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Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor.............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 18 Art.of.the.State............ 23

Foodfinds..................... 24 Film...............................26 Musicbeat.....................29 Nightclubs/Casinos........ 31 This.Week.....................35 Advice.Goddess............36 Free.Will.Astrology....... 38 15.Minutes.....................39 Bruce.Van.Dyke............39

Let sLeeping dogmas Lie See Left Foot Forward, page 6.

AbStinence onLy bringS joy to grAndpArentS See news, page 8.

Road food See Arts&culture, page 18.

Could a Reno Bike PRojeCt Radio station get the Community on the aiRwaves?

slasheR

Browser See Film, page 26.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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Tax Season Special Enrollment Period Ends April 30 See if you can still sign up for health insurance. Get covered through Nevada Health Link and avoid paying additional fees on your taxes. You may be able to sign up if you: • Did not have health insurance in 2014 and are not currently enrolled through Nevada Health Link for 2015 • Paid or will pay the fee on your 2014 taxes for not having health insurance • Did not know about the fee or what it meant when you filed your taxes If you do not purchase health insurance for 2015 during this period, you may have to pay the fee when you file your 2015 taxes. We can help find out if you qualify. Call 1-855-7-NVLINK or visit NevadaHealthLink.com/specialenrollment for more information and to find in-person help.

Nevadans who take advantage of this period will still need to pay their fee for 2014 and will also need to pay for the months they were not insured during 2015. If a Nevadan enrolls in a health insurance plan through Nevada Health Link before the 15th of the month, coverage will start on the first day of the following month.

NevadaHealthLink.com

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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

School of rock

Good thinking

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. During the semester, I very rarely get out for fun, but April 16 was the exception. Of course, I spent the whole evening on campus, but it was great nonetheless. First, I caught a poetry reading by David Lee. It was in honor of April, Poetry Month. I don’t know much about the guy, but this reading was extraordinary. I’ve never seen anything like it. Sort of a performance, sort of a reading, it was from his latest collection, Last Call. He’d go in and out of character, until I had a bit of cognitive dissonance as to whom I was hearing—the author or the character. I bought one of the books because, well, you know how it is, you buy the book and get the artist to sign it. Usually, it costs less than a movie. I haven’t had a chance to dive in, and I won’t until summer, but I’m going to be amazed if I enjoy the writing half as much as I enjoyed Lee reading it. I can tell you I’m going to have this kind of Jim Hightower drawl/Hal Holbrook presence going in my head while I read it. After that, I had the pleasure of watching Patty Bobek debut her documentary, Hosting Algeria, for which she went halfway around the world to meet some Algerian students who were coming to the United States to study leadership. She then went along with the 24 students from Algeria and eight American students in Virginia City and San Francisco and other places. It was just awesome— touching and well constructed. I’m always amazed at the kind of talent that surrounds me in my life. It’s a cliche to talk about soaring with eagles, but I know when I hang around people who are driven to produce things that will move society forward in some way, I’m inspired to do the same. It’s also true that when I hang around lazy, selfish people who don’t have a thought outside the lint in their own navels, I tend to underachieve. I think that’s one of the biggest takeaways from my master’s programs at the university. There are people who watch TV, and then there are those who make it.

Re “Middle class attacked by GOP legislature” (Left Foot Forward, March 19): I’d like to thank Sheila Leslie for her rational opinions and strong voice. I never miss her column. Also, I always make time to use the Legislature’s “Voice Your Opinion” web page. I’m wondering how effective it is? Does it have more influence than an individual election vote? Is this government poll public information? Can we calculate the ratio between individual respondents and voters? Doug Smithson Reno

Born again Not another Republican birther controversy! Chester A. Arthur, Canada; George Romney, Mexico; Barry Goldwater, U.S. Territory; John McCain, Panama; Ted Cruz, Canada. Expecting less Tea Party vehemence when one of its own really is born outside United States. Fred Hinners Reno

To go boldly Re “Space Odyssey” (Arts & Culture, March 12): I applaud Kay Radzik for her courage and foresight. It is in our genes to explore and expand. Yes, of course it is dangerous. Did anyone tell Lewis and Clark or Columbus (both of whom had to live off the land they knew nothing about), “You can’t go—it’s too dangerous”? No! As a matter of fact they had financiers who shared in their vision of discovery. NASA says there’s too much unproven technology. How does it get proven without putting someone in harm’s way? If these first adventurers were to perish in their endeavor, the lessons learned would be invaluable for the next try. Even though the risks are great, the rewards of a successful mission are enormous. If we were willing to send our young people into war and harm’s way for already occupied lands, why not use the same logic to open up absolutely unoccupied

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

territories for human settlement? I not only have great respect for these cutting edge adventurers, but I’m a little envious. More power to them and godspeed. John Bogle Reno

Come for the gambling, stay for the fascism Are voter suppression laws coming to Nevada? It seems Nevada Republican legislators are extremely excited about passing Voter I.D. laws. Over the years, there have been numerous studies involving all of the states, millions of voters and all the gathered data reached the same conclusion, “There is no voter fraud.” Yet the studies don’t seem to matter. When challenged, most courts agree. Voter I.D. laws are a poll tax. Nevadans should ask themselves, if it has been proven there is no voter fraud, what is the purpose of requiring new photo I.D. laws? How much will this law cost the taxpayer? If the elderly or young voters don’t have the required documentation, how much time and money will this law cost them and how many voters are going to be left out of the voting process? Canada and Australia use Nevada’s current voting system, and it works for them. Instead of making it harder to vote, why not encourage voting by enacting a voter state holiday or Saturday voting? Tell your representatives No on SB169, AB253 and AB266. Linda Gillaspy Reno

We’ve got some beach in Florida for you Re “Reno Baby born with full body tattoos” (Feature story, March 26): There is nothing better than a creative April Fool’s joke and when I first saw the headline, April Fool’s Day was the furthest thing from my mind! I was totally amazed at the headline and quickly grabbed the paper as I went past the box. I immediately turned to the article and quickly scanned it! I’ve

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Georgia Fisher Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Contributors Amy Alkon, Woody Barlettani, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Eric Marks, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

—D. Brian Burghart

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Associate Art Director Brian Breneman Ad Design Manager Serene Lusano Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Design Melissa Bernard, Brad Coates, Kyle Shine Advertising Consultants Joseph “Joey” Davis, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage, Jessica Wilson Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Kelly Miller

brian b@ n ewsreview . com

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got to tell you—you got me! Thanks for the laugh! Patricia Casarez Reno

Cheap schools Re “Labor gets reformed by the GOP” (Let Freedom Ring, April 2): I just read the piece by Brendan Trainor, in which he expressed happiness that Republican Gov. Sandoval signed a bill that eliminates prevailing wages on school construction jobs. Thus, it will be cheaper to build schools and, yes, have cheaper constructed schools—the kind you get with the lowest bidder. What’s the next proposal from Trainor, minimum wages for teaches and professors to save taxpayers’ money? And minimum wage for law enforcement officials also? If so, they would all qualify for food stamps. Hopefully, Trainor is not paid any compensation by the News & Review, as that would cost too much. Bob Mulholland Chico, California

Fox News Lies Re “Borders on slander” (Letters to the Editor, April 2): It may seem odd to some individuals that I am hardly a “member of the elite liberal progressive class,” as, apparently, some folks on the right (and please forgive me for using labels here, but I do so merely to make a point) have labeled me. Evidently, I have given this impression because I questioned the role of Congress. Seriously, I believed they represented the people. The former and current Congress may not be the worst in our history, but it’s darned close. The manner in which some members of Congress conduct themselves is beyond shameful. Spending so much energy on vilifying the sitting president is schoolyard bullshit. You may get standing ovations and cheers from the part of your constituency that really hates the president, but you’re not getting anything done. And that is why sitting members of Congress should be working to get things done!

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Anthony Clarke Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Steve Finlayson, Debbi Frenzi, Vicky Jewell, Angela Littlefield, Joe Medeiros, Ron Neill, Christian Shearer, Marty Troye, Warren Tucker, Gary White, Joseph White, Margaret Underwood General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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It is called compromise, folks. It’s finding some common ground somewhere and working on it. Perhaps some of Sen. Dean Heller’s fellow senators can take a cue from our GOP senator from Nevada. He’s far from perfect, but at least he tries to get things done for his home state and for his country. We “liberals” can applaud him for that. Then I had the audacity to claim that FOX, in particular, will be caught in a lie almost on a daily basis without providing a shred of evidence. Slanderous! Dude, Jon Stewart made a living exposing the crazy shit that goes on the air over there. And Rush Limbaugh reminds me of a professional wrestler. You must realize, at some point, how phony he is, but his antics are so entertaining you listen anyway. Personally, I admire the guy. There’s much to be said about longevity. So, when Professor Rush, with his many degrees in science, says that climate change is a hoax, well, I guess that’s it, then. My favorite, though, is the drug war. To think that after a lifetime of treating the marijuana plant as the “devil weed,” some people presumably still believe Reefer Madness is a serious, factual film about pot use. This is where I truly believe ignorance reigns. Marijuana is not a threat, and yet, billions of dollars, perhaps in the hundreds of billions, is wasted on a drug war that has reaped wasted lives, families torn apart, and crime. And with this madness we seem to have forgotten the hemp plant–a possible answer to at least part of our environmental problems, and yet, research is scarce. For more than 70 years we have endured one lame excuse after another why we are not taking advantage of one of the most useful plants on this earth. Imagine a headline: Last Year We Produced Enough Paper out of Hemp to save One Billion Trees! Instead, marijuana becomes a Schedule One drug, more harmful and more dangerous than heroin or cocaine. This is what I call insanity. J.R. Reynolds Reno

Business Nicole Jackson, Kortnee Angel

Sweetdeals Coordinator Courtney deShields Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir

Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins 405 Marsh Ave., Third Floor Reno, NV 89509 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds to classifieds@newsreview.com

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Website www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and Feature story design: Brian Breneman

APRIL 23, 2015

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Notify parents of teen abortions? Asked at the Washoe County Courthouses George Mahaffey Store manager

I think so. I just think teenagers today, they need parental guidance, and I think it would be best for everyone to know about that.

Jana Blair Office worker

Yes, because that’s their potential grandchild, and I think that kids who are young, they don’t know the repercussions. I’ve known many adults that have had abortions when they were younger, and they lived their entire life regretting it and being sad. … Young people, they don’t have the ability to think in their young minds that “this is a life inside of me, and this is my parents’ grandchild.” Tammy Cossey Salesperson

Pack of liars

Yes, because it’s wrong, but it’s up to the parents to help decide if their teen should be having an abortion. They’re the parents, and the parents know more. And the teenagers, you know, they think they know everything, and they don’t.

the past week in Reno, a documentary has been showing Aldous Huxley: “People will come to love their at the Riverside theaters downtown. The widely praised oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their Merchants of Doubt is based on the powerful nonfiction capacities to think.” 2010 book of the same name that describes how industry In Brave New World, Huxley envisioned a future in manipulates us by using renowned rent-a-scientists— which we are oppressed not by political tyranny but by mostly physicists—to create doubt about what science getting what we want, infinite forms of technology that says. Some of the same former scientists—they give us comfort, feed us only satisfying information, and generally haven’t done original research in years—who isolate us from each other and from our heritage, making told us science was wrong about tobacco and cancer us easily controllable—a very different conjectural vision or secondhand smoke later told us science was wrong than other fictional speculations on future repression about acid rain or the hole in the ozone layer, and now published in Huxley’s time. tells us science is wrong about climate The novel is filled with sentences change. like this: “History is bunk. History is It is not just a movie. Think tanks that do little thinking bunk. ... Accompanied by a campaign but lots of propagandizing were created It’s important. against the Past; by the closing of by the rent-a-scientists and corporations museums, the blowing up of historical to do what the pesticide industry once monuments (luckily most of them had did. That industry manufactured doubt about the findings already been destroyed during the Nine Years’ War); by of scientist Rachel Carson of the threat of pesticides. Every the suppression of all books published before A.F. 150. ... independent scientific study has upheld her findings, but And then he spends most of his time by himself—alone.” it doesn’t matter. The point of the techniques employed Huxley envisioned, in other words, a world much like by that industry was not to disprove her findings but to the United States of America in 2015. Bad information fabricate distrust, which it did. has become so omnipresent that some publications have At one Reno showing of Merchants of Doubt last fact-checking features that cannot begin to keep up with weekend, two people attended. No doubt there was heavy the flow of nonsense. Devices reduce the amount of time attendance down the hall at Mall Cop 2. Little wonder we must spend with each other. Media live by the drugMerchants was shown at only one theater. dealer’s defense: We give the public what it wants. Documentaries tend to tear through Reno like cheetahs. One consequence is that we lose sight of what is Not surprisingly, the date that this edition of our newspaper important, unable to distinguish between Stephen Hawking hits the street is the last day Merchants will show in Reno. and Stephen King—a celebrity is a celebrity—or between We urge readers to turn to other ways to see it. It is not folk wisdom and science. just a movie. It’s important, if we still can recognize that “The deepest sin against the human mind is to characteristic in media. Ω believe things without evidence,” Huxley wrote. During OPINION

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Angela Schlater Property manager

I would say yes, because you have got to know what’s going on with your kids. It’s a surgical procedure. They need to know.

Kendra Richardson Business owner

Yes. It’s your child. You should know if your child is pregnant or is going to get an abortion. It just makes sense to me. I have two little girls, and I’d want to know.

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Why not work on solving real problems? It’s become a cliché to claim a proposed idea is a solution in search of a problem. And yet, there are several prime and dangerous examples of the phenomena in the Nevada Legislature this year, leaving one to wonder why legislators aren’t more seriously focused on the very real and pressing by dilemmas confronting our state. Sheila Leslie Case in point: The voter I.D. bills. During hearings on the legislation, proponents were repeatedly asked to provide data surrounding the widespread voter fraud problem driving their request to require all citizens to show a government-sponsored identification card before voting. No one could produce the data because it doesn’t exist. While one case of a voter intentionally voting twice was caught and prosecuted under former Secretary of State Ross Miller, that’s about it. Several people mentioned the ACORN case, one that Miller also pursued successfully, but that centered on voter registration irregularities, an issue with no bearing on polling place voter I.D.

Nick Offerman AND Megan MullalLy Summer of 69: NO APOSTROPHE

APRIL 25

Despite these facts, former assemblymember Sharron Angle testified that “we do have a voter impersonation problem across the country.” When pressed by Assemblyman Elliot Anderson for examples of this occurring in Nevada, she could not provide any, but said there is “anomalous activity that goes on in Nevada elections that is not easily explained.” Assemblywoman Michele Fiore, R-Las Vegas, attacked the notion of opponents that the proposals would disenfranchise minorities, the poor, and the elderly who may not have original documents needed to get a government I.D. Instead, Fiore claimed opponents were using “the race card” and condescendingly told witnesses, in case they “hadn’t noticed,” that the president is black. The I.D. proposals come with a high price tag and were unceremoniously sent to the Assembly budget committee, where hopefully this “solution” dies amid the proven need for these dollars elsewhere. As the 2014 elections revealed, the real challenge in Nevada elections is

motivating citizens to vote at all. A number of bills propose to address this real problem, including bills to preregister 17-year-olds, same-day registration, permanent polling places open to all, and extending the registration period. But it’s hard to see those bills passing in a GOP-controlled Legislature. Young, poor and minority voters tend to lean Democratic. Another solution with no identified problem are the twin bills to enact the Nevada Protection of Religious Freedom Act. These bills are similar to SB 192 from the 2013 Legislature where no evidence was ever presented of any “state action that burdened a person’s exercise of religion,” the reported impetus for the legislation. Nevertheless, the bill was approved on a 14-7 vote by the state Senate with unanimous Republican support as well as four Democrats. Sponsors of the 2015 legislation seemed oblivious to the disaster in Arizona when a similar “legalized discrimination” bill was approved, quickly leading to businesses refusing services to gays under the guise of

“religious freedom” and a subsequent boycott that threatened to undermine Arizona’s economy. The backlash led to the embarrassment of state senators renouncing their own votes and joining the Chamber of Commerce in begging Republican Gov. Jan Brewer to veto the bill, which she did. It took the self-destructive actions of Indiana Republican Gov. Mike Pence upon signing a similar bill last month, and the threats of corporations operating in Indiana, including the National Collegiate Athletic Association, to convince Nevada legislators to drop their bills. One said he reviewed the Nevada constitution with legal counsel and found religious protections already provided therein. Instead of solving the non-existing problem of government-sponsored religious discrimination, these bills would have placed Nevada’s tourist economy at the same risk of a nationwide boycott. The casino industry was never going to allow that to happen. When it comes to fleecing gamblers, Nevada doesn’t discriminate. Ω

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Here’s a great website that talks about the principal author of many of these bills: www.alecexposed.org/ wiki/ALEC_Exposed

AARON LEWIS M AY 1 5

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Republicans excuse tax hikes Republican Assemblyman Pat Hickey said recently that promises Republican candidates made last fall to not raise taxes—well, that was just campaign rhetoric. After they got to Carson City and realized how desperately Nevada state government needed a tax increase, they by Brendan just had to face reality. Trainor The last time I heard that excuse was in 1992, when a young former governor of Arkansas, William Jefferson Clinton, ran as a New Democrat and promised not to raise taxes. He won the election, beating President George H. W. Bush who himself famously broke his promise, “Read my lips, no new taxes” and a feisty Texas billionaire, Ross Perot, who lectured the nation on the national debt, then a shocking $4 trillion, a quarter of its current size. No sooner was President Clinton inaugurated when he announced that by golly, he was shocked, shocked to discover the true state of finances in

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Washington, D.C., and would, sadly and reluctantly, have to propose new tax increases. So, I will believe Assemblyman Hickey’s excuse for the Republican push for the largest tax increase since the last one when I am convinced that Hillary Clinton is the champion of the middle class. The problem with tax increases is that they result in more government power and prop up government inefficiencies. There is no need for that. The government reforms passed this session like ending some prevailing wage mandates and for the first time allowing private school choice are welcome. Taking back the public lands would enable more local revenue for education. The Legislature should concentrate on government reforms this session, not on the logrolling and special interest pleading involved in a tax increase. Gratingly annoying is the proposed increase of the cigarette

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tax. Nevada has low cigarette taxes compared to other states, and since gamblers smoke more than the public at large, we have avoided some of the onerous regulations on individuals and property rights enforced in other states. Cigarette smokers are overwhelmingly lower middle class and poor and the least able to pay more tax. What risks peaceful people take and what they put into their own bodies should be of no concern of the state. The establishment of both parties point to “social cost” whenever they want to tax or outlaw the choices people make about their own lives. This is a fabrication that, John Stuart Mill pointed out in his 1853 treatise On Liberty, will lead to all manner of statist interventions Any human behavior outside of the prescribed norms are supposed to create costs that “everyone must pay for.” There are many problems with this argument, not the least of which is that prohibitions and

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increased taxes lead to black markets and then the violence caused by state enforcement, which results in far more “social cost” than the original infraction. The extreme case in Staten Island, New York, of a black man, Eric Garner, who was “harassed” to death by police for selling loosies, or loose cigarettes, to those too poor to buy packs under the outrageous New York cigarette tax regime, should bring the point home. The dangers of arbitrary state interference into the laws of supply and demand are seldom discussed in polite circles. Government action is presumed to accomplish what it intends to do, and any suggestion that there will be major unintended consequences caused by an increase in government police powers, even if made, seldom carries the day in our current legislative environment. Freedom is the only antidote to this madness. Ω

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APRIL 23, 2015

Remember the time Pat Hickey told the truth, and people beat him up for it? http://bit.ly/1E6jQjQ. Did anyone ever congratulate him on being right?

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

At the Nevada Legislature, Planned Parenthood  lobbyist Elisa Erquiaga took a call in the  Nevada Legislature’s front lobby while dealing  with an anti-abortion bill.

Bundy aftermath Forbes magazine columnist J.J. MacNab has tracked what has happened to some of the followers of federal tax scofflaw Cliven Bundy since the standoff at Bunkerville a year ago. • Steven Brooks of Ohio (not the former Nevada legislator) has been charged in Texas with carrying a weapon at a business that sells alcohol. • Jerred and Amanda Miller killed two Las Vegas police officers and a bystander. He was then killed by police, and she killed herself. • Richard Cook, a veteran criminal, is awaiting trial for being a felon in possession of a firearm. Those four were present in Bunkerville during the standoff. Several Bundy supporters who were not at Bunkerville have also distinguished themselves, including Charles Moreland of Oklahoma who pleaded guilty to influencing, impeding and retaliating against a federal official (U.S. Sen. Harry Reid). He had threatened Reid with death. Five people who tore up Recapture Canyon in Utah with all-terrain vehicles go to trial this month. The canyon, which contains dwellings and artifacts of the ancient Pueblo people, is closed to all but hikers and horseback riders. Cliven Bundy has never been charged with anything.

No good deed goes unpunished A joint Starbucks/USA Today effort for racial harmony has become a target for scorching criticism. The campaign was planned in the wake of the Michael Brown and Eric Garner killings last summer and was launched last month. Part of the effort was the production and distribution of a well written and fact-filled eight-page newspapersized supplement that was available in Starbucks stores around the nation and was tucked SUPPLEMENT inside USA Today. Reno Gazette-Journal writer Anjeanette Damon contributed to the supplement. But Starbucks company rules accompanying the campaign included encouraging baristas to chat with customers about race and having them write “Race Together” on coffee cups, steps which left the effort open to ridicule. Saturday Night Live, editorial cartoonists, and comedians all poked fun at it. One website ran a “How to Talk About Race With Your Starbucks Barista: A Guide,” and NBC posted an essay headlined “So a Black Guy Walks Into a Starbucks ...” “The most ridiculous part of the new campaign,” wrote the Washington Post’s Philip Bump, “is that it treats the very real problem of racial bias and tension as, at best, a peg for a marketing gimmick and, at worst, as something that can be waved away by simply thinking about it.” There was, to be sure, lots of praise. A columnist at Fast Company said the campaign is “an important and courageous initiative that deserves praise, not scorn” and a St. Louis alderman said the “scale of the attempt alone is worth praise.” Kareem Abdul-Jabbar said the effort “filled me with shock and awe,” and historian Janus Adams said productive dialogues about race were conducted in the 1960s: “Every place that it can be confronted is the place to confront it.” But the scorn and satire overwhelmed the praise. It may be awhile before a U.S. corporation tries to contribute to racial dialogue again.

—Dennis Myers

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Who’s in charge here? GOP split fuels abortion fight “I don’t think that’s ever happened before,” said one lobbyist. Her bewilderment was underby standable. When Assembly Bill Dennis Myers 405, a bill providing for parental notification of abortion, entered the Assembly Committee on Health and Human Services, chaired by Washoe Assemblymember Ira Hansen, the bill listed Speaker John Hambrick as sponsor. When the bill emerged from the committee, it listed Hansen as the sponsor.

“We have waited 22 years for this!!!” Janine Hansen Abortion opponent

The 1991 U.S. Court of Appeals ruling that overturned Nevada’s 1980s parental notification law can be read at http://tinyurl. com/obdfebm

In a legislature in which Hansen is rumored to control enough proxies in the Republican caucus to serve as a shadow speaker, it was the most blatant demonstration yet of that power, and it made Hambrick—the actual speaker—looking like a figurehead. The proponents and opponents were quickly heard. Battle Born Progress director Annette Magnus said in a prepared statement, “What is going on in the Assembly within the GOP caucus is unbelievable, and it is no more evident than in A.B. 405. Assemblyman Ira Hansen is once again hijacking the narrative, and reviving his extreme agenda by any means necessary. Speaker

Hambrick, the original bill sponsor, was right in saying that this bill ‘would create significant costs to our judiciary and put a burden on Nevada doctors.’ Majority Leader Paul Anderson estimates that significant cost to be about $2 million, but the damage doesn’t end there. Studies have shown that teens will not stop having sex, but will hesitate to share medical information with their providers, putting themselves at risk.” “We have waited 22 years for this!!!” said Independent American Party leader Janine Hansen of Elko County in her own statement. “The last time we had a real opportunity was in 1993 with SB59 and Senator [Ray] Rawson. A.B. 405 allows for a parent to be notified before their underage daughter gets an abortion. In all other surgical procedures parents must give their consent for the underage child to have surgery. Parental notification will help to bring parents and their daughters together to address this life changing situation.” The Nevada Women’s Lobby a call for women to converge this week on Carson City “to help us demonstrate that the FIFTIES are long gone! The ‘Mad Men’ and a few women in Carson City want to turn back the clock so they need to see that the WOMEN in Nevada will NOT go backwards. Get on your Fifties outfits with white gloves, pumps and pearls or aprons and join us in Carson City as

Nevada Women’s Lobby, Planned Parenthood, PLAN [Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada], Progress Now and Advocates for Justice send a visual message to the legislators as they contemplate their votes (or failure to vote) on the ... bills that impact Women and Middle Class families in Nevada!” Republicans are playing with political fire in tinkering with abortion law. The state is noted for its support for abortion. Nevadans voted on the issue in a 1990 referendum and approved the state’s Roe-style abortion law in a landslide, 71.3 to 27.2 percent. Supporters of the new measure have argued that parental notification is another matter. For example, in a recent newsletter, Washoe Assemblymember Pat Hickey quoted a Reno Gazette-Journal article that “Nevada parents must give written permission to/for their minor children before they visit ‘tanning clinics, tattoo parlors and ear-piercing specialists.’” But his fellow Republicans in earlier years wrote laws that treated abortion differently, laws that slowed or burdened the abortion process but did not apply to other procedures. For instance, state law requires in the case of abortions, “No physician may perform an abortion in this state unless, before the physician performs it, he or she certifies in writing that the woman gave her informed written consent, freely and without coercion. The physician shall further certify in writing the pregnant woman’s marital status and age based upon proof of age offered by her.” There is no such requirement for appendectomies—or ear piercings. Opponents of the measure are concerned that young women will be physically abused by parents if a pregnancy is disclosed. The Hambrick/Hansen measure allows pregnant teens to go to court to get permission for an abortion as an alternative to parental notification, but those same opponents question whether teens will have the legal sophistication to know of such an option, or the money to exercise it. It’s more likely, they say, that the teen will turn to illegal abortion to avoid either parental notification or the judicial bypass. In addition, there have been reports that the judicial process is extremely difficult and that some judges humiliate the applicant.


Rerun “The judicial bypass in this proposed bill could last as long as 22 to 30 days and there hasn’t been a court that’s found a 30-day bypass expedient enough,” said Planned Parenthood director Elisa Erquiaga last week. Nevada already has one parental notification law for abortion on the books (Nevada Revised Statute 442.255), enacted in 1981 and amended in 1985. It was passed before the state referendum on abortion, at a time when it was still assumed in political circles that the safe default position on abortion for politicians was opposition. The law is still on the books but is not enforced because it was enjoined as failing to “meet constitutional scrutiny” by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. That case found the law flawed in part because it “does not contain a time period within which the state district court must rule.” The new measure contains a 1,649-word bill drafter’s explanation of how the current draft threads the needle of constitutionality so it can survive another court test. Former Nevada assemblymember Robert Sader, an abortion supporter but also a parent, voted for that parental notification in 1985. Subsequently, over the two years until the 1987 legislature, he heard

information that convinced him that notification was one of many proposals being pushed by opponents of abortion less to help parents than as part of a strategy of numerous small restrictions on abortion, in an attempt to effectively prevent the procedure from being used at all.

“Teens…willhesitateto sharemedicalinformation withtheirproviders.” Annette Magnus Abortion supporter “So it seemed to me at the time that in the balance that the rights of the parents were fundamental enough and important enough to suggest that these court procedures ought to be required for minors,” he said later (“Then what?” RN&R, April 13, 2006). “Now, after that occurred, there was this continuing group of provisions, or let’s say new proposals, consistently proposed by the right-to-life groups that chip away at abortion laws, or a woman’s right to choose. I just grew both impatient and exasperated with the constant attempts to curtail that the right-to-life lobby proposed.” Ω

Washed up PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

A stream of water from a hose propped in a tree streaks across what was once Famous Murphy’s Restaurant. Last week, it was pounded into kindling by construction—or destruction—equipment. The popular restaurant operated at this site on the corner of Gentry and Virginia until closing in March 2008.

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APRIL 23, 2015

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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Itʼs happen ing in

EVENTS

LINE DANCING LESSONS AT GILLEY’S!

SUNDAY NIGHT MOVIE NIGHT!

Join us for Sunday night movie night. Kick back and relax while watching a flick. Enjoy our drink specials! Su, 6PM through 7/5, no charge. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799

ACTIVITIES

KIDS KLUB: MAKE MOM HAPPY

Join Scheels for a night of crafts and fun as we thank our mothers for everything they do! Please meet in the Scheels Training Rooms. All kids will receive a free ride on the SCHEELS Ferris Wheel! Classes start promptly at 6 p.m. Age Group: 4-12 years old. Registration: Please visit http://www.scheelscommunity.com/ events/kids-klub-make-mom-happy-10/ to register. M, 4/27, 6PM, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

RENO UKE FEST

The diminutive ukulele is considered the easiest instrument to learn to play. This fact, coupled with a unique, enthusiastic community of supporters, has made the uke the fastest-growing musical instrument in the world. The largest ukulele festival in the west takes place each year right here in Sparks. Th, 4/30, 1-8PM, F, 5/1, 8AM-5PM, Sa, 5/2, 8:30AM-5PM and Su, 5/3, 9:3011AM. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

TRANSFORMATION

Conversion, metamorphosis, alteration, renascence, transfiguration; things change in tiny increments or in vast revolutions. The seasons transform tiny seeds into giant trees, our physical journeys carry us far while love, faith and dreams take us even farther. As we face the crossroads of our lives, we make the decisions that will form us, reform us, and ultimately transform us and the world in which we live. The women of Bella Voce present their spring concert with songs of transformation, including the world premiere of the 5 movement choral work Magdalene, by David Montoya. F, 5/1, 7:30PM, free. Donations accepted. Sparks United Methodist Church, 1231 Pyramid Way, (775) 358-0925.

R.A.E.Y.C. ANNUAL WALK FOR CHILDREN

Children of all ages and abilities, families, friends, and pets (on leash) are invited! Enjoy free family activities and entertainment afterwards. Sa, 5/2, 9AM-1PM, $10 for the walk, the rest is free. Sparks Marina, 325 Harbor Cove Dr. (775) 353-2376

Free line dancing lessons from professional teachers. Two dances taught at a comfortable pace for everyone! W, 6-8PM through 10/21, free. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave (775) 356-3300

CROCHET CONNECTION

Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway. (775) 424-1800

FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB

MONSTERS OF ROCK

Join us for an open venue of musical talent battling to win the $1000 grand prize!!! Su, 4/26, 12-9PM, no cover. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799

SHAMROCKIT OPEN MIC NIGHT

Music is back on Victorian Square on Sundays. Join us for the best open mic night in town. Hosted by Athena. Su, 6PM through 2/15, no cover. O’Skis Pub & Grille, 840 Victorian Ave. (775) 359-7547

THURSDAY SHOWCASE

The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. First Sa of every month, 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

Showcase your act on the Sparks Lounge stage. We have a full backline for all your performance needs. Check the Sparks Lounge website or Facebook for upcoming shows. Th, 8PM through 8/28, no cover. Sparks Lounge, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 409-3340

CONVERSATION CAFE

DJ NIGHTS AT GILLEY’S!

The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month, 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

BIKINI BULL RIDING AT GILLEY’S!

Get ready for a wild night with Bikini Bull Riding at Gilley’s! Get your favorite bikini on and show off those skills for the chance to win the CASH PRIZE! Su, 9PM through 10/25. Opens 4/12, $5 for bull ride. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP

This class is for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC JOSH BUDRO BAND

Th, 4/23, 8PM, F, 4/24, 8PM and Sa, 4/25, 8PM, no cover. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

3RD PARTY

Come rock with 3rd Party at the Sparks Lounge. Always a good time. F, 4/24, 9PM, no cover. Sparks Lounge, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 409-3340

Come in and scoot your boots! The Dj plays the new favorites and the old hits. DJ is open to requests! W, 6PM through 10/28, Th, Su, 7PM through 10/25. F, Sa, 8PM through 10/24. No admission fee. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave (775) 356-3300

DANWISE AND FRIENDS

A free monthly comedy show featuring local talent. The event is BYOB and limited beer will be provided free as well. This event will run every third Th of every month, 8PM, free. The Generator, Inc. 1240 Icehouse Ave.

ACOUSTIC WONDERLAND

This is a singer-songwriter showcase. Come down to Paddy’s and bring your acoustic instruments. Sign-ups are at 7:30PM and music begins at 8PM. Drink Specials all night! Th, 8PM, through 9/25, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

F, 9PM. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

KARAOKE KARAOKE NIGHT

Join us for a rocking good time every Tuesday for Karaoke Night. Tu, 6:30PM through 7/7, no cover. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799

KARAOKE WITH BOBBY DEE

Tu, 8PM, no cover. Morelli’s G Street Saloon, 2285 G St. (775) 355-8281

KARAOKE

Th-Sa, 9PM, no cover. Bottom’s Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way (775) 359-3677

CYCO MIKE

Come dance the night away to Cyco Mike! The best Karaoke show in Sparks! Every Friday night, drink specials! F, 9PM through 9/25, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave (775) 358-5484

KARAOKE

Sing to your favorite songs with your hosts Psycho Mike Millard and DJ KrayZEE. Sa, 9PM through 4/11, no cover. Sparks Lounge, 1237 Baring Blvd (775) 409-3340

LADIES NIGHT

Deep discounts just for the ladies from 8pm-10pm: $1 off all shots and specialty drinks. Sporting bootie shorts 20 percent discount. Parties of three or more 20 percent discount. Sa, 8-11PM through 8/29. Sparks Lounge, 1237 Baring Blvd (775) 409-3340

DJ RAZZ

Come dance the night away to DJ RAZZ! You can even karaoke if you like. Ladies Night every Friday night. Drink Specials all night.

Saturday Night May 2 Live Giant Screen Viewing Nugget Ballroom $39

Includes 2 Draft Beers

Book Now!

casino resort 10 

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APRIL 23, 2015


Ross Ruf of the Palomino Valley National Adoption Center freezebrands a mustang mare. Fewer wild horses than usual have received contraceptives this year.

Fertile fillies What’s so bad about a little birth control? Spring has sprung, which is to say wild horses are having babies and apt to make more in a hot minute. But equine contraceptives, which often come in dart-form from the Bureau of Land Management, have some activists by Georgia Fisher concerned. Friends of Animals, a Connecticut group that made a stir in Northern georgiaf@ Nevada earlier this year (“Buck wild,” Feb. 5 RN&R), halted another newsre view.c om scheduled mustang roundup in the Pine Nut Herd Management Area in March. Apart from stressful roundups and shrinking range land, use of the contraceptive porcine zona pellucida, or PZP, is one of the nonprofit’s chief complaints. The Humane Society endorses the vaccine, however, and the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign works with state agencies to administer it. “They may want to stick their head in the sand and use this as a fundraising opportunity,” Friends of Animals president Priscilla Feral said in a prepared statement that jabbed at the preservation campaign and an affiliated group called Return to Freedom—and, apparently, their motives—“but the harsh reality for wild horses is that research shows PZP has long-term detrimental effects.” The Humane Society disagrees. “Both deer and wild horses treated with PZP actually show comparable or better body condition than females who continue to have offspring,” the society’s website reads. “In wild horses, at least, this improvement in condition actually leads to longer lifespans.” Friends of Animals cite a 2009 Princeton study that found the temporary contraceptive to be socially disruptive among equines, however. That’s a dire claim, considering their lives often depend on herd dynamics. PZP opponents also tout genetic research that suggests thousands of animals are needed in a given area to ensure sound offspring. As far as BLM horse and burro specialist John Axtell knows, just two area mares have had the contraceptive this spring. Had the latest roundup ensued, the bureau would have corralled more horses, given them the vaccine, and turned them loose again. In short, we’ll get a big wave of foals next spring, which sounds cute and all until you consider the drought. “If this is a normal summer, there’s the potential for a lot of horses to die out there if we don’t do anything,” Axtell said. “It’s going to continue to degrade the habitat.” As for the Pine Nut roundup being stalled, well, it’s probably just that. Friends of Animals’ injunction stemmed from an outdated environmentalassessment statement on the BLM’s part, so Axtell figures the bureau will draft a new one, then try again to gather the horses after their foals have had time to mature. The American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign doesn’t endorse roundups at all, for the record, or many of the BLM’s policies. Contraception is a different story. “It happens in a split second,” AWHPC spokeswoman Deniz Bolbol said of the darting process, for which she’s become a trained volunteer. “They don’t even run away. They jolt a little, but they just keep on grazing right in front of you.” Ω OPINION

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ERIKA HARRSCH Passport Performances Through a series of interactive public performances, this Mexican-born artist challenges concepts of borders and questions immigration practices – themes inspired by the migration of Monarch butterflies from the United States and Canada to Mexico.

Saturday, May 2 - Sunday, May 3 11 am – 5 pm Cinco de Mayo Festival, Grand Sierra Resort Thursday, May 7 | 5 – 7 pm First Thursday, Nevada Museum of Art Saturday, May 9 | 11 am – 3 pm Second Saturday, Nevada Museum of Art FREE ADMISSION See Harrsch’s exhibition Erika Harrsch: The Monarch Paradigm – Migration as Metaphor, on view at the Nevada Museum of Art through July 26.

Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts | E. L. Wiegand Gallery 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno | 775.329.3333 | nevadaart.org

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APRIL 23, 2015

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N O I S E Could a Reno Bike PRojeCt Radio station get the Community on the aiRwaves?

"P

ersonally, I don’t have any plans to be a DJ, but I know there’s a huge diversity of music in this town, and people that like music,” said Noah Silverman, director of the Reno Bike Project. “They’re called community radio stations—the idea being that people from the community have access to the airwaves.” The Bike Project, a local bicycle advocacy nonprofit organization, might soon be launching a radio station. In early 2011, President Obama signed into law the Local Community Radio Act of 2010, which authorized the Federal Communications Commission to license local low-power FM (LPFM) radio stations. This new law overturned a previous act that effectively outlawed LPFM stations for more than a decade. LPFM stations operate with a maximum of 100 watts—about 10 percent of commercial radio firepower—and with no advertising. The licenses are given to noncommercial educational entities, like the Bike Project, which was recently issued a license. LPFM stations are generally able to broadcast for a radius of only about five miles, but the stations are viewed by some radio enthusiasts as an important counter to the increasing homogenization of commercial radio, particularly after the enactment of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, which loosened regulations on media conglomeration. However, the majority of these licenses have been snatched up by well-organized, well-funded conservative church organizations that use the stations to broadcast religious material. Todd Urick is the program director of the Davis, California, based organization Common Frequency, which helps organize grassroots community radio stations by partnering with students and community organizations. “Common Frequency is a 501(c)3 nonprofit dedicated to innovative new community and college radio,” wrote Urick in a recent email. “By providing free and low-cost aid to regular people educating themselves to

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Economics student Thomas Snyder is the general manager of the university's Wolf Pack Radio.

be the media, Common Frequency has been supporting the launch of grassroots stations since 2006. Peace and justice activists, social service agencies, students, Spanish-language speakers and Native tribes are among our partner organizations. We believe every town should have a common frequency on which people's voices can be broadcast and heard.” Urick approached the Holland Project, a teenoriented, all-ages art and music nonprofit in Reno, about helping them apply for a license. After the Holland Project declined, primarily because of fundraising concerns, Urick approached Silverman, who was enthusiastic. Silverman had experience listening to ART OF THE STATE

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non-commercial radio while living in Seattle. “I was blown away by how much original music I heard on that station that I would never hear anywhere else, and the variety of the content,” he said. “We want to bring an alternative to commercial radio to Reno. … It’s also a huge asset to the Bike Project and to Holland Project, because it’s a way for the Bike Project to advocate for various cycling things—meetings and issues— and address those issues on the air, which now we can’t really do. And Holland Project can broadcast their shows—live shows and upcoming shows. And it’s for all the other community continued from page 15

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"BIG NOISE"

continued from page 14

organizations that are making this town better. So, the Bike Project would be represented on air, which is why I think it’s worth our while.” Urick helped Silverman successfully navigate the FCC’s application process and the Reno Bike Project obtained a license. And though Holland Project

it is,” said Brittany Curtis, Holland’s director. The organization often presents concerts by a variety of underground and alternative music acts. “The stuff that’s playing on college radio nationally is the stuff that’s coming through Holland. That kind of thing—supporting an alterna-

˝I was blown away by how much original music I heard on that station that I would never hear anywhere else, and the variety of the content˝ initially passed on the opportunity, Silverman recruited that organization to help develop potential content, especially music. “The stuff that’s playing [in Reno] on FM formats is not the stuff that’s playing at Holland—but nationally,

tive community, an arts and culture supported community that’s not so mainstream or corporate—that’s always been super important to us.” Tim Conder owns Cuddleworks, an artists’ work space, which is next to the Reno Bike Project on Fourth Street.

Conder suggested to Silverman that the Cuddleworks facility would be ideal for hosting the station, and also suggested approaching the University of Nevada, Reno’s student radio station, Wolf Pack Radio, about a potential partnership. Wolf Pack Radio doesn’t currently have an FM presence, and instead the student DJs tailor their content to the stations’ website. Those discussions are in a preliminary stage, and subject to university administrative approval. However, Thomas Snider, the general manager of Wolf Pack Radio, and a UNR student studying economics and entrepreneurship, is excited about the possibility of getting his radio station actually broadcast on actual radio waves. “I’ve always loved music,” said Snider. “And when I came to the university, the radio station was one of the first things that I found, and it was something that I wanted to be a part of. From that, I just started volunteering and helping out, and two years later, I became the manager of the radio station.” Snider acknowledges that, especially among younger people, who can subscribe to music streaming services, and load up their personal picks on portable electronics, radio is no longer

the singular method of musical discovery that it might have once been, but he thinks that the medium still has unique niches. “Radio is place where people can tune in to find artists that they’ve never heard, and broaden their tastes,” he said. “That’s where I see radio on one end. I also see it on the other side, on the community end, where it gives a voice to the community, a place where all members of the community can have an outlet to get their voice out there, and there can be discussion about whatever issues are facing the community.” A community-oriented, student-run station might be a key bridge across the sometimes gaping chasm between the ivory tower and the rest of Reno. “From my perspective, I noticed that there’s all these really cool things happening in Reno downtown, and there’s no reason that the university and the associated students in particular shouldn’t try to work with these different organizations, be that the Bike Project or the Holland Project,” said Snider. “We want to keep a very strong UNR presence, but then incorporate the community into it,” said Silverman. “We want to incorporate the community into Wolf Pack Radio. That’s what we’re

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4/16/15 5:23 PM


PHOTO/ERIC MARKS

going for as the basis for this partnership. It’s a great way for UNR to get its voice across I-80.” One possible problem for any potential partnership deal is that the clock is ticking: If the station isn’t broadcasting by March of next year, the Bike Project will lose its license.

“We agree on a parallel mission of inclusiveness and localism,” said Cotton. Many of the programs on KXNV are externally produced shows, like environmental programs, and Native American and Spanish language news programs, but the station also features some original music content curated by, among others, on-air radio personality Bruce van Dyke, also one of the founding board members of Open Sky Radio. (He’s also an RN&R contributing columnist.) “My core belief is that radio can be a cultural hub, much like newspaper,” said Cotton. “If there’s an area that doesn’t have a newspaper or a radio station or a TV station, it’s sort of disjointed. … If you talk to anybody around here, they don’t know what the valley would be like without [KDUP, his Surprise Valley station], because it’s sort of the center pole to so many different things related to arts and culture.” Cotton emphasizes that he’s fully supportive of the Bike Project’s efforts and the potential partnership with Wolf Pack Radio. KXNV has also aired some Wolf Pack Radio’s content. “Most towns Reno’s size have a college station, and in Reno’s case, it has a college station that has nothing

Up in the air Jeff Cotton is wthe director of Open Sky Radio, a nonprofit organization “centered on providing radio and TV to rural areas that don’t have any radio or TV,” as he describes it. He operates radio and TV stations in Northern Nevada and Northeastern California— in particular, in Surprise Valley, just across the California border a couple of hours north of Reno. He’s also the station manager of KXNV, 89.1 FM, a noncommercial, full-power station that launched in Reno late last year (“Air waves,” Art of the State, Dec. 18, 2014). KXNV was originally developed by Cotton for Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada, a consortium of various activist groups. But, given his experience operating radio stations, Cotton and his organization eventually took over the project and the license from PLAN.

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to do with the students,” said Cotton, referring to KUNR, the city’s university-based public radio station. Cotton said that, even if the partnership with the university comes together, the Bike Project will face an uphill battle with its LPFM station. “Reno has one of the most crowded radio dials in the nation for a market its size,” he said. “We are one of the last ones on. … We’re full power, but compared to the other 45 stations on the dial on the region, we’re at 1,000 watts, and most of the big boys are at 10,000 to 25,000 watts. … We haven’t gotten our underwriting act together in terms of getting out and having sales people go out and bring in the business people to support us, which is going to be necessary. We’re so young. On the air not even six months. We don’t have any grants or foundation money, so just paying the power and the tower rent and little things like that is a really big challenge. I’m helping Noah Silverman with Reno Bike—I met with him a couple of weeks ago—and I really want to do what I can to help him be aware of the pitfalls. Even at that scale, which

Nicholas Tavcar and Indri Ferguson are radio show hosts at Wolf Pack Radio.

"BIG NOISE"

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"BIG NOISE"

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is a lot smaller than what we’re doing, LPFM, he’s got financial worries ahead of him—unless he finds a sugar daddy. … He’s got my shoulder to his wheel. I’m totally in favor of that. I’d really like to see student-run radio blossom in the area. That would be great.”

longer is. Where posters worked 15 years ago—it comes in waves, sometimes they work, sometimes they don’t. There’s a lot you can do with [community radio]. It’s not like Top 40 radio. It’s not just going to cycle through the same 50 songs. There’s going to be a lot

˝Radio is a place where people can tune in to find artists that they`ve never heard, and broaden their tastes˝

Conder sees a lot of potential for cross-platform promotions with the advent of a community radio station. “Advertising and promoting things is difficult,” he said. “As fast as technology changes, so do those opportunities. Where Facebook was working two years ago to promote events, it no

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of different programming content—talk content, podcast style content.” Something reiterated separately by Cotton at KXNV, Urick at Common Frequency, Conder at Cuddleworks, Curtis at the Holland Project, Silverman at the Reno Bike Project, and Snider at Wolf Pack Radio is that the key to

the future of radio is locally oriented content. The internet covers the whole world, but a radio station with a broadcast radius of only five miles can’t help but be locally focused. “The internet is a decent platform for global issues,” wrote Urick. “Radio excels in being an excellent conduit for local discussion of pertinent civic issues and promotion of local culture. Unfortunately commercial radio doesn’t utilize the medium for this. Radio is also ubiquitous—you don’t need internet access, a paid data connection. Everyone has a radio in their car, and its easy and free to connect to. This allows for a sizable audience compared to an internet station where an individual needs to actively seek out the streaming source that is costly to maintain by the operator.” “Imagine how cool it would be to have, like, Pierced Arrows come to town,” said Conder, referencing a garage rock band that plays at the Holland Project periodically. “They do a show that night at Holland. The next morning, they have a cup of coffee, they come down to Cuddleworks, and they play a live set that we play that afternoon on the radio station. That’s it in a nutshell.” “Most of the younger generations are already off on Pandora and Spotify,

and we’re painfully aware of that, but we’re going to provide local content that nobody else does, and we’re going to provide content that’s not on the dial locally,” said Cotton. Curtis, for her part, is very cautiously optimistic about the future of the station and the possible partnership with the student radio station. She said she’s seen similar efforts fall through with previous student managers of Wolf Pack Radio and other partners, including Sierra Nevada Community Access Television and Truckee Meadows Community College. “It feels very fragile,” she said. “I’m very careful with it because I’ve seen it unravel so many times before with different parties involved. This seems like a really cool solution, but I don’t want to jump the gun on it.” Community radio is something that people in Reno—at the very least, those people associated with communityoriented nonprofits like the Holland Project and the Reno Bike Project—have wanted for a long time. Previous efforts to create a community radio station like this have fallen short. So, the question is, maybe this time? Ω


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Photo/Allison Young

KEEP ON TRUCKIN’ Our food reviewer test drives the grub from some of the local food trucks by Todd South

Lisa Anderson owns  the All Wrapped Up  food truck. 

I love food trucks, but sometimes it’s difficult to discover where they’ll be from week to week. Beginning in May, the new season of mass truck events begins, so I trekked around town finding a few more standouts to add to my list from last year (“Road Food,” Arts & Culture, May 15, 2014). I don’t mind saying it was difficult, delicious work.

The Traveling Pizza Maestro serves up mini 9-inch New Jersey-style pies with two toppings of your choosing, a zesty red sauce, and a thin, crispy handmade crust ($6). I paid an extra buck for an additional topping and my sausage/ mushroom/feta pie didn’t disappoint. Definitely the best pizza I’ve had from a truck, and better than many you’ll find in a restaurant. I paired the pizza with a simple side salad of spring mix and arugula greens with an Asian sesame dressing ($2). My buddy ordered a three-piece serving of steak and cilantro empanadas, served with chipotle ranch dip and a side salad ($6). As much as I liked the pizza, the empanadas were crispy, spicy, gooey heaven and I wished I wasn’t already too full for another order. All Wrapped Up serves wraps, but these ain’t your average cold cuts and cheese in a tortilla. Burgers, chicken and marinated sirloin are grilled to order, resulting in wraps to write home about. Shock Therapy ($10.75) is a half-pound burger wrap with bacon, potato pancakes, tomato, caramelized onion, red, yellow and green bell peppers, jalapeño peppers, your choice of American, pepper jack or cheddar cheese, finished with jalapeño ranch dressing. All wraps come with a side of potato pancake or green salad with a dizzying array of housemade dressings available. Sam’s Insane Buffalo Wrap ($7.75) is simpler and lighter but no slouch on flavor. Grilled chicken is

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tossed in spicy wing sauce, wrapped with cheddar cheese, plenty of romaine lettuce, then drizzled with ranch dressing. If you’re avoiding carbs, you can order any wrap “served naked” on a bed of lettuce. Truckee-based Pho Real travels down the hill on occasion to share its fare with Reno, and I’m certainly glad I got to try it. Though they weren’t serving pho the day I found them, they make one of the best Bahn Mi sandwiches I’ve tasted ($11). Slow-braised pork shoulder is piled on a toasted French roll with housemade pickled veggies, fresh herbs, jalapeños, and an herb citrus aioli. The meat was tender and well-seasoned, all the vegetables popped with flavor, and the dressing was a perfect finish. But as good as it was, the sandwich was nearly outdone by a side of fried Brussels sprouts ($4). Sprout halves are deep fried, then tossed in a housemade balsamic vinaigrette. Crispy, tangy, zesty, and so good I’m almost at a loss for words. Even if you think you hate Brussels sprouts, you’re going to like these. Operated by a true son of the Windy City, Organic Taste of Chicago serves up South Side street food with a modern twist: Where possible, the ingredients are sourced from local providers and certified organic. I’ve been craving an Italian beef sandwich, and I wasn’t disappointed ($8.50). Thin-sliced roast beef, simmered in seasoned juices, served on a French roll and topped with sweet peppers, hot giardiniera (housemade vegetable pickle), or both. I ordered both and was asked, “Do you want an Italian sausage added?” Well, of course I do ($1

extra for the organic chicken sausage). Going all in, I ordered it “wet,” meaning the sandwich is soaked in beefy meat juice. Think French Dip, but all at once. Yeah, it’s a bit soggy and a little harder to eat this way, but your tongue will thank you for the effort. My dining companion went with the heart-healthy option, a chicken sandwich with marinated-and-grilled free range chicken breast, lettuce, tomato, feta, and “Original Bronco Sauce” (a spicy mayo-based sauce) on a toasted sesame bun ($7). It was a kickin’ clucker, but couldn’t compete with hot, wet, spicy beef. Kenji’s Food Truck features a unique fusion of Hawaiian, Asian and Mexican favorites with a choice of chicken, pork, beef and tofu. Where else can you get a classic Hawaiian plate lunch, quesadilla, and fried udon all on the same order? Served with two scoops of steamed white “sticky” rice, Hawaiian-style macaroni salad (essentially a mayonnaise delivery system) and Hawaiian barbecue beef ($8.50), my plate lunch was much better than others I’ve tried. The salad was smoother and less gloppy than I’ve come to expect, with some veggie crunch and seasoning I enjoyed (you can substitute a spring mix green salad if you like). The beef was charbroiled, cut into long thin strips, and coated in the version of teriyaki that says, “aloha.” Hawaiian barbecue sauce usually includes pineapple, sesame and more garlic than its rice-vinegared cousin; Kenji’s version has quite a bit of zip which I found very appealing. I chose to add pork to the quesadilla ($7 total), a winning combination with caramelized red onions and a chipotle and cilantro sour cream sauce rounding out the stuffed and fried tortilla. At


this point, the fried Japanese udon noodle with chicken ($6) might seem like overkill, but the fat noodles and mild sauce provided a light Asian balance between the heavier ingredients of the other two dishes. Good stuff.

Reno Earth Day is Sunday, April 26th! See what’s happening on this page and the following 3 pages!

Saving one of the best for last, Stephon’s Mobile Bistro has been serving what I’d call “pre-hangover food” for over eight years. Though he does lunches and catering gigs, Stephon and his family team are best known for being a beacon of greasy goodness parked within stumbling distance of various watering holes over the years. During my recent midnight visit, a brisk business was underway with the well-relaxed customers treating Stephon as something between savior and favorite uncle. I was ordering take-out sandwiches, so I loaded up with three best sellers: Philly cheese ($7), grilled barbecue chicken ($6) and the infamous Woody burger ($10). The first was pretty good, if standard, chopped steak and cheese served on a long roll with grilled onions and peppers. Better was the chicken breast, served on a round bun with plenty of sauce and onion. Tasty. But nothing compares to the Woody, a double bacon cheeseburger split in half, served on a long roll with a grilled hot link on top. The Woody is every bit as good as it sounds and maybe a little bit better. Best of all, every order is served with fresh, hand-cut fries that are crispy, fluffy, and beyond delicious even without a drink or three beforehand.

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Feed the Camel, McKinley Arts & Culture Center Wednesdays, June 3 - September 30, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Over 10 trucks, crafts, entertainment Sparks Food Truck Drive-In, Victorian Square Second and fourth Saturdays, June 13 - October 24, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Over 10 trucks, free movie screening South Reno Food Truck Fest, Damonte Family Event Center at Sage Hill First and third Fridays, year round, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. 5-10 trucks, live entertainment, indoor seating Ω

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Marie

Electric Vehicles and Renewables

Things are different here and it’s starting to show. We’re utilizing more than a gigawatt of renewable resources in Nevada. That’s a lot of solar, wind and geothermal, with more on the way. Not to mention the thousands of rooftop solar projects we’ve helped our customers install on their homes or businesses. See what else we’re doing at nvenergy.com/recharged.

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,ĞůƉƉƌĞƐĞƌǀĞ ƚŚĞĨƵƚƵƌĞ ĨŽƌƚŚĞŽŶĞƐ ǁĞůŽǀĞ͘ dŚŝƐĚĂLJĂŶĚ ĞǀĞƌLJĚĂLJ͘

Join a Vanpool. ZĞůĂdžŽŶLJŽƵƌǁĂLJƚŽǁŽƌŬ͕ŵĞĞƚŶĞǁƉĞŽƉůĞĂŶĚ ƐĂǀĞŵŽŶĞLJǁŚŝůĞLJŽƵŚĞůƉƚŚĞĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚ͘

Clear the Roads. Clean the Air. ^ŵĂƌƚƚƌĂŶƐƉŽƌƚĂƟŽŶĐŚŽŝĐĞƐƌĞĚƵĐĞƚƌĂĸĐ ĐŽŶŐĞƐƟŽŶĂŶĚŐƌĞĞŶŚŽƵƐĞŐĂƐĞƐ͕ƐůŽǁŐůŽďĂů ǁĂƌŵŝŶŐ͕ĂŶĚŝŵƉƌŽǀĞĂŝƌƋƵĂůŝƚLJĂŶĚƋƵĂůŝƚLJŽĨůŝĨĞ͘

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775-348-POOL


Photo/Josie Luciano

Oldest profession

Artist Priscilla Varner put cameras in the hands of professional sex workers.

Priscilla Varner Emancipating Jane is not a photography exhibit about feminism. It is not an examination by of oppressive patriarchal structures or Josie Luciano collective choice or even individual choice. It belongs, rather, to the pretend category “first-person non-judgmental” or the real genre “participatory vernacular photography.” Both of these distinctions give the artist the freedom to sidestep the morality of an industry—if there is such a thing—and go straight to humanizing its subjects. emancipating Jane: This approach works well for challenging the Emancipating Jane, given that the subjects Representation of in question are legal sex workers. There Legal sex-Workers are few professions that can bring to mind in Fine art is on a particular kind of woman so quickly and display in the unR student Gallery in the with so little to go on—think Julia Robert’s Jot travis building character/caricature in Pretty Woman. from april 27-May 8. These stereotypes, along with a history opening reception is of sexualized images of prostitution april 30 at 5 p.m. throughout art history, are exactly what University of Nevada, Reno student Priscilla Varner set out to challenge when she started her MFA project more than three years ago. Varner is an

award-winning photographer, military wife, and mother of two. She is not, however, a photographer in her own thesis show. Her role in Emancipating Jane skews closer to curator than that of artist as she spent the last 18 months placing cameras in the hands of 15 sex workers in four brothels across the state. It took Varner about a year to get an appointment with the madame of the first brothel, but once one door opened, others followed, and soon Varner was having conversations with women from the Mustang Ranch, Bunny Ranch, Love Ranch and Sagebrush Ranch. After conducting interviews, Varner gave camera tutorials and instructed each woman to take pictures of her own life. The resulting imagery is largely mundane—pictures one might see on a friend’s phone before they are deleted in favor of photos that include people. Images of shoes, stashes of candy, art supplies, and other personal belongings dot the walls of the student gallery. Among the 221 photographs in the exhibit, only

two are portraits. The photos are grouped by “girl” and are accompanied by voice recordings of each woman’s interview. One question the audience won’t hear in on these recordings is “Why did you get into the industry?” “To me that question is irrelevant,” said Varner. “The decision is made. You are there. When people ask why you went into the industry, it’s just reaffirming why they chose not to.” Cherry, a courtesan at the Mustang Ranch, sees Varner’s fine art perspective as a counter-voice to the usual media narrative about her profession. “I think the media has a lot of Pretty Woman mentality

going on. Art delves a little deeper, it looks at the person versus the group.” Passing Cherry’s section on the wall, the first thing the viewer notices is a photo of her shoes—duck slippers included—lined up in front of her closet. This shot is a fairly common theme in the exhibit. “A lot is defined in our shoes,” said Cherry. “Every girl took a picture of them. I think it gives an insight into our personal lives.” She went on to describe the new perspective that the project gave her about her own life. “I didn’t really analyze it before because it’s my life and it’s just happening. Then I started taking photos and I saw the other girls’ pictures. It was interesting to see what they value.” When given the chance to have the final word about her show, Varner partly deflected, handing over control of the exhibit once again. “It’s all about trying to get rid of the power of the photographer.” Ω

Plant a Row for the Hungry Use surplus food from your garden to help those who need it. Visit fbnn.org for a list of drop off locations for your fresh produce.

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Pho Kietzke is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

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themselves were OK but nothing I’d order again. I generally find breaded shrimp to be lacking in actual shrimp flavor, and these were akin to any you’d find elsewhere. Much more impressive was the muc chien don ($7.95), several flat squares of squid mantle fried crispy in a light batter, tasty and deliciously tender. The sweet and sour was really optional because the calamari itself had so much flavor. Rounding out the appetizers was an order of canh ga chien ($4.95): six chicken wings fried with fish sauce and served with a pile of garnish similar to that served with the prawns. If you’re unfamiliar with fish sauce, you might be taken aback the first time you catch a whiff. It’s the Asian equivalent of a strong, stinky cheese, and like its aromatic cousin, the flavor is worth the initial olfactory jolt. My wife’s not usually one to brave anything cooked this way, but she admitted the wings were worth it. If we weren’t ordering entrees, I would have asked for a couple of more plates of wings. My wife’s wonton soup ($6.50) featured the eponymous dumplings of ground pork and shrimp wrapped in egg pasta, topped with barbecue pork and mixed vegetables in a chickenbased broth. Nothing fancy, yet full of comfort food goodness. “Hit the spot,” was her pronouncement on the subject. Similarly on target, the mi xao ga ($7.50) is essentially chicken chow mein with fried vermicelli standing in for chow mein noodles, stir-fried veggies and chunks of tender chicken. It's a little different than I expected, but in a good way. My favorite, pho dac biet ($7.50), vermicelli soup with rare beef, well-done flank, brisket, tendon, tripe and meatball, was a perfect rendition of this noodle shop standard. Tons of meat, great broth—exactly what I’m looking for when I want pho. My second favorite, bun thit nuong cha gio ($7.50), flame-broiled pork, egg roll, and vermicelli noodles with lettuce and veg on the bottom, was pretty much perfect. Having tried our favorites, I can say we’ll definitely be back to explore more of the menu. Ω

Our group ordered a variety of dishes from both the entree and appetizer menus, and for such a small place, the menu isn’t lacking in Vietnamese and Chinese options to choose from. We started with coi cuon ($5): spring rolls stuffed with shrimp, pork, lettuce, mint and vermicelli served with a very good version of peanut sauce. The rice paper wrapper was a little chewy, but the ingredients were wellbalanced with none overpowering the whole. Up next, tom chien bot ($6.50): five butterflied prawns fried in breading, and served with hearts of romaine lettuce, sprigs of fresh cilantro, fried spring onions, and a light sweet and sour sauce. I enjoyed the garnish perhaps more than the shrimp. It was practically a salad in its own right. The prawns


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A load of bully Unfriended

K N I TH

. E E FR

There have been some good—actually great—horror movies released the last couple of years. Unfriended, the latest entry in the tired foundfootage subgenre, isn’t one of them. What you get here is an entire film that requires you to watch somebody’s computer screen where a bunch of obnoxious teens are Skyping one another. A ghost-like presence by inexplicably enters the conversation and Bob Grimm knocks off the kids, one by one, while they scream and plead for mercy. They, of course, b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m never go out of frame for too long and always manage to take their camera with them no matter how much their lives are in danger. The chat starts with Blaire (Shelley Hennig) and Mitch (Moses Jacob Storm … yes, that’s his name), a boyfriend and girlfriend talking about the dirty things they’ll do on prom night when a bunch of their friends rudely join the chat party. They all goof on one another and wonder who the unidentified person is who has mysteriously joined the chat.

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These poor young  people are bored and  anxious after watching  this crapfest.

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As it happens, the chat is taking place on the one-year anniversary of their friend Laura’s suicide. Laura (Heather Sossaman) couldn’t stand the public ridicule she endured after somebody posted a video of her passed out and dumping in her pants at a party. Now it appears Laura, or somebody pretending to be Laura by using her social networking accounts, is out for revenge. Hell hath no fury like a teenaged girl who has had a video of her passed-out shitting her pants posted on the internet. Like the mostly lousy Paranormal Activity movies before it, Unfriended is one of those movies that make you wait … and wait … and wait. When something does finally happen, like one of the kids putting his hand in a blender because the malevolent force made him do it,

it’s most definitely not worth the wait. I found myself laughing more than cringing. For 82 minutes, we watch Blaire’s home screen as she uses Skype, Facebook, YouTube, research sites, etc. Some might see this film as a cinematic time capsule, a social commentary on our addiction to the internet and it’s social pitfalls. I see it as really, really lazy. Still, the setup could’ve allowed for a good scare or two. Like The Blair Witch Project before it, the director doesn’t allow us to ever see who is causing the mayhem. The teens knock themselves off because a ghost is possessing them, or some nonsense like that. I was waiting for a ghost to show up, but it never happens. You just get teens screaming “No, don’t do that!” and “No, I didn’t do that!” and “Show me your boobs!” The screaming gets to the point where it’s utterly annoying. Yeah, I know, cyber-bullying is a real thing. Unfriended is trying to tell today’s youth that it’s a bad idea to post pictures of your friends taking a shit. Cyberbullying is bad form, people. Bad form. It’s also, as it turns out, a very boring and gimmicky subject for a horror film. You just know Unfriended is going to spawn sequels where other social networks play a more prominent part. Spotify is just a supporting player in this one, but I can see a sequel where a bunch of friends have to listen to an 80 minute Spotify playlist, and each song gives a hint as to how somebody will die. Or how about a Words with Friends death match? The possibilities are endless and vigorously lame. If you like horror, go with The Babadook or It Follows. Those films actually have real narratives where the protagonists actually leave the house, and there are real cinematographers and editors involved. If you have a strong urge to see Unfriended, just Skype a couple of your friends, call them some bad names, and stare at them while they yell at you on your home screen for 82 minutes. It’s basically the same thing and would probably be far more entertaining. Ω


4

Cinderella

Director Kenneth Branagh knows what Disney junkies, young and old, crave in their fairy tale movies, and he unabashedly delivers the goods with this, the latest “live action” remake of a Disney animated classic. Of course, any Cinderella movie would be a slog without a good actress playing the title character. Luckily, Branagh has scored a great one with Lily James (TV’s Downton Abbey), as charming an actress as any to ever play an iconic Disney role. Screenwriter Chris Weitz gives Cinderella a sweet and sad backstory, showing us a young girl (Eloise Webb) living a happy and secure life with her doting parents (Ben Chaplin and Hayley Atwell). As the fairy tale dictates, Cinderella loses her mom, paving the way for the Queen Bee of all stepmothers, played here by a spot-on, devilish Cate Blanchett. Blanchett and James are so good in their roles because they aren’t trying to break the mold. They both embrace their parts as if they know what we have come to expect, and the result is a sort of adorable nostalgia in the case of Cinderella. She’s a genuinely nice person you can root for as portrayed by James. Adding to the charm is Helena Bonham Carter (Branagh’s ex-girlfriend) as Fairy Godmother. As to be expected, Carter plays it joyfully weird and quirky. When the pink gown transforms into that glorious blue dress adorning the spinning James, it’s pure movie magic. It’s a lot of fun seeing Branagh embracing the Disney canon and making it his own for nearly two hours.

3

Danny Collins

Al Pacino steps up as the title character, a Neil Diamond-like rock singer who has spent the past 40 years touring and performing “the hits.” No longer a productive songwriter, he’s come to rely on the comfort of crowds reacting happily to his most popular hit, “Baby Doll.” He’s also heavy into drugs and alcohol and engaged to a girl half his age. On the eve of his birthday, his manager (a delightfully acerbic Christopher Plummer) gives him a special present: a framed personal letter to him that John Lennon wrote many years ago that was never delivered. Lennon had once read an article about Collins, was moved, and sent a correspondence from him and Yoko with his phone number. He was offering some fatherly advice to the confused young Danny, but due to a scummy collector getting his hands on the letter, Danny never got it. The gift throws Danny into a tailspin, wondering what life would’ve been like if he could’ve called Lennon and been pals. Trivia note: This element of the story is actually based on the true story of folk singer Steve Tilston, who received a similar reassuring letter from John Lennon 34 years after it was written, phone number and all. Pacino is good here, as is a supporting cast that includes Bobby Cannavale, Jennifer Garner and Annette Bening.

3

Furious 7

The latest Furious movie says goodbye to series mainstay Paul Walker while taking car chases to seriously outlandish and fantastical extremes. In some ways, the film has become more of a science fiction offering rather than a car chase movie, and that’s fine by me. I have to admit that part of me got uncomfortable watching Paul Walker racing around in cars a little over a year after he died in a fiery car crash. You can say Walker died doing something he loved, but I’m thinking irresponsible and reckless speeding dropped way down on his favorite things list during the final moments of his life. Like, to the way, way bottom of that list. That said, Furious 7 does spark some life into a very tired franchise by going totally bananas, and it’s pretty remarkable how Walker, who had allegedly only filmed half of his scenes before he died, is inserted into the movie posthumously. Director James Wan, primarily known for horror movies like Saw and The Conjuring, has delivered the franchise’s best offering since the first one. This movie gets my blessing for the sequence involving Vin Diesel’s Dominic Toretto and Walker’s Brian O’Conner jumping a car through not one but two skyscrapers in Abu Dhabi. Will there be an eighth film, even though Walker is no longer with us? Um, given that the movie made nearly $144 million in its opening weekend, I think it’s a foregone conclusion that Universal will find a way to keep the engines running on this sucker.

2

Get Hard

For me, a new Will Ferrell movie is usually a cause for celebration. Hey, I even liked Land of the Lost, a film I feel was unjustly dismissed by the masses. Alas, even the great comedic masters misfire from time to time, and

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Ferrell’s latest goes on the dung heap with the likes of his Kicking and Screaming and Bewitched. Ferrell plays a finance guru who gets convicted for crimes he supposedly didn’t commit, and sentenced to hard time in San Quentin. In an attempt to not get raped when he goes to jail, he hires his car washer (Kevin Hart) to train him in prison ways, for he immediately assumes the man did time because he’s black. So, right there, the Ferrell character is a racist ignoramus that we are supposed to feel sorry for, and that just doesn’t happen. Ferrell and Hart labor for laughs in a sea of dick and rape jokes, and it’s all quite ugly and mostly unfunny. There are some highlights, including a simulated prison riot in a wine cellar that inexplicably includes the appearance of an angry baboon, but the jokes are mostly duds. You know you are in trouble when your plot is mostly identical to a failed Rob Schneider movie (the equally offensive Big Stan).

1

Insurgent

Director Robert Schwentke chooses a lot of gray tones to go with his dull dialogue and muddled, straining performances. Shailene Woodley, an impressive actress most of the time, simply doesn’t make for an intriguing action heroine. The material seems beneath her. After the events of the first film, Tris (Woodley) and Four (Theo James) are living in a “faction free” zone, meaning the zone is not run by any of the factions by which everybody in this society is categorized by. The factions are Amity, Abnegation, Erudite, Dauntless, Candor, Flounder and Douchebag. I would say this mess has the worst Young Adult fiction premise ever, but I’ve seen the Twilight films, so I would be lying my ass off. While living among the factionless, they have a surprise meeting with Four’s hot mom Evelyn, played by Naomi Watts, one of my all-time favorite actresses. Watts is totally wasting her time in this crap, because, well, if Kate Winslet can slum in this pigeon spooge, so can Watts. While Watts makes a fairly brief appearance in this chapter, her character figures to be bigger in future installments. So, consequently, I weep for Watts’s immediate film future.

4

It Follows

A young woman (Maika Monroe) pays for having some car-sex fun in a very, very big way in this creepy, ghoulish, unrelenting horror film from writer-director David Robert Mitchell. Taking more than a few cues from John Carpenter’s Halloween and the zombie works of George Romero, Mitchell is very much tuned into the sort of stuff that makes filmgoers squirm and sweat. The movie, based on one of his own nightmares, combines voyeuristic camera work, eerie soundtrack vibes and some fine acting for one of the better, old-school cinematic scares of the past decade. Monroe’s character gets cursed after having the aforementioned car sex. The curse involves an unstoppable force that can take the shape of any human, be it an old naked man on the roof or one of your parents. That force is not only out to kill the cursed individual; it’s out to kill the cursed individual in very violent ways. The shape-shifting “monster” proves a highly effective device, because you will find yourself constantly scanning every frame of this movie, evaluating every human being that appears. Crowd shots are especially unnerving. There are times when the “monster” is fairly apparent, and others where it is something vaguely visible in the back of the shot. In short, you don’t ever feel safe watching It Follows.

4

While We’re Young

Ben Stiller reteams with director Noah Baumbach (Greenberg) for a very funny movie about artistic integrity and learning to grow up. Stiller and Naomi Watts play a 40-something couple who are mildly content but perhaps a little bored with their lives. They meet a 20-something couple (Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried) and find themselves drawn to them, adapting aspects of their “really cool” lifestyle. The Stiller and Driver characters are both film documentarians. This leads to initial bonding, but then it leads to big problems. Stiller gets a chance to do his funniest movie since Tropic Thunder, and Watts is every bit as funny (especially when she cuts loose in a hip-hop dance class). Driver and Seyfried are adorable, and a little scary, as the younger couple who still listen to vinyl and watch VHS tapes because it’s cool and retro. Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz and Maria Dizzia get laughs as Stiller’s older friends who just had a baby and are worried about the emotional welfare of their two pals. Baumbach is always amusing, and this is one of his better films.

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Consuelo Jimenez Underwood 90 Auto Center Dr.

MOTHERS - THE ART OF SEEING Closing May 3 Sponsorship by the Nevada Arts Council.

Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts | E. L. Wiegand Gallery 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno | 775.329.3333 | nevadaart.org

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APRIL 23, 2015

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WHO: Dustin Brown WHAT: Tattoo Artist and Owner WHERE: Valor Tattoo Parlor Q: What is your favorite style or kind of tat too to do? A: My favorite style of tattooing is traditional, intricate Japanese imagery. I love Japanese mythology, it has always had a special place in my heart, especially while tattooing in Hawaii. Q: What makes your shop different from the other shops in the area? A: Valor Tattoo Parlor has an eclectic group of talented tattooers. Our shop has a spacious, comfortable atmosphere, with tons of books, art, and even a large terrarium. We treat our clients with respect, and welcome walk-ins. Q: Have you tat tooed in other areas and how does it differ from Reno? A: D uring my 12-year career as a tattooer I have tattooed in Kona, Hawaii and Reno, Nevada. When I started in Reno there were only 7 tattoo shops, and it was a small, intimate community of tattooers and clients. In Hawaii, on the other hand, I worked at one of the older tattoo shops that was located next to a harbor; this is where I tattooed mostly tourists, and I had to adapt to an ever-changing client base. I love Reno, I grew up here and I love the community, which is why I opened Valor in 2010.

Have a piece from one of these shops or artists that you'd like to feature? Email a JPG file to contest@newsreview.com and put “Ink'd Reno” in the subject line. Include your full name, age and daytime phone. Entries will be featured on our Facebook Fan Page.

Ink’d by: Dustin Brown Valor Tattoo Parlor • 141 Vesta Street (775) 324-0404 • www.valorparlor.com

Ink’d by: Jason McKillip Body Graphics Tattoo • 460 S. Wells Avenue (775) 322-8623 • www.renotattoo.com

Ink’d by: Lola Winkleman A Tota Madre Tattoos • 1465 S. Wells Avenue (775) 622-8189 • /ATMTATTOOS

Ink’d by: Zach Mueller Distinct Ink • 934 Corbett St • Carson City (775) 883-6878 • Distinct-Ink-Tattoos

Ink’d by: Parker Marked-Studios, Inc. • 945 W. Moana Lane (775) 209-1612 • www.markedstudios.com

Pulsing Canvas Tattoo, Piercing & Art Studio 1939 Prater Way • (775) 622-1023 /Pulsing-Canvas-Art-Tattoo

Ink’d by: Jorge Pintor Reno Tattoo Company • 143 N. Virginia Street (775) 322-6393 • www.renoTatco.com

Running Out of Canvas? We Can Help! Reno Tattoo Removal • 425 Marsh Ave (775) 200-0623 • www.renotattooremoval.com

Ink’d by: Anthony Velazquez Black Widow Ink • 487 E. Plumb Lane (775) 329-4369 • www.blackwidowink.com

Ink’d by: Chris Melzo Black Cat Tattoo • 905 S. Wells Ave (775) 324-9900 • Black-Cat-Tattoo

Ink’d by: Monica Gurnari Artistic Traditions • 2975 Vista Blvd, #104

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Ink’d by: Archie Wood Battle Born Tattoo • 1717 S. Wells Ave. (775) 327-4465 •

(775) 626-2400 •

BattleBornTattooReno

ArtisticTraditions


Electronic day Aether Street Where did the name Aether Street come from? “Well, I liked the name because aether represents something very by Anna Hart nebulous, but street gives it specificity,” said Daniel Sion, one half of the Reno duo. “It’s both sides of the spectrum.” Daniel plays drums and produces much of the electronic music. Alongside him is his younger brother, Aaron Sion, on guitar and lead vocals. Photo/AnnA hArt

within the context of electronic music. The result is what they call “theatrical electro-grunge” sound. Their musical process keeps the integrity of live music-making, but accepts a transition for music into the digital era, which the brothers see as inevitable. “There’s no getting around using a computer for musical production,” said Daniel. “That’s how the world is now. I can’t even book my haircuts without a computer.” Lyrically, the songs are chock full of social commentary that's coupled with the use of audio samples from cultural icons like John F. Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe. While many songs are specifically critical of the “machine of Hollywood,” many of the lyrics critique abstract social concepts that are universally applicable. “I think sometimes it’s important for art to not be literal and to convey a feeling,” said Daniel. “It can mean something different to everyone, yet it still connects everyone. … You can still have heart in electronic music.” It’s a sentiment the band has strengthened by using classical music to influence their electronic production for Aether Street's first album. “We’ve written orchestral interludes with synthesizers for many of our songs,” said Daniel. “There are audio samples [that] keep our music current and human. But the feel of the orchestra, especially the strings, almost seems ingrained in the human essence. It’s timeless and it hits you.” Though the songs on the album stand alone, the interludes provide cohesion to the work as a whole, all to create what the brothers describe as an “electronic rock opera.” The album tells the story of a fictional all-girl group, Mimi and the Diamonds, that moves from a small town to Los Angeles. The songs focus on the imaginary lead singer, Mimi, who meets Albert Cloud, a scummy, cocaine-wheeling record executive who introduces her to drugs like Xanax and gets her addicted. Just as Mimi begins to question it all, Cloud drops her, thus ending her 15 minutes of fame. “It’s a theme that’s so prevalent with pop divas today who have become such lifeless, shallow vessels of the industry,” said Aaron. “But it’s not a criticism of them, so much as it is one of the industry. It’s a culture that’s contrived without any heart.”Ω

Although Aether Street is a fairly new project, founded earlier this year, the two are no strangers to performing music. The brothers were members of the popular local band Crush for years before forming Aether Street. While this new endeavor bears some key similarities to the former—namely with the use of electronic music—the direction that Aether Street has taken their music is radically different. “We use the electronic music with real instruments to make a next level sound,” said Aaron. “[Our sound] is part Queen, part Green Day, and all run through an electronic filter.” Instead of submitting to the formulaic simplicity of electronic dance music (EDM), characterized by manufactured bass-heavy beats and melodies, Aether Street’s music combines the cinematic drama of chamber rock and aggressive vocals

The Sion brothers, Daniel and Aaron, are Aesther Street.

For more information, visit www.facebook. com/aetherstreet.

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THURSDAY 4/23 FRIDAY 4/24 SATURDAY 4/25 SUNDAY 4/26 MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/27-4/29 THURSDAY FRIDAY 4/24 SATURDAY 4/25 SUNDAY 4/26 MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/27-4/29 Blues jam w/Blue 4/23 Haven, DG Kicks, 9pm Tu, no cover 3RD STREET 9:30pm, After 11:30pm, W, no no cover cover 125 3RD W. ThirdSTREET St., (775) 323-5005 Bluesno jamcover w/Blue Haven, DGMic, Kicks, 9pm Tu, 9:30pm, no cover After Mic, 11:30pm, W, no cover 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005 Dance party w/DJ DoublePlay, Dance party w/DJ DoublePlay, Open Mic w/Steve Elegant, 7pm, Tu, no cover 5 STAR SALOON Karaoke, 10pm, no cover 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after Karaoke, W, no cover 132 5West St., (775) 329-2878 Dance party w/DJ DoublePlay, Dance party w/DJ DoublePlay, Open 10pm, Mic w/Steve Elegant, 7pm, Tu, no cover STAR SALOON Karaoke, 10pm, no cover 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after Karaoke, 10pm, W, no cover 132 West St., (775) 329-2878 BAR OF AMERICA Rustler’s Moon, 8pm, no cover Bias & Dunn, 8pm, no cover Forget the Roses, 8pm, no cover Forget the Roses, 8pm, no cover 10042 Donner Rd., Truckee; (530) 587-2626 BAR OF Pass AMERICA Rustler’s Moon, 8pm, no cover Bias & Dunn, 8pm, no cover Forget the Roses, 8pm, no cover Forget the Roses, 8pm, no cover 10042 Donner Pass Rd., Truckee; (530) 587-2626 Monday Night Open Mic, BAR-M-BAR 8pm, M, no cover 816 BAR-M-BAR Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206 Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206 BRASSERIE ST. JAMES Strange on the Range, 7pm, W, no cover 901 BRASSERIE S. Center St., (775) ST.348-8888 JAMES Strange on the Range, 7pm, W, no cover 901 S. Center St., (775) 348-8888 On Any Sunday—The Next Chapter, CARGO AT WHITNEY PEAK HOTEL Built to Spill, The Sheepdogs, Sebastian Bach, 9pm, $22 6:30pm, $10 8pm, RSVP for free tickets 255 CARGO N. VirginiaAT St.,WHITNEY (775) 398-5400 On Any Sunday—The Next Chapter, PEAK HOTEL Built to Spill, The Sheepdogs, Sebastian Bach, 9pm, $22 6:30pm, $10 8pm, RSVP for free tickets 255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 Rob, Tony and Jimmy of Reno Music Traditional Irish Tune Session, CEOL IRISH PUB Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover Sean McGuinness, 9pm, no cover Project, no cover 7pm,Traditional Tu, no cover 538 CEOL S. Virginia St., (775) Rob, 9pm, Tony and Jimmy of Reno Music Irish Tune Session, IRISH PUB329-5558 Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover Sean McGuinness, 9pm, no cover Project, 9pm, no cover 7pm, Tu, no cover 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558 Erik Downer, Evan Stokes, CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, Carson COMMA COFFEE 7pm,Erik noDowner, cover Evan Stokes, FeetCW Warmers, no M, cover 312 COMMA S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662 and Mr. 11:30am, Spoons, Tu, noon, Carson COFFEE 7pm, no cover Feet Warmers, 11:30am, Tu, no cover 312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662 COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR George Souza, 7pm, no cover 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711 & BAR COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT George Souza, 7pm, no cover 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711 Karaoke w/Nitesong Productions, 9pm, Tu, DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY VooDoo Dogz, 9:30pm, no cover Heidi’s Incident, 9:30pm, no cover Open Mic/Ladies Night, 8:30pm, W, no9pm, coverTu, 275 DAVIDSON’S E. Fourth St., (775)DISTILLERY 324-1917 Karaoke w/Nitesong Productions, VooDoo Dogz, 9:30pm, no cover Heidi’s Incident, 9:30pm, no cover Open Mic/Ladies Night, 8:30pm, W, no cover 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917 Ostracized, Iron Age, Chaz O’Neill Band, ELBOW ROOM BAR Karaoke Night, 6:30pm, Tu, no cover 7 Out, others, noon, no cover 2002ELBOW Victorian ROOM Ave., Sparks; Ostracized, Iron Age, Chaz O’Neill Band, BAR(775) 356-9799 Karaoke Night, 6:30pm, Tu, no cover 7 Out, others, noon, no cover 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-9799 Live flamenco guitar music, FUEGO 5:30pm, no cover guitar music, 170 FUEGO S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800 Live flamenco 5:30pm, no cover 170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800 THE GRID BAR & GRILL Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA 8545THE N. Lake Blvd.,BAR Kings & Beach; (530) 546-0300 GRID GRILL Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA 8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300 Canyon White Open Mic Night, HANGAR BAR Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover 8pm, no cover 10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088 Canyon White Open Mic Night, HANGAR BAR Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover 8pm, no cover 10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088 HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL Open mic, 7pm, no cover 1100HARRY’S E. Plumb Ln.,SPORTS (775) 828-7665 BAR & GRILL Open mic, 7pm, no cover 1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665 HELLFIRE SALOON Dead Letter Disciple, 8:30pm, no cover Rubles Plunge, 8:30pm, no cover 9825HELLFIRE S. Virginia St., (775) 622-8878 SALOON Dead Letter Disciple, 8:30pm, no cover Rubles Plunge, 8:30pm, no cover 9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 622-8878 Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover HIMMEL HAUS Trivia Night, no cover 3819HIMMEL Saddle Rd., South Open Mic9pm, Night,W,9pm, M, no cover HAUSLake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665 Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665 Prawn, Frameworks, In a Dream I Saw Devotion, Man the Tanks, Impurities, Gina THE3819HOLLAND PROJECT A City Invincible, 8pm, $5In a Dream I Saw Rose Waller, Resistance, 8:30pm, Tu, $5 Gina 140 THE Vesta St., (775) 742-1858 Prawn, Frameworks, Devotion, Man the Tanks, Impurities, HOLLAND PROJECT A City Invincible, 8pm, $5

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

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Rose Waller, Resistance, 8:30pm, Tu, $5

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Built to Spill Built Spill April 23,to 9 p.m.

Cargo April 23, 9 p.m. 255Cargo N. Virginia St. 398-5400 255 N. Virginia St. 398-5400

Comedy Comedy

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night125 & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, 3rd Street, W. Third St., 323-5005: W, 9pm, no cover Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, 9pm, no507 cover CarsonW,Nugget, N. Carson St., Carson Nugget, City, 882-1626: Leif Skyving, Carson 507 N. Carson St., F, 7:30pm, Carson$13-$15 City, 882-1626: Leif Skyving, 7:30pm,Star, $13-$15 Catch aF, Rising Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Ron Josol, Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Th, Su, 7:30pm, F, 7:30pm, Virginia St.,$15.95; 329-4777: Ron 10pm, Josol, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 7:30pm, $15.95; 10pm, $17.95; Th, Su, F, 7:30pm, 10pm, Sean$15.95; Donnelly, Tu-W, 7:30pm, $15.95 Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Sean Donnelly, Tu-W,Cabaret, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Harveys LakeImprov Tahoe,at Stateline, 553-1022: The Harveys(800) Cabaret, Harveys JohnLake Melendez, Eagle, Th-F, Su, 553-1022: 9pm, Tahoe,Dana Stateline, (800) $25;John Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Mark Pitta, Melendez, Dana Eagle, Th-F, Su, 9pm, Jack$25; Coen, 9pm,10pm, $25 $30; Mark Pitta, Sa,W,8pm, Jack Coen, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S.at Virginia St., Reno-Tahoe Comedy Pioneer 686-6600: Theo Von,100 Th,S.8pm, Underground, Virginia St., $12 686-6600: students; F, 8:30pm, Theo Von,$17-$19; Th, 8pm, Sa, 6:30, 9:30pm, F,$17-$19 $12 students; 8:30pm, $17-$19; Sa, 6:30, 9:30pm, $17-$19

APRIL 23, 2015 | APRIL 23, 2015

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RN&R | 31 RN&R | 31


JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR JUB THIRST PARLOR 71 S.JUB’S Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 71 S.1)Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 Showroom 2) Main Bar 1) Showroom 2) Main Bar

THURSDAY 4/23 THURSDAY 4/23

FRIDAY 4/24 FRIDAY 4/24

SATURDAY 4/25 SATURDAY 4/25

SUNDAY 4/26 SUNDAY 4/26

Bombshells & Burlesque, Bombshells & Burlesque, 9pm, $TBA 9pm, $TBA

The Prophets of Addiction, 8pm, $TBA 2) Blazin Mics!, 10pm, M, no cover The Prophets of Addiction, 8pm, $TBA 2) Blazin Mics!, 10pm, M, no cover

THE JUNGLE THE246JUNGLE W. First St., (775) 329-4484 246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

RichieRamone Ramone Richie April 23, 8 p.m. April 23, 8Tavern p.m. Shea’s Shea’s 715 S.Tavern Virginia St. 715786-4774 S. Virginia St. 786-4774

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE KNITTING FACTORY 211 N. Virginia St., (775)CONCERT 323-5648 HOUSE

Asphalt Socialites, Dangermaker, Asphalt Dangermaker, SeasSocialites, & Centuries, 8pm, $8 Seas & Centuries, 8pm, $8

A Night of Pro Wrestling, 6pm, $5-$25 A Night of Pro Wrestling, 6pm, $5-$25

MOODY’S BISTRO BAR & BEATS MOODY’S BISTRO BAR(530) & 587-8688 BEATS 10007 Bridge St., Truckee;

Free Peoples, 8:30pm, no cover Free Peoples, 8:30pm, no cover

Free Peoples, 8:30pm, no cover Free Peoples, 8:30pm, no cover

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688

Darcy Kathleen, 8:30pm, no cover Darcy Kathleen, 8:30pm, no cover

O’SKIS PUB & GRILLE O’SKIS PUB Ave., & GRILLE 840 Victorian Sparks; (775) 359-7547 840 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 359-7547

Acoustic Wonderland Singer-Songwriter Karaoke w/Cyco Mike, 9pm, no cover Acoustic Wonderland Showcase, 8pm, noSinger-Songwriter cover Karaoke w/Cyco Mike, 9pm, no cover Showcase, 8pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE POLO 1559 LOUNGE S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Chris Costa, 8pm, no cover Chris Costa, 8pm, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Johnny Lipka’s Gemini, 9pm, no cover Jake’s Garage, 9pm, no cover Johnny Lipka’s Gemini, 9pm, no cover Jake’s Garage, 9pm, no cover

RED DOG SALOON RED DOG 76 N. C St.,SALOON Virginia City; (775) 847-7474 76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RUBEN’S CANTINA RUBEN’S CANTINA 1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Reggae Night, 10pm, no cover Reggae Night, 10pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Post show s online by Post shows o regis line by ring n registete ring atat www.n e w sr www eview.com /r .newsreview m /reneon.oD. eDaeadlin e .c isoth d Friday befoline is the e Friday befo re p blicatiore pubulic ation.n.

RYAN’S SALOON RYAN’S SALOON 924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

BigData Data Big

April 28, 8 p.m. April 28, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory Knitting Factory St. 211 N. Virginia 211323-5648 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Richie Ramone, Dime Runner, Me Time, Richie Ramone, 8pm, $10-$15Dime Runner, Me Time, 8pm, $10-$15

SINGER SOCIAL CLUB SINGER SOCIAL CLUB657-9466 219 W. Second St., (775)

Blues Jam Thursday, 7pm, no cover Blues Jam Thursday, 7pm, no cover

SPARKS LOUNGE SPARKS LOUNGE 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 409-3340

Thursday Showcase, 8pm, no cover Thursday Showcase, 8pm, no cover

715 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-4774

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 409-3340

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY ST.445JAMES CaliforniaINFIRMARY Ave., (775) 657-8484 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON 4TH STUDIO ON 4TH 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 737-9776 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 737-9776

3rd Party, 9pm, no cover 3rd Party, 9pm, no cover

Local Music Night w/local bands Local Night9pm, w/local bands or Music local DJs, no cover or local DJs, 9pm, no cover The Black Box Adventures w/Scott Monroe, Darsombra, 8pm, $5 TheSick BlackPast BoxNine, Adventures w/Scott Monroe, Limbo State, 8pm, $5 Darsombra, 8pm, $5 Sick Past Nine, Limbo State, 8pm, $5

1) The Writers’ Block Open Mic,

1) The Writers’ Block Open Mic, 4275-4395 Fourth (775) 787-3769 1) GoldenW.Rose CafeSt., 2) Green Fairy Pub 3) Cabaret 7pm, no cover 1) Golden Rose Cafe 2) Green Fairy Pub 3) Cabaret 7pm, no cover

1) Reno Music Project Open Mic, 1) Reno Project Open Mic, 7pm,Music no cover 7pm, no cover

THESE DON’T MIX Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. PerIod.

APRIL 23, 2015 APRIL 23, 2015

Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, Reno Beer and Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm,DJs, Tu, Reno Record Club w/guest 9pm, Beer W, noand cover Record Club w/guest DJs, 9pm, W, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover Dance party, 9pm, no cover Low La La, Till All Is One, John LowUnderwood, La La, Till All8pm, Is One, $7 John Underwood, 8pm, $7 Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

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Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

Jazz Jam Tuesday w/First Take, Jazz8pm, JamTu, Tuesday w/First Take, no cover 8pm, Tu, no cover

WILD RIVER GRILLE WILD GRILLE 17 S. RIVER Virginia St., (775) 284-7455 WILDFLOWER VILLAGE WILDFLOWER VILLAGE 4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769

Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, W, no cover Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, W, no cover

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

SHEA’S TAVERN SHEA’S TAVERN 715 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-4774 219 W. Second St., (775) 657-9466

32 | RN&R 32 | RN&R |

Outspoken: Open Mic Night, Outspoken: Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, no cover 7pm, M, no cover Big Data, The Moth & The Flame, Big 8pm, Data,Tu, The$15-$30 Moth & The Flame, 8pm, Tu, $15-$30

Shamrockit Open Mic Night, Shamrockit 6pm, no Open cover Mic Night, 6pm, no cover

PADDY & IRENE’S IRISH PUB PADDY & IRENE’S IRISH(775) PUB358-5484 906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; 906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/27-4/29 MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/27-4/29

3) Jack Di Carlo, 5pm, no cover 3) Jack Di Carlo, 5pm, no cover

1) Comedy Power Hour Open Mic, 1) Comedy Hour Open Mic, 8pm, Tu,Power no cover 8pm, Tu, no cover


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA CASINO RESORT SPA 3800ATLANTIS S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 3800 S.Ballroom VirginiaStage St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand 2) Cabaret 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN VALLEY INN 1627CARSON Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711

THURSDAY 4/23 THURSDAY 4/23

FRIDAY 4/24 FRIDAY 4/24

2) Soul Persuaders, 8pm, no cover 2) Soul Persuaders, 8pm, no cover

2) Soul Persuaders, 4pm, All In, 10pm, 2) Soul Persuaders, 4pm, All In, 10pm, 2) All In, 8pm, no cover no 2) cover cover Soul Persuaders, 4pm, All In, 10pm, no 2) Soul Persuaders, 4pm, All In, 10pm, 2) All In, 8pm, no cover no cover no cover

2) Midnight Express, 7pm, no cover

2) Midnight Express, 7pm, no cover 1627 Ballroom Hwy. 395,2)Minden; 1) Valley Cabaret (775) Lounge782-9711 3) TJ’s Corral 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) TJ’s Corral

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB CRYSTAL BAYBay;CLUB 14 Hwy. 28, Crystal (775) 833-6333

14 Hwy.Room 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown 2) Red Room 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO RESORT CASINO RESORT CASINO 345ELDORADO N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 345 N. Virginia St., Brothers (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew 3) NoVi 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) NoVi

GRAND SIERRA RESORT 2500GRAND E. SecondSIERRA St., (775) RESORT 789-2000

2) Midnight Express, 8pm, no cover 2) Midnight Express, 8pm, no cover

SATURDAY 4/25 SATURDAY 4/25

2) Midnight Express, 8pm, no cover 2) Midnight Express, 8pm, no cover

1) BoomBox, Motion Potion, Mr. Rooney, 1) Jeff Austin Band, 9pm, $18-$38 10pm, $17-$37 Motion Potion, Mr. Rooney, 1) BoomBox, 1) Jeff Austin Band, 9pm, $18-$38 10pm, $17-$37 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ RoniofRomance, 9pm, no cover 2) Left Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 10pm, no9pm, cover 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover Brodie 3) DJStewart, Roni Romance, no cover Brodie Stewart, 10pm, no cover

2) Lumanation, 10pm, no cover 2) Lumanation, 10pm, no cover 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ RoniofRomance, 9pm, no cover 2) Left Centre, 10:30pm, no cover Brodie 10pm, no9pm, cover 3) DJStewart, Roni Romance, no cover Brodie Stewart, 10pm, no cover

2) Flirt Thursdays, 10pm, no cover 3) Honky Thursdays w/DJ 2) FlirtTonk Thursdays, 10pm, no Jamie cover G,

2) Graham Funke, 10pm, $20 3) County Social Saturdays, 10pm, no cover 2) Graham Funke, 10pm, $20

3) Boots & Daisy Dukes w/DJ Jamie G,

SUNDAY 4/26 SUNDAY 4/26

2) George Pickard, 6pm, no cover 2) George Pickard, 6pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/27-4/29 MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/27-4/29

2) George Pickard, 6pm, Tu, W,Pickard, no cover 2) M, George 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

Amy Schumer Amy Schumer April 25, 9 p.m. 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover

2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Garage 10pm, Boys, M, DJ Chris 2) Live BandTu,Karaoke, 10:30pm, no cover English,W,10pm, Tu, Garage Boys, 10:30pm, W, no cover

AprilSierra 25, 9 p.m. Grand Resort Grand Sierra St. Resort 2500 E. Second 2500 E. Second St. 789-2000 789-2000

10pm, no cover 3) Boots & Daisy Dukes w/DJ Jamie G, 5) Amy Schumer, 9pm, $30-$90 2500 E. Second2) St., 789-2000 1) Grand Theater Lex (775) Nightclub 3) Sports Book 10pm, no cover 3) Honky Tonk Thursdays w/DJ Jamie G, 3) County Social Saturdays, 10pm, no cover 10pm, no cover 1) GrandPavilion Theater5)2)Silver Lex Nightclub 3) Sports Book 10pm, no cover 4) Summit State Pavilion 5) Amy Schumer, 9pm, $30-$90 4) Summit Pavilion 5) Silver State Pavilion

HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO HARD & CASINO 50 Hwy. 50, ROCK Stateline;HOTEL (844) 588-7625 50 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (844) 588-7625 1) Vinyl 1) Vinyl

1) Reckless Kelly, 9pm, $15 1) Reckless Kelly, 9pm, $15

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE HARRAH’S LAKE 15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775)TAHOE 588-6611

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775)Nightclub 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek 1) SouthStage ShoreLounge Room 2) Peek Nightclub 3) Center 3) Center Stage Lounge

1) Rash, 9pm, no cover 1) Rash, 9pm, no cover 2) DJ JosBeatz, 10pm, $20 3) Arty Party, 9pm, no$20 cover 2) DJthe JosBeatz, 10pm, 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

1) Left of Centre, 9pm, W, no cover 1) Left of Centre, 9pm, W, no cover

1) Jose Feliciano, 7:30pm, $46 2) DJ Rick Feliciano, Gee, 10pm,7:30pm, $20 $46 1) Jose 3) Arty Party, cover 2) DJthe Rick Gee,9pm, 10pm,no$20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke Karaoke

Cobra Lounge at Asian Noodles, 1290 E. Cobra Lounge Noodles, 1290 E. Plumb Lane, Ste.at1, Asian 828-7227: Cash Karaoke Plumb Lane, Ste.Sa, 1, 828-7227: Cash Karaoke w/Jacques Simard, 8pm, no cover HARRAH’S RENO 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind w/Jacques Simard, Sa, 8pm, no cover 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind Murphy’s 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind Law Irish Pub, 180 W. Peckham RENO 219HARRAH’S N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 , 8pm,Unplugged: $29.50-$40.50 , 8pm,Unplugged: $29.50-$40.50 the1)Song Nashville The Story Behindthe1)Song Nashville The Story Behindthe Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 , 8pm,Unplugged: $29.50-$40.50 , 8pm,Unplugged: M, $29.50-$40.50 the1)Song Nashville The Story Behind3) Carolyn Dolan, 8pm, no cover Nashville The Story Behind Murphy’s 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behindthe1)Song Law 823-9977: Irish Pub,Steve 180 W. Peckham 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 Lane, Ste. 1070, Starr 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Carolyn no cover , 8pm,8pm, $29.50-$40.50 the Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 the SongDolan, , 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 , 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 , 8pm, M, $29.50-$40.50 the Song the Song the Song Lane, Ste. 1070,no823-9977: 1) Sammy’s Showroom Zone Center 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza2)5)The Convention Karaoke, F, 9pm, cover Steve Starr 3) Carolyn Dolan, 8pm, no cover 3) Carolyn Dolan, 8pm, no cover 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center Karaoke, F, 9pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater NUGGET CASINO RESORT 3) DJ, 5pm, Josh Budro Band, 8pm, 3) DJ, 5pm, Josh Budro Band, 8pm, 3) DJ, 5pm, Josh Budro Band, 8pm, 3) DJ Nights, 6pm, W, no cover Spiro’s Bar &356-6000: Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Ste.Sports 103, Sparks, F-Sa, RESORT 1100NUGGET Nugget Ave.,CASINO Sparks; (775) 356-3300 no 3) cover no 3) cover no 3) cover DJ, 5pm, Josh Budro Band, 8pm, DJ, 5pm, Josh Budro Band, 8pm, DJ, 5pm, Josh Budro Band, 8pm, 3) DJ Nights, 6pm, W, no cover Way, 9pm, no Ste. cover103, Sparks, 356-6000: F-Sa, 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; 356-3300 1) Celebrity Showroom 2) Rose (775) Ballroom 3) Gilley’s no cover no cover no cover 9pm, no cover 1) Celebrity Showroom 2) Rose Ballroom 3) Gilley’s West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO West Second 384-7976: Daily,Street 8pm, noBar, cover118 W. Second St., 2) Rusty Maples, 8pm, no cover RESORT 2707PEPPERMILL S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121SPA CASINO2) Rusty Maples, 7pm, no cover 2) Rusty Maples, 8pm, no cover 2) Verbal Kint, 6pm, no cover 2) Verbal Kint, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover 3) Fixx Fridays, 7:30pm, 2) Rusty Maples, 8pm,$10 noafter cover8pm 2707 S. Ballroom Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany 2) Terrace Lounge 2) Rusty Maples, 7pm, no cover 2) Rusty Maples, 8pm, no cover 2) Verbal Kint, 6pm, no cover 2) Verbal Kint, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover 3) Fixx Fridays, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL REGENCY 345SANDS N. Arlington Ave., (775) CASINO 348-2200 HOTEL 345Street N. Arlington (775) Theater 348-2200 1) 3rd LoungeAve., 2) Jester 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Jester Theater

SILVER LEGACY 407SILVER N. VirginiaLEGACY St., (775) 325-7401

2) Bonzai Thursdays w/DJ Trivia, 8pm, coverThursdays w/DJ Trivia, 2) no Bonzai of Aura, 8pm, no cover 407 N.Exposition Virginia Hall St., 2) (775) 1) Grand Rum325-7401 Bullions Island Bar 3) University 9pm, no cover of Aura, 3) University 1) Grand HallSilver 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) Aura UltraExposition Lounge 4) Baron Lounge 9pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge

2) Utility Players Improv Show, 8pm, $15 2) Utility Players Improv Show, 8pm, $15 1) Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally— 2) Cripple Creek Band, 9pm, no cover Summer 69: No Apostrophe, 8pm, 2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 1) NickofOfferman and Megan Mullally— 3) Fashion Friday, 9pm, no 9pm, coverno cover 2) Cripple Creek Band, $39.50-$54.50 3) Seduction Saturdays, Night,Sundays, 9pm, no10pm, coverno cover Summer of 69: No Apostrophe, 8pm, 3) Industry 2) Recovery 4) Atomika, no cover 3) Fashion9pm, Friday, 9pm, no cover 9pm, $5 4) Atomika, 9pm, no cover $39.50-$54.50 3) Seduction Saturdays, 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover 4) Atomika, 9pm, no cover 9pm, $5 4) Atomika, 9pm, no cover

1) Blues Jam Wednesday, 7pm, W, no Jam coverWednesday, 1) Blues 7pm, W, no cover 2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, no Show coverKaraoke, 2) Tu, Gong Country-Rock 8pm, Tu, noBingo coverw/Jeff Gregg, 9pm, W, no coverBingo w/Jeff Gregg, Country-Rock 9pm, W, no cover

OPINION | NEWS | GREEN | FEATURE STORY | ARTS&CULTURE | IN ROTATION | ART OF THE STATE | FOODFINDS | FILM | MUSICBEAT | NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS | THIS WEEK | MISCELLANY | APRIL 23, 2015 | RN&R | 33 OPINION | NEWS | GREEN | FEATURE STORY | ARTS&CULTURE | IN ROTATION | ART OF THE STATE | FOODFINDS | FILM | MUSICBEAT | NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS | THIS WEEK | MISCELLANY | APRIL 23, 2015 | RN&R | 33


Reno HydRo

• Biggest organic selection in the region • Largest hydroponic superstore in northern Nevada • Free grow room design & consulting • Over one dozen hydroponic displays live & in action

Antiques & Crafts! SPRING

SHOW AND SALE We have unbelievable light package specials & sales all day, everyday!

775.284.8700 www.RenoHydro.com

Saturday

MAY 2 5635 Riggins Ct., #21 East on Neil Rd. exit from 395. 1/2 mi. R on Meadow Wood Ln, 1st R on Riggins Ct.

LEADING AUCTION HOUSE

IN NORTHERN NEVADA

Sunday

MAY 3

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Livestock Events Center- Reno 1350 N. Wells Ave (Exhibition Hall)

Antiques to toTA2N2N8xE2tR8S Crafts nesignwslupetteforr the Collectibles te

Vendors Booth le Availab

Visit Our Website For More Information WWW.TANNERSRENO.COM Admission: $5.00 with Return privileges $4.00 Seniors & College Students (children under 16 Free)

FOR OVER 25 YEARS!

ONLINE ONLY AUCTION HOUSE •ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES •ESTATE SALES •BUSINESS LIQUIDATIONS •USED VEHICLES •APPRAISAL SERVICES •QUALITY CONSIGNMENTS •BANKRUPTCIES

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hair and skin services

775.826.3117

F R E E PA R K I N G

2323 Kietzke Lane • Reno in Franktown Corners

775-331-4222 • 870 S. ROCK BLVD, SPARKS, NV 89431

$ off admission For more information call Dan Clements at 775-741-9524

AuraSalonNV.com

WWW.LIGHTNINGAUCTIONS.COM

1

Bring This Coupon or a can of food for Evelyn Mount & save

WN TICKETS TO SEE THE

ABSOLUTE JOURNEY TrIbuTE lIvE, IN CONCErT - aT aTlaNTIS ON SaT

TO ENTER:

urday, May 9TH aT 8pM!

and put “JOURNEY” in the subject line. · Send an e-mail to contest@newsreview.com · You must be 21 or older to enter · Include your full name, birth date and day phone · Deadline to enter is Thursday, April 30, 2015 notified by phone and e-mail ed and correct entries submitted and will be · Winners will be chosen at random from all qualifi

Thursday, April 23 Donny McCaslin with The Collective

University of Nevada, Reno

ReNo

J

L F i T a eS V aZZ

April 23-25, 2015

Always the best in JAZZ — concerts, competitions & clinics!

34 

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april 23, 2015

WIN TIckETS!

7:30 p.m., Nightingale Concert Hall

Friday, April 24 Festival Competition and Clinics 8 a.m.- 6 p.m., University campus

SFJAZZ Collective / Vertical Voices 7:30 p.m., Lawlor Events Center Festival and Ticket Information:

(775) 784-4046

jazz@unr.edu www.unr.edu/rjf

Saturday, April 25 Festival Competition and Clinics 8 a.m.- 5 p.m., University campus

Festival Showcase and Awards Ceremony 6:30 p.m., Lawlor Events Center

Jazz Fan Pass!

General $60 / Senior $50

Provides entrance to all festival events. Call (775) 784-4278 to order.

Be a jazz volunteer! Want to earn a free concert ticket? Be a jazz volunteer! For details call (775) 762-4858 or email jazzvolunteer@unr.edu. Funded in part by a grant from the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency,; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; and the City of Reno.

@RenoJazzFest


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

Teen Art Night The Holland Project and the Nevada Museum of Art presents its annual “teen takover” featuring hands-on art stations, bookmaking, button making, patches and wall hangings and bubble wrap fashion. Local artists Omar Pierce, Denali Gray Lowder, Ashley Westwood, Lisa Kurt, Maisie Allen, Michelle Lassaline will produce original art takeaways inspired by artist Dave Eggers’ animal and text work. DJ Tucker Rash and the Gina Rose Waller Band will perform followed by Nick Rattigan and Current Joys (formerly Televisions). There will also be a photo booth designed by Austin Pratt and an Instagram live feed. The fun begins at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 24, at the NMA, 160 W. Liberty St. Admission is $5. Call 329-3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org or www.hollandreno.org.

Bug Buffet Dr. Michelle Roberts, a cultural anthropologist from the University of Nevada, Reno, will discuss insects and diet in Southeast Asia. Find out what insects can be eaten and how, and discover why backyard bugs are more nutritious than you realized. Afterward, put your taste buds (and gag reflex) to the test during a bug tasting featuring a menu of crickets, bamboo worm pupae, black ant eggs, silkworm and grasshopper kebabs, chocolate-covered superworms, white chocolate ant wafers and grain moth larvae poop tea. Yum! People who have allergies to shellfish and dust mites are advised to not eat bugs due to possible allergic reactions. The event begins at 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 25, at the Wilbur D. May Museum, Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St. Tickets are $25. Register in advance as spots are limited. Call 785-5961 or visit www.facebook.com/WilburMayCenter.

Le Cirque Vagabond: Fable This magical cirque show centers on a young girl who sneaks off after bedtime with her mysterious new storybook. As her dreamworld comes alive she is joined by a strange companion who guides her through this underworld of awe and mystery. Le Cirque Vagabond’s performers aim to dazzle audiences with their death-defying balancing, martial art skills and contortion and circus acts. The showtimes are 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 25, at the Brewery Arts Center, 449 W. King St., Carson City. Tickets are $25 general admission with discounts for students, seniors and BAC members. A $50 VIP ticket includes appetizers, select seat and a beverage of choice. Call 883-1976 or visit http://breweryarts-new.org.

Le Vent du Nord

Reno Jazz Festival

Considered a driving force in progressive folk, the FrenchCanadian group (whose name means The North Wind) combines traditional Celtic-influenced Québécois music with a little bit of pop and jazz. The group includes Nicolas Boulerice (vocals, hurdy-gurdy, piano accordion, piano), Olivier Demers (vocals, fiddle, foot-tapping and guitar), Simon Beaudry (vocals, guitar, Irish bouzouki) and Réjean Brunet (vocals, diatonic button accordion, acoustic bass guitar, piano and jaw harp). They’ve won many awards, including two Juno Awards (the Canadian equivalent of the Grammy Award) and Artist of the Year at the North American Folk Alliance. The band will perform at 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 25, at the Barkley Theater, Oats Park Art Center, 151 E. Park St., Fallon. Tickets are $20 general admission and $17 for Churchill Arts Council members. There will be a free conversation with the artists before the show starting at 5 p.m. Call (775) 423-1440 or visit www.churchillarts.org.

More than 300 school groups and 56 clinicians, performers and adjudicators will gather at the University of Nevada, Reno campus for the 53rd annual jazz festival. Student jazz musicians will learn from master artists and participate in clinics and competitions. Top jazz artists will also perform during the three-day event, including saxophonist Donny McCaslin with the University of Nevada, Reno’s faculty jazz ensemble The Collective on Thursday, April 23, at Nightingale Concert Hall in the Church Fine Arts Building, 1335 N. Virginia St., University of Nevada, Reno. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $5-$22. The SFJAZZ Collective will perform the following night on Friday, April 24, at Lawlor Events Center, 1500 N. Virginia St. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $5-$28. The festival closes with the Festival Showcase featuring a performance by the winners of the RJF All-Star Performers competition and encore performances from some of the highest-rated groups and soloists in the festival. The show begins at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 25, at Lawlor Events Center. Tickets are $5-$18. Call 784-4046 or visit www.unr.edu/rjf.

—Kelley Lang

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Shake it til you make it I’m new to online dating. I’m a nice, good-looking guy with a good job, but I have a muscular condition that causes me to shake a lot. I’m not looking to fool anyone, but I don’t want to advertise my condition on my profile because it’s so personal. My last date was several months ago, and it ended with her saying I was “creepy” because of my disability—a condition I was born with. Even women who might be open to dating a guy with a bit of a wiggle are likely to be miffed at having it withheld from them until the first date. They’d probably feel similarly if they were surprised by your actual height, weight or species. In other words, the underlying issue is the lack of disclosure, not the lack of sit-still-ness—which doesn’t justify for a second what this woman said to you. Advertising yourself as “tall, dark, and shaky” wouldn’t be ideal. Even revealing it on the phone could lead to some painful date cancellations. As for your notion that your condition is “so personal,” a spastic colon is personal; a woman won’t know about yours unless it’s in such an advanced state that it cuts into conversation to correct her grammar. Your tremors, however, become public the moment you walk into a place to meet a woman—which is actually the perfect time to make a crack like, “Is it freezing in here, or do I have a muscular disorder?” How dare I joke about a disability? Truth be told, I can’t really take credit for this approach. I call it “The Callahan,” after my late quadriplegic cartoonist friend,

John Callahan, who buzzed around Portland in a motorized wheelchair, cracking jokes like, “See my new shoes? I hear they’re very comfortable.” Callahan understood that a person’s disability often becomes a big wall between them and the rest of us because we’re afraid of doing or saying the wrong thing. But through his refusal to, uh, pussychair around the subject, Callahan told people how the disabled want to be treated, which is “just like everyone else.” And because the rest of us get poked fun of, Callahan did cartoons featuring disabled people. One of these has a posse on horseback in the desert looking down at an empty wheelchair. The posse leader reassures the others, “Don’t worry, he won’t get far on foot”—which became the title of Callahan’s autobiography. Using humor would allow you to set the tone for your condition to be just a fact about you instead of a fact people pity you for. And by offering to answer questions they might have, you can shrink any big scary mysteries down to a more manageable size. For example: How permanent is your condition? Will it get worse? If we make babies together, what are the chances they’ll be vibrating in their crib? Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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ARIES (March 21-April 19): If you’re

stumped about what present to give someone for a special occasion, you might buy him or her a gift card. It’s a piece of plastic that can be used as cash to buy stuff at a store. The problem is, a lot of people neglect to redeem their gift cards. They leave them in drawers and forget about them. Financial experts say there are currently billions of dollars going to waste on unredeemed gift cards. This is your metaphor of the moment, Aries. Are there any resources you’re not using? Any advantages you’re not capitalizing on? Any assets you’re ignoring? If so, fix the problem.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I usually

have no objection to your devoted concern—I won’t use the phrase “manic obsession”—with security and comfort. But there are rare phases in every Taurus’s life cycle when ironclad stability becomes a liability. Cruising along in a smooth groove threatens to devolve into clunking along in a gutless rut. Now is such a phase. As of this moment, it is healthy for you to seek out splashes of unpredictability. Wisdom is most likely to grow from uncertainty. Joy will emerge from an eagerness to treasure the unknown.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): There may be

a floodlike event that will wash away wornout stuff you don’t need any more. There might be an earthquake-type phenomenon that only you can feel, and it might demolish one of your rotten obstacles. There could be a lucky accident that will knock you off the wrong course (which you might have thought was the right course). All in all, I suspect it will be a very successful week for benevolent forces beyond your control. How much skill do you have in the holy art of surrender?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): What is

your biggest excuse? Or rather, what is your thickest, sickest, most debilitating excuse? We all have one: a reason we tell ourselves about why it’s difficult to live up to our potential; a presumed barrier that we regard as so deeply rooted that we will never be able to break its spell on us. Maybe it’s a traumatic memory. Maybe it’s a physical imperfection or a chronic fear. In accordance with the current astrological omens, Cancerian, you’d be wise to do an audit and reassessment of your own lamest excuse. I suspect you now have insight about it that you’ve never had before. I also think you have more power than usual to at least partially dismantle it.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you were a sup-

porting character in a popular TV drama, the producers would be cooking up a spinoff show with you in a starring role. If you were in an indie rock band, you’d be ready to move from performing at 300-seat venues to clubs with an audience capacity of 2,000. If you have always been just an average, egocentric romantic like the rest of us, you might be on the verge of becoming a legend in your own mind—in which case it would be time to start selling T-shirts, mugs and calendars with your image on them. And even if you are none of the above, Leo, I suspect you’re ready to rise to the next level.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Free at last!

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Free at last! Thanks to the Lord of the Universe or the Flying Spaghetti Monster or a burst of crazy good luck, you are free at last! You are free from the burden that made you say things you didn’t mean! You are free from the seductive temptation to rent, lease or even sell your soul! Best of all, you are free from the mean little voice in your head—you know, the superstitious perfectionist that whispers weird advice based on fearful delusions! So now what will you do, my dear? You have escaped from the cramped, constricted conditions. Maybe you can escape to wide-open spaces that will unleash the hidden powers of your imagination.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “To me, there

is no greater act of courage than being the one who kisses first,” says Libra actress and activist Janeane Garofalo. I can think of other ways to measure bravery, but for your immediate future, her definition will serve just fine. Your ultimate test will be to

by rob brezsny freely give your tenderness and compassion and empathy—without any preconditions or expectations. For the sake of your own integrity and mental health, be steadfast in your intention to always strike the first blow for peace, love and understanding.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It will soon

be that time when you are halfway between your last birthday and your next birthday. I invite you to make this a special occasion. Maybe you can call it your anti-birthday or unbirthday. How to celebrate? Here are some ideas: (1) imagine who you would be if you were the opposite of yourself, (2) write a list of all the qualities you don’t possess and the things you don’t need and the life you don’t want to live, (3) try to see the world through the eyes of people who are unlike you, (4) extend a warm welcome to the shadowy, unripe, marginal parts of your psyche that you have a hard time accepting, let alone loving, and (5) are there any other ways you can think of to celebrate your anti-birthday?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

As I climb the first hill along my regular hike, both sides of the path are dominated by a plant with glossy, three-lobed leaves. They’re so exuberant and cheerful, I’m tempted to caress them, even rub my face in their bright greenery. But I refrain, because they are poison oak. One touch would cause my skin to break out in an inflamed rash that would last for days. I encourage you, too, to forgo contact with any influence in your own sphere that is metaphorically equivalent to the alluring leaves of the poison oak.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Today

the French Capricorn painter Henri Matisse (1869-1954) is regarded as a foremost pioneer of modern art. Some critics say his innovative influence on painting nearly matched Picasso’s. But during the first part of the 20th century, his work often provoked controversy. When a few of his paintings appeared at a major exhibition in Chicago, for example, local art students were shocked by what they called its freakishness. They held a mock trial, convicted Matisse of artistic crimes and burned his painting Blue Nude in effigy. I don’t expect that you will face reactions quite as extreme as that in the coming weeks, Capricorn. But it will make sense to express yourself with such forceful creativity and originality that you risk inciting strong responses.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Leonardo

da Vinci had skills in many fields, ranging from botany to engineering to cartography, but he is best known as a painter. And yet in his 67 years on the planet, he finished fewer than 40 paintings. He worked at a very gradual pace. The Mona Lisa took him 14 years! That’s the kind of deliberate approach I’d like to see you experiment with in the coming weeks, Aquarius. Just for a while, see what it’s like to turn down your levels of speed and intensity. Have you heard of the Slow Food Movement? Have you read Carl Honoré’s book In Praise of Slowness? Do you know about Slow Travel, Slow Media and Slow Fashion?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Modern movies don’t scrimp on the use of the F-bomb. Actors in The Wolf of Wall Street spat it out 569 times. The word-that-rhymes-withcluck was heard 326 times in End of Watch, while Brooklyn’s Finest racked up 270 and This Is the End erupted with an even 200. But this colorful word hasn’t always been so prominent a feature. Before 1967, no actor had ever uttered it on-screen. That year, Marianne Faithfull let it fly in the film I’ll Never Forget What’s’isname. In the coming weeks, Pisces, I invite you to break a taboo that’s maybe not as monumental as Faithfull’s quantum leap, but still fabulously fun and energizing. Be a liberator! End the repression! Release the blocked vitality!

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Georgia Fisher PHOTO/GEORGIA FISHER

Healing power Holly Ashley is a Reno obstetrician and gynecologist who hopes to change the way health screening works, one patient at a time. At the moment, there’s not much of a universal system for questioning OBGYN patients about domestic violence— not in the straight-shooting way a doctor might ask about someone’s menstrual cycle, for example. Nevada ranks No. 6 in the country for women murdered by men, according to the Violence Policy Center. It’s an unsettling figure for Ashley, who says the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has piles of materials for members and their patients—packets about vaccines, packets about influenza during pregnancy, you name it—but little to address domestic abuse. The fact that it’s statistically worse during pregnancy makes her mission all the more salient.

How does regular screening work, for starters? Well, if you look at the annual exam or the new obstetric-exam history and physical, we’re required to focus on a lot of areas. We look at your past sexual-infection history, your menstrual history, any history of past gynecologic surgeries. We do a routine health history. We ask about cancer

It doesn’t always happen right away. I had a patient who wanted to talk about STDs, and she didn’t want her partner there, but he came anyway. Sometimes it’s about leaving the information out so they’ll pick it up, and maybe the partner won’t see them do it. I try to keep cards, to put signs in the bathroom, to be anonymous in some ways.

We’re approaching May, which in modern America means one thing. The arrival of this year’s blockbuster big budget movies based on—comic books. This now-entrenched cultural reality somehow reminds me of Max Von Sydow’s raging intellectual in the Woody Allen film Hannah and Her Sisters, when he thunders to his wife, Barbara Hershey, as he surfs through the channels, “Imagine the level of a mind that watches wrestling!” So we see that the mighty Avengers are about to do battle with some dude named Ultron. As always, the fate of the planet hangs in the balance. Fine. Yawn. Zzzzzzz. Tell you what, wake me up when the Avengers take on somebody really dangerous. Like those effing bleeping Tea-bagging House Republicans. Those relentless numbskulls are unparalleled in finding new ways to put bumblebees in my briefs. Their latest antic, a vote of 240-179 to repeal the federal estate tax, shows us yet again who really pulls their strings. Can you say Plutocracy? And no, I’m not talking about Mickey Mouse’s dog! NEWS

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GREEN

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Apparently, the city is getting a new prosecutor and taking some other steps to target domestic abuse.

assessment. … [Domestic violence] is a public health problem that needs to be part of it as well. We ask about seat belt use, sunscreen, helmets … .

There are a lot of really smart people in Reno, so some changes are happening. Luckily, Reno also has a lot of organizations. We have the Nevada Network Against Domestic Violence, the Washoe County Domestic Violence Task Force, and various shelters.

Yeah, why not ask about abuse, too? [Nodding] We also need to ask about emotional, physical and sexual health, in that your relationship does affect your health. There are a lot of things that go on in an abusive relationship that prevent a person from coming in for care: shame, fear, not having access to rides, the partner controlling her every move. When people ask, “Why don’t [the women] leave?” it really should be, “Why do abusers abuse?” The problem is that when a woman leaves, that’s potentially the most violent time. It’s the highest risk of homicide.

So what’s next for you? I don’t have my script figured out. That’s what I need to do. I need to take the inspiration and motivation and drive and desire to help, and figure out the most efficient and successful way of asking these few questions to get at the root of the issue; to have the person open up; to get the answers or at least more information, then direct them to the right resources. Ω

How do you ask patients the tough questions? You have to make it part of your universal screening, and of course in a confidential

Avenge estate tax repeal

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manner without the partner in the room. If the partner’s in the room, you have to be really creative.

How do you get them away from the partner, then, to talk?

Holly Ashley

OPINION

Last Day – Sunday, April 26!

∫y Bruce Van Dye right alongside the House refusal to end federal subsidies of billions to the oil industry. Here’s how the estate tax works. Let’s say your dad invented chipotle mayonnaise. He croaks, and leaves you, his only heir, an estate valued at $9.34 million. Under the current estate tax, the first $5.34 million is exempt. Untouchable. No tax. That leaves you with $4 million exposed to Uncle Sam. The current rate is 40 percent. So you would write a check to the IRS for $1.6 mill, and roll on down the ha-ha highway with a haul of $7.74 million. What exactly is the problem here? I mean, talk about a win-win, fercrissake. Be a respectful citizen, a gracious trustafarian, write the fucking check, and STFU! Thank god we have a president who will veto this POS as soon as it lands on his desk. Ω

Democrats quite rightly point out that a repeal of the estate tax is just another way for Republicans to plant nice, juicy hickeys on the buns of the 1 Percent. Actually, it’s an even more select group of Pebble Beach residents who would benefit from such a measure, more like .2 percent of the population. And yet, by removing the estate tax from the books, the federal treasury would lose out on an estimated $270 billion over the next ten years. This is because, in case you forgot, the 1 percent now controls 40 percent of the wealth in our country. Which sets the stage for some gigonderous inheritances. But gee, I guess 40 percent just isn’t quite enough. So we get this sickening charade in Washington. Instead of doing something constructive with their time, like create a jobs bill or an infrastructure bill or a stop our elections from becoming bottomless Dumpsters of cash bill, we see House Republicans hustling up this gratuitous repeal that’s nothing more than another way to lick the Guccis of their wealthy masters. File this madness

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