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Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

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Volume 24, iSSue 09

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thurSday, June 14, 2012

Victoria has learned some things in the past 147 years. The art of toasting malts to perfection. Adding just enough hops to be intriguing but never bitter. And mastering the fine balance of rich taste and clean finish in a world-class Vienna-style lager. History awaits you in every pint of Victoria.

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INSIDE

Vo¬ume 24, Issue 09 | June 14, 2012

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

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Editor Melinda Welsh Managing Editor Nick Miller Senior Staff Writer Cosmo Garvin Arts & Culture Editor Rachel Leibrock Copy Editor Kyle Buis Associate Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Calendar Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Kel Munger Special Sections Editor Becca Costello Editorial Interns Jonathan Nathan, Kate Paloy, Matthew W. Urner, Amy Wong Contributors Sasha Abramsky, Gustavo Arellano, Rob Brezsny, Larry Dalton, Joey Garcia, Jeff Hudson, Eddie Jorgensen, Jonathan Kiefer, Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Ann Martin Rolke, Garrett McCord, John Phillips, Patti Roberts, Steph Rodriguez, Seth Sandronsky, Amy Yannello

FOOD STUFF

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Melissa Arendt, Brennan Collins, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Art Directors-at-large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising Consultants Rosemary Babich, Josh Burke, Vince Garcia, Dusty Hamilton, April Houser, Cathy Kleckner, Dave Nettles, Kelsi White Senior Inside Sales Consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services Coordinator Melissa Bernard Operations Manager Will Niespodzinski Client Publications Managing Editor Kendall Fields Sales Coordinators Shawn Barnum, Rachel Rosin Director of First Impressions Jeff Chinn Distribution Manager Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Nicholas Babcock, Walt Best, Daniel Bowen, Nina Castro, Jack Clifford, Robert Cvach, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Wendell Powell, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Lolu Sholotan, Tola Sholotan, Jack Thorne President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Manager Cassy Vaioleti-Matu Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Business Intern Carlos Zuluaga Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Sales Fax (916) 498-7910 Editorial Fax (916) 498-7920 Website www.newsreview.com

There’s no prize if you actually take all 99 of SN&R’s suggestions for maximizing summer 2012’s cool, but there will be satisfaction in knowing where all the good is in Sacto. And that has to be worth something, right? For instance, let’s say a friend asks about the best avocado popsicles, falconers or indoor surfing spots—because people bug you about stuff like that all the time, no? Lucky you, now answers will abound. And so, SN&R’s 2012 Summer Guide.

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BEFORE

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ARTS&CULTURE

SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

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Global evangelical leader Luis Palau, who has preached to 30 million people in 75 countries, will be coming to Sacramento this week. The preacher is often compared to Billy Graham; SN&R decided a conversation with Palau was in order. Also this week: Should Sacramento County crack down on an “underground economy”? Bites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 God, festivals and taxes . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Smokeout continues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Notes from the underground . . . . . . 15

NIGHT&DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Events Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Films français. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

DISH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Phaya Thai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 The V Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Dish Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Eat It and Reap. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Food Stuff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

ASK JOEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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SUMMER

GUIDE

STAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74

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The annual Sacramento French Film Festival goes down this weekend. We’d try to impress you with some kind of French phrase here, but just go ahead and check out this week’s calendar instead. Also this week: Greg Lucas turns up the heat at Phaya Thai, Jonathan Kiefer gives the thumbs up to Wes Anderson’s latest, and Nick Miller lays out all this summer’s music festivals in a tidy row.

Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Letter of the Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 First Shot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Poet’s Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

FRONTLINES

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FILM

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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At the Ballet III: Can’t Touch This . . . 74 Next to Normal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Now Playing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

Check out SN&R’s FREE searchable EVENTS calendar online at www.newsreview.com.

FILM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Moonrise Kingdom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Clips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

MUSIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Summer music festivals . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Sound Advice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Eight Gigs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Nightbeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

THE 420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 President Choom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

AFTER

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Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Adult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

AFTER

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06.14.12

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COVER DESIGN BY HAYLEY DOSHAY AND PRISCILLA GARCIA COVER PHOTO BY WES DAVIS COVER MODEL IS KARI SHIPMAN

SN&R

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STREETALK

Dresses make you look cute

Asked at a coffee shop on Exposition Boulevard:

Your ultimate summer outfit?

Eddie Roth

Angela Pickett

salesperson

A T-shirt and a baseball cap. Just comfortable and loose. I like loose cotton shirts so you don’t get too hot. It’s good when you’re driving around.

BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

teacher

I go for the casual here. It’s all about comfort, like pedal pushers—not too tight. Some kind of detail on the top of the outfit, and sandals or flip-flops. If you go somewhere fancy, a nice print on a summer dress. That’s how I go.

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SUMMER

Crystal Urech

Cassie Singh

housing worker

I feel so cliché, but maxi dresses. You can just put ’em on and go. They look great head-to-toe with just some flip-flops and maybe a necklace, but you don’t really need anything [else].

GUIDE

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paramedic

My ultimate summer outfit would be a summer dress. I have this pink summer dress with black underneath, with sandals. Dresses make you look cute.

A RT S & C U LT U R E

Terri Hansen

Robert Sharp

barista

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state worker

A swimsuit, by the water. A swimsuit and flip-flops, that’s it. That’s how I like to spend the summer.

AFTER

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06.14.12

A pair of shorts, flip-flops and a tank top. It’s perfect for summer, because it’s cool and you’re not exposing too much skin.

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SN&R

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LETTERS

Visit us at www.newsreview.com or email sactoletters @ newsreview.com

Dog rescue DIY

FIRST SHOT SN&R reader photo of the week PHOTO BY GINGER SMITH

Re “Frank’s wild year” by Cosmo Garvin (SN&R Bites, June 7): I’m sorry Frank was not one of the animals who made it alive out of an animal shelter. But with 1,000 animals coming into the [City of Sacramento Animal Care Services] Front Street shelter every month, not all get placed for adoption. Yes, this dog may have done well at your home for the short time you had it, but the shelter staff can’t take each animal home in order to evaluate it. They do the best they can with minimal staff, not enough money and too many animals. Too bad you had to lie to your kids about the shelter not “killing dogs.” Everyone needs to know how many abandoned dogs there are in this city and how there are not LETTER OF enough homes for them all. Maybe instead of criticizing the shelter, THE WEEK the Bites family could volunteer at the shelter and help dogs get “forever homes.” They might also have rehomed Frank themselves, following this advice: If you want something done a certain way, just do it yourself. Laura Warner Sacramento

One-sided war

Just clarifying

Re “Parking wars, again” by Nick Miller (SN&R Frontlines, June 7): I object to SN&R saying “Midtown residents” want to extend residential parking hours. In this case, “Midtown residents” refers to [those quoted in the article]: Dale Kooyman, Vito Sgromo and Karen Jacques. The majority of Midtown residents are not pushing for change and certainly do not want more restricted parking hours. The restricted-parking issue has been put to a vote in Midtown twice, and twice it has been soundly defeated. It’s time to move on to more important issues such as the homeless, loss of police and fireman, garbage pickup, etc. I’m sure I will now be ridiculed by the above-mentioned people. After all, they brought Midtown from the “slum” it used to be to a “destination,” and therefore, they are the only ones who really know what is right for everyone else. Unfortunately, they don’t want it to be a destination anymore— which is why they want to discourage “outsiders” from visiting Midtown. You can’t have it both ways, folks. People move to Midtown because they like city life and are willing to take the issues that come with it. Those who are unhappy might want to consider moving to the suburbs, where there is plenty of parking and few, if any, nighttime revelers.

Re “A Texas state of mind” by Rachel Leibrock (SN&R Popsmart, May 31): I spent most of my formative years in West Africa, where we were taught the Queen’s English, and so my understanding of one who claims to be “progressive and generally accepting of people with ‘different’ lifestyles and beliefs” would mean such a person would accept not only gays, minorities and pro-choicers, but also those with pro-life convictions (damn them, those “inglourious basterds,” for supporting the dignity of all human life!), the “ultra-conservative,” the “ultra-religious,” the “religious zealots,” the homophobes, racists, Christians, Republicans, those with a “fanatical reliance on the bible to prove a point” and the “waitresses who regularly bless you on God’s behalf.” My question, therefore, is this: Is my understanding flawed? Am I missing the boat, or did my teachers—God bless them—teach incorrectly?

Terry Reed Sacramento

Just sayin’ Re “A Texas state of mind” by Rachel Leibrock (SN&R Popsmart, May 31): If you dislike Texas so much, then stop going there. That’s the great thing about living in the United States. By the way, you complain about Texans being a bunch of homophobic, intolerant, racist bigots, yet, you let your own hypocritical bigotry fall out of your purse by condemning them for the beliefs they hold. I suggest you look in the mirror before talking smack about other people and the views they hold on the world. Just sayin’. M. Beasly Sacramento BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

Did you read that recent study about how staring at palm trees actually makes the body 5 degrees cooler? OK, so that’s a lie. Anyway, there are in fact palm trees in Sacto; these are near Fulton and Marconi avenues.

about things I heard, saw and experienced in central Texas. I’m still dealing with the culture shock of being back on the West Coast, but I couldn’t be happier being back where I obviously belong! I’m letting go of my Texas state of mind because it really does not work here, and it feels good to release the confusion. It’s very difficult to explain to people these leftover coping mechanisms that are lingering from my time spent in Texas, and this column has helped me so much in telling the tale. I, too, think Texas is a great place, but also feel it has quite a ways to go when it comes to tolerance, let alone outright acceptance of “others.” I’m really glad that I spent those four years in Austin, and I’m so grateful that I’ve returned to what feels like home, in so many ways. If I’m the only person who was deeply affected by Leibrock’s words, I can honestly say that what she did for this one person has been huge. Thank you. Muchas gracias!

Claire Obenson Roseville

Just gets it Re “A Texas state of mind” by Rachel Leibrock (SN&R Popsmart, May 31): This column was so perfect and timely for me. I’m a native Northern Californian by choice, though technically I was born in Corpus Christi, Texas. As a Navy brat, we moved on to California, Hawaii and back to California again over the years. Anyway, in May of 2008, I relocated to Austin, Texas, for four years, and now I’m back in Davis. I appreciated this column so much, because it validated how I felt while living in Texas (even in liberal Austin and Travis County), and how I feel now that I’m back in NorCal. I was never really comfortable there, though I definitely appreciated all the things that are great about the great state of Texas. Basically, I felt the same way Leibrock described, and now that I’m back in Davis, I know that I wasn’t just being overly sensitive |

SUMMER

GUIDE

Denise Leitzel Davis

the agreement with other candidates to run a clean election. James Sakauye Sacramento

... or two Re “No on 29” (SN&R Letters, May 24): Letter writer Carl Schwarzott urges you to vote “no” on Proposition 29 because if it passes, the state could lose up to $750 million in sales taxes due to fewer people buying cigarettes. Using this same line of logic, I would like to urge everyone to drink a quart of whiskey every day. That way we could help the state balance the budget. Dave Zierten Citrus Heights

POET’S CORNER The Golden Door

A last election thought ... Re “K.J.’s got no competition” (SN&R Letters, May 24): After reading this letter about the lack of competition for Mayor Kevin Johnson, it’s easy to see why the mayor did not sign |

A RT S & C U LT U R E

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Have a great photo? Email it to firstshot@ newsreview.com. Please include your full name and phone number. File size must not exceed 10 MB.

AFTER

A sparrow flew in to my view Broken wing slightly askew So fragile and timid, this I knew A broken heart will never do I imagined a golden door And like an eagle he did soar —Jim Cain

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06.14.12     |   SN&R     |   11

r

and der o

EDIT-

FRONTLINES GOD, & TAXES The voters shrug

F E S T I VA L S

This was supposed to be the election

where Kevin Johnson flexed his political muscle, and helped elect a council that would back him in building the “world-class” city he talks about so much. The voters’ response: “Wait, there was an by COSMO GARVIN election?” Johnson himself got 58 percent of the vote against a weak field—well more than he needed to avoid a run-off—but, then again, do you think 23 percent of voters even knew who Jonathan Rewers was? He got their votes anyway, just by not being Johnson. The mayor spent a jaw-dropping half-million dollars in campaign funds this election—though much of the money he raised he just funneled into his pet initiatives, like Greenwise and Think Big. Rewers by contrast spent just $1,669. Another way of looking at it: Rewers spent about 13 cents per vote to Johnson’s $15 per vote. So, what should we make of the big anti-K.J. vote? Well, if you look at similar elections in recent history, K.J. performed just as you might expect a big-money incumbent lacking a serious challenger to perform. In this case, the money advantage and the weakness of the field of challengers was pretty exaggerated. But the pattern is pretty much the same. In Heather Fargo’s 2004 re-election against Jonathan gas-station flower mogul Ross Relles and deputy attorney general Mark Soble, she drew 59 Rewers spent percent while Relles won 21 and Soble about 13 cents got 11. Leonard Padilla ran that year too, he got 8 percent. per vote to Joe Serna’s 1996 re-election was of Kevin the same type. He won 57 percent to his strongest rival, Jim Hastings at 23 Johnson’s $15 percent. There were a couple of alsoper vote. rans, including the perennial Padilla, who got 7 percent of the vote. With 58, 59 and 57 of the vote, should we conclude that all three of Sacramento’s recent elected mayors were more or less equally popular? Or rather, that elections follow certain models, with limited inputs and predictable outputs? Good for Misty Yaj coming in third in the Sacramento City Council District 2 (North Sacramento, Del Paso Heights) race—with all of 500 votes. There were more Misty Yaj signs in Del Paso Nuevo—the subdivision that Allen Warren built—than there were Allen Warren signs. Still, Warren will face Rob Kerth in a November run-off, and Bites can’t wait for those debates. Bites thought it would be Kim Mack somewhere in the top three, if only by force of personality. She was one of a handful of candidates who tried to channel voter anger over issues like redistricting and the strong-mayor proposal. Mack thought District 2 voters cared that the council had refused to put Kevin Johnson’s strong-mayor measure on the ballot. They did not, and she got less than 300 votes. And no matter how much fuss Jay Schenirer and Kevin Johnson made about the rape of Oak Park in last year’s redistricting battle—by Kevin McCarty and his council allies—the voters were unfazed. In fact, voters around UC Med Center (“stolen” from Oak Park and Schenirer’s District 5, you’ll recall) voted overwhelmingly for McCarty in his District 6 election to city council and strongly against Kevin Johnson in his. Likewise, in District 4 (Land Park, Midtown, downtown) Phyllis Newton, the business candidate The Sacramento Bee endorsed, also ran against the perceived “dysfunction” on the city council, and voters said “not interested,” advancing planning commission stalwart Joe Yee and mayor of Facebook Steve Hansen to the finals this fall. The mayor’s coattails came up short in District 8, too, where Betty Williams had an awful lot going for her. The pro-K.J. businessmen’s Better Sacramento PAC put out a wildly misleading attack piece against incumbent Bonnie Pannell. Williams had the mayor’s endorsement, in a district where the mayor is still pretty popular. But Pannell won—albeit more narrowly than she would have liked—because she’d actually done some things for the people of District 8. Crazy. Ω

12

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SN&R

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06.14.12

SN&R talks faith and politics with global evangelical leader Luis Palau on the eve of his visit to Sacramento Luis Palau, a global evangelical leader who has preached to 30 million people in 75 countries, will be coming to Sacramento June 16 to 17, as by Jeff vonKaenel host of a free festival at Cal Expo—one with a decidedly Christian bent. Often compared to jef fv@ Billy Graham, the preacher’s ministry includes newsreview.com regular international radio broadcasts in English and Spanish, a new book Changed by Faith, and “more than 1 million registered decisions for Jesus Christ.” A native of Argentina, Palau has spent the Full disclosure: Jeff vonKaenel is past many decades in Portland, Oregon, a place the president, CEO where he began Season of Service, a program and majority owner of the News & that has volunteers by the thousands—includReview newspa- ing in Sacramento—helping people in need. pers. On June 7, The SN&R decided a conversation with Palau SN&R published a was in order. paid advertising program for the Sacramento Festival With Luis Palau.

Jeff vonKaenel: Many of our readers do not regularly attend religious services and never have been to a religious festival. What should they expect at your upcoming Sacramento event? Luis Palau: When we started the festival model, one of my great dreams was to show that we are just normal citizens. We’re not a group hiding behind closed doors on Sunday morning—we are regular people who know how to enjoy ourselves, but who also take spiritual life seriously. So, there will be great sports and super events for the children and contemporary music and so on. We get serious about three-quarters of the way through with a serious message. We remind people that spiritual life also counts—that they should not just live in two dimensions, but live a full life. We always think of three dimensions, body, soul and spirit. So your audience, the ones you write for in Sacramento, are perhaps very involved in their physical conditioning and health and preventative medicine and all of that, and probably pretty well-read and educated and so on. But what we are addressing is the spiritual element that might be missing. Luis Palau.

If you could crystallize your spiritual message, what would that be? We would like to see a revival of spiritual intensity and a revival of thinking about God. We emphasize the importance of adding a spiritual component to life. I want people to think about their creator, to be reconciled to him and to begin to enjoy life to its fullest by knowing Jesus Christ, by settling the problem of evil and by walking with God in the exciting life that it is. I want to communicate that. …You can know God for yourself and you don’t become a religious extremist when you do. You have an audience of millions—between your radio broadcasts and events—in America and all over the world. Why are you now bringing the festival and your spiritual message to Sacramento? I feel that there is a need for a spiritual reawakening in America as a whole. But coming to Sacramento … well, the capital always had a grip on me. To me, as the old saying goes, “As goes Sacramento, so goes California; as goes California, so goes the United States,” and some of us—we’re international—so, “As goes America, so goes the world.” And it’s still a fact. But when you look at the society right now, the national mood is

Palau with a Florida festival crowd in 2003. Many compare the Argentina native to Billy Graham.

dark; the attitudes are sometimes almost demonic. Like we are trying to commit collective suicide as a nation, you know, the hatred, the insults, the mocking of each other. … We have gone way over the top as a nation, and I feel [we’ve] got to bring back the nation to a spiritual responsibility where we respect each other and use the word love. Not because we agree, but because we are people, you know? … We desperately need a change. And if the believers in Jesus can’t do it, then I am not sure who can. Let’s talk about the Season of Service. I’m very excited about that and impressed with the work you’re doing in Portland. Tell me about what your plans are in Sacramento. Well, in Sacramento it’s already been going on for about three months. They’ve already had about 200 projects—cleaning up schools, helping the homeless—all over the area. They have mobilized, with our encouragement, 20,000 volunteers, which is good.

“I think it is a bit of a mistake to think that evangelical Christians are all voting to the right all the time. There is a lot of debate going on internally.” Luis Palau In Sacramento? Yes, in Sacramento. And of the 420 or so participating churches, 200 projects are planned. Some of the churches double up, and they will work on a school project or a medical project or the dental-health issue. What encouraged me is that the large churches and the smaller churches have cooperated together, have connected with the mayor and the mayors of the surrounding towns, and, apparently, the reaction has been very good. The big ones like Bayside [of South Sacramento] and Lakeside and Capital Christian Center—they kind of lead the way, you know. It is isn’t like they didn’t do it before, but working together, I think, has a double impact. To see people doing practical things: fixing up schools, painting classrooms, helping single mothers who are homeless find a house, training high-school students in their BEFORE

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reading and their ability to graduate. This, apparently, is going on in Sacramento, and it is very exciting. Do you want the nonchurchgoers to join you in these projects? Absolutely. It isn’t a holier-than-though club. Also, the Season of Service is not a one-shot deal, the plan is to continue it for 20 years in Sacramento. The committee leaders are really involved and are looking at it as an event to hold every year. And we are committed to doing it and going to the city council and saying, “What do you need this year?” I have been on the Habitat for Humanity board for more than eight years, and I’ve met the families that we were building houses for. It’s very rewarding. But I always try to remember that while helping one person or family is gratifying, housing policies help thousands of people. And the same thing goes for hunger programs. Food stamps are reaching hundreds of thousands of people with help. One of the concerns that I have is that these programs are being cut drastically. Do Christians have an obligation to support government social programs and prevent those cutbacks from coming? Absolutely. And I think many churches are beginning to. You see, we started out with a very low threshold so as not to frighten people away. But the demands are never ending, of course. And now, with the cutbacks of all governments, Churches have been stepping up to the plate and saying, “OK, we have got to do even more.”

But what I fear is that we are going to work really hard to help the homeless and fix schools with Seasons of Service, but that the same people who do these good works are going to vote for politicians who take money out of social programs. Well, I know. And that’s an on-going aroundand-around problem. We are working with the rich in a quiet way. I was looking at what St. Paul says to those that are wealthy … he said command those who are rich in this present world, not to be arrogant, not to put their hope in wealth, but to put their hope in God, who richly provides us with everything for our enjoyment; command them to do good, to be

“When you look at the society right now, the national mood is dark; the attitudes are sometimes almost demonic. Like we are trying to So, with that obligation, one of the things that commit collective we are currently facing in America are proposals suicide as a nation.” that take almost a quarter-trillion dollars out of

social services, housing programs, food stamps and then give tax breaks to the rich! Yeah, we see that battle in [Washington,] D.C. I tell you, whenever I hear of it, I get a little tired; I can hardly watch TV anymore. I literally get on my knees and pray. Because I don’t see how, if I was a senator or congressman with low-income constituents, how would I handle it? And I tell you, I just pray for these people, because they have got decisions to make that will affect the future of America. And I really am urging the Christian leaders to—instead of pointing the finger and angrily accusing—write respectful letters and talk to their representatives. But also to just pray. I know it sounds esoteric, but I really believe it, you know? I believe from reading the Bible and looking at history that there is great power in praying for our elected officials that they will do the wise thing for the country, not for their re-election, not for egotistical purposes. And I really am urging pastors to do that in their churches. |

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Luis Palau rich in good deeds and to be generous and willing to share. In this way, they will share a big treasure for themselves and a foundation for the life that is to come, the life that is truly life. I’ve spent a lot of time with some rather well-off people, and many are eager to help. As for the politicians, I don’t have proposals for them. They meet with us and, you know, they listen. And it is easy to give advice, but they make the decisions. But we are trying, we are making an effort. … We are doing the spiritual awakening as well as the practical service. And I’m pleased by the way things are going. I think the churches in America have become far more involved and active and the younger generation of pastors are really committed to all this. Still, I am worried that if the Republican proposals are agreed on in this upcoming election—well, it’s going to be horrible. A RT S & C U LT U R E

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And I’m afraid that the very people coming to your event are helping put these people in office. What do we do about this? Well, I think it is a bit of a mistake to think that evangelical Christians are all voting to the right all the time. There is a lot of debate going on internally, and many people openly see the extremism—where acquiring wealth becomes and end in itself and basically becomes what the Bible attacks, which is greed and the love of money. I come from Argentina where dictators do whatever they want, and the voice of the people doesn’t count. In America, I’ve seen it all for 50 years, from [Presidents] Eisenhower to Kennedy to Nixon … the whole thing. And I’ve seen how the balance is kept with the two-party system and seems to work better than any other I’ve seen … it seems like we managed to keep the ship going in pretty good shape. So we need to not give up on the system; encourage people to really participate. What I’m personally hoping for is that in the Season of Service, people have the kind of experiences that will lend them to doing more … and thinking more. Saying, “OK, we need to increase our taxes to provide social services so that we can really solve these problems. We need a combination of government programs along with spiritual programs if we are going to solve these big problems.” Yes. I agree with you, and we are not there yet. We are progressing and moving forward as we get people involved, they begin to see what you see. But there was a period where everyone just said, “Every man for himself,” and I think people now are saying, “What can we do? Can we employ a few more people?” … That is being pushed quite heavily in the circles I move in, where people are really thinking seriously, as you were suggesting, not just doing a few charitable deeds and hoping for the best, but actually seeing some structural change. How far to go with taxation and so on? That is beyond me. Ω The Sacramento Festival With Luis Palau is June 16-17, at Cal Expo, 1600 Exposition Boulevard. Admission is free. For information, go to www.sacramentofestival.com.

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You’d freak out, too, if some two-dozen Drug Enforcement Agency officers showed up in your driveway. Which is what happened on by Monday morning, June 11, in just off El Nick Miller Camino Avenue in the parking lot of medicalnickam@ marijuana dispensary River City Phoenix. newsreview.com Agents prepped assault rifles and battering rams and fit into SWAT gear. And soon, they were ready for action. Just not at River City Phoenix. Instead of looting the club they geared up near, agents got back in their cars, drove a mile down the road and raided a different city dispensary: El Camino Wellness Center. The DEA may not have a sense of humor, but, apparently, the agency is not below messing with people. So went the latest action in the federal government’s nine-month-old cannabis-crackdown effort. Neighbors say the DEA backed a U-Haultype truck up to El Camino Wellness’ front door around 6 a.m. Officers executed a search warrant at the dispensary, and Sacramento police blocked off the driveway for crowd-control purposes. Simultaneous raids also occurred at the homes of El Camino Wellness Center executive directors. By 10 a.m., at least five medical-cannabis activists arrived to protest the raid. Neighbors, including Lou Fernandez, who owns a moving company next door on Connie Drive, was surprised. “They didn’t bother me,” he said. “A

YOU ARE HERE

lot of folks who went in there look like they needed [marijuana]. A lot of seniors.” El Camino Wellness had a lot of customers, period. All California dispensaries are required to operate not for profit, but sales data from the dispensary acquired by SN&R revealed gross receipts up to of $20,000 in a single day, with upward of 70 percent profit margin on cannabis. That said, running a dispensary isn’t cheap. There’s a 4 percent city tax, plus requirements to make property upgrades and purchase security. The latter costs might explain the precipitous drop in burglaries and assaults within 1,000 feet of El Camino Wellness since the club opened in September 2008, according to recent Sacramento Police Department crime data. A press release from El Camino Wellness Center on Monday night insisted the club was operating within the guidelines of the California attorney general, and reiterated a commitment to compassion, citing its free chiropractic, massage and counseling services. Dispensary ownership was unavailable for comment, as was the property’s landlord. Some protesters on Monday said the raid was simply retaliation. El Camino Wellness Center, along with cannabis patient Ryan Landers, sued the federal government back in November over its latest crackdown. A judge threw out the case in February. Ω

Freeze frames of Sacramento-area life

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Posthaste, pugs! They’re not the speediest of canines, but dozens of Sacramento pugs raced for the blue ribbon at this past weekend’s SPCA Doggy Dash pug races.

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N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY

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Notes from the underground

change your

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SOS’ heyday of anti-immigrant sentiment piqued in 1994, when voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition 187 but later was stomped by the courts. Rodrigues says the organization he unearthed from a shallow grave in 2009 is about 1,000-strong statewide. According to its online-discussion forum, however, membership is actually stuck at 788. “It’s down quite a bit from what we used to be,” Rodrigues conceded. As for his claims that Sacramentoarea day-labor sites are growing and drawing a criminal element to oncesafe, pale-skinned neighborhoods, he has no numbers to back that up. Worse yet, his anecdotal proof—a day-labor site at 47th Avenue and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard—is no longer bustling.

Don’t let the surname fool you—Davi Anthony Rodrigues isn’t the biggest fan of undocumented Mexican immigrants. But the decrease could also have to do with what a recent study by the Pew Hispanic Center found. The April report says the net migration flow from Mexico to the Unites States is at a historic standstill—and may be reversing, due to the improving Mexican economy, the United States’ stalled one and stiffer border security. Rodrigues isn’t convinced by the report and hopes supervisors will accept his premise that undocumented workers and neighborhood crime go hand in hand. The board of supervisors has set its own dodgy standard, meanwhile. Despite Rodrigues’ complete lack of supportive data (beyond a couple of grainy photos shot outside a Home Depot), getting an audience before county supervisors was no sweat. “Once you got to the right person, what goes after that is fairly simple,” Rodrigues said. “It’s a freespeech issue.” Ω

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There are places where one expects to hear torrid anti-immigrant sentiments— on right-wing talk radio and Fox by News, even in some armpits of Raheem F. Hosseini Placer County. But a scheduled hearing before the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors isn’t exactly one of them. Last Tuesday, supervisors provided a platform to Save Our State, a hot-blooded activist organization vehemently opposed to illegal immigration. The zombified (twice dead, twice resurrected) group’s current chairman, Davi Anthony Rodrigues of Rosemont, convinced Supervisor Don Nottoli’s office to let him pitch an ordinance intended to crack down on the hiring of undocumented day laborers. Rodrigues spoke to SN&R by phone the day before his group’s highprofile bid for local political sway. His claim isn’t entirely without merit. California’s income-tax gap was estimated at $6.5 billion in 2005, due in part to this nefarious-sounding “underground economy.” In 2009, the Employment Development Department assessed $17.9 million in unpaid payroll taxes, penalties and interest, and identified 4,092 previously unreported employees. Both figures dropped from the previous year. Rodrigues’ Sacramento County ordinance proposal would require businesses to display documentation proving compliance with state labor codes, and for day laborers to show documentation verifying they’re legally permitted to work. It also requires owners of property where day laborers gather to ensure the above provisions occur, and penalizes violators with up to $1,000 in fines and 10 days in county jail. But don’t let the surname fool you—Rodrigues isn’t the biggest fan of undocumented Mexican immigrants. He blames them for the deterioration of his parents’ south Sacramento neighborhood and the failure of his small business installing and stripping fixtures. “That underground economy that has taken hold has attracted so much of the underworld there,” he charged. Incorporated in 2004 by Southern California resident Joseph Turner,

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9 9 WAYS TO G UA R A N T E E A N EPIC SUMMER SN&R’S 2012 SUMMER GUIDE

is your 99-step instruction manual for maximizing good times. We bet you didn’t know your summer plans included falcons, blimps, meteor showers, zombies, bull riding, avocado popsicles, indoor surfing and basement punk shows. Just make this issue your official summer to-do list, and come Labor Day weekend, you’ll be looking back on the wildest summer you’ve ever spent in Sacramento. Jay-Z gives you 99 problems. SN&R gives you 99 solutions. Not that we’re saying SN&R is cooler than Jay-Z, but does he know where to find the best popsicles in the 916? Didn’t think so. —Becca Costello

beccac@newsreview.com

2012 SUMMER GUIDE STAFF: Becca Costello ART DIRECTORS: Hayley Doshay, Priscilla Garcia WEB: Joe Kakacek WRITERS: Kimberly Brown, Kyle Buis, Becca Costello, Lovelle Harris, Rachel Leibrock, Jonathan Mendick, Nick Miller, Kel Munger, Anthony Nathan, Kate Paloy, Shoka, Amy Wong COPY EDITORS: Kyle Buis, Shoka Shafiee EDITOR:

INSIDE:

21 FOOD & DRINK 35 NIGHTLIFE &

ENTERTAINMENT

45 HEALTH & BEAUTY 51 TRAVEL &

RECREATION

57 ARTS & FESTIVALS Juniper James blogger (www.juniperjames.com) Kari Shipman (right) and intern Connor Morgan model local styles from Good Stock Boutique, Freestyle Clothing Exchange and Heart Boutique.

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STILL “ STYLISH ” AFTER

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DAV E F E L D PAU S C H R E I N V E N TS T H E P O PS I C L E PARKED NEAR THE WATER FOUNTAIN at Cesar Chavez Plaza at the farmers market on a hot Wednesday afternoon, sits a humble beacon of cool treats: a white food cart festooned with an army of colorful ice lollies. A bespectacled, longhaired and mustachioed middle-aged man enthusiastically describes the cart’s contents to a first-time customer. “This is new this year, Snack on a Stick. It’s more substantial. … This one tastes just like an apple pie,” he says. The man is Dave Feldpausch, creator of DavePops. It is a rarity to find someone with such a passion for a seemingly simple ice pop. But his are not the standard frozen fruit juice on a stick. Instead, they are velvety and rich, like ice cream, though they are not made with dairy. In the late ’80s, Feldpausch began searching for a method to turn any food into the smooth consistency of a blended frozen banana. Years of experiments and ice-cream-making classes at UC Davis culminated in his invention of the Dublé process (patent pending), which resulted in DavePops. Feldpausch now spends four days a week in a Stockton facility making the dreamy little treats in a bevy of flavors: strawberry, mango mandarin orange, coconut flake, root beer, piña colada, mocha and mint chip to name a few. All of the pops are dairy free—except those containing chocolate chips. He even has a sugar-free version called LukePops. Most will only set you back 100 calories for a $3 pop. “They’re not empty calories, because the whole fruit is there,” Feldpausch says. You can pick up a luscious pop from the DavePops cart at its regular appearances at the farmers markets in Cesar Chavez Plaza on Wednesdays and McClatchy Park in Oak Park on Saturdays, and at the Carmichael Concerts in the Park (see http://carmichaelpark.com for dates). Feldpausch will also wheel the treats to private events—perfect for a summer family reunion, company picnic or even a wedding. http://davepops.com. S.

continued on PAGE 23

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Food &

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bivalves to the fleshy decadence of succulent spiny lobster meat, the menu is an everchanging symphony that marries the crystalline elegance of the raw bar with comfort foods like fish tacos and savory burgers. “I love cooking,” Lampkin says. “It’s all I know how to do.” The summer menu also promises an opus of delicate young vegetables with an occasional smattering of locally foraged morsels. Lampkin’s culinary partner-in-crime at Blackbird, chef Kevin O’Connor, has a fondness for showcasing ingredients that flourish in plain sight. This may show up on the menu in the form of edible flowers, wild fennel and herbs. Blackbird Kitchen & Bar, 1015 Ninth Street; (916) 498-9224; www.blackbird-kitchen.com. L.H.

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Food & continued from PAGE 23 EVERY FLAVOR 03 TRY OF HAGEN’S FREEZE Hagen’s Orange Freeze, an heir to the Sacramento freeze tradition started by Merlino’s Freeze, has evolved far beyond the classic orange flavor. The current flavor list includes more than a dozen options, including peppermint, root beer, blackberry, mango and mint chip—all made on-site daily. It could take a while to try them all, but you can always order two flavors per cup. The smallest size costs $2.78 and is big enough for two people to share. Hagen’s Orange Freeze, 2520 Walnut Avenue in Carmichael; (916) 489-7842. B.C.

A FAIR 04 DRINK AMOUNT OF WINE When most people think of drinks at the California State Fair, which runs July 12 to 29, they likely think of gallon-sized sugary sodas or plastic cups filled with watery Budweiser. Really, the fair’s grown up in recent years. Check out its lush beer and wine garden if you’re not convinced. Tucked away from the rides, baby animals and crispy fried heartattacks-on-a-stick, exists an impressive menu of of vintages and craft beers from breweries and wineries across California, Washington and Oregon. California State Fair, Cal Expo; 1600 Exposition Boulevard; www.bigfun.org. R.L.

05

SAVOR SQUASH BLOSSOMS

You don’t need to speak Spanish to know that Lalo’s Restaurant’s flor de calabaza quesadilla is just fancy talk for a delicious corn tortilla stuffed with squash blossoms, iceberg lettuce, crema and gooey cheese. It’s both satisfying comfort food and something deliciously unexpected. Bring $10 and wash it down with a fruity horchata and maybe a tostada on the side, and you’ll still have a considerable chunk of change left in your pocket. Lalo’s Restaurant, 5063 24th Street; (916) 736-2389. R.L.

06 MAINTAIN YOUR DIET WITH SOFT-SERVE

Roseville’s Baagan cafe makes softserve that is raw, vegan, sugar free and delicious. Seriously delicious. The cafe purees frozen bananas—and BEFORE

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only bananas—into a cool, creamy treat made to order and topped with your choice of yummy extras. We recommend the chocolate soft-serve with fresh strawberry sauce or the regular banana soft-serve with caramel made from agave nectar. At $3.47 per cup (plus extra for toppings) you can afford to make this low-calorie dessert your regular summertime reward. Baagan, 910 Pleasant Grove, Suite 160 in Roseville; (916) 771-2117, www.baagan.com. B.C.

07

FIRE UP THE GRILL AFTER HOURS

“Sactown is perfect for the midnight barbecue, because the weather is so comfy after being so brutal all day long.” —Christy Savage, producer of Trash Film Orgy

A JAPANESE 08 LEARN TEA CEREMONY Visit the 66th annual Japanese Food & Cultural Bazaar on August 11 and 12. A staple event since 1947, the two-day bazaar welcomes more than 40,000 people annually. Besides getting a taste of traditional Japanese food, there will be workshops on flower arranging, Odori (classical dancing), demonstrations of tea ceremony and taiko-drum performances. Japanese Food & Cultural Bazaar, Buddhist Church of Sacramento; 2401 Riverside Boulevard; (916) 446-0121, www.buddhistchurch.com. A.W.

09

GET YOUR TAKEOUT BUZZ ON

The pies at Hot City Pizza is in the 80th percentile, if you’re into grading pizza à la the SAT. And it’s garlicky, which is a plus in my book. But what puts this East Sac hole-inthe-wall over the top and into “A” territory is its remarkable draftand bottled-beer selection. Here’s the trick: Tell your spouse or partner or whoever has you chained down that you’re going to grab takeout and order the mojito pizza (mint, chicken, lime, garnish, duh!). Then stay for a couple pints while you wait. Be wowed by the Sculpin on draft, stay for the sours. Bonus tip: Sunday is IPA day, with $2 pints. Hot City Pizza, 5642 J Street; (916) 731-8888; www.hotcity-pizza.com. N.M.

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SUMMER

Mexican-style raspados de frutas are sweet and spicy. PHOTO BY WES DAVIS

10

SEASON FRUIT WITH SALT AND PEPPER

Along with a menu of hot food, Raspados de Frutas Naturales El Manantial offers an eclectic selection of cool desserts for the summer. Raspados de frutas refer to a shaved-ice dish with your choice of natural and sweet tropical-fruit toppings. Those accustomed to the taste of salted and peppered tropical fruits will enjoy escamochas, a blend of salt and Mexican chili powder with fruit such as diced pineapple, watermelon, mango, papaya and strawberry. Cuidado, this dish is not for weak stomachs. Raspados de Frutas Naturales El Manantial, 1620 W. Capitol Avenue in West Sacramento; (916) 376-0906; www.raspadoswest sacramento.com. J.M.

GUIDE

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TOAST MIDTOWN COCKTAIL WEEK

Pay homage to the bartenders and mixologists of our region at the fifth-annual Midtown Cocktail Week. For seven nights, August 12 through 19, designated bars and restaurants including Paragary’s Bar and Oven, Cosmo Cafe and Level Up Lounge will serve specialty cocktails. There will be bartending classes open to the public, as well as industry-only workshops. At the Mixology Competition, local bartenders will vie for the title of top cocktail creator. As home of the region’s signature White Linen cocktail, created by Rene Dominguez at Ella Dining Room & Bar in 2009, there is a reputation to uphold. Bragging rights don’t hurt, either. Midtown Cocktail Week, www.midtowncocktailweek.org. A.W.

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ACHIEVE VEGETARIAN NIRVANA

A few summers back, Andy Nguyen’s Nirvana Lemon Salad was my go-to lunch. It’s nothing fancy— just grilled vegetarian “beef” served atop a carrot and daikon slaw with mint, cilantro, crushed peanuts and a sesame-soy vinaigrette dressing— but the resulting salad seems transcendental. Light yet satisfying, it tastes as bright and tangy as a cool summer morning. What better way to take the heat off a scorching Sacramento lunch break? Andy Nguyen’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 2007 Broadway, (916) 736-1157, www.andynguyenvegetarian restaurant.com. R.L.

continued on PAGE 27

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NO

SUMMER’S BEST

WO

ICE CREAM THAT’S ALWAYS IN STYLE!

PEN

!

For over 65 years Sacramento has been preparing for all occasions with this handmade delight. So scoot on over for the delicious flavors of the season. Made-to-order sandwiches, ice-cream cakes and pies are always available at Burr’s and Vic’s.

SEASONAL FAVORITES:

Fresh Peach, Banana & Strawberry Ice Cream As well as Boysenberry Sherbet

3199 Riverside Blvd.

448-0892

BURR’S FOUNTAIN

Estelle’s Patisserie is a charming, warmly lit French bakery and espresso bar dedicated to quality and our Sacramento community. Estelle’s uses fresh, local ingredients to make our breakfast and lunch items Croissants, French macarons, tarts, breads, soups, sandwiches, and a full espresso menu. Wholesale orders, catering and delivery are also available. Please call or email for details.

4920 Folsom Blvd.

452-5516

Located at the corner of 9th and K in downtown Sacramento *Wi-Fi available Open M–F, 7am–6pm • Now open Saturdays 8am-5pm Contact us at (916) 551–1500 or via email at info@estellespatisserie.com

Willie’s Burgers

5050 Arden Way

488-5050

CELEBRATE SUMMER

WITH THE F L AVORS OF THE

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rethink family dining Father’s Day, June 17 Join us on the patio for delicious BBQ specials created just for dad!

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Catering Now Available! Call today to find out more about our newly launched catering and delivery service. Offering a quality, affordable catering menu that can be customized to fit your budget.

Try our Limited T ime Specials

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ROSEVILLE 1212 Galleria Blvd. s 916.771.9463 SACRAMENTO 1249 Howe Ave. s 916.922.6673

Open Daily for Lunch & Dinner

One coupon per visit per table. Minimum purchase urchase of $20 required excluding tax, tip or gratuity. g Must be presented at time of purchase. Not valid with any other offers or discounts. Unauthorized replication d internet i t t distribution, di t ib ti li ti or resale l is strictly prohibited. Not refundable or redeemable for cash. Not valid on banquet and group menus, alcohol, merchandise and purchase of gift cards. Offer must be surrendered upon redemption. VALID FOR DINE IN ONLY. Expires 7/29/12. LMP$5off

26   |   SN&R   |   06.14.12

1022 Second Street

916.441.2211

Ten22oldsac.com

Valet and validated parking available. Catering and delivery now available! Like us on Facebook and we’ll like you back with special offers!

Food &

GR

continued from PAGE 25

AN

D

OP

EN

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G

A S K E D AT T H E S AC R A M E N TO M U S I C F E ST I VA L

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GET THEE TO GUNTHER’S “I’m on my way to get some Gunther’s ice cream right now. I was going to get either cookies and cream or maybe just plain chocolate.” —Stephanie Ercolini, fundraiser for nonprofits

MOUTH WATERING CERTIFIED PREMIUM ANGUS STEAK Free Appetizer *

with purchase of two entrees

COOK OUTDOORS “I’m a chef myself, so I think of grillin’. Grilling all, all summer long. Steaks, hotdogs, hamburgers. Whatever I can get.” —Scott Howard, chef at The Ranch House in Yuba City

Just off I-5 Exit, exit Richards Blvd, left on Bercut Open Daily 11am-9pm • Sundays 12pm-8:30pm Happy Hours Daily 3pm-6pm • Sundays Happy Hour All Day 400 Bercut Drive • 916-441-3474 • GrillMastersSteakHouse.com Max Value: Lunch $5.95 Dinner $9.95. Must present coupon upon order. Not valid with any other discounts, offers or coupons. One coupon per table. Dine in only. Excludes holidays. Exp 6/31/12.

15

SAVE ROOM FOR BARBECUED SHELLFISH “My favorite foods at summertime are watermelon, pineapple and barbeque, and the [state] fair food and barbequed oysters.” —Christina Monaco, paralegal

16

DRINK SMOOTHIES FOR BREAKFAST “I am kinda on the healthy tip right now, so I like to eat organic fruits and vegetables throughout the summer and make smoothies for myself.” —Gabriel Limon, Bath Fitter trade-show representative

17

EAT DESSERT FOR DINNER “Dinner is popsicles in the summertime.” —Jodi Smith, alcohol and drug counselor

continued on PAGE 29 BEFORE

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Gourmet Cupcakes FOR

ANY

OCCASION!

Esther’s handcrafted cupcakes are baked fresh everyday with the finest ingredients! Perfect for weddings, showers, birthdays, & corporate events

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el patron Mexican grill 7753 roseville rd (916) 455–8945

28   |   SN&R   |   06.14.12

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Food &

WANTED Social Athletes from Sacramento

BOCCE BOWLING CORNHOLE FLOOR HOCKEY SOCCER ULTIMATE AND FRISBEE MORE! Sign-up for a Summer League $5 off with this ad code: SNRAD* Keep a close watch on your food at the dog-friendly Juno’s Kitchen & Delicatessen.

PHOTO BY WES DAVIS

continued from PAGE 27

18

GO BANANAS

Chiquita says the average American eats 27 pounds of bananas a year, but don’t let that stop you from squeezing in a few more at Sacramento’s annual Banana Festival. The event offers music and children’s activities, but the real appeal is the food. Journey beyond basic banana chips and breads to sample banana lumpias, taffy, pudding, burgers and even banana ice tea. Orange you glad you put the Banana Festival on your calendar? It’s on August 18 and 19. Banana Festival, William Land Park, 1401 Sutterville Road; (916) 320-9573; www.facebook.com/bananafestival. B.C.

19

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21

LEARN YOUR WINES

If you’re like me and don’t know the difference between a pinot noir and a chardonnay, a trip to Old Sugar Mill might be in order. Representing eight wineries, Old Sugar Mill brings a chance to educate your palate on a variety of vineyard flavors. It’s open seven days a week from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., so there’s no excuse not to drop by. Old Sugar Mill, 35265 Willow Avenue in Clarksburg; (916) 744-1615; www.oldsugarmill.com. K.Bu.

WITH YOUR DOG 22 DINE There’s no more perfect combination

Frankly, the idea of an avocado-lime popsicle didn’t seem very appetizing at first. Isn’t that just frozen guacamole? Then I remembered how much I love guacamole. When I actually tasted the avocado-and-Kaffir-lime popsicle, made by Fat Face gourmond Jaymes Luu and sold at Bows & Arrows, all bets were off. The combination takes the best elements of both ingredients—creamy avocado and tangy lime—and combines them in an icy treat that’s more refreshing than anything you’d put on tortilla chips. An absolute taste heaven! Bows & Arrows, 1815 19th Street; (916) 822-5668; www.bowscollective.com. R.L.

than an excellent meal with your most treasured companion: the dog. Juno’s Kitchen & Delicatessen offers sandwiches, burgers, main dishes and salads to fit the bill. Grab a bottle of wine or beer from a neighborhood shop, then swing by East Sac’s most relaxing, fourlegged-friend friendly dinner experience. The burger—tomato jam instead of sliced ones!— wins, as do the occasional specials. If the dog’s being cranky, grab something to go. Four paws up for Juno’s. Juno’s Kitchen & Delicatessen, 3675 J Street; (916) 456-4522; www.junoskitchen.com. N.M.

FRONTLINES

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SUMMER

GUIDE

OPEN W O N ! Featuring European & American Confections Including French Bombes Glaces

Also serving 20 flavors of Gunther’s Quality Ice Cream Sandwiches, Salads, Espresso Drinks, & Cold Beverages Catering & Custom orders welcome!

3020 H Street · Sacramento CA, 95816

Across from McKinley Park · In the McKinley Square Shopping Center

continued on PAGE 35 |

*Not good with other discounts. Exp 7/15/12

“Must have a Merlino’s Freeze when it gets hot. There is nothing better. Strawberry and orange are my favorites, but they’re all good.” —Edie Lambert, KCRA 3 News Anchor

LICK AN AVOCADO POPSICLE

BEFORE

Never too old to play ★ www.SacSportandSocial.com

BATTLE TRIPLE-DIGIT TEMPS WITH A MERLINO’S FREEZE

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be a hero EAT SHAWARMA

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30   |   SN&R   |   06.14.12

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06.14.12     |   SN&R     |   31

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32   |   SN&R   |   06.14.12 PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLOWING: AD SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES)

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06.14.12     |   SN&R     |   33

ANNIVERSARY 2012–13

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866.754.2787 (toll-free) 34   |   SN&R   |   06.14.12

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MariJo Andres takes to the waves at Surf Xtreme, the surfing and paintball facility owned by Chris (below, left) and Darla Parvizyar.

PHOTOS BY WILLIAM LEUNG

W H E N N I G H T FA L LS , S U R F X T R E M E S AC R A M E N TO TURNS UP THE MUSIC AND TURNS ON THE LASERS IMAGINE SURFING without the endless paddling, chilly water

or shark threats. Now add rock music and a laser light show playing on the waves as you ride. Project a movie above the water, just for fun. Surf until you get tired, and then grab a hot Nutella croissant and a cold beer at the cafe just a few feet away. What sounds like a dream sequence from a psychedelic Gidget sequel is actually the newest nighttime entertainment in Elk Grove. The recently opened Surf Xtreme Sacramento boasts an indoor FlowRider wave simulator, a trampoline room, a paintball court, a pro shop, and a beer and wine bar. The FlowRider is the real attraction, offering a new sport that has the illusion of surfing with the maneuverability and trick potential of snowboarding or skateboarding. New riders watch a five-minute-orientation video before their first session, and first-aid-certified wave attendants are there to help everyone get the hang of it. The entertainment complex is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., but the light show only happens at night. Surf Xtreme is the project of Chris and Darla Parvizyar. The couple relocated from Phoenix to reopen and expand the shortlived Dream Xtreme indoor-surfing facility, which closed in 2010.

BEFORE

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“In Elk Grove, there are so many families with children, but there’s not a lot to do,” Darla explains. “When kids get bored, they get in trouble. We have risked everything to bring this to the community for the kids.” The Parvizyars are raising three children (including a teenager and a toddler), which might make any married couple think twice about starting such a large business. But the Parvizyars insist their strong bond will see them through all challenges. “We are so proud of ourselves as a couple. We are best friends,” Darla says. Of course, it doesn’t hurt that Surf Xtreme is a great place for a family to blow off steam. “Oh, we play!” Darla says. “When I finally started body boarding, oh my God! What a rush! I wanted to fall more than I wanted to ride. It’s like riding a waterslide backwards. I felt all this euphoria and happiness.” Surf Xtreme Sacramento, 3443 Laguna Boulevard in Elk Grove; (916) 676-4747; www.sxsac.com. B.C.

continued on PAGE 36

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continued from PAGE 35

PHOTO BY WILLIAM LEUNG

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Dance instructor Kat Painter (right and below) keeps everyone’s boots in line at the Stoney Inn.

& Entertainment

Back Roads Productions proudly presents

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"5#&"65*'6-#-"$,0",3"/$)t-":50/7*--& Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) www.katewolfmusicfestival.com

24 STEP INTO COUNTRY LINE DANCING MODERN LINE DANCING originated out

Until last year, she was the bar’s only instructor. Now she’s joined by Kurt Senser, who won a world-champion title from the United Country Western Dance Council in 1997. Senser commutes to Sacramento from the East Bay twice a month to teach country two-step and West Coast swing, waltz, chacha, and cowboy swing—depending on what’s popular with the crowds. Senser believes line dancing is accessible and a great way of breaking the ice with dance. He recommends beginners take a workshop, because students get an hour and a half to learn dance steps and break down a dance. “You can get the basics in one lesson,� Senser says. At Stoney Inn, line-dance parties happen Wednesday through Sunday. There are free dance lessons before the open dancing on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, with a $5 cover charge after 9 p.m. Check Stoney’s online calendar for a dance-workshop schedule. Stoney Inn, 1320 Del Paso Boulevard; (916) 927-6024; www.stoneyinn.com. A.W.

of necessity. Women who didn’t have dance partners weren’t going to be wallflowers, so dances like the Charleston and line dancing evolved to accommodate singles. “Women on the sidelines kind of tapped their feet and moved along. ‌ A lot of guys got on the bandwagon, too,â€? says Kat Painter, the dance director at Stoney Inn, one of Sacramento’s most popular country linedancing spots. “You don’t have to go through the nervousness of asking someone to dance.â€? Located in north Sacramento, Stoney Inn is a magnet for line dancers from as far away as Woodland, Auburn, Lincoln, Fairfield and Modesto. The draw is the music: 60 percent country with dashes of Lady Gaga, ’NSync and ’80s rock music mixed in. Painter, a Sacramento State University graduate with a bachelor of arts in dance, has taught it all: jazz, ballet, African-Carribean, waltz, fox-trot and cha-cha. Country dance is where she started 14 years ago, and she’s been teaching bargoers to line dance at Stoney Inn since it opened in 2007.

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Michael Franti & Spearhead Yonder M ountain String

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& Entertainment

Will 2011’s zombie parade marchers have enough limbs left to walk in this year’s event?

PHOTO BY OSCAR BENJAMIN

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25

RIDE THE DOUBLE DARE IN THE DARK

It might get a little chilly when the Delta breeze blows through Golfland Sunsplash’s nighttime hours, but there’s no risk of sunburn, and everyone looks sexier in bikinis by twilight. The park’s evening hours run from 5:30 to 10 p.m. most nights from June 18 through August 31. It can get pretty crowded, so you’ll have to be patient to try the new freefall Double Dare waterslide under cover of darkness. Golfland Sunsplash, 1893 Taylor Road in Roseville; (916) 784-1273; www.golfland.com/roseville. B.C.

26

DANCE IN OUTDOOR AIR CONDITIONING

If variety is the spice of life, then Rocky’s 7440 Club is among the most piquant places to be this summer. A small but animated bar will satisfy your karaoke jones and pool-playing aspirations, and a trip outside will cover the rest. Random rules the backyard—complete with flat screens, disco balls and stripper poles. Heat up the dance floor while staying cool with outdoor (yes, outdoor) air conditioning. Fetch a BEFORE

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drink at one of two tiki huts. Get sporty at the beach volleyball court or feel special with bottle service at a VIP cabana or fire pit. The crowd is just as varied as the venue’s décor. It’s like an epic house party in a cliché coming-of-age movie that neither police nor parent can shut down. Rocky’s 7440 Club, 7440 Auburn Boulevard in Citrus Heights; http://rockys7440club.com. K.B.

27

MAKE YOUR SUMMER PLAYLIST

“I like to soundtrack the season. I’ll do this at least once every spring, summer, fall and winter for walks around Midtown. The summer has particularly reliable standbys: the Dead Kennedys, Madlib, Pavement, Yo La Tengo. For this year’s mix I’m adding new records by Beach House and the latest from Quantic featuring Alice Russell & the Combo Bárbaro.” —Nick Brunner, host of Capitol Public Radio’s Blue Dog Jam

TO 28 RETURN THE PAST The pleasure of gallivanting about in a Halloween costume is too many months away, but Folsom’s Reliving a Night in History: June 23, 1862 encourages slipping into into something a little more 1800s-like. Besides dressing the part of a pioneer, there

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are old-school activities to participate in: doll making, gold panning, storytelling and even a squaredancing exhibition. Tickets are $15-$35 for the event, which happens from 5:30 to 9 p.m. on June 23. Pioneer Village, 200 Wool Street in Folsom; (916) 985-2707; http://folsomhistorymuseum.org. S.

LAY ON THE GRASS, AND WATCH THE STARS COME OUT ONE BY ONE.

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AT THE 30 PARK DRIVE-IN MOVIES I can see why people think drive-in movies are a bit sketch. People sneak in contraband. They also fog

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up windows while partaking in other illicit activities. But consider this: My last trip to the drive-in was more classy than going to the local cinemadome or indie theater. I packed my own sundried tomato, pesto and garlic-cheese spread to go along with bread, crackers, fruit and vegetables. I also snuck in a bottle of pinot noir in a water bottle to make watching The Vow bearable. Needless to say, this summer’s crop of films could also be spruced up with the aforementioned picnic materials. West Wind Sacramento 6 Drive-In, 9616 Oates Drive; (916) 363-6572; www.westwinddriveins.com. J.M.

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A 32 TAME MECHANICAL BULL Load up on totchos and liquid courage, and take the mechanical bull by the horns at Bulls Restaurant & Bar, the Western bar incongruously located in the heart of downtown. Bonus money-making opportunity: The bar sometimes holds bikini bull-riding contests with $200 cash prizes. Men, we dare you to put down the scorecards and put on a two-piece. Sacramento Bulls Restaurant & Bar, 1330 H Street; (916) 235-8674; www.sacramentobulls.com. B.C.

YOUR DIRTY 33 SHOW DANCE MOVES

WALK WITH THE DEAD

Being as this is the summer of 2012, many have their speculations as to how this world is going to end. More than a few are hoping for a zombie apocalypse. For the rest of us who prefer to pretend, Sacramento’s annual Zombie Walk opens the 12th annual Trash Film Orgy cult-movie festival. The walk begins downtown on July 14, at 10 p.m. and winds up at the Crest Theatre for a midnight screening of Army of Darkness. There will also be a zombie shortfilm contest. Crest Theatre, 1013 K Street; www.trashfilmorgy.com. A.N.

DJ Hailey and DJ CrookOne’s regular Tuesday night throwdown at The Press Club, Fffreak!, is where the real ass-shakers get down. It’s a free dance night. The drinks ($2 tall cans and $3 shots) are as cheap as Midtown gets, and the tunes speak to a higher rhythm consciousness than—I’m gonna use the word— ultra-lounge fare. Same goes for DJ Larry Rodriguez (a.k.a. the Flower Vato) and his psychedelic day-ofthe-Lord dance party, which is also free, and also quite groovy. The

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GO TO

FOR Check out the Taste of the Bay Area and Wine Lands Lineups JUST ANNOUNCED!

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& Entertainment continued from PAGE 39 underground is alive, Sacto, and it has sweet moves. Fffreak! is every Tuesday, 9 p.m., no cover. The Flower Vato’s dance party is every Sunday, 9 p.m., no cover. The Press Club, 2030 P Street; (916) 444-7914. N.M.

HARDER 34 ROCK WITH JOAN JETT In her 30-plus years in music— whether playing with the Runaways or fronting her own band the Blackhearts—Joan Jett’s musical ethos has remained consistent: Play good, stripped-down rock ’n’ roll with a trashy glam vibe and plenty of attitude. Now in her 50s, Jett looks awesome and sounds as good as ever on classics such as “I Love Rock ’N Roll” and “Bad Reputation.” Jett performs July 27, at 8 p.m. at the California State Fair. Tickets are free with fair admission, but if you want to see up close just how tough, talented and fun Jett is, be sure to snag some Gold Circle tickets. Really, $22 isn’t too much to pay to witness a rock ’n’ roll legend. Cal Expo, 1600 Exposition Boulevard; www.bigfun.org. R.L.

35

TURN ON YOUR HEARTLIGHT

Ready for a rocking summer at Power Balance Pavilion? Don’t get your hopes up. After Sesame Street Live: Elmo Makes Music at the end of June, the venue is mostly dark until Neil Diamond brings his easygoing adult-contemporary groove to Sacramento on August 27. Diamond’s been at it since before some of your parents were born, but how can you miss a show by someone so moved by E.T. that he wrote “Heartlight”? Tickets are $52.50-$117.50. 1 Sports Parkway, www.ticketmaster.com. K. Bu.

36

GET A ROOM (FOR KARAOKE)

If you like your karaoke in a dark room instead of a bar packed with frat bros rapping “Baby Got Back,” then time to howl at the BlueMoon Cafe & Karaoke. The rates are reasonable—$20 an hour for a small room that can fit about five people, $45 an hour for the big room with 20 people—and the bill at the end of the night won’t include any additional-cost surprises, something disconcertingly common at most BEFORE

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karaoke spots. It serves beer (it’s pricey) and Hong Kong-style eats (cheaper) and stays open till 3 a.m. on weekends. Go croon “Love Shack,” and snarf some stinky tofu. BlueMoon Cafe & Karaoke, 5000 Freeport Boulevard, Suite A; (916) 706-2995. N.M.

37

READ FOR PRIZES

The Sacramento Public Library’s summer reading program is open to kids and adults this year. There are more than 500 free summer reading events at local branches, plus there are prizes on the line. Win tote bags, free books, Target gift cards and even an iPad! Register at your local branch or online and log your summer reading. The more you read, the greater your chances to win. www.saclibrary.org. B.C.

38 SET

UP

LAWN CHAIRS IN A PARKING LOT TO WATCH THE FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS AT CAL EXPO. 39

BELT IT OUT

“Go sing karaoke at On the Y [670 Fulton Avenue]. Coldest beer in town, retro rock and pinup posters abound, and Shay is a super fun host.” —Robert Berry, founder of Retrocrush

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Joan Jett rocks harder than a kid at the top of the Ferris wheel at the California State Fair.

OUT IN 40 ROCK A BASEMENT Picture walking down into a basement, the ceiling so low that Manute Bol might not make clearance. It’s like those old crusty punk basement show days—but in Davis, in a pizza shop, with a sound system a helluva lot doper than the beat-up PA you stole from your uncle. Luigi’s Slice’s sister location in the 530 also boasts a “fun garden”—an Italian term for a party area in the back of a bar or restaurant—and this fun garden

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR

puts on gigs. Jerry Perry has been known to book there, ditto KDVS and all the regulars. Find out more on the Luigi’s Slice Davis Facebook page. Luigi’s, 213 E Street in Davis; (530) 231-5177. N.M.

41

CHILL ON THE MOST POPULAR PATIO

Show up early at Sophia’s Thai Kitchen for some handmade crab wontons with plum sauce. Stick around—cold Chimay in hand—on the outdoor patio for Davis’ premier |

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outdoor summertime live-music experience. Period. You can get all friendly up in the front near the bands or lurk on tiptoe in the back. You can even sneak around to the back and relax and chat, but still remain in earshot. This month’s concert slate is packed, including the Davis Music Festival on June 23. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen, 129 E Street, Suite E in Davis; (530) 758-4333; www.sophiasthaikitchen.com. N.M.

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Kari Shipman shops local: jeans, necklace and ring by Heart Boutique; bandeau by Good Stock Boutique; and lace blouse by Freestyle Clothing Exchange.

J U N I P E R JA M E S B LO G G E R K A R I S H I P M A N STAG E S A N I N T E RV E N T I O N O N YO U R S U M M E R WA R D R O B E ALL RIGHT, SACTO, let’s not disappoint the city’s premier

fashion blogger. Burn your cargo shorts stat, bros. Who’s storing anything in those dumb, baggy pockets, anyway? And ladies, send your busted flip-flops and faded tank tops back to the hell they came from. It’s time to get sharp. Heed Kari Shipman’s advice:

And for dudes?

What do you like your man to wear?

Color as well! … For those brave enough to do so, mixing prints has become a popular trend as well. Just make sure they go well together.

Fitted pieces—not tight, but tailored—are always the most flattering, no matter his size or what the item. A guy who embraces his shape and personality in buying pieces that fit him well is always in style. And invest in a nice watch. It matters.

What trend should just go away and die?

A great summer hat option for girls is a sturdy floppy sun hat. It adds interest and drama to a simple running-around-town look, but is also versatile enough to stick in your beach bag or get a little dirty on your camping trip.

For the guys, it’s not a trend, it’s an unfortunate wardrobe staple: lose the long, frumpy cargo shorts. Please. For the girls, you can do better than flip-flops and tank tops. Throw a lace or sheer top over your tank to add volume and interest while still keeping cool. Layer a bright bandeau underneath a cutout top. For go-to easy shoes, opt for sandals instead.

What is the fashion trend of the summer?

Is there a style you wish would catch on?

I dig the hat you’re wearing on SN&R’s cover. I’m so tired of boring and trendy hats.

For girls, keep it bright and bold—color is major for summer. … If you need help deciding which colors are on trend right now, neons are at the top of the list. We’re also seeing a lot of vintage-inspired cuts and primary colors on dresses and swimwear. So chic.

Ascot ties or bow ties thrown into a casual look. Quirkynerdy is the new suave.

Who are the Sacto “trendsetters”? Loressa Hutchinson (www.lonsac.com); vintage-inspired adorableness by Skylar Mundy (www.skyelarkbirdy.com) and Mary Van Note (www.maryvannote.com/blog); cutouts, sheer tops and bandeaus by Tracy Mitchell (www.gooddayhoward.com) and Jennifer Beile (www.seekingstyleblog.wordpress.com). And there’s the girl who covers all the fashion-forward mavens and trends, Erin Sierchio (www.bowsandsparrows.com). www.juniperjames.com. N.M.

How do you like to dress?

Pairing distressed, embellished denim cutoffs with sheer tops, WEB Read a longer version of SN&R’s interview with Kari Shipman at www.newsreview.com. bandeaus and sandals. A lot of local designers are doing their EXTRA: own take on cutoffs, converting vintage high-waisted jeans, and the shops can barely keep them in stock.

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43

ACCESSORIZE SUN-KISSED SKIN WITH FREYA JEWELRY

WHEN PAMELA ANDERSON was deciding on a name

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for her new handmade jewelry, she knew she needed something that evoked her work’s hard, metal edges—as well as a sweet, more delicate aesthetic. “I am a huge fan of intermingling hard edges with soft, feminine lines,” Anderson says. The resulting name, Freya, reflected both sides.“I wanted something goddess-esque,” the 27-year-old Sacramento resident says. “Then I saw ‘Freya’ and looked up the description: a goddess princess warrior who is strong and beautiful and feminine and wearing an enchanted necklace.” Anderson’s jewelry, sold via her Etsy shop and locally at Bows & Arrows (1815 19th Street), looks like something an ancient goddess would don. There are dramatic statement necklaces and graceful, geometric earrings; chunky wrapped wire and stone rings; and artful, brightly beaded pieces with a boho-hippie ethos. Anderson, who studied pyschology in college and now works in real estate, began her venture into wearable art in January 2010, with a class at Sierra College that taught her the basics of jewelry metal work, welding and soldering.

“I had done really simple beading as child [and] friendship bracelets,” she says. “I’ve always wanted to do metal work, but I never imagined making the things I make now.” Anderson’s artistry belies her relative inexperience in the field. Her Riveted Mixed Metal Necklace ($38) cloaks the wearer with oversized tiers of hammered copper and antiqued brass. The Feather Silhouette Earrings ($55), made of horseshoe-shaped pieces of metal set against contrasting copper teardrop-shaped pieces, exude an industrial wood-nymph vibe that’s at once immensely wearable, yet runway ready. The making of each piece, Anderson says, can take anywhere from a few hours to, well, “forever.” “I’m a little bit of a perfectionist. It takes me longer than it should sometimes,” she admits. That’s OK, because each necklace, pair of earrings or ring is, at the time of its creation, her favorite thing in the world. “The piece I like the best is always the one I’m working on, designing and figuring out,” she says. “That’s always what I’m really enchanted with.” www.etsy.com/shop/freyajewelry. R.L.

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A 48 HAVE BLOCK PARTY

Summer fun can be harsh on the complexion, but an avocado mask will polish your skin right up. Take one half of an avocado, preferably purchased from your local farmers market. Mash it up with a teaspoon of local honey and a little warm water for a spreadable consistency. Apply to your freshly washed, damp face and chill like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at a day spa. Bonus points for cucumber slices over your eyes. Rinse off after 15 minutes, and go make guacamole out of the other avocado half. B.C.

Agoraphobes, keep the shades drawn. Everybody elseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially the fellasâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;listen up: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have to wear sunblock. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t invite sunburns and skin cancer into your summer because you find slathering cream on yourself emasculating. (Unless you consider chemotherapyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little side effect of impotence to be less emasculating. Thought so.) Whether using a cream or spray sunblock, here are a few guidelines: Use one with an SPF 30 or higher, apply it 30 minutes before sun exposure and reapply it every two hours. Find more info at the American Melanoma Foundation website. www.melanomafoundation.org/ prevention/facts.htm. S.

YOUR BIKE 46 FIX That old bike in your

DRIPPING 47 STOP I first discovered Quiksilverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quick-drying boardshorts somewhat accidentally. As an aspiring college-aged surfer, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d always wanted to purchase surfing legend Kelly Slaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite boardshorts (noted briefly in his memoir as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the ones with stars on themâ&#x20AC;?). After finally finding them online and ordering a pair, I now know why he liked them so much. As soon as youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out of the water, the shorts repel water and dry in less than five minutesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re wearing them. Though the shorts are quite expensive, the technology keeps you and your car dry when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re driving home from a day on the river. Priceless. www.quiksilver.com. J.M.

A MASSAGE 49 GET Indulge yourself with a truly affordable massage at the National Holistic Institute at the end of a long workweek. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only $25 for a 50-minute session. While you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a choice of your massage therapist in training or the method they will be using (either Swedish or shiatsu), the students are very friendly and trained to listen to your needs. Make sure to reserve a slot in advance online, as Saturdays fill up fast. National Holistic Institute, 1610 Arden Way, Suite 110; www.nhi.edu. K.Bu.

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STAY ACTIVE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My faves: roller-skating, reading in the shade, Yogurtagogo, sitting on a stoop in Midtown to people watch, trying the veggie dishes reviewed in the recent SN&R, enjoying other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pools, punk-rock aerobics!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jessica Zaker, Sac City Rollersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lipstick Librarian

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INCREASE YOUR FLEXIBILITY

Many yoga spots, including Zuda Yoga in Midtown and Folsom, offer a 10-days-for-$10 deal. Stop in as often as you want during a 10-day period and discover what your body can (or, in my case cannot) do. Feel refreshed and excited at the possibilities. In 10 days, will you be able to balance on your head? Or rest your shoulder blades against your ankles? Those are the challenges of Sacramento’s summer. Goodbye corpus vile, hello corpus sano. Zuda Yoga, 1515 19th Street; (916) 441-1267; 220 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 130 in Folsom; (916) 985-4428; www.zudayoga.com. N.M.

GET A FREE SAUNA TREATMENT WHILE SITTING IN YOUR CAR WAITING FOR THE AC TO KICK IN.

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TREAT YOUR TOES

Summer means flip-flops and airy sandals or, maybe, just running barefoot through the sprinklers. Whatever your foot fetish, make sure your toes are up to the challenge. You could go the total cheapie-quickie-pedicure route, or you could lay down a bit more green for a sweetly indulgent experience at The Pedicure Lounge. Tucked away just off of Broadway, this small but clean and well-stocked salon offers a luxe one-hour mani-pedi combo. BEFORE

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For $60 you get a quick 15-minute manicure followed by a luxurious 45-minute pedicure. Your feet will look fresh, pretty and ready to take on surf, sun and even hot pavement. The Pedicure Lounge, 2416 18th Street; (916) 444-2590. R.L.

YOUR 54 PROTECT DOG’S PAWS Don’t forget to take extra care when exercising your dog in the summertime. Noon asphalt can burn tender paws, so schedule walks in the mornings and early evenings when sidewalks are cooler. Bring water, for you and your pet, so nobody overheats. And remember that ticks and fleas also love summertime strolls, so consult your veterinarian about precautions to keep your pet pestfree. B.C.

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BRING HOME THE BRONZE

The sun and I haven’t seen much of each other in recent years, but that doesn’t stop me from pretending. “Fake it, don’t bake it,” is my summertime motto, and EyeCandy Sunless Spa is the place to live by it. Owner Meri Thresher offers custom spray tanning that takes all the guesswork out of bringing home the bronze. Wear as little or as much as you want (don’t worry, she’s seen it all). Fifteen minutes—no automated machines, no streaky at-home lotions, no Oompa Loompa orange. Don’t forget the SPF afterward. EyeCandy Sunless Spa, 2011 P Street, Suite 100; (916) 977-3737; 47 Natoma Street, Suite 4C in Folsom; www.eyecandytanning.com. K.B.

56

CELEBRATE INDEPENDENCE WITH A 5K

Remember that New Year’s resolution about getting in shape and running more? Since you’ve spent the last five months rigorously training, you’re looking for warm-up events before the California International Marathon in December. Look no further than Sacramento’s oldest running event, the 4th of July 5-Miler, organized by the Buffalo Chips Running Club. It’s free to run, but water buffalo are highly discouraged. Registration starts at 7:15 a.m. on Wednesday, July 4. Glen Hall Park, 5415 Sandburg Drive; www.chipsrunning.com/358-2. K.Bu.

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Jen Jeffery makes more space for deep breathing at Zuda Yoga.

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SLOW DOWN AND APPRECIATE THE LITTLE THINGS

“Sleeping with the ceiling fan on, making cherry pies [with fruit] from my tree, going to baseball games and wearing flip-flops when you can’t go barefoot.” —Ross Hammond, jazz musician and host of the Nebraska Mondays series at Luna’s Café & Juice Bar

YOUR EYES 58 COVER I’m basically blind, but I like to wear shades and look cool and aloof during the summertime. So I’m stoked that eyewear spot Styleyes on J Street does a big, annual blowout sale on sunglasses each June. All of its shades are 25-percent off—even the friggin’ lenses—and the shop’s got all of the looks I like in my aresenal: Terminator shades, pilot shades, really dark shades I piss my girlfriend off with by wearing indoors.

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PHOTO BY EMILY KIYOMI MANSON

Plus, the staff’s super friendly about adjusting glasses after they fly off my face while riding bikes. I’ve never had a hiccup with an order, going on eight years. Myopia sucks. Styleyes cures! Styleyes, 2231 J Street; (916) 448-2220; www.styleyes.biz. N.M.

59

UPGRADE YOUR WHEELS

You’ve been two-wheeling around the grid, and maybe even east and west on the American River Bike Trail. Good for you, champ. Now don’t you think it’s time to invest in a real bike? Enter IkonCycles. This Midtown spot will get you turning pro with properly aligned and sized wheels. Think about it: no achy back or sore legs, plus biking faster—and farther—than ever. Makes you wish you’d upped your ride ante last summer, right? IkonCycles, 2318 J Street, Suite B; (916) 441-1122; http://ikoncycles.com. N.M. |

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THE GRACE OF MIDTOWN GIRLS RIDING BIKES IN SUNDRESSES AND HEELS.

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The People 4HE¬7INE¬ The Beauty¬4HE¬7INE¬ The Quality¬4HE¬7INE¬

7HERE¬THE¬VINES¬MEET¬THE¬PINES 50   |   SN&R   |   06.14.12

¬s¬WWWSIERRAVINTNERSCOM

PHOTOS BY WILLIAM LEUNG

W E ST C OA ST FA LC O N RY S H OW S YO U H OW TO P U T A B I R D O N I T MY FIRST ATTEMPT to interview falconer Kate

Marden was interrupted by a screeching peregrine falcon. The bird, miffed his meal was delayed, was one of many at West Coast Falconry, located in the Sierra foothills east of Marysville. How does one build a career around training and caring for birds of prey? Marden, a West Marin transplant, said it started early with an elementary-school assembly featuring a red-tailed hawk, a horned owl and a bald eagle. Years later, a chance meeting during a volunteer gig at a Renaissance fair revived her passion for falconry. “I talked to a man, he handed me a business card and said, ‘If you ever want to become a real falconer, give me a call,’” Marden said. In 1998, the doggy day care owner became a falconer. She still owns the day care, but since 2006, she’s lived and worked in the foothills training birds, giving educational tours and even leading

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school demonstrations like the one that originally inspired her. West Coast Falconry offers a wide variety of experiences, from a simple introduction to falconry ($30) to a half-day falconry experience ($250) where you can actually fly the birds to your glove. And if you want to become a master falconer like Marden, there is an apprenticeship course offered from October 26-28. Make sure to call and schedule an event ahead of time. The falcons don’t sound too happy when mealtime is interrupted. West Coast Falconry, 10308 Spring Valley Road in Marysville; (530) 749-0839; http://westcoast-falconry.com. K.Bu.

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Swimstitute owners Todd Sleizer (right) and Scott Morris can make you into an aquatic athlete.

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TAKE UP LOGROLLING

PHOTO BY WILLIAM LEUNG

Shana Martin (left) and Jamie Fischer battle each other.

IT WAS GREAT, at first, to be the only pool in the

area offering logrolling. That was until Swimstitute cofounder Scott Morris got mildly addicted to the sport and was involved in a rare logrolling accident. “It’s supposed to be really safe … and I broke my tailbone doing it,” Morris admits. The sport involves standing and balancing atop a 600-pound log which floats in a pool. (For safety reasons, the Swimstitute’s log is wrapped in carpet). The Swimstitute offers lap swimming, water-exercise classes, and competitive swim training. Morris helped bring logrolling there after seeing the sport featured in a magazine. As far as he knows, the Swimstitute is currently the only place in California offering a log for people to practice on. In a professional logrolling competition, two athletes stand on the log at the same time and roll it around, each attempting to knock the other off. Generally, the first to knock an opponent off twice (in a best-of-three format) or three times (in a best-of-five format) moves on to the next round. The competition rolls on until one person has won all his or her rounds. “It is definitely both [physical and mental],” says Morris of logrolling. “The better you get at it, obviously, the more physical it is, because a lot of people get on it and last only two to four seconds.”

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He adds that logrolling is a good summer sport because the Swimstitute is a covered pool, not exposed to the hot summer sun. But one important question remains: After breaking his butt, is Morris willing to get in the pool and try logrolling again? “I have wanted to get back on that horse and give it another go,” Morris says. While there currently aren’t any logrolling classes, aspiring rollers can reserve the log for private use at the pool. Advance reservations cost $50 per hour during business hours, or $75 per hour after business hours. Swimstitute, 11335 B Folsom Boulevard in Rancho Cordova; (916) 851-0840; www.swimstitute.com. J.M.

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64 GO SKATEBOARDING Ten years ago, finding a skate park in Sacramento was no easy task. Now you can’t drive 5 miles without running into one. There is no better day to enjoy these concrete playgrounds then on National Go Skateboarding Day on Thursday, June 21. Why not try SN&R’s Best of Sacramento 2011’s skate parks? 28th and B Street Skate Park, 20 28th Street; Granite Skate Park, 8200 Ramona Avenue; www.cityofsacramento.org/parks andrecreation/parks/skate-parks.htm; Epic Indoor Skatepark, 1104 Tinker Road in Rocklin; (916) 408-4200; www.epicindoorskate.com. A.N.

RUN THROUGH SOMEONE ELSE’S SPRINKLERS.

65

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ADMIRE MAJESTIC VISTAS

“I love getting away to the incredible vistas of the Eastern Sierras, particularly Mono Lake, Mammoth’s backcountry and Yosemite [National Park’s] high country. The Sonora

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ALL BIKES

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HUG DINGER AT A RIVER CATS GAME. ON A FARM 68 STAY If you’ve ever daydreamed about swapping your tie for a pair of overalls, mosey over to Casa de la Pradera, a bed-andbreakfast and farmstead in the serene Sierra foothills village of Fiddletown. Sitting on 15 acres of lush farmland, the family-owned homestead is a quiet retreat from city life. For $80 a night, urbanites cultivate their inner farmers by learning about organic farming through hands-on experience. While there are only two guest rooms, those looking for a more rustic experience can pitch a tent and camp under the towering oak trees. Casa de la Pradera, Fiddletown; (209) 245-6042; www.fiddletownfarms.com. L.H.

69

RAPPEL INTO A CAVE

What sounds better: rappelling into a 165-foot cave or zipping across a 1,500-foot line at around 40 mph? At Moaning Cavern, you can do both. The park also boasts a post-rappel spelunking expedition or—for the less adventurous or more frugal—a walking tour of the cavern. Moaning Cavern, 5350 Moaning Cave Road in Vallecito; (866) 762-2837; www.caverntours.com. K.Bu.

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After the largest flood in the Golden State’s recorded history in 1861 and ’62—one that famously led Gov. Leland Stanford to travel by rowboat to his inauguration—the city of Sacramento addressed its flood issues by raising streets 9 feet. Old Sacramento Underground Tours highlight the history of this momentous civic undertaking in an hour-long trip above and below the streets of Old Sac. Tours run seven days a week through November 30, and cost $15 for adults and $10 for children older than 5. Old Sacramento Underground Tours, 101 I Street; (916) 808-7973; www.historicoldsac.org. K.Bu.

Pass and Carson Pass areas are closer and still provide spectacular vistas as well, dotted with small lakes and streams to cool off in. It grounds me and renews my spirit!” –Art Luna, owner of Luna’s Café & Juice Bar

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INCITE A WATER FIGHT

“A definite must-do for me is to have a water fight. Balloons, guns, timed and proximity mines. Second thought, maybe it’s a good summer to stay indoors and play Goldeneye 64 with a few close friends until our eyeballs bleed. I’ll get back to you.” —Arjun Singh, creator of The Public Access Show and drummer for Wallpaper

71

TAKE YOUR DOG TO THE BEACH

You and your dog both need a break from Sacramento’s dry heat, so treat yourself and your best friend with a visit to the Point Isabel Regional Shoreline in Richmond. Just an hour and 20 minutes east of Sacramento, the park is one of the nation’s largest and most impressive off-leash dog parks. With sweeping views of the bay, an ever-present ocean breeze, hiking trails, a cafe and a swimming area for dogs, trips here can take a half-day or more. The park is free and so is parking, and there’s bike-trail access nearby if you want to double up on the exercise part of your day trip. If your dog gets muddy, there’s a (paid) dog wash at Mudpuppy’s Tub & Scrub, located in the park. Point Isabel Regional Shoreline, 2701 Isabel Street in Richmond; www.ebparks.org/parks/pt_isabel. J.M.

WATCH THE SIERRA FOOTHILLS TURN FROM GREEN TO GOLDEN BROWN.

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RIDE A BLIMP

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PLUNGE INTO A SAVED POOL

Take sightseeing to a higher level, literally. Aboard the Eureka, Airship Ventures’ souped-up behemoth of a blimp, “flightseers” can experience spectacular city views while sailing the open skies at a lofty 1,200 feet above ground. The Eureka is not your basic blimp, it’s a thoroughbred—seating up to 12 passengers, it’s 50-feet longer than today’s largest commercial airships and was built by the Zeppelin Company in Germany. While the airship operates primarily in the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles and San Diego, Sacramento residents can float above the City of Trees by scheduling a private tour. Prices range from $375 to $950 per person. Airship Ventures, Mountain View; (650) 969-8100; www.airshipventures.com. L.H.

Save Mart Supermarkets recently finished a successful fundraising drive to keep several city pools open. Those include the Clunie Pool and Wading Pool, Doyle Pool and Wading Pool, Johnston Pool and Wading Pool, McClatchy Park Pool and Wading Pool, Pannell Meadowview Recreational Pool, and George Sim Pool and Wading Pool. A seventh, the Natomas High School Pool, is open for lessons, team sports and lap swimming, but not open for “recreational” swimming. Also, an additional five “play pools” (for kids 7 and under) will be open. Dive in! www.cityofsacramento.org/ parksandrecreation/recreation/ aquatics/pools.htm. J.M.

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FLOAT DOWN THE AMERICAN

White-water rafting can be an exhilarating thrill ride, but if you’re looking for something a bit more chill, then renting a raft from American River Raft Rentals just might float your boat. Prices start at $64.50 for a four-person raft, but if you’ve got a big crew, $172.50 gets you a 12-person raft. Pack a cooler filled with food and cold beverages of choice, grab that waterproof boom box and your sunscreen, and enjoy a leisurely afternoon—the ride can take several hours—by taking the scenic

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Lindsay Calmettes (left) and Karen Popovich rafting on the American River.

PHOTO BY WES DAVIS

route through town. American River Raft Rentals, 11257 S. Bridge Street in Rancho Cordova; (888) 338-7238; www.raftrentals.com. R.L.

76

CATCH A FALLING STAR

Summer comes alive after dark. The nights are warm and full of possibility and romance. And what’s more romantic than a shooting star? Mid-August is the peak of the annual Perseid meteor shower, during which the rate of meteors can easily reach more than 100 an hour. Grab your honey and a blanket, and move away from the light—we suggest a drive up Highway 50 past Pollock Pines—as far from the city as possible. 2011 had some visibility issues due to near-full moons, but it shouldn’t be a problem this go-round. (Oh, and heads up: Last year, a small meteorite caused considerable damage to a Sacramento man’s roof.) K.B.

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TAKE YOUR KIDS CAMPING

“This summer, I plan lots of visits to Old Sacramento with my daughter to ride the train along the river. And hopefully we’ll get some camping done, as I’d love for her to see what the night sky looks like when you get away from the city’s bright lights.” —Keith Lowell Jensen, stand-up comedian

78

DRIVE DOWN THE DELTA

“Take a day trip to Locke. The modernist hippie shops built on top of the town’s unique Chinese heritage make it a great place to get away for a day. The drive down is nice, too. Be sure to bring your camera.” —John Marcotte, political satirist and founder of Badmouth

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BRAVE BUMPASS HELL

Yellowstone National Park isn’t the only volcanically active park in the continental United States. Although that Wyoming super crater has a much larger explosive capacity, we have Lassen National Volcanic Park, which offers plenty of opportunities to explore geologically active terrain. The park is 165 miles northeast of Sacramento, easily accessible from either Redding or Red Bluff, and roughly a three-hour drive. Lassen has fumaroles (vents for steam and volcanic gas), mud pots and a hiking stretch so full of geologic activity it’s called Bumpass Hell. While everyone else lazes around on the beach, try getting your hot on with a short day trip to the area’s most unusual park. www.nps.gov/lavo/index.htm. K.M.

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LOCAL BOOKSELLERS SHARE THEIR FAVORITE END-OFTHE-WORLD TALES WE SUGGEST LAKE NATOMA OR

Discovery Park for a long afternoon spent reading about the end of the world before it happens. Of course, now that archaeologists have found a new Mayan calendar that goes beyond 2012, we don’t need to worry quite so much. Think of it as more time to read. We reached out to local booksellers who might know a thing or two about what constitutes a great apocalypse story. Richard Hansen, proprietor of The Book Collector, located at 1008 24th Street in Midtown, doesn’t hesitate. “The first book that comes to mind is Alas, Babylon,” says Hansen. “In the book, that phrase ‘Alas, Babylon’ is the code someone on the inside uses to warn someone on the outside of what’s coming—which is the nuclear war.” Hansen and his wife Rachel put that code to use at the shop. “If my wife was alone in the store, for instance, and someone came in and she felt uncomfortable or frightened, she would call me and all she had to do was work the phrase, ‘Alas, Babylon,’ into the conversation and I knew to come running,” Hansen says. That’s one way to signal the apocalypse. At Big Brother Comics on 1722 J Street, manager Christopher Alvarez settled fairly quickly on The Walking Dead. That’s the graphic novel series by Robert Kirkman, not the TV show, which changed up some plot elements. “The Walking Dead is a zombie story that is not about the zombies,” says Alvarez. “It’s focused instead on what would actually happen. It’s a human drama, a more realistic take.” Finian Scott, a bookseller at Time Tested Books at 1114 24th Street, had a more unusual take on the best apocalyptic novel. “Even though it’s not the first one people think of for apocalypse, I think that Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian is the most apocalyptic book I’ve ever read,” Scott says. “Even though it takes place in the past, it’s apocalyptic in the biblical sense that things are ending and the world’s bleak and violent.” McCarthy also wrote the more traditionally apocalyptic novel The Road, and Scott also suggested The Hunger Games as a sort of “hybrid of post-apocalyptic and dystopian fiction.” Of course, I couldn’t leave a discussion of apocalyptic fiction without adding my own favorites. Lucifer’s Hammer by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle; Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood; and Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut top my list. And let’s not forget Harry Harrison’s Make Room! Make Room!, the novel on which the movie Soylent Green was based. Speaking of which, don’t forget to bring a snack to the beach. K.M.

Christopher Alvarez, manager of Big Brother Comics, prefers an illustrated apocalypse.

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The Seldom Scene Steep Canyon Rangers Danny Paisley and Southern Grass Country Current - US Navy Band The Deadly Gentlemen Bigfoot Loafer’s Glory Ed Neff and Blue & Lonesome The Foghorn Stringband CBA Emerging Artist Flatt Lonesome California Showcase acts: Windy Hill The Tuttles Rockridge Snap Jackson & the Knock on Wood Players

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Arts &

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YOUR FRENCH 82 PRACTICE If you’re suffering sensory overload from this summer’s bonanza of apocalyptic Hollywood blockbusters, the Sacramento French Film Festival is a good remedy. From June 15 through June 24, Francophiles can see the newest and most acclaimed French films released in 2012, as well as classic French films, shorts and locally made films that showcase the French flavor of movie making. Sacramento French Film Festival, Crest Theatre; 1013 K Street; www.sacramentofrenchfilmfestival.org. A.W.

YOUR WEEKEND 83 START WITH LIVE MUSIC Friday Night Concerts in the Park’s new booking team, Play Big Sacramento, is gearing the series toward 20- and 30-year-olds, partly by adding deejays to the lineup. See DJ Whores (June 22), DJ Nate D with Inkdup on drums (July 6) and DJ Crookone (July 20). Check the website for a complete schedule of bands, and bring your dancing shoes. Fridays at 5 p.m. through July 27. Free admission. Friday Night Concerts in the Park, Cesar Chavez Plaza; 910 I Street; www.sacfridayconcerts.com. J.M.

Launch founder Michael Hargis won’t be this relaxed again until July 29.

PHOTO BY WILLIAM LEUNG

81

COMMIT TO ALL SIX DAYS OF LAUNCH 2012

LAUNCH 2012 is a multidisciplinary art

festival that offers something for every kind of art enthusiast: fashion, film, music, design and architecture. Kicking off July 23, Launch will showcase a selected discipline at different locations in Sacramento every day, culminating with an all-day music festival on July 28. Launch has outgrown its old venue, The Greens Hotel, and festival founder Michael Hargis welcomes the event’s new stature. “I think embracing the multiday platform and embracing larger acts and coming in as a key festival for the city is really how we’ve grown over the last two years,” Hargis says. With multiple events going on throughout the week, it can be hard to keep up. Fortunately, Hargis broke it down for us: The festival commences at Hot Italian on Monday, July 23, with a pop-up shop by Model Citizens NYC, an independent group of furniture and industrial designers. Bows & Arrows will take the reins Tuesday, July 24, showing three independent silent films with original scores. BEFORE

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Twentieth Street will be blocked off Wednesday, July 25, for the Exquisite Corps album-release party. Local architects will create installations out of recycled cardboard along the street. Thursday, July 26, Ace of Spades will have a live digital-art battle with New York’s Cut&Paste. Friday, July 27, there will be a fashion show in the evening. The festival finale is set for Saturday, July 28, at Cesar Chavez Plaza from noon to 11 p.m. Chromeo, Grouplove, Chk Chk Chk, DJ Shadow and many more will perform throughout the day. Architects armed with only recycled cardboard and bales of hay will transform the plaza, creating 20foot monuments people will be able to walk through. “It’s only going to be for the day, so it is quite the undertaking,” says Hargis. The magnitude of Launch 2012 is a huge responsibility, but also a dream realized for Hargis. “When I first started Launch, I told everyone one day we’ll have Chromeo,” he says. “Four years later, it is a dream come true.” http://launchsacramento.com. A.N.

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AN ART GALLERY 84 ADD TO YOUR PUB CRAWL Elliott Fouts Gallery has a new home kitty-corner from the Zebra Club on P Street. This month, hanging on its walls is the art of Christopher Stott, a contemporary painter with a penchant for realistic portrayal of vintage and classic objects—like steel fans or old-school telephones. The gallery itself is new and fresh; Fouts recently moved into its new digs and reopened on June 1. Be sure to check out Stott’s show through July 5. A post-gallery visit to Zebra is on you. Elliott Fouts Galllery, 1831 P Street; (916) 736-1429; www.efgallery.com. N.M.

THE TIME WARP 85 DO The Sacramento Historical Society recreates the gold-rush era for Time Travel Weekends. Experience music from the 1800s, live Wild West stage shows, pioneer crafts, mining camps and more. The reenactments happen every Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., from July 7 through August 29. Old Sacramento, www.historicoldsac.org. B.C.

A redhead with clamshells on her coconuts: That’s what comes to mind for most of us when think of The Little Mermaid, thanks to Disney’s 1989 animated feature. But the story of this half-fish princess is based on a centuries-old tale by Hans Christian Andersen. The gruesome differences left out of the film will pique your morbid curiosity. (It would be unfair to reveal them, but let’s just say when the sea witch takes the little mermaid’s voice, it’s more macabre.) |

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ENTER THE 10X10 FILMMAKER CHALLENGE

A good time doesn’t count anymore unless it’s documented, so film your friends this summer. If you are looking for a challenge, try your hand at the 10x10 Filmmaker Challenge, a special program of the Sacramento Film & Music Festival. Contestants get 10 days to film and edit a 10-minute short. Since 2004, 120 films have been produced and screened at the festival. This year’s 10x10 launch party is tentatively scheduled for late July. Check the website for details. 10x10 Filmmaker Challenge, http://sacfilm.com. A.N.

YOUR HAT TO 88 TIP THE FOLSOM PRO RODEO I haven’t attended the Folsom Pro Rodeo since I was a kid, but I remember being impressed with the bull riders, fireworks and mutton busting. Held every year on Fourth of July weekend since 1960, this festival has also recently added more modern entertainment, such as dirt-bike jumping and stunt skydiving. The rodeo is set for the weekend of June 29 through July 1, with specially programmed fireworks and entertainment on July 4. Folsom Pro Rodeo, Dan Russell Rodeo Arena; 401 Stafford Street in Folsom; www.folsomprorodeo.com. J.M.

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SEE THE BARD UNDER THE STARS

The Sacramento Shakespeare Festival is a fun tradition. You’re encouraged to bring in food, drinks, blankets and lawn chairs. Don’t forget bug spray and a jacket, because the park can get unnervingly mosquito-heavy and cold at night. This year’s productions include an original telling of King Arthur (June 29 and 30, and July 8, 13, 15, 20, 22 and 27) and The Comedy of Errors (July 6, 7, 12, 14, 19, 21, 26 and 29). Sacramento Shakespeare Festival, William A. Carroll Amphithteatre; 3901 Land Park Drive; (916) 558-2173; http://sacramentoshakespeare.net. J.M.

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

Check out the story in Maria Tatar’s The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen, and then see the live interpretation of the Disney version July 10 through July 22, at Music Circus. Wells Fargo Pavilion, 1419 H Street; (916) 557-1999; www.californiamusicaltheatre.com. S.

GET MEDICATED

Explore the use of cannabis as alternative medicine at Sacramento Hempfest 2012 from August 3 through 5. Musical performers like Real One, Yukmouth and Element of Soul will keep the flow as you take in activist speakers, vendors, and the 215 smoking area. Admission is $25 per day. Sacramento Hempfest, Rio Ramaza Marina; 10000 Garden Highway; www.sacramentohempfest.com. A.W.

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8th Annual

Celtic Faerie

Festival June 16 & 17, 2012 Saturday 10:00 am to 9:00 PM Sunday 10:00 am to 5:00 PM Adults $5 | Children 12 & up $3 | Children under 12 Free Bring canned food & recieve $2 off entry fee

Gibson Ranch Park

8556 Gibson Ranch Road | Elverta, CA | Rain or Shine Hobby Horse | Obsidian Butterfly | Avalon Rising | Highland Dancing Poetry & Art Contests | Celtic Reenactments | Games, Arts & Crafts | Franny’s House

Elverta Rd CA–70 CA–99

Gibson Ranch Watt Ave

Vendors contact: celticfaeriefestival@gmail.com www.celticfaeriefestival.com

Friday & Saturday June 22nd thru July 21st

The Majestic By Mark Medoff Friday & Saturday Kid

ust 10th thru September 8th August

Kennedy Mine Amphitheatre Doors open at 6:30 for picnicking, show starts at 8:00 Tickets can be purchased at the gate, on-line at www.mstw.org or at Hein & Company, 204-A Main Street, Jackson Tickets are $17.50 for adults, $12 for students/children under 18

www.mstw.org

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

YOU’RE WELCOME, TREES.

I–80

by William Shakespeare

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we love cars.

California Automobile Museum | Sacramento, CA 95818 (916) 442-6802 | Calautomuseum.org

No Job Too Big Now through September 9, 2012 12719 CSF12_ESacNews_PoppyPak_5.93x8.58.pdf

til’9

1

6/8/12

4:17 PM

Thursday, June 21- Make Your Mark at the Museum Thursday, July 19- Art-rageous Cars half off admission 5-9pm

Citroën: Icône française Now through July 29, 2012

$8 General | $4 Student | Kids under 5 are free

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Arts & continued from PAGE 59

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DRIVE TO S.F. FOR A CONCERT

Need a place to escape the August heat of the Valley for some quality music? Head to San Francisco for the Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival. Dozens of bands from all genres of music play from noon to 10 p.m., August 10 through 12. Whether you’re going for Jack White, Metallica, Neil Young, Stevie Wonder or Geographer, there are plenty of nonweather reasons to go. Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival, Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, www.sfoutsidelands.com. K. Bu.

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PARTY WITH FIRE DANCERS

If the notion of fireflies hovering in the air on a summer night is attractive, then catch Sacramento’s fire dancers at the Fire Spectacular from 6 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, August 11. The dance troupe Obsidian Butterfly incorporates the fine art of dancing with fire, sometimes swallowing fire or flinging fireballs to tell stories through movement and light. It’s like watching ethereal insects from another realm. Fire Spectacular, William A. Carroll Amphithteatre; 3901 Land Park Drive; www.sacredfiredance.com. A.W.

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WRANGLE A TICKET TO THE OUTLAW COUNTRY BBQ

There’s no need to get on the wrong side of the fuzz to enjoy the Outlaw Country BBQ on Saturday, August 18. This all-ages event costs just $10 and gets you a plate of tasty barbecue and a drink, as well as an afternoon of unlawfully fun country and rock, with acts such as Felix Thursday & the Cheatin’ Hearts, Maidens Sorrow, the Johnson Creek Stranglers, and the Dry County Drinkers. Outlaw Country BBQ, Ione Memorial Hall; 207 Amador Street in Ione; www.facebook.com/events/ 171570812949059. R.L.

THE 94 WALK DUSTY STREETS OF OLD SAC

Pull on your boots and bonnets because Labor Day Weekend means Gold Rush Days. From August 31 to September 3, time will be turned back in Old BEFORE

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Oleander captivates at Friday Night Concerts in the Park.

PHOTO BY WES DAVIS

Sacramento to the 1800s. Tons of dirt will hide the new-fangled paved streets, and reenactments of historical events by performers in period costumes will entertain. Factor in bluegrass music, food, libations, gold panning, pony rides and free admission, and you’ve got yourself a golden opportunity for old-timey fun. Gold Rush Days, Old Sacramento; (916) 808-7059; www.sacramentogoldrushdays.com. S.

95

TAKE A CHICKEN TO A PLAY

The Fair Oaks Theatre Festival, held annually at the Veterans Memorial Amphitheatre in old Fair Oaks, is likely to be attended by the village chickens, as well as people. This year’s program includes a musical version of Willy Wonka, June 15 to July 22; The Great American Trailer Park Musical, August 10 to September 9; and The Best of Broadway, September 14 to 30. The festival also includes two nights of music by iconic folk group the New Christy Minstrels and three separate comedy nights. Fair Oaks Theatre Festival, Veterans Memorial Amphitheatre; 7991 California

FRONTLINES

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SUMMER

Boulevard in Fair Oaks; www.fairoakstheatrefestival.com. K.M.

96

LAUGH LONG

For its second year, the Sacramento Comedy Festival will stretch to one hyperextended weekend—some might call it a week— of stand-up, improv and sketch comedy September 7 through 15. The festival will also spread beyond its host venue of the Sacramento Comedy Spot to Luna’s Café & Juice Bar and other comedy stages around town. Sacramento improv acts Anti-Cooperation League and Lady Business, and the multimedia geek comedy show Critical Hit are already confirmed. Follow updates at the website to find out who else is partaking in this comedy bonanza. www.saccomedyfest.com. K.Bu.

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HORSE AROUND

For centuries, horses have been partners to humans in hunting, farming and traveling. The Draft Horse Classic, held September 20 through 23, is a reminder of horses’ strength and

GUIDE

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beauty, and of our shared history. Admission to the fairgrounds is free, so fairgoers can visit with the horses in the barns or catch a clogging performance or a cookoff. We recommend you pony up some dough to be dazzled by the hardy horses at one of the special showcases. Tickets are $10 to $21. Nevada County Fairgrounds, 11228 McCourtney Road in Grass Valley; (530) 273-6217; www.nevadacountyfair.com/dhc. S.

98

VAN GOGH FOR IT

Ask a child to paint a bowl of fruit, and there’s no hesitation. Ask grown-ups and most will make excuses for why they can’t. We’ve lost the courage to be creative. Enter artist Aimee Rebmann—and some booze. Under the name Creative Juices, Rebmann’s spent the last year getting Sacramento liquored up to help liberate our inner artists, teaching guided painting classes amid food and drink specials at local eateries. Register online, don an apron, sip a cocktail, come home with a masterpiece. And if

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you’d prefer a more intimate setting for you and your pals to paint, Rebmann makes house calls, too. What better time than summer to host a party en plein air? Creative Juices Events, http://creativejuicesevents.com. K.B.

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DANCE OVER THE RAINBOW

Midtown’s Rainbow Festival touches down every Labor Day Weekend to close the summer with dancing and revelry. In its 25-year history, the event has raised more than $500,000 for LGBT charities. Mark your calendar with a glitter pen for August 31 through September 2, and be at the corner of 20th and K streets when the music starts. Rainbow Festival, www.facebook.com/ sacramentorainbowfestival. B.C.

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BE THERE. Adopt. Mentor. Donate. ADOPT. Become a Resource Family. We are looking for families & individuals to assist children in finding FOREVER FAMILIES through adoption, mentoring and reunification support. Too many local children are living without a family to call their own. With virtually no cost to adopt and a tremendous support system, Sierra Forever Families would like to show you how you can transform the life of a child living in local foster care. Attend one of our orientations in your area: Sacramento Second Monday, 6:00-8:30pm.Sacramento SFF office. Call (916) 368-5114. Nevada County First Wednesday, 6:00-9:00pm. Nevada City office. Call (530) 478-0900. Placer County Third Thursday, 6:30-8:30pm. PlacerKids, Auburn. Call (530) 887-9982. MENTOR. Take a year-long journey with a child in foster care. Our Wonder mentoring program matches adults one-on-one with a child (age 6-12) to experience nature, sports, music, dining out and more! It only takes a few hours a month to make a positive difference in a child’s life. Wonder Guide Orientations in September. For dates and times, call (916) 290-1206. DONATE. Your gift is vitally important in helping Sierra Forever Families fulfill our mission to transform the lives of children in foster care by building and nurturing permanent families. By supporting Sierra Forever Families you can: * Break the cycle of abuse, poverty and homelessness * Provide a loving and nurturing environment for a child * Benefit everyone by building and strengthening families and communities * Enhance a child’s quality of life Online Donations: www.sierraff.org OR Mail a Donation: Fund Development 8928 Volunteer Lane, Suite 100 Sacramento, CA 95826

SIERRAFF.ORG

WE TRANSFORM THE LIVES OF CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE BY BUILDING AND NURTURING PERMANENT FAMILIES.

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   S U M M E R G U I D E   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

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NIGHT&DAY 14THURS DON’T MISS! ROLLIN’ ON THE RIVER: Get

ready to celebrate Sacramento-style during a spirited river cruise aboard the Empress Hornblower as part of an event presented by the Historic Old Sacramento Foundation. Festivities will honor the contributions of Sacramento restauranteur Lina Fat and will also include a celebratory 100th birthday champagne toast to the I Street Bridge. Th, 6/14, 5-8:30pm. $75. Sacramento History Museum, 101 I St.; (916) 808-7059; www.historicoldsac.org.

List your event! Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Special Events MOBIL SUPER GO THE DISTANCE TOUR: ExxonMobil is drafting some extra help from celebrated baseball players around the country as part of the Mobil Super Go the Distance Minor League Baseball Tour. The tour will feature Mobil Super brand ambassadors who will greet fans outside the ballpark, distribute product information, rebate coupons and Mobil Super-branded baseball souvenirs. Th, 6/14, 11am-1pm. Free. River City Car Wash, 645 Harbor Blvd. in West Sacramento; (314) 552-6713.

THURSDAY NIGHT JAZZ: Sit back, relax and enjoy a nice summer evening while unwinding to the sounds of smooth jazz inside Mangos Lounge at Arden Hills Resort Club & Spa. Music will be provided by Greg Willett. Th, 6/14, 6-9pm. $20. Arden Hills Resort Club & Spa, 1220 Arden Hills Ln.; (916) 213-4373; www.ardenhills.net.

Classes ADVANCED SOCIAL MEDIA: Remember when having an online presence meant having a website? The Web has changed. Join internationally acclaimed speaker Martin J. Cowlin to learn the practical answers to all of your social-media questions. Th, 6/14, 1pm. $35-$50. Department of Human Assistance, 2700 Fulton Ave.; (916) 874-3800; www.doviasacramento.org.

Wait, there’s more! Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

Film THE OTHER F-WORD: Celebrate and honor the important men in your life this Father’s Day with The Other F-Word, a hilarious, raucous, eye-opening and unexpectedly wise documentary on what happens when a generation’s ultimate anti-authoritarians—punk rockers—become dads. Th, 6/14, 7pm. $7-$9. Miners Foundry Cultural Center, 325 Spring St. in Nevada City; (530) 265-5040; www.minersfoundry.org.

Kids’ Stuff JUGGLING AND CIRCUS ARTS: Dana Smith presents an interactive juggling and circus arts show. Smith demonstrates threeclub juggling, ball spinning, hat tricks, hand-balancing stunts and other one-of-a-kind feats. Audience volunteers are invited to share the stage with Smith.

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Th, 6/14, 2pm. Free. Rancho Cordova Public Library, 9845 Folsom Blvd., in Rancho Cordova; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

ROCKET SHIP ORIGAMI WITH ARTWORKS: Learn how to fold paper to create a rocket ship. Then create a painting to launch your rocket ship into the stars or to the moon. Th, 6/14, 4pm. Free. North Highlands-Antelope Library, 4235 Antelope Rd. in Antelope; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Poetry POETRY UNPLUGGED: Sacramento’s longest running spoken-word open-mic, with guest hosts Frank Andrick, Mario Ellis Hill, Geoffery Neill and B.L. Kennedy. Th, 8pm. $2. Luna’s Café & Juice Bar, 1414 16th St.; (916) 441-3931; www.lunascafe.com.

Sports & Recreation RAGE III WAR: Uppercut Promotions is hosting mixedmartial-arts fights at the Woodlake Hotel (formerly the Radisson). The MMA fighters are from the training camps of Gracie Fighter (Cesar Gracie) and the Diaz Brothers (Nick and Nate Diaz). Th, 6/14, 7:30pm. $40. Woodlake Hotel, 500 Leisure Ln.; (916) 922-2020.

Concerts TWILIGHT THURSDAYS: Enjoy warm summer nights at the Sacramento Zoo with extended hours on Twilight Thursdays, June 14th through July 26th. Dinner specials, live music, car show and activities start at 5 p.m. Visit www.saczoo.org for each evening’s theme. Th, 5-8pm through 7/26. Opens 6/14. Free with admission. Sacramento Zoo, 3930 West Land Park Dr.; (916) 808-5888; www.saczoo.org.

15FRI

DON’T MISS! ANTI-COOPERATION LEAGUE

RECESSION SHOW: AntiCooperation League is Sacramento’s longest running comedy show. Each week it features a special guest interview and uses the information gathered from the interview as inspiration for improvised comedy scenes. The show is a lot like a funny episode of Saturday Night Live, but all the sketches are made up on the spot. F, 6/15, 9pm. Free. Sacramento Comedy Spot, 1050 20th St., Ste. 130; (916) 444-3137; www.saccomedyspot.com.

Special Events MANUP!: The Center for the Arts teams up with Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital to make June Men’s Health Awareness Month. ManUp combines an inspirational and instructive presentation by celebrity health and wellness guru, Chris Powell, with a fun and participatory outdoor exposition. The expo includes clinics and demonstrations on many fun and healthy activities. F, 6/15, 4-10pm. $10 for women, free to men and children younger than 12. Veterans

Memorial Auditorium, 255 S. Auburn St. in Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384; www.thecenterforthearts.org.

SENIOR DRIVER SAFETY EVENT: The objective of this event is to educate senior drivers about safety and provide an opportunity to turn in their driver license for an identification card if they are no longer qualified to safely drive and provide their caretakers with valuable resources for the care of their loved ones. F, 6/15, 10am-4pm. Free. Swanston Community Center, 2350 Northrop Ave.; (916) 239-4617; www.DMV.ca.gov.

Film SCREENING: OUTRAGE: This film explores closeted politicians who make homophobic public policy. F, 6/15, 8pm. Free. Lavender Library, 1414 21st St.; (916) 492-0558.

Sports & Recreation THE LOCAL CELEBRITY BASKETBALL GAME: Come watch some of Sacramento’s most popular and successful men get their hoops on. Additional entertainment includes live bands, cheerleaders, the little ladies’ basketball game and a threepoint shooting contest. F, 6/15, 7-9:30pm. $3. John F. Kennedy High School, 6715 Gloria Dr.; (916) 208-7638.

16SAT

DON’T MISS! SLUTWALK SACRAMENTO:

Slutwalk is a part of an international grassroots movement aimed to combat rape culture and to promote sexual empowerment. It began as a small idea in 2011 to fight back against victim-blaming and sexshaming around sexual violence. It galvanized into action and took a name from a Toronto police officer who referred to women and survivors of sexual assault as “sluts” and suggested women “dressing like sluts” were inviting their own victimization. Sa, 6/16, 2-5pm. Free. California state Capitol, 10th and L streets; (916) 324-0333; www.slutwalksac.webs.com.

Special Events A DAY ON THE EDGE: The Metro EDGE Summer Festival features dodgeball, field games, a beer garden, food and more. All proceeds support the Metro EDGE designated charity for the year, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Sacramento. Sa, 6/16, 10am4pm. $25 for participants, $5 for spectators. Boys & Girls Club, Teichert Branch, 5212 Lemon Hill Ave.; (916) 929-2950; http://metrochamber.org.

FIESTA EN LA CALLE CONCERT SERIES: Literally translating to “party in the street,” this festival celebrates Latino and world music. Now in its second season, the festival was created to provide a family-friendly outlet for Latino music, culture and food. Sa, 4-9pm through 8/11. Free. Cesar Chavez Plaza, 10th and J

streets; (916) 541-6302; www.fiestaenlacalle.com.

LUIS PALAU SACRAMENTO FESTIVAL: The Luis Palau Sacramento Festival is a two-day event featuring performances by Skillet, Toby Mac, Lincoln Brewster, Phil Wickham, TFK and American Idol’s Mandisa, as well as action sports demonstrations by BMX, FMX, and skateboarding pros. Palau is a Christian evangelist. F,

6/15, 1:30-10pm and Sa, 3:30-10pm.

Free. Cal Expo, 1600 Exposition Blvd.; (916) 259-2165; www.sacramentofestival.com.

RAISING A VOICE FOR THE ARTS: Join the Sacramento Choral Society and Orchestra’s Raising a Voice for the Arts party and fundraiser. Enjoy live music, wine, tea, appetizers, art, and a silent and live auction. Sa, 6/16, 7pm. $35. Sacramento Temporary Contemporary, 1616 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 536-9065; www.sacramentochoral.com.

WEST COAST SWING LESSON & SOCIAL DANCING: This monthly event is sponsored by the Capital Swing Dancers organization. West Coast Swing is the state dance and famous for its freedom of interpretation and variety of music genres that you can dance to. Sa, 6/16, 5:30-10:30pm. $20-$35 for membership. Fair Oaks Village Clubhouse, 7997 California Ave. in Fair Oaks; (530) 518-1598; www.CapitalSwingDancers.org.

Kids’ Stuff POPS IN THE PARK SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: Steve Cohn and the Pops in the Park Committee present the annual Pops in the Park summer concert series, featuring the Q-Balls. Food and beverages will be for sale, and all proceeds go to neighborhood and park improvements. Sa, 6/16, 6-9pm. Free. East Portal Park, 1120 Rodeo Way; (916) 808-5240; www.east sacpopsinthepark.com.

SCR BAD APPLES JUNIOR ROLLER DERBY: Sac City Rollers’ Bad Apples are hosting a junior roller-derby tournament. Doors open at 8:30 a.m., with the first whistle at 10 a.m. Come out and watch six junior derby teams competing in this double-elimination tournament. Sa, 6/16, 9am-5pm. $8-$20. Norcal Indoor Sports Center, 1460 Tanforan Ave. in Woodland; (530) 406-1100; www.saccityrollers.com.

Literary Events AUTHOR MOLLY DWYER: California Writers Club, Sacramento Branch presents Molly Dwyer, award-winning author of Requiem for The Author of Frankenstein, speaking on “story Stalking” at its luncheon meeting. Sa, 6/16, 11am-1pm. $12$14. Tokyo Buffet, 7217 Greenback Ln. in Citrus Heights; (916) 2130798; www.cwc sacramentowriters.org.

Sports & Recreation CENTRAL VALLEY AM JAM: The Central Valley Am Jam is a series of skateboard contests broken into six ages groups. Each contest will see groups competing in a four-person five-minute jam. The top five highest scores in each age group will advance to the

finals. Sa, 6/16, 10am. $15 per contest. Mather Sports Complex, 3755 Schreiver Ave. in Mather; (916) 362-1704; www.crpd.com.

PADDLES AT COSUMNES RIVER PRESERVE: Join a leisurely paddle along the Cosumnes River. The Cosumnes River Preserve’s Volunteer Naturalists will be awaiting your arrival at the visitor center. Arrive at 8:30am for a 9am departure on the water. Sa, 6/16, 8:30am12:30pm. Free. Cosumnes River Preserve Visitor Center, 13501 Franklin Blvd. in Galt; (916) 870-4317; www.cosumnes.org.

Teens DREAM BOXES WITH ARTWORKS: Create a thought-filled box by combining two art forms: calligraphy and origami. Sa, 6/16, 2pm. Free. Carmichael Library, 5605 Marconi Ave. in Carmichael; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Concerts MARINA V.: Raised in Russia and attending music school daily after regular school, Marina V. is now a California girl who has blossomed into an international voice, relentlessly touring and performing at concert halls, theaters, embassies and clubs. Sa, 6/16, 7:30pm. $20. The State Theatre, 985 Lincoln Way in Auburn; (530) 885-0156; www.livefromauburn.com.

TWANNA TURNER & SUPER DELICICIOUS: The daughter of rock ’n’ roll legend Ike Turner will be performing songs from her still-unreleased CD. Tickets and seating are limited. Sa, 6/16, 9pm. $10. 1-4-5 Club, 6750 Front St. in Rio Linda; (916) 992-1055.

17SUN

DON’T MISS! NEVADA CITY BICYCLE CLASSIC: One of America’s

top cycling events celebrates its 52nd anniversary this year and many of the nation’s top cyclists are expected to be on hand. Su, 6/17, 1-6:30pm. Free. Broad St. in Nevada City; (530) 265-2692; www.nevadacity chamber.com/blog/nevada -city-events/nevada-citybicycle-classic.

Art Galleries HIGH HAND GALLERY: Artful Sunday at High Hand Gallery, eet the talented and creative artists in this art co-op while enjoying music and appetizers. This is your chance to discover the inspiration and techniques behind the gallery member artwork. Su, 6/17, 2-5pm. Free. 3750 Taylor Rd. in Loomis; (916) 259-4298.

Su, 6/17, 3pm. Free. Sacramento Public Library (Central Branch), 828 I St.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Sports & Recreation FATHER’S DAY 5K: Run, jog or walk to celebrate 40 years of helping families in need. Since 1972, Sacramneto Area Emergency Housing Center has become on of the largest providers of shelter and supportive services to homeless families in the Sacramento region. Visit the event’s registration site for details. Su, 6/17, 7:30am. $15-$25. Maidu Park, 1550 Maidu Dr. in Roseville; (916) 335-6748; www.active.com/event_detail. cfm?event_id=2022732.

Concerts JOSÉ LUIS MERLIN: From his home in Spain, José Luis Merlin returns to InConcert Sierra to perform a special Father’s Day concert and a premiere composition in memory of local renowned guitarist Louis Valentine Johnson’s son, Alex Johnson, who passed away in 2010. A pre-concert forum with Dr. Aileen James will begin at 1:15pm. Su, 6/17, 2pm. $24. Seventh Day Adventist Church, 12889 Osborne Hill Dr. in Grass Valley; (530) 477-5017; www.gvadventists.com.

18MON

DON’T MISS! WIKIMEDIA AND WIKIPEDIA:

Linux Users’ Group of Davis will host a presentation on Wikipedia by Wikimedia Foundation developers Travor Parscal and Roan Kattouw. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. is the nonprofit organization behind Wikipedia and several other online collaborative wiki projects. The foundation’s goal is to develop and maintain open content, wiki-based projects and to provide the full contents of those projects to the public free of charge. M, 6/18, 7pm. Free. Yolo County Library, Davis Branch, 315 E. 14th St. in Davis; (530) 757-5593.

Special Events TRIVIA NIGHT AT KILT PUB: Join Questionable Trivia at Kilt Pub every Monday for two rounds of general-knowledge questions. Prizes include discounts on food and drink. Teams must be between two and six players. Show up around 7:30pm. for seating. M, 8pm through 12/31. Free. Kilt Pub, 4235 Arden Way; (916) 487-4979; http://questionabletrivia.com/ where-and-when.

Kids’ Stuff

Classes

GET ME THE MOON WITH ARTBEAST:

GROUP VOICE LESSONS: Instructor

Kids will take home glittering moon sand after enjoying Eric Carle’s tale Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. Two art stations will be explored; create Carle-style drawings using watercolor and wax crayons to create a moonscape and then mix sand, corn starch, glitter and water to create a magical sand that holds its shape and carries a bit of the moon’s glow.

Pavel Kravchuck will teach this class for beginning to intermediate vocalists looking to explore theory, sight singing, placement and technique. Class will benefit all singers who want to learn to optimize their talent. M, 6-7 & 7-8pm through 6/25. $65. Roseville Theatre, 241 Vernon St. in Roseville; (916) 772-2777; http://rosevilletheaterarts academy.com.

19TUES

Concerts PALLADIO WEDNESDAY NIGHT SUMMER CONCERTS: The Palladio

DON’T MISS! MUSIC AND DANCES OF THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: The

Ohana Dance Group presents the music and dances of the Hawaiian Islands. Learn about the historical and cultural background of each song and dance. The program offers an understanding of the Hawaiian culture and its richness. Tu, 6/19, 4pm. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Library, 7240 24th St. Bypass; (916) 264-2929; www.saclibrary.org.

ONGOING Special Events

Special Events CAR SHOW AND STREET FAIR: The High Octane Street Fair on Vernon Street in downtown Roseville features live bands playing every Tuesday, food, a beer and margarita garden, a farmers market, and fun zone for kids. A classic-car show features more than 120 classic cars from before 1973. Tu, 5-9pm through 7/31. Free. Vernon St. Parks and Recreation building in Roseville; (916) 786-2023; www.2025events.com.

RELATIONSHIP REPAIR SHOP: Facilitated by Laura Hansen, author, international speaker, counselor, and native Sacramentan, come to this event to learn new insights and communication tools each week to help fix what’s not working in your relationship. Tu, 7-9pm through 8/28. $5. Ancient Future Urban Sanctuary, 2331 K St.; (916) 265-0203; www.Laura-Hansen.com.

20WED

DOWNTOWN DOGGY DINING DASH!: Join Grubcrawlusa.com on the Downtown Doggy Dining Dash. Bring your puppy pal (on a leash, of course) through Midtown and downtown enjoying appetizer bites and discount drinks from the dog-friendly venues. W, 6/20, 6-10pm. $25. Participating Midtown locations; (916) 730-0977; http://grubcrawlusa.com.

Classes COLLEGE-ESSAY APPLICATION WORKSHOP: The Sacramento Public Library will host a onehour workshop to show high-school students and parents what college admissions officers want to see in an essay. College admissions experts will cover four steps to writing a winning essay. W, 6/20, 1pm. Free. Valley Hi-North Laguna Library, 7400 Imagination Pkwy.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Kids’ Stuff ANIMALS OF THE WORLD WITH WILD THINGS: Wild Things presents an educational live-animal presentations to inform and captivate. Learn about the diversity of life on Earth. Meet animal ambassadors from five continents and hear their personal stories. W, 6/20, 3:30pm. Free. Orangevale Library, 8820 Greenback Ln. in Orangevale; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

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COMMON DIVERSIONS: TOY TRAINS AND SCALE MODEL RAILROADS: While small in size,

Films s i a ç n a r f miniature trains are always a

big attraction for guests who visit the California State Railroad Museum. In this exhibition, guests will learn the primary difference between model trains and toy trains has to do with scale. Through 9/14, 10am-5pm. $4-$9. California State Railroad Museum, 111 I St.; (916) 417-1159; www.california staterailroadmuseum.org.

TIMELESS FASHIONS: The Nevada

Special Events

BEFORE

at Broadstone Wednesday Night Summer Concert Series will be a night the whole family can enjoy. Come for dinner or shopping and join for free musical entertainment located in the Piazza near White House Black Market. W, 7-9pm through 8/1. Free. Palladio at Broadstone, 240 Palladio Pkwy. in Folsom; (916) 983-9793; www.gopalladio.com.

City Elk’s Ladies of 518 is hosting a fall Fashion Show. It features timeless fashions, from vintage to contemporary styles. Preregistration required. Through 9/30. $20. Nevada City Elks Club, 518 Hwy 49 North in Nevada City; (530) 265-4920.

Classes SUMMER DAY CAMP: GREEN THUMB GARDENING: Give your child the opportunity to experience, discover and explore the great outdoors. These weeklong daycamp sessions focus on different nature-related themes with hands-on science investigations, art, song, hiking and more. Through 6/22, 9am-1pm. $75-$85. Placer Nature Center, 3700 Christian Valley Rd. in Auburn; (530) 878-6053, ext. 608; http://placernaturecenter.org.

Kids’ Stuff IMPROVISATION AND PLAY FOR CHILDREN: Through improvisation, kids will learn important theatrical fundamentals such as vocalization, movement, concentration, group cohesion and more. This class will culminate in a short, fun, one-act improvisation production. M-Th, 9-11am through 6/21. $200. Victory Life Church, 800 Reading St. in Folsom; (916) 207-5606; www.actorsworkshop.net.

FRONTLINES

AS

it happens, the penchant for ripping procedural melodrama from the headlines is not exclusively American. The French have been doing it beautifully for generations. Cases in point abound at the Sacramento French Film Festival, whose annual two-weekend residency at the Crest Theatre begins this Friday. Polisse, an extraordinary ensemble drama from 2011 just now arriving stateside, plays out very much like a grand, Gallic episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. But instead of a tautly topical formula best suited to a half-watched TV, it sprawls with unruly big-screen dynamism and doesn’t dare let go of your attention. As seen by a shy photographer, played by director/cowriter/force of nature Maïwenn Le Besco— or, as the credits call her, just Maïwenn—it’s ostensibly a group portrait of short-fused cops at the child-protection unit. “We don’t judge; we don’t care,” one officer says, coaxing a confession, and it is the movie’s great privilege to investigate that claim. What’s miraculous is the degree of lyricism it derives from unquenchable and innately compassionate psychological curiosity. On the other hand, French movies obviously specialize in miracles such as this: The glittering ensemble piece par excellence is Marcel Carné’s Children of Paradise, from 1945, an exemplar of poetic realism and a towering achievement in the cinema of France or anywhere. Luminious with moonglow-drenched city streets and with yearning, burning eyes, it too teems with both delinquency and human understanding. Set in the 19th-century theater district of Paris’ so-called “Boulevard du Crime,” Carné’s masterpiece, scripted by the poet Jacques Prévert, involves a mime, a stage actor, a sly criminal and an aristocrat all vying for the affections of a single courtesan, played by Arletty—another one-named woman at the center of everything. “Jealousy belongs to all if a woman belongs to no one,” she says, prophetically. Also, when told she’s bewitchingly beautiful: “I’m just alive is all.” In retrospect, that too sounds like prophecy, magnificently fulfilled by these and the festival’s dozen other films, whose ultimate throughline is vitality.

The Sacramento French Film Festival happens June 15 through 24, at the Crest Theatre, 1013 K Street. Tickets are $10-$16 per night. Weekend and all-festival passes are also available. For more information, call (916) 455-9390 or visit www.sacramentofrench filmfestival.org.

—Jonathan Kiefer |

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DISH

Gringo-wiches See FOOD STUFF

Turn up the heat Phaya Thai 4310 Marconi Avenue, (916) 482-5019

WOW! AMA ZING! EXCELLENT!

by GREG LUCAS

Rating:

★ ★ ★ 1/2 Dinner for one:

$10 - $15

FLAWED

★★ HAS MOMENTS

★★★ APPEALING

★★★★ AUTHORITATIVE

★★★★★ EPIC

Still hungry?

Search SN&R’s “Dining Directory” to find local restaurants by name or by type of food. Sushi, Mexican, Indian, Italian— discover it all in the “Dining” section at www.newsreview.com.

Humor transcends language barriers. To wit: When a suit coat, the pockets of which contain a Crackberry and other costlyto-replace accouterments, is left at Phaya Thai, it’s quite the hoot for the answerer of the restaurant’s phone to say, with a somewhat pregnant pause, “Oh, yes, your coat is still here.” English is understood at this eatery, of course—but Thai is the staff’s language of preference. And, upon arrival, there is the coat in all its synthetic finery, draped over the very same chair it was left on the previous evening. Channeling her inner Vanna White, the server gestures expansively toward the coat. There are smiles all around among the staff, but then one of the women turns and with arched brow delivers the punch line: “Just leave it one more time, and you’ll have to come back for dinner.” Such extortion is unnecessary. Portions are large here. Phaya Thai, the restaurant’s full name, is a district in central Bangkok—a region quite possibly known for the prodigiousness of its eateries’ portions. At Sacramento’s Phaya Thai, the burgundy interior with light wood wainscoting is brightened with bowls of fruit, plastic flowers and embroidered gold elephant wall hangings. Restrained but welcoming. The service is relatively speedy, although timing a to-go order appears to require skill unless one wants to spend a fair amount of quality time cooling jets by the restaurant’s teak spirit house and cash register. For diners, the servers are exhaustive in their efforts. And even if the offerings aren’t as nuanced as some other local Thai places, it’s clear someone with a strong connection to the home country—maybe a former resident of Phaya Thai—is in the kitchen. The tom kha gai coconut soup is a bit sugary, but perhaps a bit more lemongrass would slice into the sweetness. Nonetheless, quite the value at $4.95. Thai places seem to define heat differently. At some, requesting “medium hot” still leaves lips tingling for many minutes afterward, while “hot” causes eyes to bleed and steam to gush from ears. At such establishments, “Thai hot” converts the average Westerner into a puddle of charred goo. Phaya is more circumspect in its application of heat. Medium is barely so, and hot is closer to medium. For many customers, friendly Fahrenheit Thai food would be very bitchin’ indeed. But here— where, within reason, the closer the centigrade rivals the surface of the sun the more enjoyable the repast—Phaya’s tamped down fire earns a mild criticism.

Also on the mild criticism list is the Three Buddies entree with deep-fried beef, chicken and pork over mixed vegetables. Thai fried—as with Thai sweet and sour—is far less heavy than entrees of the same name that are offered by the region’s northern neighbor, China. While lighter, it seems there are numerous ways to more grandly showcase beef, chicken and pork. More pleasantly provocative is the avocado curry. The expectation is a verdant sauce of pureed avocados hiding any number of deliciosities within. Instead, what arrives is more of a panang curry featuring myriad slices of avocado. Pork or

“Thai hot” converts the average Westerner into a puddle of charred goo. chicken might have been the better choice than beef. The avocado curry routinely appears as one of Phaya’s daily specials of which the duck and salmon options are of particular note. The beef salad is enough for two and does have some heated heft, although the height of the mountain on the plate comprises more iceberg than beef, tomatoes, scallions and carrot starbursts. Another salad worth consideration is one featuring a sweet, chewy sausage with plenty of cucumbers, red onion and mint. Refreshing, particularly on a hot Sacramento day. Finally, another nifty turn, as with the decorative bowls of fruit and vases of orchids, is found in the delicate corallike carrot flowers gracing each plate. Friendly, unpretentious and economical, Phaya might be a bit off the main track but worthy of a visit or two. Or three. Ω

FREE

TACO

*

*with purchase of 24 oz. soda Expires 6/31/12

THE V WORD About your wiener In the summer, nearly everyone wants a wiener. But before grilling that classic Oscar Meyer, think about the first time you learned what comprises a hot dog. Made you feel dirty, most likely. The ingredients: “mechanically separated turkey … corn syrup, dextrose … sodium nitrite.” (That last one is an additive to prevent botulism.) If you’re going to chomp a processed hot dog, try Field Roast Grain Co.’s vegetarian Frankfurters instead. It’s still processed and not that good for you—it has a similar amount of sodium, a comparable meaty taste, though it has less fat, and you don’t have to Google the ingredients to figure out what they are. And don’t even play the protein card: The Frank has 21 grams vs. Oscar’s piddly 5 grams.

Sacramento’s 1st Taqueria Family Owned since 1974 Corner of 16th & D St (916) 446-4834

—Shoka BEFORE

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DISH Where to eat? Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

Downtown

Estelle’s Patisserie With its marble tables and light wooden chairs, there’s an airy atmosphere, casual and cozy. Estelle’s offers an espresso bar and a wide assortment of teas and muffins and rolls for the breakfast crowd as well as sweets, including DayGlo macarons. For the lunch-inclined there are soups, salads, sandwiches and meat or meatless quiche. One of the authentic touches is the spare use of condiments. The smoked salmon is enlivened by dill and the flavor of its croissant. Its tomato bisque is thick and richly flavored, and, in a nice touch, a puff pastry floats in the tureen as accompaniment. Everything is surprisingly reasonable. Half a sandwich and soup is $7.25. A caprese baguette is $5.25. Ham and cheese is $5.75. There’s a lot to like about Estelle’s—except dinner. Doors close at 6pm. French. 901 K St., (916) 551-1500. Meal for one: $5-$10. ★★★1⁄2

Midtown

Mati’s There’s a reason “Indian Express” was part of Mati’s previous title. A variety of dishes are offered daily in a buffet, but Mom serves instead of diners slopping

stuff onto their own plates. Options are fairly straightforward: A small dish at $6.99 with rice and two items, and a large, which has up to four items, at $8.99. Subtract $1 if going vegetarian. There’s five dishes in the daily veg rotation, most of them vegan. Offerings run the gamut from mild to spicy, although the temperature of spicy is well within tolerance, except for the most heat adverse. This is straightup, nicely prepared Indian food without frills. Mom and daughter make it even more appealing. Indian. 1501 16th St.; (916) 341-0532. Dinner for one: $9-$12. ★★★

The Porch The Porch is light and white with a vibe that suggests the airy sweep of an antebellum Charleston eatery. One can only envy the extensive on-site research conducted by chef Jon Clemens and business partners John Lopez and Jerry Mitchell, creators of Capitol Garage. The most enjoyable menu selections are salads or seafood sandwiches or entrees. Slaw on the barbecue pork sandwich elevates its status, and its pickled vegetables are sweet and tart, adding an additional dimension. The shrimp and grits dish, while laden with cheddar and gravy, is a synergistic mélange— perhaps The Porch’s trademark dish. Also in the running is the purloo, the low country’s version of jambalaya, with andouille, crunchy crawfish appendages, and the same sautéed bell peppers and onions that also appear in the grits. Southern. 1815 K St., (916) 444-2423. Dinner for one: $20-$30. ★★★

The Press Bistro There are flashes of Greece, such as the

crisscross rows of bare light bulbs over the front patio. Or the summery small plate of stacked watermelon squares with feta and mint. Even Italian vegetarians get cut into the action with mushroom ravioli and its corn, leek and dill triumvirate. Another special is a colorful small plate of pepperonata—slightly-pickled-in-champagne-vinegar stripes of peppers awash in olive oil. Speaking of olive oil, it’s all that’s needed to accompany the fluffy, light focaccia, whose four rectangles come neatly stacked. Share The Press with someone you love. Mediterranean. 1809 Capitol Ave., (916) 444-2566. Dinner for one: $15-$30. ★★★1⁄2

The Red Rabbit Kitchen & Bar

Sampino’s Towne Foods

Thir13en From the start—and, lo,

Resistance is futile when it comes to Red Rabbit’s desserts. The berryinfused ice-cream sandwich is bright and refreshing with a chewy shell that dovetails neatly with the smooth fruity interior. But there’s less effusiveness for the entrees. The Bastard Banh Mi doesn’t improve on the original. A number of items from the “Farm to Plate,” “Tasty Snacks” and “Buns” sections of the menu land high in the plus column, however. Any place that offers chimichurri rocks hard. Here it enlivens the Farm Animal Lollipops snack—particularly the lamb—and the mayor-of-Munchkin-City-sized lamb bocadillas. American. 2718 J St., (916) 706-2275. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★1⁄2

Sampino’s Towne Foods turns out to be a bright jewel in a drab Alkali Flat strip mall of paycheck cashers and laundromat. It’s everything an Italian deli should be and more, right down to the Louie Prima on the box and the timpano in the refrigerated display case. Several lobbyists, who elect to drive the six to seven blocks from their offices near the capitol, to pick up sandwiches or—in one instance—five meatballs, begin spewing superlatives when asked their views on Sampino’s. Italian Deli. 1607 F St., (916) 441-2372. Dinner for one: $7-$15. ★★★★1⁄2

these many weeks hence—the situp-take-notice plate remains the pork tonnato sandwich. It’s the Italian peasant spread or sauce made with tonno—tuna—tonnato that empowers this open-face masterwork. Spread on a toasted half baguette, the tonnato is the foundation upon which the pork rests. Above the pork is an awning of mixed greens, with a generous overhang, sprinkled with not enough crispy onions and paperthin slices of pickled fennel. There isn’t space to wax poetic about the cordon bleu sandwich, the burger, the designer cocktails or the fizzy water from Wales. See for yourself. Very authoritative. American. 1300 H St., (916) 594-7669. Dinner for one: $12-$20. ★★★★1⁄2

EAT IT AND REAP

by GARRETT MCCORD

Food for your flight So I’m in Terminal B at the Sacramento Airport waiting for a flight to Seattle to go to a food-blogging conference. It’s my first time here, and I have to admit, this airport is quite spectacular. Especially, might I say, the food options. Let’s be frank: The meager options at the old terminal—and at the current Terminal A—leave me somewhat truculent.

Sprite in here (anathema to me, but I’ll grant a stay).

Old Soul Co. coffee gave one of my traveling companions a jolt that was a welcome respite from the regular terminal brew (read: Starbucks, also available). A surprisingly jaunty Esquire Grill is ready to seat you with some modern fare, if you’re the power-flyer type. For the laid-back traveler who has style and a more voracious hunger, both Dos Coyotes Border Cafe and Jack’s Urban Eats will satiate and satisfy.

But now, just up the stairs past the giant red rabbit sculpture and perhaps along a tram ride are options! I’m enjoying a rather jaunty cocktail at the Cafeteria 15L bar—something delightful with St. Germain, cucumber, gin, and I swear to God they slipped some

Well done, Sacramento. I must admit, you pulled this off nicely.

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Formoli’s Bistro Formoli’s is the other half of the restaurant swap on J Street that sent Vanilla Bean Bistro (formerly known as Gonul’s J Street Cafe) to Formoli’s old warren and brought Formoli’s into its current high-ceilinged, spare, dark cranberry space of black tables and chairs just six blocks away. Flavor combinations are a big part of the Formoli playbook, and the blend of the tower’s components is the payoff just as it is in the salad of beets—wafer-thin enough to be used interchangeably in the carpaccio—with shaved fennel, frisée, a few orange segments and pistachios laced with a stentorian balsamic vinaigrette. Mediterranean. 3839 J St., (916) 448-5699. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★★★ Juno’s Kitchen & Delicatessen To quote Gov. Jerry Brown from his first iteration as California’s chief executive more than 30 years ago: “Small is beautiful.” Juno’s proves this axiom in spades. The menu is fairly compact and slanted more toward lunch than dinner. Juno’s macaroni and cheese, which comes with rock shrimp on rigatoni, a Grana Padano, Gruyère and cheddar trio and a dusting of paprika, is a creative take on a comfort-food classic. In the traditional-sandwich realm, all start out with the advantage of Juno’s homemade sour—but not sourdough—bread with its crunchy crust and soft interior. In the soppressata salami

sandwich, the bread amplifies the tartness of the pepperoncini while the turkey sandwich with provolone, tomato, arugula and pesto requires several napkins as the oil in the pesto seeps inexorably through the airy bread slices. American. 3675 J St., (916) 456-4522. Dinner for one: $5-$10. ★★★★

Mamma Susanna’s

Ristorante Italiano There’s something endearing, almost Norman Rockwell-esque about a neighborhood restaurant that is most commonly referred to by its patrons as the neighborhood restaurant. There is no shortage of options on the menu with nearly a dozen or so pastas, even more types of pizzas, a smattering of salads and various entrees, including the piccata chicken or veal dish that Mamma Susanna’s counts as one of her specialties. Of the pastas and pizzas, the norcina tastes like and looks like an orangey vodka sauce with roasted red-pepper slices and sausage rounds tossed in a bed of penne. While the menu claims spicy, some red chili flakes do the trick. Italian. 5487 Carlson Dr., (916) 452-7465. Dinner for one: $12-$20. ★★★ Vanilla Bean Bistro Gonul’s J Street Cafe has moved up the street and evolved into the Vanilla Bean Bistro. Its narrow, lowceilinged coziness is consonant with its understated, whateverthe-impulse-inspires alchemy that owner/chef Gonul Blum, has shown over the past eight years. Blum hails from Turkey. That country’s culinary tradition provides a sturdy foundation, but for her, it serves more as a launching pad. A

recurring feature practiced here is the inclusion of fruit—preserved and fresh—in many dishes. And the tabbouleh delivers a roundhousepunch flavor combination. Turkish. 3260-B J St., (916) 457-1155. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★1⁄2

ILLUSTRATION BY MARK STIVERS

East Sac

panoply of French dip, hot pastrami, Reuben and so on. Among the signature offerings is The Gobbler. Turkey, natch. Cranberry sauce, natch. Then red onion, several roma tomato slices, a thicket of green leaf and pepper jack cheese, all shoehorned into a big baguette. Brewpub. 2743 Franklin Blvd., (916) 454-4942. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★1⁄2

The Wienery The Wienery is wondrous, metaphysical, even. This 35year-old East Sacramento landmark sells old-fashioned steamed franks and sausages. The menu warns that the Fiesta Dog— refried beans, onions, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and taco sauce—is “surprisingly good.” Who can quarrel with truth in advertising? Even a simple, straightforward creation such as the Ranch Dog, starring—natch—ranch dressing, can engender a “Whoa, tasty!” The sausages—such as the Polish or Tofurky Kielbasa—are grilled as is the bacon-wrapped dog with its not-easily forgettable jalapeño relish. American. 715 56th St., (916) 455-0497. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★

North Highlands

Las Islitas Scrawled on the front window below Las Islitas is the phrase “de Nayarit.” Nayarit is a state on the western coast of Mexico of which Las Islitas is a coastal town that, one must infer from the menu, goes for seafood in a major way. The shrimp a la cora serves up plenty of grilled, red-dusted, exoskeleton-stillattached shrimp sprinkled with chili that set off with tomato and cucumber slices and red onion half moon slivers. Spicy, messy and memorable. The cazuelitas is a cold seafood stew punctuated with tomato, cucumber, red onion, avocado slices and a lime sauce so intense that bits of tostada are needed to leaven its potentially overpowering impact. It’s a joyful discovery that appears to be complimented, as many of the meals are at other tables, with michelada in foot tall mugs with chili-peppered rims. Mexican. 3618 A St., North Highlands, (916) 331-4302. Dinner for one: $15-$25. ★★★★

Land Park/ Curtis Park

Pangaea Two Brews Cafe Tables, tall and short, are large and communal, fostering that casual camaraderie that should be the goal of any self-respecting brewpub. There’s a fairly extensive menu, including breakfast items. Not to put too fine a point on it: Pangaea’s offerings are not beers that will be found at a Save Mart Supermarket or even Nugget. They are nuanced. Brewed with artisanship. In some cases, for hundreds of years. There’s the usual

Super shawarma In the midst of a battle to save the planet during the recent superhero movie The Avengers, Iron Man tells Captain America that he craves shawarma. According to The Huffington Post, that single mention of the Middle-Eastern sandwich in the film boosted business for some California shawarma makers. Fine by me. Sacramento already has its fair share of delicious and underappreciated shawarma joints. One of my favorites is Pita Kitchen Plus (2989 Arden Way). The Mediterranean restaurant serves a mean (and large) shawarma sandwich—topped with a flavorful garlic tahini sauce—for less than $5. A slightly different version of the sandwich can be found at Babylon City Market (1745 Watt Avenue). Its version excels due to a combination of a freshly baked Iraqi bread called samoon, pickled veggies and your choice of meat. Both Pita Kitchen Plus and Babylon City Market also offer Middle-Eastern and international groceries. —Jonathan Mendick

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DON’T MISS IT!

stock up on music, movies & video games many items $1 or less LPs, DVDs, CDs, Laserdiscs, VHS, Video Games and more!

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More information: capradio.org/recordsale | (916) 278-8900

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by JOEY GARCIA

Joey

visited the Institute for Wishful Thinking.

Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

Oh, honey! Remember when he mentioned your workplace and you realized you had never told him? OK, if you were watching yourself in a film, the soundtrack would feature a crescendo at the moment your realization hit. Then, the audience would gasp. If a one-hour lunch produces that much dramatic tension, it’s not hard to imagine the chaos that a relationship would generate. So, no, you should not become his stepping-stone. If you do, you will always wonder if he was truly interested in you or whether he used you to get a job.

Don’t be flattered because a hot young man set a trap online for you. Think of it this way: A trustworthy man would have started his email with an admission: “Hello, (your online name here)! You look really familiar. I think I have seen you on the (your company name here) website. I am a (his profession here) and have been trying to join your firm for a while. Would you be interested in meeting and talking about personal and professional interests? Let me know at your earliest convenience. Best, (his real name here).” See the difference? Hey, don’t be flattered because a hot young man set a trap online for you. Protect your personal and career interests. This man’s behavior is predatory, not professional. Respond accordingly. One of my favorite things about retirement is being home alone. My wife is still working but plans

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to stop in about a year. It’s all I think about because I realize I don’t want to have to be her audience during the day. She is high-maintenance in the attention department, and it’s a relief not to have to be around her. I worry that I am headed for divorce, because I can’t imagine dealing with her all day long. Please stop worrying. The more you allow your mind to pretend it knows what will happen, the less freedom you have to experience and create an enjoyable life now. In a year, your wife could be a different person. You might be, too. So, surrender yourself to the present moment. Doing so will ensure that you have whatever it takes to face the future. And who knows? Your wife might busy herself with volunteer activities or shift into a fresh way to interact with the world and with you. I am struggling to stay on a gluten-free diet for health reasons. One benefit: I have lost 30 pounds. My co-workers, all female and overweight, are always pushing food on me and saying I’m too skinny. I have explained that I can’t eat the stuff they are forcing on me, but they act like I’m being rude. I need a snappy comeback, please.

YOU’RE WELCOME, TREES.

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question— all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential.

I had lunch with a younger, very attractive guy I met online. When the check came, he mentioned the place where I work by name. I was caught off guard, because I never told him where I work. He said he recognized me from my profile on the company website, had been trying to get a job there and asked if I would help. Obviously, it was awkward, but he has been leaving messages and sounds genuinely apologetic. He wants to go out again. I am not sure whether it’s a good idea, although we got along well. What do you think?

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Practice two magic words: Thank you. When a co-worker says: “You are too skinny.” Say: “Thank you!” If someone says: “I baked chocolate chip cookies from scratch. Have one.” Say: “Thank you. No.” If being honest feels too hard, examine why. The fear of not fitting in, for example, can become a filter. When people voice their opinions your filter translates every opinion into a stinging criticism. But if you trust that everyone is entitled to an opinion, responding to comments with gratitude is easier. Ω

Meditation of the week: “There are thoughts which are prayers. There are moments when, whatever the posture of the body, the soul is on its knees,” wrote Victor Hugo. Such moments of joy and of awe are frequent during the Sacramento French Film Festival, opening this weekend at the Crest Theatre (1013 K Street). See you there!

SUMMER

916.480.6227 www.livelinks.com

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Toke by Deedee Kirkwood STAGE Performances May 31â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 30 Thur thru Sat 8:00pm Matinee Performances Sunday June 3 + June 17 2pm ooley Theater 2007 28th St. Sac

Tickets $10 www.brownpapertickets.com

At the Ballet III: Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Touch This Sophisticated it ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;except for its piano-and-voice-only rendition of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stormy Weather,â&#x20AC;? perhaps. But At by the Ballet III: Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Touch This is as enjoyable Jim Carnes as shows come. It bristles with the energy and excitement of youth as it dashes through several decades of pop music beginning before its young performers were born and continuing through, oh, last month, maybe? Created by the brothers Stewart (Alex, 20, and Tim, 22), Found Space Theatre Productionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ATB III is a musical-theater fundraiser for the Sacramento Ballet, at

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At the Ballet III: Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Touch This, 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday; $15-$20. Found Space Theatre Productions at the Sacramento Ballet Studio, 1631 K Street; (916) 552-5800, ext. 2; www.sacballet.org. Through June 17.

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Shock and withdrawal Next to Normal

Since both shows originally received 11 Tony nominations in their New York incarnations, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s introduce Next to Normal (2009) as the polar opposite of Wicked (2003). Wicked is enormous and visually grand and won Tony awards for costumes and set. It also relies on well-worn characters and plot devices, and (box-office clout notwithstanding) a surprisingly slight score. Wickedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a colorful, relentlessly perky, and carefully engineered pop-culture confection set in a far-off fantasy land. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not much meat on the bones. Next to Normal is lean, close-to-home and realistic. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a music-driven musical, winning Tony awards for score and orchestration, plus a Pulitzer for drama (drawing comparisons to Rent). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about a prosperous family in which a devastating tragedy has sent the mother off the deep end, with far too many shrinks and pills. The combination of mental shock and withdrawal, the search for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;cure,â&#x20AC;? and the catchy rock score may recall Tommy, but Next to Normal is not a fable about fame. It is a family saga about love, loss and, ultimately, hope. It triggers deep feelings at visceral levels that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in the game plan for a glittering daydream like Wicked. This production by the relatively new Ewing Ventures is â&#x20AC;&#x153;high-endâ&#x20AC;? community theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;most actors and musicians are university trained and have worked professional shows; Bevin Bell-Hall and Jed Dixon do well as the leads. The tight band could handle a Music Circus show. The sound system sometimes muddles the lyrics, but that happens at Broadway Sacramento, too. PHOTO BY DEBBIE SOTO

Art MIX

Do you wanna touch?

1 FOUL

2 FAIR

3 GOOD

4 WELL-DONE

5 SUBLIME-DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T MISS

whose studios the performances are held. Alex Stewart, who is now an apprentice dancer with the company, created the first At the Ballet three years ago as his senior project at Natomas Charter School. He enlisted Tim, who also had attended the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performing and fine-arts program, and several of their friends to perform it. They did a second program last year. So far, they have raised more than $12,000 for the ballet company. The showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two-dozen songs are linked by a clever script that plays off the real (or perceived) personalities of the performers, from sage to simpleton, diva to dummy. They are all likeable in the extremeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and talented, too. In addition to the Stewarts, the performers include Ryan Blanning, Ruby Brungess, Urias Davis, Taylor Grossman, Hunter Guenza, Olivia Hughes, Annie Purvis, Julia Soto and Rebecca Yarborough. They are accompanied by the fine four-piece band Schlagel-Schlage and the Schlagettes. Also featured is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sean Nill,â&#x20AC;? in whose performance Tim Stewart has a hand. Young Carly Stewart (yep, a younger sibling) opens the show with MC Hammerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;U Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Touch This,â&#x20AC;? which scores high on the suck-you-in-with-cuteness chart. Among the highlightsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all expertly performed and some surprisingly stagedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Okay, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alright With Meâ&#x20AC;? by character Sean Nill; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forget You,â&#x20AC;? by Guenza; Grossmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rendition of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make You Feel My Loveâ&#x20AC;?; Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Single Ladiesâ&#x20AC;? that goes way beyond Beyonce; and the show-stopping finale, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somebody to Love.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jeff Hudson

Next to Normal, 7 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday; $30-$35. Ewing Ventures at the Nevada Theatre, 401 Broad Street in Nevada City; (530) 265-5462; www.ewingventuresnc.com. Through June 24.

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Now Playing

4

EDITH CAN SHOOT THINGS AND HIT THEM

5

HOW I LEARNED TO DRIVE

B Street’s West Coast premiere of this developmental work from the 2011 Humana Festival of New Plays is a tale of the formation of a very unconventional family formed by three teenagers in a stressful situation. T, W 7pm; Th 2 & 7pm; F 7pm; Sa 8pm. Through 6/17. $25-$35. B Street Theatre, 2727 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.com. J.C. Stephanie Gularte is outstanding as Li’l Bit in Paula Vogel’s play about a young girl learning her own sexual power while learning to drive with an uncle who has improper yearnings. Janis Stevens directs, includes an excellent supporting cast and a spare but exceptionally well-done set. W 7pm; Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 6/17. $20-$32. Capital Stage, 2215 J St.; (916) 995-5464; www.capstage.org. P.R.

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OR ELSE. LOVE,

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How I Learned to Drive: A little family goes a long way.

5

RECENT TRAGIC EVENTS

3

TOKE

A blind date between Waverly (Kassandra Douglas) and Andrew (David Blue Garrison) on September 12, 2001, quickly leads to a comic and philosophical discussion of free will and determinism, featuring pizza, beer, the novels of Joyce Carol Oates, a sock puppet, a neighbor (Jes Gonzalez) who can’t stop talking and his not-fully-dressed lady friend (Carrie Joyner). Under Gina Williams’ direction, it’s smart, tragic and funnier that you’d expect. Th, F Sa 8pm. Through 6/16. $10-$15. Big Idea Theatre, 1616 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 960-3036; www.bigidea.com. K.M. This likable coming-of-age-inthe-’60s tale is fun, but packed too full—sexual equality, veteran’s benefits, medicinal marijuana—and it overwhelms an otherwise fascinating life story that includes toking with the future governor and derailing a Baader-Meinhoff Gang demonstration with some well-placed hash. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 6/17. $10$15. The Ooley Theatre, 2007 28th Street; (916) 457-2129; http://ooleytheatre.org. J.C.

3

with SAFE.

TRIPLE ESPRESSO

Campy comedy with a metastructure, as the cheesy lounge act Maxwell, Butternut and Bean (Bill Arnold, Michael Pearce Donley and Bob Stromberg) performs for—and involves— the audience. It’s either family-friendly fun or a strange open-mic night, depending on your point of view. W 7pm; Th 2pm & 7pm; F

8pm; Sa 2pm & 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 7/22.

$20-$38; student rush available. The Cosmopolitan Cabaret, 1000 K St.; (916) 557-1999; www.calmt.com. J.M.

4

WICKED

Elphaba glows green and Glinda just glows in this alternative approach to The Wizard of Oz. Executed on a grand scale with a steampunkinspired set design and great chemistry between Glinda the Good and Elphaba the Mostly Misunderstood. T, W 8pm; Th 2 & 8pm; F 8pm; Sa 2 & 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 6/17. $25$225. Broadway Sacramento at the Community Center Theater, 1300 L St.; (916) 808-5181; www.broadwaysacramento.com. J.M.

Short reviews by Jim Carnes, Jeff Hudson, Jonathan Mendick, Kel Munger and Patti Roberts. Longer reviews of these plays are available online at www.newsreview.com/sacramento/home. BEFORE

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6/8/12 11:16 AM

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FILM Instagram-as-movie Moonrise Kingdom The new Wes Anderson movie is certainly a richer pastiche than anything else you’ll see at the mulby tiplex this season. And in its Andersonian Jonathan Kiefer manner, Moonrise Kingdom is a nourishing regressive pleasure, a sort of summer movie for grown-ups. Yes, the manner is mannered, but the intention is noble: to affirm the dignity of escapism by direct example. And so we find the New England island town of “New Penzance” sent into mild upheaval when a serious and sensitive Boy Scout (Jared Gilman) runs away with the headstrong misfit girl he decides he loves (Kara Hayward). This being a Wes Anderson movie, the kids are precocious: souls old enough to seem wise beyond their years or at least beyond the callowness imposed on them by limited life experience. Their elopement is a matter of mutual acceptance and a common want of freedom—hers from a house called Summer’s End, where her parents and younger brothers live in the resigned harmony of torpid estrangement; his from the clockwork conformity of the scouts, later drolly characterized as a bunch of “beige lunatics.”

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5 EXCELLENT

It feels good and righteous to root for these two, like reclaiming those pre-adult prerogatives once regrettably ceded to the pose of maturity. Wasn’t summer once supposed to be about the pure liberty of endless possibilities? Anderson still knows better than anybody how to survey the cusp of adolescence with all the existential angst of a midlife crisis, and, for relief’s sake, to salt his findings with droll irony. If there’s a basic problem here, it’s the same basic problem as in all of the director’s six previous features— namely, that his particular piquancy is not to every taste. Co-written by Anderson and Roman Coppola, and set in the 1960s, Moonrise Kingdom accommodates not just retro flourishes of Euro-mod chic, but also the emotional aura of some wistfully remembered Charlie Brown holiday special. Habitually, Anderson revels in bric-a-brac production design, eloquent riffs on stagings from his earlier films, and a tendency, abetted by regular cinematographer Robert Yeoman, to arrange

his stars—Bob Balaban, Harvey Keitel, Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, Edward Norton, Jason Schwarztman, Tilda Swinton, Bruce Willis—in handsome tableaux. It’s all very Instagram-as-movie, this transparently contemporary simulation of a bygone era, viewed through flaxen-tinted filtration and built for frictionless dissemination. Well, this is where we’re at now, and, to a large extent, Anderson is the guy who got us here.

Moonrise Kingdom accommodates not just retro flourishes of Euro-mod chic, but also the emotional aura of some wistfully remembered Charlie Brown holiday special. At times, even his props seem to be posturing. Gosh, what a beautiful sans-serif typeface the Island Police use on their car doors; might that be the same Futura Bold routinely favored by Anderson for his screen titles and credits? And gosh, just imagine all the wondrous young-adult adventures suggested by those library books stashed in the girl’s suitcase. (Or at least do look online for supplemental animations thereof.) Meanwhile, the filmmaker’s typically tasteful musical affinities lean here toward English composers especially; sometimes it seems like instead of a full film narrative, he should’ve just tried a music video for the entirety of Benjamin Britten’s A Ceremony of Carols. Which, of course, would be fantastic. But the movie’s characters—in particular its refreshingly unactorly protagonists, so poignantly and palpably unformed, and so nicely set off against all that art direction—seem quite helpfully peoplelike. All the grown-ups are in some way hapless, and therefore implicitly obliging to the youngsters’ enterprise. With heart-swelling sympathy and sincerity, Norton, as the scoutmaster, redeems potential caricature, and Willis stands out as the cop, a melancholy and reflective figure of earned adult authority. “It takes time to figure things out,” he advises the boy, tenderly. That might also be Anderson talking to himself. Moonrise Kingdom has a welcome new allowance of naturalness, particularly in landscape and weather. (Fittingly, the action takes place during the run-up to a storied New Penzance hurricane.) It is another of Anderson’s dollhouses, unavoidably, but with its windows open and without any shortage of fresh air in circulation. Except maybe for coherence, the film doesn’t strain, and if Anderson now lacks the will to innovate, he has traded it for the real benefit of relaxing into vision refinement. Now we know for sure that he makes movies, even summer movies, the way he must. Ω

by JONATHAN KIEFER & JIM LANE

5

The Avengers

2 5 0 8 L A N D PA R K D R I V E L A N D PA R K & B R O A D WAY F R E E PA R K I N G A D J A C E N T T O T H E AT R E “A HYSTERICAL HISTORY LESSON.” “BEGUILING AND ENDEARING.”

Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), Thor (Chirs Hemsworth), the Incredible Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) band together to defend the world from the dreams of conquest of Thor’s rogue brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) and a warmongering alien race called the Chitauri; the focus of their conflict is a source of infinite energy called a Tesseract, stolen by Loki, coveted by the Chitauri, and the key to the defense of Earth. Writer-director Joss Whedon (working from Zak Penn’s story and the Marvel Comics characters created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby) is back in top form, and the movie is tremendous fun—lighter and faster than Christopher Nolan’s Batman movies, and feeling an hour shorter. J.L.

4

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Dark Shadows

Johnny Depp shines, albeit pallidly, in Tim Burton’s over-the-top take on the late-’60s supernatural soap. Returning in 1972 after two entombed centuries to his coastal Maine homestead—and to an amorous feud with a jealous spurned witch (Eva Green)—Depp’s blue-blooded bloodsucker yearns for his true love (Bella Heathcote), befriends his baffled descendants (Michelle Pfeiffer, Jonny Lee Miller, Chloë Grace Moretz), and piques the interest of their in-house shrink (Helena Bonham Carter). With an exquisite collaboration between cinematographer Bruce Delbonnel and production designer Rick Heinrichs, and an occasionally hilarious but uneven script by literary-mashup maestro Seth GrahameSmith (see also: Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter), Burton’s movie sometimes gets away from him, blurring its own otherwise beguiling camp-gothic clarity. Depp’s soulful deadpan is the best thing about it—even when climactic contrivance or giddy overacting doesn’t agree with everyone else in the cast, which also includes Jackie Earle Haley and Alice Cooper as himself. J.K.

2

STARTS FRI., 6/15

“LIFE-AFFIRMING & FUNNY.” “PITCH-PERFECT PERFORMANCES.” “PLEASURE-FILLED JOURNEY.”

Bernie

A mortician in a small Texas town (Jack Black) befriends a rich, cantankerous old widow (Shirley MacLaine); soon they’re taking trips all over the world on her dime. Director Richard Linklater and cowriter Skip Hollandsworth (adapting Hollandsworth’s magazine article) recount the true story of Bernhardt Tiede, currently serving a life sentence for the murder of wealthy Marjorie Nugent. The movie adopts the style of a Dateline NBC true-crime feature, mixing dramatization and interviews with local townspeople (some of whom are the real McCoy). We’re probably not getting the whole story—we’re left with a clear impression that Tiede did the world a favor by blowing the old battle-ax away—but the movie is wry and stranger-than-fiction quirky, and Black gives the performance of his career (so far). J.L.

3

- Joe Morgenstern, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

For Greater Glory

Mexico’s Cristero War of 1926-29, an uprising of Catholic rebels against president Plutarco Elías Calles (Ruben Blades) and his oppressive anticlerical laws, forms the spine of this movie from writer Michael Love and director Dean Wright. The story deserves a better movie than it gets here, but almost any story would. Despite the bracing presence of actors like Blades, Andy Garcia (as rebel general Enrique Gorostieta), Peter O’Toole (a martyred priest) and Bruce Greenwood (U.S. ambassador Dwight Morrow), many performances are amateurish, and Wright’s pacing is a leaden, enervating slog. The atrocious handheld cinematography of Eduardo Martínez Solares doesn’t help, weaving drunkenly from one face to another, often cutting off chins and the tops of people’s heads. An epic story becomes an epic bore. J.L.

You know you’d feel better if you’d just plug it in.

2

SHOW TIMES VALID JUNE 15 – 21, 2012 OPENING FRI, JUNE 15

Hysteria

It’s hard to begrudge this innocuous film, except maybe for its innocuousness. So unchallenging that it becomes a challenge, director Tanya Wexler’s cutesy and inauthentic tale of female sexual liberation, written by Stephen Dyer, Jonah Lisa Dyer, and Howard Gensler, posits the invention of the vibrator as a bland comedy of Victorian manners. Hugh Dancy plays the exceedingly genteel inventor, with Maggie Gyllenhaal as a forward-thinking hothead suffragette who must teach him a thing or two. Also there are insubstantial parts for Jonathan Pryce, Rupert Everett, and Felicity Jones. Dotingly costumed and lit, narratively treacly and trumped-up, restlessly edited, and complacently condescending to its characters and its audience, the movie doesn’t offer much of real interest beyond a montage of evolving vibrator technology played out over its closing credits. And quite unlike, say, an orgasm brought on by the Hitachi Magic Wand, it just takes way too long to get where you know it’s going. J.K.

1

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted

Alex the lion (voiced by Ben Stiller) and his zebra (Chris Rock), hippo (Jada Pinkett Smith) and giraffe (David Schwimmer) pals are still trying to get home to New York, this time joining a circus and being chased across Europe by a Javert-like cop (Frances McDormand). Is this the worst animated-feature franchise of all time, or is it Ice Age? I guess it’s whichever you’ve seen most recently (Ice Age 4 is coming next month; oh joy). Anyhow, this one was rotten in 2005 and 2008, and by now it’s really beginning to stink. Directors Eric Darnell, Tom McGrath and Conrad Vernon give us more of the same nonstory, the same noncharacters to go with the star voices (including Sacha Baron Cohen, Martin Short and Jessica Chastain), the same frantic ingenuity untainted by wit or inspiration. And now it’s in 3-D. J.L.

4

Men in Black III

An alien criminal (Jemaine Clement) escapes from prison, goes back in time, and kills the Man in Black who sent him up: Agent K (Tommy Lee Jones). This leaves K’s partner J (Will Smith) the only person in the present who remembers him (the reason is foggy but never mind—if he didn’t, there’d be no movie), so J travels back to 1969 to work with K’s younger self (Josh Brolin) to prevent the murder—and by the way, also to save the world. Written by Etan Cohen and directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, this second sequel to the 1997 smash is a vast improvement over the first one, and may even be better than the original. The story is fast and funny (with a sweet and surprising twist at the end), the pacing sharp, and Brolin does a bang-up impression of Jones. The only drawback is the dim (and superfluous) 3-D. J.L.

2

Prometheus

With Alien, in 1979, director Ridley Scott, more or less invented the modern sci-fi horror genre; now he’s warmed it over with this prequel for no apparent reason other than the privilege of stealing back his own fire. Scott’s reclamation, expectedly engorged with pomposity and meticulous production values, also includes a few people or approximations thereof, most notably Noomi Rapace as a researcher investigating humanity’s otherworld origins, and Michael Fassbender as an inscrutable android. Gory

freakouts ensue, and Scott manages a technically impressive equilibrium between the sleekly gadgety and the grotesquely suppurating, but so what? Before long, it’s hard to tell between specific familiar franchise bits and general genre clichés, or to want to. Screenwriters Jon Spaihts and Damon Lindelof somehow turn a surplus of exposition into a shortage of clarity. There’s a lot of spelling out of what still amounts to muddled nonsense. J.K.

3

PEACE, LOVE, & MISUNDERSTANDING Rated R

Starring Jack Black

Fri-Sun 2:40 5:15 7:45 Mon-Tue 5:15 7:45 Wed-Thu 4:30 only

NOW PLAYING

MONSIEUR LAZHAR Rated PG-13 Fri-Sun 12:00 only Ends Sunday, June 17

OPENING FRIDAY, JUNE 15

Rated PG-13 Fri-Sun 12:15 3:00 5:45 8:15 Mon-Wed 5:45 8:15 Thu 3:45 only

Exciting premieres, classic French cinema, Special guests and more! www.sacramentofrenchfilmfestival.org

1013 K Street - 916.442.7378 join the list - www.thecrest.com

THE SACRAMENTO FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL

Snow White and the Huntsman

For the second time this year, we get a revision of the Brothers Grimm tale of the conflict between Snow White (Kristen Stewart, dull and lifeless as ever) and her wicked stepmother (Charlize Theron, snarling up a storm). Where Mirror Mirror was sweetly tongue-in-cheek, this one has delusions of Shakespeare; Theron seems to be auditioning for Regan in a production of King Lear (she’d probably be pretty good, too). With Stewart as the heroine, the movie is inevitably soft in the center, so it falls to others to hold our interest—Theron, Chris Hemsworth as the huntsman, Sam Claflin as a childhood friend. The seven dwarfs are created by digitally “shrinking” such pros as Ian McShane, Bob Hoskins and Toby Jones; their presence is a boost, too, though the movie is too dark and doomy to be really any fun. J.L.

3

BERNIE

NOW PLAYING

“Hilarious and Heartfelt! n enchanted ride of a movie. dream cast.” ROLLING STONE

A

A

PETER TRAVERS

THE NEW YORK TIMES

“Wondrously Beautiful. One

of Wes Anderson’s supreme achievements.” MANOHLA DARGIS

Think Like a Man

Directed by

Four couples (Michael Ealy and Taraji P. Henson; Romany Malco and Meagan Good; Jerry Ferrara and Gabriel Union; Terrence J and Regina Hall) travel the rocky road of romance, with the women taking tips from Steve Harvey’s book Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man. Keith Merryman’s script isn’t an adaptation of Harvey’s book, it’s a commercial for it, and a none-too-subtle one; Harvey makes several guest appearances, of course, and we half-expect him to say, “Operators are standing by.” Director Tim Story huffs and puffs trying to juggle all the stories, and things tend to bog down in the third act. Still, the actors are all extremely appealing (Henson and Union, as usual, particularly shine), and the movie goes down easily enough. Kevin Hart, as a newly divorced pal of the guys, has most of the best lines. J.L.

Wes Anderson

Written by

Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola

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Ten don’t-miss summertime music festivals

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When we’re at festivals, we get a good laugh out of the donkeys on sticks, neon flags and other identifiers people carry so friends can see them from  by SN&R staff far away. At first, we were like, “Why is that dude waving that Lindsay Lohan banner in the air?” But it makes sense, now: When you’re riding hard on ecstasy, you need some kind of randomness on a stick to snap you out of being so based.

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Nic Offer of Chk Chk Chk—shown here at last year’s Outside Lands festival—will throw down at this summer’s Launch Music Festival on July 28, in Sacramento.

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This year’s SN&R Summer Guide has an entire section dedicated to the season’s music festivals. Yet there are more. So many, in fact, that we dug deep into the Internets to custom tailor 10 summertime outdoor jives for your jam. And so: The Father’s Day Bluegrass Festival is so much better than bad barbecue and U.S. Open golf at Grandpa’s retirement home. Tickets are reasonable, the drive is lovely, and the party goes down this weekend: June 16-19, at the Nevada County Fairgrounds in Grass Valley; www.fathersdayfestival.com. If outdoor, remote electronic-dance blowouts are your bag, then, uh, bounce with it: The annual Bounce Festival in Plumas County on the Feather River returns this weekend, too, June 15-18. The event is nearly sold out—but just nearly (www.thebouncefestival.com). Drink lots of water. The Sierra Nevada World Music Fest in Boonville goes down June 22-24 (www. snwmf.com), but do not confuse this throwdown with the 16th annual California Worldfest in Grass Valley on July 12-15 (http://worldfest. net). Everyone’s favorite headliner pairing— Cake and Ani DiFranco?—lead the charge at

this year’s Worldfest, plus Fishtank Ensemble, Mumbo Gumbo, dozens more—and more red dirt than you can shake a walking stick at. Reggae on the River is one of those faraway summer jams (Humboldt) that most people don’t question making the drive for (because of weed). So goes the seductive powers of reggae and cannabis. Anyway, this year’s festival features Toots and the Maytals, Midnite and Tosh Meets Marley. And marijuana. (July 21-22, www.reggaeontheriver.com.) Speaking of which: This summer’s 22nd annual High Sierra Festival really ups the ante. There’s Ben Harper, Built to Spill, the Devil Makes Three, Railroad Earth, Deer Tick, Gardens and Villa, the Nibblers and four days worth of rock and Americana. Singleday passes are all under $100; four-day passes a steal at $200 (July 5-8, www.highsierramusic.com). If you can’t get enough of high-altitude yoga and Ziggy Marley, then hit up Squaw Valley for the four-day downward-facing-dog-down that is the annual Wanderlust Fest. This year’s gathering is the weekend of July 26-29 (http://squaw. wanderlustfestival.com). Sacramento’s own Launch Music Festival grows up this year. The main event will overtake Cesar Chavez Plaza on Saturday, July 28, and the headliners include Chromeo, DJ Shadow and Chk Chk Chk. See this year’s Summer Guide for more details (page 59) or visit http://launchsacramento.com. There’s a great video on YouTube of fans sneaking in to see Chromeo at an Outside Lands festival (don’t get any ideas, 916ers!). Anyway, this year’s Outside Lands, August 10-12, has some aged cheese (Metallica), stale pop (Stevie Wonder), French imports (Justice) and crusty bread (Neil Young). I keed, I keed: This is the region’s premier outdoor weekend of overpriced oysters and impossible parking; I wouldn’t miss it for the world (www.sfoutsidelands.com).

Don’t worry, white people: Ice Cube is in the house. Rock the Bells (http://rockthebells.net) rings out the summer, as usual, on August 25-26. Kid Cudi and NAS “headline” this year’s Shoreline Amphitheatre gig—yawn?—but there is a Bone Thugs-N-Harmony 20-year reunion (still yawn?). Anyway, don’t worry, white people: Ice Cube is in the house. OK, so that’s your summer. Save up that cheddar, because festing ain’t easy, or cheap. And you know the Republicans will be jockeying for higher gas prices, so plan to carpool. Or just stay in the pool. Ω

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Learn to be a

Whack piĂąatas, not emcees A rapper who still tries: There is nothing like hip-hop to remind you how old you are getting. I was 17 the first time that I snuck into a show to see 2Mex. The Shape Shifters were opening for Living Legends. I remember a group of us talking to 2Mex outside the venue, and how completely starstruck I was. More than 10 years later, I sat down with 2Mex this past Friday night at Marilynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on K, and while I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t starstruck, I was definitely struck by the conversation. A lot of rappers use the clichĂŠ of â&#x20AC;&#x153;doing it for the loveâ&#x20AC;? because they never got famous. But when you talk to 2Mex, you really do get a feel for his appreciation for the art of rap, and how it has always powered the Los Angeles underground hip-hop scene. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People say the L.A. underground isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t poppinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; anymore like it used to be,â&#x20AC;? 2Mex explained, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but it was never about being popular. It was about being good at rapping.â&#x20AC;? A decade after I snuck into my first Shape Shifters show, 2Mex proved he could still hold a crowd captive with machine-gun, doubletime chops.

I asked him whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s changed over the last 10 years (as though we were at some kind of high-school reunion). â&#x20AC;&#x153;At some point,â&#x20AC;? he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realized it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t about any kind of fame or recognition. It was just what I do. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m an artist.â&#x20AC;? After holding down at the Paid Dues Festival in front of 15,000 people earlier this year in April, 2Mex transitioned easily to an intimate, 40-person crowd at Marilynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Friday night. The event celebrated Mr. P Chillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday, and 2Mex played a 45-minute set, even taking requests from the crowd. 2Mex had two albums on sale this past Friday: Songodsunsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (his other alias) Fallinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Angels and Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No Time To Not Love You, an album of lost collaborations. With more than 35 albums in his discography, 2Mex is always working on a new project, but word is that plans are already in the works for a follow up My Fanbase Will Destroy You, released last year on Sage Francisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Strange Famous Records (you can check out more from 2Mex at www.strangefamous records.com).

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When I was leaving, I overheard a conversation with a fan who had obviously been listening as long as I had. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to see emcees that still try,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Andrew Bell

The sound of beating papier-mâchĂŠ with a stick: Muchos kudos to the folks at Sol Collective and elsewhere responsible for this Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s PiĂąata Festival. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the third annual, and while there will be musicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;El Indio of World Hood, La Misa Negra, DJ Leydis, and the Maquilla Tonatiuh Aztec Dancersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;what could be more rewarding that learning how to construct a piĂąata. And later whacking the crap out of it with a bat. Yes, who needs therapy? Especially when there will be food trucks, sugar skulls, arts and other vendors. This all goes down on Saturday, June 16, at Southside Park, at Sixth and T streets, from noon to 4 p.m. Get pumped up at www.facebook.com/pinatafestival.

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EYE-FI Sacramento live-music scene grabs PHOTO BY AMY SCOTT

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EIGHT GIGS

15FRI

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19TUES

Favors

Sactopalooza

Brian Jennings

The Parlotones

Luigi’s Fun Garden, 8 p.m., $6 There goes David Mohr again, quietly releasing more masterful indie pop and synth jams to the 916 masses. This guy is so consistent: Just listen to the seven tracks on Favors’ newly released EP, Keeper. There’s “Ghost in the DELL,” an uptempo party jam with a funny title and, at a quick-hitting three minutes, straight-to-the-groove styling. At once modern and retro, Favors’ two-bit, electronic sound escapes the trappings of bad pastiche rock and instead excels at being INDIE catchy dance pop. This is their last show for a while; catch them with Pets, Dante Bones and the Master System. 1050 20th Street, http://favors.bandcamp.com.

—Nick Miller

Sacramento Zoo, 5 p.m., $30-$40 If you ever wanted to attend a 21-and-over party at the zoo, here’s your chance. Active 20-30 Sacramento No. 1 hosts its annual party with live music, games, food and drinks. Featured musical FESTIVAL acts are two Southern California-based alt-rock tribute bands— No Duh (a No Doubt tribute) and Red Not Chili Peppers (a Red Hot Chili Peppers tribute)—and Sacramento’s DJ Rigatony (pictured). Other fun includes a mechanical bull, gladiator jousting and acting like it’s the ’90s again with a bunch of your highschool friends—plaid button-ups, bowl cuts and slap bracelets optional. All proceeds go to local children’s charities. 3930 W. Land Park Drive, http://sactopalooza.com.

Harlow’s, 7 p.m., $15

Shine, 8 p.m., $5 Often heard performing alongside pals Autumn Sky and Adrian Bourgeois and the hardworking indie rockers of Musical Charis, singer-songwriter Brian Jennings continues to find time to write new material at the end of the day. Commonly referred to by his colleagues as a “free agent,” Jennings strums his guitar during a variety of live shows and now, he’s perFOLK ROCK forming under his own name, sharing the bill with Nat Lefkoff and, of course, Mr. Bourgeois. Adding yet another band to Jennings’ never-ending résumé, the assiduous musician himself now leads B&B Music Factory, a classic-rock jam band. 1400 E Street, http://shinesacramento.com.

—Steph Rodriguez

The Parlotones are an arena act in their home of South Africa, making anthemic and grandiose music. Their mid-tempo, pianodriven atmospheric Brit pop arrives polished and richly textured, earning them gigs last year MELODIC ROCK opening for the similarly minded Coldplay. But guylinersporting frontman Kahn Morbee isn’t as angsty and bereft as Chris Martin, instead mixing in hopeful exultation to match the music’s heavily layered swell and sway. The quartet’s been at it for 14 years, releasing six albums in the last decade, including an acoustic album last year and May’s soaring release, Journey Through the Shadows. 2708 J Street, www.theparlotones.net.

—Chris Parker

—Jonathan Mendick

CELEBRATING OUR 20TH ANNIVERSARY ALL YEAR LONG!

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20WED 21THURS 21THURS 21THURS Liz Longley

Captain Amazing and the Okay I Guesses Old Ironsides, 9:30 p.m., no cover Captain Amazing and the Okay I Guesses is a mouthful of a name, especially for a group of apparent slackers. The group plays a wide range of styles, albeit filtered through indie rock, upbeat country or psychedelic pop. Underneath the drunken-slacker image, songs have a subtle complexity that suggests a lot of time and effort put in the music. It’s intimate stuff by awkward guys who have a lot to say, but don’t know how to ROCK say it in real life. The ironically lazy presentation is the just the way they’re most comfortable expressing themselves. 1901 10th Street, www.myspace.com/ captainamazingandtheokayiguesses.

—Aaron Carnes

Unwritten Law

Neal Morgan

The Palms Playhouse, 8 p.m., $20

The Boardwalk, 8 p.m., call for cover

Bows & Arrows, 8 p.m., $5

Chances are you’re doing something right if The Washington Post and John Mayer are singing your praises. Indie singer-songwriter Liz Longley’s music combines lyrical wisdom and understated performPOP FOLK ances, with the vocal beauty and vibrancy commensurate with her age. The mixture of subtle acoustic guitar, rich vocals and the poetic lyrics found in the romantic ditty “When You’ve Got Trouble” makes for an enchanting song, and the insight and power of the haunting piano-andvocals number “Unraveling” will stop you dead in your tracks. Longley is touring to support Hot Loose Wire and currently recording a new EP. 13 Main Street in Winters, www.lizlongley.com.

Unwritten Law’s Elva was the best rock album of the year in 2002. It featured raucous pop-punk tunes about staying up all night and vicious relationships. It ROCK also displayed dynamics, with songs like “Rest of My Life” and “Rescue Me” showing lead singer and songwriter Scott Russo’s vulnerable side. Eventually, Russo’s alpha-male tendencies forced his long-time buddies out of the San Diegobased group (several bandmates quit after a physical altercation in 2011). Russo is now the only original member—which is fitting, because he’s Unwritten Law’s heart and soul, and an underrated singer-songwriter. 9426 Greenback Lane in Orangevale, (916) 988-9247; www.unwrittenlaw.com.

Drummer Neal Morgan has some wellknown friends. Since supporting Joanna Newsom and Bill Callahan, Morgan’s name is becoming more commonplace. However, Morgan’s music is nowhere near the mainstream nature of Newsom or Callahan. Being a drummer, his odd a cappella-withpercussion style is a testament to his ability to create a comDRUM AND VOICE plete sound with so little. His latest album, In the Yard, was self-released in January, but Callahan’s Drag City label is handling distribution—which features a digital download of the full album, a karaoke version and a drums-only file of the single “Fathers Day.” 1815 19th Street, http://nealmorgan.bandcamp.com.

—Brian Palmer

—Jonathan Mendick

—John Phillips

RAW RADIO LIVE BROADCAST

THURSDAY, JUNE 14

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FRIDAY, JUNE 15

FALLAJAH

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NIGHTBEAT

THURSDAY 6/14

FRIDAY 6/15

Tipsy Thursdays, Top 40 deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Fabulous and Gay Fridays, 9pm, call for cover

BLUE LAMP

The Session, 9pm, $5

ALARMS, SUPPORT THE RABID, VIBRATING ANTENNAS, SHAMBIES; 9pm

THE BOARDWALK

ANYBODY KILLA, DIVIDED ALLEGIANCE,

BOWS AND ARROWS

NIGHTGOWN, PRAIRIE DOG, FLOWERSS; 8pm, $5

BADLANDS 2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 SYNDICATE OF SILENCE; 8pm, $15-$17 1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

THE CAVE

3512 Stockton Blvd., (916) 317-9999

EUGENE CHRISTOPHER, AUTUMN SKY, ATHEL; 8pm, call for cover

Sacramento Arts Collective event, 8pm, call for cover

Sierra Dance Institute in concert, 7pm, call for cover

Sierra Dance Institute in concert, 1pm and 7pm, call for cover

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

DISTRICT 30

1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

DJs Goldroom, Shaun Slaughter and Adam J, 9pm, call for cover

DJs Benji and Kristo, 9pm, call for cover

FACES

Deejay dancing and karaoke, 9pm, $3

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

FOX & GOOSE

12 MILE BLUES, RUPERT WATES; 8-11pm, no cover

STONEBERRY, ARDELLAS CROWN, STRANGE JEROME; 9pm-midnight, $5

WHITEWASH STATION, TAKILMA, THREE TIMES BAD; 9pm-midnight, $5

DJ Chrispix, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

DJ Alazzawi, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

Sin Sunday, 8pm, call for cover

STREET URCHINZ, JANETTE HAWKINGS, BURNING WAVES; 7pm, $6-$8

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

G STREET WUNDERBAR

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/18-6/20 Mad Mondays, M; Latin video flair and Wii bowling, 7pm Tu

VANISHING AFFAIR, DOWNSHIFT, JAXX, ARTISAN, BUILT THE STEREO; 6pm, $12

Sierra Dance Institute in concert, 7pm, call for cover

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

SUNDAY 6/17

THE LEFT HAND, DIRTY FILTHY MUGS, THE NUMBER 13; 8pm Tu, call for cover

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 271-7000

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

Saturday Boom, 9pm, call for cover

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798

Hey local bands!

BISPORA, JOURNAL, SOMA RAS, TAUNIS YEAR ONE, SYMBOLIK; 8pm

SATURDAY 6/16

Sierra Dance Institute in concert, 7pm, call for cover

Poetry reading w/ Phillip Larrea, Pieter Pastoor, 7:30pm W, $5

THE DESOLATION RAMBLERS, 8pm, $5 DJ JB, 9pm W, call for cover Dragalicious, 9pm, $5

Queer Idol, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, $5; DJ Alazzawi, 9pm W, $3 Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; Traditional Irish Jam, 8-11pm W

THE GOLDEN BEAR

DJ Shaun Slaughter, 10pm, call for cover

DJ Crook One, 10pm, call for cover

DJ Whores, 10pm, no cover

HARLOW’S

DARRELL SCOTT, 7pm, $24

FEVA IN DA FUNKHOUSE, 10pm, call for cover

THE BLUES BROADS, 7:30pm, $25; ROCK & RHYME, 10pm, $10

JAVALOUNGE

2416 16th St., (916) 441-3945

THE OUT-HIGHS, THE DAN DAN NOODLES, BEN STEINERT; 8pm, $5

BLAME THE BISHOP, MARK CROSS BAND, SAMANTHA ARRASMITH; 8pm, $5

GROOVE HEROES, 4pm, $5; DAVID HOUSTON, TISRA DEWITT; 8:30pm, $5

LEVEL UP FOOD & LOUNGE

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

DJ Rock Bottom and The Mookie DJ, 9pm, no cover

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

JEFF JAVA, 8pm, $5

THE TAYLOR CHICS, DAVID SILVA; 9pm, $6

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

MARILYN’S ON K

“Rock On” Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

DAD’S LPS, BLISSES B, THE JAY BAND; 9:30pm, $7

DOG FOOD, 9:30pm, $7

MRQ, 5:30pm Tu, no cover

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN

HUMBLE WOLF, VIA COMA, UNWANTED DROIDS; 8:30pm, $5

JONAH MATRANGA, 8:30pm, $10

COLD HEART REPRESS, THE CARBONITES, JOE FRIDAY; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz session, M; TIMOTHY MALAKIE; Tu, $5; JAMES ISRAEL; 8:30pm W, $5

OLD IRONSIDES

THE SPEAK LOW, EMILY O’NEIL, STEPHEN MARCH; 9pm, $5

BOCA DO RIO, BROTHERS CATATAYUD; 9pm, $5

STORYTELLERS, TRIBE OF LEVI; 9pm, $5

BLAME THE BISHOP, 7:30pm M; Karaoke, 9pm Tu; Open-mic, 8:30pm W, no cover

2326 K St., (916) 441-2252 2708 J St., (916) 441-4693

2431 J St., (916) 448-8768

1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931 908 K St., (916) 446-4361 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504

Industry Night, 9pm, call for cover THE PARLOTONES, 7pm Tu, $15; JOE CRAVEN TRIO, 7pm W, $15 THE INSIDE STORY, 3pm; MAN IN THE PLANET, BARREL FEVER; 8pm, $5 Hip-hop and R&B deejay dancing, 9:16pm Tu, no cover

EVERY MONDAY NIGHT: LIVE MUSIC 7:30PM / FREE! EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT: KARAOKE 9PM / FREE!

tHu June 14 7PM $24

WeD June 20 7PM $15

Joe craven Darrell trio sCott fri June 15 10PM tHu June 21 8:30 $15 the sizzling sirents feva in the present funkhouse “sirents at sea!”

with guests garrett perkins & classic chris Jones

fri June 22 10PM $10

hit’s the blues the “their Final show!”

sat June 16 7PM $25

broads

sat June 16 10PM $10

rock & rhyme tue June 19 7PM $15

sat June 23 10PM $12

miDnigHT PLAYERS

sun June 24 7PM $25

Muriel the parlotones ANDERSON

Coming Soon June 27 Russian Circles June 29& 30 tainted love July 3

James Hunter

July 6

Dean-o-Holics

July 7

Joel the band

July 14 Modern english July 18 steve Kimco July 19 asleep at the Wheel aug 1 aug 8

Paul thorn ottmar liebert

aug 10 fungo Mungo aug 13 Heartless bastards aug 18 Mother Hips aug 19 strung out aug 24 Dan Curcio aug 25 Hapa sept 13 Growlers oct 17 star f***er

Dress CoDe enforCeD (Jeans are oK) • Call to reserve Dinner & Club tables

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EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT: OPEN MIC NITE W/ NICO APPLEWHITE 8:30PM SIGN-UPS / 9PM SHOW / FREE! EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT: LIVE ENTERTAINMENT & DRINK SPECIALS / 9PM - 12AM

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THURSDAY 6/14

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MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/18-6/20

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

ZEROCLIENT, REVOLVER, MONOMYTH INCEPTION, MOTH ANATOMY; 9pm, $6

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Open-mic comedy, 10pm, no cover

KILLGASM, SEXCREMENT, HUMAN FILTH; 9pm M, $6; VALE OF DNATH, 8pm W, $8

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

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RON THOMPSON AND HIS RESISTORS, 8:30pm, $20

670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731 13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

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JAMES MCMURTRY, 7:30pm, $20

TARYN MANNING, DJ Gabe Xavier; 9pm2am, $15

DJ Spider, 9pm-2am, $15

Asylum Downtown: Gothic, industrial, EBM dancing, 9pm, call for cover

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2 STEPS DOWN, 9:30pm, call for cover

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2030 P St., (916) 444-7914

LEAP IN THE DARK, SWEAT DREAMS; 8:30pm, $3

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JAIL WEDDINGS, AUDIOFAUNA; 9pm, $5

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DEVIL WHALE, FRENCH CASSETTES, RANGE OF LIGHT, WILDERNESS; 9pm, $5

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CHRIS GARDNER BAND, 8pm, $5

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Blues jam, 8pm, call for cover

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JUSTIN FARREN, JUSTIN MCMAHON, THE DAN DAN NOODLES; 8pm, $5

ADRIAN BOURGEOIS, BRIAN JENNINGS, NAT LEFKOFF; 8pm, $5

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WILLIAM PATTON, MANTRA, OLD SCREEN DOOR, MR. ROGERS; 1pm

Open jazz jam w/ Jason Galbraith & Friends, 8pm Tu, no cover KEN KOENIG, ORANGE MORNING; 1pm, no cover

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ACE OF SPADES FRIDAY, JUNE 15

Street Urchinz with Janette Hawkings and Burning Waves 7pm Saturday, $6-$8. Bows & Arrows Reggae and rock

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ALL AGES WELCOME!

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DJ Mustard & Pushaz Ink The Casualties Lite Brite Fallrise White Monorities The Jacka & Husalah Reverend Horton Heat Talib Kweli Too $hort Moonshine Bandits Relient K Pacific Dub The Demon Hunter Attack Attack! Y&T Super Diamond The Word Alive Great White Stepchild Chiddy Bang Gift of Gab Full Blown Stone David Allen Coe Powerman 5000 Rehab Anthrax/Testament Kreator Hatebreed Steve Vai D.R.I

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GUIDE

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President Choom

S SA TOC Cr K Am TO eN N TO

How does Obama’s   pot-smoking youth align   with the federal crackdown? A new biography by The Washington Post’s David Maraniss titled Barack Obama: The Story, out June 19, has been making by waves, initially for its detailed descriptions of the presiDavid Downs dent’s weed-smoking days in Hawaii. Obama described some of it in his autobiography Dreams From My Father, but Maraniss goes into detail: Barack hung with a group of smart kids who liked to smoke weed and called themselves “the Choom gang,” choom being Hawaiian slang for smoke. Hawaii of the early 1970s was something of a pot-smoking mecca, Maraniss notes. “It was sold and smoked right there in front of your nose; Maui Wowie, Kauai Electric, Puna Bud, Kona Gold, and other local variations of pakalolo were readily available.” Unlike President Bill Clinton, who claimed he did not inhale, the Choom Gang would penalize tokers who exhaled too quickly for violating the gang’s policy of “T.A.” or “total absorption.” A regular bunch of hotboxers, the gang did “roof hits” off the vehicles they smoked out of. Young Obama was known for calling “Interception!” when he interrupted the smoking circle rotation to take an extra puff. According to excerpts: Obama’s pal Mark Bendix had a Volkswagen microbus known as “the Choomwagon.” They would often drive up Honolulu’s Mount Tantalus they Young Barack Obama where parked, “turned up was known for calling their stereos playing Aerosmith, “Interception!” when he Blue Oyster and Stevie interrupted the smoking Cult Wonder, lit up circle rotation to take an some ‘sweetsticky Hawaiian extra puff. buds’ and washed it down with ‘green-bottled beer’ (the Choom Gang preferred Heineken, Becks, and St. Pauli Girl). No shouting, no violence, no fights; they even cleaned up their beer bottles.” Plenty of folks are wondering how the president aligns the experiences of his youth with his position at the helm of an unprecedented federal crackdown on lawful California dispensaries in several states. Obama himself has said the federal government is not targeting individuals complying with state law, but that cannabis is still federally illegal. The Drug Enforcement Administration and Department of Justice cannot sit idly by as a cannabis industry rapidly matures. About 58 percent of Americans say they support legalizing the drug if it was sold at pharmacies. However, a popular majority does not equal political potency; votes and dollars do. Barack Obama: The Story illustrates the president’s cool, smart and maybe overly calculating personality development—pretty much the last guy to take a politically risky leap for legalization. All choom, no fire, apparently. Ω

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06.14.12     |   SN&R     |   93

by ROB BREZSNY

FOR THE WEEK OF JUNE 14, 2012

ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s time for

your right hand to find out what your left hand has been doing lately and vice versa. They’ve been attending to their separate agendas for a while, and now it would be wise to have them work together more closely. As they get reacquainted, a bit of friction would be understandable. You may have to serve as a mediator. Try to get them to play nicely with each other for a while before jumping in to the negotiations about how best they can cooperate in the future. And be very firm with them: no slapping or fighting allowed.

four-year-old actress Annalynne McCord has risen up in rebellion against what she calls “Hollywood’s perfection requirement.” Lately, she has been brazenly appearing in public without any makeup on. She has even encouraged paparazzi to snap photos of her in her natural state. “I’m not perfect,” she says, “and that’s OK with me.” I nominate her to be your role model in the coming weeks, Scorpio. You will be able to stir up useful blessings for yourself by being loyal to the raw truth. You can gain power by not hiding anything. (And yes, I realize that last statement is in conflict with the core Scorpionic philosophy.) Here’s my guarantee: It’ll be fun to be free of unrealistic images and showy deceptions.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Do you

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Nineteenth-century Russian novelist Ivan Turgenev once called his fellow novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky a “pimple on the face of literature.” But more than a hundred years after that crude dismissal, Dostoyevsky is a much more highly regarded and influential writer than Turgenev. Use this as inspiration, Sagittarius, if you have to deal with anyone’s judgmental appraisals of you in the coming days. Their opinions will say more about them than about you. Refresh your understanding of the phenomenon of “projection,” in which people superimpose their fantasies and delusions on realities they don’t see clearly.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Author

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Take a few deep breaths. It’s important not to get overly worked up about your recent diversion from the Truth and the Way. I mean, it’s not like you sold heroin to high-school students or dumped toxic waste into a mountain stream, right? It’s true that you’ve incurred a minor karmic debt that will ultimately have to be repaid. And yes, you’ve been reminded that you can’t allow yourself to lower your standards even slightly. But I doubt any of it will matter in five years—especially if you atone now. So please go ahead and give yourself a spanking, make a definitive plan to correct your error, and start cruising in the direction of the next chapter of your life story.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): There’s a wild zoo

about two hours northwest of Seattle. After paying your fee, you can drive your car through acres of land where large animals are allowed to roam free. When I took the tour, I stopped my rented Dodge Stratus by the side of the road to get a better look at a humongous buffalo with a humped back and a long woolly beard. It lumbered over to where I was parked and for the next five minutes thoroughly licked my windshield with its enormous purple tongue. My head was just inches away from its primal power, and yet I was safe and relaxed and perfectly amused. I wouldn’t be surprised if you had a comparable experience sometime soon, Leo.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the Biblical

book of Genesis, Jacob had a dream of angels ascending and descending a ladder that went up to heaven. I recommend that you try to incubate a similar dream, or else do some meditations in which you visualize that scene. It would help prime your psyche for one of this week’s top assignments, which is to be adaptable as you go back and forth between very high places and very low places. Heaven and earth need to be better connected. So do the faraway and the close-at-hand, as well as the ideal and the practical. And you’re the right person for the job.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Thomas Edison said something to the effect that a person who is thoroughly satisfied is probably a failure. I guess he meant that if you’re not always pushing to make your life better, you must not have very high standards or passionate goals. While I can see the large

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Twenty-

tionships that you call “friendships” may be little more than useful connections or status boosters or affiliations that enhance your power and influence. There’s no shame in that. But it’s also a smart idea to make sure that at least some of your alliances are rooted primarily in pure affection. You need to exchange energy with people who don’t serve your ambitions so much as they feed your soul. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to cultivate friendships like that. Take good care of those you have, and be alert for the possibility of starting a new one.

Steven Covey describes your “circle of concern” as everything you’re concerned with or worried about. Your “circle of influence,” on the other hand, is anything that’s within your ability to change right now. For example, you may have general long-term questions or anxieties about the future of your health. That’s your circle of concern. But your circle of influence contains specific actions you can take to affect your health today, like eating good food, getting enough sleep and doing exercise. What I’m seeing for you, Cancerian, is that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to spend less time in your circle of concern and more in your circle of influence. Stop fantasizing about what may or may not happen, and simply take charge of the details that will make a difference.

by KATE

grains of truth in that theory, I don’t think it applies in all cases—like for you right now, for instance. During the upcoming grace period, it will make sense for you to be perfectly content with the state of your life just as it is. To do so won’t make you lazy and complacent. Just the opposite, in fact: It will charge your psychic batteries and create a reservoir of motivational energy for the second half of 2012.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Some rela-

remember what you were doing between July 2000 and June 2001? Think back. Did anything happen then that felt like a wild jumpstart, or a series of epiphanies or a benevolent form of shock therapy? Were you forcibly dislodged from a rut by an adversary who eventually became an ally? Did you wake up from a sleepy trance you didn’t even know you had been in? I’m guessing that at least some of those experiences will be returning in the coming months, but on a higher octave this time.

15 MINUTES

PHOTO BY KATE PALOY

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Have you

ever tried to drink from a fire hose? The sheer amount and force of the water shooting out the end makes it hard to actually get any moisture in your mouth, let alone enjoy the process. On the other hand, it is kind of entertaining, and it does provide a lot of material to tell funny stories about later on. But are those good enough reasons to go ahead and do it? I say no. That’s why I advise you, metaphorically speaking, to draw your sustenance from a more contained flow in the coming week. Cultivate a relationship with a resource that gives you what you really need.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The coming

week will be an excellent time to declare your independence from anything that depresses you, obsesses you or oppresses you. You will attract help from unexpected sources if you take that brave action. At the same time, it’ll be a perfect moment to declare your interdependence with anything that fires up your imagination, stirs up smart hope or fills you with a desire to create masterpieces. Be adventurous as you dream about blending your energies with the very best influences.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18 or older. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

06. 14.12

When a vegetarian loves a steak Is it the sizzling sound or the aroma that renders us weak to the taste of meat? Our mouths water with craving, but for some, knowledge of slaughterhouse conditions makes eating meat a tough choice. Fortunately, a table has been set by vegetarian chef Bonnie Antonini, graced with animal-rights integrity and seasoned for the meat-lover’s palate. Her Vegetarian Cooking for Carnivores online cooking show caters to those who long for the flavor of meat, but choose not to consume it. Antonini grew up with meat on the table three times a day. Although she admits her first tofu hot dog was “awfully really awful,” she feels her show is a wonderful beginning for anyone thinking about moving away from a diet that includes meat.

Do you promote products on your show? I am not promoting any products. I’m not sponsored by anybody. Taste is subjective. I say, “Here is what I use. If you don’t like it, try another one.” We are carnivorous beings. I just think we eat so much [meat] that it promotes the abuse of the animals.

So you don’t have anything against steak? No, I like meat. That’s just it. I like the taste of it. If you want a steak, you have to have a steak. There is no fake steak.

When you decided to be vegetarian, did you research the treatment of animals? I was an animal lover. I started hearing about how the chickens were cooped up and how [slaughterhouses] were killing the cows. … I don’t want to be a part of that.

I didn’t do huge research. It just made sense. I should stop participating in this.

You don’t make your own?

Do you have a favorite recipe book you turn to?

No, I don’t. They would be hard to do. There are nut burgers. It has nuts, obviously, garbanzo beans and other ingredients. It looks the same, looks like a hamburger patty. A nut burger is just more creamy, and it tastes like vegetables.

No, I have a ton of books. I haven’t seen anybody do this. I know there are a lot of vegetarian cooks out there, but what seems to be lacking is the vegetarian cook that’s incorporating meat, imitation meat, into their dishes. Vegetarians often want to really disassociate themselves from the animal world, but I don’t want to do that. You are not eating real animals, but if you like the taste, why not incorporate the imitation stuff? Some of that sausage is really good. You can’t tell the difference.

What separates your dishes from other vegetarian dishes? People who are carnivores, meat lovers; we like the taste of it, the texture of it. We want it in our food. The important thing about vegetarianism is to stick with it, you have to be happy with it. If you feel like you are sacrificing when you’re doing it, you’re probably not going to stick with it for long. You are going to get lured by a beef taco somewhere. But if you find an imitation product to satisfy that little urge, you’re going to stick with it. Hopefully.

What’s your most prized recipe? One of my absolute favorites, and the one the kids have always liked, is the corn-dog recipe. I make my own dough and wrap it around the hot dog, and it put it in the oven.

What is the best burger recipe you have? I like the Grillers by MorningStar [Farms]. I like the Boca burgers. The imitation burgers are meant to taste like hamburgers.

Is imitation meat more fattening? I don’t look at the calories. It’s just like anything else, watch what you eat. I don’t eat too much of any one thing.

If someone is just coming into this vegetarian way of thinking, what would be your first suggestion? In a chicken Parmesan, for example, what you are really tasting is the cheese, sauce, breading. Take an imitation breast, dip it in egg, put it in the bread crumbs, put the mozzarella and marinara on top. It’s going to taste really good. It’s a combination of flavors. If you start thinking about recipes you like, you can insert the imitation products.

What is your most indulgent food? Anything chocolate is my favorite. I have been a chocolate lover since day one.

What’s the one kitchen tool you can’t live without? I would have to say the Cuisinart, the food processor. I love my food processor. I make all my doughs in there. Ω Watch Vegetarian Cooking for Carnivores at www.facebook.com/vegetariancookingforcarnivores.

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