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SACRAMENTO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 24, ISSUE 25

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012

Copyright © UC Regents, Davis campus, 2012. All Rights Reserved.

WHAT DO YOU SEE? We see your vision for a healthier future. You see your personal health-care champions. When looking for a personal physician, you want a doctor who not only sees you when you need to be seen, but who sees you as a unique individual. When you choose any of UC Davis Health System’s 160 primary care physicians, you’ll find your personal health-care team of expert doctors, nurses and specialists. You’ll enjoy conveniences such as same- and next-day appointments when needed and access to your medical records online. And you’ll have peace of mind knowing we’ll be there with expert care when you need it most. To see the full story and more, visit YouSeeTheFuture.UCDavis.edu. To choose a UC Davis physician, call 800-2-UCDAVIS.

YOU SEE THE FUTURE 2   |   SN&R   |   10.04.12

OCTOBER 4, 2012 | Vol. 24, Issue 25

42

Long game on homelessness Last week, I wrote of recent efforts to criminalize downtown’s homeless community (“War on homelessness,” SN&R Midtown&Down, September 27). But I want to return to one pressing issue: Sacto’s underfunded, meager shelter and sanctuary programs. Media outlets recently reported a discouraging, miserable fact—just one out of every 10 unemployed Americans finds a job after a year. Ugh. Assuming this report, based on San Francisco Federal Reserve data, is accurate, then how can Sacramento leaders ask its homeless denizens to transition back into housing faster than 90 percent of America’s unemployed can find jobs? I’m sure it’s awful searching for work these days—but imagine trying to lock down a roof. Yet this is the expectation—and it’s a huge reason why Sacto faces a world-class homelessness crisis. It was nearly 100 degrees this past Monday, but the fall and winter shelter season is upon us. And available beds (which can be viewed at www.sacramentostepsforward.org) reveal a grim scenario: Most emergency and single-family shelters allow stays of just 30, sometimes 60 days, and there are obstacles: sobriety, referrals—and months of waiting. As Julie Ferguson of Francis House Center explained to me on Monday, she has to choose four families each week out of an application pile of 40. Ultimately, the American River Parkway or downtown’s alleyways start to make more sense. It shouldn’t. Sacramento needs a better plan, and now, to provide the means and money to keep people indoors. And not just this fall and winter, but for the long game. —Nick Miller

nic kam@ ne ws r ev i ew . com

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STREETALK LETTERS NEWS OPINION FEATuRE STORy ARTS&CuLTuRE NIgHT&DAy DISH ASK JOEy STAgE FILM MuSIC 15 MINuTES green days is on vacation and will return next week. cover photos by shoka cover design by hayley doshay

44 Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Co-editors Rachel Leibrock, Nick Miller Staff Writer Raheem F. Hosseini Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Calendar Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Kel Munger Contributing Editor Cosmo Garvin Proofreader Deena Drewis Editor-at-large Melinda Welsh Contributors Sasha Abramsky, Christopher Arns, Ngaio Bealum, Rob Brezsny, Joey Garcia, Becky Grunewald, Mark Halverson, Jeff Hudson, Jonathan Kiefer,

Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Patti Roberts, Steph Rodriguez, Seth Sandronsky, Amy Yannello

Distribution Manager Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert

SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Brennan Collins, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Art Directors-at-large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn

Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Nicholas Babcock, Walt Best, Daniel Bowen, Nina Castro, Danny Cladianos, Jack Clifford, Robert Cvach, Lob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Wendell Powell, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Lolu Sholotan, Jack Thorne

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

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President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano

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I was bullied by a lot of kids who were more fortunate than me. They would make fun of me and the clothes I was wearing. It was middle school. It was before I started working, before I had started making it on my own. I was insecure. I felt alone. ‌ Once I grew older, I found that what you wear and your appearance don’t make you who you are.

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I was bullied. It was elementary school, mostly. I was kind of chubby back then. I was bullied in the bathroom by these two twin girls who hated me for no reason. They hit me and kicked me. I got really pissed off and fought back, and they just hit me harder. I think about it. I looked them up on Facebook. They’re both messed up.

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LETTERS

Visit us at www.newsreview.com or email sactoletters @ newsreview.com

Sanity on homelessness

FIRST SHOT SN&R photo of the week PHOTO BY NICK MILLER

Re “War on homelessness” by Nick Miller (SN&R Midtown&Down, September 27): The most responsible solutions to homelessness have been eloquently made by Safe Ground [Sacramento]. What’s needed to implement them is a simple declaration of a shelter crisis under existing state law for that purpose. Such a declaration by the mayor, city council or LETTER OF board of supervisors would ease zoning requirements. It would THE WEEK have allowed now-decimated properties, such as the retired military barracks or the California Youth Authority—all lost for now— and other vacant properties to be utilized. Where is the sanity? Where is the political will? Rousting the homeless does absolutely nothing. Courage to deal with the problem is by far the most economical and effective path. The revolving door of hospitalizations, incarcerations and emergency-room visits are far more expensive than would be housing every single homeless person in Sacramento County—far more expensive, and proven to be so by many national and international studies. Frank L. Topping Sacramento

Bee should find its heart Re “War on homelessness” by Nick Miller (SN&R Midtown&Down, September 27): Huzzah! Good for the return to reality with Nick Miller’s column. After [The Sacramento] Bee’s half-month crusade of denunciation to abet a “roundup” of the homeless on the American River Parkway, Miller’s sentiment was a breeze of good clearing air. Again, we can see that the trees are still standing, and the river is onward flowing. At the end of the the anti-homeless campaign by The Sacramento Bee’s Marcos Breton (putative leader of inprint efforts to be rid of homeless folk), he wrote that he thinks things have been made better by a complete rousting of the homeless on the parkway and continual enforcement of current law requiring the park to be empty of people from dusk ’til dawn. There are more homeless people seeking food and shelter beds at the Union Gospel Mission now than I have ever seen in my four years of homelessness. With the warm weather we’ve been having, this shouldn’t be the case. A part of the influx: Prison populations have come to the county jails, and from there been released early onto the streets. There is a glut of guys in need of a roof and sustenance. These are people who, if you prick them, they bleed; if you tickle them, they laugh; and if the Bee continues to poison the dialogue, it increases the chance that some may die. People are not disposable. The Bee should find its heart and change its ways so as to not make very difficult situations impossible. Tom Armstrong via email

Expensive and futile Re “War on homelessness” by Nick Miller (SN&R Midtown&Down, September 27): Bravo, Nick Miller, for countering whatever Kool-Aid the city and the daily have been drinking. Do they really think a problem like homelessness, which is so systemic and complex, will go away just because they move it? How silly and shortsighted can our city leaders be? I guess we’ll find out. Marcos Breton seems to be blowing the bugle for removing all the homeless people (let’s not forget the “people” in the phrase; “homeless” is an adjective, not a noun) from the new River District. That may please developers that want to move in there, but what about the next place that homeless people go? Until the city— and, to be fair, the surrounding suburbs and the county need to be kicking in, because homelessness is a regional thing—addresses homelessness systematically, they’ll just be moving these unfortunate people from place to place. That’s expensive and futile, which means it’s just business as usual in Sacramento.

In the spirit of Oktoberfest, south Sacramento brewery Track 7 Brewing Co. hosted festivities on September 29, including yodeling and stein-holding competitions. And log sawing, obviously. The event—called Tracktoberfest—also included some pretty fine suds. Sip more at www.track7brewing.com.

This is all well and good if for a short time one receives unemployment and then can find a job. But with the poor growth economy, he must pay his unemployment taxes while receiving unemployment. Or it can be deducted each month at a 10-percent rate, leaving less money to live with—but we’re already living on less money. Jo Ann Jackson-Holt Cameron Park

SN&R has balls Re SN&R advertisement (SN&R Best of Sacramento, September 20): Yikes! Open the Best of Sacramento issue to a full-page ad of guns, gold and ammo. SN&R has balls. When no other Northern California newspaper was gung ho with ads for marijuana cooperatives, there was SN&R. The paper has found a good balance and drives fundamentalists up a wall. It gives us something to do, uncovering the stacks of SN&R that mysteriously and continuously get covered up.

Jan Kline Sacramento

More unemployment math Re “Do the math” by Tony Sheppard (SN&R Guest Comment, September 27): Too many people probably don’t realize that when you receive unemployment benefits, you must pay federal taxes. My husband has been unemployed for twoand-a-half years, and we owed over $1,000 in taxes in 2011.

Ron Lowe Nevada City

PTA’s overblown Master Re “Hip, hip, hooey” by Jim Lane (SN&R Film, September 20): I have been trying to figure out who Joaquin Phoenix was trying to be in The Master, and you hit the nail on the head: Popeye! Brilliant. This was the most disappointing movie I have seen in years. I wish I had walked out in protest, but there were only three people in the theater. What was the point of this trash? I have greatly admired a lot of Paul Thomas Anderson’s work, but this is overblown crap. Why is he trying to make us believe that any woman with eyes would ever be attracted to Freddie Quell, with his ugly face and stoop-shouldered stance? Why was he so bent over? I generally like Phoenix, but I hated this performance.

Have a great photo? Email it to firstshot@ newsreview.com. Please include your full name and phone number. File size must not exceed 10 MB.

Lucretia Good via email

POET’S CORNER Someone just suggested I “like” Jesus on Facebook but which Jesus? The Jesus who would be hanging with the drag queens or the one who “hates fags”? —Cynthia Linville

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FRONTLINES THE $28-MILLION QUESTION Measure U’s sales-tax bump would give City Hall a much-needed cash influx—but business leaders worry city council will squander it

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Hard to argue against all of this. But some contend the city doesn’t warrant the extra $28 million in projected revenue at the expense of local businesses. That leadership hasn’t earned a cozier fiscal cushion for the next six years. Business owners and the Sacramento Metro Chamber, for instance, remind that city council couldn’t resolve its budget’s structural imbalance even when it had healthy coffers, pre-2008, so why should it be entrusted with millions now, especially during a struggling economy? “I don’t have confidence that the money will necessarily be spent wisely,” argued local developer Mike Heller, who owns one of the city’s largest development

IO N B Y PR IS

Mike Heller owner Heller Pacific

Meanwhile, the Downtown Sacramento Partnership and the Midtown Business Association are stuck in the middle of this tug-of-war. Neither group intends to take a stand on Measure U and their members are split. Businesspeople don’t want to pass a sales-tax increase onto their customers. Nor do they want to see fewer cops or dirty streets. Multiple sources have described to SN&R ardent boardroom debates over Measure U. The Sacramento Bee editorial board recently endorsed a no vote on upping the sales tax. There are no polls looking at the increase’s popularity, but most sources SN&R chatted with shared the attitude that the measure will ultimately, if not easily, pass on November 6. Ω

T R AT

“I don’t have confidence that the money will necessarily be spent wisely.”

firms, Heller Pacific, and the popular MARRS retail and office complex on 20th Street in Midtown. He says the sales-tax boost will take leaders’ “eyes off the ball” when it comes to making government more efficient and effective. At the same time, Heller also has faith in City Manager John Shirey. “The guy’s doing a helluva job in really difficult financial waters,” Heller told SN&R. He recounted asking Shirey at a recent meeting whether he could look his “tenants in the eye and tell them, ‘You’re going to see more police out in front of our projects, you’re going to see less trash.’” Shirey responded with, “Absolutely.” Still, business would rather stomach a smaller sales-tax uptick; the Sacramento Metro Chamber, for instance, lobbied for a quarter-percent over four years. Dennis Rogers, with the public-policy and development wing of the Chamber, said he thinks his board actually would have supported a more modest bump, such as the quarter-percent proposal. “I don’t believe we would have opposed,” he said. This lesser sales-tax increase would have resolved the city’s projected budget deficit for next fiscal year. And, perhaps more importantly, it also might have fused much-needed unity between commerce and City Hall. Instead, there’s persistent divisiveness—although Rogers did insist that he is pleased with recent developments, such as Councilmen Jay Schenirer and Darrell Fong’s work overhauling regulations. “I want to highlight the fact that they’re moving in that direction,” Rogers added. It’s worth noting that business also carries blame for not being forward thinking or collaborative. There have been feuds and grandstanding over Measure U, the most notable being a major local restaurateur’s about-face when the city rebuffed using his ballot-measure language supporting the sales tax in favor of Randall Selland’s argument, according to one city source. Said prominent restaurateur is now a vocal opponent of the proposed hike.

IL LU S

Not unlike most high-stakes issues at City Hall, contentious drama—and, yes, even incompetence—envelop this November’s by sales-tax-hike proposal, Measure U. From Nick Miller Mayor Kevin Johnson forgetting to file a nickam@ ballot argument against the proposal to newsreview.com prominent local restaurateurs still waffling on their stances, the potential tax increase is more than just a $28-million question: It could be a harbinger of continued divisiveness among city leadership, or an opportunity to break bread over a meaningful chunk of cheddar. Measure U wears its Sunday best on this fall’s ballot. It boasts a voterfriendly nomenclature, “Essential Services Protection Measure,” and needs but a simple majority of voters’ thumbsup to increase the city sales tax by half a percent. There’s no rival argument on the ballot, either—the mayor takes the heat for this—and revenue from the hike—8.25 percent up from 7.75 percent—will be used, according to analysis by interim City Attorney Sandra Talbott, to shore up police and fire services, park maintenance, libraries, and more.

Sacramento power brokers are divided over Measure U, which could attract big bucks to City Hall.

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Anyone who thinks that the blindfold across Lady Justice’s stone-cold expression spares her from racial bias is smoking the wrong by Raheem F. Hosseini spreadsheet. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the raheemh@ demographic breakdown of California newsreview.com inmates sent away on 25-years-to-life thirdstrike convictions. According to the most recent data from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, 45.5 percent of the state’s 8,813 three-strikers were black. With another 2,262 inmates listed as Hispanic, that makes the state’s three-strikes prison population 71.2 percent brown as of September 2011. Here in Sacramento County, the racial disparity for blacks is even greater, according to the same CDCR report. The county’s share of the three-strikes population numbered 565, an alarming 55 percent of the 889 total interred on third-strike convictions. The remainder of this group consisted of 158 white inmates, 81 Hispanic and 15 who were classified as “other.” Dozens of studies by just as many organizations and municipalities have already chronicled the effect the state’s three-strikes law continues to have on minority communities and blacks in particular. The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice even highlighted this trend way back in 1996, two years after voters adopted the law. But little has been done to address this out-of-whack racial composition. If anything, the overrepresentation of black inmates has grown slightly worse with time. In March 2003, blacks made up 44.8 percent of the state’s three-strikes prison population and 52.6 percent of Sacramento County’s share, which then numbered 426 three-strikes inmates. Even those who oppose Proposition 36, a November ballot initiative to modify the three-strikes law so that potential life terms can’t be handed out for nonserious felonies, think the data is troubling. “It’s certainly something for society to look at,” said Steve Grippi, assistant chief deputy district attorney for the county. Grippi didn’t know the local figures when he spoke to SN&R, but claimed race wasn’t a contributing factor that determined whether prosecutors would pursue a thirdstrike conviction. What does play a decisive role, Grippi and other DA officials said, is past crimes. Of those incarcerated on third-strike offenses from Sacramento County, most were for serious or violent felonies, such as robbery, first-degree burglary and assault with a deadly weapon, CDCR records show. But there were also dozens who had been

sent away on lifer terms for what appear to be lesser offenses, such as possession of a controlled substance, driving under the influence and one instance of someone selling weed. A DA official said the office’s current case-management system was unable to look up these three individuals, whose third-strike convictions were for DUI and selling marijuana. The office did make available its criteria for deciding three-strikes cases, however, and provided the identities of the 10 people sentenced on such convictions this year so far. The office’s criteria for deciding threestrikes cases, developed more than 15 years ago, includes the recency of past crimes, whether the defendant has used violence or weapons, a history of mental illness or drug addiction, and other factors. Of the 10 defendants sentenced for thirdstrike convictions in Sacramento County this year, offenses varied from armed robbery and bloody prison attacks to pimping and sexual assaults.

“I don’t think it’s as simple as reforming the three-strikes law.” Michael Romano director Stanford Law School Three Strikes Project A sewer-treatment employee with a criminal history of arson and first-degree robbery used his position to gain entry to homes and pull off residential burglaries, according to the DA’s office. He was convicted of 11 counts of felony burglary and sentenced to 25 years to life this past May. Then there’s the case of Ennis Alonso Farmer Jr., sentenced this month to 25 years to life. According to the DA’s office summary, Farmer was stopped for running a red light while driving on a suspended license. After a California Highway Patrol officer had Farmer exit the vehicle for “making suspicious movements” inside the car, Farmer reportedly took off running and chucked a bag filled with cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine scales, other narcotics and items indicating drug sales. A jury found Farmer guilty in July of a half-dozen felony drug charges, as well as individual counts of resisting a peace officer and driving with a suspended license, both misdemeanors. Farmer’s appearances in Sacramento Superior Court stretch back to 1991, and

even a dent in our racially warped prison system? DA spokeswoman Shelly Orio said similar questions have been asked about the over- or underrepresentation of minority groups in education, housing, job markets “and many other aspects of society.” “Definitive answers still elude us,” she added. “Certainly, these questions are worthy of continued discussion and analysis.” One answer may be that the data has made an impact—we just haven’t seen the effects yet. CDCR’s own incarceration reports show a steady decline in the overall number of three-strikers being added to the state prison rolls. Whether prosecutors have lost their taste for the harsh sentencing law—as University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law professor Michael Vitiello believes—or have just learned to apply it more efficiently—as Grippi suggests—the thousands of inmates who were given lifetime sentences in the early years of three strikes will be coloring the racial pie chart for decades to come. All of which makes the 18-year-old law’s true legacy unmistakably black-and-white.

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Blacks accounted for an alarming 55 percent of the 889 total interred on thirdstrike convictions in Sacramento County. In 2004, around the 10th anniversary of three strikes, the Justice Policy Institute released a trio of reports showing, among other things, that California locked up four times as many three-strikers as 21 other states with similar laws, that there was no link between the use of three strikes and a decline in crime, and that three-strikers were disproportionately represented by blacks and Latinos. Regarding the latter, the JPI surmised that long-ingrained institutional inequalities—higher poverty rates among minority groups, fewer financial opportunities to afford bail or private attorneys—were only being exacerbated by three strikes, which Romano calls the “harshest criminal sentencing law in the country.” That may be all well and true, but after nearly two decades of casually regarded studies and alarming population breakdowns, people might just assume that blind Lady Justice hates brown people. Ω

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most of his cases involve felony drug prosecutions. But he also received a 14-year prison stint in 1997 after pleading no contest to nearly 20 counts of robbery and attempted robbery, and for possessing a firearm during the commission of a gang-related crime. As Supervising Deputy District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert put it, “It’s not the crime, it’s the criminal.” Yet an awful lot of those criminals end up being black, both here and in other multicultural metropolitan hubs. According to U.S. Census Bureau data, African-Americans make up just a shade less than 11 percent of the 1.43 million people residing in Sacramento County, yet more than half of the county’s three-strikers. November’s ballot effort to modify the three-strikes law may provide some relief, despite being patterned after a county where the average imprisonment of black threestrikers is higher than both Sacramento and the state’s—Los Angeles. “In Los Angeles County, they are no longer prosecuting life sentences for nonserious, nonviolent criminals. I don’t think they are or should take race into account,” said Michael Romano, director of the Stanford Law School Three Strikes Project and an architect of the reform effort, along with L.A. County District Attorney Steve Cooley. Since reports show black and Hispanic men are more likely to be prosecuted on third-strike offenses for nonserious, nonviolent felonies, Romano suggests these minority groups stand the most to benefit from changes to the way the law is implemented. But he admits his proposition doesn’t amount to a whole hill of beans when it comes to the larger, impossibly complex subject of racial equity in our criminal-justice system. “I don’t think it’s as simple as reforming the three-strikes law,” he told SN&R. Asked what might account for the racial discrepancy at the state level, Schubert guessed that communities with larger black populations might somehow play a role but didn’t have an answer, either. She did have a question: “How did they end up in the system?” Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department arrest reports from September 18-26 offer a small, imperfect snapshot. Of the 47 individuals arrested for suspected crimes in the unincorporated parts of the county, 17 (36 percent) were African-American, and eight (17 percent) were Hispanic. Of the arrested black suspects, 12 cases involved some form of domestic dispute, which are statistically less likely to be prosecuted by the DA’s office. But questions remain, such as, why hasn’t nearly 20 years of reported data put

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Say what? Mitt Romney isn’t the only candidate suffering from foot-in-mouth syndrome Candidates say the darndest things, to paraphrase the immortal Art Linkletter. Mainline some of the Mitt-meister’s Adam Smith über alles, we-don’tneed-no-stinkin’-social-services-safety net, USDA-choice GOP gibberish if there’s any doubt. Closer to home, there are at least two candidates hustling for each of California’s 80 assembly seats, 20 state Senate seats and 53 congressional seats on the CAS by GREG LU November ballot. To say the result is a cacophony of cheesy character caplowdown@newsreview.com attacks, hollow promises and fairly obvious obfuscation is lilygilding. Sadly, it’s not solely oral onanism our elected and wannabe elected engage in. These threadbare platitudes and half-lies are replicated on the airwaves and in the campaign “literature” (can there be a more grotesque perversion of the word?) beginning to clog mailboxes of the not-so Golden State. Peter Tateishi, a Republican candidate for the 8th Assembly District that takes in Carmichael, Arden Arcade and Rancho Cordova, has lawn signs that proclaim he will “Fix the state assembly.” Like dogs and cats in county shelters? With a staple gun and duct tape?

Voters certainly deserve a far more fulfilling diet than this mealy-mouthed biennial swill. He’s formerly Republican Dan “Don’t-Call-Me-Dolph” Lungren’s chief of

Greg Lucas’ state-politics column Capitol Lowdown will appear every-other week in SN&R. He also blogs at www.californias capitol.com.

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staff, which doesn’t seem like exactly the crow’s nest from which to scrutinize and then pass judgment on the assembly’s alleged brokenness. A visit to the candidate’s website reveals that he feels way more than the assembly is broken and, by implication, his election will “fix” that, too. The “business climate” is broken, Tateishi says. As is the “regulatory system.” Whatever that is. Shockingly, Tateishi is opposed to the “early release of dangerous criminals.” If they hit the bricks a couple hours later than scheduled, that’s OK, right? He also favors excellence in education. As opposed to rank mediocrity. By no means have Republicans cornered the pablum market, although their ceaseless yammering about highspeed rail as the apex of profligate government spending is both tedious and a bit specious. How about state-prison expenditures exceeding those for

higher education—California State University, University of California and community colleges? Didn’t hear a lot of Grand Old Party gripes about that for more than a decade running. How about a Republican-backed tax break for corporations, most of which aren’t even located in this state, that costs California roughly $1 billion annually in lost income? (See this November’s Proposition 39.) Rep. Brad Sherman is running against Rep. Howard Berman in the San Fernando Valley. The once-adecade redrawing of legislative-district lines following the census threw the two Democrats into one seat. Sherman says when the recession hit, he “made job creation his top priority.” As opposed to carving out habitat for the endangered yellow-bellied-fart catcher. And consider this gem from Democratic Assemblywoman Betsy Butler, who is running for a seat centered in Santa Monica after redistricting sliced her old seat into thirds. “We need to drive the lobbyists out of the Capitol and return the voice of the people,” Butler says on her campaign website. So, would this include the Sacramento lobbyists for Verizon Wireless, BNSF Railway Company, the California Building Industry Association, Walgreens, the California Hospital Association, California Realtors, California Applicants’ Attorneys Association, Planned Parenthood, PG&E, etc.—a handful of the entities who have generously contributed to Butler’s campaign, according to the secretary of state’s website? Maybe some lobbyists are just more equal than others. Or are those the really super bitchin’ ones, and Butler’s down with them still hanging around for a while? Spock, is there anything registering on the ship’s hypocrisy meter? Why, yes, Jim, readings are off the scale. Would that Spock could tell the captain he’s never seen anything like it before, but he can’t, since every evennumbered year features the same tawdry spectacle. Anti-abortion. Prodeath penalty. Anti-environment. Pro-same-sex marriage. The opposition wants to grind up schoolchildren of color and spread them as fertilizer for stands of poison oak. Voters certainly deserve a far more fulfilling diet than this mealy mouthed biennial swill, but the menu isn’t going to improve until diners start bellyaching. Ω

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Bee’s Breton takes potshots at homelessness, Campbell Soup takes the money and runs “My weapon is a sleek and beautiful instrument. But God help anyone looming in my unforgiving sights.” That’s from a Marcos Breton column in The Sacramento Bee several months back. Breton is talking about an actual gun. It’s a gun-control column. But he could also be talking about his keyboard. The homeless and their advocates (apologists, he might say) have been sitting ducks ARVIN in Breton’s unforgiving sights for years. by COSMO G And lately, he’s been shooting them in cosmog@newsreview.com the face. Metaphorically. There was a nasty little flourish at the end of one recent column, where he wrote that “it’s only a matter of time” before some homeless camper abducts a child. Pow! He must have gotten more than the usual amount of blowback, because he wrote a whole other column defending the first one, complete with cherry-picked evidence that he scrambled to find after the fact. “I’m still getting all the numbers,” he wrote, explaining that some homeless people have criminal records, and some are registered sex offenders. Pop, pop, pop! Here’s another scoop: “There is nothing wrong with being gay.” That sleek and beautiful sentence was sufficiently mind-blowing to earn its own line, all by itself, in the middle of another of Breton’s columns. There’s especially nothing wrong with being gay, per Breton, when the subject of your column is Kevin McClatchy. McClatchy is chairman of the board of The McClatchy Co., which owns the Bee. He just came out. He’s also rich and used to own the Pittsburgh Pirates. Is it newsworthy? Sure, why not. Is it a little smarmy to use your column to pat the boss on the back? You bet. But it is one way to do journalism, Bites supposes, afflicting the afflicted and comforting the comfortable. You used to get a bigger variety of local columnists in your daily newspaper. Hell, you used to get a bigger variety of local daily newspapers. Which is why Bites sure hopes the Bee’s new online pay wall is successful. Bites assumes that the Bee wants it to work, too. Why, then, is it going out of its way to lose paying readers? For example, why not bundle the iPad version with other products? San Francisco Chronicle readers get the iPad version included free with their print or digital subscriptions. Bee customers have to pay $6-a-month extra. Bites initially ditched the paper paper, but now the iPad version just doesn’t pencil out, either, once you add in the costs for Web access. So, it’s back to dead trees and higher bills and a little resentment. Yes, people who talk about their iPads are lame. Still, why alienate people who are otherwise willing to give you money?

Also, those pop-up ads are going to be a deal breaker. It is one thing to put up with constant in-your-face advertising when you are getting free content online, but it’s intolerable when you’re paying for it. And really, it’s not that hard to get around the pay wall.

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Marcos Breton The Sacramento Bee “Dependent upon their plans, it could be an opportunity for transit-oriented development,” said Kathy Tescher, executive director of the North Franklin District Business Association. But that’s dependent on Campbell’s plans, which haven’t always been the best plans for the neighborhood. At its height, the Campbell plant provided nearly 3,000 jobs and anchored a solid working-class community. But decades ago, the company moved most of its work to more modern and efficient plants elsewhere. The only reason it stuck around at all was because of a sweetheart deal offered by the city that allowed the company to keep its property taxes and invest them back in the plant. That meant Campbell didn’t contribute anything to the Franklin redevelopment area, either. At some point, the plant just didn’t pencil out anymore, even with the big subsidy. Some say Campbell’s closure shows Sacramento doesn’t do enough for business. It might also show that no matter how much you do for business, business will eventually take the money and walk away. That’s just business. Ω

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Three well-known businesses announced plans to leave town or shut down last week: Comcast, Campbell Soup Company and Ford’s Real Hamburgers. Ford’s is a loss. Bites feels bad for the Comcast employees but has nothing nice to say about the company. Likewise, Bites is ambivalent about the Campbell news. The sudden closure of the plant on Franklin Boulevard and 47th Avenue will cost Sacramento anywhere from 400 to 500 jobs. Just as bad is the potential for the plant and property being left to rot.

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I was thoroughly crushed. It was 1965, and the second day of San Jose’s Westmont High School football practice. The coach had suggested that I apply to be the team’s water boy. This was not an unreasonable suggestion, since I weighed around 90 pounds and was as slow as a tortoise. Nevertheless, I was devastated. Fortunately for me, 24-year-old Westmont High swim coach Bill Zirzow did not believe in cutting athletes. Having recently moved from Ohio, I was not any better a swimmer than I was a football player. But as long as I showed up for practice, I was l by Jeff VonKaene on the team. So, I became a swimmer in my freshman year of high school. j e ffv @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m From 1964 to 2007, Coach Z ran the Westmont High swim program. High school can be complicated and confusing. But swim team is not. Finish your races faster than your last time and, if you can, faster than the other guy. Swimming practice was simple, too. Coach Z would tell us the workout and then say, “Ready? Hup!” every five seconds. The fastest swimmer went first, followed by the next fastest and so on. So five seconds ahead of you (minus I weighed around a body length) were someone toes. Your mission 90 pounds and else’s during practice was to get as was as slow as close to those toes as possible. If you could touch those toes, a tortoise. then you could move ahead. Good things would happen to you if you swam hard. I know good things happened to me. Over my four years of swimming for Coach Z, I went from the worst swimmer on the team to swim-team captain. I gained strength and confidence. Through that time, I knew that Coach Z cared about me. With every “Ready? Hup!” there was a little love. We shared victories and defeats. I was never a very good swimmer, but I learned a lot about life from Coach Z. My life has been a vast number of diverse “Ready? Hup!” moments. Going on a sales call. Ready? Hup! Our baby needs to be changed in the middle of the night. Ready? Hup! Time to pick myself up and try again. Ready? Hup! At high-school graduation, I did not have the maturity Jeff vonKaenel is the president, or presence of mind to thank him. Recently, seeing that I CEO and mentioned him in a column, Coach Z sent me an email, majority owner of inviting me to visit him in Florida. His house was easy to the News & Review newspapers in spot. It was the only one with a huge San Francisco Giants Sacramento, banner flying in front. Chico and Reno. I’m glad I had the opportunity to tell him how much he meant to me. There are many Coach Z’s in the world, at pools, football fields, baseball diamonds and elsewhere who deserve our thanks. If you had a Coach Z, now is a great time to thank them. Or, as Coach Z would say, “Ready? Hup!” Ω

In a previous Greenlight column about Mitt Romney’s attack on President Barack Obama for saying “If you’ve been successful, you didn’t get there on your own,” Jeff vonKaenel wrote “Special thanks to Mrs. Francis, my first-grade teacher, and Bill Zirzow, my high-school swimming coach. These were two government employees that made a huge difference to me.” Jeff and Bill Zirzow met in Florida for lunch last week. If you’ve had a Coach Z in your life, drop Jeff a line at jeffv@newsreview.com.

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I was on the phone with my old pal who said, “It’s 1850 all over again. The nation is as deeply divided as we were right before the Civil War.” by Todd Walton My initial reaction was to agree—visions of red states an author, musician vs. blue states dancing in my head—but the more I thought and regular about his idea, the more I disagreed. I don’t think America contributor to SN&R is divided, except that six people with my last name (no relations) have more money than 42 percent of all the people in America. If we were a nation divided, half the people would vehemently oppose our ongoing foreign wars and the maintenance of hundreds of military bases around the globe that cost us trillions of dollars we might better spend on culture bases here in America. But there is no anti-war movement to speak of today, and the candidates representing the supposedly opposing political parties have almost identical foreign policies. If the nation were divided, half the people would oppose single-payer health care—otherwise known as Medicare— for all and half would be in favor of such a marvelous thing. But poll after poll shows that a vast majority of Americans in both blue and red states would love to have single-payer health care. If the nation were divided, half the people would want to increase taxes on the wealthy and half wouldn’t, but poll after poll indicates that the vast majority of Americans would love to increase taxes on the wealthy. No, I think Americans are remarkably undivided— certainly compared to the Italians or Greeks or French or Russians. When was the last time we elected a socialist president or dissolved the government for lack of confidence or marched in the streets to protest unfair austerity measures (let alone to protest elections decided by politically appointed judges)? The difference between the Republicans and the Democrats today is infinitesimal compared to the differences between the top two Greek parties, or the top two parties in any democracy, which we most definitely are not. Imagine the French putting up with a trillion-dollar student-loan debt. Wouldn’t happen. Their nation would be shut down in a trice by protests. The thing is, we Americans are fanatically undivided in our love of cars and computers and television shows and 3-D action movies and comfortable living. Oh, and in the absence of royalty, we worship celebrities. We know more about celebrities than we do about our government. In fact, we know almost nothing about our government. And the rulers of our nation know very well that ignorance unites us, so they make the continuance of our ignorance the focus of their governing, while keeping us stuffed with up-to-the-minute information about which celebrity was recently driving drunk, or in possession of an illegal substance, or cheating on his or her wife or husband with another celebrity. And though we may think we disagree about presidential candidates Mitt Romney and incumbent Barack Obama, in our collective heart of hearts we know Romney and Obama and Bill Clinton and George W. Bush and on and on ad infinitum are all representatives of the ruling elite and never deviate from the orders of their overlords. In our ignorance, we do not know who those overlords are, because they are masters of invisibility, which is one of the prerequisites for being an overlord. OK, so I’m being cynical. But I think the ruling puppeteers use the idea of a great divide to distract us from our cohesiveness and to keep us from discovering how easy it would be for us to overthrow them. Ω

ThiS ModErn World

by tom tomorrow

Vote Steve Hansen The first city council member for the new District 4, redrawn to include the entire central-city grid, will have a difficult and exciting job. The district has all the problems that the rest of Sacramento does—budget losses, service cuts—plus the sort of problems common to urban cores—infrastructure decay, afterdark vacancy and, in Sacramento’s case, homelessness. While we really appreciate Joe Yee’s thoughtful approach to policy and knowledge of City Hall’s inner workings, we’re endorsing Steve Hansen for this seat. Hansen had some specific proposals for using the burgeoning arts and entertainment scene in Midtown and downtown as catalysts to power economic growth and redevelopment. He understands that the funky, artsy style that has sprung up in the last two decades is a huge asset that has only begun to be fully utilized. He’s a hands-on, suit-up-and-show-up guy. And he’s determined to build employment sectors other than government payroll, so that Sacramento can become economically sustainable and establish an urban identity not entirely tied just to its status as the state capital. He’s also big on transparency, which we find crucial. He backs the idea of an independent city auditor and an ethics commission, both of which would go a long way toward restoring trust in Sacramento city government. For all of these reasons, we urge you to vote for Steve Hansen for Sacramento City Council District 4.Ω

Yes on 30! It’s election season, so hyperbole is in overdrive: Pundits are barking at one another, campaign ads are smothering us in half-truths and megamillions are flowing into campaign coffers from all across the globe. Despite all this, it’s possible to distill everyIn SN&R’s September 13 news story (“Yielding to traffic” and Justice gave California an “F” grade for its thing down to the single most important vote we by Raheem F. Hosseini), the writer presented weak laws dealing with child sex trafficking. Californians can make on November 6: We must pass by the opposition’s views for Proposition 35. Even local gangs are getting involved, because Hope Francis Proposition 30. Here’s what he didn’t tell you: In California, profits from selling children are high and risks Remember when Gov. Jerry Brown was a retiree who lives vulnerable women and young girls are held are low compared to selling guns or drugs. in Folsom and re-elected to the state’s top job a few years ago? He against their will and, in fear for their lives, Currently, the penalty in California for volunteers with won overwhelmingly because voters believed he was forced to sell their bodies. Often as young selling a minor for sex is four to eight years California Against our state’s best bet to enact a solution to California’s as 12, victims are sexually exploited for the in prison and a $100,000 fine. By increasing Slavery chronic problems and the continual budget shortfall financial gain of human traffickers. the penalties to 15 years to life and between that has robbed our schools of needed funds (we Proposition 35 is about stopping what the $500,000 and $1.5 million in fines, Prop. 35 now rank 47th in per-pupil funding), slashed funding FBI, the U.S. Department will result in a stronger and to higher education and threatened public safety. of State and lawmore effective law that fits Republican lawmakers blocked Brown right out enforcement organizations the severity of the crime and We should take a of the gate. They denied him the opportunity to take recognize as a growing deters the traffickers. a balanced “save California” plan straight to the stand against this problem of domestic sex And Prop. 35 will protect voters. But on November 6, Brown finally gets what trafficking—essentially victims, ensure that they can brutal crime. he wanted back then. It’s called Proposition 30. modern-day slavery—of speak out and receive justice The measure calls for a temporary quarter-cent sales children. Human traffickin the courtroom, and get more tax (from 7.25 percent to 7.50 percent) and personal ing is real and all around us. It is a criminal of their abusers off the streets and behind bars. income-tax increase for Californians earning more than business that profits from enslaving people, Many girls who are rescued have no home, $250,000 (and couples earning more than $500,000). typically the most innocent and vulnerable, for family or services to support them. Prop. 35 What will this buy? Among other things, a yes vote on sexual servitude and forced labor. fines will fund the services that are desperately Prop. 30 will prevent an immediate $6 billion in further However, much of the public is unaware of needed to help victims overcome trauma and put cuts to schools, provide billions in new school funds the realities of this crime; some do not believe their lives back together. starting this year, and prevent more tuition hikes. Add it exists. Human trafficking is a crime against the Have a comment? to this the crucial fact that Prop. 30 will protect public The FBI has designated three cities in most basic human rights. It should concern Express your views safety by halting further cuts to cops and firefighters every Californian. Prop. 35 is endorsed by law in 350 words on California—Los Angeles, San Francisco, and save billions in future prison costs. Nobody likes a local topic and San Diego—as among the top 10 child enforcement and child-protection organizataxes, even those that come alongside massive cuts as of interest. sex-trafficking cities in the nation, but children tions throughout California, and, as citizens, Send an email to we’ve seen. But what’s the alternative, except a further we should take a stand against this brutal editorial@ are trafficked wherever there are customers. erosion of our most basic services and hopes for a A recent national study by Shared Hope crime by voting yes on Prop. 35. Ω newsreview.com. flourishing future for our state? International and the American Center for Law Vote yes on Proposition 30. Ω B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |    10.04.12     |   SN&R    

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occer moms and mama grizzlies, pocketbook voters and all the single ladies. Yes, it’s another election year, which means it’s time once again for politicians—and, accordingly, much of the media—to create yet another female-voter archetype to which to pander. In the real world, however, women aren’t so easy to categorize. And the concerns that get us to the polls vary widely across a vast personal and political scope. While the conversation between President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has, at times, been dominated by topics such as abortion, birth control and health care, women—regardless of which side of the spectrum they fall—think and care about the election outcome with a passion and complexity that all the talking points, sound bites and polling numbers can’t convey. SN&R asked a diverse group of Sacramento women—lawyers and lobbyists, artists, students and clerks—to write about what they expect from the next president of the United States.

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REMEMBER THE PERSONAL IS POLITICAL I am a woman, a parent and by vocation, a lobbyist. Oh, and I am also an LGBT American. For me, the old adage that “the personal is political” rings true. I’ve spent the better part of my career lobbying for civil rights for the LGBT community before the California Legislature. I like to think that my role has helped move the national dialogue Alice Kessler on LGBT concerns legislative advocate; in significant ways DiMare, Van Vleck & Brown LLC by our state being the first to pass laws on issues such marriage equality, anti-bullying and a ban on the so-called “reparative therapy” of LGBT youth. Still, I’ve seldom felt personally impacted by some of the nightmare experiences faced by my LGBT brethren—getting fired for being gay or being the victim of a hate crime, for example. Coming out to my family was hard, and I’ve suffered the occasional anti-gay epithet, but not until recently, as I have set out to raise a family, has the ongoing inequality for LGBT people in this country hit me so personally.

Most people dream about getting married. The same was true for me. However, due to Proposition 8, I was not allowed to marry in my home state of California. Instead, our family and friends voyaged to Vancouver, British Colombia, to share in the joy of our union. It felt good to be cheered and congratulated on our nuptials by virtually every Canadian we met. Yet the experience was tinged with sadness, knowing that in most places in the United States, our marriage is not honored, and my spouse and I are considered legal strangers, thanks in large part to the federal Defense of Marriage Act. One result of this discrimination is that as the nonbiological parent of my daughter, I will have to adopt my own kid because I have zero parental rights in those states that do not recognize my marriage. This problem is due to a patchwork of adoption laws in the various states, but DOMA certainly plays in role in my needing to obtain an adoption decree. Despite these hassles, I consider my family very lucky. We are living the American Dream. But we do experience some major roadblocks that just aren’t there for families headed by oppositesex couples.

RESPECT THE SINGLE LADIES For the first time since the census began, married couples make up less than half of the households surveyed. I am a happy, single 42-year-old woman, and I’m not an anomaly. More women these days are saying “I don’t” instead of “I do.” I want our presidential candidates to know that being a single woman is about more than access to birth control. Since we are single, we are more likely to be sexually harassed in the workplace. We pay twice as much rent or mortgage as our married counterparts, and when emergencies happen, we foot the bill and sometimes wonder who to call for help. We take care of the house, the grocery shopping, the bills and the pets without help. We handle major life crises, like losing a loved family member, alone. Many of us are asked to work late or on the weekends since, you know, we don’t “have a family,” and for us unmarried, Shawnda Westly executive director, childless types, the California Democratic Party weekends aren’t considered as important. Not only that, but as women, we don’t ascend the professional ladder as quickly as we are kept in “assistant” type jobs until we break free when we’re older. That delay

I WANT OUR PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES TO KNOW THAT BEING A SINGLE WOMAN IS ABOUT MORE THAN ACCESS TO BIRTH CONTROL. Shawnda Westly

I want a president who will think long term about women like me and understand times have changed, and we are the next generation that will retire. We need a president who will guarantee a safety net and future security for this generation of single women. In addition to understanding the need for protecting women’s private health-care decisions, we need a president who is sensitive to the day-to-day BEFORE

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struggles we have—including those of us who choose to be single mothers. P.S. To all the pollsters and consultants: Whatever you do, please stop calling us “unmarried” women. I’ll take “single lady” (see Beyoncé) or “women with choices,” if you’re looking for suggestions.

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restricts access to 401(k) savings and leaves less for our retirement and the money to build up to buy a home. Last time I checked, there’s no tax credit for being single. Add to all of this, we generally make 23 percent less than men for the same job, which means it’s tougher for us all around. Women should not be held captive to a partnership they aren’t committed to just to have financial security.

LOOK OUT FOR THE LITTLE GUY

Growing up, most of my relatives were Democrats. The understanding was when you come from a modest-to-poor background, you vote for the candidate who’s most interested in the little guy. As things have |

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evolved, the needle’s moved considerably, and now some of those same relatives are Republicans for reasons I can’t understand. The reason I can’t understand it is because the choice seems so obvious to me. Do you vote for a guy who comes from a working-class background; has worked hard to reform health care; defends women’s rights in regard to both equal pay and reproductive health; supports the right to marry; repealed “don’t Liv Moe ask, don’t tell” on executive director, the crazy notion that Verge Center for the Arts those who risk their lives for us should be respected; and did what he could to salvage the economy he was left with in 2008? Or do you vote for a guy whose foreigndiplomacy skills are lacking, at best; has gone on record to say he would repeal both health-care reform and the right to marry; selected a running mate who worships Ayn Rand; co-sponsored draconian reproductive legislation; and puts his dog on the roof of his car during long family road trips? I am concerned about basic human-rights issues. I’m tired of accepting the fact that my loved ones are uninsurable and that friends can’t marry partners who, in some cases, have been together for 20 years or more, or that in 2012, equal pay for women should even be up for debate. When I sit and listen to the things our “leaders” are arguing about, it’s both exhausting and deeply disappointing. At stake are A RT S & C U LT U R E

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millions of folks struggling to make a go of it. I come from a background of farmers, artists, construction workers, waitresses, cooks, nurses, lawyers and architects. It’s my hope we can recognize the value in each other and vote for a candidate who holds the little guy’s best interests at heart.

EDUCATION IS THE KEY Education is the key to freedom and opportunity and the great leveler in American society. For 300 of the 400 years that African-Americans have been in America, it was illegal to educate us. This kept us slaves and servants, ignorant and oppressed. The end of slavery opened the door of education for a select few. Those Fahizah Alim Africancommunications director, office of the state Sen. Curren D. Price Americans who were able to access it worked hard and sacrificed much to break the shackles of slavery and poverty. Because of the escalating costs of education, access to higher education is increasingly problematic for more Americans—particularly African-Americans and Latinos. I am a mother of four who was unexpectedly widowed with two sons still in college.

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PAY IT FORWARD

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Health care’s never been a huge concern to me. Aside from a knee surgery, I stayed relatively clear of doctors’ offices. I worked and had health insurance. That all changed when I found myself unemployed and pregnant earlier this year. It didn’t all happen overnight—I’d lost my job and was trying to find a new one. I was getting by with what I had. But when the third little stick that I peed on displayed the word “pregnant,”everything changed. I started caring more about my health, and most importantly, that of my daughter’s. The father of my child and I had only been dating for a little more than a month, and while we weathered the storm and are very much in love, we don’t believe in getting married for insurance purposes. Sure, I could have returned to work, but who was hiring? I called every health-insurance company, but with my previous surgery and my current “condition,” I was a liability. So, I looked to the government for assistance and after a couple months, got approved for Medi-Cal, and by the time I was in my second trimester, I was finally able to see a doctor. I have heard a lot of complaints about being taxed for this. But if your taxes are already paying for me to get insurance through the state, wouldn’t you rather me pay for it? Once I have successfully regained my position in the world of employment, I would be happy to pay it forward. Not only will it help me, but it will help women all over the country get the health care that they deserve. I know so many women who don’t go to the doctor because they can’t afford co-payments. Money should not hold women back from proper treatment and care.

Amanda Branham artist

CULTIVATE EMPATHY

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door behind them and circle the wagons of money, power and privilege. President Obama, you won approval for a college tax credit worth up to $10,000 over four years and more money for Pell grants for low-income college students. You also pushed Congress to agree to reduce federal aid to colleges that go too far in raising tuition, and I appreciate your efforts to keep the interest rates low on student loans. I have an older son who has earned a Ph.D. and a law degree. He also owes more money in school loans than it would cost to pay cash for a four-bedroom home in a great community. He’s worked hard to contribute to America, but he is being penalized and strapped with mindboggling debts for daring to aim high.

END THE WAR ON WOMEN I’ll never forget that night in 2008, watching the election news with my then-4-year-old son and my soon-to-be-born son dancing in my pregnant belly. My husband I toasted (with sparkling cider) the election and spoke of the generations of amazing people that helped to make this moment possible. This president-elect, Barack Jenny Roberts baby-clothes designer Obama, was dynamic and brilliant, and it thrilled me to no end that my boys would start their young lives out with a strong black leader in the Oval Office. I could have never imagined, however, the backlash soon to unleashed as a war was launched on the mothers, sisters and daughters of our nation. I’ve come to expect that reproductive rights will be debated in the months prior to an election. However, over the past four years, women’s health-care rights have been attacked, pounded and paraded around like never before. Planned Parenthood funding has been threatened, some states have tried to pass laws requiring transvaginal ultrasounds prior to an abortion, and, on more than one occasion, ridiculous statements on rape and conception have been broadcasted. I hope the next president—regardless of who is elected—supports women by keeping personal medical decisions between a woman and her health-care provider.

I recently toured the family shelter of a homelessservices organization for which I volunteer, and it wasn’t what I expected. Families shared bunk beds in a single room with linoleum floors, no rugs, minimal furniture. The shelter has some comforts—artists painted the walls of the common areas, there’s a playground, et al—but none of the trappings of middle-class life I take for granted. Visiting the shelter reminded me of recent stories about how Maya Wallace American communities are auditor sorting by values and by income, that we tend to live among people like ourselves. I worry that this affects our ability to understand one another and to have empathy for those who don’t think, speak or act as we do. This makes it too easy for all of us—especially politicians—to dismiss their needs, to disagree with their perspectives, to avoid confronting the idea that our opinion may be just one REMEMBER THAT  of many valid views. We know there are no easy answers to our current GOVERNING ISN’T A WAR— set of challenges, but we cannot take refuge in surrounding ourselves only IT’S A SOCIAL CONTRACT.  with those who share our views. Maya Wallace I want a president who will cultivate empathy. Mr. President, you are well-educated, which means

My mother also died when I was young. She was a low-wage cannery worker and left no inheritance, but I was able to get a small stipend from Social Security that helped me get through college with almost no debt. My fatherless children who are enrolled in college have no such financial support. With the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, President Ronald Reagan signed that small stipend out of existence for college students who had lost a parent. Education must be made affordable and accessible to all Americans who want it and are willing hard to obtain it—and it shouldn’t place them in perpetual debt. Republicans, like Romney, have repeatedly shown that once they get theirs, they close the

you understand complex issues. You are also advised by the brightest minds on the planet. But do not let that abstract reasoning ability cloud your ability to put yourself in another’s shoes. Treat everyone with respect and be accessible. Seek our views on policy issues, and not just for polling and focus groups to advance an agenda, but as you look to develop solutions to fundamental issues: creating good jobs, education, rebuilding our infrastructure, preserving our planet for future generations, and sustaining our health and welfare. Remember that governing isn’t a war—it’s a social contract.

We l❤ve

you too! V ot e d Sac r a m e n to ’ S B e SStt Sa l o n S

Libby Sanchez legislative advocate

GO BALLS TO THE WALL Four years ago, Mr. President, your election filled with us hope. Today, after unyielding intractability in the face of your increasing willingness to compromise, many of us are terrified that it may be dashed altogether by disappointment in campaign promises not delivered, and the drowning of already watered-down ideals. Mr. President, my wish for this term is that you acknowledge what your constituents already know—that the opposition party has no interest whatsoever in compromise, and that it is now time for you to go balls to the wall in ensuring that our shared hope translates into real and positive change for working people. Multibillion-dollar corporations have their voice in Washington thanks to Citizens United, thanks to the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act and enactment of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, which opened the doors to banking-security affiliations, and thanks to Wall Street regulation and campaign-finance laws, which would be laughable if they weren’t so destructively pathetic; we the people, have you, Mr. President, and we need you to be our voice—without compromise or apology. Working people are having a really hard time. Not just because the good jobs—the ones that used to be a pathway into the middle class—have dried up, but also because the jobs that are left barely provide enough for folks to be able to eke out an existence. People—lots of people—are working two and three jobs, and still not making it. Several years ago, in testimony before California’s Industrial Welfare Commission, advocating on behalf of working people for an increase to the minimum wage, I included a personal reflection about the fact that I’d just given birth to my first child, wherein I provided the commission members a tally of the costs of the bare necessities of rearing an infant (you know, diapers, wipes, clothing, formula, baby food, day care, medical co-pays, etc.), along with a calculation which evidenced that on minimum BEFORE

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wage, it would be mathematically impossible to be able to provide for one’s children and pay for life’s other necessities (you know, rent, electricity, food, etc.). That was in 2005, long before we’d seen the real economic downturn. Before benefits meant to help those in need were slashed to the bone. Before 16 percent of Americans were living at or below the poverty line, which for a family of four is $23,000 a year. Before 100 million people found themselves surviving on a household income of approximately $45,000 per year. This isn’t the America I grew up in, the America in which my dad got to go to college on the GI Bill and I got to go to college and law school because his GI Bill education garnered him a middle-class job. There was hope then that regardless of the circumstances into which you were born, there was a pathway for a better future, for you and your children. That hope is all but lost now, Mr. President, but you can change that.

MEND THE RIFT In what turned out to be both my softball season opener and my season-ending game, I went down in Cathy Senderling-McDonald the bottom of the deputy executive director, first with a calf County Welfare Directors injury. Whether Association of California it’s a strain or a tear, I’ve yet to find out—an ultrasound was scheduled by the doctor I saw a couple days after. My total cost for all of this will be $20, my co-payment for the doctor visit. It got me thinking about what might have happened if I didn’t have health insurance.

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2000 I Street • Midtown 447-5874

5520 Douglas Blvd Roseville/Granite Bay 774-0440

1723 J Street • Midtown 444-1359

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Would I have even played softball in the first place? Maybe, maybe not. Would I just “tough out” the injury and not see a doctor, worried about the total cost of the bills I’d receive later in the mail? Probably so. Women worry about their families, their communities, their careers. We should not have to worry about leaving an injury untreated due to a lack of health insurance. Nor should we have to worry about bankruptcy if a serious illness does occur to someone in our family. I had hoped that the great lesson of the Great Recession would be simply this: There is no us, there is no them. Any of us could be plunged into poverty, if our previously stable jobs were downsized, our too-good-to-be-true mortgages turned out to be scams, and our homes turned out to be worth far less than we all thought. Any of us scrabbling to hang on to our middle-class existence could lose that handhold and slide down the cliff. Instead, what I’ve seen in this country is a lot of anger toward the poor, and a vitriol levied toward those who seek government help. Whether it’s in the form of welfare-towork assistance, food and nutrition assistance, or health care from Medicaid, the comments made about the people who seek such support have been shockingly inhumane at times. The Mitt Romney ad that states—incorrectly, by the way—that Obama’s administration wants to end work requirements in welfare programs is but just one easy example of turning “us” against “them.” What I want to say to the next president is this: Your highest duty should be to set an example for this country that we are all in this together, to try to mend the increasingly deep rifts between the classes, the blue and red states, the 99 percent and the 1 percent. Without this leadership, the country will continue to founder and this recovery will grow even longer and more divisive. It doesn’t have to be this way.

REMIND AND RE-EDUCATE I want to see the president make a positive impact on people—and one controversial topic that needs to be addressed is that of sexual crimes. Women are taught Courtney Harmening not to dress “inapproprihigh-school senior ately.” If we dress in such a manner, there’s a huge chance of us being sexually assaulted. Males need to be reminded and re-educated that even if a woman is provocatively dressed, it is not an invitation for rape.

FOCUS ON COMMON SENSE AND DECENCY I am out of practice at writing letters to politicians. I’ve been busy the last few years having babies, raising daughters, earning a living. Some women become mothers and fall into political activism. Me, I’ve circled the family wagons and mostly shut out the political noise. But Mr. President, we have a problem. Sixteen years ago, I was angry. I was angry about abortion, and not in the way you might think. I was angry about the way that abortion politics dominated political discourse in this 24

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country. I was angry that abortion rights were still the defining “women’s issue,” as if women had nothing else to think about. Sixteen years ago, I disagreed with most pro-choice candidates on many issues—the death penalty, gay marriage—but I voted the Democratic ticket anyway, like every other woman I knew. Because of abortion. And now it’s 2012, Roe v. Wade is nearly 40 years behind us, and people I know and love are worried every day about keeping their houses, paying for health care, winning the right to marry … and what are we talking about? Abortion. And I don’t want to talk about it anymore. I don’t want this to be the dividing line in American politics, the us vs. them, the sticking point that keeps so many of us (on both sides of the issue!) voting down a party line. But we keep talking about it, because a major political party has just adopted a platform that would outlaw abortions in all cases, including rape, incest and situations in which the mother’s life is at stake. It would be a lot easier for me to stop talking about this if the matter weren’t literally one of life and death. I don’t want to tell you, Mr. President, that I am a survivor of a life-saving pregnancy termination. I want that story to be Elizabeth Campbell my own business, my lawyer own grief, my family’s grief. I don’t want to talk about the terrible series of events that led to the conclusion that we could terminate the pregnancy, lose our healthy and already loved son, or do nothing and lose both of us. I had a 3-year-old daughter; I made the only choice that any mother could. Under the Republican party platform of 2012, my son and I would both be dead. I want this fight to be over. I want the protection of women’s lives and health and sanity and privacy and reproductive freedom to be common sense and simple decency. I don’t want to do this every four years anymore. I want to focus on your ideas for health care, I want to weigh your tax plans and read up on your ideas for getting us out of Afghanistan. I want to know how much longer we’re going to keep leaving kids behind with this standardizedtesting experiment. I want to talk about the deficit. I want to know when we are going to repeal DOMA. I want my daughters to grow up and solve problems, look forward, have real political choices. Hell, I want them to choose to be Republicans if that is where their hearts and minds lead them. I don’t want them endlessly on the defensive, watching their backs, voting the only way any sane woman can.

BAIL OUT SCHOOLS My 7-year-old daughter Estrella is not like other girls her age. She doesn’t listen to Justin Bieber or wear frilly dresses. She rocks out to the Pixies and wears an exorbitant amount of skulls on her clothes. She would rather sit inside drawing in her sketchbooks than be anywhere else. She wants to learn to play guitar. She designs clothes. She paints. She has creativity bursting at Olivia Monahan every seam. blogger But when she goes to school, the fire that perpetually burns in her is quelled by the lack of resources offered. She has no outlet in a

Gloria Ramirez desk clerk, Quinn Cottages place that’s supposed to nurture the very best out of her. Our school system is failing on multiple levels—too many to focus on in this letter. The arts, however, is where I see the most pressing issue. We have been so hell-bent on standardized-test scoring that I feel a huge part of our children is being ignored: It’s called the left side of their brain! It still exists! Please note how it is slowly rotting away in their skulls from lack of use. We as a nation sit idly by while varying levels of learning institutions constantly get their funding cut, yet we bail out corporations that weakened the foundation of our basic economic structure? Of course, I understand that funding for schools is handled at a statewide level, but there has to be that moment where the blind eye we have collectively turned finally begins to see. The picture must become clear. Our schools can no longer fade into the background. Bail out our schools, Mr. President—build a new foundation. One where our children are encouraged. Nurtured. Appreciated. Let them know that they are worth it.

CONVINCE ME I hope the next president will shine the light on the people who are trying to make their life better. I got really sick recently, and I’m on leave from my job, and I get disability benefits—$422 every two weeks. My daughter, she just turned 8, and she keeps me focused. I’m a single mom taking care of her. She encourages me to put one foot in front of the other, and I try to encourage her, too, because she’s a sponge right now. I don’t want to her to exist in a world where life is so hard. I tell her, “Make sure you get an education. Be anything you want to be. Be your best, and you’ll go far.” I’m going to vote, but right now, the candidates are just kind of repeating the same old thing—please convince me, that’s what I’m waiting for. You’ve got to stick to what you’re saying. Ω

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10.04.12     |   SN&R     |   25

ARTS&CULTURE

I

t’t’s a recent, drizzly weekday

afternoon, and Sacramento’s bars are mostly quiet. That’s not the scene, however, at Stoney’s Rockin Rodeo in north Sacramento. Here, a wrinkled, skinny middle-aged man stands alone, poking at a digital screen to play songs on the jukebox. Pale eyelids squint as he sorts through myriad song titles by Jason Aldean, Dustin Lynch and AC/DC. A few empty shot glasses and a full bottle of Miller Lite await him at the bar. Before returning to his seat to drink his beer, however, he selects two artists who most people probably wouldn’t associate with this country bar—or this man: Tupac Shakur and En Vogue. 26

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His picks are a signal that the days of old 7-inch-record- (a.k.a. 45s for their revolutions per minute) and CD-playing jukeboxes are long gone. Digital Internet-based jukeboxes with touch screens are the norm and allow users to play nearly anything imaginable— even Tupac in a country bar. And, his unusual selection makes me wonder: Is classic hip-hop popular at a lot of other country bars in Sacramento or just this one? What’s the current state of the jukebox scene? And is it still possible to find a bona fide old-school analog jukebox around town?

Ghosts in the machine In search of answers, I head to Old Ironsides and find yet another digital jukebox. It’s still

early afternoon, and several groups of senior citizens lunch quietly at several tables. A jukebox maintenance man has recently stopped by, leaving 10 credits on the machine. I select two songs by Stephen Marley, at two credits apiece. Manager Sam Kanelos Jr. says he enjoys my choice of “mellow” tunes—one of which features a guest verse by Mos Def— even though he deleted the rap genre from this jukebox “because of all the swearing.” No one will be playing Tupac here. Kanelos recalls Old I’s jukebox history: There was one that played 45s about 20 years ago and one that played CDs about seven years ago before the bar went digital a few years back. A local company called Southside Vending Inc. has provided and updated these jukeboxes for more than 20 years. Currently, the bar and Southside split jukebox profits

50-50 (though a small portion goes to record companies, too). Like many bars during the CD days, Old I’s juke featured local bands’ discs. Nowadays, he says, “Kids don’t care about that.” Indeed: Lately, the most-played songs at Old Ironsides include Toby Keith’s “I Love This Bar” and Adele’s “Set Fire to the Rain.” In this bar, and in other venues around town, people can now check in on smartphones to play songs over the bar’s house speakers—no need to insert cash, swipe a credit card or even touch a jukebox. My quest continues throughout the day as I head over to Streets of London Pub, Mel’s diner, and Old Tavern Bar & Grill. They all use digital systems, with touch-screen software that’s written by two companies: AMI Entertainment Network and TouchTunes.

Lotsa meaty meat … See DISH

31

…Or veggies galore?

Mel’s has a custom system that allows diners to play the jukebox from a coin-operated machine at each table. Rick’s Dessert Diner boasts an old Seeburg Stereophonic jukebox that plays 45s—with titles by the likes of Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and the Temptations—but it’s out of order. Many stops later, I finally find a working old analog jukebox, in the corner of the dark, downtown bar Pre-Flite Lounge: a neon-rainbow Seeburg that plays 45s. It’s about 3 p.m., and this dive bar is packed, the Seeburg belting out tunes from the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Patsy Cline, Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley. A pair of old regulars remembers that this juke has been here for approximately 35 years. Bar owner Jason Yee says he inherited the machine three years ago when he bought the business and doesn’t want to go digital anytime soon. “If we switch to a modern jukebox, it would take away from what the classic jukebox represents. People love the vintage sound of vinyl,” he says. The Seeburg plays two songs per quarter or 10 songs for a dollar, Yee explains, and he’s even traveled as far as Los Angeles to dig for 45s at record stores. Here at the Pre-Flight, No. 169 is the most-played song: It’s “The Pussy Cat Song” by Connie Vannett. On the side of the box, there’s an old sticker that reads “Dink Slavich, Southside Vending,” even though Yee says he’s slowly learning to perform regular maintenance on the machine himself.

See THE V WORD

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Wild art See COOLHUNTING

Jukebox heroes My jukebox journey isn’t complete, however: It dawns on me that Southside Vending must know about old—and new—jukeboxes. And so I drive to its small office in East Sacramento. Here, 72-year-old Don Slavich opens the door.

“If we switch to a modern jukebox, it would take away from what the classic jukebox represents. People love the vintage sound of vinyl.” Jason Yee owner Pre-Flite Lounge He leads me to a room full of CDs. They rest on shelves lining every wall and in stacks and boxes on the ground. Slavich used to organize the room, but he and his brother Ed, 75, are semiretired now—only dealing with a roster of select longtime clients. Don and Ed’s dad, Dominic “Dink” Slavich, started the company in 1947 as a cigarette-vending business. Nowadays, it doesn’t sell cigarettes. Rather, it rents out arcade machines, coin-operated pool tables and about 65 jukeboxes. Current manager Rod Bettencourt has worked there for 38

36

See ASK JOEY

years and leads a team of five employees, not including the brothers Slavich. Southside’s garage is full of old videogames, such as Tekken 3 and Golden Tee, pool tables, and a dozen or so jukeboxes spanning multiple generations of technology—some play CDs, others 45s. Many of them still work and were returned years ago when the majority of their clients switched over to digital jukeboxes. So, did the digital changeover kill the jukebox scene? Not by a long shot, says Bettencourt. “Overall, the jukebox business is good. When we first started on the downloader jukeboxes, 80 percent was all [still] CD players, and we held off until the very end from using downloaders,” he says. “Downloading jukeboxes changed the industry [and] boosted our income up. They just offer so much [music choice] to the consumer.” Technology, says Bettencourt, is still reinventing jukeboxes and allowing them to do more exciting things. “They’re just making things that are bigger and with more features on them. There are jukeboxes that can have photo machines on them, karaoke—stuff like that [is] in the program for the jukebox industry.” In the end, I found that some people still prefer analog, and some prefer digital. Somehow, it’s this combination of old and new—and a wide cross section of unique individual tastes (like listening to hip-hop in a country bar)—that give the jukebox scene its livelihood. Ω

Southside Vending Inc.’s technician Eric Johnson checks out a lean, mean touch-screen machine.

Pre-Flite Lounge owner Jason Yee kicks it old school with the bar’s analog jukebox. BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

37

Liar, liar

Noises on See EIGHT GIGS

44

Whiskey, wild There is no right or wrong answer, but perusing the Pour House’s menu of 133 whiskeys can be harrowing when you’re not sure what you like. Do you want a “whiskey” or a “whisky”? Kentucky or Canadian? The descriptions give some measure of what you’re in for but are still, ultimately, misleading. Do I really want something with a “long hot finish” or, more perplexing, “unbelievably chewy”? Once you’ve closed your eyes and pointed, there’s only one decision left: neat or on the rocks? If served neat (unmixed and unchilled) then God bless you. You win this round. On the rocks, by contrast, is the choice of a drinker looking for a mellower flavor experience over a longer period of time. Should this be your selection, the Pour House serves Next time, if you must your shot over a single large cube of chill, ask for one ice ice, introducing just enough water to cube, not three. accentuate flavor without swamping it, and giving you ample time to search out those notes of tobacco and spicy boot leather that prompted you to order it in the first place. On a recent night, I walk into the back bar to find all the seats are occupied by large men with laptops, staring up at the row of flat-screen TVs—apparently, it has something to do with fantasy football. The front of house is similarly populated. Beefy guys accompanied by well-heeled Brazilian blown-out dates circle like liquor-thirsty sharks, waiting for their turn at one of Pour House’s signature tables stocked with private taps. Normally, this is the sort of scene that makes you long for an earnest hipster, but the bar has Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA on tap, and one or two of these makes any crowd not just bearable, but totally enjoyable. A train rattles by, and I duck to take cover as a small stampede of dudes herald the bartenders’ cry of “Train shots!” Train shots, as it turns out, are the occasion that so many Pour Housers wait for: a sporadic $2 whiskey-shot special that’s enacted every time a train passes, teeth-rattlingly close. Seeing as it’s just Jack Daniel’s, it would be riotous to charge any more for it no matter what’s passed by, but this is not acknowledged. I skip the frat-house shots and take my chances with a glass of Four Roses Bourbon described in the Whiskey Library menu as “delicate and complex,” with notes of “vanilla, honey, and spice.” The flavor is indeed complex, but seems more befitting the descriptor: “lady’s ultradry deodorant.” The bartender sees my obvious struggle as I sip and offers to make it into an old fashioned, saving the drink and by proxy, my reputation as a drinker. With one last look through the extensive menu, I opt for a steamroller, a beer cocktail of Templeton Rye whiskey, St-Germaine, cherry liqueur, lemon juice, and Anchor Steam beer colorfully layered together in a tall, wide mason jar. It is a house specialty as sweet as it is sour and a tribute to the versatility of whiskey, no matter how you take it. –Julianna Boggs Throw one back at Pour House, 1910 Q Street; www.pourhouse sacramento.com.

STORY

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AFTER

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NIGHT&DAY 04THUR

Concerts

Special Events

OPERA AT THE CREST: This event

COMEDY UNDER THE STARS: Join

will feature popular arias, duets, and ensembles taken from the 10 most popular operas voted on by Sacramento Opera patrons. Selections will be performed by six singers appearing in productions during the season. Th, 10/4, 7:30pm. $30. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (916) 442-7378.

DON’T MISS! COMEDY COMPETITION: See one of the final rounds of the San Francisco International Comedy Competition, featuring five competing professional comedians plus a special guest host. Th, 10/4, 7:30pm. Free. Sacramento State University University Union, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-6997; www.Sacstateunique.com

List your event! Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Special Events

05FRI

DEMOCRACY VERSUS WALL STREET: Richard Becker will give a talk called The Myth of Democracy and the Rule of Wall Street. Becker is also the author of Palestine, Israel and the U.S. Empire, and the Western Region Coordinator of the Act Now to Stop War & End Racism Coalition. Th, 10/4, 7pm. Free. Sacramento Area Peace Action, 909 12th St.; (916) 448-7157.

LITERARY LECTURES: CAMPAIGN FOR LANGUAGE: The fall series of Literary Lectures kicks off with a published author and professor, Ann Keniston. The lecture title is, The New American Poetry of Engagement: Politics and Contemporary Poetry. Lectures continue for six consecutive weeks through November 8. Th, 10/4, 7:30pm. $10. Sacramento Poetry Center, 1719 25th St.; (916) 606-4303; http:// sacramentopoetry center.org.

DON’T MISS! 8: Hear a staged reading of

the new play about the Prop 8 trial, written by Oscar winner Dustin Lance Black. Studio 301 will present 8 at UCD’s University Club. A Q-and-A will follow. F, 10/5, 8-10pm. $8. UC Davis University Club; 1 Shields Ave. in Davis; (951) 413-4858; www.8theplay.com/readings/uc-davis-studio-301.

the Fair Oaks Recreation and Park District and Sacramento’s Laughs Unlimited for a full night of laughs. Food and spirits will be available for purchase in the theater. Comedy may contain explicit language and offensive materials and is intended for an adult audience. F, 10/5, 8-10pm. $15-$20. Veterans Memorial Amphitheatre, 7991 California Ave. in Fair Oaks; (916) 966-1036; www.fairoakspark.org.

Kids’ Stuff FREE YOUR MIND: Join an interactive philosophical discussion on the meaning of freedom with an “open mind” journal craft presented by library staff. F, 10/5, 4pm. Free. McKinley Library, 601 Alhambra; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Literary Events AUTHOR JERI CHASE FERRIS: California Writers Club, Sacramento Branch presents Jeri Chase Ferris, award-winning children’s book author, who will speak on researching, writing, selling and promoting a biography. She is the author of 12 biographies for children and young adults, including her newest book Noah Webster & His Words. F, 10/5, 9-11am. Free. IHOP, 2216 Sunrise Blvd. in Rancho Cordova; (916) 213-0798;

www.cwcsacramento writers.org.

06SAT

DON’T MISS! MIXTAPE SWAP: Make a mixtape or mix CD and trade with other mixtape enthusiasts. Organizers will provide beverages, snacks and musical coolness. Be sure to make a cover, include track listing, and bust out your arts and crafts supplies and have fun. All genres of music are welcome. Sa, 10/6, 6pm. Free. Phono Select, 2312 K St.; (916) 400-3164; http://phonoselect.com.

Special Events ASIAN FOOD & CULTURAL BAZAAR: The Sacramento Japanese United Methodist Church will host its annual Asian Food and Cultural Bazaar. The bazaar will feature teriyaki chicken, sushi, sesame chicken, chow mein, udon, Korean short ribs, and more, cooked on-site by church members and friends. Entertainment will include performances by Sacramento Taiko Dan, Ohana Dance, and Na Aikane Ukulele. Sa, 10/6, 11am-3pm. Free. Sacramento Japanese United Methodist Church, 6929 Franklin Blvd.;

(916) 421-1017; www.sacjumc.com.

AN EVENING WITH THE GENOME CENTER: Join as David Segal, Associate Director of Genomics at UC Davis, will be addressing timely questions and discussing the potential impact that human genetics and genomics could have on public health, as well as some ways this information can be used and protected. Sa, 10/6, 7:30pm. Free. Pence Gallery, 212 D St. in Davis; (530) 754-9134; www.pencegallery.org.

LOOMIS EGGPLANT FESTIVAL: The Loomis Eggplant Festival features performers, chefs, arts and crafts, animals, children’s activities and some of the most delicious, colorful food in California. Sa, 10/6, 9am-5pm. Free. Loomis Train Depot, 5755 Horseshoe Bar Rd. in Loomis; (916) 652-7252; www.loomis chamber.com/eggplant-festival

TACO FESTIVAL: This festival will showcase the taco in its entire splendor, whether stuffed with carne asada, chicken, pork, or veggies. Entertainment will include popular Northern California singers. In addition, charismatic cowboy showman James Barrera will show his prowess with his spectacular trick roping and whip cracking routines. The event will be capped by a dance featuring a musical band. Sa, 10/6, 2-10pm. $5. Fusion International Arts Center, 501 Arden Way; (916) 538-4008.

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Kids’ Stuff RIVER CITY TOY TRAIN MEET: See and buy toy trains from the past and present along with parts, accessories, and toy train-related items. There are lots of operating toy train layouts and displays for the entire family to enjoy. The event is hosted by the Sacramento Valley Division of the Toy Train Operating Society. Sa, 10/6, 10am-3pm. $5. Scottish Rite Masonic Center, 6151 H St.; (916) 481-4694; www.ttos-sv.org/events.htm.

Concerts HEAVY SURF ROCK: Catch a night of instrumental surf music culminating with a performance by Slacktone. The Pyronauts, who have opened 17 times for Dick Dale, fourth-wave sensations the Sneaky Tikis, and the Lava Pups will warm up the crowd. Food and a wide selection of beers will be on sale. Sa, 10/6, 5-10pm. $10. Beach Hut Deli, 4035 Grass Valley Hwy in Auburn, (530) 889-8486; www.lavapups.com.

THREE CENTURIES OF THE VIOL: Watch a concert and demonstration on viols—early versions of the violin family—by Bay Area musicians Julie Jeffries and Peter Hallifax. It includes performance of period music and a hands- on experience for string players of all ages. Sa, 10/6, 3pm. Donations accepted. St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 7850 Watt Ave. in Antelope; (916) 320-8423.

omewhere

in my mother’s old photo collection, there’s a childhood photo of me dressed as a pumpkin for Halloween. It’s shown every once in a while to embarrass me in front of complete strangers, and often accompanied by the phrase “cute as a pumpkin.” Despite lingering pumpkin-costume trauma, I still love eating pumpkin in foods such as pie, bread and pasta. Fortunately, there are plenty of good pumpkin sources in the Sacramento area. Check out the following list of patches and farms, plus one event, to satisfy your pumpkin cravings.

n i k p um

BOBBY DAZZLER’S PUMPKIN PATCH

Located between Davis and Woodland is a remote patch with pony cart rides, balloons, hair tinsel, a milo (sorghum) maze, and barbecues on the weekends. Noon-7 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 23300 County Road 99D in Davis; (530) 867-4167; www.yourpumpkins.com.

07SUN

DON’T MISS! JEWISH FOOD FAIRE:

Sacramento foodies have something truly delicious to look forward to: This year’s Food Faire will feature iconic Jewish comfort foods, such as corned beef, stuffed cabbage, matzo ball soup, chopped liver and an assortment of homemade baked goods. Much of the food is lovingly handmade by members of Congregation Beth Shalom. Su, 10/7, 9am-3pm. Free. Congregation Beth Shalom, 4746 El Camino Ave. in Carmichael; (916) 485-4478; www.cbshalom.org.

a silent auction and enjoy live music. This event is sponsored by the Delta Chambers & Visitor’s Bureau. Su, 10/7, noon4pm. $20. Old Sugar Mill, 35265 Willow Ave. in Clarksburg; (916) 744-1625; www.carvalho familywinery.com.

GOOD STREET FOOD & DESIGN MARKET: Good Street Food & Design Market features deejays, live music, good beer and wine, and good bike parking. There are a few things that set it apart from other markets: high quality products that are locally made or grown, one-ofa-kind items, and custom goods designed to improve the consumer experience. First Su

of every month, 1-5pm through 11/4. $3 entry. Street food and design market; 1409 Del Paso Blvd.; (312) 854-7524.

LAUGHTER IS THE BEST MEDICINE:

Special Events COMMUNITY YARD SALE: Join the fun at Fulton-El Camino Recreation and Park District’s Community Yard Sale. Make some extra cash, shop to your heart’s content, or do both at a massive yard sale. Food and drinks will be available for purchase during the event. Su, 10/7, 9am-1pm. Call for pricing. Howe Avenue Park, 2201 Cottage Way; (916) 927-3802 ext. 125; www.fecrecpark.com.

DELTA ART & WINE FAIRE: Enjoy a Sunday afternoon full of local art, meet the artists, taste wine, visit food vendors, bid on

Stand-up Comedian Brian Diamond will host Laughter is the Best Medicine, a benefit night of professional stand-up comedy with five comedians. The event benefits Save Ourselves, Sacramento’s breast cancer survivor-run organization. Su, 10/7, 7pm. $20. Laughs Unlimited, 1207 Front St.; (916) 787-8787; www.briandiamond.net.

NATUREFEST 2012: The second annual Naturefest, dedicated to the memory of Carol Doersch will feature a full day of nature-related activities. This event includes a birds of prey display featuring a

COOL PATCH PUMPKINS This patch, famous for its 53-acre corn maze, boasts dozens of pumpkin varieties, a scarecrow contest, hay rides, pedal carts, food and drinks. In 2007, Cool Patch’s 40-acre maze won the title of Guinness World Records’ Largest Corn Maze. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. daily, weather permitting. 6585 Milk Farm Road in Dixon, (530) 304-0163, www.coolpatchpumpkins.com.

Meetings & Groups

California Golden Eagle, two Raptor Experience flight shows, and more than 15 nature-related booths with activities and ethnobotany walks. Su, 10/7, 10am-3pm. $3. Effie Yeaw Nature Center, 2850 San Lorenzo Way in Carmichael; (916) 489-4918; www.effieyeaw.org.

Monday for two rounds of general knowledge questions. Prizes include discounts on food and drink. Teams must be between two and six players. Show up around 7:30 p.m. for seating. M, 8pm through 12/31. Free. Kilt Pub, 4235 Arden Way; (916) 487-4979; http://questionable trivia.com/where-and-when.

ELLEN EGGERS AT THE EXPERIENCE: Special guest and award-winning public defender Ellen Eggers will give a lecture titled What Happens Inside Our Prisons at The Experience. Su, 10/7, 4:04pm. Free. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1430 J St.; (916) 447-2712; http://experience sacramento.org.

VEGAN COMMUNITY FALL FEST & PICNIC: Join for a day of vegan food, fun and festivities. The featured guest speaker is nutrition expert Dr. Don Forrester, MD. There will also be a vegan poetry slam, info booths, hula, yoga and more. Su, 10/7, 11am-4pm. Free. Southside Park, Sixth and T streets; (916) 704-1868; http://sacveganchallenge.com.

Sports & Recreation

09TUES

DON’T MISS!

PADDLE AT COSUMNES RIVER PRESERVE: Join us a leisurely paddle along the Cosumnes River. The Cosumnes River Preserve’s Volunteer Naturalists will be awaiting your arrival. Once you have your canoe or kayak unloaded, flotation devices on, and boats in the water, be prepared for a breathtaking experience along the Cosumnes River. Su, 10/7, 8:30am-12:30pm. Free. Cosumnes River Preserve Visitor Center, 13501 Franklin Blvd. in Galt; (916) 870-4317; www.cosumnes.org.

Film A PLACE CALLED SACRAMENTO FILM FESTIVAL: For the thirteenth year in a row, Access Sacramento launches A Place Called Sacramento Film Festival, a scriptwriting and short film production project for local writers and producers. PCS challenges local scriptwriters to write tenminute scripts about the people, places, and events that make our community such a unique place to live. Su, 10/7, 1pm. $10. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (916) 442-7378.

08MON

BAD ART NIGHT: A variety of

arts and crafts supplies will be available to those interested in making the worst possible art piece to be entered to win a prize. Sad clowns and velvet Elvis fans, unite. Tu, 10/9, 6pm. Free. McKinley Library; 601 Alhambra Boulevard; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

GIANT PUMPKIN FESTIVAL

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FRONTLINES

STANLEY CLARKE & HIROMI: One of the most celebrated bass players in the world, Stanley Clarke is known for ferocious chops and effortless musicality. His work as a member of Return to Forever and on solo recordings are prime sources for any electric jazz bassist. On this night, Clarke will be performing as part of a trio featuring drummer Lenny White and pianist Ruslan Sirota. W, 10/10, 8pm. $25-$49. Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, 9399 Old Davis Rd. in Davis; (530) 754-2787; www.mondaviarts.org.

ONGOING

Special Events

Held annually in Elk Grove, this festival regularly sees pumpkins weighing more than 400 pounds. A contest awards prizes and glory to the grower of the largest pumpkin. There will also be boat racers, music, a scarecrow contest, food contests, and food and drinks for sale. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., October 6 and 7. Free. Elk Grove Regional Park, 9950 Elk Grove Florin Road in Elk Grove; (916) 684-7550; www.yourcsd.com/pumpkinfestival.

BICYCLE ACCESS COMMUNITY WORKSHOP: Help make it safer and easier to ride a bike on and around Folsom Boulevard. Join a community workshop to improve bicycle access to jobs, shopping, schools, parks, residences, light rail stations and the American River Parkway. W, 10/10, 6-9pm. Free. Mills Building, 2900 Mather Field Rd. in Rancho Cordova; (916) 448-1198, ext. 329; http://planfolsomblvd.org.

Art Galleries LITTLE RELICS BOUTIQUE & GALLERIA: Boobie Show Photography Exhibit, photography by artist and breast cancer Survivor Monica Neumann Lunardi. The show aims to raise awareness and raise funds for the Albie Aware Foundation. Through 10/27, 11am-6pm. Free. 908 21st St.; (916) 716-2319.

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FEATURE

STORY

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PHOTO COURTESY OF COSUMNES COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT

THE PUMPKIN FARM Celebrating its 38th year in operation, this Citrus Heights pumpkin farm boasts a zoo, train rides, hayrides, a haunted barn, scarecrows, corn mazes and a jump castle. In 2010, the farm produced a 1,535-pound pumpkin that won first place at the World Championship Pumpkin Weigh-Off in Half Moon Bay. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. 7736 Old Auburn Road in Citrus Heights, (916) 726-1137, www.pumpkinfarm.net. —Jonathan Mendick

BEFORE

Concerts

sake, beer and shochu from Japan will be featured at the 2012 Northern California Premium Sake Fest. Independent microbrewery sake masters from various regions of Japan will be bringing their finest to offer. Enjoy the sushi creations of local restaurants and watch in as calligrapher Aoi Yamaguchi creates a work of art using ink and a mop. W, 10/10, 6-9pm. $60-$70. Sheraton Grand Sacramento, 1230 J St.; (916) 373-1111, ext. 120; www.nafdc.com.

DAVE’S PUMPKIN PATCH Dave’s Pumpkin Patch at Vierra Farms allows you to pick a pumpkin straight from the vine and walk through a “haunted” maze at night. There are also numerous other child-friendly attractions, such as hay rides, pony rides, a bunny barn, a hay maze, pig races and a gigantic “jumping pillow” which resembles a huge trampoline. 10 a.m.-dusk, Sunday through Thursday; 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Friday and Saturday. 3010 Burrows Avenue in West Sacramento, (916) 849-9450, www.vierrafarms.com.

your favorite manga, watch anime and create your own works of magna-style art. W, 10/10, 4pm. Free. South Natomas Library, 2901 Truxel Rd.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

SAKE FESTIVAL: Premium

Questionable Trivia at Kilt Pub every

lection of inspirational stories about people’s joys and struggles while coming of age in the United States. Judie Fertig Panneton will explain how children of immigrants are different from native-born Americans. They are their parents’ bridge to American ways, their translators, their support system and their hope for a more promising future. They have fought to live independent lives while being true to their families’ roots and expectations. W, 10/10, 6:30pm. Free. Pocket-Greenhaven Library, 7335 Gloria Dr.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

ANIME & MANGA CLUB: Discuss

DON’T MISS!

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Teens

10WED

Special Events

Literary Events

Wait, there’s more! Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

Row, row, row your pumpkin.

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AROUND THE WORLD

WITH PINOT NOIR AND CHARDONNAY

Friday, October 5

Harveys Lake View Lounge

DOWN ON THE BAYOU DINNER

SUSHI, SASHIMI AND SAKE TASTING

Friday, October 5

Saturday, October 6

Harveys Convention Center

Gi Fu Loh

Beyond the Fork “An Affair of the Senses�

Epicurean Expo Saturday, October 6 | 2pm – 5pm | Harrah’s Special Events Center 14 Food Stations, 12 Wine Stations and 10 Liquor Stations. Cooking Demonstrations and Live Entertainment. Indulge at our relaxing and luxurious Wine Garden featuring unique wines, Champagnes and cognacs from various regions and enhanced by aromatherapy and live music. Learn from up-close cooking demonstrations with celebrity chefs Mark Estee DQG1DWKDQ/\RQ%HGD]]OHGE\H[FLWLQJOLYHLQWHUDFWLYHHQWHUWDLQPHQWà DYRUIXOIRRGVDQGZLQHWDVWLQJV A portion of all proceeds will be donated to the Carson Valley Community Food Closet. Must be 21 or older to attend this event.

Harveys Champagne Brunch Hosted by Nathan Lyon 6XQGD\2FWREHU‡.LWFKHQ‡%DU Our Ă  la carte Champagne Brunch features a wide variety of culinary delights, hosted by Nathan Lyons. Non-ticketed event; reservations recommended. Please call 775-586-6777.

See box ofďŹ ce for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.ÂŽ Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. Š2012, Caesars License Company, LLC. T1600-12-164

For tickets, a full list of events and pricing, visit LTFoodandWine.com 2012 ENTERTAINMENT SERIES

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Tickets on sale now at Ticketmaster.com or SouthShoreRoom.com

See box ofďŹ ce for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.ÂŽ Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. Š2012, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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DISH

Gringo-wiches See FOOD STUFF

Steaks, steaks and more steaks The Willo 16898 State Highway 49 in Nevada City, (530) 265-9902, http://thewillo.com Here’s a recipe for a perfect late-summer day (Indian or otherwise): Drive up through Nevada City and find a good spot on the South Yuba River. The by water is translucent and blue-green in shallow Becky spots and so magnificent it makes the Grunewald American and Sacramento rivers seem like dirty, silty bro conduits. Then, after a day spent swimming and drinking weak beer in the sun, pile back into the car and head a few miles up Highway 49 to The Willo, where a neon sign of a green martini glass with a bright-pink olive beckons as your cue to turn in to the gravel lot, which is usually Rating: packed, especially on a Friday or Saturday ★★★★ night. Reservations are strongly recommended. Still, on a recent Saturday, my party of Dinner for one: nine, sans reservation, was welcomed into the $15 - $25 back banquet room. While it was a bit of a bummer to be tucked into this quiet room rather than the buzzing main room, we took what we could get. The front room is decorated in lacquered wood photos of iconic images such as Elvis and the Golden Gate Bridge, but its central eye-catching feature is a brick-lined grill pit that is huge and stocked with glowing ★ coals and tended out in the open. Here, The POOR Willo’s grillers are constantly flipping and ★★ searing chops, ribs, garlic bread, and steaks, FAIR steaks, and more steaks. ★★★ The menu is simple, centered on a slab of GOOD meat with starchy sides—although the ★★★★ restaurant has added a veggie burger to its EXCELLENT lineup. While the thick, smoky pork chop ★★★★★ and the tender, butterflied half-chicken sufEXTRAORDINARY fice, at The Willo, it’s really all about the New York strip steak offered in small (8 ounce), medium (12 ounce) and large (16 ounce) portions. The menu claims that the restaurant has served more than 1 million steaks, and that figure seems high until you consider that The Willo’s history goes back 65 years. It started as a bar inside a refashioned World War II-era Quonset hut and, through a series of permutations, went from being a bar to Still hungry? being a bar with a hamburger window to its Search SN&R’s current incarnation as a steak house with a “Dining Directory” to bar attached. find local restaurants Another one of the menu’s charming feaby name or by type of food. Sushi, Mexican, tures is its “you cook” and “we cook” price Indian, Italian— categories—you can save 50 cents by discover it all in the grilling your own steak. “Dining” section at I prefer to sit back and be cooked for, and www.newsreview.com. as I wait, the server brings me a Manhattan “up” (no ice) in a precious little shaker. He pours it into a small martini glass that’s a reminder that sodas aren’t the only things that have been supersized over the years. This decidedly nonartisanal cocktail works its boozy magic as my steak arrives. It’s peppery and fat-rimmed, with a grainy bite.

When it comes to ordering the steak, it’s best to stick to the rare or medium-rare side of the spectrum to make sure it’s not dry. The included sides are sweet ranch beans; fluffy, charred garlic bread; and an all-iceberg salad. Remember Catalina dressing? The Willo still offers it, and it’s still too sweet—opt for the blue cheese instead; there will be plenty extra to dip your steak in, if you swing that way.

The menu is simple, centered on a slab of meat with starchy sides. A single scoop of ultracreamy coffee ice cream is included at the end, and coffee is offered. One companion compared its taste to “breakfast cereal set on fire,” so you might want to abstain, but it’s all part of the old-school charm. If you’re not the designated driver, slip into the bar for a shot to lull you during the long drive home. The sassy bartender will fix you right up as you take in the curving walls of this prefab structure from a long-gone era, the E Clampus Vitus plaques and the regulars’ birthdays listed on the wall. Luckily, a few bastions of culinary Americana such as The Willo are still going strong, and we should honor them while we can. Ω Thursday 10/4

Jack Daniels Night Thursday 10/11

THE V WORD

Moose Drool & Appetizers Monday 10/15

This picnic has everything

Mad River Brewing Company BBQ & Beer Night

After you’ve nabbed all the kale you can carry from the farmers market on Eighth and W streets on Sunday, October 7, cross the street to Southside Park for the Sacramento Community Vegan Fall Fest & Picnic. Why? Because “this place has everything: split kicks, pachucos, pile after pile of expired Lunchables, a

Tuesday 10/16 - Sunday 10/21

Absolut Martini and Appetizers

RI 0DGQHV

Thursday 10/18

Absolut Martini and Appetizers Party

Hawaiian cleaning lady that looks like Smokey Robinson”—wait, no: That’s

Monday 10/22

Celebrating The Decades — Dinner & Cocktails

what New York City’s hottest club Uhhh has, according to Saturday Night Live Weekend Update’s city correspondent Stefon. What the picnic will for sure have is food vendors, games, a cupcake walk, kids’ activities and a vegan poetry slam. But no one’s stopping you from bringing the split kicks. Just sayin’. It goes from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Thursday 10/25

Lagunitas & Appetizers Night Monday 10/29

Eel River Vegan Dinner

—Shoka BEFORE

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DISH

Downtown

Estelle’s Patisserie With its marble tables and light wooden chairs, there’s an airy atmosphere, casual and cozy. Estelle’s offers an espresso bar and a wide assortment of teas and muffins and rolls for the breakfast crowd as well as sweets, including DayGlo macarons. For the lunch-inclined, there are soups, salads, sandwiches and meat or meatless quiche. One of the authentic touches is the spare use of condiments. The smoked salmon is enlivened by dill and the flavor of its croissant. Its tomato bisque is thick and richly flavored, and, in a nice touch, a puff pastry floats in the tureen as accompaniment. Everything is surprisingly reasonable. Half a sandwich and soup is $7.25. A caprese baguette is $5.25. Ham and cheese is $5.75. There’s a lot to like about Estelle’s—except dinner. Doors close at 6pm. French. 901 K St., (916) 551-1500. Meal for one: $5-$10. ★★★1⁄2 G.L.

Midtown

Firestone Public House A sports bar with a focus on craft beer isn’t exactly a groundbreaking concept, but two local and prominent

The Porch The Porch is light and white with a vibe that suggests the airy sweep of an antebellum Charleston eatery. One can only envy the extensive on-site research conducted by chef Jon Clemens and business partners John Lopez and Jerry Mitchell, creators of Capitol Garage. The most enjoyable menu selections are salads or seafood sandwiches or entrees. Slaw on the barbecue pork sandwich elevates its status, and its pickled vegetables are sweet and tart, adding an additional dimension. The shrimp and grits dish, while laden with cheddar and gravy, is a synergistic mélange—perhaps The Porch’s trademark dish. Also in the running is the purloo, the low country’s version of jambalaya, with andouille, crunchy crawfish DO SH AY N BY HAYL EY

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Becky Grunewald and Greg Lucas, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

restaurant families, the Wongs and the DeVere Whites, know what Sacramento wants: good beer; solid pub grub; and a casual, unpretentious atmosphere. Here, the bar is the centerpiece with a full stock of liquor and 60 beers on draught. The menu features savory appetizers—the tortilla soup with poached chicken, avocado and tomato is particularly noteworthy—and a selection of sandwiches and pizzas, including a simple pie with fresh mozzarella and tomato sauce. American. 1132 16th St., (916) 446-0888. Dinner for one: $15-$20. ★★★ B.G.

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The Red Rabbit Kitchen & Bar Resistance is futile when it comes to Red Rabbit’s desserts. The berryinfused ice-cream sandwich is bright and refreshing with a chewy shell that dovetails neatly with the smooth fruity interior. But there’s less effusiveness for the entrees. The Bastard Banh Mi doesn’t improve on the original. A number of items from the “Farm to Plate,” “Tasty Snacks” and “Buns” sections of the menu land high in the plus column, however. Any place that

offers chimichurri rocks hard. Here it enlivens the Farm Animal Lollipops snack—particularly the lamb—and the mayor-of-Munchkin-Citysized lamb bocadillas. American. 2718 J St., (916) 706-2275. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★1⁄2 G.L.

Shady Lady Saloon

So many bars try to do bar snacks, and so many fail. Shady Lady, however, nails it. The fried green tomatoes are punched up with a tarragon rémoulade and the huge charcuterie board is more like a groaning board, stocked with abundant regional meats and cheeses. The pickle plate looks like Peter Rabbit’s dream, all teeny turnips and tangy carrot chunks. Generally excellent,

the saloon’s cocktail list veers from the classics with a list of bartender-created drinks with unusual, but wisely considered flavor combinations: cilantro and tequila, blackberry and thyme, and the surprisingly sublime mixture of celery and pineapple. American. 1409 R St., (916) 231-9121.$10-$20. ★★★1⁄2 B.G.

East Sac

Juno’s Kitchen & Delicatessen To quote Gov. Jerry Brown from his first iteration as California’s chief executive more than 30 years ago: “Small is beautiful.” Juno’s proves this axiom in

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spades. The menu is fairly compact and slanted more toward lunch than dinner. Juno’s macaroni and cheese, which comes with rock shrimp on rigatoni, a Grana Padano, Gruyère and cheddar trio and a dusting of paprika, is a creative take on a comfort-food classic. In the traditional-sandwich realm, all start out with the advantage of Juno’s homemade sour— but not sourdough—bread with its crunchy crust and soft interior. In the soppressata salami sandwich, the bread amplifies the tartness of the pepperoncini while the turkey sandwich with provolone, tomato, arugula and pesto requires several napkins as the oil in the pesto seeps

BREW THE RIGHT THING Day at the River

MUST DRINK:

Nowadays, I seldom drink hopped-up ales. But, admittedly, they were huge gateway beers for me. And so, I’m not going to turn away $3.25 pints of Pliny the Elder, freshly tapped at the source at Santa Rosa’s Russian River Brewing Company, which is where I found myself this past Sunday for the microbrewery’s all-day happy hour. What I admire most about this world-famous spot is the consistency and quality of all its styles of brew. The Belgian sours are tart, vinous even. The porter was earthy and smoky. And the ho-hum Blind Pig IPA is dry and piney and a great entry into the world of West Coast hoppy beers. Too bad it’s a 90-minute jaunt back to Sac; recruit a D.D. 725 Fourth Street in Santa Rosa, (707) 545-2337, www.russianriverbrewing.com. —Nick Miller

Beer: Lava (Icelandic stout) Brewer: Ölvisholt Brugghús Where: The Davis Beer Shoppe, 211 G Street in

Davis; (530) 756-5212

Beer: Oak Jacked Imperial Pumpkin Brewer: Uinta Brewing Company Where: Total Wine & More, 2121 Arden Way;

(916) 921-5328; 5791 Five Star Drive in Roseville; (916) 791-2488; www.totalwine.com

Beer: SpontanKoppi (coffee lambic) Brewer: Mikkeller Where: Pangaea Two Brews Cafe,

2743 Franklin Boulevard; (916) 454-4942, www.pangaeatwobrews.com

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Mamma Susanna’s Ristorante Italiano Most commonly referred to by its patrons as the neighborhood restaurant, there is no shortage of options on the menu with nearly a dozen or so pastas, even more types of pizzas, a smattering of salads and various entrees, including the piccata chicken or veal dish that Mamma Susanna’s counts as one of her specialties. Of the pastas and pizzas, the norcina tastes like and looks like an orangey vodka sauce with roasted red-pepper slices and sausage rounds tossed in a bed of penne. While the menu claims spicy, some red chili flakes do the trick. Italian. 5487 Carlson Dr., (916) 452-7465. Dinner for one: $12-$20. ★★★ G.L.

Vanilla Bean Bistro Gonul’s J Street Cafe has moved up the street and evolved into the Vanilla Bean Bistro. Its narrow, lowceilinged coziness is consonant with its understated, whateverthe-impulse-inspires alchemy that owner/chef Gonul Blum, has shown over the past eight years. Blum hails from Turkey. That country’s culinary tradition provides a sturdy foundation, but for her, it serves more as a launching pad. A recurring feature practiced here is the inclusion of fruit—preserved and fresh—in many dishes. And the tabbouleh delivers a roundhousepunch flavor combination. Turkish. 3260-B J St., (916) 457-1155. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★1⁄2 G.L.

Asian Café serves both Thai and Lao food, but go for the Lao specialties, which rely on flavoring staples such as fish sauce, lime juice, galangal and lemongrass, lots of herbs, and chilies. One of the most common dishes in Lao cuisine is larb, a dish of chopped meat laced with herbs, chilies and lime. At Asian Café, it adds optional offal addons—various organ meats, entrails, et al—to three versions of the dish: beef with tripe, chicken with gizzards, or pork with pork skin. The beef salad offers a gentle respite from aggressive flavors, consisting of medium-thick chewy slices of eye of round with red bell pepper, chopped iceberg and hot raw jalapeño. The single best dish here is the nam kao tod, a crispy entree with ground pork that’s baked on the bottom of the pan with rice, then stirred and fried up fresh the next day with dried Thai chilies and scallions. Thai and Lao. 2827 Norwood Ave., (916) 641-5890. Dinner for one: $10-$15. ★★★★ B.G.

South Sac

Giò Cha Duc Huong Sandwiches With banh mi, it’s the bread that sets the tone. Giò Cha Duc Huong Sandwiches goes against the grain with bread that’s more football shaped than submarine shaped, garlic bread, and a selection of premade grab-and-go sandwiches right by the counter. And, with its substitution of butter for mayonnaise and the

LIKE LOVE,

smothered in very lightly pickled, shredded cabbage with raw hunks of radish and avocado slices. Another specialty is the morisqueta—the ultimate comfort dish due to the unique texture of the white rice, which is as soft as an angel’s buttock. Diners also have the option to order hand-shaped, griddled-to-order tortillas. They are warm, soft, taste like corn and barely resemble those cardboard things you get at the store. Mexican. 5701 Franklin Blvd., (916) 428-7844. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★1⁄2 B.G.

Pho King 2 Pho King 2 takes

large sushi menu, made up of both the steroidal Americanized rolls and traditional nigiri, but it also changes seasonally and features some uncommon offerings: Kinpira gobo with renkon (braised lotus and burdockroot salad) comprises matchstick-sized fibrous pieces of burdock root and juicy slices of lotus in a sweet mirin soy sauce. It also features inventive desserts. The “uji kintoki parfait” (it translates roughly to “Best. Dessert. Ever.”) is served in a sundae glass filled with layers of green-tea ice cream and sweet red beans, and it’s topped with whipped cream, chocolate Pocky candy, salty sesame crackers, peanut clusters, and warm, soft squares of mochi. Sushi. 132 E Street in Davis, (530) 753-0154. Dinner for one: $10-$25. ★★★ 1⁄2 B.G.

Davis

Zen Toro Japanese Bistro & Sushi Bar Zen Toro features a

diners on a trip to crazy-delicious town with its salads, including one off-the-menu salad featuring cold, pink tendon smothered in pickled daikon, carrot, crunchy garlic chips and peanutss and served with sweet fish sauce dressing. A beef with lemon salad, with thin slices of eye of round “cured” in lemon juice, is coated with sesame oil, herbs and chili flakes and is meant to be piled on rice crackers studded with black sesame seeds. It’s an incredible dish, and one you won’t find on a menu very often. Vietnamese. 6830 Stockton Blvd., (916) 395-9244. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★ B.G.

Tacos & Beer This is one of the area’s best Michoacán restaurants. Of its regional dishes, the enchiladas Apatzingán are unusual, filled with only a smattering of sharp cheese and diced onion, soaked in a vinegary sauce, and

Garden hopping Fall is a good time for planting—and that means food, too. As an old family saying goes: “The sooner you plant, the sooner you’ll have food.” So take this weekend’s Edible Garden Tour as inspiration to finally plant your own home garden. The event, sponsored by Slow Food Sacramento, takes 25 participants on a bike tour of home gardens in Curtis Park and Land Park. Homeowners on this tour have particular expertise at squeezing a large number of fruits and vegetables into small spaces on patios, front lawns and backyards. Tour participants will have the chance to speak with the gardeners and sample snacks made from some of the gardens. It’s limited to 25 people to keep the event intimate, so register soon if you want to guarantee a spot. Attendees will receive the starting address upon registration. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at http://slowfoodgardentour.eventbrite.com. —Jonathan Mendick

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emphasis on pâté, Duc Huong shows a stronger than usual French influence.These details may seem trivial, but with banh mi, such small variations make all the difference. The small menu is limited to eight sandwiches (mostly pork) and two soups: chicken curry soup and a beef stew called bo kho banh mi, which comes with bread. There’s a thick float of chili oil on top of the yellow, turmeric and lemongrass-laced curry soup, which, at first, is off-putting until you realize it can be dipped into the yeasty, crusty, fluffy bread. Vietnamese. 6825 Stockton Blvd., Ste. 200; (916) 428-1188. Dinner for one: $5-$10. ★★★ 1 ⁄ 2 B.G.

ILLUSTRATION BY MARK STIVERS

North Sac

inexorably through the airy bread slices. American. 3675 J St., (916) 456-4522. Dinner for one: $5-$10. ★★★★ G.L.

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Estelle’s Patisserie is a charming, warmly lit French bakery and espresso bar dedicated to quality and our Sacramento community. Estelle’s uses fresh, local ingredients to make our breakfast and lunch items Croissants, French macarons, tarts, breads, soups, sandwiches, and a full espresso menu. Wholesale orders, catering and delivery are also available. Please call or email for details. Located at the corner of 9th and K in downtown Sacramento *Wi-Fi available Open M–F, 7am–6pm • Now open Saturdays 8am-5pm Contact us at (916) 551–1500 or via email at info@estellespatisserie.com

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In Peter Heller’s new novel The Dog Stars (Knopf, $24.95), Hig and his dog Jasper have survived nearly a decade after the superflu apocalypse, sharing BOOK their tiny Colorado airport with a wellarmed prepper and Hig’s 1956 Cessna. He’s learned to not think too much—about the past, his dead wife or the people they’ve killed to stay safe, only some of whom were actually a threat—but one more loss sends him flying out in search of an airport radio that he might have heard, once, four years ago. When 99.7 percent of the people are dead, how can one decent man start living again? Heller answers that question with Hig, a man who’s going to fly until he finds something worth loving. —Kel Munger

Pysch revival public nuiSance’S Gotta Survive Jack White’s made no secret that he’s a big Public Nuisance fan. Now, White’s putting money on his fandom. On Tuesday, October 9, the musician’s label Third Man Records will MUSIC release the Sacramento psychedelic garage-rock band’s Gotta Survive album. Available on 12-inch vinyl and via iTunes, the Terry Melcher-produced record was shelved in 1968 and finally released by Frantic Records in 2002. White’s marquee cred, however, may finally bring Public Nuisance the new ears and recognition it’s long deserved. http://store.thirdmanrecords.com/publicnuisancegottasurvive12vinyl.aspx. —Rachel Leibrock

Let there be robots Flexi FlaSh FlaShliGht Flexible light strips—those handy portable lights useful for activities such as reading or bike riding—aren’t exactly a new concept, though they are nonetheless amazing gadgets to have on hand. But ModernTribe’s new Flexi Flash Flashlights will make you feel like you have a living, breathing companion illuminating your desk—or, rather, an artificial lifeform. The flashlights look strikingly like a robot face. For $12, they are available in orange, blue and pink. The lights illuminate with either a solid GADGET or flashing beam. They are made from a flexible silicone material that makes it a cinch to attach to nearly anything. www.moderntribe.com/ judaica/accessories/flexi_flashlights. —Aaron Carnes

Wildly divergent Get Well Soon art reception A new mixed-media art show at Bows & Arrows showcases two area artists: Liv Moe and Elisabeth O’Connor Higgins. Get Well Soon comprises both two-dimensional and threedimensional works that consist of primary colors and unusual forms that are at once whimsical and thought provoking. ART Moe is executive director at Verge Center for the Arts, and her works for this exhibit include sculptural wall pieces incorporating hair and found objects. O’Connor Higgins, a professor of drawing and ceramic sculpture at Sierra College, is perhaps best known for her quirky reconstructed animal forms which, with their expressive eyes and feral, off-kilter poses, feel as though they’ve stepped out of a slightly deranged Maurice Sendak book. The Bows exhibit will feature smaller wall works. Either way, the effect remains childlike and scientifically precise. And no wonder: O’Connor Higgins has said her work is inspired by such wildly divergent images as “the rampant growth of invasive species like kudzu and weeds, saccharine-ly sweet animal toys with rubber faces from the 1950s and ’60s … and images from old wrestling magazines.” Get Well Soon runs through Wednesday, October 31, at Bows & Arrows, with an artists’ reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, October 5. 1816 19th Street, www.bowscollective.com. —Rachel Leibrock

My 15-year-old son told me that my wife is having an affair. I told him that I trust my wife and don’t believe it. I didn’t even let him finish. I have not spoken to my wife about this. My son gets along well with me but is sullen and disrespectful toward his mom. My wife keeps talking about the difficulty of having a teenager in the house. My son says my wife is sexting some guy she works with, and he read by Joey ga the messages (now erased). rcia My son tells me daily that he hates his mom. The tension a s kj o ey @ n ewsreview.c om between them is unbearable. I am not sure what to do. Joey Listen to your son so he feels eats at The Plum understood. His hostility toward Cafe & Bakery your wife will continue until he is on K Street. guided into releasing his feelings in a constructive way. Instead of denying the possibility of your wife’s affair, listen to your son’s fears that his mother is having an affair. Can you grasp the difference? Your son is scared that his mother is not who she says she is, that his family structure might be radically altered and that his father is asleep at the wheel. When he mustered the courage to talk about these fears, your response was to push him away. In terms of your relationship with your son, it doesn’t matter whether you are a cuckold. What is important is that his feelings are heard, that his worries are received without overreaction from you and that he is reassured that sharing his fears with a caring adult is a good choice.

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

Stop grieving what you can no longer have. Imagine what could be possible. It’s possible that your son is right. It’s also conceivable that he liked or dated someone who cheated on him, and he is projecting that pain. Projection is a defense mechanism. We unconsciously engage in projection when we deny feelings, thoughts or traits of our own and imagine other people are lugging that baggage.

Your rejection of your son’s fear reveals some denial in you. An unwillingness to listen may mean you carry a shred of suspicion, too. That feeling isn’t evidence that your wife is cheating, of course. But it is a nudge signifying that you have a little housecleaning to do (in your mind and heart, that is). I think that I married the wrong man. My husband is an engineer who is not interested in anything but work. He cannot hold a conversation. I don’t know why I never noticed this when we were dating, except that we spent a lot of time hiking, biking, skiing and playing tennis. He was in a car accident that required several surgeries and doesn’t enjoy sports much now. He works, watches TV and goes to bed. I can’t live like this anymore. Please help me. I feel like I’m dying. You bonded through a shared passion for athletics. The chemicals our bodies produce naturally during exercise probably added to that attraction. Now that you’re married and sporting activities are limited, you must find new inspiration. Stop grieving what you can no longer have. Imagine what could be possible. Athletes who compete in the Paralympics paved the path for new approaches to our favorite sports. Take a page from their playbook. Adapt your favorite sports to your husband’s current capability. Explore new sports together. You can also challenge yourself to practice new methods of approaching conversation with him. For example, have you talked about his grief at not being able to share his love of sports with you, the one he loves? Please do. That’s a conversation worth having.

Fighting Lou Gehrig’s Disease

Cheats and cowards?

Saturday, October 6, 2012 • Raley Field

CURE

To register visit: wwww.alssac.org or call (916) 979-9265

Dear Readers: Love is in the air! Yes, I’m back on the radio. Tune in to www.1musicnetwork.com, and catch my new show Love and Reality on the Today’s Talk channel. Ω

Meditation of the Week: “Out of clutter, find simplicity; from  discord, find harmony; in the middle  of difficulty lies opportunity,” said  Albert Einstein. Joey says: “Shake the  clutter of self-deprecating or cruel  thoughts from your head to make  space for inspiration and discovery.”

Lo ok fo r di sc ou nt s on

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STAGE Teenage ghost stories The K of D: an urban legend October starts the season of the scary, spooky ghost story. But B Street Theatre’s The K of D: an urban legend doesn’t spotlight the ghost; by rather, it casts a long shadow on the survivors, Patti Roberts or more specifically, Charlotte, the twin sister of a skateboarding teen tragically killed by a reckless driver in a small Ohio town. In The K of D (short for “kiss of death”), playwright Laura Schellhardt explores the tantalizing twists and turns of urban myths, especially as told by teens, who relish in the power of the telling. The myths pop up soon after the teen’s death and show how tragedy can change a family, a pack of friends, a town and the future of those affected, especially a young girl who is burdened with the image everyone has of her kissing her dying brother goodbye. It’s the power of this kiss that becomes the focal point of this strange, compelling and suspenseful story of emotional pain and angry revenge.

As with any ghost story, it’s the atmosphere and mood that adds to the suspense, and in this production, the eerie beauty of a small lakeside town is captured by the set, sound and lighting. B Street’s recent addition of stage manager Anthony Poston is paying off (as seen in the production values of Red and now in The K of D), where the setting and atmosphere meld into a character in itself—a looming presence that leaves as lasting as an impression as the people who inhabit it. Ω

5

The K of D: an urban legend, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday; 2 and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday; 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday; 5 and 9 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $23-$35. B Street Theatre, 2711 B Street; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. Through November 11.

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The K of D was written as a one-woman show containing more than a dozen characters. However, B Street has taken the solo show and divided the parts between two talented B Street regulars—Jason Kuykendall and Tara Sissom— who both deliver tour de force performances in their portrayals of characters that range in age, gender, backgrounds, dialects and temperaments. These two perform gymnastic acting feats as they leap and twist at dizzying speeds to capture conflicting characters—sometimes with one actor portraying both people in a conversation. There are some characters that are more believable and resonate more with the audience, but all are compelling—with credit also going to director Jerry Montoya for keeping all the plates spinning in the air. Montoya’s fast pacing in the first act keeps the action moving, which lets us enjoy some of Schellhardt’s slower, poetic language that would have otherwise bogged down the story.

Love of my life I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change

Love isn’t always as perfect as you think it is. Rarely does it even come close. That’s just reality, and it’s the idea explored in The Cosmopolitan Cabaret’s latest musical comedy I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change. It’s a collection of funny and serious vignettes about love, relationships and life. Michael Dotson, Jerry Lee, Jennifer Malenke and Melissa WolfKlain each play dozens of characters in the production, which is somewhat linear: It begins with God creating man and woman, and continues on with dating, engagement, marriage, kids, divorce, old age and death. Costumes, lights and staging are simple and effective. Sacramento’s Graham Sobelman—of Grahm-A-Rama fame—is the production’s musical director, and his straightforward piano playing provides the only musical accompaniment for the actors. Overall, it’s pretty minimalist, breaking each scene about love down to its essence. But instead of touching on psychological stages of love such as “lust,” “attraction” and “attachment,” scenes explore parts of relationships such as: “all my friends are married,” “his parents want grandkids” and “my first online dating video after our divorce.” These settings allow characters to mine comedic territory, and all four actors create humor through song and funny facial expressions. It’s a great production to take a date to. Indeed: Dozens of proposals have occurred—all successful—during stagings of the off-Broadway musical, which first opened in 1996. In I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change the tragic and lighthearted are intertwined, and you never know which one is going to hit you in the gut. —Jonathan Mendick

I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change; 7 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday; 2 p.m. Thursday, Sunday; $20-$43. The Cosmopolitan Cabaret, 1000 K Street; (916) 557-1999; www.cosmopolitancabaret.com. Through November 18.

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THE BEST MAN

This production of Gore Vidal’s play about political convention infighting for the presidential nomination is both timely and nostalgic. When was the last time we had an open convention? Probably right around the time Vidal wrote this. Nonetheless, it’s accurate in its depiction of behind-thescenes politicking and features excellent casting in the leads. As the too-smart, possibly too-ethical candidate, Mark Heckman is very good; as the former-president-turned-kingmaker, Ed Claudio is wonderful; and as the up-and-comer with more style than substance, Stuart Campbell is absolutely astonishing. The supporting cast is a bit uneven, but Matt Moore’s direction keeps things moving along. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 10/14. $12-$20. Actor’s Workshop of Sacramento at the California Stage, 2509 R St.; (916) 583-4880; www.actinsac.com. K.M.

5

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Michael Rubenfeld’s play about the relationship between a pair of incarcerated child molesters creates empathy for the not-necessarilyrepentant protagonists, and that leads to a distinctly unpleasant experience for the audience. While it aims for intense, it’s mostly uncomfortable. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 7pm. Through 10/14. $20. EMH Productions at the Wilkerson Theatre in the California Stage complex, 1723 25th St.; (916) 214-6255. M.M.

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Short reviews by Jim Carnes, Maxwell McKee and Kel Munger. BEFORE

Do you love to network and meet new people? Are you actively involved in either the chamber or rotary? Do you love the News & Review? Do you consider yourself to be an incredible salesperson, able to sell surfboards to nomads or ice to eskimos, and want to provide SN&R readers the best NEWS & REVIEW S I N E S S U S E O N LY in businesses, restaurants andB Unightclubs?

ART MIX

KNOCK ME A KISS

Charles Smith’s play takes place during the Harlem Renaissance, when W.E.B. Du Bois (Jerrold Jones) gathered a circle of influential, intellectual artists, writers and political activists around him—and insisted that his daughter, Yolande (Imani Mitchell) marry one of them: the poet Countee Cullen (James Townsend). Unfortunately, she was in love with another man, musician Jimmy Lunceford (DeAngelo Mack)—and Cullen? He was in love with another man as well. This well-done look at the politics of love and race in 20th-century America is directed by James Wheatley. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 10/14. $13-$15, $8 Thursdays. Celebration Arts, 4469 D St.; (916) 455-2787; www.celebrationarts.net. J.C.

2

Are you A true

TWITTAMENTARY

A wildly physical comedy set in the waiting room of a father-anddaughter psychiatric team is the recipe for a successful small and quirky comedy by local playwright Candace Adams. Millie Warren (patient Grace) has a streak of genius for physical comedy, not to mention a great deal of chemistry with Janet Motenko (the office manager, Colleen). Directed by Penny Kline, with a fine supporting cast. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 10/14. $15-$18. Ovation Stage at the Three Penny Theatre in the California Stage complex, 1723 R St.; (916) 448-0312; www.ovationstage.com. K.M.

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ENRON

It really doesn’t get much better than this pull-out-the-stops production of Lucy Prebble’s play about the rise and fall of the world’s least ethical company. Jonathan Rhys Williams is suitably skeezy as Jeffrey Skilling; Aaron Wilton is the boy blunder CFO, Andy Fastow; and Gary S. Martinez almost makes you think Ken Lay, the CEO, was just dumb—until you see the avarice in all its glory. With an incredible ensemble cast and Shannon Mahoney as Claudia Roe, a composite character, director Stephanie Gularte has whipped up an enraging, delightful contemporary piece. W 7pm; Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 10/21. $18-$38. Capital Stage, 2215 J St.; (916) 995-5464; www.capstage.org. M.M.

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SHOW TIMES VALID OCT 5 – OCT 11, 2012

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Seven little movies Stars in Shorts As anybody who’s made one or sat through several in a row can tell you, the short film is a tricky animal. Even in an era of webisodes and pithy by Jonathan Kiefer viral sensations, so many shorts still look too hollow or lumpily abbreviated, and the great ones—those marvels of narrative economy and pound-for-pound entertainment value—seem even harder to find. But that’s reason enough to keep looking, usually by rounding these tricky animals up into loosely unified herds. Seven little movies make

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5 EXCELLENT

up the Stars in Shorts anthology, which obeys that prudent film-biz mandate to stock one’s cast with well-known quantities. It’s uneven, as these things always are, but at least it’s commercial. The Procession, a 12-minute comedy, opens with a pile of cheeky pregnant pauses. And even one minute in, it feels too long. But that’s partly on purpose and plot appropriate: A woman (Lucy Punch) enlists her brother (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) and mother (Lily Tomlin) to attend the funeral for her friend, whom they never knew. Confined to their car and stuck in the procession, the reluctant mourners indulge themselves with a riffing dialogue duet, playing Tomlin’s complacent genius against Ferguson’s grating TVishness. Appropriately enough, the humor seems stop-and-go, but it gets close enough to closure, eventually. The actor Rupert Friend’s directorial debut Steve posits Colin Firth and Keira Knightley as apartment dwellers with peculiar circumstances, straining to be neighborly. It may inspire viewers of a certain disposition to pine nostalgically for their rangy student years of living too frugally, mounting occasional ever-so-clever one-act plays, and trying Irish accents for no good reason. It is schematic and writerish, and inevitably actorish, but narratively shapely, too, and having those fancy actors involved really does help. Like some X-Men origin story wedged into 25 oddly lollygagging minutes, the ostensible sci-fi thriller Prodigal just isn’t very thrilling.

Here, a man tries to protect his supernaturally gifted young daughter, deemed “a Darwinian quantum leap,” from nefarious special interests. And although judicious with its use of special effects, the movie wants to dwell in an ominous mood it hasn’t convincingly established. Along with Jennifer Morrison from House M.D., it also features Kenneth Branagh. Sometimes these things give off the deadening air of a famous person doing some family friend a favor. But sometimes their atmosphere is more enlivening, with the famous person seeming refreshed by a brief diversion. It is to Branagh’s credit that Prodigal suggests the former but becomes the latter. He’s definitely doing a favor to this mediocre material. Delicacy doesn’t come easily to the short-movie form, especially in the area of the soundtrack. Several of the works in this anthology have been coarsened by brash, hokey music—be it the obnoxious laugh cues of Steve and The Procession or Prodigal’s strenuously dramatic strains of Zimmer lite. Not Your Time, a musical satire of the entertainment industry starring Jason Alexander, does have a greater symphonic command, but not exactly a gentle touch. For all its cute bits and peppy production numbers, it still feels like a slog. Friend Request Pending, a sweet-natured glimpse of geriatric online dating, feels like an extracted sequence from some other full-length movie. This may be because it has Judi Dench doing a variation on the shtick she played in The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Also with a Tom Hiddleston cameo, it is at least shrewdly English: “His tweets are very good,” Dench observes of her cybersuitor. “They’re very witty. Better than Stephen Fry.”

It’s uneven, as these things always are, but at least it’s commercial. In After-School Special, written by Neil LaBute and directed by Jacob Chase, Sarah Paulson and Wes Bentley make purposely tentative small talk at an indoor playground. Being Neil LaBute, this plays out as an awkward encounter—but differently awkward than you might expect. There is only one LaBute, possibly because one is enough, but Stars in Shorts represents him twice. Sexting, which the man himself directs, supplies another example of the common setup-punchline structure, also with his keen playwright’s intuition about how to keep an audience compelled. Its theme is adultery, and its substance is Julia Stiles in an extended camera-facing monologue. This is a well-played piece, although here and there she seems to rush it. Or maybe that’s just the sense that movies often run long, but life is always short. Ω

by JONATHAN KIEFER & JIM LANE

2

Dredd 3D

4

End of Watch

In a post-apocalyptic future, where 800 million people lead marginal lives in what used to be the Northeastern United States, the only representatives of law and order are a small cadre of paramilitary “judges” apprehending perps and, when necessary, dispensing summary justice on the spot. Two such judges, the seasoned Dredd (Karl Urban) and the rookie psychic Anderson (Olivia Thirlby) find themselves trapped in a 200-story high-rise and hunted by a ruthless gang leader (Lena Headey). The 1980s sci-fi comic-book hero gets his second movie treatment (there was a Sylvester Stallone campfest in 1995), courtesy of writer Alex Garland and director Pete Travis. It’s suitably grimy and relentlessly violent. Urban does a fairly witty Dirty Harry impression, and the results will probably satisfy the comic’s remaining fans. J.L.

Two cops (Jake Gyllenhaal, Michael Peña) patrol the mean gang-ridden streets of South Central Los Angeles with courage and edgy gallows humor, even when a routine traffic stop nets a bonanza of cash, firearms and smuggled drugs, putting them on the hit list of a ruthless Mexican cartel. Writerdirector David Ayer adopts a found-footage style that’s become clichéd by now. But he uses it well, even abandoning it when necessary, and his movie has an intensity and immediacy that breathes new life into the conventions of the cop-buddy movie that serve as his basic template. Gyllenhaal and Peña have an effortless screen chemistry, which they share generously with Anna Kendrick and Natalie Martinez as their respective wives. David Harbour, Frank Grillo, America Ferrara and Cody Horn round out the excellent ensemble. J.L.

2

Hotel Transylvania

Dracula (voice by Adam Sandler) tries to protect his daughter Mavis (Selena Gomez) from the murderous human race by sheltering her in his secluded hotel for vacationing monsters. Then, one day, a hiker (Andy Samberg) wanders into the lobby, locks eyes with Mavis, and it’s love at first bat (of the eyes, that is). Just what the Cineplexes of America needed: another empty-calorie animated feature that might even lead to a series of sequels, vying with Ice Age and Madagascar for the title of Worst Cartoon Franchise Ever. Five writers (Peter Baynham, Robert Smigel, Todd Durham, Dan Hageman and Kevin Hageman) fail to come up with a real story or characters, just a parade of lame gags padding a passable seven-minute cartoon out to feature length. It’s inconsequential but harmless, like a box of gummy bears. J.L.

2

The Master

A World War II Navy vet who can’t adjust to peacetime (Joaquin Phoenix) falls under the spell of a charismatic charlatan (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a mix of self-help guru, snake-oil salesman and religious mystic. Writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson has a reputation for artistry despite (or because of) his modest output of six features in 24 years. His admirers will no doubt find this one profoundly poetic, but at 137 solemnly lumbering minutes, it’s actually a windy bore, an attractively wrapped but thick and indigestible slab of baloney. Phoenix plays an ex-sailor with anger management issues by giving—I am not making this up—an impression of Popeye: That’s the level of profundity on display. There’s a charlatan at work here, all right, but it’s not Hoffman’s character, it’s Paul Thomas Anderson. J.L.

2

ParaNorman

A timid, bookish kid (voice by Kodi Smit-McPhee), bullied at school and punished at home because he talks to ghosts, tries to save his town from a witch’s curse dating back 300 years, his mission complicated by an invasion of zombies. Directors Chris Butler and Sam Fell dress Butler’s script up with a visually inventive mix of stop-motion puppet animation and CGI, aiming at the delicious creepiness of The Nightmare Before Christmas or Coraline, but evidently that sort of thing is harder to pull off than Tim Burton and Henry Selick make it look. Here the effect is not so much creepy as simply unpleasant, and Butler’s basic theme—be nice to people: Today’s schoolyard bully is tomorrow’s witch-hunting bigot—becomes as dreary and

This is the part where I break out into a song-and-dance number.

3

Looper

In the 2070s, organized crime controls time travel, using it to send people they want dead back 30 years to be offed and disposed of. The catch is that each assassin will someday have to kill his older self, thus “closing the loop.” When one such looper (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) tries to close his loop, the old boy he will be in 30 years (Bruce Willis) has some surprises up his sleeve. Director Rian Johnson’s script is a wildly convoluted ride. It plays as if he made it up as he went along, and it doesn’t always make sense, even on its own sci-fi terms. But the movie has an irresistible energy and a don’t-give-a-damn unpredictability that holds your attention and keeps you guessing. Emily Blunt plays a farmer caught in the crossfire, Jeff Daniels portrays a coldblooded gang lord and Paul Dano is a luckless fellow looper. J.L. preachy as a finger-shaking lecture from a purse-lipped school counselor. J.L.

3

Pitch Perfect

A college student (Anna Kendrick) is dragooned into a campus a capella singing group, where her experimental nature clashes with the conservative style of the group’s self-appointed leader (Anna Camp). Kay Cannon’s script (based, ever so loosely, on a book by Mickey Rapkin) parodies, by faithful imitation, the silly adolescent soap opera of Glee, with plenty of sly winks at the audience, congratulating them on having such a knowing postmodern sense of humor. Broadly directed by Jason Moore, the story grows tiresome before long; what redeems the movie is the musical numbers, energetically danced and sung, hopefully (but maybe not) in the actors’ own voices. (Oddly enough, though, Kendrick and Camp’s group doesn’t sing a capella at the climactic competition: It’s accompanied by an unseen percussionist.) J.L.

1

The Possession

A girl buys an odd little box at a yard sale that turns out to contain a dybbuk, a demon of Jewish folklore, who takes possession of her body, to the dismay of her divorced parents (Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Kyra Sedgwick). Juliet Snowden and Stiles White’s script is supposedly inspired by a Los Angeles Times article. The article (“A jinx in a Box?” by Leslie Gornstein; July 25, 2004) is easily available online, and even a cursory reading shows the movie up for what it is—a stale and shameless rip-off of The Exorcist, into which director Ole Bornedal manages to inject not one whit of scares or suspense. Sedgwick stands out (or rather, sticks out) in a largely unknown cast. Did she lose a bet? Blackmailed? Need the money? J.L.

3

Premium Rush

A Manhattan bicycle messenger with superhuman reflexes and no brakes (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) undertakes a delivery for the ex-roommate of his ex-girlfriend (Dania Ramirez)—but whatever he’s carrying is also sought by a menacing stranger (Michael Shannon), who turns out to be a dirty cop with a gambling problem and poor impulse control. Director David Koepp (who co-wrote with John Kamps) takes an outlandish and far-fetched premise, gussies it up with slow-mo, freeze-frames and a timeshifting narrative flow, and turns it into a lightning-paced, hyper-adrenalized entertainment. Koepp and Kamps add a Looney Tunes in-joke—the hero’s nickname is Wilee and he works for Road Runner Messenger Service—but they never explain why he (or anyone) would want to be identified with that hapless, incompetent coyote. J.L.

3

Trouble With the Curve

A veteran major-league-baseball scout (Clint Eastwood) clings to his job even as his eyesight fails; his concerned boss (John Goodman) turns to the man’s semi-estranged daughter (Amy Adams) to help get him through one more season. First-time writer Randy Brown’s screenplay is short on surprises but long on grist for its likeable stars (including Justin Timberlake as a romantic interest for Adams) and dislikeable villain (Matthew Lillard as a hotshot upstart in the team office, as smarmy as Jay Mohr in Jerry Maguire). Rookie director and Eastwood protégé Robert Lorenz keeps the amiable story humming along efficiently, and the result is an easy to take starvehicle entertainment, comfy and predictable as an old pair of shoes. Robert Patrick, Ed Lauter, Bob Gunton and George Wyner add to the familiarity. J.L.

3

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5

REEL

REVIEWS.

SACRAMENTO NEWS AND REVIEW

EVERY

THURSDAY 10/04 2 COL. ( 3.9” ) X 3.5” THURSDAY. ALL.SIS.1004.SNR

Jennifer Ty Olivia Rob Ashley Alicia Garner Burrell Wilde Corddry Greene Silverstone

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FRONTLINES

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Hugh Jackman

-HitFix

The Words

A would-be novelist (Bradley Cooper) finds a typescript in an old used briefcase and realizes it’s far better than anything he could ever write. Before he can stop himself, he passes the work off as his own and becomes a bestselling sensation—then the real author (Jeremy Irons) turns up. In a framing device, a famous novelist (Dennis Quaid) reads the tale of the young plagiarist aloud as his latest work, quickening the pulse of a young student (Olivia Wilde). Writer-directors Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal’s movie is one that stays with you, a more complicated “The Lady or the Tiger?” with stories-within-stories that provoke thoughtful questions and rumination. One of the meatiest movies of the year; beautifully written and well acted. Irons is a trifle miscast, but who cares? It’s Jeremy Irons. J.L.

FEATURE STORY

and

Won’t Back Down

-The Guardian

WRITTEN BY DIRECTED BY

Jason Micallef Jim Field Smith

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT

STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5 BEFORE

FS

#1

YOU’RE WELCOME, FILM GEEKS

A frustrated mother (Maggie Gyllenhaal) and a teacher on the brink of career burnout (Viola Davis) join forces to try to improve their school, battling administrative inertia and a hostile teachers’ union. The script by Brin Hill and director Daniel Barnz betrays their relative inexperience: The process the women are going through isn’t fully described at the outset, so it’s not always clear what they’re up against, and key scenes appear to be underdeveloped or missing altogether. But Gyllenhaal and Davis make a powerhouse team, and the movie pushes most of the right buttons (we can almost see the “Applause!” sign flashing in the corner of the screen). Oscar Isaac plays an ambivalent teacher (and sort-of love interest for Gyllenhaal), and Rosie Perez, Holly Hunter and Ving Rhames contribute strong cameos. J.L.

5

SACRAMENTO Crest Theatre (916) 44-CREST

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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SACRAMENTO CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES Crest Theatre (916) 44-CREST NO PASSES ACCEPTED

10.04.12

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6

(HED) p.e.

STEPCHILD - DAMAGE OVER TIME ARE WE HUMAN? - CALI BLUE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18

KUNGFUVAMPIRE

MARS - LOWER LEVEL - GFN & R3B AMERICAZ MOZT HAUNTED LIQUID ASSASSIN - MR. GREY - SIK MOB FREELANCE ASSASSINS

ThUrSdayS

rocK on live d KaraoKe ban acouStic rocK // 9pm // Free FrI 10/5

tribe oF the red horSe: horSe tribute miKe blanchard and the caliFornianS 9pm // $7

DEADLANDS

SaT 10/6

letoneS the map $5

FORCE OF HABIT - WINGS OF INNOCENCE END OF DAYS

8:30pm // TUES 10/9

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24

happy hour live muSic SerieS: dirt nap band

THE BASTARD SUNS KNOCKOUT - DON’T YOU FAKE IT TBA - LONELY AVENUE

5:30pm // Free

mic acouStic open // 8pm // Free

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27

talent ShowcaSe

HELMET & TOADIES

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2

PHOTO BY KAYLEIGH MCCOLLUM

live muSic

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1

THE MICHAEL SCHENKER GROUP

If you’re watching Island of Black and White and catch yourself smiling uncontrollably during the band’s set, not to worry—this is precisely the by Aaron Carnes reaction its members want. And while the band’s joyful music and engaging live shows have earned it regular gigs at the likes of bookstores and cafes, it’s hardly your standard background-coffeshopsoundtrack kinda act.

wEd 10/10

UME

HONOR SOCIETY - COSMONAUTS

Island of Black and White play hard for the money

neil young and crazy

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

ACTION ITEM

For a good time, call ...

9pm

ticKetS now on Sale For these upcoming shows at www.marilynsonk.com $3 TallbOy Pbr

CALIGATOR

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20

UFO

TS: UPCOMING EVEN almas desunda

abbey road: beatles tribute the ripoFFs halloween costume party poor man’s poison

908 K Street // 916.446.4361

++Free parking aFter 6pm with validation @ 10th & l garage+

Chris Haislet (left) and Nawal Alwareeth scored a great deal on cheap island travel.

Catch Island of Black and White on Saturday, October 6, at 7 p.m., no cover, at Elkhorn Saloon Country Bar & Grill, 18398 Old River Road in West Sacramento; (916) 371-2277; www.islandofblackand white.webs.com. PERFORMANCES BY:

Bell Boys • musical charis kepi ghoulie

42

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“I think what people really enjoy is that we bring something they’ve never seen before. How many times have you seen somebody playing the guitar [and] keyboard at the same time while using a talk box with an accordion, playing a Marshall Tucker Band song?” said Chris Haislet, the band’s lead singer and multi-instrumentalist. Call it pure, uncut entertainment. Island of Black and White formed in 2004 when Haislet and a friend used it as a means to travel and play when and wherever they felt like it. It wasn’t until 2008, however, when Nawal Alwareeth joined forces as the band’s manager (and, eventually, its drummer) that they started to take all this fun more seriously. Haislet’s friend eventually quit, leaving Haislet and Alwareeth at its core. Now, while Haislet amuses everyone by juggling instruments, singing and acting like a goof, Alwareeth backs him up on the drums, and the pair is often—although not always—accompanied by other musicians. Regardless of how many people are in the band on a particular night (the band

occasionally expands into a quartet), Haislet stays busy, jumping around and getting the crowd excited. Island of Black and White’s sound follows suit, switching seamlessly between a long list of genres that include reggae, classic rock, folk, funk, blues, country and just about anything else they feel like playing. “We really like all kinds of music. If you’re a country band, then you’re stuck always playing country. We left the option open to play whatever we want,” Haislet said. Though it might seem somewhat random, it’s not the musical styles that connect the band’s music—it’s the energy created, whether that’s through a reggae groove or folk-rock anthem. “If you’re having fun, then people are having fun. It goes both ways,” Haislet said. “It feeds off of each other.” Fun, in fact, is the band’s No. 1 goal, Haislet added. And it’s not just his energy that gets them there. The entire band engages the crowd with a wild spontaneity that reaches levels few bands are willing to reach—no small feat considering its performances often exceed three hours. “We’re not one of those bands that practices everything we do. [It’s] live, real, improvised [and] in the moment,” Alwareeth said. “When we’re up there, everything can change.” Indeed, while the band does plan out some sections and arrange certain vocal harmonies, the music can and does change at any time. Sections get cut short or switched around. Sometimes Haislet decides to play a solo for 10 minutes or, maybe, jump into an unplanned breakdown.

“We’renotoneofthose bandsthatpractices everythingwedo.[It’s] live,real,improvised [and]inthemoment.… Everythingcanchange.” Nawal Alwareeth drummer Island of Black and White Such an approach, Haislet said, keeps them in sync with the crowd. “We’re on the same page as the audience. They don’t know what’s coming next, but neither do we,” Haislet said.“We try to make it special. … You have to make it good. You got to make it different.” All that merriment is paying off. The band currently plays five nights a week. In short, it makes a living playing music and clowning around. “We take our music [seriously], “ Haislet said. “But we [also] take entertaining [seriously].” Ω

SOUND ADVICE

Brand management Anyway, in an email, Phillips said this approach is completely intentional. “I wanted to create something fairly hook-less, droning, with pop sensibility,” he wrote. “The vocals are beyond the point of feeling, embracing a sense of static that lies past emotion. “Too much melody in a voice too obviously portrays too much feeling.” I agree—to a degree. There’s certainly no lack of flagrant, superficial frontmen in modern music. But I think back to epic, loud, gloomy ’90s rock such as Ken Andrews and Failure and am reminded that ennui doesn’t always mean devoid of spirit. Anyway, Ess is forceful, thunderous and strange—and a reason to be excited about guitar music in the city. The record with the dick on the cover: Death Grips apparently is upset with its mother ship, Epic Records, who, according to the band, wanted to shelve its sophomore effort until 2013. So the trio declared that it would “leak” the release last Monday, October 1, at midnight. “The label will be hearing the album for the first time with you,” the band posted on Twitter. And, true to its word, a sextingesque photo of a pink, erect penis with the album title No Love Deep Web written on it in black marker appeared on the band’s website just before midnight. This was the new album’s art: Click on it and voilà, songs—13 of ’em. Tens of thousands proceeded to download and stream the record with the cock on the cover. But by noon on Monday, the band’s site was down. According to Pitchfork, band member Zach Hill said the label took the site down. Epic told Pitchfork they did nothing. Neither parties have returned my calls or emails this year, so I didn’t bother with any journalistic due diligence. I’ve heard the album, however, and will bother with a first impression: Each new Death Grips release increasingly rejects convention, melody, structure and the power of the beat. No Love is minimal, more confusing than angry, more distant than in your face. It feels more like a band relearning how it wants to do things—an exercise in self-importance—than three talented punks churning out a ripper. And that’s fine. Hopefully, No Love eventually portends something richer and more fun. Like how beating off leads to—you get the point.

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THINK FREE.

Chant we can believe in: “Specific brand” is a term I like to avoid. As in, “That wack deejay’s specific brand of witch house had me feeling like I’d smoked crack.” Or, “Her specific brand of down-for-the-count freak folk was mistaken for epilepsy.” The genesis of the term and its accompanying showboaty taxonomies and arcane classifications can be blamed on us critics. We can’t help but feign clever or reduce even the music we love to playful sonic stereotypes. When it comes to communicating what a band sounds like, the pigeon’s hole is often the only way to the light. So it goes with local songwriter Jesse Phillips and his new band, Ess, who played Midtown’s The Press Club last week. Phillips has more than five years under his belt as a local folk artist. But while his new and promising group incites interest, it also perplexes. It’s a very specific brand of curious-but-enchanting post-wave doom metal. The band—Phillips sings and also slings the axes with Josh Ahlansberg and Karlos Ayala, Matt Maxwell on bass, and Justin Gonzales on drums—ultimately is in store for good kismet. And I like that the band firmly embraces the rule of thumb that, if you’re going to play slow and moody rock, you must play it loud as all hell. Phillips and Co. unleashed a wave of feedback throughout the Press last Wednesday before breaking into their 30-ish minute set. Most of the night’s tracks come from Ess’ self-titled debut, which was recorded in March and can be heard for free on Bandcamp (http://essmusic.bandcamp.com). The five-piece’s live show is a juxtaposition of humdrum and bravado. A song such as “Woke at Night” drives forward with pulsing, grinding guitar and bass before segueing into star-spangled choruses and dour pauses. It’s earsplitting, dynamic, awesome. But Phillips’ vocals—a muted and throaty baritone that somewhat resembles Gregorian chanting, or the singing from Eyes Wide Shut’s orgy scene—come off as too dreary. It’s not a deal breaker, but it’s definitely a bit much at times. Would it hurt to sing from the gut, let the diaphragm spark a melody? Or a roar? Then again, the style grows on you. As, I suppose, chanting is prone to do. (Is that brainwashing or just Zen?)

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FRONTLINES

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—Nick Miller

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FEATURE

STORY

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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10.04.12

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SN&R

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43

04THURS

05FRI

05FRI

05FRI

Nick Lowe

NorCal NoiseFest

Isaac Bear

Sans Sobriety

24th Street Theatre, 8 p.m., $35

Nick Lowe is best known as the guy who sang  “Cruel to Be Kind”—or a talented producer  and collaborator with Elvis Costello, the  POP Pretenders and the Damned. Lowe’s  extensive singer-songwriter catalog  reveals a man so deeply steeped in pop, punk  and country, it’s no wonder he’s considered  something of a musician’s musician. Take  a sweep through any of Lowe’s seminal  records (1979’s Labour of Lust is a crucial  starting point) and reflect upon his inarguable influence upon the likes of Tom Petty,  the Minus 5 and Wilco. Fun fact: Lowe was  once married to Carlene Carter and often  collaborated with her stepfather, the Man in  Black. 2791 24th Street,   http://nicklowe.com.

—Rachel Leibrock

Luna’s Café & Juice Bar, 7 p.m., $10

Repent at the 16th annual NorCal NoiseFest,  and you’ll be purged of pedestrian pop  rhythm and tempo. The longest-running  festival of its kind, NoiseFest has become  a Sacramento institution for unusual and  nontraditional elements of noise, experimental music and outside-sound art. The  three-day experience begins Friday at  Luna’s, continues Saturday afternoon at Sol  Collective (2574 21st Street), and wraps up  Sunday at Bows & Arrows (1815 19th Street).  Tickets can be purchased for $10 at the  NOISE door each day, but a “full membership” pass ($40) gets you in on all  the action, plus a sticker, T-shirt, CD and  brunch at Bows & Arrows. 1414 16th Street,  www.norcalnoisefest.com.

—Julianna Boggs

Blue Lamp, 8 p.m., $7

If you’ve ever wanted to hear bands  nominated for a Sammie perform live—in  particular, rock bands—here’s your chance.  This show at the Blue Lamp features nominees galore: Terra Ferno (Hard Rock), Savi0r  (Hardcore/Industrial/Post-hardcore),  ROCK Isaac Bear (Funk, pictured) and In  the Silence (Metal; full disclosure:  SN&R’s Josh Burke is lead vocalist and a guitarist in this  quartet). The lineup’s billed as  an “unofficial” Sammies showcase, but don’t  let that sway you. These bands all rocked  long before they were nominated. And make  sure not to miss the official Sammies Party  and Awards Show at Ace of Spades (1417 R  Street) on Friday, October 12. 1400 Alhambra  Boulevard, www.sammies.com. 

Old Ironsides, 9 p.m., $5

There are many bands in Sacramento of  various genres that have been kicking out  the jams since the ’80s, including the punk  group 7Seconds and the rootsy dance band  Mumbo Gumbo. Even post-hardcore threepiece Sans Sobriety, originally hailing from  North Carolina, still finds itself performing  after first forming in ’89. Now residing in  the City of Trees, these veteran musicians—combining traces of metal, punk and  hardcore—will perform with bands such as  the Left Hand, A  POST-HARDCORE Single Second and  Marsyas Complex. 1901 10th Street,   www.facebook.com/sanssobriety.

—Steph Rodriguez

—Jonathan Mendick

Proudly Presents:

Billy joe

shaver the original outlaw w/ BoB woods & swampBilly

saturday, oct 13 auBurn event Center

tickets available at: the Beat, all Dimples, Cherry records, Clock tower records, yabobo & tribal weaver www.billyjoeshaver.eventbrite.com www.Keepsmilingpromotions.com $20 advance / $25 Day of show

saturday, november 1 Great american Taxi saturday, november 10 Chris webster & Nina Gerber saturday, December 1 New Riders of the purple sage www.KEEPSMILINPROMOTIONS.com

44   |   SN&R   |    10.04.12

06SAT

06SAT

06SAT

10WED

Drive-Thru Mystics

The Lipstick Weekender

Roger Clyne

Stanley Clarke Trio

Midtown Village Cafe, 8 p.m., $5

Old Ironsides, 9:30 p.m., $5-$7

Filmmaker John Waters used to make fun of  the whole swinging-’60s, Summer of Lovedruggie thing. He loved the polar opposite of  that whole era’s values: trash and innapropriate humor. The band Drive-Thru Mystics  play trippy, acid-soaked ’60s psychedelic  rock as though it were reinterpreted by  Waters, tongue firmly planted in cheek. It’s  Nuggets-compilation era garage rock for  the criminally insane, or at least someone  who appreciates the fun, campy side of the  criminally insane. Drive-Thru’s keyboardROCK ist Jess Goddèsse comes from the  legendary Bay Area trash-punk  band the Guttersluts, a troupe that could  have easily been cast in any of Waters’  films. 1827 I Street, www.facebook.com/ drivethrumystics.

Dingus McGee’s, 10 p.m., $20

You’ve tried uptight lipliner, sleazy lipgloss  and lip plumpers, but nothing fills the void  left by the recently suspended indie-music  DANCE night, Lipstick! The 12-year-old  dance party experienced a twomonth hiatus and, thanks to an onslaught of  comments urging DJ Shaun Slaughter (pictured) to bring the boogie back, it returns  with a vengeance as a monthly event that  grooves every first Saturday of the month.  In addition to Slaughter and DJ Roger Carpio  spinning their trademark indie rock, indie  pop and ’60s soul, The Lipstick Weekender  serves as a showcase for local electro-pop  band Doom Bird to debut new songs full of  lush, synthy sounds and psychedelic melodies. 1901 10th Street, www.facebook.com/ events/192761657495358.

—Aaron Carnes

Mondavi Center, 8 p.m., $12.50-$49

Roger Clyne got his start in the  Refreshments, famous for “Banditos” and  the King of the Hill theme song. His unsatisfying major-label experience prompted him to  go DIY with his next outfit, and he’s cultivated a grassroots fanbase ever since. Clyne’s  twangy Southwestern rock possesses a  lively, inebriated insouciance that suggests  tonight might last forever. The live show  reflects an energy and spirit like a graduaROCK tion party—even if it’s only from  Saturday night to Sunday morning.  This show has a slightly different flavor, with  just Clyne and longtime drummer Paul “P.H.”  Naffah celebrating Clyne’s tequila brand,  Mexican Moonshine. 14500 Musso Road in  Auburn, http://azpeacemakers.com.

—Chris Parker

—Mark Halverson

—Vanessa Labi

ACE OF SPADES FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5

J BOOG

HOT RAIN - SQUAREFIELD MASSIVE FINN THE GROOVAH & UNITED DISTRICTZ SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6

ZION-I

VOKAB KOMPANY - MINNESOTA - K-OTTIC

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

ALL AGES WELCOME!

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13

MORBID ANGEL DARK FUNERAL - GRAVE - SOMA RAS

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14

ABANDON ALL SHIPS FOR ALL THOSE SLEEPING - SKIP THE FOREPLAY UPON THE DAWNING - PALISADES

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16

OCEANO - WITHIN THE RUINS - THE PLOT IN YOU SURROUNDED BY MONSTERS - MERCHANTS - VANNA

THE CONSTELLATIONS

IWRESTLEDABEARONCE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10

STEVE VAI BEVERLY McCLELLAN

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12

SN&R’S 21ST ANNUAL

SAMMIES

Bassist Stanley Clarke is an imposing stage  presence, consummate showman, and  prolific film-score composer who infuses  his extensive jazz vocabulary with Latin and  rock inflections. Tall, lanky and constantly  JAZZ flashing infectious grins, Clarke  became a prominent 1970s jazz-fusion  pioneer as a member of Chick Corea’s Return  to Forever troupe and has since slapped,  popped, strummed and fingered his custom  electric basses in a variety of band configurations while developing an acoustic-bass  intimacy bordering on man-instrument erotica. His current trio includes keyboardist  Ruslan Sirota and former Forever drummer  Lenny White. 9399 Old Davis Road in Davis,  www.stanleyclarke.com.

ARDEN PARK ROOTS - AUTUMN SKY - THE BELL BOYS - JAMES CAVERN ELEMENTS BRASS BAND - INKDUP - SAM MIRANDA - MUSICAL CHARIS OVERWATCH - PROJECT 4 TREES - Z ROKK - AND MORE

MATISYAHU WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17

THE WORLD ALIVE & BORN OF OSIRIS NORMA JEAN - I THE BREATHER CROWN THE EMPIRE - INCREDIBLE ME

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

DEL THE FUNKY HOMOSAPIEN GIFT OF GAB - BUKUE ONE - SLEEPROCKERS TASK1NE - MAX BUNDLES - M THEORY

COMING

SOON

10/23 10/24 10/26 10/27 11/02 11/03 11/06 11/08 11/09 11/10 11/14 11/16 11/17 11/18 11/19 11/21 11/24 11/25 11/25 11/30 12/07 12/08 12/10 12/11 12/12 12/14 12/27

Motion City Soundtrack Alesana Death Angel Groundation Dance Gavin Dance Colt Ford Gwar Miss May I Blue October Some Fear None Minus The Bear The Faint Halestorm Pierce The Veil Woe, is Me Twiztid Trapt The Acacia Strain Veil Of Maya 7 Seconds Streetlight Manifesto Motionless in White NOFX Blood On The Dance Floor Never Shout Never The English Beat X (All Original Members)

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

10.04.12     |   SN&R     |   45

NIGHTBEAT

THURSDAY 10/4

FRIDAY 10/5

SATURDAY 10/6

BADLANDS

Tipsy Thursdays, Top 40 deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Fabulous and Gay Fridays, 9pm, call for cover

Sacramento Red Dress Party, 7pm-2am, Sin Sunday, 8pm, call for cover $40-$60

BLUE LAMP

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

THE WOMBATS, MORNING PARADE; 8:30pm, $13-$15

TERRA FERNO, IN THE SILENCE, SAVIOR, MAHTIE BUSH, CENTURY GOT BARS, ISAAC BEAR; 8pm, $7 DJ Los; 9pm, $5

THE BOARDWALK

T. CHRIS, DIZZY D, KALI STREETZ, LOUIS

ONE-EYED KING, FORCE MULTIPLIED, SALYTHIA, NO WHERE BUT UP; 8pm

(HED) P.E., STEPCHILD, DAMAGE OVER TIME, ARE WE HUMAN; 8pm, $17-$20

THE CAVE

3512 Stockton Blvd., (916) 267-7576

DWIGHT DICKINSON, THE WHEELS, NEW FANG; 8pm, $5

MODERN KICKS, CRAZY EYES, COLD HEART RE-PRESS; 8pm, $5

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

COWBOY JUNKIES, 8-11pm, $35-$40

LORRAINE GERVAIS, 8pm, $22-$25

LORRAINE GERVAIS, 7:30pm, $22-$25

JOHNNY MOJO, 8pm, $8

PATRICE WEBB, WILL MOREBECK, KATHY BARWICK; 7:30pm, $8-$10

MOUNT EERIE, BIOSEXUAL, BOUQUET; 8pm, $8-$10

DISTRICT 30

DJ Benji Lugo, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Dan Mijangos, 9pm, call for cover

ELKHORN SALOON

PUSH, 7pm, no cover

ISLAND OF BLACK AND WHITE, 7pm, no cover

COLD ESKIMO, JEN N’ GENERAL, LET’S GET LOST; 9pm-midnight, $5

AUTUMN SKY, BE BRAVE BOLD ROBOT, JUSTIN FARREN; 9pm-midnight, $5

DJ Smilez, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

THE LURK, COO COO BIRD; 10pm1:15am, no cover

2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 V, GOOD THOUGHTS, DRIZZA; 8pm

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481 1016 K St., (916) 737-5770 18398 Old River Rd., West Sacramento; (916) 371-2277

FOX & GOOSE

THE MIKE JUSTIS BAND, 8-11pm, no cover

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

G STREET WUNDERBAR 228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

Hey local bands!

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

SUNDAY 10/7

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/8-10/10 Mad Mondays, 9pm M; Latin video flair and Wii bowling, 7pm Tu

GENERATORS, UNION HEARTS, NUMBER RENO DIVORCE, KEVIN SECONDS; 9pm 13, COLD HEART RE-PRESS; 6pm M, $5; SOPHISTAFUNK, 8pm W, $8

Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; STEVE MCLANE, 8pm W, no cover

HARLOW’S

!!!, 8pm, $10

TAINTED LOVE, 10pm, $15

THE LUMINEERS, 8pm and 8pm Tu, W, call for cover

LEVEL UP FOOD & LOUNGE

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

DJ Rock Bottom and The Mookie DJ, 9pm, no cover

Hip-hop and R&B deejay dancing, 9:16pm Tu, no cover

MARILYN’S ON K

“Rock On” Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

THE TRIBE OF THE RED HORSE, 8pm, $7 OH THE BAND, 9pm, $7

MIDTOWN BARFLY

1119 21st St., (916) 549-2779

A benefit for breast cancer, w/ DJ Rue, 9pm-1am, $8-$12

Pure Evolution Fridays, 9pm-2am, $5-$7

MIX DOWNTOWN

DJ Billy Lane, 9pm, $10, free before 9pm DJ Elliot Estes, 9pm, $15

DJ Mike Moss, 9pm, $20

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN

MOONDROOL, E SQUARED, RACHEL LOMAX; 8:30pm, $5

KENNY REGO & THE LAW OF ONE BAND, AMBER LEE BAKER; 8:30pm, $5

TAO JIRIKI, EGG, HANS & THE HOT MESS; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz session, 8:30pm M; WOULD BE TRAIN ROBBERS, 8:30pm W, $5

OLD IRONSIDES

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504

Karaoke w/ Sac City Entertainment, 9pm, no cover

SINGLE SECOND, LEFT HAND, SANS SOBRIETY, MARYSAS COMPLEX; 9pm

Lipstick Weekender w/ DJs Shaun Slaughter & Roger Carpio, 9:30pm, $5

THE NUANCE, 7:30pm M; Karaoke w/ Sac; Open-mic, 8:30pm W, no cover

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

STALKING DISTANCE, NO BEATINGS FROM HOLLY, CAPITAL BASTARD; 9pm, $5

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693 2431 J St., (916) 448-8768 908 K St., (916) 446-4361

1531 L St., (916) 442-8899 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731

Swing dance lessons, 8pm Tu, $6; Salsa, Bachata and Merengue, 8:30pm W, $5 DJ Gabe Xavier, 9pm, call for cover

Open-mic comedy, 9pm, no cover

DJs Gabe Xavier & Peeti V, 8:30pm-2am W, $10

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

CELEBRATING OUR 20TH ANNIVERSARY ALL YEAR LONG!

VOTED BEST COMEDY CLUB BY THE SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW!

OCTOBER 4 & 7 Thu OcT 4 8pm $10

!!! CHK CHK CHK Fri Oct 5 10pm $15

TaINTED LOvE

Fri Oct 12 7pm $25

niCK Gravenites anD DaviD laflamme fri Oct 12 10pm $10

vibesquaD anD opiuo sat Oct 13 6:30pm $10

CruSh

sat oct 6 10pm $10

dahlak Cd releaSe Tue & Wed OcT 9 & 10

THE LuMINEERS

Sold out

Thu OcT 11 8pm $18 adv

saint vitus WeeDeater sourvein

WITH GuESTS WaLES & HEaDLINES sat Oct 13 10pm $10

Iconclast Robot WITH GuESTS GREYSPaCE wed Oct 17 8pm $15 adv

stRfKR WITH GuESTS ONuINu fri Oct 19 9pm $17.50 adv

tea leaf gReen the stone foxes

Coming Soon Oct 18 Sizzling Sirens Oct 20 Steelin’ Dan Oct 21 Savoy Brown Oct 23 Omar Rodriguez-Lopez Group Oct 24 Zach Deputy Oct 25 Trailer Park Troubadors Oct 26 Red Fang/Black Tusk Oct 27 Busdriver / Open Mic Eagle / Nocando Oct 29 Other Lives / Indians Oct 30 Storm Large Oct 31 Halloween w/ Zuhg & Massive Delicious Nov 2 Close To You: Carpenter’s Tribute Nov 2 Robert Glasper Nov 3 KRS 1 Nov 8 Saul Williams Nov 14 Brothers of Baladi Nov 19 Walk The Moon / Family Of The Year Dec 10 The Sword Dec 15 Corrosion Of Conformity (C.O.C.) / Yob

Dress CoDe enforCeD (Jeans are oK) • Call to reserve Dinner & Club tables

2708 J Street • Sacramento • 916.441.4693 • www.harlows.com 46

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SN&R

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10.04.12

RESTAURANT ss BAR BAR COMEDY COMEDY CLUB CLUB ss RESTAURANT

2 FOR 1 ADMISSION!! (WITH THIS AD)

THURSDAY 10/4

MIKE E. WINFIELD LIVE THURSDAY 10/5 - SATURDAY 10/7 FROM Z ROCK AND LOUIE!

BIG JAY OAKERSON ROB F. MARTINEZ, KIRK PAPPAS

WEDNESDAY 10/10

WILEY ROBERTS & FRIENDS THURSDAY 10/11 - SUNDAY 10/14 FROM AMERICAN COMIC AND WEEDS!

BRET ERNST

SAL CALANNI, JUSTIN HARRISON WEDNESDAY 10/17

TMI: AN EVENING OF OVERLY CONFESSIONAL COMEDY THURSDAY 10/18 - SUNDAY 10/21 FROM CHAPPELLE’S SHOW!

PAUL MOONEY

AIDA RODRIGUEZ, KEVIN MUNROE

WEDNESDAY 10/24

THE REAL (FUNNY) HOUSEWIVES OF RIO LINDA WEDNESDAY 10/31

BLACK OUT HALLOWEEN COMEDY SHOW

RODNEY PERRY, DANIEL DUGAR THURSDAY 11/1 - SUNDAY 11/4 WRITER FOR THE NEW IN LIVING COLOR!

IAN EDWARDS

DEAN DELRAY, CHAZZ HAWKINS

WEDNESDAY 11/7

SACRAMENTO COMEDY SHOWCASE

2 FREE TIX WITH THIS AD!

THURSDAY 11/8 - SUNDAY 11/11 WINNER OF LAST COMIC STANDING!

FELIPE ESPARZA

KIRK MCHENRY, MARCELLA ARGUELLO THURSDAY 11/15 - SATURDAY 11/17 WINNER OF LAST COMIC STANDING AND HOST OF EXCUSED!

ILIZA SHLESINGER JASON DOWNS, JOE TOBIN

;>0;;,9*647<5*/305,:(*‹-(*,)662*6473:(* WWW.PUNCHLINESAC.COM CALL CLUB FOR SHOWTIMES: (916) 925-5500 2100 ARDEN WAY sIN THE HOWE ‘BOUT ARDEN SHOPPING CENTER

2 DRINK MINIMUM. 18 & OVER. I.D. REQUIRED. TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CLUB BOX OFFICE WITH NO SERVICE

THURSDAY 10/4

FRIDAY 10/5

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

SATURDAY 10/6

SUNDAY 10/7

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/8-10/10

THE KERI CARR BAND, 8:30pm, $15

13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

THE PARK ULTRA LOUNGE

“Life of the Party” after party, 9pm-2am, DJ Peeti V, 9pm, $15 $15

1116 15th St., (916) 442-7222

PISTOL PETE’S

140 Harrison Ave., Auburn; (530) 885-5093

POWERHOUSE PUB

614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586

Asylum Downtown: Gothic, industrial, EBM dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

WHODUNNIT, 9pm, $5

BONEDRIVERS, 9pm, $5

FRED EAGLESMITH, 8pm, $15; WHISKEY DAWN, 10pm, $15

SUPERBAD, 10pm, $10

LOVE FOOL, 10pm, $10

COCO MONTOYA, 3pm, $10

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

Sunday Night Soul Party, 9pm, $5

SacFan meet-up, noon, call for cover

THE PRESS CLUB

2030 P St., (916) 444-7914

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, W, no cover

SHENANIGANS

Comedy Night and DJ Selekta Lou, 9pm, $5

SHINE

1400 E St., (916) 551-1400

Hi There: a stand-up comedy night, 8pm, TONY MEMMEL, GENE SMITH, $5 JACKSON GRIFFITH; 8pm, $5

WOLFHOUSE, THE YOUNG VINTAGE; 8pm, $5

SOL COLLECTIVE

Skratch Pad, 9pm, call for cover

UBERKUNST, BASTARD NOISE, CRANK STURGEON, +DOG+, XOME; 3pm, $10

705 J St., (916) 442-1268

2574 21st St., (916) 832-0916

SOPHIA’S THAI KITCHEN

RANDOM ABILADEZE, DJ Professor K; 10pm, $5

STONEY INN/ROCKIN RODEO

TOM DRINNON AND DEUCES WILD, 9pm, no cover

129 E St., Davis; (530) 758-4333

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023

Country Karaoke, 9pm M, call for cover; DJ Alazzawi, DJ Rigatony, 10pm Tu, $3

Alyssa Cox 2pm Sunday, no cover. Zuhg Life Store Indie folk

SPRAGGA BENZ, 9pm, call for cover

BOCA DO RIO, 10pm, $5

JAMES CAVERN, CENTURY GOT BARS, ERICA BURNETT; 8pm M, $5

BUSTER BLUE, BESO NEGRO; 9:30pm, $5 NORTHERN HEAT, 8pm, $5

SWABBIES

Open jazz jam w/ Jason Galbraith, 8pm Tu; Poetry With Legs, 7pm W

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Bluebird Lounge open-mic, 5pm Tu, no cover

Mick Martin and the Blues Rockers blues MR. DECEMBER, 3-7pm, $5 festival, 1-9pm, $10

5871 Garden Hwy, (916) 920-8088

TORCH CLUB

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

X TRIO, 5pm, no cover; THE 44S, 9pm, $6

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm, no cover; MR. DECEMBER, 9pm, $7

JOHNNY KNOX, 5pm, no cover; CON BRIO, 9pm, $7

TOWNHOUSE LOUNGE

Deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Record Club w/ DJ Roger, 9pm, $5, free before 10pm

Pop Freq w/ DJ XGVNR, 9pm, $5

1517 21st St., (916) 613-7194

Blues for Life breast cancer benefit, noon, $25-$30

BLUE OAKS, 9pm Tu, $4; Open-mic, 5:30pm W; CALIFORNIOS, 9pm W, $6 Open-mic, 9pm M, no cover; Eyewitness Wednesdays, 9pm W, no cover

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

J BOOG, HOT RAIN, FINN THE GROOVAH, UNITED DISTRICTZ; 6:30pm, $16

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300

ZION I, VOKAB KOMPANY, MINNESOTA, K-OTTIC; 7pm, $16

CLUB RETRO

CADENCE, CITADEL, EVERY HAND BETRAYED, SOUND THE SIRENS; 6pm

LUIGI’S SLICE AND FUN GARDEN

SAN FRANCESCA, SAM ELIOT & THE MARKET CLUB GANG; 8:30pm

ZUHG LIFE STORE

DEREK YAGER, CARLOS GUZMAN, HEIRBELLA; 1pm, no cover

1529 Eureka Rd., Roseville; (916) 988-6606 1050 20th St., (916) 552-0317

545 Downtown Plaza, Ste. 2090, (916) 822-518

IWRESTLEDABEARONCE, OCEANO, WITHIN THE RUINS, PLOT IN YOU; 5:30pm

STEVE VAI, BEVERLY MCCLELLAN; 7pm W, $32.50

ALYSSA COX, 2pm, no cover

ADRIAN BELLUE, 6pm, no cover

Mahtie Bush with Century Got Bars and DJ Los 9pm Saturday, $5. Blue Lamp Hip-hop

thanks for voting us

the best!

OMAR RODRIGUEZ LOPEZ

GUITARIST FROM THE MARS VOLTA

OCT 23 – HARLOWS

FREE ENTRY WITH THIS AD ON 10/4

THURS 10/4 - SAT 10/6

MARK G

with special guest ACE GUILLEN

SUN 10/7 - 7PM

SPECIAL EVENT BREAST CANCER SUPPORT FUNDRAISER

JAKE SHIMABUKURO

OCT 25 · SAC CITY COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Live Music in the Legends Lounge:

FRED EAGLESMITH 8PM WHISKE Y DOWN 10PM

SAVOY BROWN

COCO MONTOYA

ZACH DEPUT Y

CASH’D OUT

STORM LARGE

Saturday 10/6 at 3pm Road Test - No cover The Pickups - No cover Ellis Rodriquez DVD Release Party - $10

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FEATURE STORY

OCT 24 · HARLOWS

A TRIBUTE TO JOHNNY CASH OCT 11 · POWERHOUSE PUB

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: Laughsunlimited.com Call Club for showtimes, prices and reservation (916) 446-5905 • 446-8128 Two item minimum - 17 and over 1207 Front Street in Old Sacramento

FRONTLINES

OCT 21 · HARLOWS

OCT 7 · POWERHOUSE PUB

Wednesday 10/10 at 7pm

BEFORE

OCT 30 · FREEBORN HALL, UC DAVIS

OCT 4 · POWERHOUSE PUB

Sunday 10/7 at 4pm

2408 21st Street 916 457-1120 Tues-Fri 9am-6pm • Sat 10am-4pm sacramentobarbershop.com

NEEDTOBEATHE

featuring BRIAN DIAMOND $10

OCT 30 · HARLOWS

STEELIN’ DAN

CLOSE TO YOU

A TRIBUTE TO THE MUSIC OF STEELY DAN OCT 20 · HARLOWS

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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AFTER

A TRIBUTE TO THE CARPENTERS NOV 2 · HARLOWS

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10.04.12

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SN&R

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47

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Name calling Who comes up with all these weed names? I’ve seen strains called Charlie Sheen, Green Crack and even Girl Scout Cookies. —Blazed and Confused It’s kinda like apples: A Pink Lady apple tastes way different than a Fuji or a Granny Smith, but they are still apples. It’s the same for pot: Trainwreck and Romulan are both mari marijuana, but they taste different, and they have different effects. Back in the early days, cannabis mostly had a geographical designation. Think Acapulco Gold, BEALUM Panama Red, Afghani, or Matanuska Thunderfuck. by NGAIO As the cannabis industry shifted from importing grass to growing it domestically, the nomenclature changed to a more colorful and descriptive style: a s k420 @ ne wsreview.c om Champagne, Lambsbread, and White Widow were all popular strains in the ’90s. These days, names mostly tell you what a strain tastes like: Blueberry, Tangerine Kush, Bubblegum. Generally, naming a strain is left up to the grower. That’s how you get terrible names such as Green Crack. It’s a shame, because G.C. is one of my favorite strains to smoke, yet the names bug me to no end. Who in the world besides the Drug Enforcement Administration wants to compare marijuana to crack? That’s why a lot of clubs will call Green Crack something more innocuous, like Green Candy or just G.C. As for Charlie Sheen—good grief! Naming a strain after a crackhead TV star makes no sense, except as a way to bring bad publicity to cannabis dispensaries. In fact, strains called “Charlie Sheen” That’s how you get started popping up in clubs a few terrible names such days after the whole “Winning!” scandal broke. It takes at least seven as Green Crack. weeks for a plant to grow to maturity, and a few more to trim and cure, so it was pretty clear that this was just unscrupulous club owners renaming a strain that wasn’t selling very well. I’m on the fence about Girl Scout Cookies. It does taste like cookies, but, again, do we want to even give the hint of trying to associate weed with the Girl Scouts? (Insert some sort of brownie joke here.)

Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@ newsreview.com.

Help! My garden is full of caterpillars! What can I do? —Frustrated Farmer The first rule is always don’t panic. Pests this late in the harvest season present a particular challenge. You can’t firebomb the buggers with man-made chemicals, because no one wants to smoke cannabis that’s been dusted with junk like Avid (a super powerful bug killer linked to health issues in cannabis users). Using ladybugs and praying mantises would take too long, and plucking all the caterpillars by hand would be a herculean task. There are a few organic pest-control options. Sprays such as Ed Rosenthal’s Zero Tolerance Herbal Pesticide are Organic Materials Review Institute certified (www.omri. org) and safe to use up until a few days before harvest. When I talked to Ed about your problem, he said you could use Zero Tolerance, but you might want to look into the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, which you can find at any garden-supply center. It’s a naturally occurring bacterium that stops caterpillars in their tracks. When I asked Ed if there were any health concerns about Bacillus thuringiensis, he said, “Unless you are a caterpillar, Bacillus thuringiensis has no interest in you. You breathe in thousands of different bacterium in the span of a day, so you will be fine.” Good luck, and if you need any help trimming, call me. Ω

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by ROB BREZSNY

FOR THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 4, 2012

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “In a full heart there is room for everything,” said poet Antonio Porchia, “and in an empty heart there is room for nothing.” That’s an important idea for you to meditate on right now, Aries. The universe is conspiring for you to be visited by a tide of revelations about intimacy. And yet you won’t be available to get the full benefit of that tide unless your heart is as full as possible. Wouldn’t you love to be taught more about love and togetherness and collaboration?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): As I turn

inward and call forth psychic impressions of what’s ahead for you, I’m seeing mythic symbols like whoopee cushions, rubber chickens and pools of fake plastic vomit. I’m seeing popcorn shells that are stuck in your teeth and a dog that’s eating your homework and an alarm clock that doesn’t go off when it’s supposed to. But as I push further into the not-too-distant future, exploring the deeper archetypal levels, I’m also tuning into a vision of fireflies in an underground cavern. They’re lighting your way and leading you to a stash of treasure in a dusty corner.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “It was the

best of times, it was the worst of times.” That’s the opening sentence of Charles Dickens’ best-selling novel A Tale of Two Cities. The author was describing the period of the French Revolution in the late 18th century, but he could just as well have been talking about our time—or any other time, for that matter. Of course, many modern cynics reject the idea that our era is the best of times. They obsess on the idea that ours is the worst of all the worst times that have ever been. When your worried mind is in control of you, you may even think that thought yourself, Gemini. But in accordance with the current astrological omens, I challenge you to be a fiery rebel: Come up with at least five reasons why this is the best of times for you personally.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Art washes

away from the soul the dust of everyday life,” said Pablo Picasso. That’s certainly true for me. I can purify my system either by creating art myself or being in the presence of great art. How about you, Cancerian? What kinds of experiences cleanse you of the congested emotions that just naturally build up in all of us? What influences can you draw on to purge the repetitive thoughts that sometimes torment you? How do you go about making your imagination as fresh and free as a warm breeze on a sunny day? I urge you to make a study of all the things that work for you, and then use them to the max in the coming week.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Our culture pecu-

liarly honors the act of blaming, which it takes as the sign of virtue and intellect.” So said literary critic Lionel Trilling. Now I’m passing his idea on to you, Leo, just in time for the No-Blaming Season. Would you like to conjure up a surge of good karma for yourself? Then for the next 10 days or so, refrain from the urge to find fault. And do your best to politely neutralize that reflex in other people who are sharing your space, even if they love to hate the same political party or idiot fringe that you do. P.S.: For extra credit, engage in speech and activity that are antidotes to the blaming epidemic. (Hint: praise, exaltation, thanks.)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): One of the rea-

sons platinum is regarded as a precious metal is that it is so infrequently found in the Earth’s crust. A second reason is that there are difficulties in extracting it from the other metals it’s embedded in. You typically need 10 tons of ore to obtain 1 ounce of platinum. That’s a good metaphor for the work you have ahead of you, Virgo. The valuable resource you’re dreaming of is definitely worth your hard work, persistence and attention to detail. But to procure it, you’ll probably need the equivalent of several tons of those fine qualities.

told him that in fact Venus does emit enough light to be visible by day to a highly trained human eye. My prediction for you, Libra, is that in the coming months, you will make a metaphorically equivalent leap: You will become aware of and develop a relationship with some major presence that has been virtually undetectable. And I bet the first glimpse will come this week.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Whether or

not anyone has ever called you an “old soul” before, that term will suit you well in the coming months. A whole lot of wisdom will be ripening in you all at once. Past events that never quite made sense before will more clearly reveal the role they have played in your life’s master plan. Relatively unimportant desires you’ve harbored for a long time will fade away, while others that have been in the background—and more crucial to your ultimate happiness—will rise to prominence.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In

most of my horoscopes I tell you what you can do to make yourself feel good. I advise you on how can act with the highest integrity and get in touch with what you need to learn about. Now and then, though, I like to focus on how you can help other people feel good. I direct your attention to how you can inspire them to align with their highest integrity and get in touch with what they need to learn about. This is one of those times, Sagittarius. I’m hoping you have your own ideas about how to perform these services. Here are a few of my suggestions: Listen with compassionate receptivity to the people you care for. Describe to them what they’re like when they are at their best. Give them gifts they can use to activate their dormant potential.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If

you’ve ever watched tennis matches, you know that some players grunt when they smack the ball. Does that help them summon greater power? Maybe. But the more important issue is that it can mask the sound of the ball striking the racket, thereby making it harder for their opponents to guess the force and spin of the ball that will be headed toward them. The coming week would be an excellent time for you to hunt down a competitive advantage that’s comparable to this in your own field of endeavor.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Many

people seem to believe that all of America’s Christians are and have always been fundamentalists. But the truth is that at most 35 percent of the total are fundies, and their movement has only gotten cultural traction in the last 30 years. So then, why do their bizarre interpretations of the nature of reality get so much play? One reason is that they shout so loud and act so mean. Your upcoming assignment, Aquarius, is to do what you can to shift the focus from small-minded bullies to bighearted visionaries, whether that applies to the Christians in your sphere or any other influences. It’s time to shrink any tendency you might have to get involved with energy vampires. Instead, give your full attention and lend your vigorous clout to life-affirming intelligence.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): [Warning:

The following horoscope contains more than the usual dose of poetry.] Mirthful agitation! Surprising deliverance! I predict you will expose the effects of the smoke and mirrors, then find your way out of the labyrinth. Lucid irrationality! Deathless visions! I predict you will discover a secret you’d been hiding from yourself, then escape a dilemma you no longer need to struggle with. Mysterious blessings arriving from the frontiers! Refreshed fertility roused by a reborn dream! I predict you will begin to prepare a new power spot for your future use.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): While doing

research in South America four decades ago, anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss found an indigenous tribe whose people claimed they could see the planet Venus in the daytime. This seemed impossible to him. But he later consulted astronomers who

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

15 MINUTES

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FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

KEL MUNGER

The pen and the sword You might think that Japanese sword arts and contemporary American poetry have little in common. That means you need to read Mad Cursive, the latest collection from Sacramento State University professor of English Joshua McKinney, an accomplished fencer and swordsman. His third book Mad Cursive strikes out into new territory for the poet. It includes prose poems and it also has a series that he calls “the meme poems” that take their points of departure from the video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. No, it’s not what you expect poetry to do, but McKinney likes the unexpected.

What happens to poetry when you juxtapose it with the language of war? First, questions of violence arise. One of the things I was interested in exploring in this book was questions of violence in language itself. Violence in the martial arts is misunderstood in the West. I know a lot of people who say, “Oh, I’m so surprised you do that. You’re a poet and you’re scholarly, and you do this violent stuff.” They’re appalled. But really, for many, many centuries, even in Japan, the martial arts have not been concerned with a warfare application. It has to do with the spirit, with perfection of one’s self, with beauty, with making the body at one with motion and then unifying it with the mind.

Is there a connection between the formality of the Japanese sword arts and your writing? I see a physical connection with poetry— breath, the kinesis of actually pounding on a keyboard or writing on a pad—is an extension of the body as well. I think a lot of people forget about that these days. Formalists don’t, and that’s why I’m interested in formalism—not that I’m a formalist, but I’m very interested in them. One of my primary methods of composition—and this is evident in many of the untitled pieces in this book—is to write first in a form, particularly the curtal sonnet of Gerard Manley Hopkins, a little 11-line sonnet. Then I dismantle or rearrange the sonnet. This is an example of the kato, or the root martial-arts form, one practices—like shadowboxing. No matter how good you get at that, though, it’s never real combat. You have to be able to respond spontaneously. So, I use the form to generate the poem, and then I deviate from it in the ways I think will serve the poem best. There are limitations to the form, in other words.

What’s the deal with writing a completely different style of poetry in every book? It has to do, I think, with my aesthetic overall, my poetics. First of all, I’m not sure why someone would want to be too consistent in

BEFORE

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

their poetry. To me—and I kind of outlined my aesthetics in the preface to Mad Cursive—I operate with the idea that you have to be prepared for everything, if writing is analogous to combat—well, in the real world, that’s kind of silly, but I do think about it that way. There’s an old saying among swordsmen that the most dangerous opponent is the guy who doesn’t know anything about fencing, because you don’t know what he’s going to do. So we practice our fencing technique or our poetry technique, and sometimes we get good at it in a certain way, but we never try anything different. We lack spontaneity. And also—this is the most important aspect of it—for me, as a writer, I want to try something new. I want to be excited by the language. So, just as another extension of that martial analogy, I try to find new kinds of opponents, if you will, who do different things—things that I might not anticipate.

It’s the opposite of the specialist. I’ve always been interested in the Renaissance notion of sprezzatura, the courtier who made everything look easy. It’s a courtly Western knight as opposed to the samurai version of it. But the samurai, too, were lettered and were artists. The kanji in the background on the cover [of Mad Cursive] is bun bu ichi. “Writing,” “warfare” and the numeral 1: It |

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expresses the idea of unity in the martial arts between the pen and the sword.

Some poets write individual poems, some write series and some poets write a book at a time. What’s your process like? That’s an interesting question, considering this book. I tend to prefer discrete poems. Ah, the discrete poem! Where has it gone? The whole meme series was sort of a pissed-off reaction to what I think of as the contest-winning books—the concept-driven series of poems, a book at a time—where you have to read cover to cover to get an appreciation of the book. I wonder if that’s not some sort of poetic response to the novel or something. One of the things that I love about poetry is that I have a short little attention span, and I can read a poem the way I eat a bonbon. I don’t have to roast a pig. So [with the] meme series, I thought, “I’m going to hop on that bandwagon!” I just picked the quirkiest thing I could. My son had been playing a lot of Modern Warfare 2. I’d played some of it, and I was very interested in some of the things I saw going on there, socially and metaphorically, in that game. Then, the project, pretty quickly, became serious. Ω

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