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Nevada HumaNities literary crawl returNs see arts&Culture, page 14

Michael Mikel, a.k.a. Danger Ranger, has been involved with Burning Man since 1988 RENo’s

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Burnout Welcome to this week’s Reno News  & Review. Like many Northern Nevada  locals, I have very mixed feelings  about Burning Man. I first went to  the arts festival in the desert back  in 1996. I was a teenager smuggled  into the party in the trunk of a  friend’s car. (Gate  security was  more lax in  those days.)  I had a blast  that year, and  every other  time I’ve gone.  It can be the best  party in the world, and from every  year I’ve gone, I have at least one  fond memory I’ll carry with me for  the rest of my life.  On the other hand, I haven’t  been back since 2009. In recent  years, the event has started  selling out—in more ways than  one—but specifically in the sense  that the tickets have sold out. The  first year that I actually bought  a ticket, 1997, it cost $65 and a  no-stress jaunt down to Reno’s  Melting Pot. Nowadays, obtaining  a ticket usually costs more than  $400 and involves complex whoyou-know geometry. Burning Man is now Yuppiepalooza. Most of the people I know  who still go are lawyers. Many of  the attendees are Silicon Valley  tech executives. Salon recently  ran a story about the gentrification of the festival, which included  some of the raw numbers: “In  2006, 14 percent of surveyed  Burners listed their 2005 personal  income as ‘$100,000 or more.’ By  2016, that had risen to 27.4 percent. In the past four years, the  census volunteers actually added  a new personal income category,  of $300,000+. The number of people  at Burning Man who made over  $300,000 steadily rose from 2013  to 2016, from 2.3 percent to 3.4  percent.” The Reno Gazette-Journal ran  a bizarre story about Google employees getting lobsters shipped  from Maine. This is rich-person  garbage. The first principle of Burning Man is supposedly “radical  inclusion.” Is that principle really  compatible with a big dress-up  party in a gated community too  pricey for poor people?

—Brad Bynum bradb@ ne ws r ev i ew . com

Best view Re “Best of Northern Nevada” (cover story, Aug. 10): If a stranger from a strange land, or worse yet, a travel magazine representative, was guided by RN&R Best of Northern Nevada picks, they would have to conclude the following: 1) there is a tremendous amount of inbreeding among voters, 2) there must be some kind of cartel, because three to five establishments control an overwhelming amount of “best of” awards, and 3) if you have a bright, new, quality idea, you should move here. You will be in the running immediately! Dean Hinitz Reno

The Arpaio pardon Most Americans are disgusted with this latest act by our unhinged president, the pardon of the 85 year old former sheriff before he’s even sentenced! But we need to look to a much deeper meaning behind this. Immigration and the good old war on drugs are joined at the hip. Follow this thread: The private prison industry became nervous when those pesky liberals began talking about releasing non-violent offenders. These private prisons must answer to their shareholders and if prison populations are reduced, their bottom line suffers. We were warned over and over about the harm to society the drug war causes. We must ask why the federal government is so adamant in insisting marijuana remain a schedule one drug when a majority of states have legalized medical marijuana? Let’s follow the money. Who would continue to profit from keeping the drug war going? For one, the private prison industry. Few people paid attention to this years ago, in 2012, when Mike Riggs filed this report in Reason magazine: “Nowhere is the private prison industry’s reliance on the drug war more apparent than

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Brad Bynum News Editor Dennis Myers Special Projects Editor Jeri Chadwell-Singley Arts Editor Kris Vagner Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Contributors Amy Alkon, Megan Berner, Matt Bieker, Kelsey Fitzgerald, Bob Grimm, Holly

Hutchings, Shelia Leslie, Josie Luciano, Eric Marks, Tim Prentiss, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Marc Tiar, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Ashley Warren, Allison Young Design Manager Christopher Terrazas Creative Director Serene Lusano Art Director Margaret Larkin Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Designers Kyle Shine, Maria Ratinova Web Design & Strategy Intern Elisabeth Bayard Arthur Sales Manager Emily Litt RN&R Rainmaker Gina Odegard

septembeR 07, 2017 | Vol. 23, Issue 30

in [Corrections Corporation of America’s] 2010 report to shareholders: ‘The demand for our facilities and services could be adversely affected by relaxation of enforcement efforts, leniency in conviction or parole standards and sentencing practices or through the decriminalization of certain activities that are currently prescribed by our criminal laws,’ reads the report CCA filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.” That report went on to say, basically, that if we start putting some offenders on probation with electronic monitoring devices instead of incarceration, some prisons would be in jeopardy of closing altogether. Not once will we find the word rehabilitation. How strange—one might have thought that may be the reason for prison in the first place. Jim Reynolds Reno

Fake or real letter? Re “Real or fake letter?” (letters, Aug. 17): In addition to the court decision allowing media to lie in our faces, I must add the 2013 government move which allows, according to Foreign Policy Magazine, “an unleashing of thousands of hours per week of governmentfunded radio and TV programs for domestic U.S. consumption in a reform initially criticized as a green light for U.S. domestic propaganda efforts. So what just happened?” And we wonder where the social, economic and political confusion and animosity come from? Christopher Lunn Carson City

If there are subsidies I am genuinely starting to appreciate electric vehicles. Once built, they can be charged completely off grid and without fossil fuels via currently built photovoltaic panels. Also, with a little bit of retro engineering, they can be used as a battery bank to run essential

Advertising Consultant Myranda Keeley, Kambrya Blake Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager/Operations Coordinator Kelly Miller Distribution Drivers Alex Barskyy, Jenn Bayless, Ross Chavez, Bob Christensen, Brittany Alas, Gary White, Marty Troye, Paola Tarr, Patrick L’Angelle, Rosie Martinez, Timothy Fisher, Tracy Breeden, Vicki Jewell President/CEO Jeff VonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Executive Coordinator Carlyn Asuncion Project Coordinator Natasha VonKaenel Director of People & Culture David Stogner Nuts & Bolts Nija: Leslie Giovanini

Director of Dollars & Sense Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Dargitz Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Sweetdeals Coordinator Hannah Williams Developers John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Laura Hiller N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Marketing & Publications Consultant Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Ken Cross Cover design: Maria Ratinova

items in your house in the event of grid collapse. In addition, they can theoretically pull large loads of small lightweight trailers full of either people or goods around town. In a survival triage situation, it may be possible to pull a small “train” of many trailers, even at slow speeds, to help enable commerce at a reduced level continue. And finally, the EV battery banks have been shown to be rechargeable for many thousands of hours. Probably just about as long as your PV panels last. Sounds like a win-win. Craig Bergland Reno

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09.07.17    |   RN&R   |  3


A Conversation with Apple Co-Founder

Steve Wozniak September 23, 2017

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Tuesday, September 19

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JANET JACKSON Sunday, October 1

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By JERI CHADWELL-SINGLEY

Worst thing about moving? askeD at Pignic PuB & PatiO, 235 Flint st.

Danny Feight Bartender

My lower back. I used to be a mover. I’m six foot six. That’s a bad thing for tall people. We look strong and big, but if we pick up stuff ...

Michael O’Day Video game programmer

It’s got to be hauling all of the shit, right?

Maya Zee Graduate teaching assistant

By CARoL CIzAuSkAS

Silver beauty and self-inflicted wounds As I write this, the Rib Cook-Off is underway. I don’t know if I’ll make it this year. I’ll miss the fun of an area known for its festivals, but my husband and I are moving to Madison, Wisconsin, to embrace a new life. When I moved here in 1990 from my Washington, D.C., hometown, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I knew I wanted something different, smaller, a slower way of life. After three weeks in Reno, something happened. I fell in love. That fun quality exemplified by our festivals permeated the air I breathed each morning as I looked up to a bluer, clearer sky than I had ever seen. It reminded me of beach summers. Over time, I realized that vacation quality of Reno was the lighthearted fun this resort town oozed. My love grew even as I saw the underbelly of a city focused on fun to the detriment of many. Consistently, this state ranks in the lowest 10 of so many measures of mental health—suicide, depression, teen pregnancy, to list some. I realized how the dominant casino industry supported by no corporate taxes and the regressive high sales tax led to a two-class society—the haves, dominated by the good-ol’-boys network that came to its heyday when a few white men rose to power, propelled by the success of their casinos and brothels; and the have-nots, the majority of workers in the casinos and satellite businesses. As someone who could be classified privileged with my middle-class, suburban, college-educated background, I experienced the downside of the

two-class society promoted by Reno. Any career success I experienced was hard won and characterized by much lower pay than I would have earned in other similarly sized cities with a lower cost of living. And I call myself a survivor of the mental health system here after having been misdiagnosed and treated for nearly a decade as bipolar after severe postpartum depression. I call myself a survivor of the legal system, too, after having not been protected from an ex-boyfriend who stalked me for months. In this state also, I’ve seen the legal system regularly practice retribution, rather than rehabilitation. The pain these systems cause would be reason enough to leave a state, despite what other good it holds. Still, I will miss the great good of Northern Nevada—the loved ones who changed my life for the better, the incomparable beauty of Lake Tahoe, the Sierra, and Reno itself, the vibrant and growing art scene, characterized by Artown and the Nevada Museum of Art. I wish for Reno a turn to social justice marked by economic fairness for all, not just the powerful elite of old and the new power brokers, the owners of high-tech moving to Reno and their workers imported from other states. I wish for Reno to grow its social structure to match the beauty of its natural surroundings. Ω

The worst thing about moving is having to clean your old place when you leave so you get your deposit back and then having to clean your new place when you get in so you don’t have weird, stinky carpet.

ale x tre vinO Ninja/golf instructor

The worst part about moving is having to ask somebody to help—it’s having to ask somebody for help when you know that they definitely don’t want to do it.

theresa agnellO-gOlDhaMMer Bartender

Bothering your one friend who owns a truck.

Cizauskas is a former public radio reporter who has written for the RN&R.

09.07.17    |   RN&R   |   5


by SHEILA LESLIE

Killer fish in VA waters One of the tiresome and harmful myths of the self-promoting “job creators” is the superiority of the private sector in providing more efficient and cost effective government services. The recurring portrayal of the public sector as a bloated bureaucracy incapable of anything except wasting taxpayer money demoralizes public servants and minimizes their worth even as they build public institutions to effectively serve our nation. A favorite tactic of the self-righteous business barons is to “starve the beast” of government by dramatically reducing budgets and then loudly complaining about the poor quality of care when services are cut. And they make sure the blame is placed on the people actually doing the work instead of the policymakers who made the ill-advised funding decisions. The inevitable scandal is then used as leverage to propel private contractors into the mix, undercutting the public sector workforce and introducing a profit motive that serves no one well except

those making money off the very misery they inspired. We’ve seen this cynical model used extensively over the past 30 years in corrections, primarily in state prisons, but also in other public institutions such as state mental health hospitals or juvenile facilities. The for-profit sector is now gearing up for the largest target of all, the Veterans Administration. In June, The Hill reported on new proposals from the Trump Administration designed to push more veterans into the private medical sector instead of funding their care through the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) budget. Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin told Congress he wants to replace the Veterans Choice Program with a new version that would allow veterans to select any private sector physician or provider even if there is no waiting time at their local VA or they don’t have to drive more than 40 miles to a VHA facility, the criteria previously used. The veteran would have to

search for a provider outside of the system but there would be no requirement for integrated care or communication with the veteran’s medical team at the VA. There are mountains of studies showing privatization of government services is a bad idea. Susan Duerksen from In the Public Interest says, “Governments at all levels are just desperate to balance their budgets, and they’re grasping at privatization as a panacea. But there’s evidence that it often is a very bad deal with hidden costs and consequences when you turn over public service to a for-profit company.” There’s one thing you can count on when public services are privatized. In order to generate profit, expenses need to be cut, which means workers get paid substantially less and receive fewer benefits while corporate board members and their CEOs maintain their exorbitant salaries and benefits. Secretary Shulkin is an Obama appointee who was retained by Trump, perhaps

ALL NEW ON-STAGE CHAMPAGNE SEATING

because other potential nominees refused the enormous and risky job of “fixing” the VA. He insists that “privatization of the VA won’t happen while I’m in office” as he walks the tightrope between expanding the private sector “choice” system and strengthening the 28 VA hospitals. So far, the non-partisan Shulkin has earned praise from both sides of the aisle as he tries to budget within funding caps and meet increasing demand, but that may change as he urges Congress to purchase a $16 billion digital health record system to better coordinate care. It’s unclear how long he can continue down both paths of strengthening the existing system while expanding private sector options. Shulkin says his “only party is the veteran’s party,” an admirable stance for someone tasked with fixing a decades-old problem of underfunding services for our nation’s heroes. But let’s make sure he doesn’t sell out our vets to keep the private sector piranhas happy. Ω

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6   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17


by Brendan Trainor

Nullifying law from the jury box On Tuesday, Aug. 22, in U.S. District Court, presided over by Chief Judge Gloria Navarro, a federal jury refused to convict four defendants tried for the second time over federal weapons and assault charges stemming from the 2014 standoff on the Bundy Ranch near Bunkersville. The Bundy family dispute over payment of grazing fees came to a head in 2014 when the feds came with mercenary cowboys to seize Bundy cattle. They were met by hundreds of armed supporters, causing a tense standoff that was resolved when the feds stood down. Charges were later filed against many of those involved in the standoff. These defendants’ first trials resulted in hung juries. Ricky Lovelien and Steven Stewart were acquitted of all 10 charges they faced, and the jury delivered not-guilty findings on most charges against Scott Drexler and Eric Parker. Federal prosecutors will retry Drexler and Parker on those charges that the jury could not

reach a verdict on. In addition, there are 17 other participants who face charges related to the incident who have not been tried yet. Constitutional conservatives believe the trial verdict was the result of jury nullification. They say Judge Navarro cut off defense witnesses and would not allow discussion of the First or Second Amendment during the trial. Defendant Parker’s testimony was ordered stricken in its entirety because of federal rules of evidence. Trial observers believe the jury saw through these tactics and concluded the judge and prosecutors were working in collusion and voted to acquit. The right of juries to nullify the law is an un-enumerated right widely recognized in 1791 but not explicitly protected in the Bill of Rights. It is grudgingly acknowledged by the courts that jurors can vote not guilty based on their belief that the law as enacted and given by the judge is unfair, even if the accused did

commit the offenses charged. Judges and prosecutors refuse to formally acknowledge this right, and defense attorneys are not allowed to explicitly seek nullification, although they can quietly strategize for it. One time I was called to jury duty in Reno, and the judge directly alluded to nullification when, during jury selection, he said, approximately: There are some in Montana who call themselves constitutionalists who believe that juries have the right to disregard the law as it is given by the judge. I don’t know if this idea has reached Nevada, but do any of you hold this belief? The folks in Montana the judge referred to are the Fully Informed Jury Association (FIJA), an organization located in Helena that has kept the torch of jury nullication burning for decades. FIJA activists have sometimes been arrested and falsely charged with jury tampering just for distributing their fliers on courthouse steps. Jury

nullification helped establish freedom of speech and press in the British American colonies, to defeat the Fugitive Slave Act and end alcohol prohibition. Jury nullification should be seen as a second chance for citizens to vote, this time not for candidates, but on the laws that those candidates, once elected, may pass. Twenty state constitutions recognize jury nullification in libel cases, four states in all criminal trials. Constitutional conservatives may be surprised to learn they have an ally in Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who has publicly stated that there has to be an official acknowledgement of the right of jury nullification. FIJA wants judges to instruct jurors that they have the right to judge the law as well as the facts of the case. The judge’s instructions to the jury on the law should only be a guideline, not a mandate. Ω

09.07.17    |   RN&R   |   7


by Dennis Myers

Drug law challengeD

Republicans in Congress support trusting U.S. corporations to protect internet customer interests and privacy.

A new state law under which Nevada tracks insulin prices has been challenged in court. At this year’s Nevada Legislature, pharmaceutical corporation lobbyists poured in when lawmakers started processing a measure providing for monitoring drug prices. As enacted, the new law requires drugmakers that raise list prices to disclose information about the costs of manufacturing and selling the drugs. The law prohibits gag deals under which pharmacists are forbidden to inform patients of cost-saving choices. Pharmacy benefit managers must disclose information about rebates they negotiate. Pharmaceutical sales representatives must register in Nevada and disclose information about their discussions with physicians. And patient advocacy groups must disclose when they are funded by the drug makers. Such funding for patient advocacy groups was at issue during the legislature when some of them failed to support the bill. Kaiser Health News reported, “Prominent patient advocacy groups, like the American Diabetes Association, have maintained stony silence while diabetes patients championed the bill and lobbied the legislature during this debate—a silence that patients and experts say stems from financial ties. … Generally speaking, their advocacy focuses on pressuring insurers to pay the price of insulin, not protesting price rises.” The original bill was vetoed by Gov. Brian Sandoval when sponsored by a female senator, then approved by Sandoval when modified slightly and sponsored by a male senator. The lawsuit was filed by two trade groups, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America and the Biotechnology Innovation Organization. The suit claims the law breaches trade secrets but does not explain how.

Slave labor Day? This seems like a particularly untimely moment to express sympathy for the Confederacy, but the tone of Virginia City’s Labor Day Parade may be changing in such a direction. A group called Comstock Civil War Reenactors has a website that calls the celebration “Civil War Days” and contains an apologist version of the causes of the Civil War. It’s not clear whether the Reenactors speak for the Parade—a Virginia City Tourism Commission website still calls it the Labor Day Parade—but Sparks Tribune columnist Andrew Barbano accused the Reenactors of commemorating “Slave Labor Day.” Reno’s Central Labor Council and individual unions have in the past promoted the VC parade. The first mining unions in the West began on the Comstock.

StuDent reSignS job Peter Cytanovic, the University of Nevada, Reno student who participated nonviolently in the Charlottesville demonstration, has resigned from the Campus Escort Service because escort staff or student leaders pressured him, according to the Reno Gazette-Journal. A campus administration spokeswoman had previously said Cytanovic was in a work program where he rotated from one job to another. It is not clear whether he has resigned from that program or just from the escort service. UNR’s Sagebrush quoted student body president Noah Teixeira: “I think that you can’t have him working [in the escort service] because it literally destroys the program. Students are supposed to be safe getting into vans, and if you have someone that perpetuates hate speech, then you kind of make the program unable to achieve what it’s supposed to.” Teixeira did not specify what in Cytanovic’s past behavior caused a lack of safety for students.

—Dennis Myers

8   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17

PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Net loss? Keeping the neutral in neutrality the Federal communications Commissions’ comment period on net neutrality closed last week, and one of the last comments filed broke Apple’s long silence on the topic, with the tech corporation taking dead aim at the position espoused by U.S. Sen. Dean Heller of the Senate Commerce Committee. Nevada’s Heller and U.S. Rep. Mark Amodei, who represents Northern Nevada in the House, both oppose regulation to protect consumers from corporate monoliths like Verizon that are anxious to create “fast lanes” for the internet, available only to those who pay for them. Under net neutrality, a barber’s information travels at the same speed as General Motors’, for the same price. “We work hard to build great products, and what consumers do with those tools is up to them—not Apple, and not broadband providers,” wrote Apple Vice President Cynthia Hogan in the comment filed with the FCC. “Apple’s stance on the issue dovetails with that of many tech companies who claim that, given the opportunity,

internet providers could strangle new apps and websites by forcing them to pay fees or by prioritizing better, faster service for apps that the providers own or prefer. Internet providers have said that by exploring new business models, consumers could be better served—and carriers would find new ways of making money at a time when most Americans are already paying for internet service,” reported the Chicago Tribune. Net neutrality regulations adopted by the FCC during the Obama administration have been targeted by Republicans, and the FCC has been taking comments on whether a measure overturning the regulations should be overturned. Net neutrality is the term that describes the principle that internet service providers (ISPs), a.k.a. broadband providers, must give equal treatment to the communications and data flowing over their networks. If net neutrality is not guaranteed by government regulation, corporations are free to do as they will. ISPs are treated as common carriers under Title II of the Telecommunications

Act. Common carriers are companies that transport people or property—in this case information. Title II also deals with privacy, and as a result both net neutrality and ISP privacy regulations have been treated in tandem. Earlier this year Congress overrode regulations protecting consumers from the selling of their private customer data, including app usage, browsing history and Social Security numbers to other firms. That happened after Republican U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona sponsored S.J. Res. 34: “A joint resolution providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of the rule submitted by the Federal Communications Commission relating to ‘Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services.’” The resolution, approved by the Senate in March in a 50-to-48 vote, blocked FCC enforcement of a rule protecting consumer privacy. Verizon has disclosed customer information to the National Security Agency. AT&T has sold consumer call information to the Drug Enforcement Administration and Central Intelligence Agency. Heller and Amodei both joined in dismantling privacy protection. The Center for Responsive Politics (CPR), a non-profit D.C. research organization, tracks the impact of money on politicians and the public policy they make. Heller, CRP reports, took in a whopping $372,250 from telecommunications contributors over the course of his congressional career, and $93,500 just in 2016. Subsequently, billboards were erected reading, “Heller betrayed you. He took $345,250 from telecoms, then he voted to let them sell your web history without your permission. Ask him why, call: 775-738-2001 FIGHT FOR THE FUTURE SaveBroadbandPrivacy.org.” The Flake resolution was voted on by the House on March 28 and was approved 215-to-205. Donald Trump signed it on April 3. According to CRP, during his U.S. House career, Amodei has received $69,000 in campaign money from telecommunications contributors. During 2016 alone, he has received $19,500. CRP correlated money with votes. Among Republicans, the average career contributions from telecom corporations totaled $137,908 for those who voted for


the measure. Republicans who voted against it received only $76,984. Among Democrats, those who voted no received an average of $131,788. There were no yes votes from the Democrats. Heller and Amodei were the only yea votes from Nevada. Reps. Dina Titus, Jacky Rosen and Ruben Kihuen and Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto voted not to block the privacy regulation. That still leaves the basic FCC net neutrality rule. With public comment now closed, this fight will take place within the FCC itself, with the possibility of congressional action looming if Congress does not like the outcome, as it did on privacy—and Heller himself has threatened congressional action if he does not like the outcome of a “long regulatory process.” Heller wields the term regulation as a weapon. During the Obama administration, he said, “By calling for Title II classification for internet service providers, the President is doubling down on the ‘regulate first’ mentality that inhibits innovation and growth in the tech industry. The President’s approach takes dynamic technology and turns it into another utility like electricity and water. And just like power and water, today’s internet would become stagnant instead of remaining vibrant.” Nevada Controller Ron Knecht—the guy who pays state government’s bills—has gotten in on this debate, arguing that because there are so many internet service providers (ISPs), there is no need for government regulation. “I spent 17 years as a principal economist for the public

utility commissions of Nevada and California, plus more years consulting to other commissions,” he wrote recently in an essay sent out to state newspapers. “I have some expertise in the theory and economics of utility regulation, and I know there’s no defensible reason to make the internet a regulated utility.” However, the notion of numerous ISPs is rapidly becoming a thing of the past. In a 2015 report on the top five consolidating industries, research firm IBISWorld reported that over a five year period, “total [ISP] industry enterprises declined at an annualized rate of 2.3 percent to 771 operators … while industry employment grew at a slim 0.9 percent annualized rate to total 264,674 workers. … The United States Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission have vocally opposed mergers of national carriers.” According to Quartz Media, “If those first years of the internet were marked by a dramatic expansion of players in the telecom industry, its later ones have been marked by contraction, leading to a relatively small and getting-smaller concentration of companies.” Forbes columnist Warren Grimes wrote at the time that telecom mergers were creating pressure for regulation: “The pending deals will not result in monopoly control of programming, but they are troubling steps toward less competition, fewer choices, and more dominance by ever-more-powerful distributors over programming content.” Neither Heller or Amodei have done anything to reduce mergers and acquisitions. Ω

Memorial

The range of acquaintances of the late author and journalism professor Jake Highton could be seen in the crowd at his memorial in the University of Nevada, Reno library rotunda. Seen here are German professor emeritus Grant Leneaux, former governor’s press secretary Greg Bortolin, art professor Howard Rosenberg, former Reno Gazette-Journal publisher Warren Lerude, former Reno television anchor and Highton student Lise Mousel, and former chamber of commerce official David Howard. PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

09.07.17    |   RN&R   |   9


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Danger Man

by Josie Luciano

Michael Mikel, a.k.a. Danger Ranger, has been involved with

Burning Man since 1988

art at this year’s Burning Man.

Photo/eric Marks

M

ichael Mikel, a.k.a. Danger Ranger, founded the Black Rock Rangers, edited Burning Man’s first on-site newspaper, and currently serves on the organization’s board of directors. Since 1988, he’s been centrally involved with Burning Man, the annual arts festival in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert that now attracts 70,000 people from all around the world. We caught up with him in conjunction with this year’s festival as well as the City of Dust retrospective exhibition currently on display at the Nevada Museum of Art.

Photo/Josie Luciano

Is it Michael Mikel or Danger Ranger? It’s Michael Mikel, but Danger Ranger is my playa name. What did you think when you were first approached to do this exhibit? Well that was two years ago. And David [Walker, executive director of the Nevada Museum of Art], who’s also on the board of directors of the Burning Man nonprofit, he introduced me to Bill Fox who managed the Art + Environment section of the museum. They

approached me about the possibility of having an archive of Burning Man materials. And I’ve saved pretty much everything in my history of Burning Man. And this will be my 30th year of attending Burning Man. I’ve burned on the beach in San Francisco with a handful of people, and it’s amazing now we have 70,000 people. And I had an attic full of materials and objects and papers that I’ve saved through the years and was very happy to donate it to the archives so they could be preserved and taken care of, and there’s actually a wealth of research materials [for those] who might be studying Burning Man. So I think it’s very important to have this work up. And now they’ve mounted this exhibit which is really incredible, and it’s going to be at the Smithsonian next year—even larger. Will it be called City of Dust as well? They’ve titled their exhibit No Spectators. And they’re going to have an expanded exhibit with lots more Burning Man art. They’ve got a lot more room there, and it’s going to be an incredible exhibit there at the Smithsonian.

“DangeR Man”

continued on page 12

09.07.17    |   RN&R   |   11


“DangeR Man” continued from page 11

That’s a good title too, because isn’t the idea that there are no spectators, only participants? Yes, and that was one of the slogans we adopted in the early days, was the idea that nobody is a spectator—everybody participates. We even made a giant banner and hung it out in camp for a couple of years. So then is it kind of strange that it’s an exhibit here with just observers? Ironic perhaps. But as a scholarly exhibit, I mean that’s important for people to see and understand stories that the objects tell about Burning Man and about Burning Man history. So their participation is educating. So they are learning about Burning Man, and it’s an education aspect that they are participating in.

“Black Rock Rangers became mediators and caretakers solving disputes.”

It’s been, what, 26 years since the first Burning Man? It’s been 32 years since the first Burning Man. Burning Man started on the beach in San Francisco in 1986. And I started going in 1988. What a long strange trip it’s been!

How many years have to pass for a museum to say, “Yes, we can look back at this event and do a historical exhibit?” I don’t know that I could state there’s a time. I’m amazed it has been museum-worthy, you know, because I never expected anything like this. But I guess it’s because Burning Man is having so much impact on the world now. In addition to the local area and in Nevada. It’s had a huge effect—all the art that’s come out of Burning Man that’s being installed in Reno in Las Vegas and other places in Nevada, and around the world for that matter. And other projects that Burning Man has started. Burners without Borders started when we heard about Hurricane Katrina hitting the Gulf Coast, and after the event, scores of volunteers loaded trucks with donated materials, camping supplies, food and equipment, and caravanned down to the Gulf Coast and started relief efforts. And because of our Burning Man experience of being able to survive and thrive in a very harsh environment, we could apply the things we learned to help the people down there. We were more effective than FEMA in many cases in what we accomplished. We built a Buddhist temple. Also, in 2007, the theme of Burning Man that year was the Green Man, and there was a focus on looking at aspects of the environment, how we impact it, and there were a bunch of displays under the man, under and around the man, the whole pavilion there was powered by solar panels. And after the event, we used those solar panels to launch Black Rock Solar. Black Rock Solar was the first 501(c)3 nonprofit solar company in the United States. And they’ve installed so many systems all over Nevada. On reservations, schools, hospitals, all over. In fact, there were so many solar installations along Highway 447 at the reservation facilities and schools there that the governor declared Highway 447 the solar highway. When Burning Man started, did you have all of this social and global change in mind? Not really. We got involved with a very small group of people, and it kept growing. Every year, particularly in the early ’90s, the number of people who would come to Burning Man would double. It was crazy. And it was about 1993 that I looked out across the playa and there were several thousand people, and I realized that this means something, something is happening here. It’s important what we’re doing, and then I really began to focus on that. And it’s grown and become an amazing thing.

Photo/Eric Marks

12   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17

What do you feel like other cities or other organizational efforts can learn from Black Rock City? I started calling our camp Black Rock City in 1995. At that time, there were 4,000 people there, and we were the seventh largest populous place in Nevada at that time. And we were, in my

mind, a city. I thought it was important for people to view this as a city even though it’s only temporary. But it should have equal rights and privileges as a city anywhere on the planet should have. And that’s how Black Rock City came into being. And, you know, Burning Man has a lot to teach other cities—and the world, for that matter. Bringing together such a diverse group of people and have them get along. Also to have them be responsible for their environment, everybody takes everything they bring—trash and debris. So, Burning Man has become the largest leave-no-trace event in the country. And we’ve actually set the standards for clean-up that the federal government has adopted for large scale events. So I think we can teach cities a lot about protecting the environment, cleaning up, taking care of trash, and having the citizens of the city be more responsible for taking care of their own environment. We also teach cities, other communities, about how to create art—gathering large groups of people together to create amazing works of art. And having them installed as temporary exhibits which exist for a period of time and then they’re replaced by another exhibit. So you have this change—it’s not static—and that’s really great, I think, for a city environment to have a changing facade of artworks. It seems like there are a lot of differences between a traditional city and Black Rock City—the gift economy versus capitalism for instance—can you talk about that? We’ve grown up in a system of capitalism, of commerce, where almost every transaction you have with someone is based on you either buying something from them, or selling something, or trying to sell you something. And once you remove that, it enables people to connect more directly and more honestly, and that’s really an amazing thing. And just teaching people that that’s a possibility is an amazing thing. You know, Burning Man is not against capitalism, the sale of goods and services, but teaching people that that’s not the only thing that can exist within a community, that you can have true relationships with each other is an important thing. Another thing that we’ve done at Burning Man is, in 1992, I started an organization called the Black Rock Rangers, which is a group of people assigned to look after the community. There were six of us that first year. And our main mission at that time was search and rescue. Because our camp was so far out in the desert and people would try to find it and miss it by a few degrees and would go off for miles in the desert. So we’d go out a couple times a day and make big search runs, looking for people who got lost trying to find Burning Man. And as the city grew, the role of Black Rock Rangers became mediators and caretakers solving disputes, assisting people, and it’s kind of—it’s not like a police force. These are people that are part of the community, and I think we can teach communities to have an organization, or even policing authorities, a way of dealing with communities that’s not so heavy handed and so authoritarian. And it’s been very successful in Black Rock City. There are now more than 800 Black Rock Rangers each year in our city, and they do a wonderful job. I’ve never been to Burning Man, but I always hear people complain about how it’s so big and different now from how it used to be. Do the changes bother you? I’ve seen it small and tiny. I could pretty much talk to everybody without yelling, and now we have a massive communication system and very large organization. But what is happening now, it’s still the most amazing thing on the planet. And so for all the shifts from that small group out in the desert, we now have these communities within the city. We have neighborhoods, so there’s still that sense of connection that happens in all of these neat community areas and neighborhoods within Black Rock City. The roots of Burning Man were actually in the ’60s and ’70s counterculture of the Bay Area. And there were some groups that heavily influenced the character and identity of Burning Man. And one of the earliest ones was the San Francisco Suicide Club, which came out of a free school called Communiversity where anyone could teach a class on any subject. And out of that, this group of people was formed called the Suicide Club, and they went on adventures that challenged people. They went into different places, abandoned buildings. They climbed the Golden Gate Bridge in the middle of the night and had a lot of experiences. A man named Gary Horn was the person who founded the Suicide Club, and they lasted from 1976 to, I believe, 1982, and out of some of the members of the Suicide Club, a few years later, formed a group called the Cacophony Society. And the Cacophony Society, I think, was a randomly gathered network of free spirits united in the pursuit of beyond the pale mainstream society. So we put out a newsletter each month with a list of things that you could attend or participate. So I was a member of the Cacophony Society, and I’d heard about the Suicide Club, but they were so


Photo/Eric Marks

far underground that I couldn’t find them, so when Cacophony got started, I got involved with that, and I helped it become a much more open and inclusive organization. That’s the one with the tagline, “You might already be a member?” “You might already be a member” was the quotation I came up with. So that was formed in 1986, about the same time Burning Man was starting, and more and more energy from the Cacophony Society got put into Burning Man. In 1990, we were on Baker Beach in San Francisco, and we showed up with several hundred people and a four-story-tall wooden man. And the authorities arrived before we could strike a match to it, and they said, “You can’t do this—you don’t have a permit.” So we said, “OK, we won’t burn it down.” So we took the man apart, and put it in storage and two months later we brought it out to the Black Rock Desert in Nevada. Because we had seen this video of people in this strange, dry, desert place. They were playing a game of croquet, only the croquet ball was 8 feet in diameter, and for mallets, they were using pickup trucks. And we thought, “We could burn a man out there,” and that’s when we first came to the Black Rock Desert. And I arrived there with the first group of participants. There were about 80 of us, and a large wooden man in a rental truck. And we pulled down off the highway onto this flat plane, and I had everyone get out of their cars and trucks, and I drew a line in the ground, and I said, “On the other side of this line, everything will be different.” We then all stepped across that line together, and my, how things have been different. Do you say that every year or did that just happen that first year? That only happened the first year. However, it’s become a tradition with the Black Rock Rangers. The Rangers go through a period of training, and then after they receive their graduation, they do a ceremony that relives that moment of my first line in the ground. They draw a line in the ground, and the graduating class of rangers step across that line. And there’s about a hundred rangers that graduate each year now. So that’s become a part of the tradition in Black Rock City. Can you tell me about the Rangers?

We started in 1992 with six people. Our approach is different than the heavyhanded police tactics. That’s what’s so important. We are respected by our community so much. The rangers have to set aside their own ego and listen to people and hear what they have to say. There’s a lot of negotiation in working with people and finding solutions to problems. So instead of coming out with a heavy handed authority—“You will do this!”—you try to understand the underlying causes of things and where people are coming from and what their needs are. I think police could benefit a lot from our training program. Can you tell me about Fly Ranch? Yes, recently Burning Man acquired a place called Fly Ranch. It’s a little over 300 acres in the Hualapai, Valley which is just over the mountain ridge from the Black Rock Desert. And what we want to do is to facilitate Burning Man culture into the future. What does that mean? You know, Black Rock City, we build it, and then we erase it, but with this place we will have a permanent place on the planet in which to develop and grow and enhance our culture. Right now, we’re doing a lot of research on the land. It’s a beautiful place, and we want to protect the environment, so we’re doing an assessment of all of the wildlife and vegetation, the hydrological features, the geology of it, and we’re going to find out how we can use it. There’s a lot of ideas … artists in residence, places to study, a possible art park, places where you can have salons and gatherings to think about the future of the Earth and where Burning Man could go to help the planet. But nothing’s set yet? No, it’s just in the planning. It has a beautiful geyser on it that was created when a well was drilled, and it was used largely as cattle ranching in its history for the most part. And we want to find out ways of using it and enhancing it to promote Burning Man culture. So this exhibit at the Nevada Museum of Art—it’s not a replacement for going to Burning Man, right? Oh, no. You have to experience Burning Man. You can see so much of it here, and people will talk and talk, but you can’t really know what Burning Man is until you experience it. Ω

09.07.17    |   RN&R   |   13


s d s r d o r W o W e h t n o

sean Bernard

t e e r st

Nevada Humanities Literary Crawl returns for fourth year

olIvIa romo

by Matt bieker

I

t’s no secret that the citizens of Reno love a good “crawl.” Santa, Zombie, Pajama, Superhero—there’s no shortage of themed drinking fests to pack the streets and bars throughout the year. For the past three years, the nonprofit organization Nevada Humanities has staged its own crawl in the same spirit—minus the spirits. The annual Literary Crawl highlights notable local and visiting authors, poets and storytellers. “When I was thinking about this literary crawl, I really wanted to make sure that all community members in Reno felt like this was a place for them, and that they were welcome to listen to these stories and listen to these poems and listen to these voices, and it’s not an intimidating thing—similar to how a pub crawl is not an intimidating thing,” said Stephanie Gibson, program manager for the event. This year’s Literary Crawl will take place on Saturday, Sept. 16, from 2:30 to 8 p.m. The event begins and ends at Sundance Books and Music, 121 California Ave., but encourages participants to visit more than a dozen venues around California Avenue and midtown to hear writers speak on a variety of curated topics ranging from romance novels to translation, and life in the West to Basque heritage. Writing workshops and family activities will also be offered throughout the day. “We have new writers and new voices that have never published before,” Gibson said. “We have people that probably haven’t published

14   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17

A novelist and fiction writer currently working in Los Angeles, Sean Bernard, has deep familial ties to Nevada. Growing up, the work of his great uncle, Robert Laxalt, was a source of inspiration in both subject matter and career orientation. “I grew up in Arizona, but my family is very much Nevadan, through and through,” Bernard said. “I was very aware of having a writer in the family and knowing that that was a very possible career to embark on.” Sean’s 2015 novel Studies in the Hereafter touches heavily on Basque culture in Nevada. During the Literary Crawl, he will be sharing the stage with his cousin, Gabriel Urza, whose own work All That Followed also comments on Basque heritage. “Since the two of us incorporated Basqueness in our books so much, we’ve been asked to speak to that, and to talk about how and why we incorporated it into our works,” Bernard said. “We’re going to be speaking to the concerns we had as authors in terms of representing cultural backgrounds.”

“I think our focus this year was to really expand the notion of what the written word is and how we all contend with it.” Stephanie Gibson Literary Crawl program manager

in quite a while but are senior voices in our community, and we wanted to hear their perspective on things. And we have a journalist this year—Mike Higdon. I think our focus this year was to really expand the notion of what the written word is and how we all contend with it.” Dozens of authors will be participating in this year’s event. Here, a few of them share what participants in this year’s crawl can expect:

Spoken word artist Olivia Romo is a native of Taos, New Mexico. Romo currently works with the New Mexico Acequia Association—using her poetry and experience with oral traditions to advocate for water rights and ancestral agricultural communities in her home state. “My work really roots from a strong oral history,” Romo said. “My angle has always been using my poetry and my art as a way to document, to preserve and to celebrate not just the struggles—because, yes, we have struggles—but here there are so many beautiful things happening. So that needs to be celebrated as well.” When she was 17, Romo wrote a poem about acequias—traditional irrigation ditches—and recited it to the statewide Acequia Association. Last year, the Western Folklife Center in Elko commissioned that same poem to be turned into a video. It will give Romo, who was approached to present at the Literary Crawl after attending this year’s Cowboy Poetry Festival in Elko, the chance to publicize her work to a broader audience. “I’m excited; I’m going to be on some amazing panels,” she said. “I’m still very excited to see what it’s all going to unravel to be about—this love of place, the love of the land.” Romo is currently working on a spoken word CD, which she hopes to release in the near future. Raíces (Roots) will feature Romo’s poetry, as well as traditional New Mexican ceremonial songs.


Lindsay WiLson Lindsay Wilson has been Reno’s poet laureate—since April. He has worked as an English professor at Truckee Meadows Community College since 2006 and has published poetry in literary journals around the country over the past decade. His award-winning first collection, No Elegies, was published in 2015. “My life wasn’t always the easiest life, at times,” Wilson said. “It wasn’t the hardest either—don’t get me wrong—but there were other things I wanted to write about, things I felt compelled to write about. I just kind of love playing around with language. It just snowballed, really.” Wilson has been involved with the Literary Crawl in years past and will be offering a poetry workshop during this year’s event. He will also present original poetry readings at Sundance before and after the event. “I actually think of the [poet laureate’s] office as being there for things just like Nevada Humanities,” Wilson said. “If I can use the office like that—if they can say, ‘Oh, the poet laureate’s going to be there’— hopefully it helps.” Wilson also believes the informal setting of the Literary Crawl will make narrative art forms more visible to a wider audience. “It’s a crawl,” he said. “It’s not like, ‘Come to Governor’s Mansion and read poetry about Nevada’s history,’ which is cool, too, but a certain type of audience is going to come out for each one.”

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Virginia CastLeman Virginia Castleman is a TMCC professor who has lived in Nevada off and on since 2000. A product of the foster care system, she credits her adoptive parents with instilling in her a lifelong passion for literature through the stories they chose to read her as a child. “Before adoption, I didn’t have those experiences,” Castleman said. “As a foster kid, it was important because the stories that they chose allowed me to see how healthy families lived.” Her experiences with the pitfalls of the foster care system inspired the events of her 2016 Young Adult novel, Sara Lost and Found, which was published by Simon and Schuster, and from which she will be reading at this year’s crawl. The reading is in conjunction with a workshop geared toward young writers. “I think for teens … if they want to write poetry and novels and short stories—whatever they want to write—one of the challenges is finding one’s voice,” Castleman said. Ω

Learn more about the Nevada Humanities Literary Crawl and get a schedule of events here: http://bit.ly/1Qga0fL.

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by KRIS VAGNER

k r isv @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

Theodore Waddell mixes art world and ranch world aesthetics in his paintings and sculptural work.

Like an animal Theodore Waddell One of Theodore Waddell’s artworks, “A Rabbit for Frank,” consists of a jackrabbit—yes, it’s real—upside down on a roughed-up white canvas. The bone and sinew of its feet are exposed, and its soft gray fur is caked thick with smears of paint the colors of a stormy seascape. Viewers familiar with ranch life might be inclined to read the piece as a blunthumored presentation on ordinary taxidermy or roadkill, both common sights in the rural West. Viewers who know a little American art history could easily take it as a corporeal twist on Robert Rauschenberg’s pre-pop-art painting/sculpture hybrids. And some viewers have seen this piece as a simple attempt to shock. To Waddell, it’s just part of his lifelong effort to process everyday life. “These thing started really innocently,” Waddell said of the jackrabbit piece and similar works. “I wasn’t trying to be a pop artist. I was just trying to deal with the world I live in. … I ran cattle for 30 years. … If you’re on the ranch, every ranch has a bone pile.” In that context, he said, it’s natural to have death on your mind a lot of the time—and ultimately to become comfortable with its ever-looming presence. Death is not Waddell’s only theme—his work also exudes a sense of place and a sense of humor. He makes huge paintings that read something like romantic, outsized, Westernized Monets, with a chillier palette and a bigger sky. They’re as mythic and seductive as the wide-open Montana landscapes they portray. His sculptural pieces are wry combinations of items such as cattle ranching tools, hunting weapons, 16   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17

PHOTO/KRIS VAGNER

or the skins or bones of animals. In some cases, Waddell has created utilitarianlooking implements for fantastical needs, such as canvas body bags for snakes. He’s taped bullets to jawbones and placed them in polished wood boxes lined with velvet. Again, depending on the viewer’s cultural lens, the boxes could look like antique relic cases or homages to Joseph Cornell. Waddell, who calls himself “an endangered species—a Montanan native,” has worked on ranches in his home state most of his life, save for a stint in New York during his formative years. While he was in college in Montana, in 1962, he overheard a teacher advising a fellow student to apply to study at the Brooklyn Museum. “I thought she was talking to me, so I applied for it,” he said. He was admitted, and he promptly shipped off to study art in the big city. Since then, he’s shown his work in countless gallery and museum exhibits, dozens of private collections and nine embassies. Currently, Waddell has an exhibit at the Oats Park Art Center in Fallon. It’s a survey of his mixed media work, spanning back a few decades. For those inclined to dig deeper into the stories behind his art world/ranch world viewpoint, he’s planning a gallery walk-through during a Sept. 9 reception. Meanwhile, here’s one of those stories. It’s about the paint-smeared jackrabbit. “One of my heroes was a British painter named Frank Auerbach,” Waddell said. “There was so much paint on the floor, it piled up about six inches thick. That’s who ‘Rabbit for Frank’ is a tribute to. Every few days, when I cleaned my palette, I put it on a canvas and made that piece, an homage to Frank. That was for him.” Ω

Theodore Waddell’s Hallowed Absurdities will be on exhibit through Nov. 18 at Oats Park Art Center, 151 E. Park St., Fallon. A reception and book signing for Waddell’s book, My Montana, is scheduled for 5-7 p.m. Sept. 9. For information, visit www.churchillarts.org.


By BoB Grimm

b g ri m m @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

SHORT TAKES

3

“Yahtzee!”

Near miss Thirteen minutes … that’s how close a bomb made by a man named Georg Elser came to possibly killing Adolf Hitler in 1939. Had Elser succeeded, the history of the world would’ve been forever altered in unimaginable ways. Many of us have often played the time machine game where we ask ourselves and friends, “If you had a time machine, what would you do?” The most common answer to that game is probably something along the lines of “Go back in time, kill Hitler.” Elser was the living embodiment of that time machine game answer, and he almost succeeded in taking out the evil dictator before he sent Germany to ruins. 13 Minutes, the latest from director Oliver Hirschbiegel, is a biopic on Elser. It ruminates on his possible motivations for the assassination attempt, while exploring what was surely a vicious and awful interlude with physical and psychological torture after his bomb missed its target and killed eight people. It’s Hirschbiegel’s second feature focusing on Hitler, and while it isn’t as powerful as Downfall, which studied a panicky Hitler in his final days, it’s still an occasionally fascinating piece of work. The film starts with Elser (a strong Christian Friedel) planting dynamite in a compartment behind a speech podium, a podium that will soon have Hitler pontificating at it. Elser is subsequently caught and thrown into prison, moments before his explosives go off 13 minutes too late. He’s forced to tell his story. Then Hirschbiegel’s movie becomes a mixture of gestapo torture horror show and Elser’s backstory as flashbacks show the events leading up to his decision to make the bomb. It’s in the backstory that the film flounders a little bit, concentrating too much on the love story between Elser and Elsa (Katharina Schuttler). The film also tells a sort of confused, noncommittal story about Elser’s political convictions and commitments. Where the film works really well is in time thread involving the bomb’s aftermath, and Elser’s

eventual imprisonment at the Dachau concentration camp. The man lived for five years after his bombing attempt, long enough to see his original fears about Hitler and his potential for destroying Germany come true. This man lived one of history’s most horrific existences, going through the hell of gestapo interrogation and the concentration camps, and very nearly making it out of the war alive. Friedel does an excellent job of making Elser a fully fleshed character, even if the film’s script skimps on some of the deeper details. There are scenes of Elser enjoying summer days in a pre-war Germany, womanizing and playing music. These moments do a heartbreaking job of showing the innocence and joy that was lost when folks started paying a little too much attention to the jackass with the Chaplin mustache and stupid haircut. Elser certainly sacrificed much with his actions, and the movie doesn’t shy away from the reality that his bomb killed eight and injured many, missing its main target because Hitler opted for a train instead of a plane and left the rally early. And let there be no mistake; the Nazi rally depicted in the film strikes a scary chord in today’s world with the events in Charlottesville. This movie was produced a couple of years ago, but it feels like they could’ve made it yesterday. With 13 Minutes, Hirschbiegel has created bookend movies for the Holocaust horrors brought about by Nazi Germany. This movie deals with the buildup to the war, while Downfall dealt with the last paranoiac days. I’m sure watching the two films in succession would be a powerful experience, but I’m going to put that one off for a little while. I’ve had enough of Nazis and bullheaded political rallies these last couple of months. Ω

13 minutes

12345

Annabelle: Creation

Annabelle, the creepy doll from The Conjuring movies, gets her second standalone film with Annabelle: Creation, a silly movie that’s nevertheless enjoyable thanks to some deft direction and surprisingly competent acting. The movie holds together thanks to solid performances from Talitha Bateman and Lulu Wilson, the latter being the same child actress who gave incredible work in the also surprisingly good prequel/sequel to a so-so movie, Ouija: Origin of Evil. The film is full of good performances from the likes of Miranda Otto, Anthony LaPaglia and Stephanie Sigman, but it’s Bateman and Wilson who get most of the credit for pulling it off. The film is set many years before the first Annabelle movie, with orphans Janice (Bateman) and Linda (Wilson) on their way to a new home, a group of other girls and happy nun Sister Charlotte (Sigman) at their side. Once at their new home, the doll is discovered, and the resulting playtime totally sucks ass. Last year, director David F. Sandberg delivered a decent genre film with Lights Out, based on his terrifically scary short film. (Talitha’s younger brother, Martin Bateman, starred in that one.) Sandberg also makes good-looking movies. The authentic Southern Gothic look of this film lends to its credibility.

3

Atomic Blonde

Charlize Theron goes on a tear for the ages in this fun if somewhat shallow venture, another pin on her action hero lapel after her ferocious turn as Furiosa in Mad Max: Fury Road. As Lorraine Broughton, an undercover agent on a mission in Berlin in the late ’80s as the wall begins to fall, she showcases her ability to kick people through walls with the best of them. She also shows how to use a freezer door as a weapon. Directed by David Leitch, one of the directors of the original John Wick and future director of Deadpool 2, Atomic Blonde pops with the same kind of kinetic energy as Wick when the bullets and kicks are flying. Also a legendary stuntman, Leitch knows how to make a hit look real, and the choreographed action scenes in this film stand as some of the year’s best. When Charlize lands a blow in this movie, you feel it in your face. Based on the graphic novel The Coldest City, the film drags at times, especially when Lorraine does the standard interrogation room narrative scenes with Toby Jones and John Goodman drilling her for answers.

1

Birth of the Dragon

This is a fictitious take on the real-life fight between Wong Jack Man and martial arts legend Bruce Lee, and it has a couple of good fight scenes in it. In fact, they could be called very good. And, yet, I’m forced to give this movie my lowest mark because those fight scenes are surrounded by crap. Picture a diamond like the blue one that the old lady had in that Titanic movie. Dip it in gold and put it in a bag with $780 million dollars and a Babe Ruth-autographed baseball, and then drop that bag into a communal spot where a bunch of sick hippos have taken massive shits and formed a virtual lake of shit. Let that bag sink to the bottom and become immersed in the lake of sick hippo shit. That’s what happens to the very good fight scenes in this movie. Lost in shit. Sick hippo shit. (Sorry to pick on hippos for this analogy, but, hey, they are huge, and, I imagine, rather disgusting when overcome by intestinal stress, making them capable of generating the amount of shit I needed for this particular illustration.) The movie deals a little bit with actual real-life fight between Lee and rival martial arts teacher Wong Jack Man, but it blows the details up to ridiculous extremes, even turning Lee and Jack Man into Batman and Robin by film’s end. It’s garbage.

1

Goon: Last of the Enforcers

Six years ago, Goon, a funny-as-hell hockey comedy based on a real sports figure who played shitty hockey but fought like a madman, came out and seemed to give new life to the acting career of one Seann William Scott. This sequel, directed by Goon costar Jay

Baruchel, is an embarrassment from all angles. For starters, it’s sloppy—the kind of sloppy you might expect from an actor who has no clue behind the camera. The tones shift like crazy, the jokes fall flat, and the performances get killed by piss editing. The movie deals with Goon hero Doug Glatt going into retirement shortly after being named captain of his team because he can’t fight from his left side. Then it goes into a strange side story involving his work as an insurance salesman while he tries to come back, eventually getting fight training from Ross Rhea (Liev Schreiber). His training includes fighting in a hockey league that has no actual hockey, just guys dressed in hockey gear, fighting. That sounds like it could be funny but, trust me, it’s not. The talented Alison Pill return as Eva, Doug’s love interest, and her talents are wasted, as are the talents of Elisha Cuthbert as her drunk pal. I laughed twice at this thing, both moments involving Doug’s insurance boss and his activities in Doug’s basement office. Otherwise, I just sort of groaned and felt bad for all involved. (Available for download on iTunes and Amazon.com during a limited theatrical release.)

2

Logan Lucky

4

Wind River

A gang of losers plots to rob a NASCAR racetrack on one of its busiest weekends, and they do it in a hackneyed way that makes absolutely no sense. Steven Soderbergh comes out of retirement to direct Channing Tatum as Jimmy Logan, a former football player who has fallen on bad times, then suddenly gets it in his head to rob the racetrack in a way that involves sneaking people out of prison, blowing things up with gummy bears, and secret allies within the establishment. Soderbergh did the Ocean’s Eleven movies, the first of which has a reasonably fun and inventive heist. This one is sort of Ocean’s Eleven for rednecks, and their ability to pull off the heist is totally unconvincing. The film is almost saved by some of the supporting performances, including Daniel Craig as an incarcerated safe cracker who digs hard boiled eggs, and Adam Driver as Jimmy’s one-armed brother. But, for every character that’s a plus, there’s a lame one like Seth MacFarlane’s heavily accented millionaire that’s not as funny as he thinks he is. The movie doesn’t come together in the end, and its robbery scheme is too cute to be realistic. The big reveal feels like a cheat. It’s good to have Soderbergh back in action, but this is just a rehash of something he’s done before with a Southern accent. Hilary Swank shows up in the final act, a role that feels entirely tacked on.

If you’re a fan of last year’s excellent modern Western Hell or High Water, you have some big reasons to get yourself into a theater for Wind River. Taylor Sheridan, who writes and directs, has a wordsmith’s way of capturing American dilemmas on par with the likes of Sam Shepard and Cormac McCarthy. The man knows how to pen a great thriller with depth, and his works—he also wrote Iscariot and Hell or High Water—have in common a somber tone. This is a guy who knows that many of the people you pass on the street today are dealing with an eternity of grief and loss. They are making it, but it’s a bitch, and it’s not going to get easier. Wind River marks Sheridan’s second feature directorial effort, after 2011’s low-budget Vile, and it stands as one of the summer’s best films. It’s a solid mystery-thriller and a showcase for two fierce performances from Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen—yes, Hawkeye and Scarlet Witch. They both offer up career-best work, with Renner searing the screen as Cory, a man with a tragic past, paid to hunt wolves and lions on a Native American reservation. Olsen commands her screen time as Jane, one of cinema’s gutsiest FBI agents since Clarice Starling. With this film, Renner has been tasked with some of the more difficult, emotionally brutal scenes an actor has had to handle this year.

09.07.17

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RN&R

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17


by Todd SouTh

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Follow AmadorWine on social media! 18   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17

Recently opened Badabing’s in midtown boasts one of the smallest kitchens in town. There are food trucks with more space. Seating is al fresco, and the chalkboard menu consists of burgers, sandwiches, sausages, chicken wings and deep fried appetizers. On a recent visit with friends, the service was quick. They cranked out six orders for us in less than 20 minutes—not bad for a two-person operation. The sausage selection includes hot dogs served a few different ways, and hot links, linguica or kielbasa, split in half and grilled with jalapeño and onion, and served on a long sandwich roll. My friend opted for the hot link ($8.95). It was spicy but not overwhelming, with good flavor and a nice snap from the natural casing. The roll was a nice departure from an average hot dog bun. The burgers and chicken sandwiches featured large sesame-seeded buns stuffed full of meat, cheese, lettuce, tomato, pickle and onion. A grilled pesto provolone chicken sandwich included a sizeable chicken breast seasoned with rosemary and topped with melted provolone and pesto sauce. The chicken was still fairly moist, and the sandwich got deliciously sloppy. Unfortunately, things got a lot drier from there. A double cheese burger with cheddar ($11.95) and a pastrami Swiss burger ($9.95) were both overcooked to the point of being black on the outside and gray on the inside—think “drunk uncle left alone at the grill during the family cookout” overcooked. This was particularly disappointing because the meat was actually nicely seasoned, and the patties were definitely hand-fashioned. The pastrami Swiss

Badabing’s has a tiny kitchen and al fresco seating in midtown at the corner of Virginia and Mary streets. PHOTO/ALLISON YOUNG

burger fared a bit better—aided by plenty of grilled, thick-cut lean pastrami. Next, we shared an enormous order of chili cheese fries ($4.50). It was easily a pound of fries slathered in chili (with beans) and topped with diced onion and melted cheddar. The chili itself was pretty tame, and—if I had to guess—I’d say it came from a can. It was perfectly fine, just not terribly memorable. I suppose serving a mild chili makes sense for tender palates, but I wish I’d asked to have some sliced jalapeño join the party. To top things off, we decided to try a few flavors of wings, Buffalo hot and “stingin’ honey garlic” ($7.95 per eightpiece order). At first glance, they looked pretty good, but I found them to be just a tad overcooked. This usually happens in the quest for a crispy skin—and, having myself fried plenty of wings, I can attest to the tricky balance required to achieve a crispy wing that’s not dry. Though the flavor and texture of the hot wings were acceptable, I wouldn’t have called them Buffalo style. At its core, Buffalo sauce should have a pretty good cayenne pepper kick, but the main sense I was getting was an oddly smoky quality without much heat. Similarly, I couldn’t detect any garlic or “sting” with the other wings. They were just sticky sweet—not something I’d want again. The menu lists cheesesteaks—the actual item that drew me to the place—but they’d apparently run into a problem with their distributor and didn’t know when they’d have it back on the menu. Based on the rest of our experience, I don’t know whether I’ll be back to find out. Ω

Badabing’s

999 S. Virginia St., 786-2464

Badabing’s is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.


Jump In

by Marc Tiar

get more, spend less. Lake Tahoe, a part of the Great Basin

Manager Lacy Gann pours a Vegas Bomb. Photo/ALLison Young

One recent Sunday, my wife and kids left me behind on a day trip, so I was left to my own devices after work. Not one to completely shirk my domestic obligations, I planned a quick trip to a big box store and sought out a nearby beer-and-dinner destination. My all-knowing online map pointed me to Flowing Tide Pub No. 4 in Sparks. As a beer-loving family man, I’m always happy to find places that offer a kid-friendly environment and menu complemented by a great beer selection. Reasonable prices and a convenient location—all the better. We’ve patronized the original northwest Reno Flowing Tide a few times in the past, but found it a little too bar-like for family dinner on some occasions. I knew they had opened at least one additional pub in south Reno, but didn’t realize the Flowing Tide empire was now five locations strong. A little out of my stomping ground, I found the Sparks Flowing Tide in a semi-suburban strip mall. Banners outside promoted it paradoxically as “Family Friendly” but with an “Adults Only— Smoking Allowed” section, a dichotomy I’d never seen before. I chose the former since I wanted to eat, not smoke, but I could see the appeal of a smoking area for those so inclined. Offering the choice is considerate and savvy, the first of many choices here. Signs described daily specials, happy hour details, and promoted the rotating craft beer options. An average-sized bar was only a relatively small part of a large layout—tables and booths, a sunken game area with pool, pinball and other games, and a TV the size of my living room wall showing football. It wasn’t clear if I should just sit or wait, so I wandered around pretending to look for someone. I finally

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Let it flow

asked and sat myself as instructed. Drink and food menus followed quickly, and more choices unfolded—about 20 draft beers, from the basic “domestic” category to the one arguably “super premium” beer, Sculpin IPA. Nautically-themed specialty cocktails and bottled beers completed that half of the drink menu, and a short but respectable list of wines by the glass or bottle filled the other half. I briefly considered the beer list, but a banner across the room promoted the beer of the month, local Lead Dog’s Citra Solo IPA, and the choice was made—until I had to pick a size. Twenty-eight ounces seemed a little excessive, so I ordered a pint, wondering if happy hour was based on when you ordered or when you paid your bill—happily, it was the former since the first happy hour was almost over, and I’d be long gone before the second started at 10 p.m. This is one of two Flowing Tide locations open 24 hours. The menu offers far more food choices than the drink menu does drinks—more than typical “pub grub,” including breakfast, on par with a full-blown restaurant. Pool tables and sports TVs on every wall still make it feel like a bar, but the line between the two is blurred here. I sometimes joke with a Sparks resident coworker about how everything is better there, the gas prices are lower, the Costco less crowded, like Reno without the bad parts. Even just joking, there’s a touch of truth, and Sparks sometimes feels distant and alien even though it’s literally just down the road. Even if Sparks boasts this welcome place with plenty of choices in beer, food, and even smoking or family atmosphere—at least Reno can still claim the other four Flowing Tide Pubs. Ω

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490 Mill Street • Reno • 775-499-5276 millstreetstillandbrew.com 09.07.17    |   RN&R   |   19


20   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17


by MAtt BiEkEr

Alise Corbin, Dave Hadel and Jonathan Daniel are Swigs, a surf/punk band with an EP on the way.

Connection is made Swigs Like some of the greatest love stories— and occasional high-profile crimes—of our era, local surf/punk band Swigs began with a Craigslist ad. Dave Hadel, guitarist and lead vocalist, put out an ad looking for bandmates that was quickly answered by bassist Jonathan Daniel. “It’s funny that we met right here at Bighorn [Bar], and finding out after we met here that he lives eight houses away from me,” said Daniel. “Like, how have we not heard each other playing music when we live right next to each other?” Serendipity struck again as Hadel was already jamming with drummer Alise Corbin, who quickly recognized Daniel as a friend she’d known since childhood but hadn’t seen for over a decade. The band was formed shortly after the trio played Hadel’s 2017 New Year’s party. “After that, we saw people really liked it and were dancing, and we were like, ‘Ah, man, maybe we should book gigs and stuff and actually do this,’” Corbin said. Building from familiar punk and surf sounds of past projects like the Riptide Bandits, for which Daniel used to play bass, and folding in newer elements like Corbin’s classical and orchestra background, Swigs revels in a peppy, upbeat sound that’s more Pixies than Sex Pistols. “We don’t take ourselves too seriously,” Hadel said. “We have a song called ‘The Carlton,’ which is about the obvious dance, the Carlton; ‘Top Secret Sandwiches’; one’s called ‘The Stadium,’ which is about one of the levels in Super Mario 64.” In the spirit of genre-bending fun, Swigs also wrote their own Spaghetti Western ballad called ‘The Kid Comes to Town,’ in

Photo/Matt Bieker

reference to Hadel’s nickname within their ranks—he’s “the Kid.” Daniel is “Pops,” and Corbin is “Sissy.” “This is definitely the most positive and fun band I’ve ever played in, just because we maintain that attitude of, ‘We’re just doing this to have fun,’ and there’s not going to be a limit on how stupid or silly the songs can be,” Daniel said. The bandmates consider Swigs a live band, first and foremost. But their energy is also at work offstage. In the nine months since the band’s formation, they’ve recorded an EP, were signed to play at this year’s Offbeat Music Festival, and have enjoyed airtime on local radio stations. “It took off pretty fast,” Daniel said. “We got booked for Offbeat after, like, five months of being a band.” Offbeat Music Festival will take place from Nov. 2 to 4 at venues around Reno and will feature dozens of local bands and touring acts from around the country. Swigs plans to release its six-song EP that weekend on Spotify, iTunes and CD. Two tracks can be heard now on group’s Bandcamp page. “We don’t have dreams of becoming gigantic mega stars, playing AT&T Stadium or anything, but we did just make a pact to go on tour next summer or spring,” Daniel said of the band’s next move—a decision that was made during a recent “band date” at a Primus show in South Lake Tahoe. Hadel said that a hotel in Las Vegas has already offered them rooms and a stage to perform. He believes the DIY managerial experience he’s gained from hosting his All Independent Reno Podcast will serve them well going forward. However, the trio doesn’t seem to be sweating the details. “It’s nice to know that you’re just doing what you do because you’re having fun and other people like it,” Corbin said. “That’s all we’re after, making people happy.” Ω

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For more information, visit swigs.bandcamp.com. Reno News and Review 07-27-17_09-07-17.indd 1

09.07.17    |   RN&R   |   21 7/7/17 9:05 AM


THURSDAY 9/7

FRIDAY 9/8

SATURDAY 9/9

214 W Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

Sam F, Nandez, Bob the Barber, 10pm, $10

Dr. Fresch, 10pm, $10-$15

3rd Street Bar

Beats by Mener, 9pm, no cover

Tony Ghiglieri Blues Band, 9pm, no cover

Dance party, 10pm, $5

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1up

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

5 Star Saloon

132 West St., (775) 329-2878

Mary J. Blige Sept. 8, 8 p.m.  Grand Sierra Resort  2500 E. Second St.  789-2000

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

alturaS on the down low

SUNDAY 9/10

DG Kicks Big Band Jazz Orchestra, 8pm, Tu, no cover Sunday Takeover, 8pm, no cover

Benefit for George Quick with Dissidence, Sans Ami, 8pm, no cover

1044 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-5050

the BlueBird nightcluB

Blues Jam Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover Smasheltooth, Muppet Punk, KOWTA, MotorHome Music, 10pm, $5-$10

555 E. Fourth St., (775) 499-5549

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Cody Jinks, Ward Davis, 8pm, W, $25-$125

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

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Jesse Kopp, 9pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

Comedy

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Dave Manning, 6pm, no cover

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3rd Street Bar, 125 W. Third St. (775) 323-5005: Open Mic Comedy Competition with host Pat Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover The Improv at Harveys, 18 Highway 50, Stateline, (775) 588-6611: Henry Phillips, Rawle Dee Lewis-Fri, 9pm, $25; Sat, 8:30pm, 10:30pm, $30; Darren Carter, W, 9pm, $25 Laugh Factory at Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401: K-von, Th-Sun, 7:30pm, $21.95; Fri-Sat, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $27.45; Murray Sawchuck, Tu-W, 7:30pm, $21.95 Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-5233: Sean Peabody, 8pm, $10-$15; Fri, 9:30pm, $13-$18; Sat, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $13-$18

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

Hellbound Glory, 8:30pm, no cover

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee, (530) 587-5711

Lisa Marie, 6pm, no cover

Post shows online by registerin g at www.newsrev iew.com/ren o. Deadline is th e Friday before public ation.

6300 Mae Anne Ave., (775) 787-6300 3372 S. McCarran Blvd., (775) 825-1988

Traditional Irish Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Matt Bushman, 9pm, no cover

Fine VineS

hellFire Saloon

MON-WED 9/11-9/13

Line dancing with DJ Trey, 7pm, no cover

the holland proJect

Big O, Grace Hayes, The Dead Beat, 8pm, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

JuB JuB’S thirSt parlor

Rob Ford Explorer, Hit Me Harold, Slurry, 8pm, $5 Iamsu, 7:30pm, $25

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

Karaoke with Nightsong Productions, 9pm, Tu, no cover Adrian’s Open Mic Jam Slam, 8pm, Tu, no cover Open Mic with Lenny El Bajo, 7pm, Tu, no cover KnowMads, 8pm, Tu, $7-$10 Twelve Gauge Facelift, 7:30pm, W, $5

The Living End, 8pm, $18

the Jungle

Outspoken Monday Open Mic, 7pm, M, no cover

liVing the good liFe

Canyon White, 6:30pm, Tu, no cover Jazz Jam, 7:30pm, W, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484 1480 S. Carson St., Carson City, (775) 841-4663

the loFt

Magic Fusion, 7pm, 9pm, $20-$45

Magic Fusion, 7pm, 9pm, $20-$45

Bartley Ranch Regional Park www.RenoCeltic.org

October 7 & 8, 2017

2660 Lake Tahoe Blvd., S.L. Tahoe, (530) 544-3425

Magic Fusion, 7pm, 9pm, $20-$45

Magic Fusion, 4:30pm, 7pm, $20-$45

Magic Fusion, 7pm, M, Tu, W, $20-$45

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22   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17


THURSDAY 9/7 The Loving Cup

Jazz Night, 8:30pm, no cover

MidTown wine Bar

DJ Trivia, 6:30pm, no cover

188 California Ave (775) 322-2480 1527 S. Virginia St., (775) 800-1960

MiLLenniuM nighTCLuB

FRIDAY 9/8

SATURDAY 9/9

Jakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garage, 8:30pm, no cover

The Run Up, 8:30pm, no cover

SUNDAY 9/10

MON-WED 9/11-9/13

Chris Costa, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Javier Rosas, 10pm, $37

2100 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 772-6637

MoodYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BiSTro Bar & BeaTS

Bazooka Zac, 8pm, no cover

10007 Bridge St., Truckee, (530) 587-8688

paddY & ireneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S iriSh puB

Collectivity, 8:30pm, no cover

Greensky Bluegrass

Karaoke, 10pm, no cover

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 359-1594

You Play Wednesdays, 8pm, W, no cover

pigniC puB & paTio

Mike Clark & The Sugar Sounds, in/PLANES, others, 8pm, no cover

The poLo Lounge

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Ladies Night with DJ Bobby G, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke Sundays, 7pm, no cover

red dog SaLoon

Trippin King Snakes, 8pm, no cover

Deep Groove, 5:30pm, no cover

235 Flint St., (775) 376-1948

76 N. C St., Virginia City, (775) 847-7474

The Umpires, 9pm, no cover Jam Session, 7pm, M, Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

The SainT

The Earles of Newtown, 8pm, $5

Live blues, 8pm, W, no cover

Sheaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Tavern

At Both Ends, Viva Revenge, 8pm, $TBA

BassMint Pros, 9pm, M, $8

9BelowZero, 9pm, no cover

Nigelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Acoustic Summer Showcase, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Saturday Dance Party, 9pm, no cover

Tuesday Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover Music Industry Night, 9pm, W, no cover

The Cure vs. Depeche Mode w/DJs 1134, EroticBuddha, 8pm, $3

Taylor Phelan, 9pm, W, $5

761 S. Virginia St., (775) 221-7451 715 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-4774

SparkS Lounge

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks, (775) 409-3340

Blues Etc. Jam with Tony G & Friends, 8:30pm, no cover

ST. JaMeS infirMarY

College Night Disco, 9pm, no cover

STudio on 4Th

Raised On TV, Hourglass Flies, 9pm, $5

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 737-9776

Rick Hammond Blues Band Summer Bash, 9pm, no cover

The Herbal Crew, 9pm, $5

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KnowMads Sept.â&#x20AC;&#x192;12,â&#x20AC;&#x192;8â&#x20AC;&#x192;p.m.â&#x20AC;&#x192; Theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Hollandâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Projectâ&#x20AC;&#x192; 140â&#x20AC;&#x192;Vestaâ&#x20AC;&#x192;St.â&#x20AC;&#x192; 742-1858

Zach Waters Band, 9pm, no cover

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Erika Paul, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

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AtlAntis CAsino ResoRt spA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

BooMtoWn CAsino Hotel 2100 Garson Road, (775) 345-6000 1) Convention Center 2) Guitar Bar

THURSDAY 9/7

FRIDAY 9/8

SATURDAY 9/9

SUNDAY 9/10

MON-WED 9/11-9/13

2) The Vegas Road Show, 8pm, no cover

2) The Vegas Road Show, 4pm, no cover arizona jones, 10pm, no cover

2) The Vegas Road Show, 4pm, no cover arizona jones, 10pm, no cover

2) arizona jones, 8pm, no cover

2) American Made Band, M, Tu, W, 8pm, no cover

2) The Robeys, 6pm, no cover

2) Starliters, 5pm, no cover John Palmore, 9pm, no cover

2) The Look, 5pm, no cover Ruby Jaye, 9pm, no cover

2) Crush, 6pm, no cover

2) Tandymonium, 6pm, M, no cover Jason King, 6pm, Tu, no cover Jonathan Barton, 6pm, W, no cover

2) Justin Lee Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Justin Lee Band, 8pm, no cover

1) Greensky Bluegrass, Hot Buttered Rum, 8pm, $25-$28

2) Hirie, 10pm, no cover

1) Adam Trent, 8pm, $19.95-$49.95 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ Roni V, 9pm, no cover

1) Adam Trent, 5:30pm, 8pm, $19.95-$49.95 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ Roni V, 9pm, no cover

CARson VAlley inn

2) Justin Lee Band, 7pm, no cover 1627 Hwy. 395, Minden, (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) TJ’s Corral

Gipsy Kings

CRystAl BAy CAsino

Sept. 8, 8 p.m.  Silver Legacy  407 N. Virginia St.  325-7401

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay, (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

eldoRAdo ResoRt CAsino 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Theater 2) Brew Brothers 3) NoVi

1) Adam Trent, 7pm, $19.95-$49.95 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover

GRAnd sieRRA ResoRt HARRAH’s lAke tAHoe

The Point, 1601 S. Virginia St., (775) 3223001: Karaoke, Sat, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Ste.103, Sparks, (775) 356-6000: Karaoke, Sat, 9pm, no cover West 2nd Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., (775) 348-7976: Karaoke, Wed, 9pm, no cover

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 427-7274 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub 3) Center Stage Lounge

HARRAH’s Reno

MontBleu ResoRt

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline, (800) 648-3353 1) Showroom 2) Blu 3) Opal 4) HQ 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge

Project1

2) DJ Chris English, DJ Josbeatz, 10:30pm, $20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

2) DJ Jamie Stacks, DJ Josbeatz, 10:30pm, $20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

1) Solid Gold Soul, 7:30pm, $29.50-$40.50

1) Solid Gold Soul, 7:30pm, $29.50-$40.50 iCandy The Show, 10pm, $30-$55 3) Carolyn Dolan, 8:30pm, no cover

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Solid Gold Soul, 7:30pm, $29.50- $40.50 iCandy The Show, 10pm, $30-$55 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Carolyn Dolan, 8:30pm, no cover 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

peppeRMill ResoRt spA CAsino silVeR leGACy ResoRt CAsino

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge

5/11/10

1) Adam Trent, 2pm, 5:30pm, $19.95-$49.95 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Adam Trent, 7pm, W, $19.95-$49.95 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, no cover Ashley Red, 10:30pm, W, no cover

1) Mary J. Blige, 8pm, $68-$450 2) Ayla Simone, 10pm, $15 2) DJ Sykwidit, 10pm, $15 3) Grand Country Nights 3) Grand Country Nights, 10pm, no cover with DJ Colt Ainsworth, 10pm, no cover

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) Lex 3) Race & Sport Book

Karaoke

2) Patrick Major, 6pm, Tu, W, no cover

2) Dusty Miles & The Cryin’ Shame, 7pm, no cover 3) DJs Enfo & Twyman, 10pm, no cover charge for women

3:02 PM

2) Jackson Michelson, 9pm, no cover

1) Stephen Stills & Judy Collins, 8pm, $50-$70

2) Dusty Miles & The Cryin’ Shame, 8pm, no cover 3) Latin Dance Social, 7:30pm, $10-$20

2) Dusty Miles & The Cryin’ Shame, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ Spryte, 10pm, $20

1) Gipsy Kings, 8pm, $62.50-$82.50 2) Fast Times, 9pm, no cover 4) Mike Furlong, 9pm, no cover

1) Jim Jefferies, 7pm, $69.50 2) Fast Times, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Mike Furlong, 9pm, no cover

Page 1

4) We Are the 60s, 9pm, no cover

3) Buddy Emmer and guest, 8pm, Tu, no cover

1) Gloria Trevi vs. Alejandra Guzman, 8pm, $36-$101 4) DJ Kronik, 9pm, no cover

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FOR THE WEEK OF SEPT. 7, 2017 For a complete listing of this week’s events or to post events to our online calendar, visit www.newsreview.com. TUESDAY BOOK GROUP: The group meets to  discuss this month’s selection The Light  Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman.  Tue, 9/12, 1-2pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library,  7100-A Pyramid Highway, Spanish Springs,  (775) 424-1800.

FOR THE WEEK OF SEPT. 7, 2017 For a complete listing of this week’s events or to post events to our online calendar, visit www.newsreview.com. TUESDAY BOOK GROUP: The group meets to  discuss this month’s selection The Light  Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman.  Tue, 9/12, 1-2pm. Free. Spanish Springs Library,  7100-A Pyramid Highway, Spanish Springs,  (775) 424-1800.

TRAILS & VISTAS GUIDED ART HIKE: The  guided hikes combine artistic expressions  and performances with the natural  beauty of the outdoors. The trail is rated  easy/moderate with some inclines. There  are 12 Art in Nature sites along a 2.2-mile  dirt trail. Tours start at 9am and leave  every 15 minutes.  Sat, 9/9,-Sun 9/10, 9am12:15pm. $12-$35. Galena Creek Regional  Park, 18350 Mount Rose Highway, (530)  563-6557, www.trailsandvistas.org.

The Great Reno Balloon Race

9/08-10:

The early morning skies will fill up with about 100  colorful hot air balloons this weekend during the  35th annual event. Highlights include the Super Glow Show, featuring about  35 balloons on the field glowing and twinkling to music in the pre-dawn  sky; Dawn Patrol, a choreographed show featuring a handful of balloons  operated by pilots qualified to fly in the dark; and the mass ascension of hot  air balloons participating in the race, which boasts a $11,000 prize purse.  The festivities kick off on Friday, Sept. 8, with the Super Glow Show at 5:15  a.m. The aerial spectacle continues on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 9-10, with  the Super Glow Show at 5 a.m. and Dawn Patrol at 5:30 a.m. Mass ascension  begins at 7 a.m. on all days of the event, which takes place at Rancho San  Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St. Admission to the park is free. For a  $10 donation you can park at the event site. Visit renoballoon.com.

EVENTS

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP RENO AIR RACES:  The 54th annual event showcases six  different classes of race planes and offers  up-close access to aircraft, pilots and  crews in the “pits.” The air races kick off  on Sept. 13 and run through Sept. 17.  Wed, 9/13, 8am-5:30pm. $5-$35. Reno-Stead  Airport, 4895 Texas Ave, (775) 972-6663,  airrace.org.

AN EVENING WITH ELLIOT PARKER AND KATE MARSHALL: University of Nevada, Reno  economics professor Elliot Parker and  former Nevada State Treasurer Kate  Marshall will discuss their new book,  Nevada’s Great Recession: Looking Back,  Moving Forward, with a Q&A and signing  to follow.  Thu, 9/7, 7pm. Free. Sundance  Books and Music, 121 California Ave., (775)  786-1188, www.sundancebookstore.com.

RENO SNAFFLE BIT FUTURITY: Three-year-old  equine athletes are tested in herd work,  rein work and fence work. The event  takes place Sept. 11-17 and includes a  trade show and three horse sales.  Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am. $20. Reno-Sparks  Livestock Events Center, 1350 N Wells Ave.,  www.renosnafflebitfuturity.com.

FIRST THURSDAY: Grab a drink, listen to live  music by The Sextones and check out the  galleries at Nevada Museum of Art.  Thu, 9/7, 5pm. $10 general admission, free for  NMA members. Nevada Museum of Art,  160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333.

RISE TO THE CHALLENGE PART 2: The  fundraiser includes a flight of wine, beer  and appetizers, a silent auction and live  entertainment by Sierra Crossing. All  proceeds will go to the Center for Healthy  Aging, whose mission is to improve the  quality of life of seniors by helping them  maintain independence within their  community.  Fri, 9/8, 4-8pm. $35. The  Center for Healthy Aging, 515 Court St., 

HANDS ON! SECOND SATURDAYS: The monthly  program offers free admission, hands-on  art activities, storytelling, a docentguided tour, live performances and  community collaborations.  Sat 9/9, 10am6pm. Free. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W.  Liberty St., (775) 329-3333.

(775) 384-4324.

MINI BIOBLITZ SERIES: Truckee Meadows  Parks Foundation’s BioBlitz is a day where  all attendees are volunteer scientists who  attempt to record and identify all forms  of wildlife side-by-side with local experts  and scientists.  Sat, 9/9, 9am. Free.  Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley 

SATURDAY NIGHT STAR PARTY: The Jack 

Ranch Road, (775) 410-1702.

C. Davis Observatory hosts free star  parties every Saturday. The evening  starts with a lecture on one of numerous  topics and then concludes with guided  star viewing by one of the observatory’s  astronomers.  Sat, 9/9, 6pm. Free. Jack C.  Davis Observatory, 2699 Van Patten Drive, 

WASHOE READS—THE ORPHAN MASTER’S SON: Washoe County Library System and  Nevada Humanities hosts a communitywide read of Adam Johnson’s The  Orphan Master’s Son. Book discussions  will take place in three parts at several  library locations through Sept. 15,  culminating with the 4th Annual Nevada  Humanities Literary Crawl on Sept. 16  from 3-8pm at venues throughout the  Downtown Reno arts corridor.  Sat, 9/9, 10:30am-noon. Free. Northwest Reno  Library, 2325 Robb Drive,  (775) 787-4100,  nevadahumanities.org.

ART ART INDEED ABSTRACT ART GALLERY: Art  Indeed Abstract Art Gallery will participate in the First Thursday Art Night  on Sept. 7 and the wine walk along the  downtown Riverwalk on Sept. 16. The  gallery will be open every weekend in  September from 11am-5pm, in honor of  the Shakespeare Animal Fund.  Thu, 9/7, 4pm; Sat, 9/9-Sun, 9/10, 11am-5pm. Free.  Art Indeed Abstract Art Gallery, 142 Bell  St., (775) 846-8367.

ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO: Let ’Em Run. This  is a benefit art show and sale for Lacy  J. Dalton’s Wild Horse Foundation, which  focuses on preserving, recovering and  providing sanctuary and homes for  Nevada’s wild horses and burros. The  show runs through Sept. 30.  Thu, 9/7-Wed, 9/13, 11am-4pm. Free. Artists Co-op of  Reno, 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896.

BLUE WHALE COFFEE COMPANY: Midtown  Mural Tour. This is a docent-led tour  of more than 40 of the 70 murals in the  midtown district. Learn about the artists, their process and how this form of  public art improves the life and culture of  a neighborhood. Tickets are available at  the door.  Sat, 9/9, 11am. $10. Blue Whale  Coffee Company, 32 Cheney St., (415) 5964987, artspotreno.com.

COURTHOUSE GALLERY, CARSON CITY COURTHOUSE: Industrial Art Sports  Edition. Capital City Arts Initiative’s  exhibition features the design work of  five Northern Nevada sports equipment designers and manufacturers. The  show runs through Sept. 28.  Thu, 9/7-Fri, 9/8, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am-5pm. Free.  Courthouse Gallery, Carson City  Courthouse, 885 E. Musser St., Carson  City., www.arts-initiative.org.

GALLERY WEST, MCKINLEY ARTS & CULTURE CENTER: Womb to Tomb, Birth to Earth,  Dust to Dust. In this series of prints  and books, artist Lauren Cardenas  pays homage to something that was  lost—using digital print along with traditional print methods to evoke a sense  of longing and aloneness. The show runs  through Oct. 6, with a gallery reception  on Sept. 7, 5-7pm.  Thu, 9/7-Sat, 9/9, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am-5pm. Free. Gallery  West, McKinley Arts & Culture Center, 925  Riverside Drive, (775) 334-2417.

GARDEN PAVILION AT THE LAKE MANSION:  Reno Art Collaboration Pop-Up Art Show.  This pop-up art show features various  different mediums for sale, including  painting, drawing, forged metal, jewelry, silk painting, a bike-printing press  and more.  Sat, 9/9, 11am. Free. Garden  Pavilion at the Lake Mansion, 250 Court  St., (208) 310-1153.

THE HOLLAND PROJECT MICRO GALLERY: From  the Garden. This collaborative show  features work by Ana McKay and Ally  Messer. McKay works in ink and watercolor, and Messer works in various forms  of printmaking. Their collaborative exhibit  features delicate but grounded works  that relate the human element with the  environment  The show runs through  Sept. 9.  Thu, 9/7-Sat, 9/9, 7am. Free. The  Holland Project Micro Gallery, 945 Record  St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

LASTING DOSE TATTOO & ART COLLECTIVE:  The Afterlife Aquatic—A Cabinet of  Curiosities and Oddities Opening  Reception. The show features the artwork of Steve Richards and other local  artists.  Sat, 9/9, 8pm. Free. Lasting Dose  Tattoo & Art Collective, 888 S. Virginia St.,  (775) 324-0666.

MCKINLEY ARTS & CULTURE CENTER:  Imagined—New Painted Images. Mixed  media painter Bruce Clark’s work integrates photography and paint to create  surreal industrial-looking images on  canvas. The show is open on weekdays  through Oct. 6. Gallery East is located  in McKinley Arts & Culture Center, open  weekdays from 8am to 5pm.  Thu, 9/7-Fri, 9/8; Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am-5pm. Free.  McKinley Arts & Culture Center, 925  Riverside Drive, (775) 334-2417.

METRO GALLERY: Desert Dreams. Peter  Ruprecht’s photography attempts to  capture the natural spirit of people and  places all across the world. His work  seeks to connect with both the viewer  and the subject, and creates an emotional bond between the two. The show  runs Monday-Friday through Oct. 6.  Thu,

9/7-Fri, 9/8, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am-

REID HOUSE GALLERY AND STUDIO: EcLectic  Art. DJD Foundation for Freedom of  Expression presents this show of  abstract art by Javier Sosa. Sosa interprets moments in time by combining the  use of vibrant colors, staining and gel  transfers, which are arranged to form  patterns and shapes. The artist reception on Sept. 16, 5-8pm. The show runs  Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday  through Sept. 30,  Thu, 9/7, Sat, 9/9-Sun, 9/10, Tue, 9/12, noon-6pm. Free. Reid House  Gallery and Studio, 515 Court St., (775)  391-2668, www.arthealswarwounds.com.

SIERRA ROOM AT CARSON CITY COMMUNITY CENTER: Tahoe Clarity. The Capital City  Arts Initiative presents this photography  exhibition by artist Dylan Silver. The  artwork will on view in the gallery on  Monday-Thursday through Nov. 9.  Thu, 9/7, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 5-8pm. Free.  Sierra Room at Carson City Community  Center, 851 E. William St., Carson City, (775)  283-7421, www.arts-initiative.org.

SPARKS HERITAGE MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER: A Colorful Life. This is Sierra  Watercolor Society’s judged exhibit for  2017, and is the largest exhibit of new  watercolor paintings by local artists. Both  framed and unframed original paintings  are available for sale. An artists reception  will be held on Sept. 9, from 2-4pm. The  exhibit runs Tuesday-Saturday through  Sept. 30.  Thu, 9/7-Sat, 9/9, Tue, 9/12-Wed, 9/13, 11am. Free. Sparks Heritage Museum  & Cultural Center, 820 Victorian Avenue at  Pyramid Way, Sparks, (775) 852-1583.

WEST ST. MARKET: Art Walk Reno. The  evening will highlight public art and  murals and stop at various galleries and  venues along the way, including Sierra  Arts Gallery, Art Indeed Gallery and La  Terre Verte. Proceeds from the evening  will benefit a local nonprofit.  Thu, 9/7, 6pm. $10. West St. Market, 148 West St.,  (415) 596-4987, artspotreno.com.

FILM MUSTANG: Artemisia Moviehouse presents  this 2015 drama directed by Deniz Gamze  Erguven. In a remote Turkish village, five  sisters receive harsh punishments after  innocently frolicking on the beach with  their male classmates. Forbidden from  even attending school, the girls’ home  becomes a prison, where their elders  arrange planned marriages and escape  seems to be the only viable option. In  Turkish with subtitles.  Sun, 9/10, 6pm. $5$9. Good Luck Macbeth, 713 S. Virginia St.,  artemisiamovies.weebly.com.

5pm. Free. Metro Gallery, 1 E. First St.,  (775) 334-2417.

NORTHWEST RENO LIBRARY: A 40-Year  Collection of the Art of Lady Jill. Plein air  watercolorist Lady Jill Mueller presents  favorite works from her personal collection over the last 40 years. This display  will be up until Oct. 25. Library hours are  10am-6pm on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday  and Friday, 10am-7pm on Wednesday and  11am-5pm on Saturday. The library is  closed on Sunday.  Thu, 9/7-Sat, 9/9, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13. Free. Northwest Reno  Library, 2325 Robb Drive, (775) 787-4100.

MUSIC A NIGHT TO INDULGE SALON SERIES: Sierra  Music Society continues its Salon Series  with a dinner and music event featuring  four courses paired with selected wines  and musical entertainment by soloists  from P’Opera! Reservations required.  Sat, 9/9, 6pm. $75. 9900 Wilbur May Parkway,  (775) 233-5105, poperanv.org.

Carson City, (775) 857-3033, www.wnc.edu.

26   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17

TRAILS & VISTAS GUIDED ART HIKE: The  guided hikes combine artistic expressions  and performances with the natural  beauty of the outdoors. The trail is rated  easy/moderate with some inclines. There  are 12 Art in Nature sites along a 2.2-mile  dirt trail. Tours start at 9am and leave  every 15 minutes.  Sat, 9/9,-Sun 9/10, 9am12:15pm. $12-$35. Galena Creek Regional  Park, 18350 Mount Rose Highway, (530)  563-6557, www.trailsandvistas.org.

The Great Reno Balloon Race

9/08-10:

The early morning skies will fill up with about 100  colorful hot air balloons this weekend during the  35th annual event. Highlights include the Super Glow Show, featuring about  35 balloons on the field glowing and twinkling to music in the pre-dawn  sky; Dawn Patrol, a choreographed show featuring a handful of balloons  operated by pilots qualified to fly in the dark; and the mass ascension of hot  air balloons participating in the race, which boasts a $11,000 prize purse.  The festivities kick off on Friday, Sept. 8, with the Super Glow Show at 5:15  a.m. The aerial spectacle continues on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 9-10, with  the Super Glow Show at 5 a.m. and Dawn Patrol at 5:30 a.m. Mass ascension  begins at 7 a.m. on all days of the event, which takes place at Rancho San  Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St. Admission to the park is free. For a  $10 donation you can park at the event site. Visit renoballoon.com.

EVENTS

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP RENO AIR RACES:  The 54th annual event showcases six  different classes of race planes and offers  up-close access to aircraft, pilots and  crews in the “pits.” The air races kick off  on Sept. 13 and run through Sept. 17.  Wed, 9/13, 8am-5:30pm. $5-$35. Reno-Stead  Airport, 4895 Texas Ave, (775) 972-6663,  airrace.org.

AN EVENING WITH ELLIOT PARKER AND KATE MARSHALL: University of Nevada, Reno  economics professor Elliot Parker and  former Nevada State Treasurer Kate  Marshall will discuss their new book,  Nevada’s Great Recession: Looking Back,  Moving Forward, with a Q&A and signing  to follow.  Thu, 9/7, 7pm. Free. Sundance  Books and Music, 121 California Ave., (775)  786-1188, www.sundancebookstore.com.

RENO SNAFFLE BIT FUTURITY: Three-year-old  equine athletes are tested in herd work,  rein work and fence work. The event  takes place Sept. 11-17 and includes a  trade show and three horse sales.  Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am. $20. Reno-Sparks  Livestock Events Center, 1350 N Wells Ave.,  www.renosnafflebitfuturity.com.

FIRST THURSDAY: Grab a drink, listen to live  music by The Sextones and check out the  galleries at Nevada Museum of Art.  Thu, 9/7, 5pm. $10 general admission, free for  NMA members. Nevada Museum of Art,  160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333.

RISE TO THE CHALLENGE PART 2: The  fundraiser includes a flight of wine, beer  and appetizers, a silent auction and live  entertainment by Sierra Crossing. All  proceeds will go to the Center for Healthy  Aging, whose mission is to improve the  quality of life of seniors by helping them  maintain independence within their  community.  Fri, 9/8, 4-8pm. $35. The  Center for Healthy Aging, 515 Court St.,  (775) 384-4324.

HANDS ON! SECOND SATURDAYS: The monthly  program offers free admission, hands-on  art activities, storytelling, a docentguided tour, live performances and  community collaborations.  Sat 9/9, 10am6pm. Free. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W.  Liberty St., (775) 329-3333.

MINI BIOBLITZ SERIES: Truckee Meadows  Parks Foundation’s BioBlitz is a day where  all attendees are volunteer scientists who  attempt to record and identify all forms  of wildlife side-by-side with local experts  and scientists.  Sat, 9/9, 9am. Free.  Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley  Ranch Road, (775) 410-1702.

SATURDAY NIGHT STAR PARTY: The Jack 

26   |   RN&R   |   09.07.17

C. Davis Observatory hosts free star  parties every Saturday. The evening  starts with a lecture on one of numerous  topics and then concludes with guided  star viewing by one of the observatory’s  astronomers.  Sat, 9/9, 6pm. Free. Jack C.  Davis Observatory, 2699 Van Patten Drive,  Carson City, (775) 857-3033, www.wnc.edu.

WASHOE READS—THE ORPHAN MASTER’S SON: Washoe County Library System and  Nevada Humanities hosts a communitywide read of Adam Johnson’s The  Orphan Master’s Son. Book discussions  will take place in three parts at several  library locations through Sept. 15,  culminating with the 4th Annual Nevada  Humanities Literary Crawl on Sept. 16  from 3-8pm at venues throughout the  Downtown Reno arts corridor.  Sat, 9/9, 10:30am-noon. Free. Northwest Reno  Library, 2325 Robb Drive,  (775) 787-4100,  nevadahumanities.org.

ART ART INDEED ABSTRACT ART GALLERY: Art  Indeed Abstract Art Gallery will participate in the First Thursday Art Night  on Sept. 7 and the wine walk along the  downtown Riverwalk on Sept. 16. The  gallery will be open every weekend in  September from 11am-5pm, in honor of  the Shakespeare Animal Fund.  Thu, 9/7, 4pm; Sat, 9/9-Sun, 9/10, 11am-5pm. Free.  Art Indeed Abstract Art Gallery, 142 Bell  St., (775) 846-8367.

ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO: Let ’Em Run. This  is a benefit art show and sale for Lacy  J. Dalton’s Wild Horse Foundation, which  focuses on preserving, recovering and  providing sanctuary and homes for  Nevada’s wild horses and burros. The  show runs through Sept. 30.  Thu, 9/7-Wed, 9/13, 11am-4pm. Free. Artists Co-op of  Reno, 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896.

BLUE WHALE COFFEE COMPANY: Midtown  Mural Tour. This is a docent-led tour  of more than 40 of the 70 murals in the  midtown district. Learn about the artists, their process and how this form of  public art improves the life and culture of  a neighborhood. Tickets are available at  the door.  Sat, 9/9, 11am. $10. Blue Whale  Coffee Company, 32 Cheney St., (415) 5964987, artspotreno.com.

COURTHOUSE GALLERY, CARSON CITY COURTHOUSE: Industrial Art Sports  Edition. Capital City Arts Initiative’s  exhibition features the design work of  five Northern Nevada sports equipment designers and manufacturers. The  show runs through Sept. 28.  Thu, 9/7-Fri, 9/8, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am-5pm. Free.  Courthouse Gallery, Carson City  Courthouse, 885 E. Musser St., Carson  City., www.arts-initiative.org.

GALLERY WEST, MCKINLEY ARTS & CULTURE CENTER: Womb to Tomb, Birth to Earth,  Dust to Dust. In this series of prints  and books, artist Lauren Cardenas  pays homage to something that was  lost—using digital print along with traditional print methods to evoke a sense  of longing and aloneness. The show runs  through Oct. 6, with a gallery reception  on Sept. 7, 5-7pm.  Thu, 9/7-Sat, 9/9, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am-5pm. Free. Gallery  West, McKinley Arts & Culture Center, 925  Riverside Drive, (775) 334-2417.

GARDEN PAVILION AT THE LAKE MANSION:  Reno Art Collaboration Pop-Up Art Show.  This pop-up art show features various  different mediums for sale, including  painting, drawing, forged metal, jewelry, silk painting, a bike-printing press  and more.  Sat, 9/9, 11am. Free. Garden  Pavilion at the Lake Mansion, 250 Court  St., (208) 310-1153.

THE HOLLAND PROJECT MICRO GALLERY: From  the Garden. This collaborative show  features work by Ana McKay and Ally  Messer. McKay works in ink and watercolor, and Messer works in various forms  of printmaking. Their collaborative exhibit  features delicate but grounded works  that relate the human element with the  environment  The show runs through  Sept. 9.  Thu, 9/7-Sat, 9/9, 7am. Free. The  Holland Project Micro Gallery, 945 Record  St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

LASTING DOSE TATTOO & ART COLLECTIVE:  The Afterlife Aquatic—A Cabinet of  Curiosities and Oddities Opening  Reception. The show features the artwork of Steve Richards and other local  artists.  Sat, 9/9, 8pm. Free. Lasting Dose  Tattoo & Art Collective, 888 S. Virginia St.,  (775) 324-0666.

MCKINLEY ARTS & CULTURE CENTER:  Imagined—New Painted Images. Mixed  media painter Bruce Clark’s work integrates photography and paint to create  surreal industrial-looking images on  canvas. The show is open on weekdays  through Oct. 6. Gallery East is located  in McKinley Arts & Culture Center, open  weekdays from 8am to 5pm.  Thu, 9/7-Fri, 9/8; Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am-5pm. Free.  McKinley Arts & Culture Center, 925  Riverside Drive, (775) 334-2417.

METRO GALLERY: Desert Dreams. Peter  Ruprecht’s photography attempts to  capture the natural spirit of people and  places all across the world. His work  seeks to connect with both the viewer  and the subject, and creates an emotional bond between the two. The show  runs Monday-Friday through Oct. 6.  Thu,

9/7-Fri, 9/8, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 8am5pm. Free. Metro Gallery, 1 E. First St., 

REID HOUSE GALLERY AND STUDIO: EcLectic  Art. DJD Foundation for Freedom of  Expression presents this show of  abstract art by Javier Sosa. Sosa interprets moments in time by combining the  use of vibrant colors, staining and gel  transfers, which are arranged to form  patterns and shapes. The artist reception on Sept. 16, 5-8pm. The show runs  Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday  through Sept. 30,  Thu, 9/7, Sat, 9/9-Sun, 9/10, Tue, 9/12, noon-6pm. Free. Reid House  Gallery and Studio, 515 Court St., (775)  391-2668, www.arthealswarwounds.com.

SIERRA ROOM AT CARSON CITY COMMUNITY CENTER: Tahoe Clarity. The Capital City  Arts Initiative presents this photography  exhibition by artist Dylan Silver. The  artwork will on view in the gallery on  Monday-Thursday through Nov. 9.  Thu, 9/7, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13, 5-8pm. Free.  Sierra Room at Carson City Community  Center, 851 E. William St., Carson City, (775)  283-7421, www.arts-initiative.org.

SPARKS HERITAGE MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER: A Colorful Life. This is Sierra  Watercolor Society’s judged exhibit for  2017, and is the largest exhibit of new  watercolor paintings by local artists. Both  framed and unframed original paintings  are available for sale. An artists reception  will be held on Sept. 9, from 2-4pm. The  exhibit runs Tuesday-Saturday through  Sept. 30.  Thu, 9/7-Sat, 9/9, Tue, 9/12-Wed, 9/13, 11am. Free. Sparks Heritage Museum  & Cultural Center, 820 Victorian Avenue at  Pyramid Way, Sparks, (775) 852-1583.

WEST ST. MARKET: Art Walk Reno. The  evening will highlight public art and  murals and stop at various galleries and  venues along the way, including Sierra  Arts Gallery, Art Indeed Gallery and La  Terre Verte. Proceeds from the evening  will benefit a local nonprofit.  Thu, 9/7, 6pm. $10. West St. Market, 148 West St.,  (415) 596-4987, artspotreno.com.

FILM MUSTANG: Artemisia Moviehouse presents  this 2015 drama directed by Deniz Gamze  Erguven. In a remote Turkish village, five  sisters receive harsh punishments after  innocently frolicking on the beach with  their male classmates. Forbidden from  even attending school, the girls’ home  becomes a prison, where their elders  arrange planned marriages and escape  seems to be the only viable option. In  Turkish with subtitles.  Sun, 9/10, 6pm. $5$9. Good Luck Macbeth, 713 S. Virginia St.,  artemisiamovies.weebly.com.

(775) 334-2417.

NORTHWEST RENO LIBRARY: A 40-Year  Collection of the Art of Lady Jill. Plein air  watercolorist Lady Jill Mueller presents  favorite works from her personal collection over the last 40 years. This display  will be up until Oct. 25. Library hours are  10am-6pm on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday  and Friday, 10am-7pm on Wednesday and  11am-5pm on Saturday. The library is  closed on Sunday.  Thu, 9/7-Sat, 9/9, Mon, 9/11-Wed, 9/13. Free. Northwest Reno  Library, 2325 Robb Drive, (775) 787-4100.

MUSIC A NIGHT TO INDULGE SALON SERIES: Sierra  Music Society continues its Salon Series  with a dinner and music event featuring  four courses paired with selected wines  and musical entertainment by soloists  from P’Opera! Reservations required.  Sat, 9/9, 6pm. $75. 9900 Wilbur May Parkway,  (775) 233-5105, poperanv.org.


FOX BREWPUB CONCERT SERIES: Blues 

to local albums, national releases and  more. Make new friends, meet other  creatives and/or fans. Drink local beer,  plan upcoming projects and learn about  events going on in the area. Sometimes a  band or two will drop in to perform.  Wed, 9/13, 9pm. Free. St. James Infirmary, 445  California Ave, (775) 657-8484.

NPR’S FROM THE TOP: Broadcast on more  than 200 stations nationwide to an  audience of nearly half a million listeners,  NPR’s From the Top is 90 minutes of music  and fun with host Christopher O’Riley  and the area’s classically trained young  musicians who have auditioned and have  been selected to participate in the show.  This is a live taping of a national radio  program. Recommended for children  ages 7 and older.  Sun, 9/10, 4pm. $16$59. Pioneer Center for the Performing  Arts, 100 S. Virginia St., (775) 686-6600,  pioneercenter.com.

fundraiser for Reno Blues Society is a  pub-like crawl with four bands playing  at four venues, including Cantina Los  Tres Hombres, Mummer’s Bar, Paddy  & Irene’s Irish Pub and Great Basin  Brewing Co., with drink specials all for  $5. Wristbands will be sold at the venues  that night. Bands scheduled to perform  include VooDoo Dogz, Jason King Band,  Blue Haven and Soul Connection, and  times will be staggered between 7-11pm  at the four venues. A portion of proceeds  will go to music programs in the Washoe  County School District. Blues Brothers  attire encouraged but not required.  Sat, 9/9, 7pm. $5. Victorian Square, 800-900  blocks of Victorian Avenue, Sparks, (775)  848-2590, www.renoblues.org.

RENO TAHOE MUSIC FESTIVAL: Enjoy two  nights of music, libations and food and  more. On Sept. 8, Neon Velvet will heat up  the stage with their modern dance party  sound. On Sept. 9, Live Wire takes the  stage showcasing a mix of the best songs  from the ’70s and ’80s through current  rock and dance hits. Proceeds from  the event will benefit the Sierra Nevada  Performing Arts Association.  Fri, 9/8-Sat, 9/9, 8pm. $20-$25. Greater Nevada Field,  250 Evans Ave., www.snpaa.org.

TRAILS & VISTAS WORLD CONCERT FOR PEACE:  The evening will take guests on a musical  journey of art and sound featuring  performances by Tim Eriksen, Nava Dance  Collective, Fared Shafinurey, Liza Carbé  and JP Durand of the band Incendio,  Mountain Eagle from the Wa She Shu  nation of Lake Tahoe and local musician  Angèle Carroll.  Sat, 9/9, 6:30pm. $24-$138.  Warren Edward Trepp Stage, Sand Harbor  Nevada State Park, 2005 Highway 28,  Incline Village, www.trailsandvistas.org.

ONSTAGE EQUIVOCATION: Reno Little Theater present  Bill Cain’s play. It’s 1606 and the British  government commissions “Shagspeare”  to create a new work about a national  crisis as told from their point of view.  Shag must decide to what degree he is  willing to equivocate about the truth while  maintaining his integrity as an artist.  Performances are Thursday-Saturday,  Sept. 8-9, 14-16, 21-23, at 7:30pm with  matinees on Saturday, Sept. 9, and  Sunday, Sept. 10, 17 and 24, at 2pm.  Fri,

9/8, 7:30pm; Sat, 9/9, 2pm & 7:30pm; Sun, 9/10, 2pm. $15-$25. Reno Little 

Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 813-8900,  renolittletheater.org.

THE MOUNTAINTOP: Katori Hall’s play is a  fictional depiction of the Reverend Martin  Luther King’s last night on earth set  entirely in Room 306 of the Lorraine Motel  on the eve of his assassination on April  4, 1968. Performances are ThursdaySaturday, through Sept. 16.  Thu, 9/7-Sat 9/9, 7:30pm. $15. Good Luck Macbeth, 713  S. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716.

SPEAKING IN TONGUES: Nine parallel lives,  interlocked by four infidelities, one  missing person and a mysterious stiletto,  are woven through a fragmented series  of confessionals and interrogations that  gradually reveal a darker side of human  nature in this play written by Andrew  Bovell.  Thu, 9/7-Sat, 9/9, 7:30pm; Sun, 9/10, 2pm. $12-$20. Restless Artists Theatre  Company, 295 20th St., Sparks, (775) 5253074, www.rattheatre.org.

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RBS’ BALLOONS AND BLUES STRUT: This 

Dolan and brunch presented by chez louie.  The menu features artful dishes, mimosas  and a Bloody Mary bar. Reservations  recommended.  Sun, 9/10, 10am-2pm.   Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St.,  (775) 284-2921, www.nevadaart.org.

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MUSIC INDUSTRY NIGHT: Open your ears 

SUNDAY BRUNCH: Enjoy live music by Carolyn 

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singer and guitarist Shane Dwight closes  the summer concert series.  Fri, 9/8, 7:30pm. Free. Fox Brewpub, 310 S. Carson  St., Carson City, (775) 883-1369.

Johnson VS Borg SEPT 9 | Sat VIEWING PARTY BOTTLE SERVICE AVAILABLE 775.443.7008 $15 GENERAL ADMISSION | DOORS OPEN AT 4PM BOOK TICKETS & RESERVE TABLES ONLINE MUST BE 21+

8/09:

Northern Nevada isn’t the first place you think of when  it comes to camels, but every year the long-legged  ungulates—along with a few ostriches and zebras—make an appearance  on the Comstock for the annual races in which jockeys attempt to ride  the humpbacked animals down a dirt track at the Virginia City Arena &  Fairgrounds on F Street. The races begin at noon on Friday, Sept. 8, 10 a.m.  and 2 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 9, and noon on Sunday, Sept. 10. Tickets are $8$50. Call 847-7500 or visit www.visitvirginiacitynv.com.

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The sum of his beers Apocaclips

ERIK HOLLAND

I’ve been with my boyfriend for nine months. We’re both in our late 20s and go out drinking a lot with our friends. I’ve noticed that when he’s drunk, he’ll be super affectionate and say really gushy things about me, our getting married, etc. Are his true feelings coming out, or is he just talking lovey-dovey because of the booze? Many people insist that their personality changes dramatically when they’re all likkered up. Remind them of some outrageous thing they did the other night at the bar, and they’ll go, “But that wasn’t the real me!”—and point the finger at Jack, Jose or the Captain (as in, Daniel, Cuervo or Morgan). The reality is, research on drinking’s effects on personality by clinical psychologist Rachel Winograd finds that beyond one area of personality—extroversion, which increases slightly in drunken people—we’re all pretty much the same jerks—or whatever— that we are when we’re sober. This consistency that Winograd and her colleagues observe makes sense vis-à-vis how psychologists find that personality has a strong genetic component and involves habitual patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behavior. There are five major personality dimensions: conscientiousness, agreeableness, emotional stability, openness to experience, and extroversion. And though the Winograd team did find a small increase in extroversion, a body of research finds that personality traits are largely consistent across time and situations. However, the skeptic in you might ask: If personality doesn’t change after, say, three Sriracha margaritas, how come we’ve all seen people behaving differently when they’re sauced? Well, according to research by social psychologists Claude M. Steele and Robert A. Josephs, the behavioral changes of drunken excess appear to be caused not by alcohol itself but by alcoholdriven changes in perception that they call “alcohol myopia.” Alcohol appears to restrict attention, giving a person a sort of tunnel vision for whatever’s right in front of them.

To explain this more simply, alcohol basically turns a person into the chimp version of themselves—focusing on whatever’s right in their face and experiencing simple, basic emotions in response, like fear, lust, anger or blubbering affection. Meanwhile, alcohol diminishes their ability for mental processing of any complexity—most notably the sort of thinking that normally leads a person to say, “Well, on the other hand …” (that little voice of reason that pipes up in more sober moments). Interestingly, the research on alcohol myopia debunks a widely believed myth—the assumption that getting drunk will necessarily lead a person to be much less inhibited. It may, but it may also lead the other way—to increased inhibition and less risk taking. That may be hard to believe when you’re watching your brother, the uptight accountant, do a drunken striptease on the bar. However, recall that whatever’s right in front of the sloshed person’s face tends to drive how restrained or unrestrained their behavior is. Getting back to your boyfriend’s drunken mushygushies, consider how the tunnel vision of alcohol myopia likely plays out for him as he looks at you in the moment at the bar: “She’s so sparkly and nice …” What’s missing, however, is all the adult complexity—all that “on the other hand …” thinking that he’d likely do in more sober moments—whether you two can make it as lifelong partners, whether he’s up for creating little people who’d call him Daddy, etc. In other words, there’s probably some stuff he still needs to figure out. Give it some time—tempting as it is to use the findings about alcohol myopia to answer the question “How will you make him hurry up and propose?” Two words: “open bar.” Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

09.07.17    |   RN&R   |   29


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by ROb bRezsny

For the week oF September 7, 2017 ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’re half-intoxicated

by your puzzling adventures—and halfbewildered, as well. Sometimes you’re spinning out fancy moves, sweet tricks, and surprising gambits. On other occasions you’re stumbling and bumbling and mumbling. Are you really going to keep up this rhythm? I hope so, because your persistence in navigating through the challenging fun could generate big rewards. Like what, for example? Like the redemptive transformation of a mess into an asset.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Free your mind

and your ass will follow,” sings funk pioneer George Clinton in his song “Good Thoughts, Bad Thoughts.” And what’s the best way to free your mind? Clinton advises you to “Be careful of the thought-seeds you plant in the garden of your mind.” That’s because the ideas you obsess on will eventually grow into the experiences you attract into your life. “Good thoughts bring forth good fruit,” he croons, while “Bullshit thoughts rot your meat.” Any questions, Taurus? According to my astrological analysis, this is the best possible counsel for you to receive right now.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): James Loewen wrote

a book called Lies My Teacher Told Me/ Everything Your American History Textbook got Wrong. He said, for instance, that during the Europeans’ invasion and conquest of the continent, it wasn’t true that Native Americans scalped white settlers. In fact, it was mostly the other way around: Whites scalped Indians. Here’s another example: The famous blind and deaf person, Helen Keller, was not a sentimental spokesperson for sweetness and light, but rather a radical feminist and socialist who advocated revolution. I invite you to apply Loewen’s investigative approach to your personal past, Gemini. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to uncover hidden, incomplete, and distorted versions of your history, and correct them.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Roger Hodge writes

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books now, but when he worked for Harper’s Magazine, he had an unusual specialty. He gathered heaps of quirky facts and assembled several at a time into long sentences that had a nutty poetic grace. Here’s an example: “British cattle have regional accents, elephants mourn their dead, nicotine sobers drunk rats, scientists have concluded that teenagers are physically incapable of being considerate, and clinical trials of an ‘orgasmatron’ are underway in North Carolina.” I’m offering Hodge as a worthy role model for you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Be curious, miscellaneous, and freeflowing. Let your mind wander luxuriantly as you make unexpected connections. Capitalize on the potential blessings that appear through zesty twists and tangy turns.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In Japan you can buy

a brand of candy that’s called The Great Buddha’s Nose Snot. Each piece consists of a rice puff that resembles the Buddha’s nose filled with bits of brown sugar that symbolize the snot. The candy-making company assures customers that eating this treat brings them good luck. I invite you to be equally earthy and irreverent about your own spiritual values in the coming days. You’re in a prime position to humanize your relationship with divine influences … to develop a more visceral passion for your holiest ideals … to translate your noblest aspirations into practical, enjoyable actions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Will a routine trip to

carry out an errand take you on a detour to the suburbs of the promised land? Will you worry you’re turning into a monster, only to find the freakishness is just a phase that you had to pass through on your way to unveiling some of your dormant beauty? Will a provocative figure from the past lead you on a productive wildgoose chase into the future? These are some of the possible storylines I’ll be monitoring as I follow your progress in the coming weeks.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Let’s meet in the woods

after midnight and tell each other stories about our origins, revealing the secrets we almost forgot we had. Let’s sing the songs that electrified our emotions all those years ago when we first fell in love with our lives. Starlight will glow on our ancient faces. The fragrance of loam will

seep into our voices like rainwater feeding the trees’ roots. We’ll feel the earth turning on its axis, and sense the rumble of future memories coming to greet us. We’ll join hands, gaze into the dreams in each other’s eyes, and dive as deep as we need to go to find hidden treasures.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I don’t usually

recommend giving gifts with strings attached. On the contrary, I advise you to offer your blessings without having any expectations at all. Generosity often works best when the recipients are free to use it any way they see fit. In the coming weeks, however, I’m making an exception to my rule. According to my reading of the omens, now is a time to be specific and forceful about the way you’d like your gifts to be used. As an example of how not to proceed, consider the venture capitalist who donated $25,000 to the University of Colorado. All he got in return was a restroom in a campus building named after him. If you give away $25,000, Scorpio, make sure you at least get a whole building named after you.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Now that you’re

getting a taste of what life would be like if you ruled the world, I’ll recommend a manual. It’s called How to Start Your Own Country, by Erwin Strauss. (Get a free peek here: tinyurl. com/YouSovereign.) You could study it for tips on how to obtain national sovereignty, how to recruit new citizens, and how to avoid paying taxes to yourself. (P.S.: You can make dramatic strides toward being the boss of yourself and your destiny even without forming your own nation.)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There was a time

when not even the most ambitious explorers climbed mountains. In the western world, the first time it happened was in 1492, when a Frenchman named Antoine de Ville ascended to the top of Mont Aiguille, using ladders, ropes, and other props. I see you as having a kinship with de Ville in the coming weeks, Capricorn. I’d love to see you embark on a big adventure that would involve you trying on the role of a pioneer. This feat wouldn’t necessarily require strenuous training and physical courage. It might be more about daring creativity and moral courage.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Science fiction

proposes that there are alternate worlds alongside the visible one—hidden, yes, but perhaps accessible with the right knowledge or luck. In recent years, maverick physicists have given the idea more credibility, theorizing that parallel universes exist right next to ours. Even if these hypothetical places aren’t literally real, they serve as an excellent metaphor. Most of us are so thoroughly embedded in our own chosen niche that we are oblivious to the realities that other people inhabit. I bring these thoughts to your attention, Aquarius, because it’s a favorable time to tap into those alternate, parallel, secret, unknown, or unofficial realms. Wake up to the rich sources that have been so close to you, but so far away.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m always in favor

of you cultivating a robust relationship with your primal longings. But I’ll be rooting extra hard for you to do that during the next eleven months. I hope you will dig deep to identify your primal longings, and I hope you will revere them as the wellspring of your life energy, and I hope you will figure out all the tricks and strategies you will need to fulfill them. Here’s a hint about how to achieve the best results as you do this noble work: Define your primal longings with as much precision as you can, so that you will never pursue passing fancies that bear just a superficial resemblance to the real things.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.


by DENNis MYERs

Prevention Heidi Parker

When I did some research, it seems to me that there are a couple of things that helped contribute to this. Anti-vaxxers in the state are not organized, and there’s a lot of free vaccinating— clinics, health fairs and so forth. Yes, I think our partners have done a great job of increasing community access. We have partners who might extend clinic hours. We know not everybody works the traditional schedule in Nevada, and so we have industries that definitely—parents are working non-traditional hours. We have clinics and providers that have made access to appointments easier. ... We have partners that have helped by bringing vaccines to the people in the community. So whether it’s a community event, whether maybe for back-to-school, maybe it’s at a mall, they’re kind of getting into those zip codes that we know need a little more access. Another piece of the puzzle that I think is incredibly important is we can

PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Recently, we reported on how the immunization rate in Nevada has been improving. We thought readers would like more information on this trend. Heidi Parker is executive director of Immunize Nevada.

look at the increasing immunization rate and we can look at the Affordable Care Act. So we know that during that time of ACA, the uninsured rate dropped significantly in Nevada. We made great strides there. So when you have more people accessing Medicaid and private health insurance plans, those plans were required to cover vaccines as an essential health benefit. And so we really saw that increase as well.”

How much of the funding for those free vaccinations is federal? Nevada participates in the federal Vaccines for Children Program and that is a program that is under the CDC [Centers for Disease Control] and all of the free, no-cost vaccines that come to Nevada through that program are federally funded.

Nevada’s a hundred percent federally funded program. We can look at adults. Adults need vaccines too, so it doesn’t just stop with kids. So Nevada also participates in a program that does provide no-cost vaccines to uninsured adults and that is also a hundred percent federally funded program. Now, I will also say, though, we … do fundraise, and we work with partners like Renown Health and some of our NGOs [non-governmental organizations] like Silver Summit Health Plan, Amerigroup and the Health Plan of Nevada. So they support our community events that we do, especially back to school, and their support actually helps us be able to serve whoever walks in the door.

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We’re only eight months into a Republican Congress and presidency. Are you going to be able to sustain the progress you’ve made? That is something I’ve been working on since January. A couple things are at play right now and in each iteration of health care bills, health care reform, however you want to label it, the Prevention and Public Health Fund has been cut in every one of those bills. The PPHF does support about 12 percent of the CDC’s budget. However, it disproportionately supports immunization, so it actually covers about half of the immunization budget nationally. So that’s a big concern. Ω

by BRUCE VAN DYKE

The Aaron Mitchell thing Well, that’s a new one. Selfimmolation at The Burn. Aaron, my man, if you wanted to be remembered for a long, long time by thousands of your fellow Burners, you just pulled it off. Right? So, of course it’s a shame and a sin that Aaron Mitchell died in the sacred flames of The Man, a fire that has done so much inspiring and cleansing over the years. Aaron, or Ay-Ay-Ron as The Substitute Teacher on Key & Peele would’ve called you, all us Burners tip our hats, wave a dusty goodbye, and ask, “Dude, just what were you thinkin’ and what the fuck were you drinkin’?” My theory? I have one and I must admit, I have no proof whatsoever that it might be true. It’s all pure hunch and intuition. But it’s worthy of mention. I don’t think Mitchell wanted to kill himself. I really don’t. So far,

the comments we’ve seen from family and friends is that he was a fit, fine fellow who liked hiking, a native Oklahoman living in Switzerland, married with no kids, and had just recently visited Madras, Oregon, to partake of the Ecliptical Cermonies there. Sure, there may be clues as to a suicidal mindset that were overlooked until the actual deed, but as I write this on Labor Day, Mitchell doesn’t really sound like a guy who wanted to be dead. If not suicide, what? I think it’s possible he may have been victim to a wild impulse. A very wild impulse. An impulse that echoed in his mind, “Dude, we can become instantly legendary. Instantly. Just run through the flames of the Man—as he’s Burning!” I think he may have wanted to be the coolest Burner ever, and run through that outrageous

blaze. Think of the stories at the bar if you pull that shit off! I don’t think he wanted death. I think he wanted immortality. And he actually—OMFG—went for it! (My guess as to his drug—Ketamine). He dodged some Rangers, hit that fire like a Heisman halfback, and then—oops. He fell. And that was that. Crazy. I hope one merciful thing for Aaron after he went down, that he never regained consciousness. OK. Shit happens. I don’t need counseling. I don’t need a hug. I’m OK with Aaron’s story. I repeat, I have no idea if what I’m saying is actually true. It’s my conjecture, one scenario that strikes me as possible. But chances are we will never really know the why in this tale of Aaron Joel Mitchell. The Burning Man. Ω

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