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Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor.............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 18

Foodfinds...................... 19 Film.............................. 20 Musicbeat.................... 23 Nightclubs/Casinos....... 24 This.Week.....................27 Advice.Goddess........... 28 Free.Will.Astrology....... 30 15.Minutes..................... 31 Bruce.Van.Dyke............ 31

TraiTors to the cause See Let Freedom Ring, page 7.

sigNs of thE

apocalypse See News, page 8.

Future EvaporatEd

THE

See Green, page 11.

avenged

COWS HOME COME

BiFoLd See Film, page 20.

W i l l G r e at B a s i n G r a z i n G s u r v i v e c l i m at e c h a n G e ?

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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Act FAST! A stroke occurs when a vessel that carries blood to the brain is blocked or ruptured. Since the blood flow is disrupted, the brain cells start to die, which can lead to brain damage. Now that you know what a stroke is, it’s important to learn the signs.

“The temptation is to wait it and d hope the symptoms will subside,” ubsid de,” says Jeff Wagner, MD, a neurologist ologiist at the rthern Primary Stroke Center att Nor Northern Nevada Medical Center. “Thee problem passess, the is that if too much time passes, treatment to reverse stroke symptoms ke sy mptoms nister.” is no longer safe to administer.”

Take Time to Learn the Signs

Excellence in Stroke Care

Knowing the signs of stroke and getting immediate help can be the difference between life and death, as well as minimize brain damage and disability. Here’s how to think F.A.S.T.:

The Joint Commission awarded d its Gold Seal of Approval for certification ificatio on as a Primary Stroke Center to Northern Northe ern Nevada Medical Center. The rapidapidresponse stroke team can communicate mmuniccate with first responders in the ambulance. bulancce. Emergency physicians, a neurologist ologistt and other team members are ready and waiting to assess patients and begin immediate treatment.

Stroke is the third-leading cause of death in the United States, as well as the leading cause of adult disability.* But what is a stroke, really? It’s a “brain attack” that strikes very quickly.

F = FACE Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop? A = ARMS Ask the person to hold up both arms. Does one drift downward? S = SPEECH Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Does the speech sound slurred or strange? T = TIME If you observe any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately.

Symptoms of Stroke? Get to a Primary Stroke Center like NNMC!

Jeffrey Wagner, MD, earned his medical degree at Oregon Health Sciences University, y, where he also completed his residency in neurology. He completed his fellowship in neurophysiology at the University of Utah. Dr. Wagner practices stroke neurology at the e Primary Stroke Center at Northern Nevada Medical Center.

Board-Certified Neurologist | NNMC Primary Stroke Center Learn more about the Primary Stroke Center at Northern Nevada Medical Center at nnmc.com

Exceptional People. Exceptional Quality. Experience the Difference.. 2375 East Prater Way | Sparks, NV | 775.331.7000 Information is provided for educational purposes only, and is not intended to constitute medical advice or to be relied upon for the treatment of any particular condition. If you have concerns or questions about specific symptoms that may affect your health, please contact your healthcare provider. *American Stroke Association Physicians are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Northern Nevada Medical Center. The hospital shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. 150556

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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Still encountering

What would Jesus do?

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. How about an update on Fatal Encounters? Fatal Encounters was part of our project last year to look at the various issues regarding officer-involved homicides. I now tend to call them “officer-involved deaths,” since so many people equate homicide with murder, but I’m still a little irritated that I have to modify my own language so as not to upset the ignorant. Anyway, part of the project was the database I was building, which eventually became a 501(c)3. In the database, fatalencounters.org, I attempt to track 17 details of incidents of law enforcement-involved deaths. We get our information through a combination of crowdsourcing volunteers, public records requests and paid volunteers who cull through media accounts. (I call them “paid volunteers” because there’s no way they’re being fully compensated for their time. It’s more of a stipend.) In the four months since the newspaper’s part of this ended, we’ve added nearly 2,000 entries, putting us up to 6,200 records. We figure at our current rate, we’ll be finished with the database in about 99 weeks. We’ve gotten love from around the world for our efforts. Here’s a story that ran in the Netherlands last week: www. volkskrant.nl/opinie/hopelijkkan-obama-zwart-en-blankverzoenen~a3986497, which I think is cool because I can’t read a word of it except my name. I’ve got an on-camera interview with China Central TV’s flagship talkshow, The Heat, tomorrow, and producers from Real Money with Ali Velshi coming to Reno to watch our process at the house. The New York Times had us on the front page on May 1. http://ow.ly/Mmmm9. They were pretty generous, saying among other things, “Fatal Encounters, maintained by D. Brian Burghart, the publisher of the Reno News & Review, may be the most meticulous aggregator of reports of killings by the police.” That Times piece bought us some credibility. People are quoting from it, using the Times’ analysis of our data as proof of legitimacy: http://ow.ly/MrQ2o. But get ready, we aren’t going to rest on our laurels. There are always a few new things in development.

Re “Faculty, students and staff” (Editorial, April 2): Guns on campus. What would Jefferson do? Or Madison? There’s no need to argue or guess—both men banned guns at the University of Virginia—Jefferson as founding rector (president) and Madison as his successor. Given that Thomas Jefferson was something of a tyranny buff, and that James Madison more or less wrote the Second Amendment, their position was pretty solid. In fact, it wasn’t even controversial. The reason for the founders’ campus gun prohibition was no different from our own. They wanted to create a safe atmosphere conducive to academic life. Guns smuggled onto the Virginia campus proved to be a distraction and a hazard. One professor was shot by armed pranksters and later died. Where there are guns, people get shot, and it’s no different today. There should be a learning moment with this issue in our own time. College campuses, with strict gun control and very few guns, are among the safest places in America. In fact, there are twice as many homicides just in Michele Fiore’s home city of Las Vegas as there are on all 4,700 higher ed campuses combined. We should be exporting the campus gun control model to our states, not importing guns to campus. I think the founders had no idea that the Second Amendment would end up being twisted into a pretext for vigilantism. If AB148 ends up on Gov. Sandoval’s desk, he ought to side with those two U.Va. presidents, and keep guns out of our schools. C.G. Green Reno

The viciously ignorant I am astonished at the uncompromising ignorance some people exhibit while speaking (or writing) on a topic they know absolutely nothing about. The subject matter of concern to me here is marijuana, and more specifically, the plant itself. The hemp plant has been around for millennia, and has provided humans with benefits still being discovered to this very day.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

The discovery of the New World was powered by hemp sails and rigging. With modern technology, we are learning we can use the hemp plant in many ways to take advantage of this natural gift of the earth. Hemp seed, as an example, is nature’s perfect food product, containing proteins and essential fatty acids. Only recently have we talked about the medicinal benefits contained in marijuana. Some state legislators have passed laws legalizing medical marijuana, including our very own state of Nevada. Others have begun the process of legalizing the plant for recreational use. Why aren’t we using hemp today to save our environment? Deforestation is slowly killing our planet! Have you considered how much paper we consume in any given day? Constitutionalists should know that the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were written on hemp paper. Why aren’t we doing that today? The answer, of course is simple—greed! Big money interests want to keep this plant illegal for all the obvious reasons. And so, you see, I could go on and on about benefits to humanity, not to mention the buds can give you a buzz. But seriously, we’ve known about this for decades and we haven’t really done anything about it until recently, as in sporadic legalization. And that’s not good enough. We need to educate ourselves about marijuana and hemp so we may eradicate the ignorance about this plant. I try not to sound mean about this, but some of these self-proclaimed drug warriors need to understand the harm this idiocy (the drug war) has caused our great nation. We need people to stand up against this every chance they get. It’s the only way we have a chance to stand up to the big money interests—our voices. J.R. Reynolds Reno

Certified Nevada organic Re “Battle grown” (Green, April 9): Thank you for covering this issue, as it is hugely important for our community and local economy. Austin Koontz Reno

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Georgia Fisher Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Contributors Amy Alkon, Woody Barlettani, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Eric Marks, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Associate Art Director Brian Breneman Ad Design Manager Serene Lusano Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Design Melissa Bernard, Brad Coates, Kyle Shine Advertising Consultants Joseph “Joey” Davis, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage, Jessica Wilson Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Kelly Miller

—D. Brian Burghart

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

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Long memory Re “Alive and well in Lockwood” (News, July 10, 2003): This statement is incorrect: “It was [Charlie] Cheramie who called the first meeting of park residents back in 1999. The cooperative was his idea. And he nominated Edna to be president.” It was Cheramie, Brent Tyler and Bret Tyler who called the first meeting to present their idea to the residents. A second meeting was scheduled so the residents could think about their proposal for a week. At the second meeting it was voted to form a co-op. A call for nominations was then placed and Edna Cudworth was nominated. Faith StClair Lockwood

Think before you vote The current legislators were voted in to represent the hard-working Nevada majority, but instead, they are spending their time destroying anything that resembles democracy! Their attacks on the middle class include bills related to voter suppression, collective bargaining, prevailing wage, health benefits, women’s rights (ERA), and all rational gun regulations. They truly have redefined Nevada as “The Wild West.” I hope that the next election will reclaim Nevada for “We The People.” I urge all voters to be cautious about who you put into office and to select people who are responsible citizens and who represent the issues that protect the concerns and the rights of average middle class citizens. Gale Audia Reno

Not a literal reading Re “Thou shalt not pack” (Letters to the editor, April 16): I respect people’s right to their religious views. However, using your religious scripture to justify a ban on guns or guns on campus is a bit spurious. Rabbi Blair states, “Normalizing murder does not make for a safer or more compassionate society. Moses taught us that thousands of years ago…”

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Anthony Clarke Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Steve Finlayson, Debbi Frenzi, Vicky Jewell, Angela Littlefield, Joe Medeiros, Ron Neill, Christian Shearer, Marty Troye, Warren Tucker, Gary White, Joseph White, Margaret Underwood General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist

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The Bible is such a great place to find peaceful and compassionate ideology. Let’s start with Moses. In Exodus 2:12 he sees an Egyptian beating a Hebrew, so he kills the Egyptian and hides his body in the desert. Exodus 11:5: Now, in order to free the Hebrew slaves from Egypt, he conspires with God to murder the first born of everyone in Egypt even those born to slaves. Moses isn’t like, Lord, this is a bit much, how about give them all chicken pox or AIDS? Nah, we’ll just kill them all. Numbers 31:18: Once free of Egypt, he doesn’t lead the Hebrews to an empty land where they can raise their children and live in peace. No, he goes on a genocidal rampage through Israel. Supposedly, the Lord tells him to kill every male, even the little kids, and every woman who’s not a virgin. What about the virgins? Well, you can take them as booty prize. Moses isn’t like, Say what, Lord? This is just not right. At least we can spare the women and children. Whether it’s supporting disproportionate unjustified violence, discrimination against women, or hatred of gays, the Bible is not the best reference guide. So don’t use the Bible to justify your dislike of guns. They didn’t have guns back in the days of Moses, but I’m pretty sure if the Midianites had guns, Moses would have used guns as well to wipe them off the face of the Earth in addition to the other tribes of Israel. In fact, the Egyptians would have banned all Hebrews from owning weapons to enslave them, and that my friend, is why governments like to ban guns. Ed Park Reno

Correction Re “Love and skate” (Arts & Culture, April 30): We incorrectly reported that Classic Skateshop owner Eric Lantto was born in Gardnerville. He’s actually from Florida. We regret the error and apologize for any confusion.

Business Nicole Jackson, Kortnee Angel Sweetdeals Coordinator Courtney deShields Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins 405 Marsh Ave., Third Floor Reno, NV 89509 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds to classifieds@newsreview.com

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Website www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and Feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

MAY 7, 2015

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special aDVeRTising secTion

special aDVeRTising secTion

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It’s happen ing in EVENTS

BIKINI BULL RIDING AT GILLEY’S!

SUNDAY NIGHT MOVIE NIGHT!

Join us for Sunday night movie night. Kick back and relax while watching a flick. Enjoy our drink specials! Su, 6PM through 7/5, no charge. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799

ACTIVITIES

Get ready for a wild night with Bikini Bull Riding at Gilley’s! Get your favorite bikini on and show off those skills for the chance to win the CASH PRIZE! Su, 9PM through 10/25. Opens 4/12, $5 for bull ride. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP

SCHEELS KIDS KLUB: CAMPING 101

What equipment do you need to go camping? Learn how to make a survival keychain and why they are important when you are doing outdoor... M, 5/11, 6PM, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

SCHEELS OUTDOOR EXPO

Come and join Scheels as we look at all the latest products for camping and fishing. Whether you are a beginner fishermen or an experienced... Sa, 5/16, 10am-4PM, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

SCHEELS PADDLE DEMO

Must be at least 18 years old or accompanied by a legal guardian to participate. Sa, 5/30, 10am-2PM, free! Sparks Marina, 325 Harbor Cove Dr. (775) 353-2376

LINE DANCING LESSONS AT GILLEY’S!

Free line dancing lessons from professional teachers. Two dances taught at a comfortable pace for everyone! W, 6-8PM through 10/21, free. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave (775) 356-3300

CROCHET CONNECTION

This class is for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

PERFORMANCE & MUSIC

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CJ SIMMONS

CYCO MIKE

Come dance the night away to Cyco Mike! Every Friday night, drink specials! F, 9PM through 9/25, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

THE JOKERS WILD BLUES BAND

The Jokers Wild Blues plays down home jumping blues that will get your toes a tapping and feet a moving! F, 5/8, 9PM, no cover. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799 Sa, 5/9, 8PM, $49. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 Th, 5/14, 8PM, F, 5/15, 8PM and Sa, 5/16, 8PM, no cover. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

RUBLES PLUNGE

Hard Rock - The Way You Like It!! F, 5/15, 9PM, no cover. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799

Come dance the night away to DJ RAZZ! You can even karaoke if you like. Ladies Night every Friday night. Drink Specials all night. F, 9PM. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

KARAOKE NIGHT

Th, 5/28, 8PM, F, 5/29, 8PM and Sa, 5/30, 8PM, no cover. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Join us for a rocking good time every Tuesday for Karaoke Night. Tu, 6:30PM through 7/7, no cover. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799

THURSDAY SHOWCASE

KARAOKE WITH BOBBY DEE

DJ NIGHTS AT GILLEY’S!

Th, 9PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

ERICA SUNSHINE LEE

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KARAOKE

Th, 5/21, 8PM, F, 5/22, 8PM and Sa, 5/23, 8PM, no cover. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

OPEN MIC COMEDY

FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB

The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month, 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

CHAD BUSHNELL BAND

Th, 5/7, 8PM, F, 5/8, 8PM and Sa, 5/9, 8PM, no cover. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

TONY ORLANDO

CONVERSATION CAFE

DJ RAZZ

A free monthly comedy show featuring local talent. The event is BYOB and limited beer will be provided free as well. Third Th of every month, 8PM, free. The Generator, Inc., 1240 Icehouse Ave., Sparks, NV 89431

Showcase your act on the Sparks Lounge stage. We have a full backline for all your performance needs. Check the Sparks Lounge website or Facebook for upcoming shows. Th, 8PM through 8/28, no cover. Sparks Lounge, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 409-3340

MICHAEL BECK BAND

Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway. (775) 424-1800 The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. First Sa of every month, 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

DANWISE AND FRIENDS

Come in and scoot your boots! The Dj plays the new favorites and the old hits. DJ is open to requests! W, 6PM through 10/28, Th, Su, 7PM through 10/25. F, Sa, 8PM through 10/24. No admission fee. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave (775) 356-3300 DANWISE AND FRIENDS

A free monthly comedy show featuring local talent. The event is BYOB and limited beer will be provided free as well. This event will run every third Th of every month, 8PM, free. The Generator, Inc. 1240 Icehouse Ave.

ACOUSTIC WONDERLAND

This is a singer-songwriter showcase. Come down to Paddy’s and bring your acoustic instruments. Sign-ups are at 7:30PM and music begins at 8PM. Drink Specials all night! Th, 8PM, through 9/25, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

LADIES NIGHT

Deep discounts just for the ladies from 8pm-10pm: $1 off all shots and specialty drinks. Sporting bootie shorts 20 percent discount. Parties of three or more 20 percent discount. Sa, 8-11PM through 8/29. Sparks Lounge, 1237 Baring Blvd (775) 409-3340

Tu, 8PM, no cover. Morelli’s G Street Saloon, 2285 G St. (775) 355-8281

KARAOKE

Th-Sa, 9PM, no cover. Bottom’s Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way (775) 359-3677

CYCO MIKE

Come dance the night away to Cyco Mike! The best Karaoke show in Sparks! Every Friday night, drink specials! F, 9PM through 9/25, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave (775) 358-5484

KARAOKE

Sing to your favorite songs with your hosts Psycho Mike Millard and DJ KrayZEE. Sa, 9PM through 4/11, no cover. Sparks Lounge, 1237 Baring Blvd (775) 409-3340


by Dennis Myers

This MoDeRn WoRlD

by tom tomorrow

Give the Nevada Legislature a grade Asked at a lunch meeting of the Nevada Women’s Lobby Janice Flanagan Retiree

It is bad. It’s bad for middle-class Nevadans. I think they’re pandering to a very small base. They’re very afraid of the primaries that they will be facing during the next elections, and so they’re setting up their sound bites for that. I’d give them a D.

Jan Browne Retiree

I would give them a D, because they are not catering to what I consider the middle of Nevada voters. They seem to have a right-wing agenda.

Sarah Galetti Development director

You’re on your own

Probably a D. I really feel that there was a lot of legislation that came up that had to do with women’s health and school and guns, and all the crazy things. I was disappointed that the major issues like jobs were taking second place. … It’s like watching a comedy routine at times.

tapped. Legislators should incentivize bicycle use, but Reno’s Bike to Work Week starts May 9 and runs they can’t think this way because it doesn’t put money through the 15th. You can get more information on it at in their pimps’ hands. http://bikewashoe.org. We’re a sponsor, so that means You’d think the medical-pharmacological-insuranceupon death, you can turn in your chit as an indulgence industrial complex and government would jump at for all manner of sinning. the chance to decrease insurance costs for people who You know, every year since 2005, we’ve written one ride their bikes. You know, those so-called diseases of of our we’re-all-in-this-together, feel-good-about-yourplenty, like obesity, heart disease and diabetes strike self-for-helping, save-the-planet, it’s-for-the-children the physically fit much less than they strike the fat-asseditorials. This year, after watching our Legislature in-SUV types, right? It’s easy to track whether you’re of Whores posture their convictions while bending riding your bike or walking. What do you think your over gratefully for their contributors, we thought we’d cell phones and FitBits do? But then, approach it from a different angle. Legislators should how would insurance companies actuYou’re on your own. ally maintain their astronomical fees Do not count on government to incentivize bicycle if we increased fitness and decreased do any of those things that a rational use, but it wouldn’t the lung and heart disease caused by person would do. Our Legislature air pollution and a sedentary lifestyle? has done nothing—nothing—to help put money in their Nope. You’re not going to find stave off climate change by encouragpimps’ hands. any help from those who benefit by ing individual investment in greener keeping you sick. technologies or to discourage the use You’re on your own. The changes you make in your of air-polluting, planet warming hydrocarbons. own life, and the feels you get from good health and No, they’re actually working to figure out ways to personal connection to your commuting route, are the discourage the purchase of electric automobiles by talkonly rewards you’re going to get for riding to work. ing about increasing taxes to compensate for the “lost” The zealots talk a lot about personal responsibility tax revenue that electric car owners don’t pay because and the impotence of government while they feather they don’t buy gasoline. They actually enable utilities’ their own nests, undermine government effectiveness greed. They’re going to have to choose between masters from within and destroy their own children’s and grandwhen Tesla starts selling those batteries that will power children’s planet. Don’t count on them doing anything homes off solar. They don’t see the millions saved in wear and tear on that people with conscience would do. You’re on your own. Ω the roads, since electric cars can’t be used for long trips. They just see the potential for wallets that aren’t being OPINION

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Edith Isidoro-Mills Farmer

I don’t know. It depends. If you’re talking about actually doing something that will help, it’s maybe about a D, and an A for humor, because they certainly have been colorful.

Laurie Haley Political volunteer

F. I think there’s so much that they are wasting time on, not focusing on our critical issues in Nevada. You know, square dancing—really?—when we have schools failing, children failing, horrible dropout rates? Their priorities are not the priorities of the people of Nevada.

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Destroy government from within You do know you’re the one paying for this, right? As the Legislature blithely goes about granting millions of dollars in tax credits to “opportunity scholarships” and Hollywood filmmakers, the ultimate funding source for these giveaways is somewhat obscure. Tax credits sound so nebulous and harmby lessThe taxpayer-funded scholarships Sheila Leslie to private schools, much better than more descriptive terms like corporate welfare or taxpayer-funded subsidies. “Opportunity scholarships” sounds like something no one could be against. Identify it more properly as a revenue-siphoning mechanism transferring tax money to private and parochial schools, leaving less in the coffers for public schools, and it might not be so popular. Assembly Bill 165, calling for taxpayer-funded scholarships to private schools, is Gov. Sandoval’s version of school vouchers, essentially privatizing public education. The bill was approved on party-line votes by the Assembly and the Senate and was proudly signed into law by its architect.

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The bill authorizes $10.5 million in tax credits over the next two years to businesses that contribute to the Nevada Educational Choice Scholarship program. The funds will be used to subsidize enrollment at private and religious schools. Children who come from a family that meets a certain income threshold, 300 percent of the poverty level, about $73,000 a year for a family of four, can qualify for a ‘scholarship.’ The tax credits are authorized to increase 10 percent per year after the initial biennium, with no cap. Republicans insist the new law gives parents a choice about where to send their children to school. Senate Minority Leader Aaron Ford summed up the Democrats’ opposition to the ‘back-door’ voucher plan, saying, “It serves as a tax break for wealthier families as opposed to an opportunity for lower-income families to attend private school.” Businesses who contribute to the scholarship fund will receive a tax credit on their Modified Business Tax so they won’t really be engaging

in a charitable act, just redirecting public tax money to private and religious schools, thus designating their tax money for a specific purpose. Wouldn’t we all like the opportunity to do that with our taxes, donate to our preferred program and then deduct it from our tax obligations? Those millions may seem like chicken feed compared to the Senate bill championed by the Senate minority leader. He successfully convinced the 2013 Legislature to allocate $80 million for movie subsidies, only to see the governor snatch back $70 million in 2014 to put in the Tesla mega-incentive package instead. At that time, when a forceful corporate mogul was negotiating for taxpayer funding, the governor’s economic development czar, Steve Hill, said the permanence of the Tesla jobs outweighed the temporary jobs of filmmakers. But it’s a new year, which means the corporate appetite for taxpayer subsidies must be fed. The new and improved film subsides sailed through the state Senate

unanimously, now allowing the program to utilize as much money as the Legislature will allocate in any given year. Soon we’ll be able to underwrite more projects like Mall Cop 2, which received $4.3 million of the original $10 million of our tax revenue to film in Nevada, while also earning a whopping 0 percent from Rotten Tomatoes Top Critics for its unwatchability. Meanwhile, Tesla, the recordbreaking subsidy scooper, is backing away from its 2014 promise to pay an average wage of $26.16 per hour, telling the Reno Gazette-Journal its wages would hover around $22 per hour. Enter Hill once again to explain to the taxpayers: “We often don’t hold those companies to the exact amount (in the application) because, frankly, if we did, everybody would just say they would pay the minimum amount required because they don’t want to overcommit and put themselves in jeopardy in the future.” Need a translation? Big business wins. Again. Ω

Here’s a list of U.S. corporations that don’t pay taxes: www. cnbc.com/id/101917093


Voters exchange liberty for complacency “These are the times that try men’s souls,” wrote pamphleteer Tom Paine. My soul is troubled, too. The news is grim, and the prospects for liberty slim. We now have a two-year contest to choose the next emperor for eight years. Most countries don’t electioneer for more than two by Brendan months. We have become a constiTrainor tutional monarchy, with competing dynasties spending fortunes for the opportunity to be the leader of the “free” world, even though they have to step down after two terms—at least for now. We are in the thrall of the unspoken Clinton-Powell-BushCheney-Wolfowitz doctrine. We have decided that we will not tolerate any competition, never mind a threat, from any other nation. We have no respect for any other countries’ claims to a legitimate sphere of interest. Our goal has been for decades now to topple Baghdad, Damascus and Tehran,

and to weaken or topple Moscow and Beijing. The Republican presidential field is, as former CIA analyst Philip Giraldi said, “batshit ignorant” of the world. But so is the nation. Almost 50 percent of America believes we should put another country’s interests before ours. Republican candidates pray for a religious revival in Iowa, then kiss the ring of a vice lord in Las Vegas. Our Congress invited the prime minister of a favored nation to denounce in their assemblage a sitting president’s negotiations to limit the spread of nuclear weapons. A freshman senator authored a letter signed by half the Senate behind the president’s back to the nation we are negotiating with saying they will not implement the agreement. This from the party of patriotism! We aspire to control the world through a single financial and monetary system and a series of satraps and lackeys. We claim that right because we are so exceptional,

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our awesomeness so brilliant, that the world will surely acquiesce to our benevolent hegemony. If they resist, of course, we will bomb them until they do acquiesce. Yet, the same people who constantly remind us how exceptional we are, when it comes to immigration, then suddenly say no, no, we are just like other nations! Every other nation, you see, has tough immigration laws, so why don’t we? They sound just like those who argue that all civilized nations have socialized medicine. They yearn for socialized borders. They want to build walls along a 2,000-mile border to secure it from the invading hordes of children, workers and sellers of contraband. They will never secure the border. Even the Berlin Wall was breached over a thousand times a month. The Democrats are led by their dynastic queen who travels among us eating our commoner food and listening to supplications from carefully chosen local petitioners. Meanwhile, rumors swirl around

her of corruption and underhanded dealings against our interests. She struggles to feign indifference to the charges, because she must appeal regal and yet approachable at the same time. After all, she is a woman. For her devoted followers, that in itself is enough. If she falls, they have no one to replace her. They rally around her because history demands, not peace, not prosperity, not freedom, but gender equality. Three years ago, the recently deceased Cardinal Francis George of Chicago brilliantly pointed out the problem is the nation states themselves. All these conflicts, wars, and corruptions are done by rulers of nation states. It is nation states that kill while espousing ideals like democracy and national greatness. Perhaps they have reached the zenith of their power, and their influence will wane. The young will decide. If so, they should start now—before the old Ω decide their fate for them.

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

A speedway near Mustang is one business that  would benefit from a proposed county code  change to allow billboards.

Hansen bill would aid him Assemblymember Ira Hansen of Washoe County testified last week that he could personally benefit financially from enactment of his bill to make penalties for trespass and other wildlife offenses more permissive. Hansen said he sponsored Assembly Bill 142, which makes it more difficult to revoke trapping, fishing and hunting licenses, because the Nevada Wildlife Commission has made the penalty for trespass 12 points under its demerit system, and that can cause revocation of a license. “That was like, no longer was I comfortable leaving a demerit system—which was in place at that point for 20 years—in the hands of regulatory people, where only five people basically could change it and put people—lose, in some cases, their livelihood,” Hansen told the Senate Natural Resources Committee. “Keep in mind that for trappers, there are many of them, including myself, are commercial trappers, we’re professionals, and this is part of our livelihood. And to have your licenses revoked, and take away a person’s livelihood—or an opportunity to hunt or fish or trap or whatever it is you love to do—over something that could be a very minor and unintentional act was just way beyond the pale of where this was supposed to go.” Members of the committee did not question Hansen on the point of his trapping business. Hansen also said, “Where is the proportional penalty? And if in fact [an] individual hasn’t learned his lesson, that is where these guys [game wardens] come into play and where you can throw people into jail if necessary, fine them thousands of dollars and so forth. But those kinds of cases are extremely rare. Extremely rare.” But game warden chief Tyler Turnipseed said the revocations that Hansen is trying to stop are also extremely rare, and that virtually no responsible sportsmen have been revoked. He said there is an annual average of 14 revocations in years during which more than 190,000 licenses are granted. That is well under a percentage point. “It’s not a matter of all these innocent spokesmen getting revoked all the time,” Turnipseed said. A spokesperson for the Nevada Trappers Association also testified for Hansen’s measure. Hansen has long battled against state wildlife policies. As a Sparks Tribune columnist for more than a decade, he wrote at least 39 columns attacking the Nevada Department of Wildlife or its officials, though wildlife policies are set by the Legislature. He has often called for restoration of a pre-1960s arrangement in which the agency was controlled by the small counties instead of state government.

Hickey writes Deposed as Assembly GOP leader in November in favor of Ira Hansen, Washoe Assemblymember Pat Hickey was freed to comment candidly on the legislative session, and sometimes he does. His observations have been appearing at www.PatHickeypolitics.com.

Outlier came close Dan Perkins, whose Tom Tomorrow cartoons appear on our editorial page each edition, was a Pulitzer Prize finalist this year. The Pulitzer committee said Perkins’ cartoons “create an alternate universe—an America frozen in time whose chorus of conventional wisdom is at odds with current reality.” The award was given to Buffalo News cartoonist Adam Zyglis. Washington Post writer Michael Cavna wrote that “perhaps no first-time Pulitzer finalist has ever been more of an outlier than Dan Perkins. ... Not only did Perkins’s work appear mostly in alt-weekly papers most of those years, but his format is as a text-heavy, multi-panel feature—far from the single-image format that the Pulitzer jurors generally favor.” Perkins is a two-time recipient of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Excellence in Journalism.

—Dennis Myers 8   |  RN&R   | 

MAY 7, 2015

Return of billboards? County commissioners eye looser code The Washoe County Commission last week engaged in a discussion of a proposal to exempt three sections of land in the by county from billboard restrictions. Dennis Myers For months there have been below-the-radar rumors that several parcels would be treated differently under the county’s restrictive billboard code. At the commission meeting, county senior planner Trevor Lloyd tried to calm that concern, though he didn’t deal with the question of several parcels. A slide was shown during his presentation: “Is Washoe County establishing an exception for one property owner only? No, at least three possible locations have been identified at this time.”

“There are certain areas that are in need of more signage.” Jeanne Herman County commissioner It was unclear what prompted the proposal in the first place, since there has been little if any agitating for change in the county billboard code. Lloyd said he and the county staff had been “request[ed] to revisit an issue having to do with the sign code.” And one of his visual aids said that on Aug. 26 last year, the County Commissioners directed the staff to draft language “to provide for certain large signs in the proposed sign code,

subject to approval of a special use permit by the [commissioners].” A map showed three locations that would be affected by the new proposal. Two are east of Sparks, one near Wadsworth, the other near Mustang. The third is northwest of Reno near Bordertown Casino. On March 29, 2000, a group called Citizens for a Scenic Reno filed a city initiative petition providing for a cap of 278 on the number of off-premise billboards in Reno. On the day after CSR submitted its signatures, the billboard industry filed its own initiative, but was unable subsequently to get the signatures it needed. So only the CSR—designated R1—went on the ballot. It was approved by city voters by a margin of 57 to 43 percent. A billboard company—Eller, formerly Donrey—filed an unsuccessful lawsuit to keep the measure from taking effect on technical grounds. Though only voters inside the city limits voted on the measure, it has been regarded as a good indicator of local sentiment on billboards, and the county has strong anti-billboard language. In the section of Interstate 80 between Mustang and Sparks, only one billboard remains, an advertisement for back pain treatment at Northern Nevada Medical Center. The site among the three proposed to the County Commission that has drawn the most fire so far is located in hills above the Truckee River canyon east of Sparks near Mustang. It is the site of a speedway owned by

Norm Dianda. An exemption would allow a sign advertising the Wild West Autosports Park, giving drivers on Interstate 80 a better indication of where the speedway is located than it currently has—a small sign off the highway at the start of the drive to the site. Billboards would have to advertise certain activities to be permitted. In devising language for the Commission, county staffers proposed something called regional recreational, travel and tourism (RRTT) locations where signs could be located if the County Commission consented. Three places fit the definition, a definition which was apparently created as a result of guidance from the commissioners. Asked how they identified the three sites as RRTT, Lloyd said, “Based on a number of criteria. Based on zoning, what current zoning is currently out there, what zoning would allow for unlimited gaming is one option. Also, outdoor recreation within those certain zones. That’s really limited to a certain number of zoning categories. It would have to fall under one of those, or large-destination resort, and we limited that. We looked on the map throughout Washoe County and there were only three locations with that potential.” There was some discussion of the county allowing some billboards and denying others based on content, which could raise legal problems. Lori Wray of Scenic Nevada reminded the commissioners that the county has a policy of no new billboards, and urged them not to make exceptions: “So today, we hope your direction to staff will be to confirm that earlier direction, policy direction, to prohibit billboards and digital billboards. ... The draft allows all signs to display off-premise ads, which is the definition of a billboard. ... The draft will allow billboards but the regulations that control billboards have been thrown out. ... The draft also gives one property owner the ability to put up a digital billboard in East Truckee Canyon and we think this is a violation of the state law and ethic standards. We refer to it as the Dianda exemption and staff calls it the RRTT category. ... Norm Dianda’s motor sports park is the only existing venue in the county today that would be using the loophole in the regulations to get a billboard location on the freeway.” Referring to some backup materials given to the commissioners by staffers, Commissioner Kitty Jung asked Lloyd, “In your section when you’re defining regional recreation travel and tourism, what is large scale lodging?


What is large scale entertainment? What’s large numbers of visitors? Do we have an operational definition or is it up to staff’s discretion?” Lloyd answered, “I think it would be more up to the commission’s discretion, when a special use permit is brought here before this group. And you’re right, we left that intentionally undefined. However, it sounds like at least two of the commissioners would like to see more definition.” The staff gave the commissioners a list of five options they could follow in dealing with the draft language. Doing nothing and leaving the county’s current policy in place was not one of the options listed.. County Commission chair Marsha Berkbigler said, “I also agree with Commissioner June that it is a badge of honor that we have the toughest sign code in the state. I have a real problem. I still don’t know what I’m going to do.” She said she had “a problem with the RRTT as opposed to just general billboards.” Commissioner Jeanne Herman said, “There are certain areas that are in need of more signage,” and she suggested that different places be “looked at separately.” Commissioner Vaughn Hartung said, “But it seems as if at every time someone wants to do something there’s a hundred people who are saying no, no, no, I don’t want to do that. The sad part is that most of the people who say I don’t want to do

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that are not the same people who pull out their checkbooks and try to create economic development. That’s the hard part for me.” Jung said she would vote for “option two,” which is the closest item on the list to leaving the existing code in place. But at another point, she said, “But I do definitely believe there needs to be a directional public safety sign” on the freeway where the speedway exit is.

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Commissioner Bob Lucey expressed concerns about the county’s legal position and the size of signs. He proposed that the commission set the matter aside to add amendments, and his motion carried. Jung also said, “There have been allegations that there has been some verbal gymnastics or legal gymnastics gone on to make this fit. I’m not at all indicting staff on this, just by the way. They were asked to do this. Staff just does what we tell them to do. So I would feel terrible when people get mad and yell at staff. Yell at me. That’s why I get paid the big bucks.” Ω

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Closing out PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

“I’ve worked in this store for 51 years, and it’s time,” said Marcia Adams Frugoli of her plans to shut down W.R. Adams & Son Jewelers in Sparks. She is the granddaughter of store founder William Adams, who bought the vintage cash register secondhand and installed it when the store opened in 1915. Her father, Robert, was the “and Son” and joined the business in 1929, and her mother, Louise, ran the business after him. Marcia has owned the store since 1990. It is one of Nevada’s oldest businesses.

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PHOTO/GEORGIA FISHER

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Reno City Councilman David Bobzien’s latest project involves forming a citywide response to climate change.

Climate inclined A new focus group will address Reno’s changing environment Last week, Reno City Councilmember David Bobzien got the go-ahead for a task force of sorts to address the local effects of climate change. It’s a mighty tall order, but Bobzien’s hope for the forthcoming Climate Action Working by Georgia Fisher Group is that it will “bring together a diverse set of people with different backgrounds and different perspectives on the issue, with the idea of creatgeorgiaf@ ing an action plan that has all sorts of what I believe to be off-the-shelf newsreview.c om items the city can put into practice to deal with climate change.” Examples might include new zoning to accommodate tiny houses and to address denser urban development, he said, and finding more warm-weather uses for city property at the Sky Tavern ski area, which is clearly strapped for snow. Apart from basic environmental stewardship and resiliency, the healing economy is also a motivator. “I believe it’s crucial to Reno’s brand, with all the discussion of our new economy and with Tesla being here,” Bobzien said. “The big story about Tesla deciding to locate [a battery factory] in Nevada is that we are a community—we are a state—that prides itself on businesses that are dealing with the climate-change problem head-on. I think it’s our responsibility both socially and environmentally to deal with this issue, but it’s also consistent with our brand, with economic the development we’re doing right now around climate change and its solutions.” Be the Change Project founders Katy Chandler and Kyle ChandlerIsacksen—a Reno couple who maintain a food and clothing ministry, and a sustainable, electricity-free homestead, among other things—have been an influence. “We approached David to share the idea of Reno creating a Climate Action Plan like many cities and counties across the world,” ChandlerIsacksen said in an email. “Reno currently has none, and we are behind the tide as the climate crisis worsens at an increasing rate.” On to the bureaucratic fine print, though: “To begin a climate-change focus group or workshop will probably take a year,” figures Maureen McKissick, assistant to City Manager Andrew Clinger. “And after that, we’ll tackle ISIS,” she quipped. The watch group also isn’t the first of its kind—two or three city sustainability groups have formed since 2006, McKissick said—and this one’s genesis could be especially slow if councilmembers must be appointed to serve. “Obviously we’re at the early stages of forming this climate action team, and will look forward to input and participation from local leaders, experts, and organizers, many of whom have been doing climate-related work in Reno for years,” Chandler-Isacksen said, citing as examples Transitions Reno, which advocates against oil dependency (“In Transition,” RN&R Jan. 28, 2010), and the Desert Research Institute. “There are so many common-sense solutions that are win-wins for all of us,” he continued. “Solutions that lower costs, save and honor water, help us grow healthy food, provide clean energy, heat water with the sun, make better homes, develop amazing mass transit … and make a great city. Sadly, many of these ‘low-hanging fruits’ which are so obvious, even to children, are blocked by corporations and politicians putting money and ego before people and planet.” Ω OPINION

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Will Great Basin GrazinG survive climate chanGe? by Dennis Myers

J

oe Guild is a member of one of Nevada’s older families. He manages a small ranch for another of the state’s pioneer families in Douglas County. Though he has a Reno law practice, ranching seems to be his preference. When he returned from military service and Vietnam in February 1971, he spent some time working on a Carson Valley ranch. Carson Valley is in Douglas County south of Carson City. The valley also contains Minden and Gardnerville. Guild is now 68 and back in Douglas County to ranch. And he’s worried about climate change. He’s not sure what it means for ranching. In the past, even droughts could be dealt with and waited out. But now there’s no certainty that this dry period will end. “This period of time is exactly what occurred in the 1930s,” Guild said. “I remember talking to an old rancher in Carson Valley when I was down there in the 1970s. So the worry is the uncertainty. Is this 1930s redux, is this the mid-1970s with two years considered a drought, is this 1880s redux or … are we in the beginning of a mega-drought? So it’s the uncertainty.” The ranch he now runs has a Forest Service grazing permit that allows its small herd of 170 to graze in the Carson-Iceberg Wilderness, all the way to the Pacific Crest Trail at one point, from June 16 to September 16 each year. Then the herd is brought back to a meadow maintained by the ranch. (Grazing takes place on both rangeland, composed mostly of native grasses and plants, and pastureland, composed of introduced or cultivated plants.) Surprisingly, the ranch has been able to keep its herd at normal size during these dry years. But that won’t last much longer. “Now, if we go into another winter like we’ve had … these past two winters, I’m going to have to recommend to the owners that they liquidate some of their cows,” Guild said. Someone once said that the West begins where the average rainfall drops below 20 inches a year, meaning that the region is already defined by its dryness. And it is in the West that so many cattle are grazed on public land—in an era of climate change. What happens when climate change hits the Western ground cover on which cattle feed?

THe

COWS

Terrain

Grazing. It’s a word identified with the West, part of the script of innumerable movie Westerns, a target for reformers who say the federal government undercharges on public lands, a target for environmentalists who claim the practice despoils the land. Grazing was the putative issue in the fight Cliven Bundy picked with the feds. Grazing is a cultural and political as much as an agricultural issue. And as we will see, there is division among experts on the impact and consequences of grazing. The danger to grazing could be very real. A term like “could” is not very satisfying, but science doesn’t deal in the certainty that its critics do. And grazing in Nevada could be a different matter than grazing elsewhere in the West. That’s because Nevada is in the Great Basin. The geography is different from other states, and

C OMe

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“The cows come home” continued on page 14

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“The cows come home” continued from page 13 it’s not known whether climate issues play out the same in Nevada as in Wyoming or Utah or Arizona, which have little or no portions of the Basin within their borders. Some scientists say the characteristics of the Great Basin—which nearly encompasses Nevada—mean that climate change may affect this region differently from other Western regions. Though sections of the Great Basin extend into four other states, Nevada is the dominant human-made jurisdiction within its territory. The term basin can be misleading. Nevada historian James Hulse has compared it to a bowl of mashed potatoes in which the potatoes in the center rise above the outside rim of the bowl. At any rate, the impact of climate change on the basin is still uncertain. Oregon State University beef cattle specialist Dave Bohnert: “The difficulty is we really do not have the answer. ... [Studies] lay out many scenarios and possibilities, but in general we do not really have an idea what will happen if temperatures do warm over the long-term. Tie this with potential changes in precipitation patterns and we are dealing with an answer of ‘It depends.’ I know that is not what you wanted to hear but that is about as good as I can do with the available data.” Denialists would likely see that as evidence for their viewpoint, but scientists have warned that lack of knowledge of all the implications of climate change should not be taken to mean climate change is not real. In a 2013 report by six scientists on rangelands and climate change, the authors argued, “Despite these uncertainties, it would be irresponsible to ignore the cumulative evidence for climate change—both the current footprint and model projections—on the basis that the rates and magnitude of change are not fully known.” A couple of years ago, University of Nevada, Reno rangeland scientist Sherman Swanson told us, “Somewhere through the middle of Nevada is a line, and we don’t know where it is. South of that line, it’ll be drier. North of that line, it’ll be wetter.” He may be in doubt on the exact effects of climate change, but not on climate change itself. While some folks portray the relationship between ranchers and the Bureau of Land Management as hostile, some of those close to the scene consider the agency too cozy to those it is supposed to regulate, which affects grazing and climate issues. Ranchers dislike scientific study of grazing, and BLM officials have resisted such studies on their behalf. In 2001, the New York Times reported on a plan for study of climate change factors that affect Western ranges. When scientists included grazing 14   |  RN&R   | 

MAY 7, 2015

among the factors being studied, it raised the hackles of BLM officials. When the study was completed, the grazing data was used in a federal study but BLM refused to release the data to the public so it could be used in non-federal studies, sparking a lawsuit. At an Oct. 11, 2007, congressional hearing in Las Vegas, Mark Salvo and Andy Kerr of the Sagebrush Sea Campaign gave a presentation that argued, “A primary cause of excessive wildfires in the Great Basin is the spread of flammable, nonnative cheatgrass. ... A primary cause of cheatgrass invasion is domestic livestock grazing. ... Rangelands restored with native species and ungrazed by livestock will be more resistant and resilient to climate change than

Best defense

Why would ranchers resist study of grazing? It’s not surprising. Grazing is under attack, and they become defensive. The livestock industry and grazing are often both cited as a cause of climate change, and that citation is frequently and unfortunately framed with a tone of blame and scapegoating. In 2008, a three-scientist study said, “Because of the regular presence of beef cows across the nation, beef cow vitality provides an effective indicator of the regional impact of climate change.” So there are things to be learned from ranching. But why should ranchers cooperate with such studies if they come back with recommendations that could put ranchers out of business?

more meat. Producing the annual beef diet of the average American emits as much greenhouse gas as a car driven more than 1,800 miles.” New York Times writer Mark Bittman has written, “A primer: The Earth may very well be running out of clean water, and by some estimates it takes 100 times more water (up to 2,500 gallons) to produce a pound of grain-fed beef than it does to produce a pound of wheat. We’re also running out of land: somewhere around 45 percent of the world’s land is either directly or indirectly involved in livestock production, and as forests are cleared to create new land for grazing animals or growing feed crops, the earth’s capacity to sequester greenhouse gases (trees are especially good at this) diminishes. I could go on

Legislative Exchange Council and the Heartland Institute dropping or softening their skepticism, denialism is becoming less common. Virtually all movement is away from skepticism. In Nevada, voices that might be expected to resist the notion of climate impact on ranching are open to it. Some of them wonder if the current drought is a reflection of climate change. Lynn Hettrick, deputy director of the Nevada Agriculture Department, for instance, does not dismiss the notion, as some might expect a former Republican speaker of the Nevada Assembly to do: “Well, there’s no doubt that the drought that is occurring—for whatever reason— is a big deal. Yes, it’s going to impact our folks out in rural Nevada, without question.” Sweetwater Ranch owner Bryan Masini, who currently runs between 3,000 and 4,000 cattle—down from his norm of 4,000 to 5,000—takes a similar view. “Well, obviously, with the drought today it is absolutely at this point almost unbearable for the agricultural community,” he said. “And whether it’s climate change based on what the environmentalists said or climate change based on day-to-day what’s happening, there is definitely something going on. What that is, I’m not a scientist, so I leave that to them. But what’s happening to us right now in the state of Nevada and a lot of the West is to the point of being a disaster.” His ranch follows an Eastern Sierra corridor from Nevada to Yosemite. “We’re backing off all the time, trying to make the grass fit the cattle situation,” he says of the struggle to graze his cattle. And Masini and Guild are in a relatively lush part of the region. For ranchers in central Nevada, life is even more grim.

and on about the dangers of producing and consuming too much meat ...” Those who write these kinds of things deemphasize the fact that there are real people behind statistics, people who support families and communities on their earnings from the livestock industry. On the other hand, some who say they support ranching are doing livestock families no favors by engaging in denialism. Range Magazine, for instance, is a forum for noted climate denialists Fred Singer (featured in the book and documentary Merchants of Doubt, in current release) and Michael Coffman. Ranching may be in real danger from climate change and needs support and information. Fortunately, with major denialist organizations like the American

The Center for Biological Diversity has said in an undated position paper: “The ecological costs of livestock grazing exceed that of any other western land use. In the arid Southwest, livestock grazing is the most widespread cause of species endangerment. By destroying vegetation, damaging wildlife habitats and disrupting natural processes, livestock grazing wreaks ecological havoc on riparian areas, rivers, deserts, grasslands and forests alike—causing significant harm to species and the ecosystems on which they depend.” Flat, unequivocal statements like this tend not to indicate any doubt, though scientists themselves are divided on the issue. Nor do such bloodless postures indicate any sense

A steer crosses  a dry lake.

degraded lands. ... The federal government should ... [d]iscontinue livestock grazing on federal public lands to eliminate a primary cause of weed invasion and increase the success of ecological and hydrological restoration programs in sagebrush steppe.” Mike Pellant of the Bureau of Land Management responded that his agency had a “team of fire and resource specialists ... addressing this issue with rancher input, remote sensing, monitoring data, and fire models to determine how livestock grazing may be used in the future to reduce catastrophic wildfires. This is one of several projects in the Great Basin addressing livestock, fuels, and wildfires.”

“we are dealing with an answer of ‘it depends.’” Dave Bohnert Oregon State scientist And that’s unfortunate, because ranchers badly need further research. Describing a United Nations report, Scientific American’s Nathan Fiala wrote, “Pound for pound, beef production generates greenhouse gases that contribute more than 13 times as much to global warming as do the gases emitted from producing chicken. For potatoes, the multiplier is 57. Beef consumption is rising rapidly, both as population increases and as people eat

C u lt u r e w a r


and allows authors to select the literature which supports particular points of view about grazing impacts.” The first study argued that range fires and the invasive plants that fueled them were fostered by grazing and livestock production. The second study argued that grazing is actually a tool that can be used to reduce range vegetation that fuels range fires. Will climate warming dry out grazing areas and put ranchers out of business? There are some who say that the future of ranching is set. A website called Clean Technica contends that ranching has been “outgunned” by climate change: “These are just the early days. Climate scientists predict that by the end of this century, current cattle-producing regions could average 75 to 120 days per year where the temperature exceeds 100°F. That will mean the end of the cattle industry.”

But most scientists are less categorical. One study argues that grazing issues could unfold in different ways and the policies need not be either/or: “Some potential negatives could be increases in woody plants and annual invasives, such as cheatgrass and medusahead. One possible scenario that this could cause is increased fuel loads on rangelands and, thereby, increased number and severity of wildfires. In another scenario livestock could be used to control fuel loads with properly managed grazing and potentially alter the timing and/ or duration of grazing to obtain the most beneficial (from an ecological and livestock production perspective—they do not have to be mutually exclusive).” Hettrick believes that the Great Basin enjoys advantages over other areas—history and experience: “The one advantage we have is that we’ve dealt with droughts forever, as you PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

of what their recommendations could mean for the livelihoods of many westerners. Masini, for instance, is a fourth generation operator of the Sweetwater, and his children are coming along behind him. In November 2012, a study by eight scientists argued that “livestock production—the most widespread and long-running commercial use of public lands—can alter vegetation, soils, hydrology and wildlife composition and abundances in ways that exacerbate the effects of climate change on these resources. ... Removing or reducing livestock across large areas of public land would alleviate a widely recognized and long-term stressor and make these lands less susceptible to the effects of climate change.” The study further said that federal law “explicitly recognizes the BLM’s authority (with congressional oversight) to “totally eliminate” grazing from large areas ... of public lands.” This was strong stuff, and 14 months later, a short review of the science by 27 scientists argued forcefully that the first study was wrong—and that it had cherry-picked the science to make its case. The complexity of climate change, the new survey said, “leads to challenges in synthesizing the scientific literature

Fourth generation rancher Bryan Masini: Will he be able to hand off to a fifth?

“We could be in a very serious situation in Western america.” Joe Guild Nevada rancher

well know. And California is finding out how really serious it is when you don’t have water, and they’re really struggling, where I think we’re a step ahead, but it doesn’t make it any better. We still have issues.” Guild keeps watching the science. “What are we facing here? If you look at the NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] predictions … there’s various scenarios playing out. If this high pressure ridge off the West Coast stays for a period of time, and we don’t know the length of which, we could be in a very serious situation in Western America. If the high pressure ridge stays where it is, and we get a repeat in the next few winters, the East Coast is going to get slammed. I mean, you know, I just read a ski report from Killington, Vermont, and they’re going to ski at Killington into June. Well, [Sierra ski area] Mammoth has skied into June in this past decade, so I don’t know. It’s the uncertainty because we don’t know and can’t predict. And the models—I think the models have flaws because FEMA’s created the models. Mother Nature didn’t have any input into the models. There’s a quote for you.”

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A locAl crAft distillery re-releAsed A whiskey first mAde on the nevAdA frontier before the civil wAr

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ome people, when they want to re-live history, dress up in handsewn soldiers’ garb, shoot some blanks from a revolver, and reenact the Battle of Gettysburg. Not Tom Adams. When he wants to go back in time, he recreates a different kind of shot—the intoxicating, liquid kind: period re-enactment whiskey.

Old Commissary, reportedly Nevada’s first commercially made whiskey, was produced circa 1862 by the Cave Creek Distillery (later the Overland Distillery) in Ruby Valley. According to Adams’ blog, in 1877, “the railroad brought Kentucky Bourbon out West, public tastes changed and the distillery was forced to liquidate.” He learned about all this from Steve Treehall, a friend from Ruby Valley. Adams is a born tinkerer who’s hard pressed to remember a time before he was fascinated by craft distilling. He’s also part-owner of Seven Troughs Distillery in Sparks, where the smallbatch spirits’ names and labels pay tribute to local phenomena: Black Rock Rum; RecessionProof Moonshine. So naturally, he decided he’d attempt to re-create Old Commissary Whiskey. In March of this year, he released the closest interpretation of the long-dormant brand he could come up with. Seven Troughs is in a tidy warehouse in an industrial neighborhood in Sparks. In a modest showroom at the front of the building, the aroma of sweet, raw corn greets visitors at the door. Wooden shelves are lined with tall bottles, mason jars, and clay jugs of spirits, and someone is usually chatting with customers from behind a three-stool bar or pouring samples into clear, plastic cups. On a recent Thursday morning, Adams, sporting a goatee, a polo shirt and the congenial nature of a native Nevadan who loves to tell a good story, explains his distilling process. At first glance, making a historic style looks like making any other whiskey. Barley is ground in a machine that looks like a bulletproof coffeegrinder, then yeasted and fermented in 130-gallon oak barrels. The barrels are coated on the inside with food-grade lime to add calcium to the water. That makes it more closely resemble the Ruby Valley’s water, which is reputed to be delicious. Employee Bryan Harter stirs the mash with a very long mixer bit attached to a drill. (Harter,

one of just three employees, has no official title; they call him The Mash Man.) Adams pauses to admire the vodka dripping from a tall, shiny, modern still, which manager Kelsey Kuhnmuench oversees. It comes out just right, and the two fist bump in celebration. Adams’ attention goes back to the Old Commissary process tour, and it’s here that things start to look a little different. This whiskey is distilled in a contraption that looks like a 100-gallon, steel tank grafted on top of a brick fireplace with a soot-coated, glass door. Is this usual? He shook his head and slowed his cadence: “Not. What. So. Ever. It is inefficient. And inconvenient. But it’s authentic.” He designed this still himself. “I’m not a mechanical engineer,” he said, but he’s no stranger to big projects. In his day job, he’s a geologic engineer who designs roadways.

Adams has soaked up a lot knowledge making his own spirits and visiting bourbon producers in Kentucky. For this project though, he was, to some extent, starting from scratch. “There’s no handbook for this,” he said. “We don’t have a recipe book that says, ‘Do this, this and this.’” So he called Joyce Cox, formerly head of reference with the Nevada State Library. She’s retired now, but she still does contract research. Adams asked her to help piece together the story behind Old Commissary. Cox said newspapers were often the most fruitful sources. Searching digitized versions of papers such as the Daily Nevada State Journal from Reno and the Reese River Reveille from Austin, she found stories about the origin and culture of Fort Ruby, whose soldiers bought the whiskey. She found detailed references to the area’s farming output, which included copious amounts of barley, and a for-sale ad for the distillery in a San Francisco paper. After about a month of research, she presented Adams with an inch-thick stack of photocopies, sparsely marked with a yellow highlighter, and a cover letter saying that it had been a fun project. While Cox was piecing together shards of history, Adams was noticing that not even a shard of surviving bottles of Old Commissary have been found. He talked with historic glass expert Fred Holabird, who advised that the

whiskey had likely been sold in clay jugs. Through a friend of friend, Adams met potter Joe Winter. As luck would have it, Winter had recently perfected wheel-thrown, ceramic beer growlers for breweries and retailers in the region, with each company’s logo stamped into the clay. “Tom showed me pictures of old-style bottles,” said Winter. “They’re all obviously salt-fired.” That means salt is thrown into the kiln during firing. It melts and forms a glaze-like, translucent coating on the bottles. Winter was already a master of the technique, so getting a historically accurate glaze was no problem. The challenge was getting the size right. The bottles need to hold exactly the required 750 ml. Clay shrinks when it’s fired, and this particular clay shrinks enough to change the volume of the bottle by about 30 percent. “It took some fine tuning,” he said. “I threw a few and then measured them after they were fired, then made little adjustments.” Winter has produced about 50 bottles so far, about 30 of which have sold, some to history fans, some to whiskey fans, and some to collectors who say they’ll keep the whiskey unopened on a shelf indefinitely. He plans to produce more, but producing pottery is intensely timeconsuming, and he has other projects underway too, so the historic bottles will remain something of a special edition. The rest of the whiskey, which Adams plans to keep producing, will be sold in glass bottles. “We’re happy with the product,” Adams said, pouring a sample. “Customers like it. It’s unique. It has an organic, grainy nose; it’s raw.” The rawness is his least favorite part if it. “Surprisingly smooth; the husks lend a little astringency to an iodine note; the nose is very green, not floral, not oaky; wildly the opposite of bourbon.” Adams said he’s not offended when drinkers add a splash of ginger beer. He said in-house mixologist Jeremy Fried is working on incorporating Old Commissary into a few cocktail recipes. While Adams may not have found ready-touse recipes or original packaging, he did find that in Elko County, oral history traditions run deep. He’s heard some great stories while researching frontier-style whiskey, and he’s hoping to learn more. Ruby Valley and Elko County residents, if you have a story about the original Old Commissary or anything related, Tom Adams would like to hear it. Of course, he said, “The holy grail would be to cough up a bottle of Old Commissary.” Ω


Seven Troughs Distillery co-owner Tom Adams has recreated Nevada’s first commercially produced whiskey.

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PHoTo/KriS Vagner

Seven Troughs Distilling Co. is at 1155 Watson Way, Sparks. Hours are 3-6 p.m., Wed-Fri, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat., and Sun. by appointment. For more information, visit www.7troughsdistilling.com or call 219-9403. OPINION

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Photo/Josie Luciano

What’s mine

Some of the photos featured in Pit Stops: Open Pit Mine Overlooks in the West, on display st Sierra Nevada College.

Center for Land Use Interpretation The Center for Land Use Interpretation is a nonprofit organization that catalogs “unusual and by exemplary” instances of land use across Josie Luciano the United States. CLUI presents information to the public about the contemporary landscape through a series of programs, exhibits, artist residencies, and its massive land use database. Since its inception in 1994, art critics and environmental activists have attempted to unpack the organization’s intentions and political motives only to Pit stops: open Pit find that the center’s straightforward Mine overlooks in the message also reads word-for-word as West is on display at its mission statement: “Dedicated to the sierra nevada college, increase and diffusion of information 999 tahoe Blvd., about how the nation’s lands are apporincline Village, 8311314, in the Garage tioned, utilized and perceived.” Door Gallery until June Taken at face value, this mission 5. For more informamakes CLUI sound a lot like any other tion, visit www.sierbuilding-based, possibly stodgy, probably ranevada.edu. government-funded land institution in the country. But unlike federal agencies whose primary activities are driven by

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policy or environmental organizations whose missions center around changing human behavior, the center treats its viewers like rational beings who—upon observing evidence of land transformation—can simply take a step back and adjust for the view. This “step back” perspective also applies to Pit Stops: Open Pit Mine Overlooks of the West, the center’s latest exhibit currently on display at Sierra Nevada College through June 5. Curated by CLUI program manager Aurora Tang, this collection from the organization’s photo archives depicts iconic vistas of open pit mines and the infrastructures and overlooks that make up their public face. Tang’s original attraction to pit mines crept up on the periphery of her work. “Over the years, I have found myself visiting and documenting these very exciting open pit mine overlook sites, often on the way to work on other projects or jobs,” she said. “These overlooks provide curious onlookers a glimpse into a complex industry that is often very

much a mystery to the general public.” In this series of 60 photographs, images of gaping voids are framed by interpretive plaques, designated photo spots, and giant mining truck tires. From the Yerington and Ruth mines of rural Nevada to mining towns like Bisbee and Butte in Arizona and Montana, these overlook sites mimic those of the Grand Canyon or other national park vistas. It’s all a little absurd but not entirely surprising. Experiencing one’s surroundings from another person’s vantage point practically comes with the territory—any territory—as everyone from mining companies and city planners to museums

and universities puts careful thought into curating viewers’ daily interactions with the environment. But CLUI is no naked eyeball. For every layer of interpretation it peels back, the center adds its own. Field research documents, bus tours, photographs, and the trappings of art exhibits all bring with them the context of their particular formats and the authority that comes with being an institution dedicated to the public good. On May 5, gallery visitors were invited to watch an interpretive panel discuss CLUI’s perspective on the excavation companies’ contextualization of the mining sites. Of course, if it all got to be too much, visitors were free to walk out into the desert until their minds went blank—or they reached an open pit mine, whichever came first. Ω


Sweet talk Icecycle Creamery & Pedalers Deli

Photo/ALLison Young

there’s good service, and then there’s “I really care about this product and the work I put into it.” Hard to say when I’ve witnessed this much enthusiasm while ordering either ice cream or sandwiches in recent memory. I went with “The Fixe” on jalapeño cheddar bread ($8.75). What I received was a sandwich big enough for two, stuffed with porchetta, salami, provolone, red pepper, aioli, olives, pepperoncini, arugula, tomato, onion and seasonings. The bread was a large, sweet French roll topped with cheese and chiles, baked fresh that morning and every bit as good as it sounds. I added a cup of pork chile verde ($2 with a sandwich, $3.50 on its own), and I’m glad I did. More of a stew than soup, this cup of spicy, piggy goodness was almost better than the sandwich. Let’s call it even. My wife ordered “The Cruiser” on the same bread ($8.75), featuring ham, turkey, Monterey jack, avocado, mustard, mayo, lettuce, tomato, onion and pickle. She enjoyed it but felt the bread was a bit on the sweet side. I tried a bite and had to admit hers tasted sweeter than mine. Not sure why that could be—perhaps the selection of ingredients somehow brought out a sweet note my sandwich lacked? Speaking of sweetness, there’s plenty of that on the ice cream side of the room. Available in waffle and sugar cones, hand-packed pints, half pints, quarter-pints and cups, the flavors vary week-to-week depending on the mood of the wizard behind the curtain. Having just had a sizeable meal, we settled on single-scoop cones ($2.50 each), my wife choosing Earl Grey tea while I threw the diet out the window and chose maple bacon. Real chunks of bacon, real maple extract. Damn, that’s good. My wife only made it through half her cone, partly due to being full and the fact that this ice cream is closer to the fatty mouthfeel of gelato than not, something she doesn’t particularly love. I’m not a huge fan of bergamot, but I finished her cone because at this level of quality, it’d be a shame not to. Other flavors we tasted included sweet potato casserole (more like pie), fresh prince of Persia (rosewater, pistachio), chocolate salted lavender, pineapple jalapeño sorbet, toasted sesame (think tahini), and ricotta fig. Somehow I missed tasting the “I Do Declare” bourbon peach, but I’ll definitely be back to try that and more. Ω

renowned for baking amazing breads, the foundation of many a childhood sandwich. I’m reminded of these moments after my recent visit to the Iceycle Creamery & Pedalers Deli, a small shop serving a combination of creative ice creams and sandwiches featuring fresh-baked bread. The business name stems from its origins as a bicycle ice cream cart that still makes occasional appearances around town. The bicycle theme is reflected in sandwiches with names such as “Tricycle Club” and “Pedalerstrami,” even extending a 10 percent discount to cyclists who ride to lunch. The staff working during our visit were beyond friendly, eager to answer questions and offer information about the menu. I mention this because

For more information, visit icecyclecreamery. com and pedalersdeli.com

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When the latest Marvel movie wrapped, I realized a terrible thing for a fanboy like me: I had just watched 2 and a half hours of stuff that did relatively nothing for me. It was all just a big blur intermittently interrupted by half-interesting moments. It was boring. You can’t accuse director Joss Whedon of “second verse, same as the first” with Avengers: by Age of Ultron. He and his team definitely go Bob Grimm for something different with this sequel to one of the greatest blockbusters ever made. As b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m things turn out, perhaps it would’ve been OK to retain more of the good humor, camp and noncluttered thrills that made the original Avengers such a gas. It’s flat. Nothing of any real consequence happens here other than a bunch of scenes teasing future Marvel movies and some action sequences that lack clarity. With the exception of an interesting smackdown between Iron Man and the Hulk, the action sequences feel repetitive.

2

Hulk smash. Hulk sad.

1 Poor

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The Ultron of the movie’s title is a series of robots inhabited by an A.I. program initiated by Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.). Stark, thinking he can create a security force that can save the world and attain peace, gets a little ahead of himself, forgoes the approval of his fellow Avengers with the exception of Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo), and starts the program, only to discover that A.I. can sometimes mean Absolute Insanity. The program goes AWOL and produces the anti-human Ultron. Voiced by James Spader, Ultron is a onenote villain who lacks the personality of Tom Hiddleston’s Loki and other recent comic book villains. He’s not a formidable bad guy, probably in part because he’s just a CGI creation voiced by an actor. All of the great Marvel and D.C. villains are usually a little more on the human side. Ultron comes off as a third-rate

Transformers Decepticon. Yes, Spader has a menacing voice, but he’s no James Earl Jones. On the other hand, the Vision—a sort of good guy offshoot of the same program that produces Ultron—is a far more interesting character. Derived from Jarvis, the program that propelled the Iron Man suits and played by Paul Bettany, the Vision is a welcomed member to the roster. Bettany’s likeness is actually used in the Vision, and he looks cool. Also new to the roster is Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen) and Quicksilver (Aaron Taylor-Johnson). Scarlet Witch does the mind control thing, which Whedon chooses to illustrate with a visual that looks like red mist surrounding her victim’s head. This reminded me of Uma Thurman’s Poison Ivy and her red mist mind-controlling pheromones in Joel Schumacher’s Batman & Robin. When it comes to comic book movies, it is never a good thing when anything reminds you of Batman & Robin. Quicksilver is a potentially fun character, but Johnson’s incarnation isn’t half as interesting as Evan Peters playing the part in last year’s X-Men: Days of Future Past. Nothing the Quicksilver character does in this films rivals the visual greatness of the Magneto rescue scene in X-Men. The film plays around with the notion of Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and the Hulk having an affair. We get a couple of scenes with Black Widow managing to get the Hulk to calm down, and a little bit of Ruffalo and Johansson sort of flirting, but the subplot doesn’t really go anywhere. While the original Avengers was a terrific showcase for the Hulk, the latest mostly loses the big green guy in the shuffle. Also, they give Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) a wife in a failed effort to raise his character above least-interesting Avenger. If you are an Avengers fan, I guess you have to see Age of Ultron simply because it sets up a series of other films and you might find yourself lost when watching future movies like Captain America: Civil War, Thor: Ragnarok or Black Widow: She Will Never Have her Own Movie … What Gives? As for Whedon, perhaps he was the wrong man for the gig. The sequel searches for a darker tonal shift, a sort of Empire Strikes Back for the Avengers. The result is one of the year’s most crushing cinematic letdowns. Ω


3

Danny Collins

Ex Machina

Maggie

This one certainly boasts a promising premise: A father (Arnold Schwarzenegger) keeps authorities at bay as he deals with the slow death of his daughter (Abigail Breslin) who is becoming a cannibal zombie. Unfortunately, director Henry Hobson takes this premise and soft pedals it, making the movie less a horror film than it is a disease-of-the-week family drama. While the leads do some decent work, there’s little in this movie that surprises or, more importantly, scares. I got the sense that the folks putting this movie together went in with one idea, and perhaps wound up with something completely different. It’s PG-13, and there are scenes that play as if they were re-edited to attain that rating. Schwarzenegger can’t really catch a break since coming out of semi-retirement, even though he’s putting in some of his best performances. Breslin did zombies much better with Zombieland. Joely Richardson plays the mom role as if she has no idea what kind of movie she is in. Hobson’s movie was highly anticipated by genre and Arnie fans, and it’s a bit of a letdown. (Available for rent on Amazon.com, iTunes and On Demand during a limited theatrical release.)

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GREEN

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There have been some good—actually great—horror movies released in the last couple of years. This, the latest entry in the tired found-footage subgenre, isn’t one of them. What you get here is an entire film that requires you to watch somebody’s computer screen where a bunch of obnoxious teens are skyping one another. A ghostly presence inexplicably enters the conversation and knocks off the kids, one by one, while they scream and plead for mercy. They, of course, never go out of frame for too long and always manage to take their camera with them no matter how much their lives are in danger. The chat starts with Blaire (Shelley Hennig) and Mitch (Moses Jacob Storm … yes, that’s his name), a boyfriend and girlfriend talking about the dirty things they will do on prom night when a bunch of their friends rudely join the chat party. They all goof on each other and wonder who the unidentified person is who has mysteriously joined the chat. As it so happens, the chat is taking place on the oneyear anniversary of their friend Laura’s suicide. Laura (Heather Sossaman) couldn’t stand the public ridicule she endured after somebody posted a video of her passed out and dumping her pants at a party. Now it appears Laura, or somebody pretending to be Laura by using her social networking accounts, is out for revenge. If you like horror, go with The Babadook or It Follows. Those films actually have real narratives where the protagonists actually leave the house and there are real cinematographers and editors involved. If you have strong urge to see this, just Skype a couple of your friends, call them some bad names, and stare at them while they yell at you on your home screen for 82 minutes. It’s basically the same thing, and would probably be far more entertaining.

FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

RN&R

NEWS

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Unfriended

Men playing with microchips learn that perhaps highly intelligent robots aren’t the best idea in this competent and exciting directorial debut from Alex Garland, who also wrote the script. Computer programmer Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson) wins a weekend hanging out with his eccentric, reclusive boss Nathan (Oscar Isaac) at his secluded house in the middle of nowhere. Shortly after arriving, Caleb learns that he’s to take part in an experiment where he must interact with Nathan’s latest creation: a mightily attractive and lifelike robot named Ava (Alicia Vikander). Caleb is told to analyze Ava’s legitimacy as a full-blown A.I., a thinking robot with emotional capability. He does this, and develops a robot crush along the way. Not only is Nathan playing god, but he’s totally using Caleb as a guinea pig. While Garland could’ve easily made this a Caleb vs. Nathan affair, he tosses in enough variables and throws plenty of curveballs to keep the audience guessing. The film works as a thriller, science fiction, a mystery, and even passes a few horror movie tests. Isaac is developing into one of his generation’s best actors, and he’s quite the chameleon. His Nathan is a slithery, hard-drinking, narcissistic, brilliant mess of a human, and a far cry from the grouchy folk singer he played in Inside Llewyn Davis. Garland has been kicking around Hollywood for years, delivering solid screenplays for the likes of 28 Days Later, Dredd and Sunshine. His work behind the camera here definitely points to a future directing if he wants it.

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The latest Furious movie says goodbye to series mainstay Paul Walker while taking car chases to seriously outlandish and fantastical extremes. In some ways, the film has become more of a science fiction offering rather than a car chase movie, and that’s fine by me. I have to admit that part of me got uncomfortable watching Paul Walker racing around in cars a little over a year after he died in a fiery car crash. You can say Walker died doing something he loved, but I’m thinking irresponsible and reckless speeding dropped way down on his favorite things list during the final moments of his life. Like, to the way, way bottom of that list. That said, Furious 7 does spark some life into a very tired franchise by going totally bananas, and it’s pretty remarkable how Walker, who had allegedly only filmed half of his scenes before he died, is inserted into the movie posthumously. Director James Wan, primarily known for horror movies like Saw and The Conjuring, has delivered the franchise’s best offering since the first one. This movie gets my blessing for the sequence involving Vin Diesel’s Dominic Toretto and Walker’s Brian O’Conner jumping a car through not one but two skyscrapers in Abu Dhabi. Will there be an eighth film, even though Walker is no longer with us? Um, given that the movie made nearly $144 million in its opening weekend, I think it’s a foregone conclusion that Universal will find a way to keep the engines running on this sucker.

w w w. n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Al Pacino steps up as the title character, a Neil Diamond-like rock singer who has spent the past 40 years touring and performing “the hits.” No longer a productive songwriter, he’s come to rely on the comfort of crowds reacting happily to his most popular hit, “Baby Doll.” He’s also heavy into drugs and alcohol and engaged to a girl half his age. On the eve of his birthday, his manager (a delightfully acerbic Christopher Plummer) gives him a special present: a framed personal letter to him that John Lennon wrote many years ago that was never delivered. Lennon had once read an article about Collins, was moved, and sent a correspondence from him and Yoko with his phone number. He was offering some fatherly advice to the confused young Danny, but due to a scummy collector getting his hands on the letter, Danny never got it. The gift throws Danny into a tailspin, wondering what life would’ve been like if he could’ve called Lennon and been pals. Trivia note: This element of the story is actually based on the true story of folk singer Steve Tilston, who received a similar reassuring letter from John Lennon 34 years after it was written, phone number and all. Pacino is good here, as is a supporting cast that includes Bobby Cannavale, Jennifer Garner and Annette Bening.

OPINION

3

Furious 7

Jake (Nick Kroll) loses all of his money on a get-rich tech scheme, and winds up moving in with his sister Justine (Rose Byrne) and her husband, Danny (Bobby Cannavale). Jakes takes a temporary gig as their son’s nanny. The trip helps to straighten out Jake as he gets a deeper appreciation of family, but not before some speed bumps are hit. This is standard, by-the-numbers stuff made almost tolerable by Kroll, Byrne and Cannavale, who try to make the most of it. Cannavale is especially good as the happy-go-lucky brother-in-law who doesn’t mind Jake crashing at his place because he gets somebody to smoke pot with. Byrne is funny as the pregnant mom who never gets to go out and has a few issues with her deadbeat brother. Kroll is OK as a guy having a mini-meltdown, although he seems more suited to broader comedy. Blink and you’ll miss Joel McHale in a small role as Jake’s coke-snorting buddy, and Bobby Moynihan of Saturday Night Live as a clothing store clerk. Directed by Ross Katz, who captures some good performances with a script that leaves a lot to be desired. (Available for rent on iTunes, On Demand and Amazon.com during a limited theatrical release.)

4

Gift certificates to local merchants for up to 50% off

Adult Beginners

Gift certificates to local merchants for up to 50% off

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MAY 7, 2015

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WHO: Archie Wood WHAT: Tattoo Artist & Owner WHERE: Battle Born Tattoo Q: What brought you to tattooing? A: I was interested in tattooing because of the art and the people. I love interacting with so many different kinds of folks. Q: What is your favorite style or kind of tattoo to do? A: My favorite style of tattooing would have to be Traditional American and Traditional Japanese. However, I try not to hold myself to just a few styles. Q: What makes your shop different from others in the area? A: I think the thing that makes my shop different than others is the good attitude of the artists that work here. We do our best to make sure everyone has a good experience whether they are heavily tattooed, or just getting their first one.

Have a piece from one of these shops or artists that you'd like to feature? Email a JPG file to contest@newsreview.com and put “Ink'd Reno” in the subject line. Include your full name, age and daytime phone. Entries will be featured on our Facebook Fan Page.

Ink’d by: Archie Wood Battle Born Tattoo • 1717 S. Wells Ave. (775) 327-4465 •

BattleBornTattooReno

Ink’d by: Jordan Isaacson Reno Tattoo Company • 143 N. Virginia Street (775) 322-6393 • www.renoTatco.com

Ink’d by: Crizzo A Toda Madre Tattoos • 1465 S. Wells Avenue (775) 622-8189 • /ATMTATTOOS

Ink’d by: Sarah McGraw Pulsing Canvas Tattoo, Piercing & Art Studio 1939 Prater Way • (775) 622-1023 •

/Pulsing-Canvas-Art-Tattoo

Ink’d by: Griffen Graehl, Acetate done by Pat “the picture machine” Martynuik Body Graphics Tattoo • 460 S. Wells Avenue (775) 322-8623 • www.renotattoo.com

Ink’d by: Stephanie Cootware Valor Tattoo Parlor • 141 Vesta Street (775) 324-0404 • www.valorparlor.com

Ink’d by: Mark Marked-Studios, Inc. • 945 W. Moana Lane (775) 209-1612 • www.markedstudios.com

Ink’d by: John Seaver Distinct Ink • 934 Corbett St • Carson City (775) 883-6878 • Distinct-Ink-Tattoos

Ink’d by: Anthony L. Velazquez Black Widow Ink • 487 E. Plumb Lane (775) 329-4369 • www.blackwidowink.com

Ink’d by: Monica Gurnari Artistic Traditions • 2975 Vista Blvd, #104

BEFORE

AFTER

We specialize in full color removal and modification. Let us help you get a cover up! Reno Tattoo Removal • 425 Marsh Ave (775) 200-0623 • www.renotattooremoval.com 22 

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may 7, 2015

Ink’d by: Jason Lynch Black Cat Tattoo • 905 S. Wells Ave (775) 324-9900 • /Black-Cat-Tattoo

(775) 626-2400 •

ArtisticTraditions


By any other name The Gina Rose Band Reno is a big enough town that there are many different kinds of musicians here, but it’s small enough that everybody by Brad Bynum knows people from different parts of the music community, and sometimes bradb@ that leads to unusual collaborations— newsre view.c om like a metal rhythm section backing up a coffee shop troubadour. Gina Rose Waller is a young singer-songwriter. She has a gorgeous, melancholy alto voice and a decent knack for writing memorable, folksy, Western tunes. She can pull off the solo girl-with-an-acoustic-guitar thing as well as just about anybody, but paired with a rocking rhythm section and playing her big open chords on a slightly distorted electric guitar, her songs really take off.

Photo/Brad Bynum

skills are applied to a simpler, more unusual—almost unclassifiable—style of music. Waller is a confident singer who can sing comfortably in a variety of styles, including down in the tenor range. Her voice sounds sad, but also oddly comforting. She writes personal songs with lyrics that are either wise-beyond-her-years or grew-up-too-fast, or both, depending on your perspective. “Is This What You Call Love,” for example, is about domestic abuse. Even in their full band versions, the songs still retain some of the flavor of the solitary songwriter. “When I first started, I was just a bedroom rocker,” said Waller. “It’s good when I play by myself, but when I play with them, it’s like every element of music I like.” She’s only been writing songs for a year-and-ahalf, but she’s been playing guitar and singing for longer. She learned how to play guitar when she was 8 years old. More recently, she started playing cover songs at coffee shop openmic nights, and decided that if she was going to play shows, she ought to start writing tunes. “I got really good feedback from other people and that motivated me to write more songs,” she said. The Gina Rose Band’s debut album, Desatoya, was just released digitally on the band’s BandCamp website. It was recorded locally with Rick Spagnola of Dogwater Studios and released by Reno label Damn Deal Done Records, with plans to press vinyl and CDs. The album is diverse—with solo acoustic songs and Crazy Horse-style rockers. The album title refers to a Nevada mountain range, and the title track is a post-rock instrumental in the vein of Explosions in the Sky—but with a distinctly Western flavor. “When we were trying to put this into a genre, we didn’t really know if we could put it under indie rock or Americana or rock ’n’ roll or what it was,” said Waller. The Gina Rose Band can’t be easily pigeonholed into any single genre, but it’s the sort of exciting, weird hybrid band that’s recognizably from Northern Nevada. Ω

Waller, Tyrus Legg and John Bigby, all teenagers, are the Gina Rose Band. Waller sings and plays guitar. Legg is the drummer, and Bigby, the bass player. At first glance, the bassist and drummer seem like they must belong to a different band than Waller. Bigby has long blond hair and likes to wear corpse paint onstage. Legg wears Iron Maiden T-shirts. Bigby plays a five-string bass, and Legg uses a double-bass pedal. Those pieces of equipment are considered superfluous in just about every genre besides heavy metal—and in fact, Legg and Bigby also play in two metal-influenced local bands, Idol Smasher and Victims of the Cave. In the Gina Rose Band, the two metalheads play very tasteful support, providing accompaniment that rarely showcases their technical chops but instead simply enhances Waller’s songs. They clearly have the skills to play technically demanding metal, but in the Gina Rose Band, those

Difficult to pigeonhole: Tyrus Legg, Gina Rose Waller and John Bigby are the Gina Rose Band.

For more information, and to hear the Gina rose Band’s album desatoya, visit theginaroseband. bandcamp.com.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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MAY 7, 2015

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RN&R

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THURSDAY 5/7 1UP

214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET

FRIDAY 5/8

SATURDAY 5/9

Griffage, CharlestheFirst, Boggan, Game Genie vs. Kronyax, others, 10pm, $10-$50

Mikey Lion, Sabo, Miss Cooper and Her Pet Craigslist Hookup, others, 10pm, $10-$50

SUNDAY 5/10

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Busking By Moonlite, Spontaneous Groove Bazooka Joe, Rigorous Proof, 10pm, $5 Party, Niko’s Mystery Vaporchestra, 10pm, $5

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover After Mic, 11:30pm, W, no cover

5 STAR SALOON

Karaoke, 10pm, no cover

Dance party w/DJ DoublePlay, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after

Open Mic w/Steve Elegant, 7pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke, 10pm, W, no cover

132 West St., (775) 329-2878

Dance party w/DJ DoublePlay, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after

The Polish Ambassador 40 MILE SALOON

Gaytheist, Baby Gurl, PostWar, 9pm, no cover

1495 S. Virginia St., (775) 323-1877

May 9, 9 p.m. Cargo 255 N. Virginia St. 398-5400

BAR-M-BAR

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

BRASSERIE ST. JAMES

Strange on the Range, 7pm, W, no cover

901 S. Center St., (775) 348-8888

CARGO AT WHITNEY PEAK HOTEL

The Polish Ambassador, Wildlight, Tumba-Powered, 9pm, $20-$35

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

CEOL IRISH PUB

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

Comedy

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RN&R

Gnarly Pints, 9pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Norm Follett, 7pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Chaz O’Neill, 9:30pm, no cover

ELBOW ROOM BAR

Jokers Wild Blues Band, 9pm, no cover

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-9799

FUEGO

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088

HIMMEL HAUS

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MAY 7, 2015

Second Tuesday Jam, 7pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Nitesong Productions, 9pm, Tu, Open Mic/Ladies Night, 8:30pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Canyon White Open Mic Night, 8pm, no cover Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 622-8878

Carson Feet Warmers, 11:30am, Tu, no cover Mile High Jazz Band, 8pm, Tu, $5

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL HELLFIRE SALOON

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Karaoke Night, 6:30pm, Tu, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

HANGAR BAR

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

Rick Hammond Band, 9:30pm, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665

24

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St., Carson City, 882-1626: Mike Faverman, F, 7:30pm, $13-$15 Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Willie Barcena, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Kermet Apio, Tu-W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Todd Glass, Daniel Kinno, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Vince Morris, Michael Palascak, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Mike Faverman, F, 9pm; Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm; Su, 7pm, $10-$15

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/11-5/13

Mustache Kitty, 8:30pm, no cover Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover


THURSDAY THURSDAY5/7 5/7 THE THEHOLLAND HOLLANDPROJECT PROJECT

FRIDAY FRIDAY5/8 5/8

SATURDAY SATURDAY5/9 5/9

SUNDAY SUNDAY5/10 5/10

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY MONDAY-WEDNESDAY5/11-5/13 5/11-5/13

Characters, Characters,Skinwalkers, Skinwalkers, Wait WaitFor ForYesterday, Yesterday,8pm, 8pm,$5$5

140140Vesta VestaSt.,St.,(775) (775)742-1858 742-1858

Steve SteveRoggenbuck, Roggenbuck,7pm, 7pm,Tu,Tu,nonocover cover SVC SVCSpeak SpeakEasy, Easy,7:30pm, 7:30pm,W,W,$5$5

JUB JUBJUB’S JUB’STHIRST THIRSTPARLOR PARLOR

E-40, E-40,Stevie StevieStone, Stone,Tae TaeBreeze, Breeze, Guilty GuiltyOne, One,D-Rey, D-Rey,CA2NV, CA2NV,7:30pm, 7:30pm,$30 $30

7171S.S.Wells WellsAve., Ave.,(775) (775)384-1652 384-1652

Twiztid, Twiztid,Kung KungFuFuVampire, Vampire,Davey DaveySuicide, Suicide, The TheDamn DamnDirty DirtyApes, Apes,7:30pm, 7:30pm,M,M,$20 $20

THE THEJUNGLE JUNGLE

Outspoken: Outspoken:Open OpenMic MicNight, Night, 7pm, 7pm,M,M,nonocover cover

246246W.W.First FirstSt.,St.,(775) (775)329-4484 329-4484

KNITTING KNITTINGFACTORY FACTORYCONCERT CONCERTHOUSE HOUSE

Gaytheist Gaytheist

Comedy Night w/Joe Klocek, Richard Hunter, Comedy Night w/Joe Klocek, Richard Hunter, WeWePredict PredictA ARiot RiotEPEPrelease releaseparty, party, Emily Devine, JayJay Randall, 8:30pm, $6$6 8pm, Emily Devine, Randall, 8:30pm, 8pm,$6-$10 $6-$10

211211N.N.Virginia VirginiaSt.,St.,(775) (775)323-5648 323-5648

THE THELOVING LOVINGCUP CUP

Whatitdo WhatitdoWednesday, Wednesday,9pm, 9pm,W,W,nonocover cover

188188California CaliforniaAve., Ave.,(775) (775)322-2480 322-2480

MOODY’S MOODY’SBISTRO BISTROBAR BAR&&BEATS BEATS 10007 10007Bridge BridgeSt.,St.,Truckee; Truckee;(530) (530)587-8688 587-8688

Quartet QuartetMinus MinusOne, One,8pm, 8pm,nonocover cover

LeLeBoeuf BoeufBrothers, Brothers,8:30pm, 8:30pm,nonocover cover

LeLeBoeuf BoeufBrothers, Brothers,8:30pm, 8:30pm,nonocover cover

O’SKIS O’SKISPUB PUB&&GRILLE GRILLE

Shamrockit ShamrockitOpen OpenMic MicNight, Night, 6pm, 6pm,nonocover cover

840840Victorian VictorianAve., Ave.,Sparks; Sparks;(775) (775)359-7547 359-7547

PADDY PADDY&&IRENE’S IRENE’SIRISH IRISHPUB PUB

906-A 906-AVictorian VictorianAve., Ave.,Sparks; Sparks;(775) (775)358-5484 358-5484

Acoustic AcousticWonderland WonderlandSinger-Songwriter Singer-Songwriter Karaoke Karaokew/Cyco w/CycoMike, Mike, Showcase, 9pm, Showcase,8pm, 8pm,nonocover cover 9pm,nonocover cover

POLO POLOLOUNGE LOUNGE

Johnny JohnnyLipka’s Lipka’sGemini, Gemini,9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

1559 1559S.S.Virginia VirginiaSt.,St.,(775) (775)322-8864 322-8864

Johnny JohnnyLipka’s Lipka’sGemini, Gemini,9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

RED REDDOG DOGSALOON SALOON

Open OpenMic MicNight, Night,7pm, 7pm,M,M,W,W,nonocover cover

7676N.N.C CSt.,St.,Virginia VirginiaCity; City;(775) (775)847-7474 847-7474

RUBEN’S RUBEN’SCANTINA CANTINA

Ruben’s Ruben’sHouse HouseParty, Party,9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

1483 1483E. E.Fourth FourthSt.,St.,(775) (775)622-9424 622-9424

SINGER SINGERSOCIAL SOCIALCLUB CLUB

Blues BluesJam JamThursday, Thursday,7pm, 7pm,nonocover cover

SPARKS SPARKSLOUNGE LOUNGE

Thursday ThursdayShowcase, Showcase,8pm, 8pm,nonocover cover

219219W.W.Second SecondSt.,St.,(775) (775)657-9466 657-9466 1237 1237Baring BaringBlvd., Blvd.,Sparks; Sparks;(775) (775)409-3340 409-3340

May May10, 10,9 9p.m. p.m. 4040Mile MileSaloon Saloon 1495 S. Virginia 1495 S. VirginiaSt. St. 323-1877 323-1877

ST. ST.JAMES JAMESINFIRMARY INFIRMARY

HipHipHop HopOpen OpenMic, Mic,10pm, 10pm,W,W,nonocover cover Jazz JazzJam JamTuesday Tuesdayw/First w/FirstTake, Take, 8pm, 8pm,Tu,Tu,nonocover cover

Local LocalMusic MusicNight Nightw/local w/localbands bands ororlocal localDJs, DJs,9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

445 445California CaliforniaAve., Ave.,(775) (775)657-8484 657-8484

Reggae ReggaeNight, Night,10pm, 10pm,nonocover cover

STUDIO STUDIOON ON4TH 4TH

432432E. E.Fourth FourthSt.,St.,(775) (775)737-9776 737-9776

Dance Danceparty, party,9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu,Tu, Reno Beer and Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Reno Beer and Record Club w/guest DJs, 9pm, W,W, nono cover Record Club w/guest DJs, 9pm, cover

Laganja LaganjaEstranja, Estranja,DJDJFreddo, Freddo, 10pm, 10pm,$15$15

Busking BuskingByByMoonlite, Moonlite,Whitebulbs, Whitebulbs, Walk WalkByBySea, Sea,8pm, 8pm,W,W,$7$7

WILD WILDRIVER RIVERGRILLE GRILLE

Twiztid Twiztid May May11,11,7:30 7:30p.m. p.m. Jub JubJub’s Jub’sThirst ThirstParlor Parlor 7171S.S.Wells Ave. Wells Ave. 384-1652 384-1652

Sunday SundayJazz, Jazz,2pm, 2pm,nonocover cover

1717S.S.Virginia VirginiaSt.,St.,(775) (775)284-7455 284-7455

WILDFLOWER WILDFLOWERVILLAGE VILLAGE

1) 1)The TheWriters’ Writers’Block BlockOpen OpenMic, Mic,

4275-4395 4275-4395W.W.Fourth FourthSt.,St.,(775) (775)787-3769 787-3769 7pm, cover 7pm,nono coverPage 1 280945_4.75_x_5.5 4/7/15 11:00 AM 1) 1)Golden GoldenRose RoseCafe Cafe2)2)Green GreenFairy FairyPubPub3)3)Cabaret Cabaret

1) 1)Reno RenoMusic MusicProject ProjectOpen OpenMic, Mic, 7pm, 7pm,nonocover cover

3)3)Jack JackDiDiCarlo, Carlo,5pm, 5pm,nonocover cover

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OPINION OPINION | | NEWS NEWS | | GREEN GREEN | | FEATURE FEATURE STORY STORY | | ARTS&CULTURE ARTS&CULTURE | | ININROTATION ROTATION | | ART ARTOFOFTHE THESTATE STATE | | FOODFINDS FOODFINDS | | FILM FILM | | MUSICBEAT MUSICBEAT | | NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS | | THIS THIS WEEK WEEK | | MISCELLANY MISCELLANY | | MAY MAY7, 7, 2015 2015 | |

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 5/7

FRIDAY 5/8

SATURDAY 5/9

SUNDAY 5/10

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/11-5/13

2) Highway 42, 8pm, no cover

2) Highway 42, 4pm, no cover Two Way Street, 10pm, no cover

1) Absolute Journey, 8pm, $20-$30 2) Highway 42, 4pm, no cover Two Way Street, 10pm, no cover

2) Two Way Street, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Vegas Road Show, 8pm, no cover

2) Vegas Road Show, 8pm, no cover

2) Steve Lord, 6pm, no cover

2) Steve Lord, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Dustbowl Revival, 10pm, no cover

1) Incidental Animals, Holy Boots, 9pm, $18-$38

1) Tap Factory, 7pm, $26.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Voodoo Cowboys, 10pm, no cover

1) Tap Factory, 7pm, 9:30pm, $26.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Voodoo Cowboys, 10pm, no cover

1) Tap Factory, 7pm, $26.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Tap Factory, 7pm, Tu, W, $26.95 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, W, no cover

2) DJ Rick Gee, 10pm, $15-$30 3) Boots & Daisy Dukes w/DJ Jamie G, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ Enfo, 10pm, $30 3) County Social Saturdays, 10pm, no cover 5) Foster the People, Milo Greene, 8pm, $37.50

1) The Novelists, 9pm, no cover

1) Element of Soul, 9pm, no cover

1) Sammy Hagar, 7:30pm, $84.50 2) DJ JosBeatz, 10pm, $20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

1) Sammy Hagar, 7:30pm, $84.50 2) DJ Rick Gee, 10pm, $20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) TJ’s Corral

Foster the People May 9, 8 p.m. Grand Sierra Resort 2500 E. Second St. 789-2000

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO RESORT CASINO 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) NoVi

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

1) Tap Factory, 7pm, $26.95 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 2) Flirt Thursdays, 10pm, no cover

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 3) Honky Tonk Thursdays w/DJ Jamie G, 1) Grand Theater 2) Lex Nightclub 3) Sports Book 10pm, no cover 4) Summit Pavilion 5) Silver State Pavilion

HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO 50 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (844) 588-7625 1) Vinyl 2) Outdoor Arena

Karaoke

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

Cobra Lounge at Asian Noodles, 1290 E. Plumb Lane, Ste. 1, 828-7227: Cash Karaoke w/Jacques Simard, Sa, 8pm, no cover El Cortez Lounge, 235 W. Second St., 3244255: Daily, 9pm, no cover Money Bar, 180 W. Peckham Lane, Ste. 1070, 823-9977: Steve Starr Karaoke, F, 9pm, no cover Ponderosa Saloon, 106 South C St., Virginia City, 847-7210: Steel Rockin’ Karaoke, F, 7:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Ste. 103, Sparks, 356-6000: F-Sa, 9pm, no cover West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub 3) Center Stage Lounge

HARRAH’S RENO

NUGGET CASINO RESORT

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

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2) The Inciters, 7pm, no cover 3) Prestige Productions presents Emerge, 7:30pm, $25-$35

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover Michael Beck Band, 8pm, no cover

1) Tony Orlando, 8pm, $49 3) DJ dancing lessons, 5pm, no cover Michael Beck Band, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing lessons, 5pm, no cover

3) DJ/line dancing lessons, 6pm, W, no cover

2) The Inciters, 8pm, no cover 3) Fixx Fridays, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm

2) The Inciters, 8pm, no cover

2) Kyle Rea, 6pm, no cover

2) Kyle Rea, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL

2) Utility Players Improv Show, 8pm, $15

345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Jester Theater

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge

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3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover

3) Michael Beck Band, 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Celebrity Showroom 2) Rose Ballroom 3) Gilley’s 8pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

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1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind the Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 the Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 the Song, 8pm, M, $29.50-$40.50 3) Tany Jane, 8pm, no cover

1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 the Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 the Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Tany Jane, 8pm, no cover 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

2) Bonzai Thursdays w/DJ Trivia, 8pm, no cover 3) University of Aura, 9pm, no cover

1) Anjelah Johnson, 8pm, $29.50-$39.50 2) The Wiz Kid, 8pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 9pm, no cover 4) Big Trouble, 9pm, no cover

2) The Wiz Kid, 8pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Big Trouble, 9pm, no cover

1) Blues Jam Wednesday, 7pm, W, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover Country-Rock Bingo w/Jeff Gregg, 9pm, W, no cover


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

Discover the Dinosaurs Learn about Earth’s prehistoric past at this traveling show. The exhibit area consists of eight to 10 scenes that represent different eras when dinosaurs lived. The scenes engage the visitor’s senses through sight, sound and motion by using special lighting, sound effects, animatronics and fog. Other attractions include the Dino Dig, where guests can brush away sand to reveal dinosaur fossils beneath, the Dino Theater, where visitors can watch educational movies on a dinosaur-sized screen, the Dino Den featuring dinosaurs designed just for young children to sit on, hug and touch, and Dinosaur Rides, where kids can ride the back of a T-Rex or triceratops. There are also inflatables to bounce on, gem and fossil panning, mini golf and dinosaur face painting. Hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, May 9, and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday, May 10, at the Reno Events Center, 400 N. Center St. Tickets are $16-$22. Admission is free for children age 1 and younger. Call 335-8800 or visit www. discoverthedinosaurs.com.

—Kelley Lang

Loud As Folk The songwriter showcase features acclaimed French songwriter Forest Pooky and Israeli troubadour Yotam Ben Horin, best known for his work as front man of the legendary punk rock band Useless ID. John Underwood, who creates intricate layers of guitar, bass, drums, banjo, trumpet and trombone with a loop pedal, will also perform. The showcase is hosted by founder Spike McGuire from local band Six Mile Station. Admission is free, but attendees are encouraged to donate $5 to local causes and charities. This month marks the beginning of a partnership between the showcase and Reno Art Walk, which also takes place on the first Thursday of the month beginning at 5 p.m. at Liberty Fine Art Gallery, 100 W. Liberty St. The events are raising charitable funds together, beginning this month with St. Mary’s Art + Retreat center in Virginia City. The show begins at 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 7, at Pignic Pub & Patio, 235 Flint St. Visit www.facebook. com/LoudAsFolk. OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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Holland Project Gallery Closing Receptions

Reno Sculpture Fest

Visible Wasting features work by artists J. Gallego, Jon Kortland and FEEDING. Gallego is a Seattle-based artist working in photo, video and musical mediums. Kortland is a former Reno artist, musician and co-founder of Iron Lung Records who now lives in San Francisco. Kortland has also been collaborating with artist Nic Schmidt for a project called FEEDING. The two have created a graphic style using illustration, collage and printmaking to accomplish a singular vision. In Twin Peaks showcases Natalie Woodlock’s nine large-scale silkscreen prints that pays homage to David Lynch’s hit TV series from the early 1990s. Each individual print is a special tribute to the characters and scenes that have made Twin Peaks a cult classic and pop culture phenomenon. The closing receptions takes place on Saturday, May 9, from 6-8 p.m., at the Holland Project, 140 Vesta St., Reno. Call 742-1858 or visit www.hollandreno.org.

The inaugural festival showcases larger-than-life art installations created by local and nationally recognized artists, including Android Jones, Matt Schultz, Jeff Shomberg, Scott Cohen, Aric Shapiro, Christina Angelina, Mischell Riley, Pan Pantoja, Brett Moten, Mike Burke and Mike Mechanic. Other highlights of the event are Permaculture Action Day and evening concerts by The Polish Ambassador & Wildlight, Moondog Matinee, the Novelists and others. The event takes place Friday through Sunday, May 8-10, at the plaza between Whitney Peak Hotel and the Eldorado Casino Resort at Virginia Street and Commercial Row. The fun continues into the night with official afterparties at Cargo, 1up and 3rd Street Bar. Admission is free to the daytime festival and $50 for an all-night pass to five afterparties. Call 391-0278 or visit http://renosculpturefest.org.

ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

Reno River Festival Due to low river levels caused by severe drought there won’t be any whitewater events at the Reno River Festival this year, but the organizers still plan to kick off Reno’s special events season with a splash. The 12th annual festival begins on Saturday with the Biggest Little 5K Run at 9 a.m. and continues with yoga in the park, live music at Wingfield Park Amphitheater, the Craft Beer Village and fun in the sun. Hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday, May 9, and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday, May 10, at the Truckee Whitewater Park/Wingfield Park, at First Street and Arlington Avenue, in downtown Reno. Admission is free, although the 5K costs $15-$30 and entrance to the beer village is $25. Call 784-9400 or visit www.renoriverfestival.com. |

MISCELLANY

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For Thursday, May 7, to Wednesday, May 13

To post events to our online calendar and have them considered for the print edition, visit our website at www.newsreview.com/reno and post your events by registering in the box in the upper right of the page. Once registered, you can log in to post. Events you create will be viewable by the public almost immediately and will be considered for the print calendar in the Reno News & Review. Listings are free, but not guaranteed. Online and print submissions are subject to review and editing by the calendar editor. For details, call (775) 324-4440, ext. 3521, or email renocalendar@newsreview.com.

The deadline for entries in the issue of Thurs., May 28, is Thursday, May 14.

Events ART WALK RENO: The monthly art walk features works of local and regional artists on display in venues within the Arts District, between Liberty and Second streets and Virginia Street and Arlington Avenue. The walk officially begins at Liberty Fine Art Gallery, where you can purchase a ticket for $10, which includes a glass, raffle entry and program for the evening. A portion of proceeds from Art Walk Reno will be donated to nonprofit groups focused on art, education and community. First Th of every month, 59pm. $10. Liberty Fine Art, 100 W. Liberty St., (775) 232-8079, http://artspotreno.com/art-walk-reno.

BATTLE BORN ENDURO: The Battle Born Enduro kicks off the California Enduro Series, challenging racers on the desert trails of Peavine Mountain with loose and sandy single track, rocky technical descents and punchy climbs. The event is a fundraiser for The Poedunks, benefiting local trail projects. Sa, 5/9, 8am. Visit website for details, www.battlebornenduro.org.

BIGGEST LITTLE 5K RUN/WALK: The second annual run is a way for the community to celebrate the city’s history and to help raise funds for the Riverwalk District’s beautification program. With the help of showgirls, spirited costumes and live music, the Biggest Little 5K will kick off at the Reno arch. The run will continue through the Reno Riverwalk District and end with a big celebration at Wingfield Park for the 12th annual Reno River Festival. Sa, 5/9, 9-11am. Entrance fees are $30 for adults and $15 for runners age 18 and younger. The Riverwalk District, downtown Reno along The Riverwalk, (775) 825-9255, www.renoriver.org.

CULTURAL CROSSWORDS, EAST SIDE TOUR: Learn about the vibrant neighborhoods of early Reno including Chinatown and Little Italy. Tour guide is Sharon Honig-Bear. Reservations required. Sa, 5/9, 10-11:30am. $10 or free to HRPS members. National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection), 10 S. Lake St., (775) 747-4478, www.historicreno.org.

FIRST THURSDAY: This month’s First Thursday event features beer and wine, access to art galleries and live music by the Flannel Fish. Th, 5/7, 5-7pm. $1-$10. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

GALENA KIDS: Galena Creek Visitor Center offers this fun and educational presentation and craft session for kids ages 2-10 on the second Saturday of each month. Second Sa of every month, 10-11am. $5 suggested donation. Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway, (775) 8494948, www.galenacreekvisitorcenter.org.

HANDS ON! SECOND SATURDAYS: Enjoy free admission and activities at the Nevada Museum of Art and participate in hands-on art projects and storytelling. The event also features a performance by JamPro Music Factory Student Rock Band and a public tour for adults. Sa, 5/9, 10am-6pm. Free. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

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MAY 7, 2015

JACKPOT OF GEMS: Reno Gem & Mineral Society holds its 50th annual show featuring dealers, demonstrations, exhibits, minerals, fossils, gems, beads, geodes, books, raffles and more. Sa, 5/9, 10am-5pm; Su, 5/10, 10am-4pm. $6 general, $4 seniors, children ages 6-12, free for children under age 6. Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center Exhibit Hall, 1350 N. Wells Ave., (775) 356-8820, www.renorockhounds.com.

MOTHER’S DAY PLANTS & POTS: Make your own arrangement and select a handmade vase crafted by a Reno ceramic artist (price depends on size). Choose fresh cut flowers and arrange them in a vase for or with your mom. Enjoy mimosas, coffee and macaroons, explore the ceramics studio and view the work of local artists. Tour the plants and ponds at Sierra Water Gardens across the street. Sa, 5/9, 10am-5pm; Su, 5/10, 10am-5pm. The Wedge Ceramics Studio, 2095 Dickerson Road, (775) 7704770, www.thewedgeceramics.com.

DOWNTOWN RENO LIBRARY: Spring: Awash with Color! Sierra Watercolor Society features a new exhibit of original watercolor paintings by local artists. All paintings are for sale. Su, 10am-5pm through 5/31; M-Th, 9am-5pm through 5/28. Free. 301 S. Center St., (775) 849-3231.

HOLLAND PROJECT MICRO GALLERY AT BIBO COFFEE CO.: Didn’t Go Home When I Was Supposed To. Rachel Dickson was influenced by female portraiture and interpreting the genre with her own cinematic style and gaze. Dickson creates narrative portraits that give the sense of a heightened moment. There will be an opening reception on Friday, May 8, 68pm. M-Su through 5/29. Free. 945 Record St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org.

JOE WINTER POTTERY STUDIO: Joe Winter Pottery Spring Show, Joe and Shiho

Winter open the studio for their Spring Show. The kiln load is mostly mugs and bowls, platters, mortar and pestle sets and tall jars. Sa, Su, 10am through 5/17. 16620 Fetlock Drive, (775) 969-3394.

JOT TRAVIS BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Priscilla Varner: Emancipating Jane: Challenging the Representation of Legal Sex-Workers in Fine Art. The exhibition explores the power dynamic between the photographer and the subject by removing the photographer, arming the legal sex worker with the tools necessary to more fully represent her identity. Through 5/8, 10am-4pm. Free. 900 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-6837.

MCKINLEY ARTS & CULTURE CENTER: Before the Fall: Reena Spansail. McKinley Gallery West hosts new work by University of Nevada, Reno student

Reena Spansail. M-F, 8am-5pm through 5/8; Dancing Alligators, Mermaid Kitties and Other Extraordinary Creatures, McKinley Gallery East hosts drawings and paintings by nine-year-old artist Zoe Murkovich M-F, 8am-5pm through 5/8. Free. 925 Riverside Drive, (775) 334-2417.

METRO GALLERY AT RENO CITY HALL: Moments in Nature: Emma Auriemma-McKay. Auriemma-McKay’s landscape paintings showcase the majesty and grandeur of the Sierra Nevada under the kaleidoscopic skies of western Nevada. There will be a reception on May 7, 5-7pm. M-F, 9am-5pm through 5/8. Free. 1 E. First St., (775) 334-2417.

NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Art Exhibits and Fundraiser, Infused With Color—Three Placer Area Artists in the NTA Main Gallery and May Miniatures Fundraiser

NATIONAL PUBLIC GARDEN & MOTHER’S DAY TOUR: Start your Mother’s Day weekend by attending a free garden tour on National Public Garden Day. A flower will be presented to the first 20 moms. Horticulturist Bill Carlos will lead the tour and discuss the unique plants, gardens and history. Bring a camera, water and comfortable shoes. Register by calling the Arboretum office and leave your contact information. F, 5/8, 11:45am-1pm. Wilbur D. May Arboretum and Botanical Garden, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St., (775) 785-4153.

NEVADA STATE POLICE MEMORIAL PARADE & CAR SHOW: The parade and car show features restored police cruisers, fire trucks and ambulances, and honors officers who have died in the line of duty. Sa, 5/9, noon-2pm. Free. Downtown Virginia City, C Street, Virginia City, http://peaceofficersmuseum.org.

SKIN CANCER PREVENTION LUNCHEON: A luncheon on skin cancer prevention with James Harris, who will provide information regarding the best ways to prevent and treat skin cancer, along with how to detect questionable moles. Tu, 5/12, noon-1pm. $10. Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 982-5400.

Art ARTS FOR ALL NEVADA: Creativity Explored: Abilities in Art. Arts for All Nevada presents this exhibit of two-dimensional mixed media pieces created by adults with developmental delays who participate in free weekly visual art classes. In addition to the featured show, visitors can tour the historic Lake Mansion while enjoying and purchasing work from Arts for All Nevada’s year-round Art Access Gallery. An artists’ reception will be held on Monday, May 11, from 4pm to 6pm. M-F through 5/29; M, 5/11, 46pm. Free. 250 Court St., (775) 826-6100 ext. 3, www.artsforallnevada.org.

ARTSPACE, WEST STREET MARKET: Influenced by contemporary artists, Flo Oy Wong makes art that speaks of personal, family, community, cultural and historical stories. In acknowledgement of her identity as an American of Chinese descent, Flo Oy Wong frequently uses Chinese and English text in her work. This exhibition at Artspace will share artwork from several bodies of work. 5/7-6/27, 4-8pm. Free. 144 West St.

CCAI COURTHOUSE GALLERY: The Driest State: Nevada Watersheds. The Capital City Arts Initiative presents 29 of Nolan Preece’s photographs, many taken from an aerial perspective, that feature the beauty of the desert’s land forms, the lack of water and the range of water needs and uses. M-F, 8am-5pm through 5/29. Free. 885 E. Musser St., Carson City, (775) 721-7424.

All the single m’ladies I feel that for most men, chivalry is dead. Maybe feminism killed it, and maybe men have just gotten lazy. Well, I was staying over at a platonic male friend’s house, keeping him company because he’s sick with cancer. Despite that, I woke up to him serving me breakfast in bed! Is it really so much to ask for a guy I’m actually sleeping with to at least hold the door open for me? I mean, come on! What we still call “chivalry” got its formal start in medieval times. It was a knightly code entailing, among other things, courage, honor, and the defense of those more physically delicate—as in, women and children. But chivalry actually traces back through millions of years of evolution. As developmental psychologist Joyce Benenson writes in Warriors and Worriers, an excellent new book on evolved sex differences, “Throughout most of human history, men and women have specialized in different behaviors necessary to ensure the survival of their children to adulthood.” Men evolved to be warriors, physically and psychologically prepared to do battle in a way women are not. Most men have far more muscle mass and physical strength than women and far more of the hormone of aggression, testosterone. Even very young boys show a love— not usually shared by girls—of play fighting, of having an “enemy” to battle, and of weaponry—to the point where Benenson finds it common for boys in preschool who lack toy guns to shoot “bullets” out of a doll’s head.

In addition to women being physically weaker, research finds that they are more fearful than men—from infancy on—and rarely engage in physical fighting. This makes sense, Benenson points out, as physical injury would jeopardize a woman’s ability to have children or to survive to protect the ones she’s already had. So women evolved to prefer men who would protect them and their children—a preference that’s still with us today. (Our genes are clueless about the women’s movement and the fact that a woman can defend herself just fine by using a pink Glock with a Hello Kitty slide cover plate.) This is why it makes sense for men today to at least symbolically show they are protectors, like when they put their coat around a shivering woman’s shoulders. This implies that they’d tackle the valet guy or invade Cleveland for her if necessary. The problem is that men sometimes get hollered at for door opening and such—largely as a result of the bro-ification of women that comes out of feminism’s biology-snubbing confusion of “equal” with “the same.” So, before the first date, a man should ask a woman where she stands on this stuff. And you should let men know the sort of woman you are -- one who responds to a door being held for her by flipping her hair and saying thank you, not twirling her mustache and snarling, “Smash the patriarchy!” Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


crack the code

404 Scytale Barrel-Aged IImperial Stout is delicately crafted using ingredients in of the highest order and guided by our love of brewing – this is one deeply comp complex and intimate Imperial Stout weighing in i at 13% ABV. Aged in whiskey barrels for precisely precis 404 days, the result is a layered tapestry of su sublime aromas and tastes that will lead you on o an unexpected journey – in more ways th than one. at the NTA Corison Loft Gallery. Through 6/1, 11am-4pm. Free. Art Gallery & Gift Shop in 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com.

Music

Onstage

AUSTIN LOUNGE LIZARDS: The folk/country band

OFF-OFF WELLS: ANY GIVEN MONDAY: Playwright

combines pointed lyrics, precise harmonies and instrumental expertise. Su, 5/10, 7pm. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Piper’s Opera House, 12 N. B St., Virginia City, (775) 847-0433, www.pipersoperahouse.net.

SHEPPARD CONTEMPORARY GALLERY, CHURCH FINE ARTS BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Tehching Hsieh: One Year Performance. This artwork nurtures the beginnings of meaningful conversations about spirituality, meaning, labor, daily life and the creative spirit. Thought of as the godfather of performance art, Hsieh’s work is foundational to the art form. This is the second time this work will be seen in the United States after its previous installation at the Guggenheim in New York City. Through 6/21, 12-4pm. Free. 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-6658.

DAVID BREWER & REBECCA LOMNICKY: The Bay Area act performs as part of the Celtic Music Series. Sa, 5/9, 7pm. $8-$15. Brewery Arts Center, 449 W. King St., Carson City, (775) 883-1976, www.breweryarts.org.

uprising of the rebel poor as they fight to take back control of public amenities during a 25-year drought. The musical makes jabs at the legal system, capitalism, social irresponsibility, populism, bureaucracy, corporate greed and environmentalism all while poking fun at musical theater itself. F,

Symphony’s Strings in the Schools half-day event includes a workshop from 9:15am to 3pm for string players of all ages, a potluck lunch and a public concert beginning at 3pm. The public concert features a lecturedemonstration by Tom Stryker about the harmonica, performances by workshop participants with Stryker on harmonica and Gary Edwards on bass and a jazz combo. Sa, 5/9, 9:15am. Free. Empire Elementary School, 1260 Monte Rosa Drive, Carson City, (775) 540-5584.

Chisolm’s work portrays themes of justice and peace. M-Su, 11am-1pm through 6/21. Free. 780 Del Monte Lane, (775) 851-7100, www.uufnn.org.

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO: Reflections on

Harrsch: The Monarch Paradigm—Migration as Metaphor, W-Su through 7/26; Dave Eggers: Insufferable Throne of God, W-Su through 7/26; Tamara Kostianovsky: After Goya, W-Su through 7/26; Betsabeé Romero: En Tránsito, W-Su through 7/26; Larry Mitchell: The 1ºC Project, W-Su through 7/26; Andrea Zittel: Wallsprawl, W-Su through 8/16; Robert Adams: A Road Through Shore Pine, W-Su through 7/26. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org.

US AND THEM: TheatreWorks of Northern Nevada presents this play by David Campton that begins with two groups of wanderers looking for a place to settle. They agree to share and mark the line between their territories, then build a small wall. The wall is built higher and still higher. Suspicion and mistrust grow to the point where the groups must inevitably explode in conflict. This production will be performed by TheatreWorks of Northern Nevada’s youth company. Th, 5/7, 7pm. Ticket prices are pay what you can. Laxalt Auditorium, Warren Nelson Building, 401 W. Second St., (775) 2840789, www.twnn.org.

160 W. Liberty St., (775) 284-2921, www.nevadaart.org.

Sports & Fitness ADAPTIVE & CHAIR YOGA: This yoga program is for people living with heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating diseases. The class teaches breathing techniques, relaxation, guided meditation and visualization. Please call before attending. Tu, 2-3:15pm. $8 per class. Yoga Loka, 6135 Lakeside Drive, Ste. 121, (775) 337-2990, www.yogalokareno.com.

NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: smudge studio: Look Only at the Movement, W-Su through 7/26; Erika

Auditions

CLASSIC INTERMEDIATE MAT PILATES: Students

CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY:

learn to build on the basic mat routine. Modified intermediate to intermediate exercises will be added to the repertoire as students progress. Maximum of 10 people per class. Call to reserve your spot. Tu, 5:306:20pm through 6/23. $16 per class. Mind Body & Pilates, 615 Sierra Rose Drive, Ste. 2B, (775) 745-4151, www.pilatesreno.com.

TheatreWorks of Northern Nevada will hold auditions for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which will run in July as a part of the Artown Family Series. Auditions will be held on May 11 for actors and May 12 for dancers. M, 5/11, 6-9pm; Tu, 5/12, 6-9pm. Free. Laxalt Auditorium, Warren Nelson Building, 401 W. Second St., (775) 722-2155, www.twnn.org.

FELDENKRAIS CLASSES: Guided Feldenkrais

Poetry/Literature THE WRITERS’ BLOCK OPEN MIC AT WILDFLOWER: This show is open to all ages for the first half with the second half open to whatever words need escaping. Sign-ups for participants begin at 6:30 p.m. Th, 7pm. Wildflower Village, 4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (415) 6400389.

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narrative improv based on audience suggestions. Sa, 8pm through 3/26. $5. The Potentialist Workshop, 2275 Dickerson Road, (775) 250-0189, https://www.facebook.com/ upandatomimprov.

Su, 5/10, 10am-2pm. Nevada Museum of Art,

Museums

846 Victorian Ave. 775.355.7711

UP & ATOM IMPROV: The group performs long-form

series features guest artists performing on the church’s Casavant pipe organ. F, noon. Free. Trinity Episcopal Church, 200 Island Ave., (775) 329-4279, www.trinityreno.org. music and brunch presented by chez louie.

Gailmarie Pahmeier is accepting submissions for the Reno Community Poem Project. Your submissions will be edited by the poet laureate and compiled into an evolving poem about the community. Send your submissions and any questions you may have to Gailmarie Pahmeier at renopoetlaureate@reno.gov.

Sparks:

on opening night. Damonte Ranch High School, 10500 Rio Wrangler Parkway, (775) 334-7124, www.showtix4u.com/launch/index.php.

PIPES ON THE RIVER: The Friday lunchtime concert

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Reno’s Poet Laureate

5525 S. Virginia St. 775.284.7711

5/8, 7pm; Sa, 5/9, 7pm; W, 5/13, 7pm; Th, 5/14, 7pm; F, 5/15, 7pm. $9-$11; two tickets for $15

SUNDAY MUSIC BRUNCH: MEL WADE: Enjoy live

Call for Artists

Reno:

URINETOWN, THE MUSICAL: This satire follows the

HARMONICAS AND STRINGS FESTIVAL: Carson City

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP OF NORTHERN NEVADA: Bryce Chisholm—Liberty for All.

Pyramid Lake. An exhibit put on by the University of Nevada Reno’s Special Collections showcasing historic, artistic, scientific, native and natural visions. M-F through 9/15. Free. 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-1110, www.unr.edu.

Bruce Graham uses his dark comedy to put a fresh spin on the family in crisis storyline while creating a world where political correctness goes by the boards, liberal guilt is examined and discarded and the Machiavellian theme of the ends justifying the means has never rung so true. Th, 5/7, 7:30pm; F, 5/8, 7:30pm; Sa, 5/9, 7:30pm; Su, 5/10, 2pm. $8. Reno Little Theater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 329-0661, www.renolittletheater.org.

Available as a li limited release at our brewpubs and select beEr stores whil while it lasts.

classes in pain-free movement will give you the tools you need to improve stability, balance and performance and increase your vitality and flexibility as you learn to do slow, non-habitual movements with focused attention. These carefully structured lessons activate neural pathways, relieve pain and stress, and improve the communication between you brain and body. Tu, 10-11:30am through 12/15. $12 drop-in. Midtown Fitness, 600 S. Center St., Ste. 300, (775) 240-7882, www.renofeldenkrais.blogspot.com.

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Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. AIRLINE CAREERS start here - if you’re a hands on learner, you can become FAA Certified to fix jets. Job placement, financial aid if qualified. Call AIM 800-481-8389 BEWARE OF FAKE CHECK SCAMS Fake check scams are clever ploys designed to steal your money. You can avoid becoming a victim by recognizing how the scam works and understanding your responsiblity for the checks that you deposit in your account. If someone you don’t know wants to pay you by check but wants you to wire some of the money back, beware! It is a scam that could cost you thousands of dollars. For more information, go to www.fraud.org/scams. This reminder is a public service of the N&R

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here’s one of

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monks observe the Latin motto Laborare est Orare. The 19th-century abbot Maurus Wolter interpreted these words to mean “work is worship” or “work is prayer.” He was trying to impress upon his fellow monks that the work they did was not a grudging distraction from their service to God, but rather at the heart of their devotion. To do their tasks with love was a way to express gratitude for having been blessed with the gift of life. I propose that you experiment with this approach in the coming weeks, even if your version is more secular. What would it be like to feel contentment with and appreciation for the duties you have been allotted? the best things you can do for your mental and physical health: Withdraw your attention from the life that lies behind you, and be excited about the life that stretches ahead of you. Forget about the past, and get wildly inventive as you imagine the interesting future you will create for yourself. Forgive everyone who has offended you, and fantasize about the fun adventures you’ll go on, the inspiring plans you’ll carry out, and the invigorating lessons you hope to learn.

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children’s book The Little Engine That Could, a little blue engine volunteers to pull a long chain of train cars up a steep hill, even though it’s not confident that it has the power to do so. As it strains to haul the heavy weight, it recites a mantra to give itself hope: “I think I can, I think I can, I think I can.” The story ends happily. The little blue engine reaches the top of the hill with its many cars in tow, and is able to glide down the rest of the way. As you deal with your own challenge, Gemini, I recommend that you use an even more forceful incantation. Chant this: “I know I can, I know I can, I know I can.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s a

confession: I have taken a vow to foster beauty, truth, love, justice, equality, tolerance, creativity, playfulness and hope. To do this work is one of my life goals. I approach it with the devotion of a monk and the rigor of a warrior. Does that mean I ignore difficulty and suffering and cruelty? Of course not. I’m trying to diminish the power of those problems, so I sure as hell better know a lot about them. On the other hand, my main focus is on redemption and exaltation. I prefer not to describe in detail the world’s poisons, but rather to provide an antidote for them. Even if you don’t normally share my approach, Cancerian, I invite you to try it for the next two weeks. The astrological time is right.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The hill where I take

my late afternoon hikes is teeming with the six-petaled purple wildflower known as the elegant cluster-lily. Every one of them—and there are hundreds—lean hard in the direction of the sun in the west. Should I deride them as conformists that follow the law of the pack? Should I ridicule them for their blind devotion? Or should I more sensibly regard them as having a healthy instinct to gravitate toward the life-giving light? I’ll go with the latter theory. In that spirit, Leo, I urge you to ignore the opinions of others as you turn strongly toward the sources that provide you with essential nourishment.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Am I reading

the astrological omens correctly? I hope so. From what I can tell, you have been flying under the radar and over the rainbow. You have been exploiting the loopholes in the big bad system and enjoying some rather daring experiments with liberation. At this point in the adventure, you may be worried that your lucky streak can’t continue much longer. I’m here to tell you that it can. It will. It must. I predict that your detail-loving intelligence will paradoxically guide you to expand your possibilities even further.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to

the three science fiction films collectively known as The Matrix, we humans suffer from a fundamental delusion. What we think is real life is actually a sophisticated computer simulation. Intelligent machines have created this dream world to keep us in suspended animation while they harvest our energy to fuel their civilization. Now as far as I can tell, this scenario isn’t literally true. But it is an apt metaphor for how many of us seem to be half-asleep or under a spell, lost in our addiction to the simulated world created by technology. I bring this to your attention, Libra, because now is a favorable time to diminish the hold that the metaphorical Matrix has on you. What can you do to at least partially escape your bondage? (Hint: A little more contact with nature could do the trick.)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the

coming weeks, you may be as alluring and intriguing and tempting as you have been in a long time. I suggest you capitalize on this advantage. Proceed as if you do indeed have the power to attract more of the emotional riches you desire. Assume that you are primed to learn new secrets about the arts of intimacy, and that these secrets will make you even smarter and more soulful than you already are. Cultivate your ability to be the kind of trusted ally and imaginative lover who creates successful relationships.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Physicist Frank Wilczek won a Nobel Prize for his research into quarks, the tiny particles that compose protons and neutrons. The guy is breathtakingly smart. Here’s one of his operating principles: “If you don’t make mistakes, you’re not working on hardenough problems. And that’s a big mistake.” Let’s enshrine his advice as your meditation, Sagittarius. I think you’re strong enough and brave enough to go hunting for some new super-rich dilemmas. Yes, they may lead you to commit some booboos. But they will also stretch your intelligence beyond its previous limits, giving you a more vigorous understanding of the way the world works.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In

1934, Capricorn baseball player Dizzy Dean was named the Most Valuable Player after winning 30 games in one season. It was a feat that no National League pitcher has repeated ever since. After Dean retired, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame. Never shy about acknowledging his own prowess, he declared that “if you can do it, it ain’t bragging.” It is in this spirit that I invite you to freely expound on your talents and accomplishments in the coming week. You won’t be boasting. You will simply be providing information. And that will ultimately result in you being offered an interesting new opportunity or two.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): There has

rarely been a better time than now to refine the art of being your own mommy or daddy. You’re finally ready to take over from the parental voices in your head and assume full responsibility for raising yourself the rest of the way. What do you want to be when you grow up? You may feel a giddy sense of freedom as it becomes clear that the only authority who has the right to answer that question is you.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The universe

has always played tricks on you. Some have been so perplexing that you’ve barely understood the joke. Others have been amusing but not particularly educational. Now I sense a new trend in the works, however. I suspect that the universe’s pranks are becoming more comprehensible. They may have already begun to contain hints of kindness. What’s the meaning of this lovely turn of events? Maybe you have finally discharged a very old karmic debt. It’s also conceivable that your sense of humor has matured so much that you’re able to laugh at some of the crazier plot twists. Here’s another possibility: You are cashing in on the wisdom you were compelled to develop over the years as you dealt with the universe’s tricks.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Dennis Myers PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Leader

I read recently that there are only three members of the tribe who still speak the language.

Vinton Hawley chairs the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe. This interview was taped at a ceremony featuring nontribal federal and state officials.

No, there’s more who speak the language. You know, we have classes and we’re trying to re-educate culturally. But there’s probably 15 to 20 individuals who speak fluently, and we also provide the language classes. Ralph Burns teaches a community class. For us, that’s one of the biggest priorities on my part.

Did you grow up here? Yes. I grew up in Nixon. … When I grew up we had old people from the old days that we were able to get some insight into some matters that had happened historically, and that was really a key thing for me that happened—cultural values, across the board.

What’s the population of the reservation? The membership is 2,140, somewhere around that area. ...

What kind of problems does the tribe face these days? There are several issues. Water is probably the biggest issue we’re facing at this time.

Even with the settlement in place? Even with the settlement in place. Everywhere is experiencing drought conditions. California—our water comes from California—we feel it on the Nevada side, and they’re feeling it on the California side.

What kind of cooperation do you get off the reservation, from folks like this? There’s cooperation. The [Pyramid Lake Tribal] Council is generally in charge of

W IN A

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Is it difficult to keep young tribe members on the reservation? Yes and no. That’s really a two-pronged question, because with the development outside and knowing that there are options and other venues for life, it’s not a real difficult thing, but it’s something that the people in the life actually promote. You know, it’s not the tribe trying to say, “You’ve got to stay here.” It’s important, the expansion of education, you know—so much more opportunity. And building them up to that is really what the tribe would like to do in school.

making the administrative decisions in regards to the water issues, and the tribal chairman has the executive decisions. … But one of the things we also look at with the membership is trying to educate them on some of the issues we do have with the settlement. I don’t know which settlement you’re referring to—.

The Truckee River water agreement.

Within administration, we probably employ close to 150, but with seasonal operations it does increase. And then with the fishery operation, there are seasonal positions, but the population outweighs the job opportunities on the reservation. So that’s why we try to continually promote expansion and make the membership aware of the opportunities. And home is home. Ω

So there have been misunderstandings even after the agreement was enacted?

· Put “DISCOVERY” in the subject line · Include your full name, birth date and day phone · DEADLINE to enter is 5/28/15 · Winner will be notified by phone and e-mail

How many jobs are there on the reservation?

Yes. There’s some misunderstandings, and it’s up to us to educate and let the membership know what the tribe contentions are, and meeting with the local governments. We’re still working on some of those things. …

TO ENTER: · Send an e-mail to contest@newsreview.com

Yes. There are misunderstandings. There’s a lot of parts to the agreement that come into play.

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Water over the lawn So with the chances appearing excellent for a summer of brush fires, dry creeks, and a whole lot of dire drought news—Lake Mead becoming Lake Mud, fire season now from Super Bowl to Christmas, multi-state aquarium ban—I thought I would share a story of water. Lots of water. From a place far, far away. Two years ago, I was in Ohio, in the Toledo area. They’d just had a very wet winter, loaded with rain and snow. Spring had been stormy, too. In fact, the locals were sick of it. Like this year. As we drove around between Toledo and Cleveland, just below Lake Erie, I began to notice the lawns. The area was fairly rural, so there were no sidewalks, and every house was on a parcel of decent size, from a quarter acre to a full acre. And every one of ’em had a lawn to friggin’ die for. Dark green grass, thick and full, nothing even approaching a bare spot. If you looked up “lawn” in the dictionary— there ya go. You just knew the guy who sold and repaired riding mowOPINION

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∫y Bruce Van Dye She could sense she had a desert boy in her clutches, and she moved in for the knockout punch. “You know, recently, our mayor asked if we would run our hoses a bit. The storms from the last few months have caused the water table to rise so high, we’ve got to lighten it up a bit.” My mind kinda glazed over. “What do you mean, you’ve got to run your hoses?” “Oh, you know, they ask us to wash the car or rinse off the driveway, whatever we can do to relieve the water table. It’s getting kind of swampy.” So fantasize about that—a municipal request to waste water. Yes, this really happened. I’m pretty sure. Or maybe it was all ... a dream? All I know is, those people back there in Toledo can’t xeriscape worth shit. Ω

ers was probably doing very, very well for himself. Riding mowers must be to Ohioans what ear plugs are to bass players. I was on a bus on some tour for the day. We were in Ohio for this remarkable bird festival, an event that is becoming to birders what Burning Man is to transgender dahlia growers. And beside me was a local, an old lady of about 70. Old ladies are usually very pleasant to talk to, if they’re not batshit from dementia, and this gal was no exception. We got to talking about these obviously superb lawns, and she said, “Yes, Ohio certainly was a place of nice grass.” I asked how often people had to water these lawns to keep them so splendid, and she replied that most years, they don’t. Come again? “No, most years, the lawns are fine until July, maybe August, Then we might water them a little. But usually, the thunderstorms take care of the lawns.” Gee. What a concept. You know— rain and stuff.

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