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Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor ............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green........................... 10 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 18

Foodfinds..................... 20 Film.............................. 22 Musicbeat.................... 23 Nightclubs/Casinos....... 24 This.Week.....................27 Advice.Goddess........... 28 Free.Will.Astrology....... 30 15.Minutes..................... 31 Bruce.Van.Dyke............ 31

Hate Crimes

and leaders see News, page 8.

tilling the soil N E VA D A

SOUPED UP WHEN ’S LUNCH ?

Really

though?

WHATEVE

CALIFORNIA

P E N N S Y LV A N I A

see Green, page 10.

R

Rides see arts&Culture, page 16.

FINE

Lame

SLY?

SERIOU

Ugh

NEITHER ONE

WAIT,

NOT

WHAT?

IMPRESSED

teACheR

aPPreCiatiON see art of the state, page 18.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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VolumE

22,

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18

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16-22,

2016


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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Condolences

We’re so proud

The enthusiasm factor

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Condolences, love and sympathy to the family and friends of the people who were murdered at the horrific shooting massacre in Orlando on June 12. It’s a senseless and terrible thing—and all the more so because these kinds of awful incidents have become routine in our country. It’s just so sad. And like most senseless and terrible events, it has inspired some senseless and terrible reactions. I was disturbed by the debates about whether the event should be classified as a “hate crime” or a “terrorist act,” like those two things are somehow mutually exclusive. But what really bothered me was Donald Trump’s reaction on Twitter: “Appreciate the congrats for being right on radical Islamic terrorism, I don’t want congrats, I want toughness & vigilance. We must be smart!” In the face of something genuinely sad—a monstrous, heartbreaking crime— Trump’s reaction was to say, essentially, “I told you so.” That petty, narcissistic opportunism is really vile. (And don’t even get me started on his comma splices. His sentence construction is as offensive to the grammarian in me as his sentiments are to the humanitarian.) Up until now, I’ve watched Trump’s presidential campaign with gleeful schadenfreude —it was amusing to see the Republicans saddled with a candidate so plainly unqualified and unelectable. But he’s a man who will exploit a terrible crime to stoke the fire of his own ego and to compensate for his own insecurities, and such a person must be kept far away from the corridors of real power. So, this is when Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy stopped being funny to me. (And I know it stopped being funny to most smart people a long time ago—but I’m a mirthful motherfucker.) And there can never be enough sorrow expressed for the people who were murdered for no reason. Whatever the motive, there is no reason.

Overheard while biking past a car at the intersection of California and Virginia: “That is so Reno!”— followed by snickering laughter. I turned to see two young women in a car with Oregon plates facing the digital billboard of the Wild Orchid strip club. Pole dancers and stripper selfies were playing at the time. Sigh. Kyle Isacksen Reno

Re “The Republican baggage” (Left Foot Forward, June 9): Shelia, you and many others, keep pointing out how bad Trump would be for the country. However, you keep ignoring the passion of the Trump supporters. Trump said he could shoot someone in the middle of the street and he wouldn’t lose any supporters. He was right. His poll numbers didn’t go down after he made that statement. Marco Rubio said during the debates he wouldn’t trust Trump with the nuclear codes but he is now supporting Trump over Clinton. That liberal browser Can you say that about Sanders Like Facebook, the autocomplete supporters? Will they switch to controversy with Google appears Clinton once Sanders drops his to be a trend in internet scrubbing campaign? One by one the bigs of to suppress or enhance the internet the Republican Party are declaring queries found on important people their support of Trump while a few have said they would cast their vote for None Of The Erik Holland Above if they have the option, but won’t support Clinton, and the rest (very few) have turned against Trump by saying Clinton is a better choice. On the other side of the fence some Sanders supporters have said it’s the Bern or no one. Even if they do switch to Clinton, it is a tepid support. Here’s the kicker: Come November, Trump supporters will come out in force no matter what the weather, how long the lines are, how many hoops they have to jump through just to vote for him. Clinton supporters will have read your

—Brad Bynum

bradb@ ne wsreview.com OPINION

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Still dueling Re “Dueling conventions” (Left Foot Forward, May 26): Why does Sheila Leslie continue to make claims of violence at the Nevada Democratic Convention in Las Vegas? Even Anderson-Cooper at CNN has (belatedly) clarified that, while raucous, the Convention had no violence and no arrests. The canard about flying chairs was effectively refuted by Dennis Myers in his article seven pages after Ms. Leslie’s piece. I did see one chair flee (not fly), and that was Democratic Party Chair Roberta Lange taking flight after gavelling the meeting closed before its business was concluded. Why would a respected Democratic figure like Sheila Leslie continue to tar the Sanders campaign with the charge of violence? Did she reveal her true agenda when she said, “He [Sanders] should step out of a race he can’t win,” and is she willing to use any smear, no matter how discredited by facts, to accomplish that end? In Philadelphia, the delegates, both elected and unelected (unfortunately), will decide who can and can’t win, especially in light of her own preferred candidate’s problems with erased emails and the Clinton Foundation. Paul Lenart Reno

Marks, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Brad Bynum News Editor Dennis Myers Special Projects Editor Jeri Chadwell-Singley Arts Editor Kris Vagner Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Contributors Amy Alkon, Kelsey Fitzgerald, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Shelia Leslie, Eric

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

Design Manager Lindsay Trop Art Directors Brian Breneman, Margaret Larkin Marketing/Publications Manager Serene Lusano Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Designer Kyle Shine Senior Advertising Consultants Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Advertising Consultant Emily Litt

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column and listened to all the late night comedians, seen media stories about the antics of Trump and election day will see two drops of rain on the car windshield and go back to bed saying no one will be voting for Trump. Clinton just doesn’t excite her supporters like Trump. It’s one thing to point out Trump’s daily offenses, but you need to remind the Clinton leaning voters they can’t take it for granted that Trump’s latest gaff is the one that will lose the election for him. Dewey Quong Reno

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager/Operations Coordinator Kelly Miller Distribution Assistant Denise Cairns Distribution Drivers Tracy Breeden, Alex Barskyy, Debbie Frenzi, Vicki Jewell, Patrick L’Angelle, Marty Lane, Marty Troye, Warren Tucker, Gary White, Dave Carroll, Denise Cairns President/CEO Jeff VonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Marketing/Promotions/Facilities Manager Will Niespodzinski Executive Coordinator Jessica Takehara Business Manager Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Dargitz Accounts Receivable Specialist Kortnee Angel

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Sweetdeals Coordinator Courtney DeShields Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Managing Editor Shannon Springmeyer N&R Publications Writers Kate Gonzales, Anne Stokes Cover Design and Illustration: Margaret Larkin

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

like incumbent political figures. Similarly, everyone has a right to hire someone like reputation. com to delete attacks on family, faith, personal life, unsubstantiated innuendo or false information. Use of reputation management must (in my opinion) be reported through the State, just like a campaign contribution. Then, everything is on record. Is it just good business to use an IT firm to scrub a political candidate as part of a campaign? Yes. Combined with a voluntary background check, the practice of reporting reputation management will become far more tenable and transparent to the public. It will go a long way to repair the general perception that career politicians are evasive and untrustworthy. Social media scrubbing is worth a lot of money. Niklas Putnam Norfolk, Virginia

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Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permissions to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to rnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. RN&R is printed at Sierra Nevada Media on recycled newsprint. Circulation of RN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. RN&R is a member of CNPA, AAN and AWN.

JUNE 16, 2016

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by Jeri Chadwell-Singley

This Modern World

by tom tomorrow

How’s your dad? Asked at Piñon Bottle Co., 777 S. Center St.

Mark Hatjakes Filmmaker

How’s my dad? My dad is good. … We went to an event together last night, and I was asking him for, you know, more fatherly advice—20-some years later after I left the house. Yeah. He’s good, and it’s always good to see him.

Dana Hatjakes Business owner

My dad is awesome. He’s a good guy. He’s taught me everything that I needed to know in life, really. I get all of my advice from him. He was a small business owner when I was growing up. He owned a jewelry store, and he pretty much taught me everything I needed to know about business … and so that inspired me to start my own business.

Aaron Edgcomb Musician

How’s my dad? I don’t know if I’m going to have a very interesting answer for you on this one. He’s a great guy. I mean, he’s good. He’s doing well. He’s a guy who—he can accept a lot of things and maintain a positive light at all times. So, you know, he’s doing very well.

A nonviolent convention As a life-long progressive and native Nevadan, it who stood and heard their voices and votes honestly pained me to read Sheila Leslie’s being denied by people and parties who are May 26 column (“Dueling conventions”). supposed to care about democracy, could have There has been a lot of animosity during rioted. They were angry; they had a right to this primary season, and as an enthusiastic be. But they did not riot. They were loud, supporter of Bernie Sanders, no small amount vocal and stubborn, but at the end of the day, of that negativity has been directed at me, and non-violent. many of my friends. Bernie Sanders is not The attitude and actions of the Democratic just a politician—he has become a symbol. Party affirm what many have felt all along— His campaign is having a profound effect our voices and votes don’t matter. on many Americans, in that he gives voice We are throwing rocks at a tidal wave. We by to an enormous anger are screaming into a void. Andrea that has been building This is the Democratic Juillerat-Olvera in the U.S. for a long We are Party? They want us to shut Andrea Juillerattime. We know that up, go home? olvera is an throwing rocks They are too tired to count interpreter, advocate, we’ve been had, lied to, activist, artist and cheated, ignored and our votes? at a tidal wave. scholar, who lives in marginalized by powers Sanders supporters exist the reno area with beyond our grasp. We to pose a question to the her husband ricardo know the system is broken, and the primaries Democratic Party at large. olvera. are another glaring example of dysfunctional “Are you part of the problem, or part of the American democracy. Bernie Sanders represolution?” sents an acknowledgment of that truth, which The party would do well to answer that is why emotions run high. This is an ideologiquestion with grace, not contempt. cal battle that cuts very deep. I know that Sheila Leslie is a good person, No one threw any chairs at the Nevada and has done a lot for the people of the State convention. Had a chair been thrown, we of Nevada, which is why it upsets me that she, would have seen it, and not just once, but and others like her, are spitting in the face of replayed online endlessly, assisting in the Nevada’s newly energized, progressive voter further vilification of our group. But that base. I hope that she will retract her statements didn’t happen, because no one threw a and stop perpetuating these lies. Ω chair. In actuality, the crowd of thousands, OPINION

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Griffin Webb Bartender

My dad is pretty dang great. He works in the security industry, installing security systems. He’s an awesome guy. He also drinks a lot of beer, so he’s around here pretty often, and you might end up meeting him. How is your dad?

Charlie Goodnight Project manager

My father’s a good man. He’s probably the best man I know. He’s fantastic. He’s retired. He has grandkids and, yeah, he’s living the dream.

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The real choice The Nevada Supreme Court has announced it will hear oral arguments on at least one of the lawsuits filed against the Educational Savings Accounts (ESA), Nevada’s broadest-in-thenation school voucher law, on July 8. The arguments relate to a lawsuit filed by parents of Nevada students by who object to the voucher program Sheila Leslie because it violates the state’s constitutional provision of uniform funding. Carson City District Court Judge James Wilson agreed with the parents, but an appeal of his decision was filed, asking the Supreme Court to overturn it. A district court judge in Las Vegas, Eric Johnson, dealt a harsher blow to advocates of public education when he recently ruled in favor of the ESA. Johnson ruled against a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and Americans United for the Separation of Church and State that argues the ESA violates Article 11, Section 10 of the state’s constitution because it takes

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publicly funded education dollars away from public schools, funneling it to private religious schools under the guise of parental choice. It’s worth noting that Judge Johnson was appointed last year by Governor Sandoval, who signed the law creating the voucher program, a bill championed by Republicans that failed to attract even one Democratic vote. Johnson is currently running to retain his appointed seat after being chosen by Sandoval to fill a vacancy in the middle of the 2015 legislative session. In his decision, Judge Johnson found the mechanism by which the funding is provided to parents negates the problem of the state funding religious schools since it’s up to the parents to decide how to use the funds. He acknowledged the reality that the vast majority of private schools in Nevada are religious but agreed with the Legislature’s tortured work-around as a remedy to the constitutional ban of funding religious instruction with taxes.

It’s sickening to watch Republicans continue to pretend the ESA offers school “choice” for every student. They know most of the applications come from wealthier zip codes since the amount of dedicated funding doesn’t even cover tuition, leaving behind students from poor families. They also ignore the fact that these private schools are not required to accept high-cost students who need extra services. They act like the oversight mechanism to ensure that parents actually use the funding for proper educational purposes will prevent fraud. Worst of all, they refuse to acknowledge the harm done to public schools whose fixed costs, including a crumbling infrastructure, don’t change when wealthy students opt out. Instead, the Republicans proudly tweet that Nevada’s school voucher program is available to any child regardless of income or need, and make much of the “choice” this offers poor families who want their children to go to a better school. They are oblivious to the fact that

the average of $5,100 in tuition assistance doesn’t begin to cover the cost of a good private school, not to mention transportation and other expenses associated with a poor student leaving her neighborhood to attend school. Let’s be clear. The real impact of the ESA is a taxpayer subsidy for private school tuition for wealthier Nevadans and fewer education dollars for a struggling public school system. You know, the one the rest of us use. It’s up to the Supreme Court now to stand up for all of Nevada’s children and reject school vouchers in favor of a public education system that is adequately funded for everyone, rich or poor. Instead of perpetuating income inequality with separate but hardly equal educational systems, the Supreme Court should remind these elected officials that good public schools are the foundation of our great nation. Let’s use our taxes to invest in all our children. Ω


Dangerous talk As I predicted in this space, the Nevada Supreme Court dismissed the American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit challenging school choice law under the Nevada Constitution’s prohibition on using public funds for “sectarian” purposes. The ACLU should be ashamed, since the case by Brendan law is nearly unanimous that school Trainor choice legislation like Nevada’s does not fund religious schools, but rather funds parents who then may choose a religious education for their children or not. “Sectarian” is a code word for “Roman Catholic.” Bishop Manogue High School held its first open house to educate parents on their new freedom to choose without being unfairly taxed. In most Muslim countries other religions can live peacefully if they pay additional tax. School choice prevents the government educational monopoly from imposing a “secular” tax on parents who wish to send their children to Catholic and other religious educational institutions.

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Prejudice against Catholics in the U.S. was carefully hidden by a code word, but in the late nineteenth century the first federal immigration act was the “Chinese Exclusion Act,” aimed at curbing immigration from China. In those days, Congress did not feel the need for focus group acronyms when it passed unconstitutional legislation. The U.S. Supreme Court admitted federal control over immigration was not authorized in the Constitution, but simply blessed the legislation by saying federal control of immigration was an attribute of nationhood. Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump agrees when he says you can’t be a nation without hard borders. Banning Muslims from coming to the U.S. may be stupid, but it is not unconstitutional, unless you really believe in strict constitutional construction. Original intent requires that—since the federal government is not authorized to set quotas or ban immigrations—that power falls to the states and to the people. Neither Democrats nor Republicans want to surrender their power to raise money

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by incessantly arguing over immigration. When they do pass legislation, it makes things worse. The states who tried to set their own policies have been rebuffed by a Supreme Court defending its faulty precedent. This separation of powers gridlock is why a protectionist like Trump is winning! elections. Libertarians are immigration friendly. To make a difference, LP candidates Gary Johnson and Bill Weld have to show they are for freedom to immigrate, but not for taxsubsidized immigration. Donald Trump is saving free speech by ripping apart elitist cultural restrictions on speech. His ability to spontaneously blast through the political correctness gripping America shows he did not make the usual Republican mistake of bringing a knife to a gunfight. The recent celebration of the life and death of Mohammed Ali is marred by the spectacle of public figures afraid to completely quote his most famous political statement: “No Viet Cong ever called me nigger.” Ali was forbidden to box in the prime of

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his career for his opposition to the Vietnam war. Today PC terrorism caused even outspoken black ESPN commentator Stephen A. Smith to finish that quote with “… the N word.” Dick Gregory’s autobiography Nigger has been censored. Public school districts have even banned the iconic American novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from school curricula because the word “nigger” is sprinkled through Mark Twain’s classic satire of slavery and ignorance. Many whites and Asians fear speaking their mind will get them fired. They will vote for Trump because he will protect free speech. Even Ralph Nader sided with Trump’s followers. No one can tell an ethnic joke anymore. A monopoly education system is run by the political factions in power. Instead of continuing to argue over which faction should rule, school choice allows parents to break the logjam caused by political warfare to put their children’s education first. Ω

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Sociologist Richardson:  Where are the leaders?

Disney disses Pahrump Pahrump, the 36,000-resident Nye County community that often seems to bewitch show biz types—it was featured in Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, Mars Attacks and Lady Magdalene’s—has received an apology from Disney. A Disney XD show, Gamer’s Guide to Pretty Much Everything, called the town “a stinkhole,” referred to a fictional medical malady as “Pahrump lump,” and described children in Pahrump as “filthy.” A clip of the items was posted online by Nye County teen Danyelle Ormiston where it got good ratings. After the Pahrump Valley Times publicized the disparaging language about the town, Disney vice president of children’s communications Patti McTeague wrote the newspaper, “Regarding your report about viewer response to a recent episode of the comedy series … we reviewed the episode and have removed references to Pahrump and other lines of dialogue for future airings. Any disrespect to the people of Pahrump is unintentional and we sincerely regret if any offense was taken.” This is known as a non-apology apology, incidentally. McTeague did not say, “We sincerely regret it.” Rather, she wrote, “We sincerely regret if any offense was taken.” Also known as an ifpology (comedian Harry Shearer’s term), it shifts the fault from the offender to the offended. Such apologies are common in politics. In January 1992, after a tape recording of Bill Clinton making demeaning remarks about New York Governor Mario Cuomo being a Mafioso was released by Gennifer Flowers, Clinton said, “If the remarks on the tape left anyone with the impression that I was disrespectful to either Gov. Cuomo or Italian-Americans, then I deeply regret it.”

Geyser changes hands Fly Geyser, a familiar and colorful—but rarely seen—formation on the Black Rock Desert has been sold to Burning Man Project, along with the ranch that encloses it. The sale was made for $6.5 million. One unnamed geyser in the area was created a century ago when a well was being drilled for irrigation purposes that never came to pass. In 1964, another test well drilled by a geothermal company created Fly Geyser and also drained the first geyser of its pressure. Fly Geyser was not hot enough for power generation and was sealed back up but the seal did not hold.

But!? Anti-gay violence may not be the only area where leadership is lacking (see News, this page). In commenting on the possible creation of a national monument at Bear Ears in Utah, U.S. Sen. Orrin G. Hatch said, “I would hope that my fellow Utahans would not use violence, but there are some deeply held positions that cannot just be ignored.”

Fantasy betting may be revived Nevada state gambling regulators recommended approval on June 8 of a proposal for fantasy sports wagers on a platform akin to parimutuel betting. The decision came as the New York Assembly was moving forward on a fantasy sports measure. Daily fantasy sports was well underway in Nevada until October, when the state said operators needed gambling licenses. The websites halted Nevada wagers. The approval last week came in an application from race and sports book operator Vic Salerno. The recommendation came from the Gaming Control Board to the Gaming Commission. Salerno’s Sanderina II LLC issued a prepared statement about its USFantasy platform: “The USFantasy contest platform provides a level of consumer protections unparalleled in daily fantasy sports (DFS). Pari-mutuel systems are the original skilled selection platform for contestants to compete against one another in a fair, regulated and transparent environment. In a pari-mutuel environment, the consumer has a constantly updated, real-time view of the entire contest market. The consumer has immediate access to how much money is in the entire pool as well as how these monies are dispersed among the individual athlete in each contest in the form of current odds. This turn-key DFS solution can easily adapt with existing pari-mutuel regulations in 43 states.”

—Dennis Myers 8   |  RN&R   | 

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Silence Few leaders speak against anti-gay violence In California in 2000, the anti-marriage equality ballot measure called Question 22 was approved by 61.4 by percent of voters. Eight years later, Dennis Myers the issue was back on the state’s ballot as Question 8, and while it was approved again, it passed by only 52.5 percent. Opposition to marriage equality had dropped almost nine percentage points in eight years.

Admonitions against anti-gay violence are rare In Nevada, where a similar measure went on the ballot by initiative petition, the figures were less dramatic but went in the same direction. In Nevada, the measure had to pass in two general elections two years apart. In the first round of voting in 2000, the measure passed by 69.62 percent. In second round voting in 2002, it passed by 67.2 percent. In two years opposition to marriage equality lost 2.4 percent of its strength (which, if projected onto eight years, would be a greater drop than in California). For those who believe that acceptance of gays is a sign of a healthy society, these striking

changes in public sentiment were encouraging. But the rate of crime against gays did not follow such a steady line downward. In the first half of the first decade of the century, there was a sharp decline in anti-gay crime, but then it rose slightly and leveled off. Other sources show more fluctuating— and higher—figures recently. By any set of figures, a drop in gay bashing does not appear likely any time soon. What happened in Orlando last weekend was surprising only in its scale. Violence against gays has been common for decades. Until the 1970s, official anti-gay violence was frequent, little covered by journalists, and drew little sympathy from the public when it became known. Police officers brutalized gays, invaded their gathering places, and jailed them, where they sometimes were further injured. There were statutes making homosexuality illegal. Once gays began gaining political power and incidents like the police invasion of the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village caused public backlash, police violence began to decline, but it continued from other sectors—often exacerbated by attacks on gays from political activists that were rarely leavened with warnings against violence. When a Moral Majority chapter launched an anti-gay campaign

in San Francisco in 1981, its advocates said nothing to discourage violence against gays but did make reference to “the Sodom and Gomorrah of the United States and the armpit of this perverted movement … a capital crime against God and upon society.” It’s a judgment call whether that kind of language encourages violence. When Oregonian Lon Mabon launched an anti-gay petition in Nevada in 1994, and Las Vegan Richard Ziser started an ultimately successful anti-marriage equality initiative petition in 2000, neither of them urged nonviolence. Given the decades-long history of violence against gays, do critics of the gay lifestyle have an obligation to couple their attacks on gays with calls for order and nonviolence? “They certainly do,” said University of Nevada, Reno sociologist James Richardson. “But that doesn’t mean they’re going to follow through with that. I mean, we have abortion doctors being killed, we have gays being killed, and those are often not condemned. Some people have very strong views. Fundamentalists of varied stripes have strong feelings.” When condemnation does not follow violent incidents, Richardson said, it encourages more of them. He said anti-gay feelings among some people are so strong that it elevates minor issues. “Who uses what bathroom has somehow become a hill to die on for some,” he said.

Discomfort But in researching this article, we also found something of a lack of Democrats discouraging anti-gay violence, too. Not until an Orlando happens does it come up. And silence creates a climate of harsh language in which violence can thrive. Must politicians and religious leaders wait until an Orlando to discourage anti-gay violence? “We have a real dearth of leadership,” Richardson said. Some gays say they feel the silence of Democrats simply reflects the discomfort some people still feel about gays. It is reflected in other ways, too, they say. “We have spousal abuse campaigns and bullying campaigns,” said a UNR student. “Where is the stop anti-gay violence campaign?” Other gays are unsure about that idea, but they say there are other


ways that gays are made to feel they don’t count. “No one was collecting data on people killed by police until last year—well, data collection on gay-bashing isn’t anything to brag about, either,” one prominent gay Renoite told us. The Fatal Encounters database showed not just a high percentage of minorities were killed by police, but also a high number of people with histories of mental troubles— both groups that have had a history of being regarded as unimportant or disdained by society. Last week, the Associated Press reported that thousands of police agencies fail to report hate crimes or hate crime allegations to the FBI. In fact, “more than 2,700 city police and county sheriff’s departments across the country that have not submitted a single hate crime report for the FBI’s annual crime tally during the past six years— about 17 percent of all city and county law enforcement agencies nationwide.” Mark Potok, an official of the Southern Poverty Law Center, told AP reporter Christina Cassidy, “If these crimes are never really counted, it’s a way of saying they are not important.”

Richardson said that given the dramatic legal progress and changes gays have made, even he has been surprised at the enduring problems with anti-gay sentiment—and that may account for the reticence of Democrats, too.

Some people don’t count? “I usually think of Democrats and liberals as kind of passive, and it hasn’t occurred to them that someone would visit such violence on gays, particularly after the progress of the last few years. They think we’ve passed the time when someone would strap a gay person to a tree in Wyoming with barbed wire. I’m thinking of my own sentiments and how I feel, and I’m astonished that something that happened in Orlando could still happen.” He also said, “There is an irony, a tragic irony, that what happened in Orlando is going to cause more sympathy to rebound to the victims and strengthen support for gays.” Ω

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Customers and workers filed out of the Walmart in the Firecreek Crossing shopping center as the store was evacuated on June 3. Clerks said they were told there was concern about a suspected gas leak.

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This guy saves you money. RnRsweetdeals.newsReview.com JUNE 16, 2016

PHOTO/JOSIE LUCIANO

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Nikki Boyce prepares  the soil at Prema  Organics.

Farm love New agriculture project launched It’s June and 90 degrees in Reno, which means it’s a cool 80 in Bordertown. But the heat doesn’t stop a small group of 20- and 30-somethings from gathering to prepare nearly a hundred rows of soil at Rosewater Ranch. Sandwiched by Josie Luciano between Toiyabe National Forest and the Sallaberry Ranch, Rosewater has become a hub for permaculture farming, communal living and bright ideas. The newest idea to come out of the property is the reason for this latest workday. It’s called Prema Organics, and it’s a budding, 35-customer, community supported agriculture project, known as a CSA. It’s overseen by a co-op of people who also happen to be Co-op people. Zach Cannady, Kasey Crispin, Nikki Boyce, Andrew Yokom and David Funk are among the Great Basin Community Food Co-op workers who are trading sweat equity for profits in the fall. Like in any cooperative structure, there is no hierarchy, but Cannady is considered something of a spokesperson. As the produce buyer for Great Basin and a longtime yoga teacher in Reno, Cannady sees farming as a natural extension of his work. “For me it’s been something that I was always kind of aspiring to that I didn’t know I was aspiring to,” said Cannady. “I think that inherently we all seek to be connected to what we do, and there’s nothing quite as meditative as spending time outside really working with the land and getting your hands in the soil,” he said. Prema Organics Today, getting hands in the soil means testing the irrigation to find can be contacted at out if 20 pounds per square inch is enough pressure to run only two water NVPremaFarms@ zones on the property. (It isn’t.) It’s not a bad problem to have, given gmail.com. other common obstacles farmers face like poor soil, germination rates and weather, all issues that Prema is lucky—or smart—enough to have in the bag. “The soil is really amazing in that particular spot,” said Rosewater Ranch founder Nate Rosenbloom. “There’s not a lot of spots like that anywhere else in the state.” Set on two acres previously planted in alfalfa, Prema soil is a sandy loam that was nitrogen rich even before adding compost. As for germination rates, Prema uses a method of seed starting called soil blocking where seeds are planted in two-inch cubes that fit 50 instead of 72 to a tray. Though there are fewer plants, germination and transplant rates are higher because the roots “self-prune” when they hit air, resulting in less root-spinning and stress when the plugs are put in the ground. Weather-wise, Prema sits 1000 feet higher and 10 degrees cooler than Reno, providing an opportunity to offer cool-season crops like kale and lettuce a bit longer than everyone else. So those who sign up for the 12-week CSA basket can expect lots of greens with warm-season crops like tomatoes and peppers sprinkled in as “ornaments.” Not a bad start for a new CSA. But in the end, Prema’s biggest advantage might come down to its Sanskrit definition. “Supreme love,” explained Cannady. “What that means is that you’re giving everything every moment of the day to whatever action is at hand, and you’re completely disconnected or detached from the results of it.” Even if that means having more than two watering zones. Ω


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Lesser EVI LS With two wildly unpopular presidential candidates, what now? BY DENNIS MYERS

THE NEW PRIMARIES Presidential primaries were a 20th century creation, invented by Oregon in 1910. They did not actually have an official part in the delegate selection process for the national nominating conventions, and candidates dabbled in them mainly from necessity. In 1912, Republican Theodore Roosevelt—opposing incumbent Republican President William Howard Taft and progressive Republican Robert La Follette—knew that Taft as an incumbent had the delegate selection process locked up unless he could show party leaders that he could best the president. Roosevelt won nine primaries, La Follette two, and Taft one, and the leaders gave the nomination to Taft, who came in third in the election. That became common. Party

Really

though?

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leaders had other agendas than just winning, and in that particular case, keeping Roosevelt from returning to the presidency was one of them. Later leaders, in both Republican and Democratic parties, had other reasons for ignoring primaries. In 1948 on the Republican side, in 1952 in both parties, in 1956 on the Democratic side, the national conventions rejected the winner of the primaries in favor of other candidates, even when U.S. Sen. Estes Kefauver trounced incumbent President Harry Truman in the 1952 presidential primary—Truman then dropped out of the race—and then swept a dozen more primaries, losing only to favorite sons or unpledged slates. While all these things were going on, most delegates were still selected as they always had been—in precinct meetings, also called caucuses. A few states held primaries, which got lots of attention, but most states had caucuses, which had a bigger role in the selection of the presidential nominee. Primaries were beauty contests. In 1960, it was John Kennedy’s turn to use primaries to try to convince party leaders. In his case, they doubted the chances of a Catholic candidate. For the first time, the primaries made a difference for a presidential candidate—Kennedy

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won every presidential primary he contested and the nomination. He believed delegates should vote as they were pledged but did not call for binding them to candidates. The 1968 Democratic convention was a turning point. In that troubled year, the Vietnam War haunted the campaign trail. Antiwar candidate Eugene McCarthy came so close to defeating incumbent President Lyndon Johnson in the New Hampshire primary that Johnson dropped out of the race. Robert Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey then entered. Kennedy and McCarthy won all the primaries after New Hampshire and the convention gave the nomination to Humphrey, who carefully stayed out of the primaries. There had been unhappiness when Kefauver was denied the nomination after winning the primaries in 1952— his followers had a slogan: “No one likes him but the people”—but now there was outrage. McCarthy and Kennedy had made the case against the war, and a war supporter had been nominated. That focused attention on the delegate selection process as never before, and the 1968 convention approved creation of a commission to “aid” state parties in guaranteeing a “full, meaningful and

N E VA D A

WHEN ’S LUNCH ?

delegates were expected to use their own judgment to decide the best and most electable nominee for the party. These were the people who were closest to the grass roots, the real experts at running campaigns. Their judgment was well regarded. But the notion that they were supposed to pick the best and most electable candidates was a nuanced one. Best meant not just capable or skilled but also being good for the party. More than once, party leaders have sacrificed electability to get a candidate they were comfortable with.

CALIFORNIA

P E N N S Y LVA N I A

In July 1960 in Los Angeles, Charles Springer was facing a choice. As a delegate to the Democratic National Convention, the future Nevada attorney general and state supreme court justice was being tugged in two directions over the presidential nomination. He was a close ally of Nevada’s governor, Grant Sawyer, who was the chief John Kennedy booster in the Silver State. But both of the state’s U.S. senators, Howard Cannon and Alan Bible, were pushing for their majority leader in the Senate, Lyndon Johnson. Every vote was precious. Kennedy was believed to be achingly close to a majority—so close that the roll call reached W and Wyoming before he closed the deal. So Springer’s vote was zealously sought. He surprised a lot of people by endorsing Johnson. That was the way delegates made up their minds then, by considering all views before making up their minds. It was the kind of courtship that’s more difficult today. Springer was a free agent. Today’s delegates are much less so. The current notion that the delegates should represent the results of their state primaries or caucuses is relatively new. Until the 1960s and later,

timely” opportunity to participate in delegate selection.

Reform The reform commission, chaired by U.S. Sen. George McGovern, who had stepped in as a late antiwar candidate after Kennedy’s murder, found appalling conduct of the process in 1968. In one state, two men selected the state’s delegates. Some delegates had been selected well before the issues of the year had emerged. “In Hawaii ... proxies were voted at the state convention from unorganized precincts. One such precinct consisted of an urban renewal area comprised largely of vacant lots. In another case, a Missouri party official cast 492 unwritten proxies in a township caucus.” New York had a law forbidding candidates for delegate from disclosing their presidential preferences. Some precinct meetings were simply secret. In April 1970, the McGovern Commission released its report containing guidelines that were adopted by the Democratic National Committee. (Pat Potter of Carson City was Nevada’s liaison to the commission.) They eliminated practices like instructing delegates, awarding ex-officio delegate seats, and using the unit rule—all guidelines that diluted

“lesserevils” continued on page 14

FINE

Lame

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“LessereviLs” continued from page 13

Primary states began to proliferate

The Nevada standard is seen in a freeze frame from NBC footage of the 1956 Democratic National Convention race for vice president between Estes Kefauver and John Kennedy, the last contest to go beyond a single ballot in a major party convention.

the power of party leaders. Some of the rules were simple common sense that should have been used all along, such as adequate notice for meetings. The Democratic National Committee had already mandated elimination of racial discrimination, but the commission reemphasized it. The Democratic National Committee endorsed the guidelines, making them binding on state parties. But the next two Democratic presidential nominees were McGovern himself and Walter Mondale, both of whom lost by substantial margins. Party insiders blamed the reforms and convinced the Democratic National Committee to revive ex-officio delegates. These are delegates who, because they hold elective or party office, are automatically national convention delegates, do not need to be elected through the primaries or caucuses, and are not bound to any candidate. Basically, they are party bosses. The notion was that they would stand back, observe the primaries and caucuses, and step in if the party seemed to be choosing someone unacceptable. The number of primaries had begun to grow, with more than half the states creating them. But even states with primaries have precinct meetings, or caucuses, because caucuses are the way the delegates are selected. And the process has become much more bureaucratic—paperwork, rules to observe, marks to toe. Some of these are suspected—including in Nevada—of being used by party leaders to work their will and screen out delegates. The practice of binding delegates to candidates who won in primaries and caucuses increased. In 1980, Edward Kennedy called for releasing delegates as part of his drive for 14   |  RN&R   | 

JUNE 16, 2016

the presidential nomination. CBS News hauled out an old tape of John Kennedy talking about how delegates should abide by their commitments and portrayed it as JFK taking a different posture on bound delegates than his brother, which was false. The unelected delegates were a problem from the time they were created in 1982, generating suspicion of highhandedness and undemocratic process. In 1988, their function seemed to be to keep a black man down—Jesse Jackson. In July of that year, shortly before the national convention, columnist William Schneider pointed out that Jackson got 28 percent of the vote in the Pennsylvania primary but got only eight percent of the state’s delegates. With primary results like those plus the fact that the unelected delegates were running 365 to 55 against Jackson, there was little wonder that he wanted the number of unelected delegates reduced. The Democrats promised Jackson, the second-place finisher in the nominating contest that year, that it would reduce the number of superdelegates from 15.5 percent to 10 percent. The number is now 14.94 percent—30 percent of the total needed to nominate. (It was at 20 percent in 2008.)

Not so super The unelected delegates caused other problems. It is little remembered now, but after Bill Clinton locked up the nomination in 1992, a couple of hundred unelected delegates withheld their support, unconvinced that he should be the nominee. For instance, former New Mexico governor Tony Anaya said, “I just didn’t find a candidate I felt I could really get passionate about.” He faulted Clinton’s association with the Democratic Leadership

Council, a group formed to make the party more conservative. Republicans tended to follow the Democratic process. Some of these changes required changes in state laws, and there’s no way of distinguishing between the political parties in law, so Republicans had to go along. Locally, when Nevada got an early berth in the caucus process, the Republicans grudgingly went along, but more recently have been trying to torpedo it. The Republicans have their own superdelegates. Each state’s national committeewoman and national committeeman is automatically a national convention delegate. All along, supporters of Bernie Sanders have been suspicious of the unelected delegates, suspecting that they would try to defeat their candidate. They seem not to be aware that is their job. The whole reason unelected delegates were created was to override primary and caucus voters. On the other hand, the unelected delegates have slowly been evolving into something far from super. For years after they were created, they held off their decisions on who to support to see if they would be needed to avert some disastrous selection by the voters. But in more recent years, they have been endorsing early, before it is clear where the race is going. McGovern Commission research director Ken Bode told us in 2008, “I mean, the idea was that they are ballast. They have the right to commit themselves, but the idea was that they would be the kind of people who would be there because of their position, their judgment, their experience, their wisdom, what have you. And if they’re committed early that kind of takes away the original motive for them.” This year, Bode told the Charlotte Observer, “There is plenty of talk

about the Republican convention being rigged. The fact is that the Democratic convention is more clearly rigged. If the GOP had a similar system, you can imagine Jeb Bush getting the lion’s share of the superdelegates before the primaries ever began. Imagine the bellowing we would have heard from Cruz, Trump and the other 14 candidates.” In 2015, Clinton was piling up unelected delegates long before Iowa, New Hampshire or any state had voted. That rupture of process may have been why Sanders in March said he would go after unelected delegates even if Clinton was winning. Now, in June, the process has produced two nominees—Donald Trump for the Republicans and Hillary Clinton for the Democrats. It’s a matchup that seems tailor-made for superdelegates. For the first time in public opinion polling history, the two parties have produced two very unpopular candidates for president, both of whom have horrendously high negative ratings in public opinion surveys. If they weren’t facing each other, it would be hard to imagine either winning. The latest NBC survey: “Traditionally a fair number of partisans on either side of the aisle express negative opinions about the other party’s candidate, but the latest poll found that a majority of voters express negative feelings about both leading candidates. Nearly six in 10 Americans said they either ‘dislike’ or ‘hate’ Clinton, while slightly more—63 percent—expressed negative opinions about Trump. Four in 10 voters said they ‘admire’ or ‘like’ Clinton, and 36 percent said they ‘admire’ or ’like’ Trump.” That pretty well eliminates the tactic of defining the opponent—both candidates are already defined. Not in the memory of anyone living has there been such a contest of unlikable presidential candidates. It’s the kind of thing that unelected delegates were created to avert—candidates who turn off the voters. This is the point at which the superdelegates are supposed to jump in and save their parties. But in the Democratic Party, the unelected delegates committed themselves so early they are disinclined to take action now. This is a breach of the original plan for the unelected delegates.

Clinton, though they began weakening after Obama nailed down the delegates to win. This year, every delegate but one—Erin Bilbray—is again supporting Clinton. (Harry Reid waited until after the caucuses to endorse Clinton.) One of them, Dina Titus, endorsed Clinton before the echo of her announcement of candidacy had faded. Artie Blanco, Ruben Kihuen, Roberta Lange, Andres Ramirez, Chris Wicker—they’re not going to do anything to stop Clinton. Democrats are bound by party rules for at least the first ballot but also by their own quixotic loyalties. In the Republican Party, there is considerably more talk of doing something about Trump. But there is always talk in presidential years about bringing back brokered conventions. “There is growing speculation that the Republican convention in San Diego this August may turn out to be that rarest of all birds, a brokered convention,” wrote columnist William Rusher about the 1996 convention that nominated Robert Dole on the first ballot. In 1987, columnist Tom Wicker wrote that the Democratic Party’s numerous presidential candidates appeared “to be moving them to a contested and brokered convention.” The ended in another first ballot victory, for Michael Dukakis. The last time a convention nominating contest went beyond one ballot was 1956— and that was for vice president. To be sure, the Dump Trump effort has gotten further than most of these efforts such as the Anybody

The system works? In Nevada in 2008, when Hillary Clinton ran against Barack Obama, all of Nevada’s unelected delegates but one—Steven Horsford—supported

An online ad by something called the Sound Money Defense League asks a question plenty of Republicans are asking themselves.


but McGovern (ABM) and Anybody but Carter (ABC) efforts on the Democratic side. With Republican leaders like Lindsey Graham and Mark Kirk abandoning Trump, Republicans like Brian Sandoval and Paul Ryan dipping toes in the abandonment pool, conservative radio hosts like Hugh Hewitt blasting Trump, Trump-supporting corporate executives like Carl Icahn and Ken Langone blasting his racial views, and the billionaire’s post-Orlando behavior further inciting his critics, the situation is unpredictable. But unelected Republican delegates are smaller in number than on the Democratic side, and they would have to be the first line of GOP defense against Trump. In addition, the super status of Republican superdelegates has been undercut by a new party rule providing for them to be pledged to a candidate at least for the first ballot. One of the unelected Nevada Republican delegates, Lee Hoffman of Elko, is indeed a superdelegate—and a rare one. He is not bound to any candidate. He holds down a delegate

slot that was pledged to candidate Ben Carson, who has released his delegates to vote as they wish. But that doesn’t mean Hoffman’s planning to join any anti-Trump effort. This is all the more remarkable because he has been a Trump skeptic all along. “Personally, I liked Scott Walker, then Ben Carson, then Ted Cruz,” he told the Las Vegas Sun at the Nevada Republican Convention last month. But now he says he’s not going to try to impede a candidate who played by the rules and won. “I think Mr. Trump has secured enough delegates to win the nomination, he did it under the rules in all the states, so as far as I am concerned he is the nominee,” he said. “I believe in process as much as I believe in individuals and since that is where the process has gotten us, I am not going to support any attempt to manipulate rules or to create any new candidate.” Republican National Committeewoman Diana Orrock was not available for comment. If this year’s choice is the outcome of more and more primaries, it’s difficult to make the case that the process

today works better than it once did. There was a time when party leaders would have stepped in to stop candidates with such high antipathy ratings, but that protective fuse has melted. The country is facing a campaign in which both parties are going to have to urge their own supporters to vote for someone they really don’t want,

using the argument that the other side is worse, not an exploration of issues. It will likely be, even by U.S. standards, record breaking in its negative tone. As Mort Sahl would say, Darwin was wrong. The Democratic Party’s dilemma is of its own making. The outcome of the Republican quandry is yet

to unfold. Remarkably, given how distasteful and destructive they find his racial views, a lot of Clinton’s supporters are hoping the Dump Trump folks fail. It’s her best hope of winning—though if GOP leaders succeed in displacing Trump, they will have to deal with the rage of his followers. Ω PHOTO/MARIANNE KOBAK McKOWN, ElKO DAIly FREE PREss

Superdelegates quickly generated suspicion

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Superdelegate Lee Hoffman: I’ll respect the process.

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Why do we love food trucks? Maybe it’s because many specialize in a narrow cuisine, enhancing the notion you can’t get these yummies from anywhere but their mobile kitchen. Here are a few of the latest to park and serve in the Truckee Meadows. Best wurst

Schnitzel’s Austrian Grill serves up authentic schnitzel ($8.75) with a selection of pork, chicken or haddock, available as a platter with your choice of two sides, or as a ciabatta sandwich ($6.95) served with lettuce and tomato. Both come with a condiment of your choice. Additional condiments are $1.50 and include fancy housemade preparations. Similarly, housemade sides are available. I recommend the cranberry horseradish cream and basil pesto mayo. Chilled chickpea, cucumber and warm potato salads were all delicious. For a cross-cultural twist, try the currywurst ($4.75 ciabatta, $6.75 platter with fries), a grilled bratwurst slathered in a sweet and spicy curry sauce. Doughnut, meet meat

Tahoe Tenderloins’ signature dish, the classic tenderloin ($8), is a Midwest favorite. This pork fillet is pounded flat like a schnitzel—though thinner 16   |  RN&R   | 

JUNE 16, 2016

and twice the width—and breaded in a cracker-crumb mixture. It’s placed somewhat awkwardly on a hamburger bun with lettuce, red onion, pickle and tomato. I tried a bite with the bun for full effect, then ditched the bread. The meat was so tender it was literally being held together by the slightly sweet coating, with a scent and flavor reminiscent of fresh, raised doughnuts, sans glaze. Soup and salad is also available, as well as a sandwich featuring housemade mild Italian sausage ($8). I didn’t get a bite because my hungry friend polished it off while I was enjoying my pork pastry. Fresh catch

Chef John Smee of Smee’s Alaskan Fish Bar worked 40 years as an Alaskan fisherman, and fishermen don’t eat at sea unless they learn how to cook. Smee’s fish and chips ($12) might be the best I’ve ever had. The fried batter is thinner than most, very crispy, allowing giant flakes of moist, high-quality fish to really shine. Similarly, the fries, coleslaw and tartar sauce are above average and full of

atypical flavor. Other menu items include a very nice cod chowder ($5) and fried and grilled seafood specials (prices vary). If fries aren’t your thing, you can’t go wrong with a seven-piece basket of that amazing fish ($15) with a side of slaw for an extra buck. skip the line

The Codfather truck’s best attribute is online ordering, allowing you to use your smartphone to skip waiting in line. The Captain’s Platter ($12.75) includes a side of coleslaw, two pieces of battered cod, breaded shrimp, clam strips, scallops and an oyster, served with tartar and cocktail sauces. The breaded items were pretty good, with the scallops a stand-out. The fries were OK, but the slaw was a bit bland. The fish was disappointing, crispy at first but progressively softer as the coating of thick batter sucked moisture out of the fish. My daughter enjoyed a side of corn fritters, doused in an agave chipotle sauce ($3). slice anD roll

the meat was so tender it was literally being held together by the slightly sweet coating, with a scent and flavor reminiscent of fresh, raised doughnuts, sans glaze.

Starkey’s serves two great tastes that go great together, pizza and sushi— wait, what? Featuring a beautiful wood-fired oven, it’s the creation of a veteran Lake Tahoe sushi chef. And it works. The 11-inch Classico cheese pizza ($10) was crispy with a decent sauce and a generous portion of mozzarella. The sushi menu features mostly classics—California roll, spicy tuna, etc.—but there are specials available. I tried a spicy scallop hand roll ($7.50) with crispy salmon skin, cucumber, and—of course—wasabi, pickled ginger and soy sauce on the side. I was surprised at how good it was, so I can confirm it is possible to serve tasty sushi from a truck. And wash it down with pizza. hot packets

The Sublime food truck has a shortand-sweet selection of subs and wraps with the usual accoutrements, but there was one item I had to try. The Hot Mess ($7 sm., $8.50 lg.) is a hot pastrami sandwich with habañero jack cheese. I doubled down and chose jalapeño jack bread. The proprietress of the truck confirmed, “a very wise choice.” She was right. I’ve had a lot of pastrami sandwiches—and I’ve cooked more than a few—but this baby was stacked. It was hot both ways and super satisfying. Veg out

Nom Eats is one of only a couple of vegan trucks in the area. The menu is burritos, sandwiches and tacos made with veggies and either tofu or

seitan—a Japanese wheat gluten meat substitute—with various ingredients including vegan “cheese.” I went with the Philly cheese on a toasted hoagie roll ($10). The “beef” actually had a reasonably meaty texture, though none of the umami of beef. And the “cheesey sauce” was tasty but didn’t resemble real cheese. The dominant flavors were a rainbow of bell peppers with sliced pepperoncini and portabello mushroom. Not bad, but not my first choice. wine not?

Winey Munkies is part of a very niche trend, that of ice cream and sorbets created with wine. For $5 you get a generous scoop. The chocolate merlot sorbet was very smooth with an enlightening flavor combination. The strawberry pinot grigio ice cream basically tasted like … strawberry ice cream. It was good, but I couldn’t have distinguished it from a nonalcoholic strawberry product.


59,814 married adults

59,814 married adults

Locals Anna Golbov and Mike Fasano enjoy pulled pork sandwiches from Brothers Barbecue.

th

Parade, Midtown - June 18 starting at 10am

Redneck Truck Show - June 18 And the runners up ...

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Upcoming food truck gatherings include Reno Street Food, Idlewild Park, 5-9 p.m. Fridays through Oct. 7; Feed the Camel, McKinley Arts & Culture Center, 5-8 p.m. Wednesdays through Sept. 7; and Moana Food Truck Roundup, Rounds Bakery parking lot, 294 E. Moana Lane, 5-8 p.m. Thursdays.

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Bull Fighting - June 19-22

Visit RenoRodeo.com for full event details For tickets call

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There are also various food stands at food trucks events, and a few deserve honorable mentions: The Rub Shack is all about barbecue. The tri-tip pesto sandwich ($9), served on a Dutch crunch roll, was full of flavor. The salmon in the tacos ($6) was grilled well, and the gingercitrus sauce was a nice complement. Best of all, the bourbon and Coke ribs were fall-off-the-bone perfect ($2 per bone). The rub was great, but the just-enough-bite sauce was outta sight. Best sauce I’ve tasted recently that didn’t come from my own kitchen. Fire On The Mountain sports an Italian wood-fired oven on a trailer, fed by a group of guys who have a passion for pizza. Their crust wasn’t as bottom-crisp as I prefer, but the sauce was zesty, the edges were nice and chewy, and my selection of three-cheese plus mushroom ($11) was a success. A little more fire on the

bottom and this would be a perfect 11-inch pie. Peluso’s Mobile Rotisserie featured a whole hog in a gas-fired rotisserie, trussed-up in the style of pancetta and served with lettuce, etc., on an Italian roll ($8). They also had a mixed shellfish roll that was pretty tasty ($12), but the pig had all my attention. Holy moly, it was a feast for the eyes and palate. Papa Peluso—of Peluso’s Pizza in Reno—waved us over to take a gander at the star of the show. Drooltastic. Ω

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College try Whole Fantasmagoria Duality An exhibit at Sierra Arts features nine artists who teach at the region’s colleges. by The quality of their work is top-notch, Kris Vagner but the curatorial strategy that tries to buttress its meaning doesn’t k ri s v @ acknowledge the already-well-thought ne w s re v i e w . c o m intentions of the artists, nor does it shed any light for viewers. This is the wording from the (unsigned) curatorial statement: “Each of the invited artists provided three individual words of their choosing which were then placed into a ‘hat.’ ‌ The three words drawn: Whole Phantasmagoria Duality.â€? That became the exhibit’s title and theme. PHOTO/KRIS VAGNER

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Whole Fantasmagoria Duality, an exhibit of artwork by area college instructors, runs through June 16 at Sierra Arts, 17 S. Virginia St. A reception will be held 5-7 p.m., June 16. For information visit sierra-arts.org or call 329-2787.

Clever? Sure. But these are mature artists who’ve been refining their reasons for making art for years or decades, so the added cleverness doesn’t help anything. And for viewers, trying to parse out what’s so “Whole Fantasmagoria Duality� about the artwork is a confusing job with zero payoff. “Phantasmagoria� means “a shifting series of illusions� or a confounding, dream-like situation. Think visual cacophony. Think Alice needing a mental break from trippy Wonderland. None of these artists’ work is about that. Drawing words from a hat is a legitimately helpful exercise if you’re an Art 101 student who needs to learn how to proceed from concept to finished piece. It’s a great idea for those with an affinity for Dadaist experimentation. (The Dadaists threw meaning into a blender by, say, cutting words from books and remixing

them into nonsensical poems.) But for artists who aren’t Dadaists or beginners, the process comes off as gimmicky for gimmick’s sake. Here, instead, are a few examples of how you could frame this work: Candace Garlock, gallery director and printmaking instructor at Truckee Meadows Community College, had already been making multimedia prints and collages questioning how we sensationalize and sexualize human bodies. Then she contracted multiple sclerosis and folded her thoughts about dealing with disease into the already rich mix. The work she makes today is elegant, nuanced, hard-hitting and honest. Sheri Leigh O’Connor, chair of fine arts at Sierra Nevada College, uses ceramics to wrap her head around the role of guns in American culture. This exhibit shows a glossy, sushi-roll gun and a “Kentucky fried� gun, coated with realistic, crispy breading. Her work always packs a socially relevant punch, especially so this week, in light of the shooting in Orlando. (For maximum effect, check out the KFC-style buckets of fried guns on her website: www.sherileighceramics.com.) Dean Burton, photography instructor at TMCC, has long paid homage to traditional and new forms of imagemaking. He takes a careful, meditative look at mundane things—the insides of film cameras; the negative spaces between clouds— asking us always to dig deeper into what’s right in front of our noses. Here, he shows a grid of calotypes, a type of photography from the 1840s that yields a luscious, rich surface. His pictures are extremely meta without being cloying or coy, and, as always with Burton’s work, figuring out what they’re pictures of is a delightful game—not to be plot-spoiled here— of discovering beauty where we may not have thought to look for it. Figuring out Burton’s imagery game is not the only reason to see this show. Even though none of these artists’ work needed the external justification, all of the work outshines the made-up “phantasmagoria� concept. There’s just a tiny sample of each artist’s work here. If that seems like a tasty appetizer, there’s a second course coming up in August, when artwork by college instructors Russell Dudley, Megan Berner and Jeff Erickson will appear in an exhibit of Nevada artwork at the Nevada Museum of Art. Ί


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Where there’s smoke Hellfire Saloon 3372 S. McCarran Blvd., 825-1988 In a short span of time, a music/dive bar on the south end of town went through several ownership changes and by Todd South then closed. After decades of success, a veteran bar and grill in a nearby neighborhood sat vacant for a few years. Combine the former with the latter and you get the new Hellfire Saloon. PHOTO/ALLISON YOUNG

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Hellfire Saloon  owner David Heffern  shows off a spread  of Habanero Hellfire  chicken wings, the  Nevada blue avocado  burger and an   inverted wedge   salad.

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Hellfire Saloon opens at 11 a.m. daily.

A Western theme of kitschy artifacts adorns the walls, along with pubheight tables, hewn from reclaimed Truckee timber and hand-finished by the owners. There are TVs tuned to sports programming and a prominent stage for live music events. I’m told a mix of cover and original bands are booked for weeks to come. The menu includes bar classics along with trendier fare. We started with slow-smoked wings doused in Hellfire Habanero sauce ($11, 12 pieces, other sauces available). I’ve been a wingnut since the ’80s, and these dinosaur-descendent morsels were among the largest I’ve seen. The wings were crisp-yet-moist—the sauce sweet with a very fiery kick. By the pound and in quality, this was a great deal. Brussels sprouts ($8) often get a bum rap, yet have become a trendy item when combined with bacon and other foodie favorites. Hellfire doesn’t skimp on the bacon and Parmesan cheese, but the result was a tad bitter, greasy and underdone. I took it home, added a few dashes of balsamic vinegar, then put it back on the heat for a quick finish. Yum. Though I’m a fan of chili con carne ($5 per cup) in its original form—sans beans—the “rich and thick signature chili” was definitely stout enough to stand a fork in. Tons of meat, thick gravy, well-cooked

beans, slightly sweet and barely a touch of heat. Satisfying for spicechallenged folk as well as we who add hot sauce to everything. Among the wedge salads I’ve tried, this one ($12) bests them all. Half a head of iceberg lettuce, incompletely quartered so toppings can fill-in the nooks. Topped with super-chunky blue cheese dressing, diced tomato, minced chive, panko bread crumbs and barbecue pulled pork—or your choice of meat—it’s not your average salad. The pork was a little sweet with just a touch of spice, and very good bark—a salad even a devout carnivore can love. The Nevada Blue avocado burger ($10) was topped with blue cheese, spinach, and tons of avocado, with tomato slice and lettuce leaf on the side. The side of French fries wasn’t as crispy as I long for, but the seasoning salt was great. The burger was cooked to order—medium—and perfectly seasoned. That’s a tasty burger. Though not quite as amazing, my Basque burger ($12) with side salad was still yummy. The patty is a blend of beef and chorizo topped with grilled onion and Jack cheese, served on garlic butter-grilled sourdough. The patty was grilled-to-order medium rare, and the onion and cheese were spot-on. But it was a bit dry and could have used a condiment to complement the seasonings and smooth mastication. Something other than ketchup. The salad was a nice portion of mixed greens, tomato, onion, carrot and crouton. For barbecue we ordered the Bonanza Feast ($36), including a half rack of ribs, a half pound of beef tri-tip or pulled pork—we went with beef—half a roasted chicken, and a choice of three sides, for which we chose a double order of baked beans and one of coleslaw. The rib rub had good flavor, similar to the pulled pork—not super spicy, but fall-off-thebone goodness. The tasty tri-tip was very tender with good smoke flavor. The baked beans were thick and rich with a ton of bacon. The coleslaw was crisp and not too sweet, though a bit bland and could’ve used more dressing. The chicken was seasoned just right, moist and toothsome. This combination of a dive music joint and an above-average bar and grill is a venue I know I’ll revisit, if only for those insanely enormous and perfectly cooked wings. Ω


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4

Jump around

Captain America: Civil War

The Conjuring 2 As he did with The Conjuring, writer-director James Wan uses the story of a supposedly real poltergeist in The Conjuring 2. The Conjuring involved a haunting here in the U.S., while the sequel draws upon the infamous Enfield Poltergeist that allegedly occurred in England in the late ’70s. Wan has tapped into something interestby ing with this franchise. Two films in, it’s Bob Grimm showing some decent durability and originality. It’s also pretty scary. bg r i mm@ newsr evie w.c om Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson return as the Warrens, paranormal investigators known to have visited many legendary haunted spaces, including Amityville and Enfield. Wan, of course, blows up their involvement in each of these cases to deliver a platform for fictional circumstances and scares. While not quite as good as The Conjuring, this is a sequel that mostly does its predecessor proud.

3

“I’ll clean my room!   I swear! I swear!”

1 Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5 excellent

Amityville actually gets a little bit of attention in the film’s pre-opening credit sequence, a creepy one that has Farmiga’s Warren possessing the body of killer Ronald DeFeo, Jr. during a séance vision of him murdering his family. Farmiga is seen walking around with an invisible shotgun shooting people, and DeFeo is seen with the actual weapon in mirrors. Many have tried to make the Amityville Horror story scary at the movies, but this movie is the first to actually accomplish the feat. The film then crosses over to its main focus, an impoverished family in Enfield, England. Peggy (Frances O’Connor) is raising her children on no money, and their flat just happens to get haunted. Not only does it get haunted, but daughter Janet (Madison Wolfe) gets possessed by an old man who supposedly died in a living room chair years earlier. He’s now causing shit because it’s his house, and he likes scaring kids.

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One of the main reasons The Conjuring 2 works in the end is the performance of young American actress Wolfe, who employs a flawless English accent to go with her appropriately eerie facial expressions. She has a swing-set scene with Farmiga that makes the skin crawl, as do the numerous times when she flaunts her best “Linda Blair in The Exorcist” chops. She’s great in every moment she spends on screen. Knowing full well that his movie needed something besides a little girl effectively croaking like an old man to fill up its running time, Wan includes a monstrous ghost that emerges from a toy in the house, and some sort of nun demon that has an uncanny resemblance to Marilyn Manson. These two spooky entities provided a couple of jump scares that got this particular veteran of many attempted jump scares up a few inches out of his seat. I’ll say this for Wan: He’s the current king of the jump scare. He has some impressive, impeccable timing at what has become a bit of a lost art among current horror film directors. Farmiga and Wilson are decent once again as the Warrens, although the film keeps them on the back burner for much of the first half. O’Connor, the mom in Steven Spielberg’s A.I: Artificial Intelligence, is solid as the cranky mom. Wan, not looking to be pigeonholed as a horror director, made 2015’s Furious 7 and is slated to enter the DC universe with Aquaman in 2018. When he gets everything clicking, including an excellent soundtrack and camerawork, he’s an effective horror maestro. He’s made some stinkers—I still say the original Saw is crap, and Insidious 2 is terrible—but he’s pretty consistent within the horror genre, especially with his ghost stories. Due to his busy schedule, a return as director for the inevitable The Conjuring 3 seems unlikely for Wan. I attended a well-packed screening for this movie, and it was met with a lot of screams and laughs during the film and even a round of applause when it was over. My feelings weren’t nearly as enthusiastic for the movie, but I did enjoy it. It’s a good enough summer scare machine that’ll put a couple of jolts into you. Ω

This is a nice blast of superhero fun that finds a diplomatic way to include many Marvel favorites, even introducing a few characters to the modern Marvel Cinematic Universe, without feeling crowded or rushed. Front and center, there’s Steve Rogers (former Human Torch Chris Evans), a.k.a. Captain America, still having bro issues when it comes to the Winter Soldier, Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan). Cap wants to back up his former best friend, but the guy committed some pretty shady acts while brainwashed, some of them very hard to defend. Captain America has to make some hard choices. Meanwhile, Secretary of State Thaddeus Ross (William Hurt) thought Age of Ultron sucked for more than the obvious reasons. On top of being kind of boring, it left death and destruction in its wake, as did the far more exciting original The Avengers. World leaders want to put the Avengers in check, using them as a sort of alternative to nuclear weapons. Tony Stark, a.k.a. Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr., still owning it) suffering a crisis of conscience, agrees to the proposed accord. Rogers thinks it’s bullshit and won’t sign. This works as a fine setup for an eventual battle between Iron Man and Captain America, where both sides have compelling reasons to fight.

1

Cell

Remember when a Stephen King movie was an event? Remember when a John Cusack movie was an event? Heck, the John Cusack/Stephen King movie 1408 (2007) was actually pretty badass. Here in 2016, the latest Cusack/King vehicle gets an On Demand release shortly before a limited theatrical run. Produced three years ago, this one was better off staying on the shelf and is easily one of the worst King adaptations. Cusack, reteamed with his 1408 costar Samuel L. Jackson, plays Mike, a graphic artist estranged from his wife and son. Shortly after placing a call to them on an airport payphone, Mike witnesses cell phone users spazzing out and going into a zombie state after some sort of pulse. Director Tod Williams is utterly lost with this opportunity, making a humorless piece of horror satire wrought with lethargic performances, shoddy camerawork and terrible special effects. The origin of the “pulse” that sets off the zombie apocalypse is never fully explained, and no real villain is ever established. The ending is a confusing mishmash of three finales. Cusack seems pissed to be in this thing, while Jackson is clearly bored and resigned to the fact that he signed up for a stinker. Eli Roth was the original director on this, and he left due to creative differences. Maybe he was arguing that a film like this should be crazy and even funny. This one takes itself a little too seriously. (Available for rent on iTunes and On Demand before and during a limited theatrical release.)

4

The Jungle Book

Jon Favreau’s delightful and funny take on the Rudyard Kipling’s tale of a boy raised by wolves is a winner. A young boy raised in the jungle is pursued by a pissed-off tiger (Idris Elba) who had his face burned by a human when he was young. When plans to leave for a human village are rudely interrupted, Mowgli (newcomer Neel Sethi) winds up staying in the jungle longer than he planned, and he must keep wearing the same pair of red baggy shorts. He encounters Kaa (Scarlett Johansson), an evil temptress snake, and other perils while building a special friendship with a big bear. And, as far as I could see, he never stops to wash those red shorts. A swim in the river doesn’t count. You need detergent. Bill Murray is, indeed, a masterstroke of vocal casting as Baloo, the big bear who befriends Mowgli on his extended jungle trek. Casting Christopher Walken as King Louie, the Kong-sized master of all apes in the jungle, actually tops the Murray casting feat. It gives Favreau’s film an opportunity to become truly weird, very funny, and even a little scary. The highlight comes when Walken’s King Louie, portrayed with undertones of Brando’s Colonel Kurtz, suddenly busts out “I Wanna Be Like You.”

4

The Lobster

This is as brutal a satire you will ever see. Writer-director Yorgos Lanthimos gives us a world where being single is so frowned upon, you will be transformed into the animal of your choice if you don’t find a partner in an allotted time. Colin Farrell stars as David, a recently dumped man who must stay at a hotel with his brother, who is also his dog, and find a new mate, or become a lobster. He even-

tually finds himself living in the woods with the leftover single people, who must dodge daily hunting expeditions by people looking to extend their time before animal transformation (they earn extra days for every single person they bag). David eventually meets Short Sighted Woman (Rachel Weisz) among the singles, and he finds himself needing to make some big decisions on how to start a relationship with her. The film is intentionally drab in its look, with all of the actors delivering their lines with nearly no emotion. The effect is just plain nasty, a scathing indictment on a society that puts too much pressure on individuals to become couples. It’s often extremely funny, with an equal amount of necessary unpleasantness.

3

The Nice Guys

4

Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping

2

X-Men: Apocalypse

Shane Black, director of the classic Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and the very good Iron Man 3, returns to film noir with The Nice Guys, a grimy detective story starring Ryan Gosling and Russell Crowe. The movie is good. Just good. It’s often so good, it’s painful to witness the moments that don’t work. Crowe plays Jackson Healy, an L.A. loser who takes punching requests from people. Folks pay him to rough up child molesters, for the most part. He gets an assignment from Amelia (Margaret Qualley), who wants him to pay a visit to private detective Holland March (Gosling), a visit that turns out to be hilariously infused with comic violence. Holland and Jackson wind up working on a case together, one that involves Amelia, a dead porn star, and a gun for hire named John Boy (Matt Bomer, relishing the chance to be super nasty). When Gosling and Crowe are allowed to go off, the movie purrs on all cylinders. It’s when Black’s script (co-written with Anthony Bagarozzi) leads to a conspiracy involving Amelia’s mother, played by Kim Basinger, that it stalls out. That’s mainly because Basinger is tone-deaf in this film.

It’s been nine years since the comedy trio Lonely Island—Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone and Akiva Schaffer—made its cinematic debut with the now cult fave Hot Rod. Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping gives them a chance to play in their favorite sandbox: the music world. The results are what feel like the first fully realized Lonely Island movie. Given how damn funny the movie is, let’s hope there are many more to follow. All three members of the Lonely Island contribute as writers and performers, while Taccone and Schaffer handle directing chores. The movie goes along the mockumentary route, clearly spoofing all of those bio films from the likes of Justin Bieber, the Jonas Brothers and Katy Perry. Samberg headlines as Conner 4 Real, a former member of the boy band/rap group the Style Boyz, who has gone his own way with a successful solo career. After that initial success, Conner’s latest solo album is tanking—Rolling Stone rated it a shit emoji—and his career handling has entered the panic phase. He goes on tour with an opening act that’s better than him. He gets sponsored by appliances that play his music when you operate them. And he basically sells out like a whore.

After scoring a huge critical and box office success with X-Men: Days of Future Past, Bryan Singer’s triumphant return to the franchise, 20th Century Fox wisely brought the director back for this one. However, in a move that induces head scratching, Fox cut the budget for the current installment, while padding the cast and upping the action quotient. Actually, this is the studio that screwed up Fantastic Four, so maybe the shortchanging of a reliable franchise isn’t all that surprising. There are portions of the movie that are sloppier than the usual Singer offerings, and quite a few moments have cut-rate CGI. The flaws eventually pile up, and while there are some nice, enjoyable stretches, it’s a bit of a mess in the end—despite powerful work from Michael Fassbender as Magneto and new-to-thefranchise Oscar Isaac as the menacing villain Apocalypse. Before the opening credits, which look like shit, we get a quick back story for Apocalypse. En Sabah Nur (Isaac), an ancient Egyptian, merges with some sort of ancient mystical being, thus becoming the world’s first mutant, or something like that. He’s then buried under a crushed pyramid for centuries. What follows are too many characters demanding subplots and, ultimately, the worst chapter in the X-Men franchise.


Sea legs Seas & Centuries It’s been just over five years since Seas & Centuries released its first EP, Until December. Each of the three by Jeri EPs that followed reveals a key Chadwell-Singley element in the band’s evolution. Seas & Centuries’ ambient-meetsj eri c@ news r eview.c om alternative rock by way of shoegaze sound has been gradually slowing down—stretching and settling into a more spacious place. This change in pace is echoed in the band’s latest project, a full-length album they’ve been working on for months and likely won’t release until autumn.

PHOTO/JERI CHADWELL-SINGLEY

guitar at my house or anything like I normally would and generated ideas,” Hay said. “It’s all been here, off the floor.” Writing an album in the studio is somewhat easier when the band’s practice space doubles as a recording studio, which is the case for Seas & Centuries, whose bassist, Colin Christian, is the head engineer at the Sound Saloon recording studio on Fourth Street. He’s been engineering and mixing for Seas & Centuries since early in the band’s development and will fulfill this role again on the new album. His position as bassist for the band, however, is newer and began as a sort of marriage of convenience. “It’s exhausting to try to find a lot of people, and Colin knows music, so we asked him to play bass with us,” Hay explained. The lines between the sometimes monthslong writing process and the subsequent recording process—which for an average local band may often be constrained to a matter of days in order to control costs—are blurred. “We’ve all done the thing where we go and lock ourselves in the studio somewhere, and you make the record,” Christian said. “It always comes up short. … With something like this, everyone can kind of just be. You live in the moment. You capture the moment. Maybe that moment sucked. Maybe you don’t realize it for another two weeks. We can fix that. We have that liberty to actually experiment, which brings out cooler things, because there’s less to lose in the moment.” The guys aren’t currently planning to play any concerts or debut any new music before the album release. For Hay, the downtime is a welcome reprieve. “You know, the longer I’ve done this, the more I realize that I don’t want to play shows in Reno three times a month because it’s just overkill, and that would mean that I’m doing the exact same thing over and over and over for people,” he said. Ω

“We’re moving more to a kind of empty-room sound, I guess,” said drummer Andrew Sherbondy. “We have a lot of layers that are still taking place, but we’re looking more for a kind of emptiness in the sound at the same time. … All the music we love—it’s so simple and thoughtful, and I think we’re trying to go for that without losing kind of the core of what Seas & Centuries really was, so expanding but still remembering the roots.” Those roots lie with guitarist and vocalists Alex Hay, Seas & Centuries’ only remaining founding member. “When I first started doing this … a lot of it felt progressive, like, there’s 50 parts jammed in a song,” Hay explained. “Did they work together? Sure. But I’ve just fallen in love so much more with a good song and trying to improve on that end, as far as writing a good song rather than just putting as much cool stuff in it as you can.” Hay’s approach to good songwriting also requires taking more time with the writing process. “That’s what’s been really interesting this time, on this cycle, is I basically have not played any

Seas & Centuries, Andrew Sherbondy, Alex Hay and Colin Christian, have slowed down their sound—and their recording schedule.

Visit http:// seasandcenturies.com.

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THURSDAY 6/16

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125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

YourDay Karaoke w/DJ Manny, 9pm, no cover

The Whiskey Haulers, 9pm, no cover

Black Market III, 9pm, no cover

5 STAR SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Kimmies Shimmy: Elektro Specter, DJ Izer, DJ Heidalicious, 10pm, $5

DJ Izer, 10pm, $5 after 10pm

BAR OF AMERICA

Rustler’s Moon, 8:30pm, no cover

Paul Covarelli, 9pm, no cover

Paul Covarelli, 9pm, no cover

132 West St., (775) 329-2878

The Killers June 16, 9 p.m. Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. 789-2000

SATURDAY 6/18

10042 Donner Pass Rd., Truckee; (530) 587-2626

Clémon Charles, 4pm, no cover

Reno’s Daze Crew, 9pm, no cover

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

CEOL IRISH PUB

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Liam Kyle Cahill, 9pm, no cover

After Eights, 6pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY ELBOW ROOM BAR

2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-9799 846 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 355-7711

Mojo Green, 6pm, no cover

Nevada Storm Fundraiser w/Blackwater, 6pm, no cover

Open Mic Jam Slam w/Adrian Diijon, 9pm, Tu, Karaoke Nite, 9pm, W, no cover

Heidi Incident, 8pm, no cover

Canyon White Open Mic Night, 8pm, no cover

Electric Catfish, 8pm, no cover Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Mrs. Magician, Applied Ethics, Snack, 8pm, $5

Nick Meza + Tarzan Benefit Crawl, 8pm, $10

June & July Showtimes ee W a

k

!

7 Da y s

RN&R   | | 24  | | RN&R 24

JUNE 16, 2016 JUNE 16, 2016

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover Dave Leather, noon, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Nitesong Productions, 9pm, Tu, Border Line Fine, 9:30pm, W, no cover

HIMMEL HAUS

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Fossils, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088 3372 S. McCarran Blvd., (775) 825-1988

James McMurtry, Max Gomez, 8pm, Tu, $32

Strictly Business, 7:30pm, no cover

HANGAR BAR

HELLFIRE SALOON

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

Lisa Marie, 6pm, no cover Chaz O’Neill Band, 9:30pm, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

GREAT BASIN BREWING CO.

Kelly Ann Miller, 9pm, no cover

World Dance Open Floor, 8pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, W, no cover

SundaYze: Brunch and live jazz w/Reno Jazz Syndicate, noon, no cover

CARGO AT WHITNEY PEAK HOTEL

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St., Carson City, 882-1626: Patrick Garrity, F, 7:30pm, $13-$15 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Vince Morris, Jen Murphy, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; John Melendez, Frances Dilorinzo, Tu-W, 9pm, $25 Laugh Factory at Silver Legacy Resort Casino, 407 N. Virginia St., 325-7401: John Wesley Austin, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $21.95; F-Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $27.45; Johnny Sanchez, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $21.95 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Patrick Garrity, Th, 8pm, $8$10; F, 9pm, $14-$18; Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $14-$18

Free-Spin Sundays w/DJ Zoiree, 5pm, no cover

901 S. Center St., (775) 348-8888 425 S. Virginia St., (775) 432-1633

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/20-6/22

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

BRASSERIE ST. JAMES

THE BRIDGE RESTAURANT & BAR

Comedy

SUNDAY 6/19

VICE w/Game Genie, Max Kronyak, Zepra, others, 10pm, no cover

SHINE BRIGHT, FOR THOSE SEARCHING, FTHC w/special guests DJ'S GIVE UP THE GHOST Doors 7pm- $5.00 • June 16th FRONT ROOm SHOw: SALYTHIAN, ALTA LUNA , PURGE THE PERFECT DOORS 6:30 $5.00 BACk ROOm SHOw: FERNANDO ISAIAH, DAVID JAmES, STUN'Em, JAmES X DEX. Doors 6pm- FREE SHOW! • June 17th HOLY wHITE HOUNDS Doors 7pm- $10.45 • June 21st HEmLOCk, LAVISH GREEN, ANGERHEAD, FROm THE RUINS Doors 7pm- $15.00 • June 24th SPECIAL SPCA BENEFIT SHOw w/mAN THE TANkS, FOR THOSE SEARCHING, THE RETRIBUTIONERS, PONGUESTIBE Doors 6pm- $5 • June 25th COOLIO THE UNDERDOG July 2nd I SET mY FRIENDS ON FIRE Swmrs w/Party Baby July 13th SUBHUmANS September 11th

Summer Cannibals, California, Gosh!, 8pm, Tu, $5-$7


THURSDAY 6/16

FRIDAY 6/17

SATURDAY 6/18

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 1) Showroom 2) Bar Room

SUNDAY 6/19

1) Prozak, 7:30pm, $18 2) The Lives We Live, 10pm, $5

2) Daikaiju, 10pm, $TBA

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/20-6/22

1) Chrch, Colombian Necktie, 8pm, $5

THE JUNGLE

1) Bad Cop/Bad Cop, 9pm, M, $10, Ill Nino, 7pm, Tu, $18 2) Drink Fight Thugs, 8pm, Tu, $5 Outspoken: Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

THE LOVING CUP

Live jazz, 8pm, no cover

MIDTOWN WINE BAR

Crush, 7:30pm, no cover

Jason King, 9pm, no cover

Musicole, 8pm, no cover

MOODY’S BISTRO BAR & BEATS

Chuck Hughes Trio, 8pm, no cover

George Souza Trio, 8:30pm, no cover

George Souza Trio, 8:30pm, no cover

Dale Poune, 5pm, no cover

Karaoke, 5pm, no cover

188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480 1527 S. Virginia St., (775) 800-1960 10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688

MUSTANG RANCH STEAKHOUSE & HUNTERS LOUNGE/BAR

Tandymonium, 6:30pm, Tu, no cover Jamie Rollins, 7pm, W, no cover

June 18, 7:30 p.m. Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor 71 S. Wells Ave. 384-1652

5 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-4188

PADDY & IRENE’S IRISH PUB

906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484

Acoustic Wonderland singer-songwriter showcase, 8pm, no cover

U Play Wednesday (open mic jam), 8pm, W, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Johnny Lipka’s Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Johnny Lipka’s Gemini, 9pm, no cover

THE SAINT

DJ Tigerbunny, 9pm, no cover

Los Pistoleros, 9pm, no cover

SHEA’S TAVERN

715 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-4774

Valient Thorr, Pears, Thunderhead, Misfritz, 9pm, $15

SPARKS LOUNGE

Chili Sauce, 9pm, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864 761 S. Virginia St., (775) 221-7451

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 409-3340

St. Christopher Project, 6pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, W, no cover Gygax, Strange Weather, 9pm, Tu, donations

Hollywood Trashed, 9pm, no cover

SPECTRE RECORDS

James McMurtry

Nick Meza + Tarzan Benefit Crawl, 8pm, $10

1336 S. Wells Ave., (775) 409-4085

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Saturday Night Dance Party, 9pm, no cover

Tuesday Trivia, Tu, 8pm, no cover

STUDIO ON 4TH

Dust in my Coffee, Silverwing, 8pm, $5

Matthew Azrieli, Low La La, Given My Goodbye, Britt Straw, 8pm, Tu, $5

WHISKEY DICK’S SALOON

Dead Lifeboats, Ninja Slaughterhouse, 9pm, no cover

Josh Clemens, 9pm, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

DJ Grey Grey, 9pm, no cover

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 737-9776 2660 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 544-3425

WILD RIVER GRILLE

Tyler Stafford, 6pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

Prozak

Eric Andersen, 6pm, no cover

Erika Paul, 2pm, no cover Milton Merlos, 6pm, no cover

Alex Muddy Smith, 6pm, no cover

WILDFLOWER VILLAGE

June 21, 8 p.m. Cargo 255 N. Virginia St. 398-5400

Joel Ackerson, 6pm, M, Mel Wade & Gia, 6pm, Tu, Milton Merlos, 6pm, W, no cover 1) Comedy Power Hour Open Mic, 8pm, Tu, no cover

4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769 1) Golden Rose Cafe 2) Green Fairy Pub 3) Cabaret

Pops On The River goes from Broadway to Hollywood for its 22nd year! Dive into your favorite themed attire and enjoy this year’s mix of friends, food and fun. Guest performers will take center stage as Maestro Laura Jackson conducts the Reno Phil, creating a memorable night filled with outstanding music and song. Don’t miss this evening of Broadway hits and Hollywood glamour!

SATURDAY JULY 9, 2016

POPS FROM F ROM TO

OPINION OPINION

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NEWS NEWS

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GREEN GREEN

FEATURE STORY STORY | | FEATURE

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ARTS&CULTURE ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF OF THE THE STATE STATE ART

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FOODFINDS | | FOODFINDS

FILM FILM

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Seats are on sale now! Call 775-323-6393 or visit RenoPhil.com RN&R | | 25 | | NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS | | THIS THIS WEEK WEEK | | MISCELLANY MISCELLANY | | JUNE JUNE 16, 16, 2016 2016 || RN&R 25

MUSICBEAT MUSICBEAT


THURSDAY 6/16

FRIDAY 6/17

SATURDAY 6/18

SUNDAY 6/19

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/20-6/22

2) Joey Carmon Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Joey Carmon Band, 4pm, no cover American Made Band, 10pm, no cover

2) Joey Carmon Band, 4pm, no cover American Made Band, 10pm, no cover

2) American Made Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Swinging Chads, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 5pm, no cover Stephen Lord, 9pm, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 5pm, no cover Stephen Lord, 9pm, no cover

2) Crush, 6pm, no cover

2) Tandymonium, 6pm, M, no cover Jason King, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Armer & The Hot Dogs, 8pm, no cover

2) Armer & The Hot Dogs, 8pm, no cover

2) Jonathan Barton, 6pm, no cover

2) Jonathan Barton, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Funky Meters, 7 Come 11, 9pm, $27-$32

2) Aux, Little Miss Mixer, DZL, 10pm, no cover

1) Donavon Frankenreiter, Tom Curren, 9pm, $17-$20

1) Rock of Ages, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) The Money Shot, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Rock of Ages, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) The Money Shot, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ Roni V, 9pm, no cover

1) Rock of Ages, 7pm, 9:30pm, $24.95+ 2) The Money Shot, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Live country bands, 9pm, no cover

1) Rock of Ages, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) The Money Shot, 10:30pm, no cover

1) The Killers, 9pm, $69.50

2) Lex Fridays, 10pm, $15

2) Lex Saturdays, 10pm, $15 3) Country Nights w/DJ Colt Ainsworth, 10pm, no cover

2) Dance Bootcamp with Eric & Corrie, 6pm, Tu, $15

1) Alex Ramon IMPOSSIBLE, 7:30pm, $29.35

1) Alex Ramon IMPOSSIBLE, 7:30pm, $29.35 2) DJ Twyman, DJ JosBeatz, 10pm, $20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

1) Alex Ramon IMPOSSIBLE, 7:30pm, $29.35 2) DJ Loczi, DJ Rick Gee, 10pm, $20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

1) Alex Ramon IMPOSSIBLE, 7:30pm, Tu, W, $29.35 3) Live blues w/Buddy Emmer Band and guest, 8pm, Tu, no cover

1) Petty vs. Eagles: A Musical Shootout, 8pm, $27-$37 2) Terry Stokes Hypnolarious, 10pm, $30 3) Take 2, 9pm, no cover

1) Petty vs. Eagles, 8pm, $27-$37 2) Terry Stokes Hypnolarious, 10pm, $30 3) Take 2, 9pm, no cover 4) Kim Emmer Blues Band, 7pm, no cover

1) The Bacon Brothers, 8pm, $40-$50 2) JKC Band, 8pm, no cover 4) The Killer Dueling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

2) Jason King, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 7pm, no cover 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Celebrity Showroom 2) Nugget Grand Ballroom Johnny Young Band, 9pm, no cover 3) Gilley’s

3) DJ/dancing, 8pm, no cover Johnny Young Band, 9pm, no cover

1) Heart and Sole Dance Academy: Follow Your Heart Beats, 4pm, $20 3) DJ/dancing, 8pm, no cover 3) Johnny Young Band, 9pm, no cover

1) Key To Broadway, 6pm, $TBA 3) DJ/dancing, 6pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 6pm, W, no cover

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

2) Frankie Boots and the County Line, 8pm, no cover 3) The Latin Dance Social, 7:30pm, $10

2) Frankie Boots and the County Line, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ Spryte, 10pm, $20

2) Erica Sunshine Lee, 6pm, no cover

2) Erica Sunshine Lee, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Justin Lee, 8pm, no cover

1) Justin Lee, 8pm, no cover

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA

3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

BOOMTOWN CASINO HOTEL

2100 Garson Rd., Verdi; (775) 345-6000 1) Event Center 2) Guitar Bar

Funky Meters

CARSON VALLEY INN CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO RESORT CASINO 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Theater 2) Brew Brothers 3) NoVi

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2) DJ Mike Fusion, Jon Wilkes, 10pm, 3) Country Nights w/DJ Colt Ainsworth, 2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) Lex Nightclub 3) Sports Book $TBA 3) Country Nights, 10pm, no cover 10pm, no cover

Karaoke

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

CBQ, 1330 Scheels Drive, Ste. 250, Sparks, 359-1109: Karaoke w/Larry Williams, Th, 6pm, no cover Corkscroo Bar & Pizzeria, 10 E. Ninth St., 284-7270: Cash Karaoke w/Jacques, W, 6pm, no cover La Morena Bar, 2140 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 772-2475: College Nite/Karaoke, F, 7pm, no cover Murphy’s Law Irish Pub, 180 W. Peckham Lane, Ste. 1070, 823-9977: Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, H&T Mobile Productions, F, 10pm, no cover The Man Cave Sports Bar, 4600 N. Virginia St., 499-5322: Karaoke, Sa, 8pm, no cover The Point, 1601 S. Virginia St., 322-3001: Karaoke, Th-Sa, 8:30pm; Su, 6pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Ste. 103, Sparks, 356-6000: F-Sa, 9pm, no cover West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

RN&R  | | 26  | | RN&R 26

2) Armer & The Hot Dogs,

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 7pm, no cover 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) TJ’s Corral

June 17, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

JUNE 16, 2016 JUNE 16, 2016

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub 3) Center Stage Lounge

HARRAH’S RENO

1) Petty vs. Eagles: A Musical Shootout, 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 8pm, $27-$37 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Showroom 2) HQ Center Bar 3) Opal Ultra Lounge 4) Blu

2) Karaoke w/Dreu Murin, 10pm, no cover

NUGGET CASINO RESORT

2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge

2) Frankie Boots and the County Line, 7pm, no cover

1) Rock of Ages, 7pm, Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Left of Centre, 10:30pm, W, no cover

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL 345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Copa Bar & Grill 3) The Tent 4) Pool

4) Wednesday Blues Jam Pool Party, 6pm, W, no cover


For a complete listing of this week’s events or to post events to our online calendar, visit www.newsreview.com.

Events

ONE FOUND SOUND WOODWIND QUINTET: Tahoe Chamber Music Society presents the Bay Area-based ensemble. Su, 6/19, 2:30pm. Free. St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church, 341 Village Blvd., Incline Village, (775) 298-0075.

39 NORTH MARKETPLACE: The marketplace showcases the best in arts and crafts and highlights produce and specialty food from the Truckee Meadows. Th, 4-9pm through 8/4. Victorian Square, 14th Street and Pyramid Way along Victorian Avenue, Sparks, (775) 690-2581, www.39northdowntown.com.

SLAVIC SOUL PARTY!: The nine-member ensemble plays an acoustic mash-up of Balkan and Gypsy sounds with North American musical traditions. Sa, 6/18, 8pm. Free. Oats Park, Center and East Park streets, Fallon, (775) 423-1440.

BEYOND THE ARCHES WALKING TOUR: This tour links the downtown Reno arches with stories of the forces that shaped the town. Walk in the footsteps of Bill Harrah, Myron Lake, Baby Face Nelson, Frederic DeLongchamps and others. Register online. Sa, 6/18, 9-11am. $10; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection), 10 S. Lake St., www.historicreno.org.

SUMMER FREEDOM MUSIC FESTIVAL: Morris Hotel holds its official summer kick-off party featuring performances by Blackwater, Anchors For Airplanes, Krosphyer, Lethal Gospel, among others. Sa, 6/18, 11am. $20 at the door. Morris Burner Hotel, 400 E. Fourth St., (775) 327-1171.

TOCCATA SUMMER MUSICFEST: TOCCATA kicks off its 11th Summer MusicFest with “Go4Baroque—Summer Solstice Series.” The program features works by Bach, Vivaldi and Fasch. F, 6/17, 7pm. First United Methodist Church, 209 W. First St.; 6/19, 4pm. $5-$35, free for youth under age 19 in nonpreferred seating. St. Theresa’s Church, 1041 Lyons Ave., South Lake Tahoe, (775) 313-9697.

CARSON TAHOE RENO ROCKABILLY RIOT: The sixth annual celebration of cars, rockabilly music and lifestyle features a car show, drag races, body paint expo, tattoo show, burn outs, pinup contest, burlesque show, live music and more. Th-Su through 6/26. Opens 6/23. Mills Park, 1111 E. William St., Carson City, (775) 291-5008.

2016 Great Race

DASH FOR DADS: The third annual

FEED THE CAMEL: The Hump Day food truck event and arts bazaar takes place under the Keystone Bridge. W, 5-8pm through 9/28. Free admission. McKinley Arts & Culture Center, 925 Riverside Drive, (775) 450-0062.

THE GREAT ELDORADO BBQ, BREWS AND BLUES FESTIVAL: Eldorado Resort Casino’s annual festival is equal parts barbecue block party, microbrewtasting event with more than 50 microbrews from around the world, and a music festival with two stages featuring rock and blues acts. The Gin Blossoms and Everclear headline this year’s musical lineup. F, 6/17, noon8pm; Sa, 6/18, noon-8pm. Free admission. Eldorado Resort Casino, 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700.

NEVADA HUMANITIES FESTIVAL AND CHAUTAUQUA: The theme of the

NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY SPECIAL EVENT: Nevadans who made history by their service and stature will be celebrated at a special event at the Nevada Historical Society. The reception is free. Museum admission fees apply to other attractions. Th, 6/16, 5:30-7pm. $5 adults, free for members, children age 17 and younger. Nevada Historical Society, 1650 N. Virginia St., (775) 688-1190 ext. 221.

FEATURE STORY

melodrama presented with steampunk flair. W-Sa, 7:30pm through 6/25.

Opens 6/16; Sa, 2pm through 6/25. Opens 6/18. $15 in advance, $20 at the door.

Laughing Owl Productions, 75 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-9967.

LIGHTS OUT: Marvin Gonzalez’s play explores a world in the midst of a natural disaster that has taken out all electricity. Four people thrown together on a ranch in Elko during the blackout question God, their pasts and ultimately reality. Is this just a blackout or something more sinister?

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ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

US OPEN OF WATERCROSS: Some of the best watercross riders in the world will vie for the title of US Open of Watercross Champion. Sa, 6/18, 9:15am8:30pm; Su, 6/19, 9:15am-2pm. Free. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive, Sparks, http://prowatercross.com.

VALHALLA ART, MUSIC AND THEATRE FESTIVAL: The 34th annual celebration of music, theater and the visual arts begins in mid-June with events and activities that continue through August. Events take place in the Boathouse Theater, the Valhalla Grand Hall and the Grand Lawn. M-Su through 8/31. Opens 6/22. Prices vary. Tallac Historic Site, 1 Valhalla Road, South Lake Tahoe, (530) 541-4975, http://valhallatahoe.com.

person. Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 329-0661.

MAXBETH: Merry War Theatre Group presents its post-apocalyptic, Mad Max-inspired take on William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. This show is not recommend for young children. F-Su, 7-10pm through 6/27. $5 suggested donation. Lear Theater, 528 W. First St., (775) 848-9892, www.merrywar.com.

MR. BURNS: A POST-ELECTRIC PLAY: Brüka Theatre presents this dark comedy/musical written by Anne Washburn. Th, 6/16, 8pm; F, 6/17, 8pm;

Sa, 6/18, 8pm; W, 6/22, 8pm; Th, 6/23, 8pm; F, 6/24, 8pm; Sa, 6/25, 8pm. $20-

$25. Brüka Theatre, 99 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-3221, www.bruka.org.

STEWART FATHER’S DAY POW WOW: Celebrate Native Indian heritage, history and pride at the annual Father’s Day weekend pow wow. There will be more than 200 dancers, over 25 arts and crafts vendors, food, exhibits and more. The pow wow benefits the establishment of the Stewart Indian School Cultural Center. Grand entry is at 7pm on Friday, 1pm and 7pm on Saturday and at noon on Sunday. F-Su through 6/19. Opens 6/17. Free. Stewart Indian School, 5500 Snyder Ave., Carson City, (775) 687-8333.

begins on June 16 with the Cattle Drive arriving at the rodeo grounds and continues later that evening with PRCA Xtreme Bulls, a night of professional bull riding in which 40 cowboys compete for $40,000 cash. The 10-day event continues through June 25 with PRCA events including bareback, saddle bronc, bull riding, women’s professional barrel racing, team roping, steer wrestling and tie-down roping. The Reno Rodeo parade begins at 10am on June 18 and will travel through Midtown on Virginia Street from Arroyo Street to California Avenue. M-Su through 6/25. Opens 6/16. $8-$26 advance tickets. Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, 1350 N. Wells Ave., www.renorodeo.com.

room and make a show at various downtown venues during the 10th annual event. Th-Su through Su, 6/21. Free admission. Locations vary, http://nadadadamotel.weebly.com.

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pating Riverwalk District merchants on Wine Walk day and receive a wine glass, a map of Wine Walk merchants and a wristband that allows you to sample wine at any participating merchant. Third Sa of every month, 2-5pm through 4/15. $20. The Riverwalk District, downtown Reno along the Riverwalk, (775) 825-9255.

RENO RODEO: The 98th annual rodeo

NADA DADA 2016: Local artists get a

GREEN

RENO WINE WALK: Visit any of the partici-

seats; $50 for June 21 VIP event. Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, (775) 784-6587, www.nevadahumanities.org.

trunk event features family-friendly activities, entertainment and more. Th, 5-9pm through 9/29. Free admission. Rounds Bakery, 294 E. Moana Lane, Ste. 10, (775) 329-0800.

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The gourmet street food event features more than 20 gourmet food, craft dessert, beer, wine and mixed drink vendors. Local musicians provide free live entertainment each week. F, 5-9pm through 9/30. Free admission. Idlewild Park, 1900 Idlewild Drive, (775) 825-2665.

Tu, 6/21, 6pm; W, 6/22, 6pm; Th, 6/23, 6pm. $25 general admission, $10 lawn

MOANA FOOD TRUCK ROUNDUP: The food

NEWS

THE DRUNKARD: An original American

—Kelley Lang

RENO STREET FOOD—PARTY IN THE PARK:

25th annual Chautauqua festival is “Culture of Food.” This year’s event kicks off with “Day of Young Chautauqua” on June 19, featuring performances by the Great Basin Young Chautauquans. Admission is free. The festival continues with a VIP event “The Stories of César Chávez” on June 21. Other programs include “Science and Storytelling” on June 22 and “At the King’s Table—Henry VIII and Food” on June 23. Live musical performances precede the program at 6pm. The Chautauquan presentations follow at 7pm. Su, 6/19, 9am-2pm;

ing stroll along the Truckee River from the McKinley Arts & Culture Center to the Lear Theater reveals eclectic architecture grounded by rich political histories and spiced with colorful anecdotes. Register online. Tu, 6/21, 6-8pm. $10; free for Historic Reno Preservation Society members. McKinley Arts & Culture Center, 925 Riverside Drive, www.historicreno.org.

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Onstage

Th, 6/16, 7:30pm; F, 6/17, 7:30pm; Sa, 6/18, 7:30pm; Su, 6/19, 2pm. $10 per

HISTORIC TRUCKEE RIVER WALK: A relax-

OPINION

with the lowest score wins the race. The 2,400mile race begins on June 18 in San Rafael, California, and finishes on June 26 in Moline, Illinois. On Day Two, the rally will make an overnight stop in Reno. Cars will arrive in one-minute intervals over a two-hour span starting at 4:15 p.m. on Sunday, June 19, arriving at the National Automobile Museum, 10 S. Lake St. The public is invited to see the cars up close and talk with race participants during the free event. Call 333-9300 or visit www.greatrace.com.

The 33rd annual event brings together 120 of the world’s finest collector cars—model year 1972 and older—for a week-long time/distance/ endurance rally across the United States. This year, the route travels parts of the Lincoln Highway in six states, including California, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Iowa and Illinois. Each day of the race, the driver and navigator of each vehicle are given precise instructions that they must follow down to the second. They are scored at secret check points along the way and are penalized one second if they are too early or too late. The team

Father’s Day Dash is a 5K run/walk to raise money for local cancer patients’ medical expenses. Su, 6/19, 8am. $40 for 5K run, 2-mile walk. $10 for kids. Sparks Marina Park, 300 Howard Drive, Sparks, (775) 420-7944.

THURSDAY DOWNTOWN FARMERS MARKET: Local vendors will converge under the large tent in the Sands parking lot located south of Third Street in Reno. The event includes free live classic rock concerts, food trucks and weekly summer games. Th, 4-9pm through 8/25. Free. Sands Regency Casino Hotel, 345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2295.

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Music THE HOLD UP: The San Jose band’s music incorporates elements of reggae, hip hop, pop and indie. F, 6/17, 6-10pm. Free. Brewery Arts Center, 449 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 883-1976.

Classes EMPIRE IMPROV: WEEKLY DROP-IN CLASS: Open to all levels. Classes will differ each week working on different skills.

Su, 7:30-9:30pm through 8/28. Opens 6/19. $15. The Potentialist Workshop,

836 E. Second St., (530) 414-0050, http://empireimprov.com.

MUSIC ON THE BEACH 2016 SUMMER CONCERTS: Free live music performances featuring a variety of genres on the North Shore of Lake Tahoe. Concerts take place at Kings Beach State Recreation Area and start at 6:30pm (6pm on Aug. 19, Aug. 26 and Sept. 2). F, 6:30-9pm through 9/2. Opens 6/17. Free. Kings Beach State Recreation Area, 8318 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, (530) 546-9000, www.northtahoebusiness.org.

SPOON CARVING: Using traditional Japanese tools, participants will learn how to design, carve and hollow out the bowl of the spoon, as well as sand and finish the piece. W, 6/22, 11am-3pm. $48. Atelier Truckee, 10128 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, (530) 386-2700.

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Someday, her prince will run I’m a single woman in my 40s. It’s been ages since I’ve seriously dated anyone. People tell me that I seem “closed off.” I don’t want to be, but I worry that I’ll get into another relationship that ends badly. I don’t want to die alone, but I just don’t think I can survive another heartbreak. My dad loves quoting that FDR line, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” Sorry, Pops, but that’s ridiculous. There are things to fear in life. A couple of examples that spring to mind: 1. A hug from the lady at work who just got back from vacationing in Ebola territory. 2. Being in immediate need of lifesaving surgery and waking up to your drunken neighbor operating on you with salad utensils and a steak knife. However, it turns out that there’s a next part to that “fear itself” line—explaining that the problematic kind of fear is “nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.” Perhaps that sounds familiar? And granted, when love packs its bags, leaving you with just a few empty hangers swinging in your closet where your man’s shirts used to be, it’s normal to come undone for a while—perhaps spending some time lying on the bathroom floor in an evening dress and breakfasting on Froot Loops a la vodka. However, what’s also normal is recovering from heartbreak. Grief researcher George Bonanno explains that while therapists and self-help books portray grief after a loss as a paralyzing sadness that people are unable to survive without professional help, this isn’t how he finds it affects most of us. In fact, he says we are wired to be resilient—to pull ourselves out of our misery hole and get on with things. What helps in this, Bonanno explains, is “hardiness.” Research by clinical psychologist Salvatore Maddi finds that hardiness involves three interrelated attitudes—a desire to engage with people and life (rather than detach and isolate yourself), a belief in taking action to make things better (rather than sinking into “passivity and powerlessness”) and a willingness to face stressful stuff and use it as a learning experience—transforming personal disasters into personal growth. Even if the behaviors that make up hardiness don’t come naturally to you, they’re there for the taking. So, yes, heartbreak will be painful, but hardiness is a shovel you can use to dig yourself out. What you don’t get to do is make the bratty demand, “I want love without hurt or

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disappointment!” You can fill up your life so it won’t be so empty if somebody leaves you and get comfy with the hard truth: Having love is no guarantee that you won’t “die alone”—choking on a chicken bone just as your beloved’s gone out the door all, “Wow, double coupon day at the Quik Sak! Be right back, loverbunny!”

Wow or never There are two women who arouse mega-chemistry in me when we hug, talk, etc. Unfortunately, neither is available. Though I’m basically attracted to the woman I’m dating (meaning she’s the right height, weight, hair color, etc.), I don’t feel those highs with her. So, my question is, can I make a go of this relationship even though I lack the tingly zest I have with the taken ladies? Can you “make a go” of this relationship? Of course you can! Before you know it, you’ll be booking one of those romantic weekend getaway packages to try to rekindle that magical indifference you felt at the start. Unfortunately, you can’t work up to lusting after a woman, like by making your libido do pushups over her picture. We seem to have evolved to be subconsciously drawn to the smell of certain people—those who have immune system genes different from ours, with whom we’d make a baby with a broader set of defenses against icky parasites and disease. Men, in particular, evolved to be hot for features that reflect high fertility, like a small waist, big eyes and big pillowy lips. The right smell and physical features flick the “on” switch in what affective neuroscientist Jaak Panksepp calls your “seeking system,” sending you signals (in the form of “tingly zest”)—much like a sign spinner holding up a big arrow, “Your penis here!” No, obviously, you can’t have it all, but you have to have enough of it all—enough of the hots for a woman, along with the hots for who she is as a human being. This isn’t to say there won’t be issues in bed, but you’re more likely to solve them if the licensed professional best suited to help you is not the corner taxidermist.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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predictions for the next 15 months are a blend of hopeful optimism and a reasonable interpretation of the astrological omens. Here we go: (1) You will have an excellent chance to smooth and soothe the rough spots in your romantic karma. (2) You will outgrow any addiction you might have to frustrating connections. (3) Unrequited love will either be requited, or else you’ll become bored with the futile chase and move on. (4) You’ll be challenged to either refresh and reinvent an existing intimacy, or else get shrewd enough not to repeat past mistakes in a new intimacy. (5) You will have an abundance of good ideas about how to install the theme of smart fun at the heart of your strongest alliances.

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to an old Chinese proverb, if you want to get rich, you must have a nickname. My meditations on your future suggest that this curious formula may have some validity. The next 15 months will be a favorable time to attend to the groundwork that will ultimately increase your wealth. And your luck in doing this work is likely to be oddly good if you add a frisky tweak to your identity—such as a zesty new nickname, for example. I suggest you stay away from clichés like Ace or Vixen or Sharpie, as well as off-putting ironic monikers like Poker Face and Stonewall. Instead, gravitate toward lively choices like Dazzler, FluxLuster, Hoochie-Coochie or FreeBorn.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): During the next

15 months, you will have an unprecedented chance to materialize a fantasy you’ve harbored for years. Essential to your efforts will be a capacity to summon more ambition than you ever have before. I’m not talking about the grubby self-promotion that typically passes for ambition, however. Arrogant self-importance and selfish posturing will not be part of your winning formula. Rather, the kind of ambition I’m referring to is a soaring aspiration that seeks the best and highest not just for yourself but for everyone whose life you touch. I mean the holy hunger that drives you to express impeccable integrity as you seek to master the tasks you came to Earth to accomplish. Get started!

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next 15 months, composting should be a primary practice, as well as a main metaphor. If you have been lazy about saving leftover scraps from your kitchen and turning them into fertilizer, now is an excellent time to intensify your efforts. The same is true if you have been lax about transforming your pain into useful lessons that invigorate your lust for life. Be ever-alert for opportunities to capitalize on junk, muck and slop. Find secret joy in creating unexpected treasure out of old failures and wrong turns.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Have you ever made a fool of yourself while trying to fulfill your deepest yearnings? I hope so. If you haven’t, your yearnings probably aren’t deep enough. Most of us, on multiple occasions, have pursued our longings for connection with such unruly intensity that we have made foggy decisions and engaged in questionable behavior. That’s the weird news. The good news is that now and then, the impulse to leave our safety zone in a quest to quench our deepest yearnings can actually make us smarter and more effective. I believe this is one of those times for you.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Dur-

ing the next 13 months, what can you do to enhance your ability to be the boss of yourself? What practices can you engage in on a daily basis that will build your potency and authority and clout? How can you gain access to more of the helpers and resources you need to carry out your life’s master plan? These are excellent questions to ask yourself every day between now and July 2017. It’s time to find or create your ultimate power spot.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The

prison population in the U.S. is over 2 million, more than twice what it was in 1990. In contrast, Canada keeps about 41,000 people in jail, Italy 52,000, and France 66,000. That’s the bad news. The good news, at least for you and your tribe, is that a relatively small percentage of you will be incarcerated during the next 15 months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Aquarians all over the world will specialize in liberation. Not only will you be extra ethical; not only will you be skillful at evading traps; you will also be adept at emancipating yourself from your own delusions and limitations. Congratulations in advance! It’s time to start singing some new freedom songs.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The English

word “catharsis” is derived from the ancient Greek katharsis, which was a technical medical term that meant “purgation” or “purification,” as in flushing out the bowels. Aristotle converted katharsis into a metaphor that described how a drama performed in the theater could “clean out” the emotions of spectators. These days, catharsis may refer to any event that precipitates a psycho-spiritual renewal by building up and then releasing tension. I foresee at least one of these strenuous blessings in your immediate future.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The coming

months will be a favorable time to boost your skills as a cagey warrior. I don’t mean you should push people around and get into lots of fights. Rather, the goal is for you to harness your aggressiveness constructively and to wield your willpower with maximum grace. In the face of fear, you will not just be brave, but brave and crafty. You’ll refrain from forcing storylines to unfold before they’re ready, and you’ll rely on strategy and good timing instead of brute strength and the decree “Because I said so.” Now study this counsel from the ancient Chinese statesman Zhuge Liang, also known as Crouching Dragon: “The wise win before they fight, while the ignorant fight to win.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Everything

you do in the coming days should be imbued with the intention of enhancing the Flow. It’s high time to identify where the energy is stuck, and then get it unstuck. You have a sacred mandate to relieve the congestion … to relax the tweaks … to unravel the snarls if you can, or simply cut through them if necessary. You don’t need to tell anyone about your secret agenda. Just go about your business with zealous diligence and unflagging purpose. If it takes more effort than you wished, so be it. If your progress seems maddeningly gradual, keep the faith.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Kris Vagner PHOTO/KRIS VAGNER

Storyteller Juanita Westbrook has worked as a children’s advocate, and for 15 years she hosted a TV show, Juanita’s African-American Folktales. During the Nevada Humanities Festival & Chautauqua, she’ll perform folktales written by Zora Neale Hurston, an African-American author who worked during the Harlem Renaissance. Westbrook’s show, “Storytelling and Sweet Potato Pie,” runs 1-2:30 p.m., June 17 at Goodluck Macbeth Theatre, 713 S. Virginia St. Admission is free. For the full festival schedule visit http:// nevadahumanities.org.

What’s your work like? I am an interactive oral storyteller. I don’t use books. Some of the stories I write. Some I recreate. I just take stories and make them my own. All of my stories have morals. I think that comes from my African ancestry. Before the written word, there was the spoken word. I had a grandmother. You would ask her, “Why is the sky shaped like that?” She would always tell you a story, a parable. Stories can teach, and stories can heal.

Do you approach your role more as an actor, or as a teacher? As both, I would hope. I worked not only at the Children’s Cabinet, I worked at Head Start. I have a background at Sierra Nevada Job Corps. I’ve seen the changes that have occurred, not only generational, but as a society. At the Cabinet, we had to use these buzzwords—“at risk”—to get

What kinds of reactions have you gotten from audiences?

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I can’t tell you how many letters I’ve gotten. I believe that you and I and everybody else in this world, we’re tied to each other by something called humanity, and that’s bigger than you and I. I tell everybody that comes from the divine creator. I hope I am motivating someone. I do five terrific ladies that never got the recognition they deserved because of their time—and the racism in America. When people say, “I never knew that person. Who was that?” that’s what I love to hear. You never know where history will take you. Knowledge is not to be hoarded. It’s to be passed on.

[grant] money. I think all kids are at risk. It’s my job and your job as an adult, to tap that potential. Every kid has a potential.

What made you want to play Zora Neale Hurston? Zora’s love of folklore, of her people, our people. She started out to become a teacher. She found out she had a knack for anthropology. She devoted herself to preserving the black heritage. She took it upon herself. She said [about losing our heritage], “Not on my watch.” That’s what I said: “Not on my watch.” I’m not a religious fanatic, but I’m spiritual, and I think it was meant for me to portray these five women that I do. I want to bring out these people who let me stand on their shoulders. They’re some phenomenal, classy, sassy ladies. I would love to go back to the roaring ’20s, the Harlem Renaissance, just to be around. She just had that character, had that something about her. When she walked into a room she was the life of any party. She died in 1960, buried in a pauper’s grave. No one knew anything about her. Alice Walker felt compelled that

Feel better? I don’t know about you, but I’m extremely tired of listening to cops, mayors, governors and other officials asking us, in the wake of yet another mass murder by some troubled sociopath, to pray for the victims. It’s usually the first thing out of their mouths, a knee jerk call to pray for the victims. Yeah, well, you know what? Twenty million prayers and two bucks will get you a cup of coffee at Starbuck’s. You want to actually do something that might help prevent future onslaughts of armed madness? Try this. Try taking that eentsy teentsy amount of mental energy you would use for your quickie prayer of compassion that, let’s face it, is being prayed so as to make you feel better, and use it instead to write to your congressman, suggesting to him that he stop fellating the paranoid tapeworm penis of the National Rifle Association and sign on to a bill that will finally stop this insanity of legalized automatic weapons that exist for one reason and one reason only and that is to kill people. Seriously. To hell with your meaningless, impotent, feeble prayers. The

somebody had to do something. She hooked up with this lady, they wandered down to Fort Pierce [in Florida, where Hurston lived during her last years], saw no tombstone. Now she has a wonderful tombstone with a wonderful epitaph on it: “Here lies the genius of the South.” That just moved me so.

How does the sweet potato pie factor in? Our theme is food and culture, and Zora was a phenomenal cook. Zora’s place was always open. Even though she might be writing or working, you could always come in. There was always food, a pot of beans or greens or whatever it was. Sweet potato pie, that’s one of the things that I like to do. When I came out here from the South, everybody was about pumpkin pie. I was like, What, everybody’s got to know about sweet potato pie.

You’ll actually be serving pie during your performance? Ω

Yes.

∫y Bruce Van Dye time for politeness passed a long fucking time ago. • American Reality Check—I dare you to watch Michael Moore’s stunning new film, Where to Invade Next. In this one, Moore travels to Italy, France, Finland, Iceland, Portugal, Germany, Slovenia and Tunisia—yes, Tunisia!—and discovers that in major lifestyle sectors (education, health care, employee benefits, women’s equality, drug wars), America is to Europe what monster trucks are to ice skating. Even more interesting/ alarming, Moore is reminded that these advanced, progressive policies and realities embraced by modern Europeans were installed courtesy of American ideas that we’ve sacrificed and forgotten in favor of maintaining our ridiculously expensive and soulsucking bullshit Superpower Empire. It’s eye-opening. It’s shocking. It’s essential. And will stay with you much longer than any lame-ass comic book flick. Ω

Great Recipient of those messages consistently appears to give not even the tiniest spotted mouse turd about them, and He obviously could also not care less about stacking ’em up in a Big Prayer Bank to prevent future slaughters. You know what millions of prayers add up to? Nothing. No mass, no weight, no presence. You know what millions of letters/emails add up to? Something. Maybe. There’s a chance they may add up to something. Granted, you’d be sending them to the most stubborn bunch of obstructionist do-nothings, but again, there’s no getting around the fact that a million pieces of impassioned mail is a helluva lot more substantial than a million impassioned prayers. The three Nevadans in D.C. who are tools doing the bidding of the NRA and voting against any restrictions on the sales of machine guns and automatic weapons are Sen. Dean Heller and Reps. Joe Heck and Mark Amodie. Contact them through their websites at heller.senate.gov., heck.house.gov. and amodei.house.gov. Don’t worry about being polite. Let ’em have it. The

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