again The Price

Going through a childhood home after a parent’s death is always difficult. When there’s a complicated past between siblings, the process has a way of dragging all the skeletons out of the closet. B Street Theatre tackles this subject with masterful storytelling and a vivid, sensual stage as Buck Busfield directs one of Arthur Miller’s lesser well-known plays, The Price. It’s been 16 years since Victor (David Pierini) and Walter’s (Brian Dykstra) parents passed away, and now they must come to terms with their pasts—lives that were affected directly by the aftermath of the stock-market crash and the Great Depression. Victor’s unhappy wife, Esther (Elisabeth Nunziato), and an ancient antique salesman, Gregory Solomon (David Silberman), join the fray, and soon, every party’s vested interest makes his or her words and actions suspect. Thankfully, the cast is small and all more than capable of their roles. The dialogue fits the characters onstage perfectly, most especially with Silberman’s portrayal of the stereotypically Jewish Solomon. Samantha Reno’s stage takes up an entire wall, creating and using higher set pieces. Both bric-abrac and treasures litter the stage, from a harp to a pair of dueling foils. The mess it creates is the perfect backdrop for the events of the play. Anyone who has seen the emotional wreckage this process can inflict will be able to understand the play’s subtleties and feel real, honest sympathy for the characters. People who have not yet gone through this process may also learn a valuable lesson about the importance of family in the long term. —Maxwell McKee

The Price, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday; 2 and 7 p.m. Thursday; 7 p.m. Friday; 8 p.m. Saturday; 1 p.m. Sunday. $23-$35. B Street Theatre, 2711 B Street; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. Through November 3.

Refurbished Wireless Toshiba $ Laptops only 75

Encounter God & Come Alive Spiritually Now Playing

4

THE BEST MAN

This production of Gore Vidal’s play about political convention infighting for the presidential nomination is both timely and nostalgic. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 10/14. $12-$20. Actor’s Workshop of Sacramento at the California Stage, 2509 R St.; (916) 583-4880; www.actinsac.com. K.M.

5

ENRON

It really doesn’t get much better than this pull-out-the-stops production of Lucy Prebble’s play about the rise and fall of the world’s least ethical company. W 7pm; Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 10/21. $18-$38. Capital Stage, 2215 J St.; (916) 995-5464; www.capstage.org. M.M.

4

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While supplies last!

SUNDAY SERVICES: 7:30am Classical Language 9:00am Contemporary Organ & Piano 11:15am Classical Music

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Reverend Dr. Brian Baker

HEALING GRACE

A wildly physical comedy set in the waiting room of a father-anddaughter psychiatric team is the recipe for a successful small and quirky comedy by local playwright Candace Adams. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 10/14. $15-$18. Ovation Stage at the Three Penny Theatre in the California Stage complex, 1723 R St.; (916) 448-0312; www.ovationstage.com. K.M.

4

I LOVE YOU, YOU’RE PERFECT, NOW CHANGE

5

THE K OF D: AN URBAN LEGEND

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From the Garden of Eden—or the primordial ooze—forward, the course of true love has never run smoothly. A talented foursome (Michael Dotson, Jerry Lee, Jennifer Malenke and Melissa WolfKlain) shows us the story, one musical vignette after another, of how romance plays out in our lives. W 7pm; Th 2 & 7pm; F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 11/18. $20-$43. The Cosmopolitan Cabaret, 1000 K St.; (916) 557-1999; www.cosmopolitancabaret.com. J.M.

OR ELSE.

nts! e v e g n i m o c p u t e e w these s

Playwright Laura Schellhardt explores the twists and turns of urban myths in this two-actor (Jason Kuykendall and Tara Sissom) play with characters of multiple ages, races and backgrounds. It’s a tour de force of gymnastic acting feats under the direction of Jerry Montoya.

Tu 6:30pm; W 2 & 6:30pm; Th, F 8pm; Sa 5 & 9pm; Su 2pm. Through 11/11. $23-$35.

Boo at the Zoo

B Street Theatre, 2711 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. P.R.

OctOber 30 & 31, $10 tickets fOr $5

4

KNOCK ME A KISS

4

THE MIRACLE WORKER

Charles Smith’s play takes place during the Harlem Renaissance, when W.E.B. Du Bois (Jerrold Jones) gathered a circle of influential, intellectual artists, writers and political activists around him. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 10/14. $13-$15, $8 Thursdays. Celebration Arts, 4469 D St.; (916) 455-2787; www.celebrationarts.net. J.C.

kids can safely trick-or-treat around the lake at 25 different candy stations! Other activities include magic shows, costume dance party, and ghoulish games! rides on the spooky train or creepy carousel are also available for an additional fee. N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY

Sac ALcity RolleRS 06.18.09 pReSent REM “the Rocky hoRRoR RolleR 02.19.09 DeRBy Show”

This tale of blind, deaf and mute Helen Keller (Bella Bagatelos and Courtney Shannon alternate) and the teacher who ends her isolation, Anne Sullivan (Brittni Barger), may be an old chestnut, but director Greg Alexander and a well-chosen cast make the case that it’s still worthy and relevant, with a genuine payoff. W 6:30pm; Th 12:30 &

DESIGNER

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6:30pm; F 8pm; Sa 2 & 8pm; Sa 2pm. Through 10/28.

TicketsPLEASE include: CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR

$15-$38. Sacramento Theatre Company, 1419 H St.; (916) 443-6722; www.sactheatre.org.J.H.

4

ISSUE DATE

- special seating in our ViP section with a private ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLOWING: entrance AD SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES) - Your own personal Derby Girl to explain the action! SPELLING - free beverage and food by rubio’s NUMBERS & DATES - One raffle ticket CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESSES, ETC.) - Goodie bag

THE OGRE

Big Idea Theatre’s production of the Don Nigro play about the last months of American writer Stephen Crane’s life is suitably spooky and dark, with snarky one-liners threaded throughout. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2:30pm. Through 10/27. $10-$13. Big Idea Theatre, 1616 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 960-3036; www.bigideatheatre.com. K.M.

AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED APPROVED BY:

Short reviews by Jim Carnes, Jeff Hudson, Maxwell McKee, Jonathan Mendick, Kel Munger and Patti Roberts. Need more drama? For longer reviews of these plays, go to www.newsreview.com.

www.newsreview.com

SUPPORT MY SISTER’S HOUSE IN THEIR 11TH YEAR PROVIDING SHELTER AND SERVICES TO VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BEFORE

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Show timeS valid october 12–18, 2012

Now PlayiNg

bUtter

Opening Friday Oct. 12

liberal arts

Street-poet steez

Rated R Fri-Sun 2:10 5:20 Mon-Thu 5:20 nightly

Now PlayiNg

stars iN sHOrts

not Rated Fri-Sun 11:30 8:10 Mon-Thu 8:10 nightly

Searching for Sugar Man

SUN. oct. 14 oNly

bill w.

Rated R Fri-Sun 11:45 2:30 5:00 7:45 Mon-Thu 5:00 7:45

12:15, 3:00, 5:45 AdvAnce tickets At tickets.com, & crest Box office

oct. 11-13

SacrameNto gay & leSbiaN Film FeSt

1013 K Street - 916.442.7378 join the list - www.thecrest.com

7:30 nightly $10 ticKetS.com, cReSt

First-time Swedish filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul’s documentary wonders what became of Sixto Rodriguez, the mysterious Mexican-American by Jonathan Kiefer folk singer who in the 1970s was huge in South Africa without even knowing it, while unaccountably irrelevant in his hometown of Detroit. Interesting story, actually—moving, surprising, and somewhat spoilable by Google, let alone conversation with anyone who’s actually seen Searching for Sugar Man, so try to go in with ears open and knowing as little as possible. You might even consider reading no further into this review. Or see the movie, then come back.

4 BOOK SALE

WAREHOUSE

FRIENDS OF THE SACRAMENTO PUBLIC LIBRARY

Sat, Oct 13 th • 9am-4pm

GREAT PRICES !

We still have thousands of good quality books of all kinds for your reading pleasure! Book donations appreciated during open hours. Store books offered at regular low prices.

8250 Belvedere, Suite E • Off Power Inn Rd one block south of 14th Ave. For more information contact fspl@att.net or call (916)731-8493

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Good

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Some mystery remains anyway; in Bendjelloul’s account, a spirit of rediscovery trumps real investigation, but there’s enough substance here to discern Rodriguez as a man of genuine modesty and unfakeable street-poet steez. Not being a proper star somehow makes him seem that much more exalted. Yes, definitely a good find, documentarywise. It seems telling, too, that those who testify to his greatness include not just music-industry personnel but also a brewery owner and a construction worker. And the songs say plenty. They tend to be dusky, unvarnished brooders of the Nick Drake variety, although your ear might associate other singer-songwriters too: Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, James Taylor and on and on. With his canonworthy talent briskly established, Rodriguez scored many points for originality by seeming abruptly to disappear from the face of the Earth. After positive early reviews but no commercial industry foothold, suddenly all that remained of him were the spotty Rashomon-like remembrances of his alleged onstage suicide. How rock ’n’ roll. Except how shameful, too, if it meant Rodriguez never realized how much his melodious anti-establishment attitudes had helped white liberal middle-class South Africans cope with the repressive cruelty of apartheid. This is true: Local reissues of his records made him bigger than Elvis down there, but somehow he never got notified or paid for it. Could that peculiar oversight account for Rodriguez doing

himself in? Or perhaps a self-destruction was foretold in the music: “Sugar man, won’t you hurry? ’Cause I’m tired of these scenes. / For a blue coin, won’t you bring back all those colors to my dreams? / Silver magic ships you carry: jumpers, coke, sweet Mary Jane.” Then again, what if the rumors of his death were greatly exaggerated? One committed fan, the owner of a Cape Town record shop, decided to look into it. He began by combing lyrics for cryptic geographical references and other clues to the songwriter’s whereabouts. He enlisted far-flung helpers. The most remarkable of his findings—and here comes that quasi-spoiler again—was the fact of Rodriguez being alive and well and still living in Detroit. Certainly his music career had been snuffed out, but Rodriguez just went uncomplainingly back to his day-labor demolition and construction jobs. In the film, one of his daughters suggests that maybe he’s too grounded. He does share your surprise at how his story has developed. Although friendly, he’s not the easiest interviewee, possibly in part because he’s never really had to be. He is, however, the same agreeably unpretentious guy who made those songs. “Oh, that’s nice” seems to be his attitude about being rediscovered—not dismissive, but definitely not expectant or entitled, either. It’s a bit like he’s seen a ghost: his own. In 1998 Rodriguez traveled for the first time to South Africa, where he and his daughters were stunned by the limousines and paparazzi awaiting them, not to mention thousands of concertgoers where they’d been expecting fewer than 50. Oh, that was nice. Then he returned home to the usual stateside poverty and obscurity.

To capture this story, Malik Bendjelloul courted poverty himself, chipping away at the project—much of which he reportedly shot on his iPhone—for four unpaid years. To capture this story, Bendjelloul courted poverty himself, chipping away at the project—much of which he reportedly shot on his iPhone—for four unpaid years. Now he surely has changed his subject’s life and his own. The movie could be more fastidious with its reportage—on both the man and his missing money— and less inclined to romanticize a hibernal, down-and-out Detroit. But as music appreciation, it seems timely and essential. Its case firmly made that Rodriguez belongs among the most adored of American troubadours, Searching for Sugar Man might well reestablish him. Ω

by JONATHAN KIEFER & JIM LANE

4

EVERYBODY LOVES “SUGAR MAN!”

ASTONISHING!”“A SENSATION

Argo

In November 1979, as Iranian revolutionaries overrun the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and take the staff hostage, six Americans manage to escape and find refuge in the residence of the Canadian ambassador (Victor Garber). A CIA exfiltration expert (Ben Affleck) hatches an elaborate cover story to smuggle the Americans out disguised as members of a Hollywood film crew. Director Affleck and writer Chris Terrio fictionalize a real-life story, the CIA component of which wasn’t declassified until 1997—and is here emphasized somewhat to the detriment of the Canadian contribution, which was considerable and highly risky. Still, it’s a crackling good suspense thriller, told with mounting tension and just the right splashes of humor. John Goodman plays Oscar-winning makeup artist (and CIA contractor) John Chambers. J.L.

2

End of Watch

Two cops (Jake Gyllenhaal, Michael Peña) patrol the mean gang-ridden streets of South Central Los Angeles with courage and edgy gallows humor, even when a routine traffic stop nets a bonanza of cash, firearms and smuggled drugs, putting them on the hit list of a ruthless Mexican cartel. Writerdirector David Ayer adopts a found-footage style that’s become clichéd by now. But he uses it well, even abandoning it when necessary, and his movie has an intensity and immediacy that breathes new life into the conventions of the cop-buddy movie that serve as his basic template. Gyllenhaal and Peña have an effortless screen chemistry, which they share generously with Anna Kendrick and Natalie Martinez as their respective wives. David Harbour, Frank Grillo, America Ferrara and Cody Horn round out the excellent ensemble. J.L.

3

Frankenweenie

Young Victor Frankenstein (voice by Charlie Tahan) applies elementaryschool science and native genius to bring his dog back to life after it’s run over by a car— but keeping the secret opens a Pandora’s box of problems. Writer-director Tim Burton remakes his 1984 live-action short as a blackand-white stop-motion feature—literally reanimated—with mixed results. It’s an odd, notalways-comfortable blend of sweetness and doleful gloom, with dozens of in-joke references to 1930s horror movies that few viewers under 30 will get. Burton has plowed this ground before (The Nightmare Before Christmas, Corpse Bride), and it’s not that fertile; this one feels like exactly what it is: a padded-out short. The melancholy atmosphere sometimes plays as lack of energy, but it’s still an interesting novelty. J.L.

2

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Dredd 3D

In a post-apocalyptic future, where 800 million people lead marginal lives in what used to be the Northeastern United States, the only representatives of law and order are a small cadre of paramilitary “judges” apprehending perps and, when necessary, dispensing summary justice on the spot. Two such judges, the seasoned Dredd (Karl Urban) and the rookie psychic Anderson (Olivia Thirlby) find themselves trapped in a 200-story high-rise and hunted by a ruthless gang leader (Lena Headey). The 1980s sci-fi comic-book hero gets his second movie treatment (there was a Sylvester Stallone campfest in 1995), courtesy of writer Alex Garland and director Pete Travis. It’s suitably grimy and relentlessly violent. Urban does a fairly witty Dirty Harry impression, and the results will probably satisfy the comic’s remaining fans. J.L.

4

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Here Comes the Boom

A high-school teacher (Kevin James) springs into action on behalf of his school’s music teacher (Henry Winkler), whose job is about to be eliminated by their cashstrapped school. James’ plan: to raise the needed money by becoming a mixed-martial arts fighter. Try to imagine a bizarre hybrid of Rocky, Warrior and Mr. Holland’s Opus produced by Adam Sandler and directed by Frank Coraci—the accomplice in several of Sandler’s cinematic crimes—then you’ll have an idea of this dim-bulb rabble-rousing comedy. Fortunately, it’s not as bad as it might have been, mainly thanks to James—who co-wrote with Allan Loeb and Rock Reuben, and who brings a surprising hangdog dignity to his performance (more than the movie deserves).

BEFORE

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Look at the little dog. Proof of psychopathy.

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Seven Psychopaths

A screenwriter (Colin Farrell) gets sucked into the Los Angeles underworld when two friends (Sam Rockwell, Christopher Walken) kidnap the beloved dog of a gangster (Woody Harrelson). Do you really need to be told that a movie called Seven Psychopaths is not for the squeamish? Good. If your cringe threshold is high enough, this is one of the funniest comedies of the year. Writer-director Martin McDonagh manages to top his debut feature, the cult favorite In Bruges, with the same flair for daffy non sequitur dialogue—but cranked up several notches— and a sterling deadpan cast able to pull it off with ease. Farrell is the sane one here: The psychopaths include Tom Waits and Long Nguyen, but after that, you might lose count. Abbie Cornish, Olga Kurylenko and Zeljko Ivanek are also along for McDonagh’s wild ride. J.L. There are a few hearty laughs scattered here and there, and Salma Hayek for romance. J.L.

2

Hotel Transylvania

Dracula (voice by Adam Sandler) tries to protect his daughter Mavis (Selena Gomez) from the murderous human race by sheltering her in his secluded hotel for vacationing monsters. Then, one day, a hiker (Andy Samberg) wanders into the lobby, locks eyes with Mavis, and it’s love at first bat (of the eyes, that is). Just what the Cineplexes of America needed: another empty-calorie animated feature that might even lead to a series of sequels, vying with Ice Age and Madagascar for the title of Worst Cartoon Franchise Ever. Five writers (Peter Baynham, Robert Smigel, Todd Durham, Dan Hageman and Kevin Hageman) fail to come up with a real story or characters, just a parade of lame gags padding a passable seven-minute cartoon out to feature length. It’s inconsequential but harmless, like a box of gummy bears. J.L.

3

Looper

In the 2070s, organized crime controls time travel, using it to send people they want dead back 30 years to be offed and disposed of. The catch is that each assassin will someday have to kill his older self, thus “closing the loop.” When one such looper (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) tries to close his loop, the old boy he will be in 30 years (Bruce Willis) has some surprises up his sleeve. Director Rian Johnson’s script is a wildly convoluted ride. It plays as if he made it up as he went along, and it doesn’t always make sense, even on its own sci-fi terms. But the movie has an irresistible energy and a don’t-give-a-damn unpredictability that holds your attention and keeps you guessing. Emily Blunt plays a farmer caught in the crossfire, Jeff Daniels portrays a cold-blooded gang lord and Paul Dano is a luckless fellow looper. J.L.

2

The Master

A World War II Navy vet who can’t adjust to peacetime (Joaquin Phoenix) falls under the spell of a charismatic charlatan (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a mix of self-help guru, snake-oil salesman and religious mystic. Writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson has a reputation for artistry despite (or because of) his modest output of six features in 24 years. His admirers will no doubt find this one profoundly poetic, but at 137 solemnly lumbering minutes, it’s actually a windy bore, an attractively wrapped but thick and indigestible slab of baloney. Phoenix plays an ex-sailor with anger management issues by giving—I am not making this up—an impression of Popeye: That’s the level of profundity on display. There’s a charlatan at work here, all right, but it’s not Hoffman’s character, it’s Paul Thomas Anderson. J.L.

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Pitch Perfect

A college student (Anna Kendrick) is dragooned into a campus a capella singing group, where her experimental nature clashes with the conservative style of the group’s self-appointed leader (Anna Camp). Kay Cannon’s script (based, ever so loosely, on a book by Mickey Rapkin) parodies, by faithful imitation, the silly adolescent soap opera of Glee, with plenty of sly winks at the audience, congratulating them on having such a knowing postmodern sense of humor. Broadly directed by Jason Moore, the story grows tiresome before long; what redeems the movie is the musical numbers, energetically danced and sung, hopefully (but maybe not) in the actors’ own voices. (Oddly enough, though, Kendrick and Camp’s group doesn’t sing a capella at the climactic competition: It’s accompanied by an unseen percussionist.) J.L.

3

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Trouble With the Curve

A veteran major-league-baseball scout (Clint Eastwood) clings to his job even as his eyesight fails; his concerned boss (John Goodman) turns to the man’s semi-estranged daughter (Amy Adams) to help get him through one more season. First-time writer Randy Brown’s screenplay is short on surprises but long on grist for its likeable stars (including Justin Timberlake as a romantic interest for Adams) and dislikeable villain (Matthew Lillard as a hotshot upstart in the team office, as smarmy as Jay Mohr in Jerry Maguire). Rookie director and Eastwood protégé Robert Lorenz keeps the amiable story humming along efficiently, and the result is an easy to take starvehicle entertainment, comfy and predictable as an old pair of shoes. Robert Patrick, Ed Lauter, Bob Gunton and George Wyner add to the familiarity. J.L.

3

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Won’t Back Down

A frustrated mother (Maggie Gyllenhaal) and a teacher on the brink of career burnout (Viola Davis) join forces to try to improve their school, battling administrative inertia and a hostile teachers’ union. The script by Brin Hill and director Daniel Barnz betrays their relative inexperience: The process the women are going through isn’t fully described at the outset, so it’s not always clear what they’re up against, and key scenes appear to be underdeveloped or missing altogether. But Gyllenhaal and Davis make a powerhouse team, and the movie pushes most of the right buttons (we can almost see the “Applause!” sign flashing in the corner of the screen). Oscar Isaac plays an ambivalent teacher (and sort-of love interest for Gyllenhaal), and Rosie Perez, Holly Hunter and Ving Rhames contribute strong cameos. J.L.

FEATURE STORY

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Think seductive, soulful tunes with an Americana flair sealed with enough bluesy bravado that it might even make the late Waters raise an eyebrow. Think music culled from a lifetime of experience, including DuHain’s chronic struggles with health. In short, think songs that are primed for bars. “Drinking music,” DuHain said over a pitcher of Pabst Blue Ribbon with bandmates and a handful of friends at their dive bar of choice, the Old Tavern Bar & Grill in Midtown. “[It’s] drinking music because people congregate, drink and end up discussing what’s going on.” Not too long ago, on a late summer night at Luigi’s Fun Garden, DuHain set out to live up to her words as the band launched into a cover of the Beatles’ “Oh! Darling.” Barefoot onstage and accompanied by her three best men, DuHain stepped up to the mic in front of a crowd of more than 40. Her voice began modestly as she recited Paul McCartney’s lyrics, but DuHain was building up to the song’s second verse. With a gustlike force, she belted out the second half, strumming her guitar as Williams and Aiello joined in, screaming behind her. It’s tricky covering such a widely known hit, but on this night, she brought the song to a close, eyes squinting as she sang intensely to the audience. Their approval was clear, with the majority of the room raising their beers in the air, hollering right along with the singer.

The Carly DuHain Band doesn’t just bust out covers, though. In December, it will release InsideFires, a 13-song album of originals, produced by local singer-songwriter Justin Farren. DuHain describes the record, which the band is still recording, as comprising songs as varied as “a drunken-circus” to “a raw opus.” But if you ask guitarist Aiello what separates DuHain’s lyrics from other female vocalists in town, he won’t put a bow on it. “Most of the female singer-songwriters in Sacramento go for cutie, indie, soft-spoken,” Aiello said. “What’s different about [Carly] is [that she’s] way more raw. There’s just way more passion.” And whether she’s singing about heartache, depression or illness, DuHain said she writes music as a way to connect with the audience and insists they leave knowing one simple thing. “[T]hey’re not alone,” DuHain said. “Any weirdness, any oddities, any pain, any singularity that they felt was damaging or solitary, they’re not alone. And they can convene with people who are like-minded.” It’s not all sweet and cozy, though. Indeed, DuHain isn’t one to sugarcoat things. “Life isn’t fucking perfect,” DuHain said, swiping her black locks behind one ear.

“Mostofthefemale singer-songwritersin Sacramentogoforcutie, indie,soft-spoken. What’sdifferentabout [Carly]is[thatshe’s] waymoreraw.” Gabe Aiello guitarist the Carly DuHain Band

DuHain should know. Despite a tough exterior—tattooed arms, a boisterous personality and a powerful voice that suggests invincibility—the 30-year-old singer has long battled lupus and rheumatoid arthritis to the point of being bedridden and, at times, even hospitalized. DuHain doesn’t linger over the topic of her health: She admits she’d rather kick both illnesses than let them control the music. “I’m a tough cookie. I’ve got a seriously high pain tolerance. I would prefer to not be weighed down by a disease that really has no cure,” she said. “But it also gives me more of a fight, which I feel makes the music better, because I feel like I have something to prove.” Ω

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Happy birthday: On Monday nights, Sol Collective hosts a unique open-mic, aptly titled Microphone Mondays. Slam poetry, guest songwriters, spokenworders—but the coolest thing is how audience members send texts and the comments are then projected live on a wall next to the stage. I’ve seen this before, of course, but not often in Sacramento—yet it’s such a simple, engaging way to make a show that much more fun. Get with it. It, of course, helps when a guy such as singer-songwriter James Cavern is part of the lineup. He toted a sleekly polished acoustic ax onstage this past Monday just after 8 p.m. and played hiding under a black, flat-billed ball cap and behind black-rimmed glasses. Later, he invited emcee Century Got Bars up for a duet, a song about how relationships always get to a “comfort level where people are too afraid to say it’s not working out.” Cavern’s style, though, works: simple, pop-R&B acoustic ballads made unique by tender styling and heart-onsleeve lyrics. Monday night’s tunes were wayfaring, chill odes to positivity and hope. And my only criticism would be that they’re possibly a bit one-note, lacking a dynamic in theme and tone. And that it’s also difficult to make out the words and go along for the story in the song. But that’s just first-impression feedback: Cavern will have a new EP in January 2013, and you can hear more at http://jamescavern.bandcamp.com. Also: Happy Birthday to Microphone Mondays, which celebrated a one-year anniversary this week (2574 21st Street; 8 to 10 p.m.; no cover before 8:08 p.m., $5 after; all ages).

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Tchicai’s work with Archie Shepp on the New York Art Quartet. It was a treat to unearth these works on Monday night after the Luna’s set. Back at Luna’s, Botz, who was running the door in lieu of Hammond, shared a hilarious story of a Tchicai performance at Old Ironsides one night. “I was across the street and heard him start playing,” he recalled, “and almost got hit by a car going to see him.” Lessons learned: 1. Jazz legends lived right under Sacramento’s nose. 2. Jazz music compels all sorts of illegal activity, such as jaywalking. 3. Always use a crosswalk.

THINK FREE.

RIP John Tchicai: What’s sweeter than jaywalking across 16th Street toward Luna’s Café & Juice Bar for an evening of experimental jazz? Doing so and not getting a ticket. Or being hit by a car. Anyway, it’s hard to deny Ross Hammond’s Nebraska Mondays when you’re in the P and 16th neighborhood. The sonic burst of drum thumps, clunky keys, sharp brass and bumping bass seduces street side, and the clatter is a cool reminder that bitchin’ nightlife still exists amid humdrum weekday grid streets. You can’t resist. You just can’t. And this past Monday was something more: Friends gathered to listen—and jam—in honor of a jazz legend, one John Tchicai, who passed away on Sunday at age 76. Jazz fiend I am not, so knowledge of Tchicai was but armchair before this evening. Yes, I knew he soloed on John Coltrane’s Ascension, the pivotal 1965 release. And I also knew he’d dabbled in Davis for a while. But at Luna’s on Monday, Tchicai’s buddies and acquaintances Joe Botz and Tony Passarell shared fond memories. Local sax player Passerell remembered Tchicai moving to Davis in 1991, where he posted a bandmateswanted ad in a Laundromat, which led to Tchicai starting a group with Jeff Simons of Watermelon Music and others. Tchicai became a mentor to Passarell and taught him much about free-form improv. He says Tchicai also had a healthy a sense of humor: During a KDVS interview, for instance, Tchicai once spun a lengthy yarn about how a palm reader compelled him to move to Davis (in truth, his daughter attended high school in the area). Born in Denmark, Tchicai was the recipient of government funds, approximately $30,000 to $40,000 annually, according to Passarell, which allowed him to make music well into his senior years. Locally, he played in John Tchicai and the Archetypes with Simons and others, but it was tricky tracking down this material online. Easier to find (Spotify) was his Infinitesimal Flash, which also included local Mat Marucci on drums and Francis Wong and Adam Lane. This 2000 album features 11 whirlwind modern-jazz tracks that are more accessible and not as wild as

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11THURS

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Danny Secretion

Holly Near

Flowerss

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Naked Lounge Downtown, 8:30 p.m., $5

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Sometimes, he’s a luchador going by the  name El Flaco Loco. Other times, he’s striking a drum kit with his longtime punk band  PUNK the Secretions. But every once  in a while, you can catch Danny  Secretion with an acoustic guitar performing at smaller venues in town. Sure, he  may be doing it solo, but he’s got enough  personality and witty entertainment knowhow to keep even the most intimate coffee  establishments laughing or moving to music  from the ’50s, his originals and maybe even  a Secretions song or two. Also performing  on this evening is the Voodoo Organist—a  Southern California band mixing goth, punk  and blues—and Julie Bruce. 1111 H Street,  www.facebook.com/dannysecretion.

How you feel about Holly Near will be directly  related to how you first heard her: She  sings about peace, feminism, the environment, social justice and good-ol’ fashioned  romance. For those of us old enough to  remember “We Are a Gentle Angry People,”  she’s beloved for this singalong-friendly unity-building anthem, necessary in the wake  of the murder of Harvey Milk. But it doesn’t  really matter how you approach Near; she’s  versatile, with rich pop-inflected vocals on  folk songs both alternative and traditional,  FOLK covering many issues of importance  about life on this blue dot in this  little corner of the galaxy. 1275 Starboard  Drive in West Sacramento,   www.hollynear.com.

—Steph Rodriguez

—Kel Munger

Bows & Arrows, 8 p.m., $5

Naked Lounge Downtown, 8:30 p.m., $7

There was a point a couple of years ago  when I couldn’t stop listening to Building  Breedings’ In the Key of Calloused Fingers album. The band, featuring guitarist Chris  Larsen trading vocals with drummer Melanie  Glover, crafted sublime pop songs—the  POP kind that insist upon being played  repeatedly. The Sacramento group  has long disbanded, but now Larsen has  Flowerss, a new band, with Two Sheds’ John  Gutenberger. Charm, released by Senescent  Records on vinyl and as a download, comprises songs that give a nod to ’90s British  shoegaze, trip-hop and orchestral pop  scenes without ever succumbing to shallow  nostalgia or derivation. Desario is also on the  bill. 1815 19th Street, www.senescentrecords. com/artists/Flowerss.

7Seconds vocalist Kevin Seconds and  Groovie Ghoulies frontman Kepi Ghoulie  (pictured) often team up and hit the coffeeshop scene with acoustic guitars. Ghoulie  recently returned from a European tour  with pop-punk sister-duo Dog Party, while  7Seconds has been performing in the Bay  Area and its home away from home, Reno— alongside bands such as City of Vain and  Bastards of Young. Notably, Seconds has  performed with the likes of Elliott Smith and  Chuck Ragan of Hot Water Music. Ghoulie  continues to have a strong presence in the  ACOUSTIC ROCK local music scene  and is often seen  at Shine coffeehouse sipping caffeine. 1111 H  Street, www.facebook.com/kepi.ghoulie.

—Steph Rodriguez

—Rachel Leibrock CELEBRATING OUR 20TH ANNIVERSARY ALL YEAR LONG!

RESTAURANT ss BAR BAR COMEDY CLUB CLUB ss RESTAURANT COMEDY

VOTED BEST COMEDY CLUB BY THE SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW!

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OCTOBER 11 & 14

2 FOR 1 ADMISSION!! (WITH THIS AD)

Thu OcT 11 8pm $18 adv

SaINT VITuS WEEDEaTER SOuRVEIN

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wed Oct 17 8pm $15 adv

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WITH GuESTS ONuINu

thu oct 18 9pm $12 adv

NICK GRaVENITES THE SIZZLING SIRENS aND DaVID LaFLaMME fri Oct 19 9pm $17.50 adv fri Oct 12 10pm $10

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WITH GuESTS WaLES & HEaDLINES sat Oct 13 10pm $10

ICONCLaST ROBOT WITH GuESTS GREYSPaCE

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Coming Soon Oct 21 Savoy Brown Oct 23 Omar Rodriguez-Lopez Group Oct 24 Zach Deputy Oct 25 Trailer Park Troubadors Oct 26 Red Fang/Black Tusk Oct 27 Busdriver / Open Mic Eagle / Nocando Oct 29 Other Lives / Indians Oct 30 Storm Large Oct 31 Halloween w/ Zuhg & Massive Delicious Nov 2 Close To You: Carpenter’s Tribute Nov 2 Robert Glasper Nov 3 Tim Hockenberry

sat Oct 20 7pm $15

STEELIN’ DaN

sat Oct 20 10pm $12

MIDNIGHT PLaYERS

Nov 3 KRS 1 Nov 8 Saul Williams Nov 10 Diamond Rings Nov 14 Brothers of Baladi Nov 19 Walk The Moon / Family Of The Year Dec 10 The Sword Dec 10 Corrosion Of Conformity (C.O.C.) Dec 12 Charlie Hunter

2708 J Street • Sacramento • 916.441.4693 • www.harlows.com 10.11.12

FROM AMERICAN COMIC AND WEEDS!

FrI 10/12

BRET ERNST

Steel toed SlipperS

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WEDNESDAY 10/17

rocK/alternative // 9pm // $7

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THURSDAY 10/11 - SUNDAY 10/14

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TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CLUB BOX OFFICE WITH NO SERVICE CHARGE.

ticKetS now on Sale For these upcoming shows at www.marilynsonk.com $3 TallbOy Pbr

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908 K Street // 916.446.4361

++Free parking aFter 6pm with validation @ 10th & l garage+

16TUES

Mfalme Fest

Matisyahu

UC Davis Pavilion, 7 p.m., $55-$65

Wale headlines this festival, which means  “king” in Swahili. Mfalme Fest also features  underground emcees Ryan Leslie, Curren$y,  Dom Kennedy, Stalley, Pac Div and Nitty Scott.  Some critics now regard Wale as “king lyricist” in Rick Ross’ Maybach Music Group after  his successful 2011 album Ambition, but Wale  was even better as just an underrated emcee  repping Washington, D.C. Unfortunately, Ross’  influence seems to have led Wale to embrace  songs about “dirty bitches” and “chasin’  money,” in lieu of beautifully poetic songs  HIP-HOP such as “Mirrors,” “Shades”  and “Diary” from his debut,  Attention Defecit. Here’s to hoping the old  Wale returns. 1 Shields Avenue in Davis,   www.mfalmefest.com.

—Jonathan Mendick

phoTo by paUl piazza

14SUN

Ace of Spades, 7:30 p.m., $25

16TUES

17WED

Jason Bonham

Rat Damage

Crest Theatre, 8 p.m., $29-$125

Matisyahu is a reggae-singing-and-rapping  former Hasid (a source of controversy this  past year) who is a genuinely unique talent.  REGGAE/HIP-HOP His ability to  mix positive  messages with hypnotic beats and dynamic  vocal performances is the stuff of legend. His  latest album, Spark Seeker, sees him broadening his horizons further. Middle Eastern  rhythms creep into tracks like “Crossroads,”  while “Breathe Easy” employs a more danceable rhythm than many of his previous  tracks. Parts of “Summer Wind” sound like  they have Indian influences. Content is still  every bit as uplifting as you would expect  (especially “Sunshine”). There’s no doubt:  Matisyahu’s still got it. 1417 R Street,   www.matisyahuworld.com.

If you never had the good fortune to see  Led Zeppelin perform live when it was still  around—or attend the group’s one-off  reunion gig in 2007—you’ll have to settle  for the next best thing: watching Jason  Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience. Bonham,  the son of the late original Zeppelin drummer John Bonham, filled in for his dad at  the famous 2007 gig in London; and he also  leads his own group called the Led Zeppelin  CLASSIC ROCK Experience. In addition to performing  from the innovative and hard-rocking  Zeppelin catalog, Jason and Co. help tell the  story of the band through video footage and  period-specific staging. 1013 K Street,   www.jblze.com.

—Jonathan Mendick

The Cave, 7 p.m., $8

I don’t know Rat Damage personally, but  I suspect it’s the type of band that would  punch you in the face if you said “Green  Day is the best punk band in the world.”  Rat Damage plays punk rock the way it was  HARDCORE PUNK done back in the  early ’80s: loud,  angry and paranoid. Back then, strippeddown recordings and raw performances  were every bit as important as the music  was. But this group doesn’t exclusively play  fast-driving, guttural-screaming hardcore.  It adds tempo changes and nuance to chord  progressions—adding creativity to its  conformity-hating, middle-finger-waving  musical explosions. The one thing it doesn’t  play is pop-punk. 3512 Stockton Boulevard,  www.facebook.com/rat.damage.

—Brian Palmer

—Aaron Carnes

OMAR RODRIGUEZ LOPEZ

GUITARIST FROM THE MARS VOLTA

OCT 23 – HARLOWS

JAKE SHIMABUKURO

NEEDTOBEATHE

OCT 30 · FREEBORN HALL, UC DAVIS

OCT 25 · SAC CITY COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

CASH’D OUT A TRIBUTE TO JOHNNY CASH OCT 11 · POWERHOUSE PUB

STEELIN’ DAN

STORM LARGE

A TRIBUTE TO THE MUSIC OF STEELY DAN OCT 20 · HARLOWS

SAVOY BROWN OCT 21 · HARLOWS

OCT 30 · HARLOWS

CLOSE TO YOU

A TRIBUTE TO THE CARPENTERS NOV 2 · HARLOWS

ZACH DEPUT Y OCT 24 · HARLOWS

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

TEMPEST

NOV 3 · POWERHOUSE PUB

10.11.12     |   SN&R     |   43

NIGHTBEAT List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

THURSDAY 10/11

FRIDAY 10/12

BADLANDS

2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

Tipsy Thursdays, Top 40 deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Fabulous and Gay Fridays, 9pm, call for cover

Saturday Boom, 9pm, call for cover

BLUE LAMP

KOFFIN KATS, 9pm, call for cover

TIMOTHY RHYME, 60 EAST, SOOSH E, SPIFFY, LIL BIT, REAZ; 9pm, $5

ISLAND OF BLACK & WHITE, 8:30pm, call for cover

THE BOARDWALK

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 CRUSH, MIND FLOWERSS; 8pm

WASH, COMMERCIALIZED, GROUNDED,

THE COSMONAUTS, VICTORY OR DEATH, LOST FREEDOM, VERA; 7:30pm

LAZIE LOCZ, CUDDY KEV, WAR MUSIK, ROCC STEADY, SIR JOHNSON; 8pm

BOWS AND ARROWS

CASEY LIPKA, 8pm, no cover

Grown-up Spelling Bee, 8pm, $7-$15

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

THE CAVE

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

ALASDAIR FRASER, NATALIE HAAS; 7:30pm, $20-$25

JAMAL WALKER & LOOSE CHANGE, 8pm, $12-$15

HOLLY NEAR, 8-11pm, $22-$25

THE COZMIC CAFĂ&#x2030;

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

RICK HAMMOND, 7:30pm, $10

TEMPEST, 8pm, $13-$15

REDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLUES, 6pm, no cover

THE TWILIGHT DRIFTERS, 6pm, no cover

18398 Old River Rd., West Sacramento; (916) 371-2277

FACES

Deejay dancing and karaoke, 9pm, $3

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

FOX & GOOSE

JAMES ISRAEL BAND, COLLIN JONES; 8pm, no cover

SPIDER GARAGE, DYLAN CHAMPAGNE, WOLFGANG VEGA; 9pm-midnight, $5

PATRICK WALSH, LUCKY LASKOWSKI, FLIES IN THE KITCHEN; 9pm-midnight, $5

DJ Smilez, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

PLAYBOY SCHOOL, ARE WE HUMAN; 10pm-1:15am, no cover

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798 1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

Hey local bands!

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/15-10/17

Sin Sunday, 8pm, call for cover

Mad Mondays, 9pm M; Latin video flair and Wii bowling, 7pm Tu THE STRANGE PARTY, DIRTY FILTHY MUGS, CONCUSSION; 9pm W

MATT BAUER, KEVIN LEE FLORENCE; 8pm W, $5

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

SUNDAY 10/14

ACCIDENTALLY MURDERED, EXTIRPATE, INCISUS, JON GENOCYDE; 8pm

3512 Stockton Blvd., (916) 267-7576

ELKHORN SALOON

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

SATURDAY 10/13

G STREET WUNDERBAR 228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

Dragalicious, 9pm, $5

Queer Idol, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, $5; DJ Alazzawi, 9pm W, $3 Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; Traditional Irish jam session, 8pm W

THE GOLDEN BEAR

DJ Shaun Slaughter, 10pm, call for cover

DJ Crook One, 10pm, call for cover

DJ Whores, 10pm, no cover

HARLOWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

SAINT VITUS, WEEDEATER, SOURVEIN; 8pm, call for cover

NICK GRAVENITES, DAVID LAFLAMME; 7pm, $25; VIBESQUAD, OPIUO; 10pm

CRUSH, WALES; 6:30pm, $10; ICONOCLAST ROBOT, GREYSPACE; 10pm, $10

STRFKR, ONUINU; 8pm W, call for cover

LUNAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CAFĂ&#x2030; & JUICE BAR

Joe Montoyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

THE RAIL FLOWERS, 8pm, $10

SOLWAVE, MIKE DIAZ, CHERYL MARTIN, CHRIS SAYERS; 8:30pm, $6

Nebraska Mondays, M; ACLU meeting, 4:30pm Tu; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

MARILYNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON K

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rock Onâ&#x20AC;? Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

STEEL TOED SLIPPERS, DIRTY CLERGY; 9pm, $7

NORTH BOUND TRAIN, TAORMINA/LOUDON/ODOM; 8:30pm, $5

MRQ, 5:30pm Tu, no cover; HONYOCK, 9pm W, $3

Pure Evolution Fridays, 9pm-2am, $5-$7

DJs Gavin Varitech and Funksion, 9:30pm, no cover before 10, $5 after

Swing dance lessons, 8pm Tu, $6; Salsa, Bachata and Merengue, 8:30pm W, $5

2326 K St., (916) 441-2252 2708 J St., (916) 441-4693 1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931 908 K St., (916) 446-4361

MIDTOWN BARFLY

1119 21st St., (916) 549-2779

MIX DOWNTOWN

1531 L St., (916) 442-8899

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

DJ Billy Lane, 9pm, $10, free before 9pm DJ Elliot Estes, 9pm, $15

DJ Mike Moss, 9pm, $20

DANNY SECRETION, VOODOO ORGANIST, JULIE BRUCE; 8:30pm, $5

KEVIN SECONDS, KEPI GHOULIE; 8:30pm, $7

TRAVIS LARSON BAND, 8:30pm, $5

A D U LT

Industry Night, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Gabe Xavier, 9pm, call for cover

DJs Gabe Xavier and Peeti V, 8:30pm2am W, $10 Jazz session, 8:30pm M, no cover

M A G I C

S H O W

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THURSDAY 10/11

FRIDAY 10/12

OLD IRONSIDES

KONCRETE JUNGLE, 10pm, $5

CLASSIC ROCK, MY DIRTY ADDICTION, FAIR STRUGGLE; 9pm, $5

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

CLAUDIA NYGAARD, 8pm, $15

BILLY JOE SHAVER, 8:30pm, $20

HOLDSTOCK AND MACLEOD, 8pm, $20

DJ Shift, 9pm-2am, $15

DJ Peeti V, 9pm, $15

POLITICAL PLUM, 9pm, $5

RODENTS OF UNUSUAL SIZES, 9pm, $5

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504 13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

THE PARK ULTRA LOUNGE 1116 15th St., (916) 442-7222

PISTOL PETE’S

140 Harrison Ave., Auburn; (530) 885-5093

POWERHOUSE PUB

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

SATURDAY 10/13

SUNDAY 10/14

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/15-10/17 THE NUANCE, 7:30pm M; Karaoke, 9pm Tu; Open-mic, 8:30pm W, no cover SONNY LANDRETH, 8pm Tu, $25

Asylum Downtown: Gothic, industrial, EBM dancing, 9pm, call for cover

614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586

CASH’D OUT, 8pm, $15; FRANKIE BALLARD, MISS WILLIE BROWN; 10pm, $15

SHINE

SANDBOX, 8pm, $5

INFERNO OF JOY, LOVE IS OVER; 8pm, $5

TRAVIS LATRINE, JEAN PAUL DE ROOVER, INSTAGON, RADIO DRIVE BY; 4pm,

SOPHIA’S THAI KITCHEN

SHANNON HARNEY, DRMS, ANNA ASH; 9pm, $5

WOODY PINES, JOHN COURAGE & THE GREAT PLAINS; 9:30pm, $5

SEA OF BEES, JAKE MANN & THE UPPER HAND, MATT BAUER; 9pm, $10

STONEY INN/ROCKIN RODEO

KIANNA MARTINEZ & THE JON ALLEN BAND, 9:30pm, no cover

JASON MICHAEL CARROLL, 6:30pm, $15-$20

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Bluebird Lounge open-mic, 5pm Tu, no cover

Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; TESS MARIE & THE POOR MAN BAND, 8pm, $5

WINGNUT ADAMS, Tu; Open-mic, 5:30pm W; PETER PETTY REVIEW, 9pm W, $5

1400 E St., (916) 551-1400 129 E St., Davis; (530) 758-4333

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023

SWABBIES

SUPERLICIOUS, BAYERN MAIDEN; 8pm, call for cover

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, W, no cover

Sea of Bees with Jake Mann & the Upper Hand and Matt Bauer 9pm Saturday, $8-$10. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen Indie folk

Country Karaoke, 9pm M; DJ Alazzawi, DJ Rigatony, 10pm Tu, $3

GUMBO STEW, 3pm

Open jazz jam w/ Jason Galbraith & Friends, 8pm Tu, no cover

FRYED BROTHERS BAND, 3pm, $10

5871 Garden Hwy, (916) 920-8088

TORCH CLUB

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

X TRIO, 5pm, no cover; LONESOME LOCOMOTIVE, 9pm, $5

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm, no cover; TRACORUM, 9pm, $7

JOHNNY KNOX, 5pm, no cover; FUNK REVIVAL ORCHESTRA, 9pm, $8

TOWNHOUSE LOUNGE

Deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Roger and special guests, 9pm, $5, no cover before 10pm

Video-game party, 3-7pm, no cover; Pop Freq w/ DJ XGVNR, 9pm, $5

Open-mic, 9pm M, no cover; Eyewitness Wednesdays, 9pm W, no cover

THE BUCK FORD BAND, 9pm, call for cover

THE CRIPPLE CREEK BAND, TRAVIS SIMAS & NEAL MORGAN; 9pm

Karaoke Wednesdays, 8pm W, call for cover

1517 21st St., (916) 613-7194

THE WRANGLER

8945 Grant Line Rd., Elk Grove; (916) 714-9911

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

ARDEN PARK ROOTS, AUTUMN SKY, INKDUP & Z ROKK; 6:30pm, $5

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300

CLUB RETRO

COFFEE GARDEN

Open-mic, 8-10pm, no cover

LUIGI’S SLICE AND FUN GARDEN

ROCCA VARNADO, BELL BOYS, NICATYNE, BLEE; 8pm, call for cover

1050 20th St., (916) 552-0317

MATISYAHU, CONSTELLATIONS; 7pm Tu, $25; WORD ALIVE, 5:30pm W, $16

SLEEPING GIANT, BEFORE ME; 7pm, $10$15

1529 Eureka Rd., Roseville; (916) 988-6606 2904 Franklin Blvd., (916) 457-5507

ABANDON ALL SHIPS, FOR ALL THOSE SLEEPING, SKIP THE FOREPLAY; 6pm

SAMANTHA CLEMONS, 8pm, call for cover

ZUHG LIFE STORE

COMMON CROOKS, THE BODY RAMPANT, WALES; 8pm W, $7 COLLIN JONES, 6:30pm, no cover

545 Downtown Plaza, Ste. 2090, (916) 822-5185

SOFIA TALVIK, 8:30pm Tu, no cover

Timothy Rhyme with 60 East, Soosh E, Spiffy, Lil’ Bit and Reaz 9pm Friday, $5. Blue Lamp Hip-hop

THE WHEELS, CORY NORRIS; 1pm, no cover

JEAN PAUL DE ROOVER, 2pm, no cover

ADRIAN BELLUE, 6pm Tu, no cover

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BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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marinello.com

Defining Beauty Education Since 1905

ARTS&C U LT U R E | AFTER Marinello_SNR(Sacramento)_4.9x5.67_4clr.indd 1

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SN&R 10/1/2012

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One to grow on We own a rental home. A friend of ours with a pot card would like to rent our house and grow several plants (or the whole house). I’m cool with it, as long as the feds can’t come in one day and take our home from us. What are the legal ramifications as a landlord? —Home Stink Home It seems like such a simple idea: Use a room in your house to grow cannabis, make a little money to cover the mortgage, and have a little head stash of your BEALUM own. What can go wrong? by NGAIO All kinds of things can go wrong. How good are you at keeping a secret? How good is your friend? What measures will you use to minimize odor? How a sk420 @ ne wsreview.c om well do you know your neighbors? Are they cool? Nosy? Cannabis users? Methamphetamine addicts? Does your friend have any experience setting up a grow room? Anyone have any crazy current or ex-boyfriends? Are you sinking your savings into this project? Will you be financially devastated if the first crop goes wrong? I could go on and on. Growing marijuana seems easy, and it is if you just have a few plants in your garden. But a grow room, even a small one, is more like a part-time job than a serious hobby. I asked cannabis attorney James Anthony about the odds of a small grow house being raided by the feds. His response: “What am I, a bookie? 972-to-1.” Then, he added, “The feds aren’t your problem. I would ask, ‘Where is A grow room is your heart? Why are you growing?’ more like a part- And I would say, ‘Don’t piss off your neighbors.’” time job than a I think Anthony’s right. The odds of the feds trying to seize your house serious hobby. are pretty small. But, unless you or your friend has extensive experience, the odds of shit going wrong are pretty high. So, think it all the way through before you commit to anything.

Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@ newsreview.com.

I haven’t smoked in years; simply don’t enjoy it. I plan to help friends with their harvest. Will even being around 50 plants and breathing be enough to give me a positive drug test? Think it would be fun to hang with them and lend a hand, but if it could put my job in jeopardy, I will need to bow out. —Helping Second Hand I love harvest season! Trimming weed can be a very social activity. You get to hang out with your friends, talk about stuff, listen to music, eat good food (insert “potluck” joke here) and have a great time. Don’t worry about your drug test. Dr. Frank Lucido, a cannabis expert, told me that it is virtually impossible to test positive for pot just by being around a bunch of it. Even if there is cannabis smoke in the air, you should be fine. “I heard that the only way you can test positive from inhaling secondhand smoke is if you were with 10 other people in a phone booth,” Lucido told me. You won’t be trimming in a phone booth, will you? Do phone booths even exist anymore? Doctor Who’s Tardis doesn’t count. You should be fine. Do be mindful of repetitive stress injuries. Take breaks. Use your other hand every once in a while. If you need any extra help, give me a call. I will make those buds look like a High Times centerfold. Have fun. P.S. Don’t worry that you don’t enjoy marijuana. I will enjoy it enough for the both of us. Ω

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10.11.12     |   SN&R     |   47

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10.04.12     |   SN&R     |   49

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Feeling nervous about going? First time? Deja Vu Showgirls gets that and aims to make your experience as comfortable as possible. In addition to a variety of beverages – including Deja Vu’s own Fountain of Youth bottled water – there are also four LCD high definition televisions tuned to every major sporting event. If you want to kick back, you can rent out several different booth sizes. There’s even a convenient smoking area located inside. Deja Vu Showgirls wants you to feel at home while you’re here. It’s also safe. At Deja Vu Showgirls, there are hosts, not bouncers. Unlike other clubs where you might find a hostile atmosphere, hosts at Deja Vu Showgirls are real professionals that ensure you and everyone else can have a great time by greeting each person and catering to their needs.

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FEATURE STORY

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To place an adult ad, call (916)498-1234 ext.5 WANTED TO BUY CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

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10.11.12     |   SN&R     |   53

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54

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FOR THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 11, 2012

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Ten percent of all sexually suggestive text messages are delivered to the wrong number. Take precautions to make sure you’re not among that 10 percent in the coming weeks. It will be extra important for you to be scrupulous in communicating about eros and intimacy. The stakes will be higher than usual. Togetherness is likely to either become more intensely interesting or else more intensely confusing—and it’s largely up to you which direction it goes. For best results, express yourself clearly and with maximum integrity.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If it were

within my power, I’d help you identify the new feelings you have not yet been able to understand. I would infuse you with the strength you would need to shed the wornout delusions that are obstructing your connection to far more interesting truths. And I would free you from any compulsion you have to live up to expectations that are not in alignment with your highest ideals. Alas, I can’t make any of these things happen all by myself. So I hope you will rise to the occasion and perform these heroic feats under your own power.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Dutch

graphic artist M.C. Escher (1898-1972) was a Gemini. He liked to depict seemingly impossible structures, like stairways in which people who climbed to the top arrived at the bottom. I nominate him to be your patron saint in the coming week. You should have his talent for playing with tricks and riddles in ways that mess with everyone’s boring certainties. Here are four Escher quotes you can feel free to use as your own. 1. “Are you really sure that a floor can’t also be a ceiling?” 2. “My work is a game, a very serious game.” 3. “I think it’s in my basement. ... Let me go upstairs and check.” 4. “Only those who attempt the absurd will achieve the impossible.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The Venus

flytrap is a remarkable plant that gobbles up insects and spiders. Its leaves do the dirty work, snapping shut around its unsuspecting prey. Evolution has made sure that the flowers of the Venus flytrap sit atop a high stalk at a safe distance from where all the eating takes place. This guarantees that pollinators visiting the flowers don’t get snagged by the carnivorous leaves below. So the plant gets both of its main needs met: a regular supply of food and the power to disseminate its seeds. I’ll ask you to derive a lesson from all this, Cancerian. Be sure that in your eagerness to get the energy you need, you don’t interfere with your ability to spread your influence and connect with your allies.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A sinuous and shimmering archetype that begins with the letter “S” has been trying to catch your attention, Leo—sometimes in subliminal and serpentine ways. Why haven’t you fully tuned in yet? Could it be because you’re getting distracted by mildly entertaining but ultimately irrelevant trivia? I’m hoping to shock you out of your erroneous focus. Here’s the magic trigger code that should do the trick: Psst! Now, please do what you can to make yourself very receptive to the slippery, spidery signals of the simmeringly sublime surge.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t burn

down a bridge you haven’t finished building yet. OK, Virgo? Don’t try to “steal” things that already belong to you, either. And resist the urge to flee from creatures that are not even pursuing you. Catch my drift? Stop yourself anytime you’re about to say nasty things about yourself behind your own back and avoid criticizing people for expressing flaws that you yourself have, and don’t go to extraordinary lengths to impress people you don’t even like or respect. Pretty please? This is a phase of your astrological cycle when you should put an emphasis on keeping things simple and solid and stable.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Hello, Dear Sir: I would like to place a large order for yellow chicken curry; cherry cream-cheese cupcakes; and sour, malty Belgian golden ale. It’s for my birthday party this Saturday, and it will need to serve exactly 152 people. My agent will pick it up at 11 a.m. Please

BEFORE

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have it ready on time. —Ms. Lori Chandra.” Dear Ms. Chandra: I am an astrologer, not a caterer, so I’m afraid I can’t fulfill your order. It’s admirable that you know so precisely what you want and are so authoritative about trying to get it, but please remember how crucial it is to seek the fulfillment of your desires from a source that can actually fulfill them. You’re a Libra, right? Your birthday is this week? Thanks for giving me an excuse to send this timely message to all of your fellow Libras.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Here comes the big reveal of the month, the trick ending of the year, and maybe the most unusual happiness of the decade. Any day now you will get the chance to decipher the inside story that’s beneath the untold story that’s hidden within the secret story. I won’t be surprised if one of your most sophisticated theories about the nature of reality gets cracked, allowing you to at recover at least a measure of primal innocence. I suggest you start practicing the arts of laughing while you cry and crying while you laugh right now. That way, you’ll be all warmed up when an old style of give-and-take comes to an end, ultimately making way for a more profound new give-and-take.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

There’s almost nothing about the dandelion that humans can’t make use of. People of many different countries have eaten its buds, leaves and greens. Besides being tasty, it contains high levels of several vitamins and minerals. Its flowers are the prime ingredient in dandelion wine, and its roots have been turned into a coffee substitute. Herbalists from a variety of traditions have found medicinal potency in various parts of the plant. Last but not least, dandelions are pretty and fun to play with! In the coming weeks, Sagittarius, I invite you to approach the whole world as if it were a dandelion. In other words, get maximum use and value out of every single thing with which you interact.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

“Intellect confuses intuition,” asserted painter Piet Mondrian. I don’t think that’s always true, even for creative artists. But in the coming week, I suspect it’ll be important for you to take into consideration. So make sure you know the difference between your analytical thinking and your gut-level hunches, and don’t let your thinking just automatically override your hunches. Here’s more helpful advice from painter Robert Genn: “The job of the intellect is to give permission to the intuition, and it’s the job of intuition to know when intellect is once again appropriate.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s time

to seek help from outside the magic circle you usually stay inside. You need to call on extracurricular resources—people and animals and deities who can offer useful interventions and delightful serendipity and unexpected deliverance. The remedies that work for you most of the time just won’t be applicable in the coming days. The usual spiritual appeals will be irrelevant. I’m not saying that you are facing a dire predicament—not at all. What I’m suggesting is that the riddles you will be asked to solve are outside the purview of your customary guides and guidelines.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): These days

lobsters are regarded as a luxury food, but that wasn’t the case among early Americans. In the 17th and 18th centuries, the large crustaceans were meals that were thought to be suitable only for poor people and prisoners. Wealthy folks wouldn’t touch the stuff. After examining your astrological omens, Pisces, I’m wondering if your future holds a similar transformation. I think there could very well be a rags-to-riches story in which an ignored or denigrated thing ascends to a more important role.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

15 MINUTES

by MARK

HALVERSON PHOTO BY RYAN DONAHUE

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Sold! Every Saturday and Sunday at 11 a.m., auctioneer Col. Larry Folkerts sits onstage behind a large table in Building G at the sprawling Denio’s Farmers Market & Swap Meet (1551 Vineyard Road in Roseville) and takes bids on a variety of major namebrand tools, housewares, store fixtures, new furniture and miscellany at a clip of about 120 lots per hour for four hours. Folkerts, aided by two assistants, holds court for potential buyers, using his voice to command attention and a laptop to parade product images across a screen. Folkerts caught his breath long enough to talk with SN&R about obsessive bid calling, fans and the art of auctioneering. Ladies and gentlemen, start the bidding, please.

You work under the name TGW Auctions. What does the “TGW” stand for? Tiffany Glass Works. Years ago, we owned a major glass company in Las Vegas. We did a lot of high-end casinos and higher-end homes.

How did you venture from Vegas to Roseville? We were involved with auctions in Vegas. We were buying about 100 storage units a month. I had five auction houses that I supplied product to, [and] a building came up for auction in North Dakota at such a price that we bought it and moved up there for about five years and had an auction company there. The weather just was horrible, so [we said] “We’re done.” We took a year off up in Northern California and gold mined, and then picked a spot to start our auction again, and this is where we ended up.

This is a family business. How many other family members are employed by your company? My mom and dad, my brother and his daughter.

What drew you to becoming the auctioneer? Years ago, I was taking our products to different auction houses, and when we had our auction company in North Dakota, I was hiring auctioneers to come in and do it. It got to the point that their schedule wasn’t fitting with our schedule. I’ve always been around auctioneering but never grabbed a mic and did it myself, so I flat just had to grab a mic and start doing it. But I’ve been involved with auctions since I was about 13.

Did you try bid calling when you were a kid? (Laughs.) Yeah, I did. But I really had a speech impediment, so it’s something I probably shouldn’t have done. But I got over that speech impediment, and it’s funny how things work out.

STORY

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

Did you go to auctioneering school? I did, in Minnesota. It’s a two-week course. They give you the basics, and then you’ve got to do the fill-in yourself and get something that’s comfortable for you [to chant] so people can understand what you are saying. What they do is the basic “10, 10, 20, 20, 30, 30” [technique]. They give you that flow and that speed and tempo, and then you fill in and do your auction how you want it. It [takes] some time to come up with something that you can do without fumbling over your words.

Do you ever practice bid calling in the shower? Oh, God. I dream about it. I try to go to sleep at night, and in my head I’m [auctioneering and then thinking], Oh quit! Quit! If I don’t practice during the week for Saturday, I feel like I’m not ready, so I do it all the time. I’ll go in the car [to practice]. If I’m by myself, I’ll have an auction.

Has the auction business changed since you started? What’s really impacted the auction business in our favor [is] the stuff that they’re having on TV, the TV auction wars and this kind of |

AFTER

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stuff. People see those and [say], “You know what? I want to go see an auction.” We get a lot of people who have never been to an auction come to our auction because of TV.

What about “Colonel” in front of your name? Where did that come from? Richard Haas [president of Continental Auctioneers School in Mankato, Minn.]. He made me an honorary colonel in the auction industry. The way that came about is [from] the Civil War days [and] the spoils of war. The colonel was appointed to sell all the stuff they had gotten in war, so if they ransacked someone’s house … the colonel was the one that always did the auction.

People ever corner you and try to get you to do your spiel? Every place I go (laughs). A Denny’s waitress … [or someone at] Home Depot. Any place that [I] say, “I’m the auctioneer at TGW,” it [turns into], “Oh, can you do something?” All the time. If you ever want to be an auctioneer, just be ready to do an auction wherever you go. Ω

10.11.12

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SN&R

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55

THREE STAGES AT FOLSOM LAKE COLLEGE PRESENTS

NATALIE ER MACMAST THU 10/25

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THE 39 STEPS

Three Stages at Folsom Lake College

Harris Center for the Artss *

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ENCE IMPERIAL SIL SUN 10/28 IN THE S FOOTSTEPO OF DJANG THU 10/11

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ThreeStages.net * A renaming i off Th Three St Stages iis under d way. The Th new name, Th The H Harris i Center C t for the Arts, honors Dr. Brice Harris, Chancellor Emeritus of the Los Rios Community College District, for his many contributions to the capital region.

02 SAMMIES 2012 OFFICIAL PROGRAM 10.11.12

, U O ! E Y N E K C S N IC A S U H M TACTO

Tens of thousands of individual votes were cast in this year’s Sammies, which completely blew away the number of votes from last year. Kudos to all the participants for supporting their favorite local bands, artists and musicians. Winners will be announced this Friday night at Ace of Spades. Get tickets in advance—it might sell out!—and see you there. In the meantime, congrats to all the 2012 nominees.

S

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SAMMIES 2012 OFFICIAL PROGRAM 10.11.12 03

2 1 S 0 E 2 E

S S N A IS C I W A R D U A M IC L S A OC A MU L F RE O S OA D SU A N M E N T HO CRA T HT E ’ S S A O AR T S YE N O HIS I T LA IN T U AT ED R BLUES G AT N CO MIN NO

S E I IN M M M A O S N

Aaron King After Dark Barrel Fever Bone Mac Donald Band Dippin’ Sauce Blues Band Tessie Marie & the Poor Man Band Rick Estrin & the Nightcats The Kyle Rowland Band Stillwood Sages Two-Tone Steiny and the Cadillacs

CLUB DEEJAY

AMERICANA/ALT-COUNTRY The Alkali Flats The Carly DuHain Band Dry County Drinkers Forever Goldrush The Foxtails The Golden Cadillacs Hot Tar Roofers The Nickel Slots Trainwreck Revival Whiskey Dawn

ARTIST OF THE YEAR HALL OF FAME 2012 Arden Park Roots Random Abiladeze Ross Hammond Sol Peligro Tha Fruitbat

04 SAMMIES 2012 OFFICIAL PROGRAM 10.11.12

A Lot Like Birds Autumn Sky Death Grips Lindsey Pavao Live Manikins The Nibblers Sea of Bees Sleeprockers, Tribe of Levi Zuhg

DJ Billy Lane DJ Bryan Hawk DJ Eddie Edul DJ Elements DJ Elliott Estes DJ Gabe Xavier DJ Oasis DJ Peeti-V

Grimey at TownHouse Lounge every other Tuesday with DJ Whores, Jay Two and others The Lipstick Weekender at Old Ironsides every first Saturday with DJ Shaun Slaughter and Roger Carpio Mid-Week Magnum at Mix Downtown every Wednesday with DJ Gabe Xavier and DJ Peeti-V Release at Faces Nightclub on Thursdays Le Twist Tuesdays at Dive Bar every Tuesday with Sam I Jam, Adam J, Taylor Cho and Roger Carpio Sunday Night Dance party at The Press Club every Sunday with DJ Larry Rodriguez Hot Pants at Level-Up Lounge every first and third Friday with DJ Rock Bottom

DEEJAY DJ Blackheart DJ Epik DJ Lahn DJ Los DJ Mike C DJ Rated R DJ Rock Bottom DJ Roger Carpio DJ Whores

ELECTRONIC Dibiase Kwes the Bess Lee Bannon Raleigh Moncrief Waylonn

COVER BAND

EMCEE

Essex Funk.defied Groove Thang Band Hip Service Mercy Me! (Band) Metal Health Mother Mayhem Radio Rue the Night Tragically White

Bueno C-Plus Century Got Bars Chuuwee Mahtie Bush Mr. P Chill Nome Nomadd Npire Tha Great Task1ne The Gatlin

DANCE NIGHT

EXPERIMENTAL

Asylum at The Park Ultra Lounge on Sundays with DJ Bryan Hawk Golden Era Music at The Golden Bear every second and fourth Thursday with DJ Epik

Buk Buk Bigups Egg ElectroPoetic Coffee Gentleman Surfer Pregnant

FOLK ROCK Awkward Lemon Be Brave Bold Robot Blue Oaks CAVE Women Honyock Lasher Keen

FUNK Crossing the River Feva in Da Funkhouse Hans! and the Hot Mess Isaac Bear The Nibblers Rendezvous With Cool Beans

HARDCORE/INDUSTRIAL/ POST-HARDCORE A Lot Like Birds And Came Back Brutal City of Vain Havenside Kill the Precedent Paint Over Pictures Savi0r Ten After Two (Waning) White Minorities

Musical Charis Sea of Bees Sister Crayon The Speed of Sound in Seawater

JAZZ Alex Jenkins’ Sound Immersion E-squared Elements Brass Band The Freebadge Serenaders Garage Jazz Architects Harley White Jr. Orchestra Mat Marucci Tony Passarell

LATIN Dinorah In the No Mentes Diferentes Rey Y Kaye Ritmoz Latinoz World Hood

LIVE PERFORMER A Lot Like Birds The Alkali Flats Cowboy and a THUG Exquisite Corps Sister Crayon

HARD ROCK

METAL

A Single Second Allinaday Dogfood Fair Struggle Journal Misamore Overwatch Some Fear None Terra Ferno Track Fighter

Black Mackerel Deadlands Drop Seven FallRise For All I’ve Done In the Silence Mudface Plague Widow Prylosis Restrayned Stepchild Zeroclient

HIP-HOP/RAP DLRN Live Manikins Lostribe Project4Trees Sleeprockers Tribe of Levi Who Cares

HIP-HOP PRODUCER Chase Moore Goldfingaz Hippie Sabotage Jon Reyes Lee Bannon Medl4 Styles 1001

INDIE Appetite The Bell Boys Desario Doom Bird Exquisite Corps Knock Knock

MUSIC VIDEO Death Grips, “Hustle Bones” Gentleman Surfer, “Sweep Tactics” Nome Nomadd, “My People” Task1ne, “Villain” Tribe of Levi, “Things to Do”

NEW ARTIST Massive Delicious Olla Parie Wood Screature Wrings

POP/ROCK Color the Sound Deer Park Avenue Fate Under Fire Hero’s Last Mission Method Echo The Reel The Kimberly Trip Mondo Deco

Wife & Son Wrings

POST-PUNK Charles Albright The Croissants Dog Party The Four Eyes G. Green Man in the Planet Pets

PUNK Another Damn Disappointment Avenue Saints Bastards of Young BlackEyed Dempseys Dcoi! The Left Hand Rad Rat Damage Union Hearts Whiskey and Stitches

R&B/SOUL Ava Lemert J. Black James Cavern Kaleo Ross Maryann Midnight Players Rashell Tessa Evans Thai Nicole Tone Malone

RECORDING STUDIO Alley Avenue Recording Studios Omina Labs Fat Cat Recording Studio The Formulation Room The Hangar Pus Cavern Studios Rock Inc. Sound Cap Audio The Track Shack

REGGAE/JAM Eazy Dub Element of Soul Island of Black and White JRas Massive Delicious Official Response The Old Screen Door Simple Creation The Storytellers Zuhg

RELEASE OF THE YEAR A Lot Like Birds, Conversation Piece Death Grips, The Money Store Knock Knock, We Will Raise Your Child Sea of Bees, Orangefarben Sleeprockers, Machine Language

ROCK I’m Dirty Too The Kelps Lite Brite Walking Spanish

ROCK PRODUCER Tony Cale Robert Cheek Z Rokk Joe Johnston Weston Ray Ira Skinner Jay Trammell Chris Woodhouse

ROCKABILLY The Infamous Swanks KB and the Slingtones The Vintage Vandals

SINGER-SONGWRITER Sherman Baker Ricky Berger Adrian Bourgeois Hans Eberbach Justin Farren Kepi Ghoulie Reggie Ginn Jackson Griffith Autumn Sky

TEEN BAND Crow Canyon Grant High School Drumline The Hungry Simpl3Jack Those Meddling Kids

TRIBUTE BAND Departure: The Journey Tribute Band Houses of the Holy (Led Zeppelin tribute) In the Garage (Weezer tribute) Renegade: A Tribute to Styx Revolver (Rage Against the Machine tribute) Riff/Raff: A High Voltage Tribute to AC/DC Steelin’ Dan: The Music of Steely Dan SuperHuey (Huey Lewis and the News tribute)

TURNTABLIST DJ Amp One DJ El Conductor DJ Kool Kutz DJ Mike Colossal DJ Nocturnal DJ Rated R Kodac Visualz Mr. Vibe

SAMMIES 2012 OFFICIAL PROGRAM 10.11.12 05

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Ace of SpAdeS thursday, october 12

saturday, october 13

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

All Ages Welcome!

wednesday, october 16

saturday, october 20

friday, october 26

saturday, october 27

friday, november 2

deatH angel

gRoundation

tuesday, november 6

friday, november 9

sn&Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 21st annual

sammies moRbid angel arden park roots - autumn sky the bell boys - james cavern elements brass band - inkdup sam miranda - musical charis overwatch - project 4 trees - z rokk and more

wednesday, october 24

dark funeral - grave - soma ras

deadlands - legionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reQuiem chernobog - damage over time

Saturday, November 3

gWaR

devil driver - cancer bats legacy of disorder

trevor hall - sQuarefield massive

COMING SOON 10/14 10/17 10/17 10/19 10/23 11/08 11/10 11/14 11/16 11/17 11/18 11/19 11/21 11/24 11/25 11/30 12/07 12/08 12/10 12/11 12/14 12/27

Abandon All Ships The World Alive & Born of Osiris The Dark Side Motion City Soundtrack Miss May I Some Fear None Minus The Bear The Faint Halestorm Pierce The Veil Woe, is Me Twiztid Trapt The Acacia Strain & Veil Of Maya 7 Seconds Streetlight Manifesto Motionless in White NOFX Blood On The Dance Floor The English Beat X (All Original Members)

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202 SAMMIES 2012 OFFICIAL PROGRAM 10.11.12 07


S-2012-10-11