RNR Nightlife 2017

Page 1

Inside 3

Intro

10

The breakfast club

5

Toast of the town

14

Dealer’s choice

6

Hitting the chocolate sauce

17

Lucky you

8

Something brewing

20

Game night

22

Bar of soap


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check out Anna Hart’s article on page 20 to learn about local establishments where the entertainment ranges from board games to bowling. If you’re a hands-on person, take a look at Kelsey Fitzgerald’s story on page 8 about Imbib’s brew club, which allows members to have a say in what’s brewed. And, just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, you’ll find a piece from our Drink columnist Marc Tiar about Irish bars. That’s on page 17. Perhaps you’re a night owl. In that case, flip to page 10 to read a story from Shaun Hunter about local bars that stay open to greet the sunrise. I’ve also got a few stories in here. On page 5, you can read about the Genoa Bar, the oldest watering hole in the state. Or—if you’re up for mixing household work with pleasure—you can check out page 22 to read about my experience of washing down a few beers while washing my clothes at Duds ’n’ Suds. Are you getting tired of drinking the same old thing every time you go out? Why not try asking the bartender to make you his or her favorite drink? I did, and I have to say—it was a lot of fun. You can read the recipes on page 14. Happy reading, and, please, don’t drink and drive!

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ere at the RN&R we take our jobs, if not ourselves, pretty seriously. We love that you turn to us when you’re curious about what’s going on with local government, the arts scene or—in this case—booze. I’m not being facetious here, because the truth is, regardless of the subject matter, there’s a common thread that runs among every story we write. That thread is people. It’s the locals who pour their passions and hard work—sometimes literally—into this community. And the folks behind the watering holes we all know and love are the very definition of hardworking. So let’s raise a glass to our local barkeeps, mixologists and brewers and the damn fine job they do. This year, we’ve put together a guide that has a little something for everyone. On page 6, our food writer, Todd South, has a piece about boozy desserts and where to find them. And if you’re looking for more than a place to sit and have a few drinks,

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Genoa Bar

Toast town of the

By JeRi Chadwell-SiNGley

here were pickups parked on the sidewalk outside the 164-yearold Genoa Bar on a brisk Friday night in February. The tail end of winter isn’t really tourist season for Nevada’s historical towns, so the din coming from the little brick building with its crown of red string lights promised a chance to mingle with the locals at “Nevada’s oldest thirst parlor.” Inside, the long bar was already crowded with bodies—sporting denim and slacks, cowboy boots and loafers. At a quarter past 8 p.m., the Lost Reverends of the High Sierra kicked off their set, and those bodies packed the wooden dance floor.

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Out of the woodwork Genoa Bar is owned by Willy and Cindy Webb, who purchased it from the previous owners in 2000.

Genoa Bar was packed on a late winter evening when the lost Reverends of the High Sierra played there. PHOTO/JERI CHADWELL-SINGLEY

“It’s like a museum, you know,” Willy said. He’s right. The walls are covered in memorabilia, from animal skulls and mounted heads to paintings and photos. The varied accumulation of cobwebs and dust hints at the respective ages of these artifacts. A red, oil lamp chandelier above the bar is original. It was lit a decade ago when a days-long power outage in Genoa forced the bar to rely on candles for light and snow brought down from the mountain to cool beers. Since then, the Webbs have made it a tradition, hosting unplugged, candlelit New Year’s Eve parties. Before retiring from carpentry and buying Genoa Bar, Willy built and remodeled many a thirst parlor for the casinos in Stateline. “I built dozens of them,” he said. “I never ran one or worked in one. But as a builder, I knew what made them work.” When the opportunity to buy Genoa Bar presented itself, he felt that he had the skills necessary to make a go of it. Of course, the plan was never to remodel the historic bar. Changing the crowded, comfortably worn interior would be too close to sacrilege. Willy did, however, redo the electrical and the plumbing. Not everything about Genoa Bar is old fashioned. In fact, the cocktail menu would give even the swankest bar in Reno a run for its money. Willy gives the credit for this to his two daughters, who both work at the bar. The drinks they crafted have names pertaining to the bar’s history. For example, the Diamond Dust Margarita is named after the mirror behind the bar that made its way from Glasgow, Scotland, to Genoa in the mid-19th century. And then there’s Red’s Ghost Beer. “We have several ghosts in the bar,” Willy said. “I kid you not. We’ve been investigated three times in the last 12 years or so by paranormal investigators that are the real deal.” At first, Willy said, he was a skeptic. But two of the three investigative groups told him they were picking up signs of a ghost named Red, a biker involved in a love triangle that culminated in his death. His lover was purportedly a biker prostitute named Minnesota Minnie. “Which is a perfect name for a biker prostitute, I guess,” Willy said. According to Willy, both of the paranormal investigation groups 03.09.17

arrived at another corroborating conclusion. Red was in Genoa Bar because he liked the old jukebox. Unfortunately, a few years ago, the jukebox had to go. Some licensing complication forced Willy to replace it with one of the now ubiquitous internet jukeboxes. “I went in there about 6 in the morning and just had a little sit down with Red,” Willy said. “And I said, ‘Red, look, I’m really sorry I had to get rid of your jukebox. I know you love it, but, here, I’ll play a bunch of Rolling Stones for you.’ It was just me and Red and the jukebox at 6 o’clock in the morning with the Rolling Stones blaring.”

“It was just me and Red and the jukebox at 6 o’clock in the morning with the Rolling Stones blaring.” WIlly WeBB Genoa Bar owner

in good spirits When the band came back after a short set break, there was no sign of Red the ghost. The wood burning fireplace and bodies packed into the bar left no room for a chill that might be construed as a spectral presence. Yet, the music seemed to call up a different kind of spirit—that of good times past. As the Lost Reverends of the High Sierra sailed through blues and country and vocal jazz it was easy to see what past musician visitors—from Willie Nelson to John Denver—saw in this place. Ω

Genoa Bar is at 2282 Main St., Genoa. learn more at www.genoabarandsaloon.com.

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Hitting the chocolate sauce By todd south

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he association of alcohol and dessert might have begun with sweet beverages intended as companions to after-meal bites, or as treat on their own. Sweet wines, liqueurs and various herbal potions deemed “bitters” have long been imbibed as digestifs, e.g., elixirs intended to aid digestion. Although I appreciate a well-executed dessert, I’m more apt to opt for an after-dinner cocktail. Call me a traditionalist. However, when done right, there are some meldings of booze and sweets that are tough to turn down. The pairing of red wine with chocolate is well known, but how about taking that combination a step further? Food cart vendor Winey Munkies, wineymunkies.com, offers ice cream and sorbet with wine as a primary ingredient ($5 per generous scoop). Although the strawberry pinot grigio has a very nice, fresh berry flavor, the chocolate merlot sorbet is a much more complex, smooth concoction that definitely hits that wine-plus-cocoa mark and then some. Ice cream is probably my favorite dessert item, and my family has a tradition of making it at home. A couple of my favorites include bourbon toasted pecan and a strawberry/ cherry ice, spiked with kirschwasser—cherry liqueur. Sharing space with a sandwich shop, Icecycle Creamery, 6147 Lakeside Drive, has many hooch-infused and inspired frozen treats. Regular items on the menu include cherry merlot sorbet, mimosa sorbet, rum raisin, coconut mojito and pina colada—the latter two containing no actual alcohol ($2.50 per scoop). I sampled a specialty batch of bourbon and peach called “I Do Declare,” which I’m pleased to hear makes a frequent appearance in the line-up. In recent years, hard root beer has become a bit of a fad, resulting in restaurants and bars offering a buzzed up take on the classic float. The Twisted Fork, 1191 Steamboat Parkway, has an adult root beer float ($9) featuring the hard stuff, vanilla bean ice cream, chocolate sprinkles and a cookie straw. What does it taste like? It’s a really, really sweet version of the original—one that will get you hammered if you can stand to consume more than one. When anyone mentions liquor and dessert, tiramisu is always top of the list. An assembled cake of mildly sweet ladyfinger biscuits dipped in a mix of espresso and booze, layered in a pan with a custard of eggs, sugar, mascarpone cheese and cocoa. Depending on the recipe, the liquor could be Marsala or Madeira wine, dark or coconut rum, port, brandy, Irish cream, amaretto or coffee liqueur. Sardina’s Italian

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Indulge your sweet tooth with boozy desserts

Bistro, 7499 Longley Lane, makes my favorite version ($7), soaked in a combination of brandy and rum with an exceptionally creamy texture. The serving is big enough to share with a companion, assuming they’re in the mood to share. Your grandma’s bread pudding usually starts with stale bread that is repurposed into dessert by cutting it into cubes and soaking those in a mixture of eggs, milk, butter, sugar and cinnamon. This is then spread into a pan and baked until the whole thing becomes a sort of sweet, doughy omelet, something I’ve never been entirely hip to. Traditional sauces drizzled over a serving include caramel, vanilla or maple—you name it, so long as it’s sweet and viscous. But for my money the best versions include bourbon; if your grandma included a bit of whiskey kick, you were one lucky grandkid. Centro, 236 California Ave., is a bastion of small plates and creative cocktails. Here you’ll find a version of bread pudding ($8) unlike any other I’ve seen. Described somewhat awkwardly as a “pecan pie croissant bread pudding waffle,” it is definitely all of that—in a mad scientist mashup of flavor and texture. The bread base is croissant, perhaps adding a bit of flakiness to the party. They then churn that into a sort of batter and iron it into waffle sticks. These are then drizzled with a pecan-bourbon-caramel sauce and paired with a dollop of maple vanilla whipped cream. The combination is almost certainly unlike anything you’ve had, and could convince even a skeptic that bread pudding is a good idea. Bananas Foster is another classic, created in 1950s New Orleans—back when lighting stuff on fire at the table was a thing people paid extra for. Apparently that hasn’t gone away, because I found more than one casino and other “old school” fine dining establishment in Reno offering this gem. Lengthwise-sliced bananas are sauteed in a sauce of butter, brown sugar, cinnamon and dark rum. Banana liqueur or brandy is then added to the pan and ignited en flambe, served up to you hot and caramelized. For a better than average presentation, Sierra Street Kitchen & Cocktails, 50 N. Sierra St., produces a decent version ($9.50) suitable for two, although this one is made from the safe confines of the kitchen. Ω A speCiAl supplemeNt to ReNo News & Review

Icecycle Creamery serves up a peach-bourbon concoction called “I Do Declare.” Photo/jeri chadwell-singley


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Something

A look inside the barrel with the Imbib Collaborator Club

i brewing By Kelsey FitzGeRAld

Matt Johnson and the other owners of Imbib used crowdfunding to get start their brewery. PHOTO/KELSEY FITZGERALD

For more information on Imbib Custom Brews or the Collaborator Club, visit imbibreno.com or call 470-5996.

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t has been a year and a half since Matt Johnson, Jason Green and Bart Blank— co-founders of Imbib Custom Brews—opened the doors of their brewery on East Second Street, after a successful crowdfunding campaign. A community-oriented endeavor from the get-go, more than $28,000 was raised on Indiegogo in support of the creation of “a brewery that will engage you in the process of creating beer.” Today, in addition to running a busy taproom, the team at Imbib works to engage a growing crew of community supporters through a membership-based beer club called the Collaborator Club. The Collaborator Club is not the type of club that has meetings, or uniforms, or special handshakes. It does, however, involve drinking beer—special beer. “The idea is to offer something to our most loyal customers,” said Johnson. “It’s a chance for them to get some exclusive beers that we don’t always release to the general public. Even when we do, the collaborators are getting that beer well in advance. The concept is much like a wine club, where they pay an annual fee, and they get an allotment of those special beers throughout the year.” Members of the Collaborator Club receive 16 large bottles per year of special release Imbib beers, in exchange for an annual membership fee ($200 for 2017). Throughout the year, members provide input into the brewing process via surveys—styles they like or don’t like, ideas for specialty and experimental ingredients—and give feedback about the beers that they receive. Members also receive a 15 percent discount on anything they purchase in the taproom and access to occasional special events. A typical member? “I would call them a beer geek,” said Johnson. “Not a beer snob, but somebody who really likes to taste new flavors and likes when breweries really push the boundaries of things. Typically somebody who is a pretty serious connoisseur of good craft beer.” Club members do not get to help with the brewing, but their feedback and ideas for ingredients are used to help the brewers determine what to brew next. This is where the collaboration comes in. So far, beers brewed for the Collaborators have included a wide variety of flavors and styles—everything from wine-barrelaged Belgian strong ales to hoppy beers to sour beers. One of the most unusual recipes they’ve tried, based on Collaborator Club suggestions, was an Ancho Chili Stout, Johnson said. “You’re taking on some risk because you don’t know what you’re going to get, but that’s kind of the fun part of it for a lot of people,” Johnson said. “They trust that we’re going to make something good. They just don’t know what it’s going to be.”

Since opening the brewery in 2015, the Imbib brew crew has produced more than 50 unique beers. They brew a variety of styles but specialize in oldworld, barrel-aged beers. For those not familiar, “old world” beers are styles that originated in Europe, such as English, German or Belgian-style beers. “Barrel-aged” beers are just what they sound like: beer that is aged in a barrel (a wine or whiskey barrel, for example), absorbing some of the flavor over time. Many, but not all, of the Collaborator Club releases have been barrel-aged beers. “There’s a little bit more that goes into barrelaging beer, because you have to kind of let go of control of the beer,” Johnson said. “You have to be able to know when that beer is soured enough or is funky enough. And then there’s a lot of blending that goes on. It’s really this fun, artistic side of brewing on the back end where you’re trying to create flavors that are balanced and interesting, but that you couldn’t achieve without sitting in a barrel and aging over time.”

“They trust that we’re going to make something good. They just don’t know what it’s going to be.” MATT Johnson Imbib co-owner

The Collaborator Club came about as part of the brewery’s initial crowdfunding campaign, Johnson said. One of the perks that you could select when donating was a membership. Now in its second year, the Collaborator Club has grown to about 50 people and is no longer taking new members for 2017—however, they hope to expand the size of the club next year, possibly doubling the size of current membership. They will start taking signups for 2018 in October. In addition to the Collaborator Club, Imbib encourages community engagement via beer education classes held at the brewery throughout the year, including an upcoming sensory series. “It’s kind of a night to learn about beer and geek out a little bit on beer, but really to train your senses so that you can identify flavors and aromas that you like or dislike, and understand why they might be in the beer,” Johnson said. “We also teach a beer judge certification class every year. That’ll probably be happening around September.” Ω


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The breakfast club By shAuN huNteR

Bob & Lucy’s Tavern is among the local bars that cater to the morning crowd. PHOTO/SHAUN HUNTER

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espite Reno being known as a 24-hour city, any insomniac, graveyard shift worker or Las Vegas transplant can tell you that after 2 a.m., you might be hard-pressed to find food or drinks without having to venture into a casino. And after 4 o’clock, you’re most likely stuck having your nightcap in the 7-11 parking lot. But what if you close out at Reno’s latest of the late-night bars, and you’re still not ready to call it a night? A friend and I decided to do just this recently. A couple of questions came up immediately. Should our childhood suspicions of about the kinds of adult parties that took place after our bedtimes apply to this as well? And if a bar serves food around the clock, just when is the kitchen cleaned? My friend Nicolette and I decided to spend a weekend venturing out at hours when there’s no semblance of wholesomeness to be found—to flex our characteristically Nevadan right to order drinks and keep ’em coming until the new day’s sunlight burned outside and people far more respectable than us started their commutes to work. We were looking for Reno’s real 24-hour establishments.

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A drinking guide for morning people

Nicolette and I started after 4 a.m., when the bulk of the night crowd had long since made their questionable decisions, settled their tabs and Lyfted home. Who would be left sitting when the lightweights had fallen? It’s been a few years since I’ve been likely to catch myself searching for an OPEN sign at 5 a.m. And there seem to be fewer of them now. One bartender observed that the 2006 statewide smoking ban in bars that serve food had caused a decline 24-hour bars. Old standbys like the Wonder Bar have painted over their outer wall advertisements for 6 a.m. happy hours. And questionable hangouts like the Zephyr Bar (now Z Bar) on South Virginia street have changed ownership, been remodeled and begun shutting their doors at a “reasonable” hour.

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There are, of course, some wellknown all-night spots like the Alibi and Shea’s. But we wanted find a few places more off the beaten path. On Friday, I decided that, to keep things gritty, I’d stay up until Nicolette and I met at 4 a.m. Nicolette, on the other hand, had set her alarm to wake her up for our plans. Doc Holliday’s, 120 E. Second St., was our first stop. When we settled onto our seats at the bar around 4:30 a.m., it was still crowded. Most of the bar stools were taken, and a group was playing pool. The bartender took our order and explained that it was her first night. We made it easy on her, ordering a beer and a gin and tonic. It felt pretty much like any other night, except it was morning. Some women beside us slurred through their conversation, chain

smoking and hardly touching their half-empty beers. The bar went silent when a rag tag gang of younger guys wearing black uniform shirts and black latex gloves walked through the front door, along with an older woman and a squat, gray-haired man—both wearing nametags identifying them as Cal Neva casino security. “Did two white guys just run in here?” the woman demanded, eyeing everyone at the bar, before settling on two men who fit the description. “Nah, they’ve been here awhile,” one of the pool players said. The room took on the tense feeling, as if the patrons were banding together against these self-important intruders. But the security guards soon left. And we decided to head out for our second stop. “I’m just covering between bartenders and don’t know what’s in


that,” the bartender said to Nicolette when she ordered from the menu at Atomic Bootlegger inside the Travel America truck stop, 200 N. McCarran Blvd. To make things easy, we settled on two beers. Atomic Bootlegger is a deceivingly nice bar—probably not what most would imagine to be inside a truck stop in Sparks. A few people sat at the bar, but the oversized chairs and tables on the floor were empty. As Nicolette and I pondered over what appeared to be a trend—giving the new person the late shift—one by one, the stools emptied. The blasting music and multiple TVs replaying sports highlights were all for an empty house. We soon left, weaving through the banks of playerless slot machines, and headed toward our final stop in Sparks.

wrapping up their darts game, and the bar stool crowd had the excitement of a funeral procession. Drinking a kamikaze and a gin and tonic, we were again watching the night crowd slowly take their leave. The evidence to back up my theory about the late night hours being a refuge for the truly committed—those whose livers will one day be harvested to line the exterior of space craft—was looking scant. Was it possible they’d all abandoned the bars and fled in search of that late night greasy meal? Is there a point when Jox clears out and Roberto’s Taqueria becomes the epicenter of the party? To answer this, we went across the street to the Lucky Beaver, 3655 S. Virginia St., where the kitchen is open 24 hours a day. The cook and bartender stood behind the bar, but otherwise the room was empty. We took

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It felt pretty much like any other night, except it was morning. Bob & Lucy’s Tavern, 1515 Oddie Blvd., is a small and otherwise unassuming boxy building with a few electronic games. On the way in, we stopped to see the sky in the east changing with the first light of day. After being buzzed in, we found the air inside smoky and the bar empty save for the bartender. Experience has taught me that sometime around midnight to 2 a.m. in Reno, when many bars close, bars like 5 Star Saloon, Our Bar and Tonic get busy. But it seemed that the 24-hour joints don’t get a similar rush when these later-night bars close. The woman tending bar at Bob & Lucy’s was unusually friendly—to a degree I would not have expected at that early hour. She even invited Nicolette to fill her rum and Coke from the soda dispenser adjacent to the bar as she returned to vacuuming the floor. A little later a well-dressed couple walked in and greeted the bartender by name. “Are you drinking this morning?” she asked them. “Not today, sweetie. We’re headed to church.” This seemed as good a cue as any to wrap up our night. We closed our tab and walked outside into the 9 a.m. sunlight. For our second night we decided to head first in the direction of South Reno. Jox Sports Bar, 3652 S. Virginia St., sits in the shadow of the Atlantis. The neon-lit windows of the bar shined outside, while smoky air, floor-to-ceiling sports memorabilia and music from my dad’s era filled the room inside. A few people were

a table and ordered burgers, noticing the sky change to light through the large windows lining the wall. “You should’ve seen this place about an hour ago,” the bartender told us. We were quickly learning that this seemed to be the standard small talk at this hour. All of a sudden, flashbacks to the decadence and unthinkable scenarios—like ice cream binges and TV!—I imagined went on after my childhood self was sent to bed disintegrated. Maybe my parents were being truthful, and I really wasn’t missing out on much. While our sleep-deprived and hazy selves were eating our burgers and contemplating this completely upturned order of things, cleaning staff began making their way throughout the dining area with a vacuum. We made a final stop at Flowing Tide Pub, 9570 S. McCarran Blvd. This time we weren’t surprised by the empty room. It was Sunday morning, and bright sunlight bled through the tinted glass on the doors. I thought to myself that the ’80s new wave playlist was far better than anything else we’d listened to over the past two nights. If we learned anything, it’s that maybe there is a valid reason not many places are open 24 hours anymore. “This place was packed a couple hours ago.” “Of course,” we thought taking our seat. And then Nicolette and I ended our foray into Reno’s nightlife netherhours the only way that seemed logical and appropriate—by ordering a fishbowl of overly sweetened fruit juice and liquor at 9 a.m. on a Sunday. Ω 03.09.17

RN&R Bars & Clubs Guide

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ADele’s RestAuRANt & louNGe 1112 North Carson St. Carson City, NV 89701 www.adelesrestarantandlounge. com

ButteRFlY BAR AND CAsCADe louNGe Inside Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. Reno, NV 89595 www.grandsierraresort.com 775-789-2000

viNYl

RoYCe

Inside Hard Rock Hotel 50 Highway 50 Stateline, NV 89449 www.hardrockcasinolaketahoe. com 844-588-7625

115 Ridge St. next to Old Granite St. Reno, NV 89501 www.roycereno.com 775-440-1095

sieRRA GolD AlpiNe uNioN BAR Inside Hard Rock Hotel 50 Highway 50 Stateline, NV 89449 www.hardrockcasinolaketahoe. com 844-588-7625

CARGo CoNCeRt HAll

Listings

Inside Whitney Peak Hotel 255 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.whitneypeakhotel.com 775-398-5454

CoppeRtop BAR Inside Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. Reno, NV 89595 www.grandsierraresort.com 775-789-2000

CRYstAl BAR Inside Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. Reno, NV 89595 www.grandsierraresort.com 775-789-2000

FiltHY mCNAstY’s 1718 Holcomb Ave. Reno, NV 89502 775-622-3208

HARD RoCK Hotel & CAsiNo lAKe tAHoe 50 Highway 50 Stateline, NV 89449 www.hardrockcasinolaketahoe. com 844-588-7625

williAm Hill spoRts BAR & BooK Inside Hard Rock Hotel 50 Highway 50 Stateline, NV 89449 www.hardrockcasinolaketahoe. com 844-588-7625

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CeNteR BAR ultRA louNGe Inside Hard Rock Hotel 50 Highway 50 Stateline, NV 89449 www.hardrockcasinolaketahoe. com 844-588-7625

JuB JuB’s tHiRst pARloR 71 S. Wells Ave. Reno, NV 89502 www.facebook.com/ jub-jubs-thirst-parlor 775-384-1652

lAuGH FACtoRY ComeDY CluB Inside the Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.silverlegacy.com 1-800-687-8733

leX NiGHtCluB & leX louNGe Inside Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. Reno, NV 89595 www.grandsierraresort.com 775-789-2000

RACe & spoRts BAR Inside Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. Reno, NV 89595 www.grandsierraresort.com 775-789-2000

ReNDeZvous BAR Inside Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. Reno, NV 89595 www.grandsierraresort.com 776-789-2000

680 S. Meadows Parkway Reno, NV 89521 www.sierragoldreno.com 775-850-1112

tAmARACK JuNCtioN 13101 S. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89511 www.tamarackjunction.com 775-852-3600

AuRA ultRA louNGe Inside the Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.silverlegacyreno.com 775-325-7401

BAR CeNtRo Inside the Eldorado 345 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.eldoradoreno.com 775-786-5700

BleNDAR BAR Inside the Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.silverlegacyreno.com 775-325-7401

CiN CiN Inside the Eldorado 345 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.eldoradoreno.com 775-786-5700

el JeFe’s CANtiNA Inside Circus Circus Reno 500 N. Sierra St. Reno, NV 89503 www.circusreno.com 775-329-0711

DRiNX Inside the Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.silverlegacyreno.com 775-325-7401


MILLIE’S 24 BAR

THE BREW BROTHERS

THE STAGE AT THE ZONE

Inside the Eldorado 345 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.eldoradoreno.com 775-786-5700

Inside the Eldorado 345 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.eldoradoreno.com 775-786-5700

Inside Harrah’s Reno 219 North Center St. Reno, NV 89501 775-786-3232

NOVi

TROCADERO

Inside the Eldorado 345 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.eldoradoreno.com 775-786-5700

235 West 2nd St. Reno, NV 89501

RACE & SPORTSBOOK BAR & LOUNGE

239 W. 2nd St. Reno, NV 89501 www.noblepieparlor.com 775-567-6649

NOBLE PIE PARLOR-MIDTOWN 777 S. Center St. Reno, NV 89509 www.noblepieparlor.com 775-323-1494

ROXY’S BAR & LOUNGE Inside the Eldorado 345 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.eldoradoreno.com 775-786-5700

RUM BULLIONS Inside the Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.silverlegacyreno.com 775-325-7401

PIGNIC PUB & PATIO 235 Flint St. Reno, NV 89509 775-376-1948

SOUTH SHORE ROOM Inside Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Hwy 50 Stateline, NV 89449 www.ceasars.com 800-427-7247

SILVER BARON LOUNGE

CLICHE’ LOUNGE

Inside the Silver Legacy 407 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.silverlegacyreno.com 775-325-7401

Inside Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Hwy 50 Stateline, NV 89449 www.caesars.com 800-427-7247

STADIUM BAR

PEEK NIGHTCLUB

Inside the Eldorado 345 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.eldoradoreno.com 775-786-5700

Inside Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Hwy 50 Stateline, NV 89449 www.caesars.com 800-427-7247

VILLAGE BAR

SAPPHIRE LOUNGE

Inside Circus Circus Reno 500 N. Sierra St. Reno, NV 89503 www.circusreno.com 775-329-0711

Inside Harrah’s Reno 219 North Center St. Reno, NV 89501 775-786-3232

Inside Harvey’s Lake Tahoe 50 at Stateline Ave. Lake Tahoe, NV 89449 775-588-6611 www.caesars.com

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO. 846 Victorian Ave. Sparks, NV 89431 www.greatbasinbrewingco.com 775-355-7711 5525 S. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89511 775-284-7711

Listings

Inside Circus Circus Reno 500 N. Sierra St. Reno, NV 89503 www.circusreno.com 775-329-0711

NOBLE PIE PARLOR

CABO WABO CANTINA

Shea’s Tavern 715 S. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 www.facebook.com/ sheastavernreno/events 775-786-4774

Through the Motion 80 E. Patriot Blvd.,, Suite C Reno, NV 89511 www.throughthemotion.com 775-501-5999

Law Offices of Troy Jordan LTD 300 S. Arlington Ave., Suite B Reno, NV 89501 www.troyjordanlaw.com 775-432-1581

Big Ed’s Alley Inn 1036 E. 4th St. Reno, NV 89512 (775) 348-6494 Instagram @bigedsalleyinn

Hellfire Saloon 3372 S. McCarran Blvd. Reno, Nevada 89502 775-825-1988 http://www.hellfiresaloon.com

Men’s Club 270 Lake St. Reno, NV 89501 www.renomensclub.com 775-786-7800

03.09.17

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by Jeri Chadwell-Singley

Dealer’s

choice

Local bartenders share their favorite cocktails

Are you stuck in a drink rut, ordering the same old thing every time you go out? Why not ask the bartender for a recommendation? We did, and here’s what they said.

Georgia maestro

Georgia Maestro mixes up an Aviation cocktail at St. James Infirmary.

St. James Infirmary 445 California Ave., 657-8484

PHOTOS/JERI CHADWELL-SINGLEY

Aviation cocktail • 1.25 ounces of Aviation American Gin • 1.5 ounces of crème de violette • .5 ounces of Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur • 1.25 ounces of sour mix or lemon juice • Maraschino cherry garnish

toray Henry Stamp Social Club 50 S. Virginia St., 848-8680

Mezcal Mai Tai • .75 ounces of Plantation Rum • .75 ounces of Myers’s Original Dark Rum • .5 ounces of Mezcal • .5 ounces of agave syrup • .5 ounces of orgeat • .25 ounces of falernum • .25 ounces of Grand Marnier • Top with tonic water and fruit garnish

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A speCiAl supplemeNt to ReNo News & Review


Toray Henry measures ingredients for a Mezcal Mai Tai. Photo/jeri chadwell-singley

Kendall Vanoosten places drops of spicy chili olive oil on a drink called Interview with a Vampire. Photo/jeri chadwell-singley

Cecily Bob

Rhys Pasalich

West Muller

Polo Lounge

RedRock Bar

The Waterfall

1559 S. Virginia St., 322-8864

241 S. Sierra St., 324-2468

134 W. Second St., 322-7373

Scooby snack • 1 ounce Malibu Rum • 1 ounce Midori • 1.5 ounces pineapple juice • .5 ounces cream

Dylan Evans

Bees knees • A spoon of honey and about an ounce of water, steamed to combine

• 1.25 ounces of Southern Comfort

• A squeeze of lemon and spoon of sugar

• .5 ounces of Triple sec

The unnamed cocktail • 1 ounce Skipper’s Rum • 1 ounce of Brooklyn Gin • .75 ounces of lime juice • .75 ounces of grapefruit juice • .25 ounces orgeat syrup • Grapefruit rind, Jamaican #1, and angostura bitters garnish

• 1.5 ounces of watermelon liqueur

• Agave nectar

• Top with equal parts sweet-andsour, lemonade and 7 Up

• 1.5 ounces of gin

• lime wedge garnish

• Top with 7 Up and club soda

1864 Tavern 290 California Ave., 329-1864

Watermelon Jolly Rancher

Jess Smith Foxy Olive 220 Mill St., 997-3733

The Carrie

Kendall Vanoosten The Z Bar 1074 S. Virginia St., 348-1723

Interview with a vampire

• 4 ounces of champagne

• 1.5 ounces of Espolón tequila blanco

• .5 ounces of peach schnapps

• 1.5 ounces of Lillet blanc

• Float of Deepy Eddy Cranberry Vodka

• 1.5 ounces of Cointreau • Spicy chili olive oil and orange zest garnish 03.09.17

RN&R Bars & Clubs Guide

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RN&R Bars & Clubs Guide

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A guide to Irish bars in the Truckee Meadows

E Lucky

you By MaRC TiaR

ceol pours an authentic pint of guinness. Photo/jeri chadwell-singley

veryone is getting fired up about immigration, but we are a nation of immigrants regardless of your feelings about people coming here. Most of us have roots elsewhere—often Europe—from the British pilgrims to the waves of Germans, Czechs and others who followed. Thanks to that melting pot, much of our culture is imported, including our drinking culture.

And what’s one of the first cultures you think of when you think of drinking? Ah, yes, one of the last socially semi-acceptable stereotypes of an ethnic group, that of the imbibing Irishman. But it’s not just a stereotype— statistically the average Irish adult does drink significantly more than the average American. Studies look at everything from the Catholic church to the dreary weather to explain why the Irish drink more, but in their defense, they aren’t even in the top 10 among countries. (Look to Eastern Europe and former Soviet republics for that.) As you look at what it is about Ireland that drives people to drink, a history rife with poverty, starvation and persecution could seem likely, but those are just as likely reasons people leave the Emerald Isle. Of course, in a drinking culture dating back centuries, there are traditions, and for the Irish, the pub is part of the social fabric—the oldest one in the country was pouring for five centuries before Columbus landed here. So take an ancient institution of a people with an appetite for alcohol, in a country with a long, harsh history that makes people leave, and you see the worldwide spread of the Irish pub. There are some of the genuine article— real, straight-from-the-homeland Irish migrants who settle abroad and offer a bit of Irish cheer and entrepreneurship in the form of a watering hole like those they left behind. Others are little more than regular bars with a splash of green, an Irish flag, and some Guinness swag. Often, whether

you’re in Tokyo, Barcelona or Istanbul, it’s a business with a theme, like a Mexican restaurant or vaguely Japanese sushi bar, and little, if any, genuine Irishness behind it. Over the last few decades, the potential revenue of the Irish “brand” for business has become clear. A cottage industry now exists in turnkey “Irish” bars anywhere on Earth. Companies such as Dublin’s Irish Pub Company, partnering with Irish beer giant Guinness’ Irish Pub Concept initiative, have helped local owners open over 8500 Irish bars in 152 countries. Budding publicans can choose from several designs, such as the Victorian, Gaelic or Country Cottage, depending on the market and owner’s desires. Authentic Irish decor, from musical instruments to furniture, complete the vision. I’ve seen the appeal when traveling— like Starbucks or McDonalds, if you’ve been struggling with a language barrier, homesick for the food and drink of home after days or weeks of sampling exotic local fare, stumbling into an Irish bar can be a glorious thing, a sort of crossroads of international travelers united in their want of familiar food, drink and experience. Locally, we’ve largely dodged the “instant Irish pub.” Dating back to the height of the Comstock boom, Northern Nevada has had its share of Irish immigrants settling here. Hardworking Irish miners extracted much of the silver in Virginia City, at one time forming up to a third of that city’s population. Some of the most influential figures in Nevada history such as John Mackay and Pat McCarran come from Irish stock. Of course, you can’t discuss bars and the Irish this month without addressing the elephant in the room, St. Patrick’s Day. Leave it to us Americans to take a relatively quiet Catholic holiday from Ireland and turn it into a huge excuse to get wasted. Reno

“Lucky you” continued on Pg. 18

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“luCky yOu” CONTINueD FROM PG. 17

The Rack is downtown fun for everyone! Pary eat bowl with us! appetizers - pizzas - burgers - drinks - bowling - arcade games pool tables-darts-ping pong

naturally embraces this holiday, from longpast days of parades downtown and late night shenanigans painting Virginia Street’s middle stripe green to more recent years shutting down Vesta Street and crawling Wells Avenue. The traditions continue and evolve today as bars come and go, owners change and trends rise and fall. Most bars with any slight Irishness to them will take the opportunity to have a huge celebration, let the Guinness flow, and pack the house.

One final American St. Patrick’s Day tradition to comment upon: green beer. It’s not a new practice. It was first done in 1914. However, brewers work hard to make beer a lovely beer color already. Green beer is perhaps only slightly more appealing than a Halloween black-bunned Whopper. If you want to pretend to be Irish this month, stick to Guinness, Harp or Jameson in the hues their creators made them. Ω

For your local Irish fix, whether celebrating St. Patrick’s Day or the rest of the year, you have some choices in our area:

TheRackReno.com - 111 n virginia st. reno, nv

• Ryan’s Saloon and Broiler, 924 S. Wells Ave., 323-4142, is an old-school Wells Avenue bar with a decent menu of pub food. • O’Skis Pub & Grille, 840 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-7547, is pretty much a Sparks institution after 16 years in business. It’s heavily Irish themed, plus it has a touch of Polish from the owners and a better-than-average food menu. • Paddy and Irene’s Irish Pub, 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-1594, was formerly owned by a real Irishman in a different location. Now, it’s a basic bar with a slight Irish theme.

The Stick is your go-to desitnation for excellent food, local beer and spirits, and all of the sports you can handle! We offer a full lunch and dinner menu daily with the best in sports entertainment on 24 TVs!!

TheStickReno.com - 95 n sierra st #101 reno, nv

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RN&R Bars & Clubs Guide

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dishes. It’s owned by a California “management group.” • Ceol Irish Pub, 538 S. Virginia St., 329-5558, is probably the most Irish of all, regularly featuring live traditional Irish music, an epic St. Patrick’s Day celebration, and the best selection of Irish alcohol. • Filthy McNasty’s, 1718 Holcomb Ave., 622-3208, is another midtown dive with a bit of Irish decor situated in Reno’s St. Patrick’s Day hub, near Wells Avenue. And any column on Irish bars and Reno would be incomplete without a mention of these longtime fixtures that are no more:

• Shea’s Tavern, 715 S. Virginia St., 786-4774., is a midtown landmark that’s Irish in name and signage, but it’s basically a dive bar, often with live bands.

• Corrigan’s Bit O’Ireland, was part of the Wells Avenue tradition. This landmark Reno bar closed recently after 30 years in business.

• O’Cleary’s, 1330 Scheels Drive, Sparks, 359-1209, is unique by virtue of its bowling lanes. This polished venue at Legends in Sparks is as much restaurant as bar, including some Irish influenced

• Mr. O’s was a historic Virginia Street bar. Owner Paul O’Gorman and his wife provided a free corned beef dinner for customers every St. Patrick’s Day for over a decade. Ω


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RN&R Bars & Clubs Guide

19


Trevor Tomburello watches as his friends, Corey Tunney and Andrew Kastenbaum, play Battleship at Sierra Tap House. Photo/ Jeri Chadwell-Singley

Game 20

Boozy gameplay in the Biggest Little City

night RN&R Bars & Clubs Guide

03.09.17

A speCiAl supplemeNt to ReNo News & Review

By ANNA HARt

p

eople often say that baseball is America’s favorite pastime. These people have obviously never been to a college town, where drinking is our sport of choice and the Santa Crawl our World Series. Over the years, generations have refined the art of drinking, even enhanced the practice with the addition of games. But as we move past the rounds of King’s Cup and Irish poker of our yesteryear, what comes next? Trivia seems the obvious choice, or maybe even a little pool and darts, should the need to hustle someone arise. But why not broaden our boozy gameplay?


More than a decade ago, Sierra Tap House opened its doors at 253 W. First St. Since then it has become a crowd favorite, as a bar that keeps a low-key, comfortable atmosphere with great drinks. But one of the best qualities of the bar is an excellent selection of board games. That might not sound like a selling point, but have you ever had a nice pilsner over a casual game of Battleship? Can you comprehend the added level of difficulty that comes with playing Scrabble after three glasses of petite sirah? In all, Sierra Tap House is a brilliant spot if you want to drink like a polished adult while simultaneously regressing to childhood ways. Bingo has a bad reputation. For too long, bingo gameplay has been dismissed from popular culture, existing only in senior centers, classrooms and church community parties. But we are entering a

The Rack, 111 N. Virginia St., offers bowling along with a respectable menu food and drink, and is an ideal location for a fun night out with friends or with the entire family. If you’re looking to enjoy the family fun of bowling without the “family” aspect, O’Cleary’s Irish Pub, 1330 Scheels Drive, is a good choice. O’Cleary’s is the type of pub where you come for the booze and stay for the bowling (and more booze). In the past, The Corkscroo’s infamous reputation as Reno’s seediest college dive bar often preceded it. But after a few years under new ownership, the bar, 10 E. Ninth St., has become known more for its good pizza and happy hour specials than it is for its less-than-stellar history. The bar hosts a handful of different events, but their Cash Karaoke Wednesdays are in a class of their own. Sure, giving your drunken rendition

ON DiNiNg! 5

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As we move past the rounds of King’s Cup and Irish poker of our yesteryear, what comes next?

new era—one where bingo can reach its true potential. At MidTown Wine Bar, 1527 S. Virginia St., Bingo Tuesdays finally gives the game the attention and environment it deserves. From 6:30 to 11 p.m. every Tuesday, patrons can come in and play a fast-paced, high-energy game of Bingo for a chance to win cash and prizes. The bar also offers drink specials and live music during the night, which guarantees a good time. For some, it simply isn’t enough to sit down and drink. It is for these people that the partnership between bowling and drinks was created. During the formative stages of this partnership, there were growing pains. Bowling Alleys served as the main location to drink and bowl, but often left patrons with mediocre beer choices and the added shame of going to a bowling alley as an adult. But the culture has evolved, meaning it’s no longer necessary to sacrifice the quality of the drinking experience to play this sport. Instead, locations have popped up over the last few years that wed these experiences.

of “My Heart Will Go On” isn’t exactly a new thing. But if the chance to spin a wheel for drinks and cash prizes isn’t incentive enough, I don’t know what is. But if there was one bar to rule all college bars in Reno, it would be the Little Waldorf Saloon, 1661 N. Virginia St. Affectionately known as The Wal, this bar has become an integral facet of Reno’s history after decades of serving the alcohol needs of the Wolf Pack’s best and brightest. If there is one bar game night that is truly a rite of passage for Reno’s newest members of the drinking class, it would be The Wal’s Wednesday night Trike Races. Over the last few years, the weekly races have grown to mythic proportions. There is truly nothing quite like watching respectable, grown men and women shamelessly ride around a packed restaurant on tricycles after drinking copious amounts of beer and well drinks, competing to win more alcohol. While the sign-ups start at 10 p.m., get there early if you want a front-row seat. Ω

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– COMING SOON!

rnrsweetdeals.newsreview.com 03.09.17

RN&R Bars & Clubs Guide

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Duds ’n’ Suds is the place for mixing domestic chores with booze By JeRi ChAdwell-siNGley

Bar of

or years, I only ever cleaned my house while inebriated. And why not? Once a week, I would put on my headphones, crank some tunes and treat the house like my private club—dance with the mop; have a drink, dance with the vacuum; have another drink. I haven’t done this in years, but I was reminded of it when I heard about a local place that’s been mixing domestic work with pleasure for three decades now. I read about Duds ’n’ Suds last October in an article from the Guardian. Discussing politics had been banned there after an argument about the election led to a fist fight at one of the two locations. That sounds like a bar problem, right? Well, Duds ’n’ Suds is a bar—kind of anyway. According to a YouTube video featuring the stores’ owner, Duds ’n’ Suds opened in 1986. The slogan on the sign is “We make laundry fun!” And I’d seen the signs before, near Meadowood Mall and at the intersection of Clearacre and McCarran, but I had no idea that inside each of the laundromats was small bar serving up beverages, snacks and beer. After reading about the scuffle, I made a mental note to go there sometime—after the election. The opportunity presented itself on a recent Tuesday evening. I chose the location on the south end of town and arrived shortly before 7 p.m.—my camera, notebook, laundry and mother in tow. Inside, the air was warm and smelled pleasantly of laundry soap and fabric softener. There were a dozen or so people milling around the machines and sitting at the small bar in the back. In one corner, children played arcade games. On the TV, Trump addressed Congress. I ordered a Lagunitas IPA and fished out cash and my driver’s license. The woman behind the bar studied it for a few minutes, longer, in fact, than I can recall anyone studying my ID. “She’s only 12,” said the man seated next me. I secretly hate it when people joke about how young I look, especially now that I’m in my 30s, but I laughed and smiled anyway. After receiving my beer, I went to break $5 in the change machine and start my laundry. “Here, I said, handing my camera to Mom. “Take pictures of me.” “Just loading the washing machine?” she asked. “Yeah, loading the washing machine while drinking a beer.”

F

soap

The wash cycle took 26 minutes. We sat at the bar and studied the signs and made small talk with the bartender and other patrons. Trump gesticulated in that signature manner of his—blessedly inaudible on the quiet TV and looking for all the world like an agitated, orange mime. Soon, I found myself contemplating the singular experience of quaffing beers from a bar stool while my clothes were on the rinse cycle a few feet away. The big question I pondered: Is Duds ’n’ Suds a bar with laundry facilities or a laundromat with beer and food—a laundrobar or a baromat? In the “it’s a bar” column, there is, of course, the beer—and the bar and the bar stools and the bar snacks and the bartender. There’s the TV and the free wifi. And there’s the bevy of little plaques and handwritten signs one expects to find in among the décor at a neighborhood watering hole. The laminated list of house rules is taped to the wall. Number six notes that “Everything is use at your own risk, including the bartenders.” But many of the rules apply to the laundromat side of things, including the notice that refunds are given “only for mechanical failures ... human fails fall into the category of pointing and laughing” and that unattended children will be “given to the Goblin King.” (The world has gone mad and your lawyers are seeking your love children, but may your rest in peace, David Bowie.) Other things go in the “it’s a laundromat” column, too. For one thing, there’s the restrooms. They’re spotless—much cleaner than any I’ve seen in any bar anywhere. Duds ’n’ Suds has another thing that separates it from other bars. There’s a three-drink limit. To me, that sounds like a common sense rule. Otherwise, people might get too drunk and wind up barfing in a washing machine, right? And I was certainly feeling the single beer I’d downed by the time I put my clothes in the dryer. In fact, I put the clothes in the top dryer but fed my quarters into the bottom one. It took longer than I’d like to admit to realize my mistake. And it earned me a bit more good-natured ribbing from my new drinking/laundering buddies. Ω

Is Duds ’n’ Suds a bar with laundry facilities or a laundromat with beer and food—a laundrobar or a baromat?

I enjoyed a Lagunitas IPA while washing my clothes.

Photo/Jeri’s MoM

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There are two Duds ’n’ Suds locations: 2900 Clear Acre Lane, 786-7837; and 5890 S. Virginia St., 8258850. Both are open from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m..


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23


Take the FIRST STEP... W

e welcome dance enthusiasts from beginners to professionals to join us as we un-harness the joy that dance brings and create memories that will last a lifetime by experiencing it Through The Motion.

80 East Patriot Blvd. Suite C | Reno, NV 89511 | 775-501-5999 | www.throughthemotion.com