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Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor.............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 19

Foodfinds..................... 20 Film............................... 21 Musicbeat.................... 23 Nightclubs/Casinos....... 24 This.Week.....................27 Advice.Goddess........... 28 Free.Will.Astrology....... 30 15.Minutes..................... 31 Bruce.Van.Dyke............ 31

One big

bathtub See Let Freedom Ring, page 7.

nO respect. nO respect at all See News, page 8.

Is The Generator Phase 2,

Grimm picks

the Oscars

a potential land deal between the

city and a Burning Man-affiliated

See Arts&Culture, page 16.

arts organization, good for Reno?

whiter shade Of pale See Film, page 21.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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19–25,

2015


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February 19, 2015


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

It’s our birthday Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Feb. 22 is a big day for this newspaper. From one angle, it’s the 20th anniversary of the first issue of the Reno News & Review. I was here for that day in 1995. My name was also on the masthead of the first Nevada Weekly, Nov. 17, 1993, which became the RN&R. People have been bugging me about what we were going to do for our anniversary for a year now. “Nothing,” I’d always say, “nobody cares about a 20th birthday party.” That’s true, right? People are excited to turn 18, so they’re a “legal adult.” But then they’re stuck in the doldrums of 19 and 20 (when you’re an adult with the rights of a child). And by that I mean, you have the responsibilities of being able to sign contracts, vote, or join the military without your parents’ permission. I think most states will allow you to get married without parental permission. But it’s really about 21. I mean, I never heard of anyone going out to rent a car just because they turned 25. And by their 30th birthday, I think most people begin to put quotation marks around “celebrate.” I was living in Houston when I turned 20. I’d been drinking legally there for a year. I’d been drinking 3.2 beer in Kansas legally since I turned 18. But I couldn’t drink in Nebraska until I was 21, and if I couldn’t drink with my friends in Nebraska, well, I’d drink with them in Kansas—and drive home. Nowadays, every state has the 21-and-over law. Do you feel me? The Reno News & Review has been nothing if not precocious. I remember those toddler years when everything was a challenge. We had people around here who wouldn’t know a deadline if it knocked them down and “made love” to them. We had people who showed up whenever they wanted. Lots of very committed people. A couple should have been committed. It’s actually amazing to me that we never have really changed from those crazy early days. You probably know the new science suggests that people don’t become real adults—as opposed to the legal fiction—until they turn 25. Well, I’m not waiting for us to get mature before I start celebrating. Get ready for something.

A horse of a different color Re “Buck wild” (Green, Feb. 5): Good for you! You showed some moral courage to stand up and do what you did. Too many people today are herded around like so many domesticated cows and then led to the slaughter just like the cows are in one way or another. The wild horses in the wild are everything that is good in this world today. They restore the life community. They are healing presences. Thank you so much for standing up for them! Craig Downer Minden

When they’re gone Re “Buck wild” (Green, Feb. 5): Seems to me the Bundys were more extreme than these little women were or would ever be. When is BLM ever going to come clean and admit they are working to exterminate the horses to make room for more privately owned cattle? Sue Carter Truth or Consequences, N.M.

Gunshy As a University of Nevada, Reno student, the proposed bill permitting of campus carry at universities and child-care facilities is not only terrifying, but a recipe for disaster. As of now, I consider the UNR campus as a very safe place, but, like any college campus, it is an environment where hundreds of potentially unstable people spend their day. If this bill were to pass, our campus will turn from a place of safety into a danger zone. Time has reported that a trained police officer hits his or her target only 18 percent of the time during a gunfight. Now, imagine how poor the accuracy of an untrained person might be. In addition to the extremely high likelihood for accidents or misfires, in a rare emergency situation the unpredictability of armed students would worsen the situation and lead to more

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

casualties. Even with the intention to help and protect, allowing students and employees to be armed would further escalate a dangerous situation. If violence is fought with violence the campus will become a war zone. I urge my fellow students, community members, and concerned citizens to contact their legislators and fight for our right to succeed in a safe, gunfree environment. Lila Reeves-Hampton Reno

Call your legislator My name is Kayla, and to hear that campus carry is even an option is shocking. As a UNR student, I’ve come to realize lives can be put in even more danger when anyone can have a gun on campus. Legislators need to reject the bill; it does nothing, but has the ability to cause more incidents to happen. If everyone had the right to carry a gun on campus, the chance for more tragedy would increase, whether it’s a huge shooting or even a gun being dropped and shooting someone. People say, “It will be for protection,” but you have a higher chance of your gun being used against you than using it to protect yourself. Guns need to be nowhere near any type of school, daycare, high school or college. As a citizen with a voice, we need to reject campus carry! Kayla Larson Las Vegas

Not voting has consequences As a retired teacher, mother and grandmother, I am very opposed to the passage of AB2, which would allow carry-on weapons on school campuses. Allowing carryon weapons on school campuses increases, rather than decreases, the likelihood that deranged and unstable individuals will use weapons in destructive ways. It is also a fact that the availability of guns results in more violence rather than less. Also, placing weapons in the hands of

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Georgia Fisher Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Contributors Amy Alkon, Woody Barlettani, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Eric Marks, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Design Melissa Bernard, Brad Coates, Kyle Shine Advertising Consultants Joseph “Joey” Davis, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage, Jessica Wilson Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

—D. Brian Burghart

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

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untrained individuals in emergency situations may result in the injuring or killing of other innocent students. I encourage you to join me in opposing AB2 because it endangers more students than it protects. Schools should be gun free zones, and children should feel safe on school campuses. I urge our legislators to vote against this bill, and I urge all your readers to contact your legislators and request that he/she also vote “NO” on AB2. Gale Audia Reno

security number. I save receipts, monitor personal accounts regularly and alert my credit card companies when I plan to be out of town. I’ve also become a bit paranoid. Since we are such a litigious society, filing lawsuits, as indicated in the article, may be the only way to get companies to take notice. Or, we can wait until someone hacks into a missile or nuclear weapons site and annihilates the earth. Now, that’s a comforting thought. CT Masters Reno

It’s all public

Cancel meetings?

Re “You will be hacked” (Feature story, Feb. 12): Welcome to the 21st century where personal data can be plucked like succulent low-hanging fruit, and it’s no longer a matter of if we will get hacked, but when. According to FBI Director James Comey, “There are two kinds of big companies in the United States. There are those who’ve been hacked … and those who don’t know they’ve been hacked.” What’s become so frustrating with all these data breeches is how slow and seemingly incompetent and cavalier companies appear when dealing with them. And, not only do we have to worry about our identity and credit/debit cards being compromised, there is the equally worrying concern of someone hacking into our medical files. What about that tax refund you never received? It probably wound up in someone else’s pocket when they falsely filed your return. There is no such thing as personal privacy anymore. Our entire lives are online, thanks in part to our own doing. However, if we try to remove what is deemed “public” information—name, previous addresses and cities, age, etc.—some sites require proof of identity. Ludicrous! I, for one, refuse to feed that trend more than I have to. I shop local whenever possible, use my credit card sparingly and question every time a business asks for my social

Re “No Fair” (Feature story, Feb. 11): Once again it’s clear: Dennis Myers is one of the few journalists working in Nevada who knows his stuff. Is anyone in Carson City paying attention? It’s been clear to me for years that Myers knows more about Nevada’s failed tax systems than any elected official in the State Legislature. His recent cover story proves the case again. Or perhaps it’s more accurate to say that no legislator in Carson City possesses the common sense or courage to fix a broken system. We must hit the “reset” button on our failed and failing tax structure. Democrats and Republicans alike share the blame for session after session of allowing lobbyists to govern. The bigger picture is that these folks whom we elect stand helpless in the face of a biennual 120 day session, yet again they seem to lack the courage or common sense to say so publicly. The only true “reform” of Nevada’s tax system that will create the changes we need must involve shredding the current system entirely and starting from a blank slate. Gov. Sandoval should at least respond publicly to the Tax Foundation report cited in Myers’ article. And legislators ought to cancel a few of their meetings with lobbyists in order to use the time to read the report. Brad Summerhill Reno

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Anthony Clarke Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Steve Finlayson, Debbi Frenzi, Vicky Jewell, Angela Littlefield, Joe Medeiros, Ron Neill, Christian Shearer, Marty Troye, Warren Tucker, Gary White, Joseph White, Margaret Underwood General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

Business Nicole Jackson, Kortnee Angel

Sweetdeals Coordinator Courtney deShields Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir

Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalinn Jenkins 405 Marsh Ave., Third Floor Reno, NV 89509 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds to classifieds@newsreview.com

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and Feature story design: Brian Breneman Cover photo: Eric Marks

FEBRUARY 5, 2015

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Ignite your passion for adventure! The Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour will exhilarate you with amazing big-screen stories when it comes to Reno at 7pm on April 2! TIX:Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 775-686-6600, pioneercenter.com or 775-828-9090

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February 19, 2015


by Dennis Myers

This ModeRN WoRld

by tom tomorrow

Ready for a water-poor summer? Asked along the Truckee River Heidi Haines Nanny

It’s not good. I wish we had more snow and rain this year. It would have been better.

Richard Hutton Teacher

This is my second year living here. It doesn’t affect me too much. I know what to expect. I guess tubing the river would be more fun if there was more water.

Rich Talman Computer technician

Competing budgets In a challenge to Gov. Brian Sandoval, State Treasurer Dan Schwartz has issued his own proposed state budget recommendations. The Nevada Constitution reads, “The Governor shall submit the proposed executive budget to the Legislature not later than 14 calendar days before the commencement of each regular session.” If you missed seeing the treasurer’s office mentioned, that was not an oversight by the founders. If you went looking for the treasurer’s budget duties in the constitution, it would be a fruitless search. There’s aren’t any. All it says is that the treasurer will perform the duties “prescribed by law”—that is, assigned to the treasurer by the Legislature. That’s OK. Anyone can sit down and propose an alternative budget—especially one like Schwartz’s. Sandoval and his budget division spent months combing through the requested budgets of all state agencies, whittling them down, checking back with agencies for more information, reexamining functions before making final recommendations for each. His budget recommendations are 3,361 pages long and weighs a couple of pounds. Schwartz didn’t do any of that. He jumped over those steps and went right to reaching conclusions without facts. He didn’t read all the agency memos making their cases for their original requests. He didn’t evaluate the need for slowing the loss of Nevada prison guards to other, better paying state prisons or county jails. He didn’t scrutinize the economic development travel budget. He didn’t examine a mental health system that is a national scandal and has been dumping patients out of state. He just lopped the top off Sandoval’s recommended total, adjusted broad figures to fit, and urged the governor and Legislature to buy in. His “budget” is three pages OPINION

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I think it stinks, because we need it. I mean, we need the water. I don’t live here, I live in Phoenix, but we have the same issue.

long, and we could not find a scale on which it moved the needle. In other words, Sandoval had to make the tough calls. Schwartz, standing off at a safe distance, didn’t. If this is writing a budget, almost any Nevadan could be state budget director. Nor, apparently, is Schwartz—who was educated in Illinois, New Jersey, Massachusetts and New York— particularly in touch with what life is like in Nevada. “But the Governor’s budget funds a vast expansion of the state’s educational system, a system that despite receiving generous funding in the past, has failed to deliver the goods,” Schwartz wrote, elsewhere referencing “ample revenue in the past” for health and education purposes. Perhaps he is a new arrival in Nevada. Setting aside the fact that punctuation and other language problems in Schwartz’s narrative text argue for better schools, his only substantiation for this claim is “a state controller’s study.” The state controller is Ron Knecht, another right wing state official who recently wrote, “And the great K-12 spending growth of a few years ago has not yielded any improvement in student achievement.” That’s another assertion, not substantiation. Nevada education has not been funded either generously or amply. It has been funded Spartanly. And while there is room for criticism of how that money has been spent, it is also fair to say that most administrators and teachers have tried hard to get all they could from the available money. Republicans like Schwartz have become accustomed to pitting people against each other, but his search for villains here should fall flat. Sandoval’s budget is far from perfect, but if a challenge is to be made to it, it will have to come from someplace other than the treasurer. Ω |

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Luke Nyhammer Bartender

I kind of saw it coming with the lack of snow. It’s something we need, but we’re definitely not going to get it by now. So we’re going to be paying for it. … Don’t water my yard, things like that.

Randy Pelish Retiree

We live in the desert. I can’t really add much to that. I think normally Reno gets five or six inches of precipitation a year, and with the exception of the oil companies and Rush Limbaugh, everybody else knows that global warning is occurring.

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What was Schwartz thinking? Nothing brings people together better than fighting a common enemy. That was just one of the many dynamics newly elected state Treasurer Dan Schwartz failed to understand when he accepted the invitation to present his version of the state budget to the Senate Finance by Committee, an obvious trap that Sheila Leslie wasn’t even all that clever. Too bad his fair-weather friend, Nevada’s new state Controller Ron Knecht, didn’t warn him—or, better yet, show up to help. As Democrats and Republicans pummeled his truly ridiculous threepage outline for Nevada’s biennial budget, Schwartz stubbornly clung to his plan despite having to admit he “should have checked” before including $540 million in potential revenue from a new $5 per passenger fee on airline tickets the state has no authority to impose. His replacement revenue source was a 25 cent tax on tourist meals, but he seemed clueless about how to separate the tourists from the locals who also eat out or the

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infrastructure needed to collect such a levy. He should have admitted from the start his “budget” was really just a publicity stunt, never intended to be a serious proposal. Why pretend otherwise? The senators seemed to thoroughly enjoy their moments of political theater in front of crowded hearing rooms in Carson City and Las Vegas. But it was the Assembly members in Ways and Means who did the real work of revealing what a hypocrite Schwartz is as they combed through the treasurer’s office budget. His requests for new staff, higher salaries, and remodeling of his office were only dwarfed by the whopping 372 percent increase in his travel budget. It left one wondering how the previous treasurer, Kate Marshall, managed to do such a stellar job with so much less. Or if the current treasurer has any idea of the sub-optimal work conditions more lowly state workers have endured for years. Schwartz was also criticized in the Assembly for incomplete budget

detail, and he repeatedly promised to submit the missing information. Soon. At the conclusion of the meeting, he was told by the committee chair, “It sounds like you have a lot of homework to do.” What was he thinking? As the treasurer descended one floor to present his budget to the Senate Finance Committee, roomfuls of angry parents, teachers and advocates were waiting, eager to take him to task for suggesting that Gov. Sandoval’s new initiatives on anti-bullying and autism be put on hold. He insisted he wasn’t specifying which programs should be eliminated or stalled, just that the Legislature should prioritize spending as any household would. But the more he talked, the meaner he sounded. He failed to appreciate the years many parents have spent begging for budget crumbs from the Legislature. He didn’t anticipate the fury of a father who has lost his daughter to a bully or a mother whose child’s future depends on the autism services she gets today.

Amid the outrage and emotion over the potential cuts, too little attention was paid to the most offensive item in the Schwartz/Knecht plan, their proposed $2 billion giveaway to private businesses that want to “relocate and expand in Nevada.” Instead of strengthening education and human services in a state that has long ignored both, they want to divert $2 billion of tax revenue into the pockets of the corporate sector. Maybe it was too absurd to contemplate. In his poorly executed bid to be relevant in the biggest debate of the 2015 legislative session, Schwartz ironically helped build support for what he really detests, the governor’s plan to increase revenue through graduated levels of the existing business license fee. Instead, the treasurer managed to do the unthinkable, unite Republicans and Democrats in support of an unrivaled tax and spend budget. Job well done. Ω

Lots of fun facts on the Nevada treasurer’s page: www.nevadatreasurer. gov.


Spoils has two meanings In December the rumors were flying that the Republican-controlled legislature would throw away their landslide victory by sharing the spoils with the Democrats. Stories that moderate Republicans (RINOs) would share committee chairmanships with Democrats did not materialize, but by Brendan who better to snatch defeat from the Trainor jaws of victory than Republicans? Turns out the conservatives, not the moderates, have Legislative control. Ira Hansen is no longer Assembly Speaker, but as assistant majority leader he is backing up very conservative Clark County Assemblywoman Michele Fiore. Jim Wheeler and Jill Dickman are other Northern Nevada reform conservatives who have important leadership roles. On paper, it’s a good team. But you won’t win many victories if the front office is throwing the game, and Gov. Sandoval’s $1.3 billion tax hike proposal is like an opponent’s first inning three-run homer that

puts you behind before you even get to bat. Frustrated grassroots conservatives are wondering why elect Republicans if, like former Gov. Kenny Guinn, they want to give Nevada the largest tax hikes in its history? Gov. Sandoval’s proposed tax hike is a slightly modified version of the margin tax proposal the voters defeated by four to one last November. The business license tax he proposed is also a gross receipts tax, not a net profit tax, and so businesses that lose money could pay taxes. His budget also includes gimmicks like making taxes that were supposed to sunset permanent. (There is nothing more permanent than a temporary government program or tax, as Ronald Reagan used to say.) Sandoval is also proposing to hike the cigarette tax, that favorite whipping boy of politicians. Like the saying goes: “Don’t tax him, don’t tax me, tax that guy behind the tree.” Cigarette smokers, being

mostly lower middle class working stiffs, are the perfect guy behind the tree to hit up for money so the political class can stay in the clover. The government simultaneously wants smokers to pay more tax and at the same time tells them to quit the habit. Hmm. Could the proposed regulation of e-cigarettes be a way to reduce the hit that cigarette taxes would take if vaping continues to grow in popularity? Speaking of tax conspiracies, the governor proposed giving new powers to local school boards to extend certain taxes without a vote by the people, which suddenly sheds new light on his proposal to have school board members appointed, not elected. Voters have consistently rejected new property taxes for schools and for good reason. The school districts have wasted a lot of money while education has not improved. Nevada’s schools are on the average 22 years old, so they are not crumbling away. Contrary to false reports, heating and air

conditioning in the schools are in good shape. Yes, there are financial challenges for the state. But the answers should lie in structural reform, not huge tax hikes. The Nevada Republican platform emphatically states that Nevada does not have a revenue problem, it has a spending problem. Now the governor wants the largest tax increase in Nevada history. As I predicted, the Republicans will not cut the budget by one dime. The property tax increase bill also proposes eliminating the prevailing wage mandates for construction contracts. This would save a lot of money. If modest tax increases with tough sunset provisions are coupled with structural reform, they may be tolerable. But it would have to be real reform, not merely the appearance of reform. Gov. Sandoval’s business license tax, however, should be DOA. Ω

It’s sort of like watching how they make Chicken McNuggets, but here’s the governor’s proposed budget: http://budget.nv.gov.

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PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Gov. Brian Sandoval, fresh off a landslide,  still has to drag his fellow Republicans into  supporting his program.

Drivers Inc. Uber has been legally enjoined by the courts from operating in Nevada while the Legislature gets a chance to decide what to do with it. Meanwhile, two articles in the Nation magazine suggest that Uber itself—the corporation, not the drivers—is fat that can be trimmed away. The drivers must pay for their own cars, which is nearly the entire value of the company, so why do they need Uber? the magazine asks. “Almost all of the actual capital is already owned by the workers, in the form of cars that they pay for and maintain themselves,” the magazine reported. “And these workers labor individually, doing the same tasks, so there’s no need for a management class to control their daily operations. The capital owners maintain the phone app, but app technology isn’t the major cost, and it’s getting cheaper and easier by the day.” One thing the corporation does do is take 20 percent of the drivers’ earnings. Otherwise, in contrast to its claims of being innovative, it acts much like any other corporation—“They are fighting regulators and hiring lobbyists in order to bring down the incumbent taxi-medallion business.” Then there’s Uber’s use of an old National Rifle Association tactic. The Wall Street Journal reports that in Washington, D.C., the corporation dealt with regulators by calling on internet denizens to drown the regulators in emails and tweets, which the obedient Uber buffs did, a technique that also worked in Virginia where the governor and other officials collapsed before the flood and gave Uber its way. In that state the corporation hired different lobbying firms. In Nevada its lobbyists are Scott Bensing, Chelsea Capurro, Tia Dietz, John Griffin, Josh Griffin, Matthew Griffin, Erik Jimenez and Mary Sarah Kinner. And like airlines, whose ticket prices fluctuate like crazy, Uber has something called “surge” pricing. Prices can change at any time, depending on availability of drivers and the degree of demand.

Sunlight and stagnant wages There was a time that “Solar energy isn’t practical” was a mantra among energy executives, to the point that Ralph Nader said solar would remain impractical until the oil companies got a franchise on the sun. Those days seem to have passed, and as a sun-drenched state with lots of empty land, Nevada is naturally getting a good share of that kind of economic activity. A report from the National Solar Jobs Census 2014 was conducted by The Solar Foundation and BW Research Partnership tracked jobs growth in the solar sector by surveying 7,600 solar industry companies. Its report reads in part, “Nevada’s solar industry employed 5,900 Nevadans in 2014 and added 3,500 solar jobs over the previous year. Nevada’s 146 percent solar industry employment growth allowed it to rise back to seventh in rankings of highest number of solar jobs by state—and number one in solar jobs per capita. Solar employment in Nevada grew more than 53 times faster than the state’s average employment growth rate of 2.7 percent in the same period.” The margin of error for the survey is plus or minus 2.03 percent. Unfortunately, weekly wages in the state are still stagnating. During the third quarter of 2014—the most recent quarter for which figures are complete—wages grew by just half a percentage point. Meanwhile, the Nevada Senate approved a bill that would cut construction wages on public works projects. The Assembly gets the next crack at the measure.

—Dennis Myers

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Sandoval can’t get respect 2014 dominance becomes 2015 struggle It seems like only yesterday that Gov. Brian Sandoval was riding high—coming off the Tesla giveaway with its by promise of thousands of Nevada jobs, Dennis Myers winning easy reelection in an election in which the Democrats couldn’t scrape up a credible candidate, parceling out excess campaign money to other Republican candidates, helping achieve the first Republican sweep of all state executive offices and both houses of the legislature since 1890. Now, however, Sandoval can’t get arrested. And he might wish his party had won one fewer of those executive offices—it’s little-known State Treasurer Dan Schwartz who is taking him on most directly.

“If the governor is not successful, this will be the collapse of his governorship.” Fred Lokken Political analyst Republicans in the Legislature, particularly the Assembly, regard Sandoval’s budget recommendations as one option, a sharp change from the respect accorded most executive budget proposals in the past. Sandoval has had a prickly relationship with the intransigents in his party. He played footsie with them in his first term as governor, running for and winning the office on

a no-new-taxes pledge. But it didn’t necessarily win him their love—they defeated his candidate for chair of the Nevada Republican Party organization in 2013 and have taken shots at him from time to time, as when he sought extension of “temporary” taxes in the last Legislature, a step he wants again this year. And his failure to repeat the no-tax pledge in his second campaign raised their hackles. GOP Assemblymember Michelle Fiore has said Sandoval’s budget should go “down the drain.” Treasurer Schwartz has equated the governor’s proposed business license tax to the margins tax defeated in the November election. “Moreover, Nevadans rejected changing the Constitutional cap on mining industry taxes in the 2014 election,” Schwartz wrote online. “In a democracy, shouldn’t elected officials respect the express will of the people?” And Schwartz has issued what he calls “alternative budget” recommendations to the governor’s budget proposals. Schwartz’s plan was not taken seriously by budget committee members in either party—the governor’s GOP allies tore into him—but still gives the intransigents a rallying point. “He may have bungled the numbers, but they are with him, not the big guy,” said one lobbyist. The Nevada Women’s Lobby has challenged Schwartz’s plan, which is not an ally that brings the governor any gain in credibility

with the GOP caucus. For that matter, Sandoval’s strongest supporters in the Legislature so far are Democrats, and they have only enough votes to stop action on taxes (under a minority control provision in the state constitution), not enough to pass Sandoval’s tax plan. In the Senate, Sandoval’s party has just a one vote majority—11 out of 21 members, not enough to pass a tax increase. Sandoval needs every Democratic senator plus four Republicans under the supermajority requirement. To be sure, calling Schwartz’s recommendations an “alternative budget” is like describing Archie Comics as Moby Dick. It’s only three pages long and deals with state spending in the broadest terms, not including the culling and cutting governors and legislators must do. Article 4 of the state constitution makes the executive budget recommendations (including those for the state treasurer’s office) a function of the governor, leaving the treasurer with no part in the process at all, so Schwartz’s budget falls in to the “Who asked you?” category. In addition, it returns to the otherpeople’s-money approach, using an air travel fee that would make Nevada’s revenue sources still more unstable and unpredictable and is probably illegal under federal law. But as a challenge to Sandoval, it seems to have gotten Schwartz plenty of ink, and made him a momentary rallying point for Republican critics of the governor—including State Controller Ron Knecht, who jumped onto the Schwartz alternative bandwagon. (One legislative budget committee member said Schwartz’s budget for the treasurer’s office was “just as poorly constructed” as his alternative.) Schwartz ended his “alternative budget” with the phrase, “We look forward to working with the governor and legislature ...” The sentiment was not returned.

Make or break Political analyst Fred Lokken said that if Sandoval does his job and uses a governor’s normal behind-the-scenes advantages, his power will return. “It may still be there,” Lokken said. “The new Republican legislators believe they somehow received a mandate from the votes on Nov. 4, and they can flex their muscles. But these [new legislators] are a lot of inexperienced people that are backed by a broken state Republican Party.” He said what the governor is aiming at with his tax plan is more revenue, and if that’s what comes out


at the other end of the Legislature, Sandoval will be able to claim success, even if the final tax package is not what he proposed. “It may not be this tax,” Lokken said, his voice giving the emphasis. “I don’t know that it’s DOA, but it’s certainly a controversial tax.” In 2003, when Gov. Kenny Guinn proposed sweeping changes in the tax system, he did not get the tax he wanted—a business gross receipts tax—but he did get most of the revenue he wanted, after legislators substituted a modified business tax. But Guinn’s fellow Republicans—the intransigents of that year—blocked action through the regular session and two special sessions before it passed. Then as now, the party came second to ideology with some GOP members. (An alternative budget produced in 2003 by Assembly Republicans was more detailed than Schwartz’s document.) Though it has been given little news coverage, both the governor and the state have a lot riding on this legislative session. Lokken said defeat of Sandoval’s program would create terrible political problems for the rest of his term. “If the governor is not successful, this will be the collapse of his governorship.” And it won’t be any better for Nevadans, he said. If Sandoval’s program stalls, “The legislative agenda is shot to hell. The governor’s agenda is shot to hell. Economic development would fall apart. This is one of the highest stake [legislative] sessions in the history of the state of Nevada.”

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Investors and businesses mulling a move watch these things, he said. “Recession and cuts have made this the smallest state government in the United States,” Lokken said. “State workers haven’t had a raise in 5 or 6 years. They are overworked. Morale could not be lower. They’ve waited for light at the end of the tunnel. We can expect a slide in the quality of our state government if things don’t change. ... State government is hanging on by a thread.”

“Welookforwardtoworkingwith thegovernor.” Dan Schwartz State Controller That would play into the hands of the anti-government intransigents, who like it when government doesn’t work. But the intransigents won’t gain much by blocking Sandoval, Lokken said. “If this session turns out to be a disaster, I assume it will be put squarely on the backs of the conservatives.” The business community might not fare much better. Though business spokespeople have been saying for a decade or more that they are willing to accept a new tax system, they have defeated two such plans sponsored by the state teachers—one in court, the other at the ballot box—and have been grumbling about Sandoval’s approach and encouraging Republican legislators looking for a different approach. Ω

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CROCHET CONNECTION Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway. (775) 424-1800

FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. First Sa of every month, 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

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The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month, 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP This class is for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

BIKINI BULL RIDING DJ and Bikini Bull Riding Competition. Su, 5 & 9PM through 12/28, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

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SHAMROCKIT OPEN MIC NIGHT

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Music is back on Victorian Square on Sundays. Join us for the best open mic night in town. Hosted by Athena. No Cover. We kick it off with complimentary champagne & appetizers. Su, 6PM. Opens 2/15, no cover. O’Skis Pub & Grille, 840 Victorian Ave. (775) 359-7547 LINE DANCING LESSONS Line dancing lessons from the Gilley’s Girls from 6PM8PM. Enjoy DJ Trey from 6PM-mid. W, 6PM through 12/31. No cover. JA Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Th-Su, 5PM and F, Sa, 11PM, no cover. JA Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

LADIES NIGHT & TOUGHEST COWBOY

Tu, 8PM, no cover. Morelli’s G Street Saloon, 2285 G St. (775) 355-8281

Ladies Night w/live music and Toughest Cowboy Competition. DJ breaks until midnight. W, 7 & 9PM through 12/31, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

DANWISE AND FRIENDS A free monthly comedy show featuring local talent. The event is BYOB and limited beer will be provided free. Third Th of every month, 8PM, starting 1/15. Free. The Generator, Inc., 1240 Icehouse Ave. (775) 530-1477

ACOUSTIC WONDERLAND This is a singer-songwriter showcase. Come down to Paddy’s and bring your acoustic instruments. Sign-ups are at 7:30PM and music begins at 8PM. Drink Specials all night! Th, 8PM, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

DJ RAZZ Come dance the night away to DJ RAZZ! You can even karaoke if you like. Ladies Night every Friday night. Drink Specials all night. F, 9PM. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

KARAOKE KARAOKE WITH BOBBY DEE

KARAOKE Th-Sa, 9PM, no cover. Bottom’s Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way (775) 359-3677


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More plans gel for sage grouse protection By late April, the sage grouse—namely the unique subspecies near Mono Lake— could finally be designated as threatened. In the meantime, new policies to protect the charismatic bird are making their way down the bureaucratic by Georgia Fisher pipeline. The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest has released a draft Record of georgiaf@ Decision, which amounts to a plan that won’t become official until a public newsreview.c om comment ends in April, as well as an environmental impact statement about land-use guidelines surrounding the bi-state sage grouse. The Forest Service area in question extends south of Carson City to the forest boundary north of Bishop, California. The plan suggests that grazing and mining in that area will be limited when legally possible, and that invasive grass species could be contained and suppressed. New campgrounds, trail heads and the like will be limited or prohibited, and tall structures that could harbor grouse predators banned. The list goes on. “A lot of them have been in practice for some time, either as best-management practices or recommendations on some level,” Humboldt-Toiyabe land management planner James Winfrey said of the recommended policies. “This document just puts them into one place where everybody can go and say, ‘OK, here are the standards and guidelines.’ … We do forest-plan amendments of varying scales all the time, but this one is fairly comprehensive and focused on the sage grouse.” The BLM’s 2016 federal budget requests include a $46 million funding increase for conservation efforts surrounding the greater sage grouse and the sagebrush steppe. It’s an ongoing conversation, really, and one that runs The Bi-State PinyonJuniper Expansion the gamut from environmental concerns to various business interests. Forum is slated for The Bi-State Pinyon-Juniper Expansion Forum, a public event next Feb. 25 and 26 at week in Minden, is an appeal to ranchers as well as the general public. CVIC Hall in Minden. Left unchecked, pinyon-juniper woodland “will overtake the sagebrush, Admission is free. and essentially eliminate that habitat that is essential for sage grouse,” RSVP by Feb. 20. For more about USFS polisaid forum organizer Steve Lewis, an affable sort who refers to the trees’ cies surrounding the combined names as “PJ.” bi-state sage grouse, Management of their growth is by no means mandatory on private visit http://1.usa. land. Even on public space, approval is necessary under the National gov/1fccdry. Environmental Policy Act, said Lewis, who’s with the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. “It’s not required,” he explained. But it’s necessary, “if we are to protect and maintain and even possibly rehabilitate sagebrush ecosystems.” Those ecosystems don’t cover sagebrush alone, for the record; they also include meadows, where grouse chicks find insects and flowering plants for sustenance in warm weather. “But in the wintertime, they all depend primarily on sagebrush leaves,” Lewis said. “That’s their exclusive diet.” “We’re losing lots of sagebrush from wildfire,” he continued. “Wildfire is wiping out tremendous acreage of sagebrush. We’re losing it from wild horse populations that are above their appropriate management level, and we’re losing it from PJ expansion. It’s a combination of a lot of things that is threatening the habitat of sage grouse, but this forum is really concentrating specifically on the best ways for treating pinyon-juniper.” Ω OPINION

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BY BRAD BYNUM bradb@newsreview.com PHOTOS BY ERIC MARKS

is a dreamer. M attHe’sSchultz a utopian idealist who

he said, because many of the council members, including Mayor Hillary Schieve, were supportive of the project, but frustrating for him because other council members, as well as property owners from the neighborhood, had questions and concerns. The council eventually voted to postpone making a decision about the project until after Schultz and other members of The Generator could develop more details of their financial plan and address the concerns of the nearby property owners. Michael Stewart, who owns a warehouse in the area, was concerned about how the park might affect access to his building, which is for sale. Those concerns might change the exact dimensions of the parcel and other details, but are unlikely to derail the project. However, Councilmember Jenny Brekhus raised some

imagines big projects, speaks with infectious enthusiasm, and rallies people to join his causes. He’s led the construction of massive art pieces for the annual Burning Man festival. He’s the executive director of The Generator, a nonprofit collaborative artists’ workspace in Sparks. But after four hours at a Reno City Council meeting on January 28, he seemed uncharacteristically exhausted and disheartened. He was at the meeting to pitch a land deal to the council. The deal, which he calls Generator Phase 2, would allow The Generator to lease a parcel of land from the city for $1 a year for five years, and then to buy the land for $860,000. In exchange, The Generator would develop a sculpture park, a community garden, and a 50,000-foot artists’ workspace on the parcel, which is along the railroad tracks near Chism Street west of downtown. “It was really amazing, but a little frustrating,” said Schultz a week later. It was amazing,

Is The Generator Phase 2, a

potential land deal between

the city and a

Burning Manaffiliated arts organization,

good for Reno?

“I love what this community builds, and I love all of it—all of Reno.” Matt Schultz, executive director of The Generator

“THE NEXT GENERATION” continued on page 14

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continued from page 13

“tHe next generation”

other questions—among them, how are other local arts organizations going to react to this deal? “This is not unique to the Generator—this is applicable to anyone who got a public-private partnership during the heyday of our redevelopment activities,” she said in a recent phone interview. “When you pick one, particularly in a noncompetitive way, particularly when it’s not an open process—someone just walks in and you pick them—it does make other people wonder, ‘Well, what about me? Where do I stand?’”

Burning questions Schultz grew up around Truckee and Tahoe. He went to school in Arizona and worked in the Bay Area before moving to Reno. In 2008, he was an artist and filmmaker, but was working for an advertising company. And then, after the economic downturn, he was laid off. “Like the rest of my generation, there were no job prospects for about two years while the economy was completely destroyed, so a lot of us decided to create our own jobs, our own worlds,” he said. After what he says was a decade of avoiding the event, he went to Burning Man for the first time. “For me, it was a place where a bunch of regular people can make art and have a chance to be seen by a world that cared about art.” It was a life-changing event. He and his friends began making large-scale artworks, like a long pier, a giant shipwreck, and then last year, the largest yet, “Embrace,” an enormous wooden sculpture of two figures sharing a hug. The piece cost $250,000 and over 100 volunteers spent hundreds of hours working on it. The artists burned the piece down at the festival last year. Like other charismatic idealists, Schultz is prone to wax philosophic. “If it’s a one in 10,000 chance of inspiring the next Da Vinci to start the next renaissance in Reno, then that’s worth it,” he said. “For us, tying together the engineer, the artist and the scientist in a city, and saying everyone can build the world they envision, and supporting that message with every tool we can find, all the space we can find, every bit of inspiration we can have—someone is going to change the world in a very positive way on their own. And the only thing we ask from the city is a piece of land that up until two weeks ago no one cared about, next to a railroad track with a whole bunch of gravel and liquor bottles covering it.” Brekhus said she was supportive of an earlier proposal from the group to install sculptures on the parcel, but that the project has become more elaborate and is missing important documents and plans. “There wasn’t a development plan or a pro forma,” she said. “I wanted a more concrete plan of what they want to do. When you go out and sell property in this manner … you have to be clear that you’re achieving a community 14   |  RN&R   | 

FEBRUARY 19, 2015

benefit. While I think they’re a good group and have a lot of support and have demonstrated an ability to do some really interesting things in keeping with our community’s overall arts and culture revitalization, it was just unclear to me that they were being held to a standard of deliverables that we would expect for the benefit that they were going to get for that property transaction. That’s why I voted and agreed that they should be sent back to work out a little bit more specificity.” The Generator’s current 34,000-foot location in Sparks is, according to Schultz, full. Over 50 resident artists work there. It’s been the construction site of over 60 large art projects, including 30 international projects, by artists from places like Lithuania, the Czech Republic, South Africa and South Korea. Most of the projects are constructed for Burning Man, but The Generator has also worked with schools and other organizations in the area, including Vaughn Middle School and Hug High School, and the Good Luck Macbeth theater company. The Generator receives $330,000 annually from an angel, Paul Buchheit, the inventor of Gmail, and a man partly famous for coining Google’s simple, memorable motto: “Don’t be evil.” “My hope is to capture some of that same magic that you have at Burning Man or on some of these projects where you bring together people from all over the community,” said Buchheit in a recent phone interview. “You have a lawyer and a homeless guy working together on a project as peers. I think that really transforms things in a more fundamental way than is readily apparent, because it isn’t somewhere you go just to buy something. It’s a place where people can go to share what they love and be inspired by other people.” “We don’t have one funder,” said Schultz. “This year, we had 571 funders.” But most of those donors gave small donations, mostly Kickstarter contributions for individual projects. Two-thirds of The Generator’s funds come from Buchheit. “I wonder if that model is sustainable,” said Tim Conder, a local artist, small business owner, and the owner of Cuddleworks, a for-profit artists’ space, where artists can rent individual studios. “The question that comes to my mind when I think about spaces that are privately funded by an anonymous outside donor is, so, you provide all this access to all these artists in this community free of charge, and at some point, someone looks at that line item on a bank statement somewhere in California, and says, ‘This doesn’t make sense for me anymore.’ All of a sudden, the artists and creative types who have grown accustomed to that free access are put out—just on a whim. What does that do to an arts community?” For his part, Buchheit does seem to have a lot of passion for the project.

“ the only thing we ask from the city is a piece of land that up until two weeks ago no one cared about, next to a railroad track with a whole bunch of gravel and liquor bottles covering it.”

Matt scHultZ

executiVe director, tHe generator

tiM conder

oWner, cuddleWorKs

“ My take on city-owned buildings and land that they’re looking to unload is that there should be a transparent, organized process for how that occurs. How did the generator find out about that land? should city-owned land and property by brokered for on the playa? i don’t think so. and i don’t think current city council members think so either.”

“This is obviously a project that we’ve invested a lot of time and everything else into, so I want it to be a success,” he said. “I want to see it be a success, and to me this is the next stage in that evolution. I think that it’s an opportunity for Reno and the whole community to create something that has really never existed. … What’s most important to me is to see that community support. It has to come from the community, ultimately. I can help out in my own way, but ultimately, really, the whole thing comes from the community. It’s just a matter of giving that extra little push from the start.” “Ultimately, nearly every single nonprofit in America, their sustainability is based exclusively on donations,” said Schultz. “Boys & Girls Club of America is one of many nonprofits who sustain the majority of their interactions through yearly donations. Most American nonprofits get less than 10 percent of their revenue from recurring revenue or sales. A large body of nonprofits in this nation are built around the idea that nonprofits are providing something for the civic good. That’s why the tax code is there. ... Any business, any investor, any park, any entity has a chance in time where their primary financing will run out. As we work to make this land happen, we’re able to diversify our own investment funds. We grow into this land, and we create a larger donor base. Having a public-private partnership with the city makes it so our nonprofit is more favorable to other granting entities, both private and public.”

radical exclusion Burning Man is one of the biggest arts festivals in the world, and it attracts millions of dollars and international

attention to Northern Nevada. But some local artists resent focusing the city’s art community toward the festival during the other 51 weeks every year. There’s also the perception that Burning Man artists are carpetbaggers. After all, Burning Man is not a Northern Nevada venture; it’s a Bay Area venture that happens to take place in Northern Nevada. One main principle of Burning Man is “radical inclusion,” but now that the tickets sell out every year, they’re a rarefied commodity, with prices starting at $390. In addition to the ticket cost, Burners need the resources to afford food, drink and shelter for a week-long camping vacation in a potentially harsh desert environment. So, despite the rhetoric about radical inclusion, Burning Man has become, especially in the last few years, an exclusive event. Bloomberg Business, in a Feb. 5 article, “The Billionaires at Burning Man,” is among the sources which have reported on the rise of wealthy, pampered participants and even class stratification at the festival in recent years. “That’s one of the reasons we want to bring this art to Reno,” said Schultz. “Burning Man has become a place where a large number of people can never go, and that’s why I’m so passionate about this. I started making this big art because Burning Man was the only place where a homeless guy could make big art. If that doesn’t put a wheel in people’s head, like, wait a minute, a homeless guy making art for a bunch of billionaires? Well, that same guy, who came back to the real world and found one of those millionaires to fund his art, is having a hard time getting the city that he loves to support his art.” “I don’t think it’s a Burning Man versus everybody else thing, or a


Cuddleworks versus Generator thing,” said Conder. “I think what they have over there is a great thing. I think it’s an important piece of the arts community in town, but it’s not the entire equation. I think it’s important to remember that there are other things that are often overlooked because the Burning Man machine is real, and those things deserve the same help or attention from the city and the citizens here.” Conder first went to Burning Man in 1999. He worked for the organization for several years, and is friends with many of the people involved with Burning Man, which became a nonprofit organization itself last year. Conder also helped start and currently serves on the board of an ongoing bike-sharing project on the playa, Yellow Bike Project. “I am only an artist today because of Burning Man,” he said. “Burning Man was a pivotal experience in my life, and it was years of my life. Burning Man is no longer a counterculture. It is the mainstream. We have to remember that as the arts community here in Reno. … Although the ideas might still seem radical, Burning Man as an event and as a practice is Nevada big business. And there’s nothing wrong with that. That’s OK. It brings millions of dollars to our community, and that’s a great thing.

… But there are a lot of other things happening and those things shouldn’t be overshadowed by the Burning Man umbrella.” “I love what this community builds, and I love all of it—all of Reno,” said Schultz. “The Burning Man community is part of that community. So, I love the artwork that’s coming out of Cuddleworks and the Holland Project just the same as I love the artwork that’s coming out of Reno Art Works and The Generator. We have an enormous variety of down-to-earth, real-world people making wonderful, wonderful art.” “I think art is important for art’s sake,” said Conder. “I don’t really care where people make it or how they make it. What I will take personal offense at is if they’re provided the capacity to create what they want to create, and then that rug is pulled out from under them. I take personal offense at that. And we’ve seen that happen repeatedly in Reno.” It’s often difficult for local artists to have these kinds of conversations, because Reno is a small town, and the arts community is smaller still. Anything that happens to one local arts organization will have ripples that affect others. That’s why a land deal for one of the most well-funded organizations in town might rub some local arts advocates

the wrong way. Additionally, Burning Man tends to be very polarizing. Local artists—and everyone else—tend to either love it or hate it. It’s a difficult subject to express a nuanced opinion about. “The way that Burning Man works now, if you say anything negative about it, you’re demonized by the people who love it,” said Conder. “I will say this. It’s hard for me to stomach the idea of locally sourcing $200,000 [for “Embrace”] when I know that would fund the Holland Project for two years. That’s a really hard thing. … Holland is specifically for the people of Reno, and The Generator is specifically for some people in Reno and some people from Burning Man.” The Holland Project, a youth-oriented nonprofit that curates music and art events geared toward Reno teenagers, is just one local arts organization that struggles to get by on a fraction of The Generator’s budget, and without the continuing aid of a millionaire donor. “There are a lot of great, great organizations that are really underfunded, that struggle every day to offer great programming to our community,” said Conder. “So when I see an organization that’s really well funded, I always think it would be cool if everyone could have a slice of that. … The Reno Philharmonic is going to ask for money. The Hug High Marching Band is going to ask for money. The Nevada Arts Council is going to ask for money. The Holland Project is going to ask for money. And people are going to say, I was going to, but I gave 10 grand to that sculpture that burned down.” However, as a platform for building large Burning Man projects, the Generator brings national and international attention to the Reno arts community. “I think it’s important as a community to recognize all art, not just really grandiose, expensive art,” said Conder. “There’s an important distinction between how good something is and how large something is—they’re not one and the same. … I think it’s OK for people to say, ‘I don’t like that and this is why.’ It doesn’t mean that you don’t like the artist. It doesn’t mean that you don’t like his organization. It doesn’t mean that you don’t like Burning Man. The world is not that black-and-white.” “The reason that people have a delineation about Burning Man art is that Burning Man accepts all kinds of art, so for a lot of those people, they stick their nose up at that art project that the housewife did for the first time in the middle of the desert,” said Schultz. “It actually really offends me when the fine arts world put their nose up at the Burning Man arts world, because it’s not good enough.” Schultz and Conder both acknowledge that an all-inclusive art space might not appeal to artists who value privacy and prefer working in solitude. It can be

Art in progress at The Generator.

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difficult to parse which of their perspectives is the more populist and accepting. They both seem to have valid points— and that, in addition to questions about land use, financing and property values, is part of what the Reno’s City Council must examine when the Generator Phase 2 revised proposal is presented. Debates about The Generator are also part of larger conversations about how the city manages land resources. Brekhus said she and Councilmember Paul McKenzie have been advocating a closer examination of all the city-owned properties, and deciding which ones are “family jewels,” cultural resources like the McKinley Arts Center, which are buildings necessary for municipal purposes, like City Hall, and which others can be sold. In some cases, she said, sales should be made to the highest bidders or to adjoiners. In other cases, deals like what The Generator proposes might be more appropriate. “We need to scope all of that out, and I really do not want to be involved in any more land transaction discussions until we have that more comprehensive analysis and program,” said Brekhus. “As a City Council member, I don’t want to be brokering property parcel by parcel. I want a policy and a program and to have the staff administer it.” “My take on city-owned buildings and land that they’re looking to unload is that there should be a transparent, organized process for how that occurs,” said Conder. How did [The Generator] find out about that land? Should city-owned land and property be brokered for on the playa? I don’t think so. And I don’t think current City Council members think so either.” Schultz said he was clued in about the property by former City Councilmember Dave Aiazzi, an avid arts supporter. Conder said he hopes the current City Council is cautious about embracing Burning Man. “They don’t want Burning Man to be the next gaming,” said Conder. “We’ll put all our eggs in that basket, and then 20 years later, we’re left with fur boots blowing in the street. … I think Burning Man was a great idea. It’s a really beautiful way of thinking, and a really great event that’s now big business. There are good things and bad things about that. The good things are that it brings a lot of money to our community, and that’s awesome. It affords projects like The Generator to happen and that’s great. On the negative side, now let’s ask questions like, if Burning Man were gone tomorrow, what would the cultural landscape and the economic landscape of our city look like? Would we be OK? Would The Generator be OK? Would all those artists who rely on that space and its equipment, which is paid for by Burning Man benefactors, still be able to make art?” Ω

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sTory of

Selma  brought a  stellar performance  from British actor  David Oyelowo.

oscAr T

he 2014 movie year will officially be put to bed when a bunch of well dressed sorts head home with their naked golden men. Who will be graced with the golden dude doorstops? How the hell should I know? Since I write about movies, and since Oscar night is some sort of big deal, I have been asked to make some guesses. So, I acquiesced and prepared the following list. My editor swore if I failed, he’d leave me off his annual Pig Roast Party, one of those things where somebody puts a pole through some poor pig and then shoves an apple in its mouth, while everybody converges like cannibals and shaves the meat off its bones. Curiously, my editor says this to me every year and, the strange thing is, I’ve never been to any of his Pig parties even though I always write this thing. (I think he’s lying.) Also, I don’t eat pork, so I don’t know why this particular trickery always works. OK, here are my best guesses as to who will win the Oscars and all that crap.

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BesT PicTure American Sniper Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) Boyhood The Grand Budapest Hotel The Imitation Game Selma The Theory of Everything Whiplash While I would’ve left American Sniper off this list—it’s just not a great movie—the rest of the films are solid. It looks like this is coming down to Boyhood or Birdman. Birdman is the better film, but Boyhood is pretty fantastic as well. Ultimately, I think Birdman is great enough for it to garner some major awards, but too polarizing—a lot of folks outright hate it—to take the ultimate prize. Richard Linklater’s Boyhood will win this by a hair. SNUBS: There was room for two more nominees on this list. I think 2014 was a well-above-average year, and 10 nominees would’ve made sense. The Academy did pretty well here, but I would’ve dropped Sniper and added Gone Girl, Interstellar and Foxcatcher. ShoUld wiN: Birdman will wiN: Boyhood

BesT AcTor Steve Carell (Foxcatcher) Bradley Cooper (American Sniper) Benedict Cumberbatch (The Imitation Game) Michael Keaton (Birdman) Eddie Redmayne (The Theory of Everything) This is another tough call, this one being between Keaton and Redmayne. As with Best Picture, I want this to go to Birdman and a well deserving Keaton. I just think Redmayne as Stephen Hawking has always had Oscar written all over it. It could go either way, but I’m betting Redmayne. SNUBS: I’m pretty unhappy with this list. If this were the Grimmy’s, I would drop Carell, Cooper, Cumberbatch and Redmayne, replacing them with Miles Teller (Whiplash), Ralph Fiennes (The Grand Budapest Hotel), Jake Gyllenhaal (Nightcrawler) and the criminally snubbed David Oyelowo (Selma) for his brilliant performance as Martin Luther King. I think Oscar voters snubbed Oyelowo because they were worried they’d get the gig of trying to say his name at the ceremony when announcing the nominees. They don’t want to be this year’s John Travolta. I would’ve also nominated Nicolas Cage, creating a sixth slot, for Left Behind. I would do this not because he deserves it, for he

Our resident movie guy predicts what will happen at the Academy Awards by BoB grimm bgrimm@newsreview.com

surely doesn’t, but because such a nomination would cause a cataclysmic cinema vortex over Southern California, where the entire entertainment industry would collapse upon itself and get sucked down into the bowels of the Earth below all of the corpses and magma and shit. The industry would then be reborn with the help of pixies, magic foxes and a resurrected and svelte Orson Welles. Hey, one can dream. ShoUld wiN: Keaton will wiN: Redmayne BesT AcTress Marion Cotillard (Two Days, One Night) Felicity Jones (The Theory of Everything) Julianne Moore (Still Alice) Rosamund Pike (Gone Girl) Reese Witherspoon (Wild) This is one of the night’s sure things. All of the nominated performances are good, and while I’m an especially big fan of Pike in Gone Girl, Moore is just too damned good as a 50-year-old woman suffering from Alzheimer’s to be ignored. A long deserving actress finally gets her due. SNUBS: I would drop Jones and Cotillard from this list, replacing them with Tessa Thompson (Dear White People) and the remarkable work of Essie Davis (The Babadook). ShoUld aNd will wiN: Moore

BesT suPPorTing AcTor Robert Duvall (The Judge) Ethan Hawke (Boyhood) Edward Norton (Birdman) Mark Ruffalo (Foxcatcher) J.K. Simmons (Whiplash) This is another sure thing. While Norton, Hawke and Ruffalo were all spectacular; Simmons is going to get this one. Robert Duvall is a great actor, but his nod here qualifies as this year’s worst nomination. Simmons has been the frontrunner from the beginning, and he will get the gold. I’m thinking that’s on his tempo. SNUBS: This list almost matched my year-end picks, with the exception of one. I would dump Duvall and replace him with Shia LaBeouf for his performance in the Sia video—I mean Fury. ShoUld aNd will wiN:

Simmons BesT suPPorTing AcTress Patricia Arquette (Boyhood) Laura Dern (Wild) Keira Knightley (The Imitation Game) Emma Stone (Birdman) Meryl Streep (Into the Woods) Say, this predicting stuff is getting pretty easy. Arquette gets the award in yet another easy-to-guess contest. I suppose Stone could creep in and cause an upset, but there’s no way in


hell that Streep, Dern or Knightley win. Arquette will triumph. SNUBS: I would dump the undeserving Streep, Knightley and Dern, replacing them with Carrie Coon (Gone Girl), Maggie Gyllenhaal (Frank) and Tilda Swinton (Snowpiercer). ShoUld aNd Will WiN:

Arquette AnimAted FeAture Film Big Hero 6 The Boxtrolls How to Train Your Dragon 2 Song of the Sea The Tale of Princess Kaguya A damn shame that The Lego Movie was ignored in this category, but Big Hero 6 is just as good, and perhaps better. I say Big Hero 6 wins this. SNUBS: I say again, The Lego Movie should’ve been in the mix. ShoUld aNd Will WiN: Big Hero 6 Best director Alejandro G. Inarritu (Birdman) Richard Linklater (Boyhood) Bennett Miller (Foxcatcher) Wes Anderson (The Grand Budapest Hotel) Morten Tyldum (The Imitation Game) Kudos to the Academy for leaving Clint Eastwood off this list for his work on American Sniper. I love me some Clint, but he was off his game a bit for that one, perhaps the most overrated movie of 2014. While I don’t think Birdman will get Best Picture, Inarritu did take home the Director’s Guild of America Award, always a good indicator of who gets the Oscar. Linklater pulled off his directorial feat over 12 years, something that

is sure to get the attention of some voters. Still, I think this will be one of those weird years where Best Picture and Best Director Oscars go to different films. SNUBS: The worst omissions of the year involve Selma, with no Best Actor nod and director Ava DuVernay getting ignored. She absolutely, 100 percent deserved the recognition. Everybody here did good and even great jobs, but I would replace Tyldum and Miller with Damien Chazelle (Whiplash) and DuVernay. ShoUld aNd Will WiN:

Inarritu the rest Best Original Screenplay: Birdman Best Adapted Screenplay: American Sniper Cinematography: Birdman Costume Design: The Grand Budapest Hotel Documentary Feature: Citizenfour Documentary Short Subject: Joanna Film Editing: Boyhood Foreign Language Film: Ida Makeup and Hairstyling: The Grand Budapest Hotel Original Score: The Theory of Everything Original Song: “I’m Not Gonna Miss You” from Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me Production Design: The Grand Budapest Hotel Short Film Animated: Feast Short Film Live Action: The Phone Call Sound Editing: Interstellar Sound Mixing: Whiplash Visual Effects: Interstellar Ω The Academy Awards will air on Feb. 22, at 5:30 p.m. on ABC.

“Hold still—I’m looking for your talent.”

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Photo/Josie Luciano

Natural world

"As Above, So Below," by Kaitlin Bryson, is an exploration of preservation and decay.

Embodied Place at Sierra Nevada College Environmental art is everywhere. Work that explores the relationship between culture and nature by has become ubiquitous. There are good Josie Luciano reasons for this trend toward environmental work and several of those are on display at Sierra Nevada College’s latest show, Embodied Place. This exhibit, juried by Futurefarmers founder Amy Franceschini and SNC professor Russell Dudley, is small, quiet and personal. Unlike the romantics of the mid-19th century, large-scale earthworks of the '60s sierra nevada college and '70s, and the shock pieces that characis at 999 tahoe Blvd, terized environmental work in the '90s, this incline Village. exhibit reflects the contemporary movement away from the adoring gaze or the militant stare,and toward an unassuming first glance. The 20 featured artists demonstrate a keen understanding of restraint in their work and a collective trust in their audience to make unstated connections as they invite them to explore their surroundings through a combination of photography, video, sculpture, drawing and sound-work. A few pieces offer a glimpse in the truest sense of the word, showing viewers a

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cross-section of what it actually looks like to support our lifestyle, in all its mundane detail. Christmas trees are processed by the thousands in one video. In another film, footage of passengers on a bus loops on the screen, giving the audience a view that is simultaneously strange and familiar. Some pieces commemorate surroundings beyond our control, such as a map documenting an orchard that no longer exists, or a compilation of photographic evidence suggesting the presence of a ghost in one artist’s home. Other works have an exuberant tone, like the mechanized plantbot that spastically rattles in its glass cage, or a twochannel video installation called “Queer Migration,” depicting the side-by-side re-creation and original roadtrip of two gay men making their way across the country. One piece that manages to be both commemorative and subversive at the same time is a sculpture titled “As Above, So Below,” an entry from the only selected Reno artist, Kaitlin Bryson. In this piece, Bryson nests dead honeybees inside a

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hanging catacomb made of beeswax, wool and willow branches. The inverted triangle mimics the structure of a hive and calls into question our ideas of preservation and decay. “This piece is an ode to bees, but it is also a way to depict death as a part of a whole system,” said Bryson. Her unique take on humanity’s place is heavily influenced by her geography. “I grew up surrounded by both mountains and desert— a place with no temperateness. I think that is reflected in the people here too.” This harsh but fertile quality that attracts people to the Sierra is a primary purpose for the exhibit itself.

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“One point of this exhibit is to make a connection with the new MFA program and provide a frame of reference for artists who may be looking to enter,” said Sarah Lillegard, SNC’s graduate admissions counselor. Currently open for applications, the college’s MFA of Interdisciplinary Arts focuses on “skill development, experimentation, collaborative dialogue and community connectivity.” The reception for Embodied Place is Feb. 27 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Holman Arts & Media Center at Sierra Nevada College. From 7 to 8:30 p.m., there will be a panel discussion about conceptions of place, relationships between art and science, and—as panelists Geoffrey Holstad and Mary Rothlisberger put it, “the artist’s responsibility to embody a place in order to sustain it.” The public is invited to participate. Other panelists include Ignacio Chapela from University of California, Berkeley, Wendy Baroli of GirlFarm, and Jared Stanley, a local poet and writer. Ω

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Silver Chopsticks 10580 N. McCarran Blvd., 424-2121 Stormy days bring to mind a variety of comfort foods. Personally, I lean toward savory, broth-based soups as by Todd South bolster against inclement weather. Thus, on a rainy afternoon, my wife, a friend and I found ourselves at the strip mall gem that is Silver Chopsticks. For starters I ordered goi cuon (two Vietnamese spring rolls cut in half, $4.95) and salt and pepper calamari ($7.25). The rolls were served with room temperature peanut sauce spiked with chopped peanut and julienned carrot. The overall flavors of vegetable, noodle, herb and shrimp were present but the pork was a bit dry. Not terrible, but they could definitely use improvement. Photo/AllisoN YouNg

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I’ve eaten my share of fried squid, but this presentation was new to me. Lightly fried in tempura, the squid appeared to be mantle cuts similar to those used for “calamari fries,” yet with nubby bits that reminded me of tentacles. Having previously enjoyed suckered appendages, I’m fairly certain these weren’t squid legs, but I think they were clipped to evoke this notion. Interesting. Served on a bed of shredded cabbage and sliced scallion they were a little chewy, yet pretty tasty despite lacking much “salt and pepper” flavor. A light sweet and sour sauce—provided for our friend’s egg roll—was delivered just before the starters, so we used it on the seafood to good effect.

My buddy and my wife each ordered from the menu of Chinese lunch specials, curry chicken with egg roll and steamed rice being his choice ($6.95). The egg roll was gone before I could beg a nibble, but he reported, “It was an egg roll.” I think I enjoyed the flavor of the curry sauce more than he did. I found it to be fairly creamy with just enough spice, and possessing more of a Thai than Chinese character. My wife declared her beef broccoli to be “the best I’ve ever had.” It’s entirely possible, since the broccoli was perfectly stir-fried with tender, well-seasoned meat. Nothing at all like the spongy, low-rent beef one often receives in this dish. Her choice of pork fried rice was only notable for not being overcooked or greasy—not a star item but just fine as support for the entrée. Hot and sour soup rounded out her lunch special ($7.25). We agreed the soup was pretty good, though it could have used a bit more vinegar tang. As noted, I was in search of a big bowl of soup to counter the storm. I goofed by ordering pho tai nan (vermicelli noodle soup with rare steak and well done flank, $6.95) rather than my usual pho dac biet (same thing, but with the addition of tendon, tripe, and meatball). Some may say, “Ewww,” but I really missed the tendon and tripe. The soup was served at the perfect temperature—just below scalding— with the usual plate of fresh Thai basil, jalapeño slices, bean sprouts and wedge of lime. The word “pho” refers to the noodles, but this style of soup is best judged by the flavors of its broth. Some possess a strong, single flavor (too much ginger, onion, etc.), while others are so weak they’re akin to leftover vegetable rinse. The best pho broths combine an involved preparation of herbs, spices, vegetables and meat stock simmered for hours, then combined with noodles, meats and other ingredients for each individual order of soup. This particular broth was more delicate than some but had a very satisfying finish. I added items from the side plate to complement the broth and otherwise left it alone; no sauces necessary. It was delicious and exactly what I was after. Mission accomplished. Ω


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So, I’ve seen a lot of people reading Fifty Shades of Grey these last few years. I’ve seen them reading it at airports, reading in their front yards while the kids are at play, reading while driving their cars on the freeway, reading at church with the book cleverly tucked in their hymnals, reading while violently kickboxing and, most by notably, reading in public lavatories while Bob Grimm jovially humming (very unsettling, that jovial humming). b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m Everybody, everywhere has been reading that crazy book where the girl gets all bondage-like with the rich guy harboring major, major mommy issues. The Fifty Shades phenomenon has been impossible to avoid, and that virus has now spread to movie screens. While I managed to avoid the book as if it were an ill-tempered grizzly bear infected with Ebola and brandishing a shotgun, the cinema now beckons, so off to the Red Room of Pain I go.

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Subbing for her sick roommate, mousy college student with a porn name Anastasia Steele (Dakota Johnson), who is so innocent she doesn’t know what a butt plug is, goes to Seattle to interview billionaire business guy douchebag Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan). Grey’s offices are immaculate and adorned with supermodels. The place is also riddled with fancy pencils that have GREY stenciled on them, so that when Anastasia erotically sticks one in her mouth, its sort of like she’s sucking on Grey’s dick. Shortly after the interview, Grey starts stalking Anastasia at the hardware store where she works, but that’s OK because he has billions of dollars and looks like the result of a night of passionate lovemaking between Ryan Phillippe and Eric Bana. I mean, let’s face it, if Grey looked like Zach Galifianakis and

Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5 excellent

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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only had a quarter in his pocket, straight to jail he would go for such behavior. His psychotic courtship eventually winds up with Anastasia becoming his prospective bondage slave. He offers her a formal contract that, if she signs, will allow him to be the dominant and her the submissive in a kinky sex relationship that will involve spanking, humiliation, nipple clips and eating toast in bed. The sex scenes eventually happen and, if anything, they provide some good, hearty laughs. While the screenplay doesn’t explain much, Grey’s sexual proclivities and needs to abuse his mate have something to do with his being a crack baby. So I guess we’re supposed to feel sorry for him when he’s torturing his girlfriend because his mom was a stupid crack whore. Fair enough. When people aren’t having sex in this movie, which is quite often as things turn out, they talk in a somber, slow, irritatingly elongated manner. Everybody in this movie is a mopey, sodden sop. I love Seattle, but watching how residents behave and communicate in this movie makes me never want to visit the city again, even if the Mariners make the playoffs. On the subject of Grey’s dick again, take note: Dornan signed a “no dick whatsoever … sorry!” clause, so he never whips it out on screen. There’s plenty of Dornan ass, and Dornan chest, and Dornan chin scar, but no Dornan dick. So any of you out there highly anticipating a chance to see some massive Dornan dick will have to score a real life date with the guy, because there is no Dornan dick to be found in this flick. The guy could be a eunuch for all we know. The movie sort of just ends at the just over two-hour mark. Yes, those of you who get intensely, emotionally involved in the plights of Anastasia and Christian will have to wait, Empire Strikes Back style, for the sureto-happen sequel. Frantic negotiations have no doubt commenced with Dornan to get him to show the dick. I saw Fifty Shades of Grey on a Valentine’s Day late-night showing. I suspect there might’ve been some tug jobs and fingerbanging going on in the theater since it was the sweetheart holiday and, well, I heard grunting and snorting. If there were various acts of covert sex commencing around me, I’m pretty sure they were a thousand times more erotic and genuine than the hilarious supposed sexual antics occurring on screen. Ω

MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 19, 2015

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RN&R

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21


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CIGARETTES

3

American Sniper

While Clint Eastwood’s film has plenty of problems, Bradley Cooper rises above the patchy melodrama and overly slick segments with his portrayal of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle. Kyle holds the American sniper record of 160 confirmed kills, and was killed by a veteran he was trying to mentor on a shooting range. The film works best when depicting Kyle at work in Iraq, constructing some very tense battle scenes and sequences as seen through Kyle’s riflescope. There’s a subplot involving an enemy sniper named Mustafa (Sammy Sheik) that feels like an entirely different movie. For some reason, Eastwood employs a showier style in the scenes involving Mustafa, which feel a bit false and artificial alongside the movie’s grittier moments. Saddled with the film’s worst dialogue, Sienna Miller battles hard in trying to make Kyle’s wife, Taya, an intriguing movie character. Cooper, who physically transformed himself for the role, does an excellent job of conveying the difficulties and stress that Kyle’s job entailed. He’s an actor forever taking risks and challenging himself, and he’s a big reason to see this movie.

2

A Most Violent Year

While the cast and crew do admirable work, the script and pacing render this movie a near miss rather than the solid outing it could’ve been. Considering the talent on hand, that’s a bit of a shame. The film is a shining example of art direction, and one that boasts a firecracker cast with the likes of Oscar Isaac, Albert Brooks and Jessica Chastain. Set in New York in 1981, it certainly has the look of early ‘80s Manhattan—I lived half an hour outside of Manhattan at the time, so I know—it’s just not a crack example of storytelling. Writer-director J.C. Chandor (All is Lost) takes a slow-burn look at the life of Abel Morales (Isaac), a fuel company owner trying to grow bigger in the face of lawsuits and constant criminal attacks on his truck drivers. The film opens with one driver (Elyes Gabel) getting hijacked outside an NYC tollbooth, and he suffers through a vicious beating. His story becomes one of the threads that run throughout the movie. I’ve watched the film twice, and it simply doesn’t stand up well on a second viewing. Despite how real it looks, and some credible moments and performances, the film ultimately comes up a little dull and implausible.

1

Black or White

Kevin Costner plays a widower fighting for the custody of his black granddaughter (Jillian Estell) in this dopey, misguided and frequently offensive movie. Costner gets to be drunk for most of the movie, and it’s unintentionally funny. He and the rest of the cast are forced to play stereotypes in what adds up to a big pile of embarrassing nothing. It sometimes flirts with meaningfulness, but it degenerates into your typical courtroom drama where a bunch of jerks fight for the right to raise a precocious child. The whole thing feels dishonest, even straining for laughter in extremely inappropriate ways. Costner stumbles around, Octavia Spencer shakes her head a lot, and we face palm ourselves for over two hours. By the time the Costner character’s dead wife’s ghost goes for a late night swim, the film has become a complete disaster. It’s surprising to me that anything like this makes it past directto-video and actually hits movie screens. The film is as simple-minded as its title.

5

Foxcatcher

Steve Carell disappears into the role of John du Pont, the crazy rich guy who took it upon himself to shoot and kill one of the wrestlers on a team he created. Channing Tatum and Mark Ruffalo are heartbreakingly good as Mark and David Schultz, two Olympic gold medal-winning siblings who, unfortunately, worked for du Pont when he had his breakdown. Down on his luck and living on ramen noodles, Mark gets a call from du Pont inviting him out to his Foxcatcher farm. Mark finds a sense of purpose working with du Pont, and eventually summons his brother and his family to Foxcatcher. What follows is a descent into insanity for the attention-starved du Pont, who lives under the chastising eye of his mother (Vanessa Redgrave) and is obsessed with controlling others. The madness eventually ended with the death of one of the brothers, and du Pont living his final years in prison. Carell is amazingly good here; one only need watch a few minutes of the real du Pont on YouTube to know that he

has nailed the characterization. Tatum and Ruffalo are equally good as the confused brothers. Mark Schultz is currently protesting director Bennett Miller’s portrayal of him in the film, and he might be in the right on a few aspects of that portrayal. Still, it’s a great film that leaves an appropriately sick feeling in the stomach.

3

The Imitation Game

Benedict Cumberbatch plays Alan Turing, who helped win the war against the Nazis when he and others invented a machine capable of breaking the Enigma code. Morten Tyldum’s film, while a tad cumbersome at times, does do a good job of illustrating the impossible odds Turing and his team were up against in trying to decipher the code. Keira Knightley (who had a nice 2014 with this and Begin Again), Matthew Goode and Charles Dance contribute to a strong supporting cast. Cumberbatch portrays Turing as a disagreeable, unlikeable social outcast who just happened to play a huge part in saving the free world thanks to his talent for solving puzzles. The film also delves into some of the more controversial times in Turing’s life, and sometimes the order of things gets a little confusing. Cumberbatch keeps the whole thing afloat with a typically strong performance.

3

Paddington

This one got pushed out of 2014, which had me worried it was worthy of the junk heap. As things turn out, this mixed animation treatment of the character created by Michael Bond is actually cute. Ben Whishaw voices Paddington, a Peruvian bear who travels to England looking for a home. He winds up in the abode of the Browns, where he quickly takes to causing major damage, creating a little marital strife for Mr. and Mrs. Brown (a delightful Hugh Bonneville and Sally Hawkins). Nicole Kidman has a lot of fun as the film’s villain, determined to trap and stuff Paddington. The movie has plenty of British charm, a couple of really good jokes, and the likes of Kidman, Bonneville and Hawkins in top form. As for Paddington himself, he looks pretty good, a solid animated creation mixed in neatly with real actors and actresses.

3

The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water

Things go bad for the sea creatures of Bikini Bottom when the hallowed secret formula for the Krabby Patty goes missing. The undersea home falls into a deep apocalypse with everybody wearing leather, and it’s up to SpongeBob and some of his cohorts to go above water and get the recipe back. The film is typical zany SpongeBob when it’s underwater, rendered in traditional animation (albeit 3-D). When they go above water, it’s a different story. Live action and CGI mix in a way that’s visually fun, but a little spastic at times. Still, there’s a spirit to the movie that’s always alive, and some great random humor (Bubbles the Future Dolphin is definitely a highlight). Antonio Banderas has some fun as a goofy pirate looking to start his own food truck using his pirate ship. SpongeBob fans won’t be disappointed, although they will probably enjoy the underwater scenes more than the flashier live action sequences.

4

Still Alice

Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease steals the mind of a very smart woman in this moving and heartbreaking film. Julianne Moore plays Alice, a professor at Columbia University who leads a very organized and regimented life of lectures, dinner parties and runs in the park. Alice starts forgetting words here and there, and then proceeds to lose her place in lectures. When she loses her way during a routine jog and can’t find her way home, she begins to realize that these aren’t normal memory loss problems for a 50-year-old woman. At first, Alice thinks she has a brain tumor. But some memory tests suggest to her neurologist (Stephen Kunken) that something else could be causing her difficulties. After a series of brain scans, the conclusion is made: Alice has Alzheimer’s. Moore gives us a deep, fully realized, multi-dimensional performance that never overdoes the sentiment or feels trite. Alice is a woman who prides herself on her encyclopedic knowledge for teaching, and exhibits nothing but grace as that knowledge is rapidly stripped away. Credit Moore for making every step of Alice’s tribulations seem honest and credible. A great supporting cast includes Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart and Kate Bosworth.


Cross pollinate Bazooka Zoo An unusual thing about Reno is that the city has a fairly diverse overall music scene, which is itself a collection of many by Brad Bynum overlapping miniature scenes, but the overall scene is small enough bradb@ that there tends to be a lot more newsre view.c om cross-pollination than there is in larger cities, where musicians from different genres tend not to intersect. A prime example of this kind of cross-pollination is Time Capsule, a new album credited to the local psychedelic rock band Bazooka Zoo, but actually a collaborative effort made by 34 local musicians, ranging from jazz instrumentalists to rappers, and from rock guitarists to electronic beat makers. Photo/Brad Bynum

"Bazooka Zac" Haley is always hard at work in his home studio.

According to Zac “Bazooka Zac” Haley, the Bazooka Zoo name is an umbrella term for all of his and his bandmates’ creative projects— including videos, albums, artwork, fundraisers and parties. The group’s current lineup includes Haley on guitar, Scott Turek on keyboards and synthesizer, J.D. Christison on drums, and Mac Esposito on bass. The band’s last record, Satellite Series, is a rock album reminiscent of the band’s live show. But Time Capsule is a record that Haley describes as “all the guys in the band, making new music with our friends.” Time Capsule isn’t even really a rock record. The music is more like dreamy, atmospheric, psychedelic hip-hop. One of the great things about hip-hop has long been how it’s able to seamlessly absorb aspects from other genres, which makes it an ideal base for this sort of eclectic collaboration.

For more information, visit bazookazac.bandcamp.com/album/ time-capsule.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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“This album is for stoners,” said Haley. “It’s headphone music, for sure. It’s all about textures and sound effects—so many sounds you’ve never heard before—big, nasty synthesizers and lots of pedal effects.” The album is available streaming for free on the band’s Bandcamp page. The website details every musician on the album, which songs they perform, and includes links to their websites. Building up to the release of the album, the band’s Facebook page, featured photos and brief bios of all the musicians involved. “That was just introducing the entire cast of Time Capsule,” said Haley. “I wanted to take my time with it so that people could see that this was a record that had so many individuals on it.” Haley said that he goes to three or four local concerts a week and would just invite musicians to participate if he thought they might fit with the “minimal skeleton” of songs he was working on. The cast of musicians ranges from a Las Vegas metal guitarist, Sergio Medina, to Emily Chamberlain, a mellow piano-playing singer-songwriter who recently moved to Northern Nevada. The album also features unusual instruments, like a Theremin played by Drew Ernhout, and a didgeridoo played by Cody Mac. The seemingly disparate cast and wide range of instruments might seem like it would be challenging to tie together in a cohesive way, but Haley believes he was successful in doing so. “The thing that worked is that I’m just one guy, and I got to produce the entire record,” he said. So that’s the interlocking thing that pulled the album together—there’s just one producer.” Haley, who’s currently in his last semester as an undergrad at the University of Nevada, Reno, worked on the album every week throughout 2014. He did all the engineering, mixing and mastering of the record. “I just wanted to make new music—new, futuristic, synthetic music with lots of genres and people, and not be like, this is this kind of band and we play this kind of music,' and put myself in a box,” he said. “This album is just breaking free of all the constraints and labels.” Ω

ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 19, 2015

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RN&R

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THURSDAY 2/19

FRIDAY 2/20

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Re-No Comedy Showcase, 9pm, $5

Anima Stereo, 9pm, no cover

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover After Mic, 11:30pm, W, no cover

5 STAR SALOON

Karaoke, 10pm, no cover

Dance party w/DJ DoublePlay, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after

Kenneth Rex of Frank Marino’s Divas, 10pm, $5 after 10 p.m.

Open Mic w/Steve Elegant, 7pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke, 10pm, W, no cover

BAR OF AMERICA

Rustlers’ Moon, 8pm, no cover

Thick Newton, 8pm, no cover

Identity Crisis, 8pm, no cover

3RD STREET

132 West St., (775) 329-2878 10042 Donner Pass Rd., Truckee; (530) 587-2626

Mayhem

SATURDAY 2/21

BAR-M-BAR

Feb. 20, 7 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

BRASSERIE ST. JAMES

901 S. Center St., (775) 348-8888

CARGO AT WHITNEY PEAK HOTEL

Hoist the Colors, 8pm, $10-$15

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Band of Lovers, 7pm, no cover

Dan Copeland, 7pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

Comedy

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Geno Bisconte, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Adam Hunter, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

DJ Trivia, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

HIMMEL HAUS

Chaz O’Neill Band, 9:30pm, no cover

The Last Kings, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Nitesong Productions, 9pm, Tu, Open Mic/Ladies Night, 8:30pm, W, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

DJ JuuJ, 10pm, M, no cover Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, W, no cover

Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

Canyon White Open Mic Night, 8pm, no cover Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

HELLFIRE SALOON

Dead Keno Chamber Trio, 8pm, no cover

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 622-8878

Dead Letter Disciple, 8pm, no cover Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Art + Fashion Fusion Show, 6pm, $8

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 1) Showroom 2) Main Bar

Strange on the Range, 7pm, W, no cover

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Steve Treviño, F, 8;30pm, $15-$17; Justin Rupple, Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $14-$16

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Doc’s Holiday, 9pm, no cover

HANGAR BAR

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/23-2/25

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Bob Zany, Chris Brown, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Charles Fleischer, W, 9pm, $25

SUNDAY 2/22

Fit For An Autopsy, Purification By Fire, Awaiting the Apocalypse, Victims of the Cave, Mustakrakish, 7pm, $10-$13

SVC Youth Poetry Slam, 6:30pm, $3-$5 Skate Jam 2015, noon, $10

I The Breather, Exotype, Forevermore, Come The Dawn, Walk Away Alpha, 7:30pm, Tu, $12 2) Blazin Mics!, 10pm, M, no cover

BLACKHAWK AND OUTLAWS S AT U R D AY, M A R C H 7

LOS LONELY BOYS S AT U R D AY, M AY 2

ROCKAPELLA - SINGS THE HITS! Live at Sammy’s Showroom Friday and Saturday Nights!

For show tickets, visit the Box Office, call 855-CEI-SHOW or book online at ticketmaster.com

Visit the Box Office for show age restrictions. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Entertainment subject to change without prior notice. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2015, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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THURSDAY THURSDAY2/19 2/19

FRIDAY FRIDAY2/20 2/20

SATURDAY SATURDAY2/21 2/21

SUNDAY SUNDAY2/22 2/22

THE THEJUNGLE JUNGLE

246246W.W.First FirstSt.,St.,(775) (775)329-4484 329-4484 Mayhem, KNITTING Mayhem,Game GameGenie, Genie,Motorhome, Motorhome, KNITTINGFACTORY FACTORYCONCERT CONCERTHOUSE HOUSE Bluff BluffCaller, Caller,Bad BadCane, Cane,PostWar, PostWar,8pm, 8pm,$7$7

188188California CaliforniaAve., Ave.,(775) (775)322-2480 322-2480

Reno RenoJazz JazzSyndicate, Syndicate,8pm, 8pm,nonocover cover

MIDTOWN MIDTOWNWINE WINEBAR BAR

1527 1527S.S.Virginia VirginiaSt.,St.,(775) (775)323-1377 323-1377

MOODY’S MOODY’SBISTRO BISTROBAR BAR&&BEATS BEATS 10007 10007Bridge BridgeSt.,St.,Truckee; Truckee;(530) (530)587-8688 587-8688

ZPZPRatik, Ratik,Toc TocN’N’Face, Face,Black BlackRock RockCity City Allstars, Allstars,7pm, 7pm,$5$5

Gurbtron, Gurbtron,Kalvin Kalvin&&Clein, Clein,7pm, 7pm,$10 $10

211211N.N.Virginia VirginiaSt.,St.,(775) (775)323-5648 323-5648

THE THELOVING LOVINGCUP CUP

Jack JackDup, Dup,8pm, 8pm,nonocover cover

Whatitdo WhatitdoWednesday, Wednesday,9pm, 9pm,W,W,nonocover cover The TheConey ConeyDogs, Dogs,8pm, 8pm,nonocover cover

Eric EricAnderson Anderson&&Kate KateCotter, Cotter, 7:30pm, 7:30pm,nonocover cover

Tina Tina&&Tammy TammyTam TamTam, Tam, 7:30pm, 7:30pm,W,W,nonocover cover

Therianthrope, Therianthrope,8:30pm, 8:30pm,nonocover cover

Therianthrope, Therianthrope,8:30pm, 8:30pm,nonocover cover

O’SKIS O’SKISPUB PUB&&GRILLE GRILLE

Shamrockit ShamrockitOpen OpenMic MicNight, Night, 6pm, 6pm,nonocover cover

840840Victorian VictorianAve., Ave.,Sparks; Sparks;(775) (775)359-7547 359-7547

PADDY PADDY&&IRENE’S IRENE’SIRISH IRISHPUB PUB POLO POLOLOUNGE LOUNGE

1559 1559S.S.Virginia VirginiaSt.,St.,(775) (775)322-8864 322-8864

Johnny JohnnyLipka’s Lipka’sGemini, Gemini, 9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

Johnny JohnnyLipka’s Lipka’sGemini, Gemini, 9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

PONDEROSA PONDEROSASALOON SALOON

Steel SteelRockin’ Rockin’Karaoke, Karaoke,8pm, 8pm,nonocover cover

Silver SilverWing WingBand, Band,8pm, 8pm,nonocover cover

106106S.S.C CSt.,St.,Virginia VirginiaCity; City;(775) (775)847-7210 847-7210

RUBEN’S RUBEN’SCANTINA CANTINA SHEA’S SHEA’STAVERN TAVERN

Guttermouth, Guttermouth,Counterpunch, Counterpunch, Vampirates, Vampirates,7pm, 7pm,W,W,$12-$15 $12-$15

Blues BluesJam JamThursday, Thursday,7pm, 7pm,nonocover cover

ST. ST.JAMES JAMESINFIRMARY INFIRMARY

Local LocalMusic MusicNight Nightw/local w/localbands bands ororlocal localDJs, DJs,9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

445 445California CaliforniaAve., Ave.,(775) (775)657-8484 657-8484 432432E. E.Fourth FourthSt.,St.,(775) (775)737-9776 737-9776

HipHipHop HopOpen OpenMic, Mic,10pm, 10pm,W,W,nonocover cover

The TheCold ColdHard HardCash CashShow, Show, Josiah JosiahKnight, Knight,Myke MykeRead, Read,7pm, 7pm,$5-$8 $5-$8

715715S.S.Virginia VirginiaSt.,St.,(775) (775)786-4774 786-4774

STUDIO STUDIOON ON4TH 4TH

Dance Danceparty, party,9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

Zen ZenLeprechaun, Leprechaun,Rachmanamiss, Rachmanamiss, 8pm, 8pm,$5$5

7th7thAnnual AnnualOscar OscarParty, Party, 3pm, 3pm,nonocover cover

Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu,Tu, Reno Beer and Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Reno Beer and Record Club w/guest DJs, 9pm, W,W, nono cover Record Club w/guest DJs, 9pm, cover

Far FarEast EastMovement Movement Feb. Feb.21, 21,1010p.m. p.m. Grand GrandSierra SierraResort Resort 2500 E. Second 2500 E. SecondSt. St. 789-2000 789-2000

ONE ONEoz., oz.,8pm, 8pm,$TBA $TBA

WHISKEY WHISKEYDICK’S DICK’SSALOON SALOON

Massive MassiveTuesdays TuesdaysWinter WinterSeries, Series, 10pm, 10pm,Tu,Tu,$5$5

2660 2660Lake LakeTahoe TahoeBlvd., Blvd.,S. S.LkLkTahoe; Tahoe;(530) (530)544-3425 544-3425

WILD WILDRIVER RIVERGRILLE GRILLE

Sunday SundayJazz, Jazz,2pm, 2pm,nonocover cover

1717S.S.Virginia VirginiaSt.,St.,(775) (775)284-7455 284-7455

WILDFLOWER WILDFLOWERVILLAGE VILLAGE

Feb. Feb.20, 20,9 9p.m. p.m. Hard HardRock RockHotel Hotel&&Casino Casino 5050Highway Highway5050 Stateline Stateline (844) (844)588-7625 588-7625

Corky CorkyBennett, Bennett,7pm, 7pm,W,W,nonocover cover

Reggae ReggaeNight, Night,10pm, 10pm,nonocover cover

1483 1483E. E.Fourth FourthSt.,St.,(775) (775)622-9424 622-9424

219219W.W.Second SecondSt.,St.,(775) (775)657-9466 657-9466

The TheStone StoneFoxes Foxes

DJDJRazz, Razz,9pm, 9pm,nonocover cover

906-A 906-AVictorian VictorianAve., Ave.,Sparks; Sparks;(775) (775)358-5484 358-5484

SINGER SINGERSOCIAL SOCIALCLUB CLUB

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY MONDAY-WEDNESDAY2/23-2/25 2/23-2/25 Outspoken: Outspoken:Open OpenMic MicNight, Night, 7pm, 7pm,M,M,nonocover cover

1) 1)The TheWriters’ Writers’Block BlockOpen OpenMic, Mic,

1) 1)Reno RenoMusic MusicProject ProjectOpen OpenMic, Mic, 7pm, 7pm,nonocover cover

4275-4395 4275-4395W.W.Fourth FourthSt.,St.,(775) (775)787-3769 787-3769 7pm, 7pm,nonocover cover 1) 1)Golden GoldenRose RoseCafe Cafe2)2)Green GreenFairy FairyPubPub3)3)Cabaret Cabaret

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

opEns FRidAy at BRÜKA THEATRE

3)3)TexTexWeir, Weir,6:30pm, 6:30pm,nonocover cover

3)3)Red RedDawn, Dawn,Jack JackDiDiCarlo, Carlo, 5pm, 5pm,nonocover cover

1) 1)Comedy ComedyPower PowerHour HourOpen OpenMic, Mic, 8pm, 8pm,Tu,Tu,nonocover cover

Inside

On the Corner of Glendale & Rock

Great Food! Get Brewed! Stop and Try our “Beer Bites” We Brew Our Own

A slAMBAng, Wildly WEsTERnly FARcE

$18 - sTudEnTs/sEnioRs $20 - gEnERAl AdMission $25 - AT THE dooR *ARTisT nigHT $10

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BRÜKA THEATRE 99 n. viRginiA sT. REno 775.323.3221 | www.Brüka.org

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OPINION OPINION | | NEWS NEWS | | GREEN GREEN | | FEATURE FEATURE STORY STORY | | ARTS&CULTURE ARTS&CULTURE | | ININROTATION ROTATION | | ART ARTOFOFTHE THESTATE STATE | | FOODFINDS FOODFINDS | | FILM FILM | | MUSICBEAT MUSICBEAT | | NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS | | THIS THISWEEK WEEK | | MISCELLANY MISCELLANY | | FEBRUARY FEBRUARY19,19,2015 2015 | |

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THURSDAY 2/19

FRIDAY 2/20

SATURDAY 2/21

SUNDAY 2/22

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/23-2/25

2) Cook Book, 8pm, no cover

2) Cook Book, 4pm, no cover Midnight Riders, 10pm, no cover

2) Cook Book, 4pm, no cover Midnight Riders, 10pm, no cover

2) Midnight Riders, 8pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) It’s Only Rock & Roll,

2) It’s Only Rock & Roll, 8pm, no cover

2) It’s Only Rock & Roll, 8pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) G Jones, Sayer, CharlestheFirst, 9pm, $5-$30

1) The Suffers, Drop Theory, 9pm, no cover

1) ALO, T Sisters, 9pm, $22-$25

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) Stadium Bar

1) Madame Houdini, Enchantress of the Elements, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Madame Houdini, Enchantress of the Elements, 8pm, $24.95+ 2) Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Madame Houdini, Enchantress of the Elements, 7pm, 9:30pm, $24.95+ 2) Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Madame Houdini, Enchantress of the Elements, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Steel Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Madame Houdini, Enchantress of the Elements, 8pm, Tu, 7pm, W, $24.95+ 2) Cash Presley, 10:30pm, W, no cover

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

2) Flirt Thursdays, 10pm, $15-$30

2) Jeremiah, 10pm, $25 3) Boots & Daisy Dukes w/DJ Jamie G, 10pm, no cover

2) Far East Movement, 10pm, $25 3) County Social Saturdays w/DJ Jamie G, 10pm, no cover

1) The Stone Foxes, 9pm, $20

1) Dead Sara, 9pm, $20

3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

1) Los Lobos, 7:30pm, $48.40 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

1) Rockapella, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 3) Take Two, 8pm, no cover

1) Rockapella, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 Tassel, 10pm, $29.50 3) Take Two, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover High Noon, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm , 11pm, no cover High Noon, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, 11pm, no cover High Noon, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover

2) Ike & Martin, 7pm, no cover

2) Ike & Martin, 8pm, no cover 3) Fixx Fridays, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm

2) Ike & Martin, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ Spryte, 10pm, $20

2) Everett Coast, 6pm, no cover

ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 7pm, no cover 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) TJ’s Corral

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

ALO Feb. 21, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO RESORT CASINO

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 3) Honky Tonk Thursdays w/DJ Jamie G, 1) Grand Theater 2) Lex Nightclub 3) Sports Book 10pm, no cover 4) Summit Pavilion 5) Silver State Pavilion

HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO

Karaoke Cobra Lounge at Asian Noodles, 1290 E. Plumb Lane, Ste. 1, 828-7227: Cash Karaoke w/Jacques Simard, Sa, 8pm, no cover Murphy’s Law Irish Pub, 180 W. Peckham Lane, Ste. 1070, 823-9977: Steve Starr Karaoke, F, 9pm, no cover

50 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (844) 588-7625 1) Vinyl

1) Rick Hammond Blues Band, 9pm, no cover

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub 3) Center Stage Lounge

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Ste. 103, Sparks, 356-6000: F-Sa, 9pm, no cover

JA NUGGET

West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Celebrity Showroom 2) Rose Ballroom 3) Gilley’s 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL

1) CZ and the Bon Vivants, 9pm, no cover

345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Copa Bar & Grill

SILVER LEGACY

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge

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2) Bonzai Thursdays w/DJ Trivia, 8pm, no cover 3) University of Aura, 9pm, no cover

2) Rebel Yell, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 9pm, no cover 4) Halie O’Ryan Band, 9pm, no cover

1) Craig Ferguson, 8pm, $55.50-$69.50 2) Rebel Yell, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Halie O’Ryan Band, 9pm, no cover

2) Everett Coast, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Blues Jam Wednesday, 7pm, W, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover Country-Rock Bingo w/Jeff Gregg, 9pm, W, no cover


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno weekly PIcks

e a gle s a nd Agr icu ltu re The Carson Valley’s 13th annual celebration of wildlife and ranching explores the interaction between eagles and other raptors as they descend upon the valley’s ranches during calving season. The event is a combined effort of the Carson Valley Chamber of Commerce, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, The Nature Conservancy, Lahonton Audubon Society and local ranchers, and features bird-watching tours, visits to local ranches, a photography contest, workshops, demos and other activities. The festival takes place from Thursday, Feb. 19, through Sunday, Feb. 22, at the Carson Valley Inn, 1627 Highway 395, in Minden and other locations in the Carson Valley. Tickets range from $10 to $75. Call the Carson Valley Chamber at (775) 782-8144 or visit www.carsonvalleynv.org.

WINTER TIME BREWS

e a st Me et s we st The world music concert features harpist Marina Roznitovsky of the University of Nevada, Reno and Chakrapani Singh on his kachappi veena. They will play a unique collaboration of Western and Indian classical music accompanied by Peter Fairley on tabla. The event begins at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 21, at the Laxalt Auditorium in the Warren Nelson Building, 401 W. Second St. Tickets are $5-$30. Call 336-9733 or visit www.tach.info.

Astronomy : Jupiter ’s Mo ons The Astronomical Society of Nevada will discuss Jupiter’s four largest moons: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. These four moons are known as the Galilean Satellites, after the astronomer Galileo, who observed them in 1610. Each moon has unique attributes that will be discussed in detail. The presentation will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 21, inside the Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway, followed by outdoor telescope viewing. Admission is a $5 suggested donation per person. Call 849-4948 or visit www.galenacreekvisitorcenter.org.

Fr e e z e you r P int s Off Under the Rose Brewing Company presents an outdoor winter beer festival with more than 12 local breweries showcasing their strong beers, winter warmers and barrel-aged brews. The beer fest will also include music by DJ MoJo JoJo and three food trucks. Participating breweries include Under the Rose Brewing Company, Great Basin Brewing Company, Brasserie Saint James, The Brewer’s Cabinet, Pigeon Head Brewery, The Brew Brothers, The Brewing Lair, StoneyHead Brewery, High Sierra Brewing Company, BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse, Tahoe Mountain Brewing Co. and The Depot Craft Brewery Distillery. Participating local vendors include Mellow Yellow Food Truck, Electric Blue Elephant Food Truck, Full Belly Deli Food Truck and Hub Coffee Roasters. Proceeds will benefit the Nevada Craft Brewers Association. The event begins at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 21, at Under the Rose, 559 E. Fourth St. Tickets are $46-$65. Call 657-6619 or visit www.undertherosebrewing.com.

Find ing the Fore st: A R e a d ing by Mich a el Bra nch Mike Branch, a professor of literature and environment at the University of Nevada, Reno, will read some of his creative nonfiction from a book in progress. Branch explores the relationship between Tahoe Basin forests and the health of the watershed in the western Great Basin Desert. The free reading begins at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 24, at the W.M. Keck Museum inside the Mackay School of Earth Sciences and Engineering building at UNR, 1664 N. Virginia St. Call 682-6395 or visit http://guides.library.unr.edu/arboretum.

—Kelley Lang

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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FEBRUARY 19, 2015

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Beak experience I recently started dating this new girl. I asked her whether her lips and boobs are real (and it turns out they are). However, I did call her out on having a nose job. She admitted it but seemed kind of upset. It’s the truth. And she’s beautiful, however she got that way. What’s the problem? At least you didn’t hold her up to the light like a hundred-dollar bill to look for the hologram. The fact that you have a thought is not reason enough to let it out to roam the streets, exposing itself to the ladies. At the root of manners is empathy. So before speaking to someone—especially someone you’re dating—ask yourself, “Gee, wonder whether she’ll feel all warm and fuzzy inside when I point to her boobs and ask, ‘Yours or cubic zirconia?’” The reality is people often spin the truth to present themselves in a better light, just as businesses do. Your cable company does not really “value your time,” and unless you’re a wino, I’m pretty sure Miller High Life is not “the Champagne of beers.” However, evolutionary psychology research by William Tooke and Lori Camire finds that men and women tend to fudge their presentation in different ways. Because women evolved to prioritize men with the ability to “provide,” men are far more likely than women to be deceptive about their finances. You don’t see women doing as a male friend of

mine did. He lived in a dumpy apartment and drove an old Nissan that looked like it got used for soccer practice by Godzilla and Mothra, but he had me take a photo of him for his online dating profile in a beautiful neighborhood—in front of some stranger’s Porsche. On the flip side, because men evolved to prioritize physical attractiveness in women—with the features men find beautiful reflecting health and fertility—women are most likely to be deceptive about their looks (those factory installed by the assembly line boss known as Mother Nature). That’s why women are extremely sensitive about a man parsing their appearance—just as men are when a woman sizes up their finances and position. So, for the future, keep in mind that there’s a reason the term is “beauty secrets” and not “beauty announcements.” To reset the balance—so she isn’t insecure about your feelings regarding her appearance—get in the habit of saying something nice about what she’s wearing and if she looks particularly sparkly some night. And do try to maintain perspective on the level of transformation here. She was merely born with a different nose; she wasn’t born “Alan” or “Bruce.” Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   february 19, 2015  |  

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29


N A N I D E V L O V IN

ACCIDENT?

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): There are

many different facets to your intelligence, and each matures at a different rate. So for example, your ability to think symbolically may evolve more slowly than your ability to think abstractly. Your wisdom about why humans act the way they do may ripen more rapidly than your insight into your own emotions. In the coming weeks, I expect one particular aspect of your intelligence to be undergoing a growth spurt: your knowledge of what your body needs and how to give it what it needs.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What is

the proper blend for you these days? Is it something like 51 percent pleasure and 49 percent business? Or would you be wiser to shoot for 49 percent pleasure and 51 percent business? I will leave that decision up to you, Taurus. Whichever way you go, I suggest that you try to interweave business and pleasure as often as possible. You are in one of those action-packed phases when fun dovetails really well with ambition. I’m guessing that you can make productive connections at parties. I’m betting that you can spice up your social life by taking advantage of what comes to you through your work.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 1900, the

world’s most renowned mathematicians met at a conference in Paris. There, the German whiz David Hilbert introduced his master list of 23 unsolved mathematical problems. At the time, no one had done such an exhaustive inventory. His well-defined challenge set the agenda for math research throughout the 20th century. Today he’s regarded as an influential visionary. I’d love to see you come up with a list of your own top unsolved problems, Gemini. You now have extra insight about the catalytic projects you will be smart to work on and play with during the coming years.

Most accidents have

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

“Spanipelagic” is an adjective scientists use to describe creatures that typically hang out in deep water but float up to the surface on rare occasions. The term is not a perfect metaphorical fit for you, since you come up for air more often than that. But you do go through phases when you’re inclined to linger for a long time in the abyss, enjoying the dark mysteries and fathomless emotions. According to my reading of the astrological omens, that’s what you’ve been doing lately. Any day now, however, I expect you’ll be rising up from the Great Down Below and headed topside for an extended stay.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): When faced with a big

decision, you might say you want to “sleep on it.” In other words, you postpone your final determination until you gather more information and ripen your understanding of the pressing issues. And that could indeed involve getting a good night’s sleep. What happens in your dreams may reveal nuances you can’t pry loose with your waking consciousness alone. And even if you don’t recall your dreams, your sleeping mind is busy processing and reworking the possibilities. I recommend that you make liberal use of the “sleep on it” approach in the coming weeks, Leo. Revel in the wisdom that wells up in you as you’re lying down in the dark.

• The other person’s insurance company pays you for pain and suffering after treatment and is usually based on reasonable medical care. DR. JEFF BURRES, D.C. – A former hospital administrator and Palmer Graduate with the Clinical Award for Excellence, Dr. Burres has over 20 years experience.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1962, Edward

Albee published his play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? It won numerous awards and is still performed by modern theater groups. Albee says the title came to him as he was having a beer at a bar in New York City. When he went to the restroom, he spied the words “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” scrawled in soap on the mirror. I urge you to be alert for that kind of inspiration in the coming days, Virgo: unexpected, provocative and out of context. You never know when and where you may be furnished with clues about the next plot twist of your life story.

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instead be provided with a regular stipend? Keep this story in mind, Libra, as you contemplate the benefits or rewards that might become available to you. Ask for what you really need, not necessarily what the giver initially offers.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): To make the

cocktail known as Sex on the Beach, you mix together cranberry juice, orange juice, pineapple juice, peach schnapps and vodka. There is also an alternative “mocktail” called Safe Sex on the Beach. It has the same fruit juices, but no alcohol. Given the likelihood that your inner teenager will be playing an important role in your upcoming adventures, Scorpio, I recommend that you favor the Safe-Sex-on-the-Beach metaphor rather than the Sex-on-the-Beach approach. At least temporarily, it’s best to show a bit of protective restraint toward the wild and sometimes erratic juvenile energy that’s pushing to be expressed.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

In Herman Melville’s short story “Bartleby, the Scrivener,” a lawyer hires a man named Bartleby to work in his office. At first Bartleby is a model employee, carrying out his assignments with dogged skill. But one day everything begins to change. Whenever his boss instructs him to do a specific task, Bartleby says, “I would prefer not to.” As the days go by, he does less and less, until finally he stops altogether. I’d like to propose, Sagittarius, that you take inspiration from his slowdown. Haven’t you done enough for now? Haven’t you been exemplary in your commitment to the daily struggle? Don’t you deserve a break in the action so you can recharge your psychospiritual batteries? I say yes. Maybe you will consider making this your battle cry: “I would prefer not to.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “All

life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.” That’s what American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson advised. Even if you’re not naturally inclined to see the potential wisdom of that approach, I invite you to play around with it for the next three weeks. You don’t need to do it forever. It doesn’t have to become a permanent fixture in your philosophy. Just for now, experiment with the possibility that trying lots of experiments will lead you not just to new truths, but to new truths that are fun, interesting and useful.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The art

of the French Aquarian painter Armand Guillaumin (1841-1927) appears in prestigious museums. He isn’t as famous as his fellow impressionists Paul Cézanne and Camille Pissarro, but he wielded a big influence on them both. His career developed slowly because he had to work a day job to earn a living. When he was 50 years old, he won a wad of free money in the national lottery, and thereafter devoted himself full-time to painting. I’m not saying you will enjoy a windfall like that anytime soon, Aquarius, but such an event is possible. At the very least, your income could rise. Your odds of experiencing financial luck will increase to the degree that you work to improve the best gifts you have to offer your fellow humans.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “It isn’t nor-

mal to know what we want,” said pioneering psychologist Abraham Maslow. “It is a rare and difficult psychological achievement.” That’s the bad news, Pisces. The good news is that you may be on the verge of rendering that theory irrelevant. In the coming weeks, you will be better primed to discover what you really want than you have been in a long time. I suggest you do a ritual in which you vow to unmask this treasured secret. Write a formal statement in which you declare your intention to achieve full understanding of the reasons you are alive on this planet.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Edward III, a

medieval English king, had a favorite poet: Geoffrey Chaucer. In 1374, the king promised Chaucer a big gift in appreciation for his talents: a gallon of wine every day for the rest of his life. That’s not the endowment I would have wanted if I had been Chaucer. I’d never get any work done if I were quaffing 16 glasses of wine every 24 hours. Couldn’t I

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by D. Brian Burghart PHOTO/D. Brian BurgHarT

Heart attack Billy Howard It’s probably not a rare thing when the national Humane Society calls to tell a reporter about a local activist, but maybe it’s more unusual when their call is informative. That was the case with a call about Billy Howard. He turned out to be an activist force of nature, and he has received national recognition for his Northern Nevada efforts to help animals.

How did you get involved in the puppy mill thing? I do a lot of advocacy, and I have a number of initiatives going. You guys have written about my proposal to end the sale and distribution of foie gras. I’ve been working on that for the last year, organizing the community on it. I’m also looking at trying to end animal testing in the area in laboratories. I also have founded Reno’s vegan group, and I’m the former chair of the Green Party in Nevada. Lots of other things.

So you are busy! It’s always important, wherever I am, to get very, very, very involved. I was the chair of my neighborhood advisory board, which was an appointment by the City Council ... and there’s more. But I’ll just leave it at that just now.

I called because of the press release from the Humane Society, and I was wondering whether you had any input on that pet shop on Virginia Street closing.

You asked me how I got involved. Well, I’ve been a vegan for 40 years of my life. I’ve been aware of a lot of animal cruelty situations for many decades, one of which is the puppy mill situation. For decades we all felt that there was just nothing we could do. We were facing the USDA [U.S. Department of Agriculture], and they were facing us down, and there just wasn’t anything we could do. Very interestingly, in South Lake Tahoe, they passed the second [local ordinance] to end the sale of cats and dogs in retail stores in the country back in 2009, and that was the one that catalyzed the entire country to do this locally on a grassroots level. And now 74 cities and counties throughout North America have passed this ban, and many, many are on the table at the moment, just like they are here in Washoe County and Carson City. ... I called around to the local organizations, and asked, “OK, what are you doing? I want to help.” And everyone said, “We’re not doing anything, but we’d really be behind it if someone were.” So the writing was on the wall and on 7-112013, I began PuppyMillFreeReno. [Visit at puppymillfreereno.com.]

Below the surface The recent murders of those three gleaming Muslim students in North Carolina gives us another lesson in the pitfalls of generalizations, stereotypes, and assumptions. Once again, we see how wrong and worthless it all can be. Like many, I leapt to snap judgments about accused gunman Craig Hicks as soon as I saw his photos. “Brute. Cracker. Gun nut. Moron. Spends four hours a day playing video games. Four hours a day watching Fox News.” Leading to “Parking dispute?” Right. Total Musliphobe. Guilty. Then, my predictable knee jerk jive was assaulted by actual information. How thoughtlessly inconvenient! Tidbits of data that quickly incinerated my horribly inaccurate insta-calls. For starters, it was plain that Hicks didn’t hate Muslims; he hates all the Abrahamic religions. “Of course I want religion to go away. I don’t deny your right to believe whatever you like; but I have the right to point out it’s ignorant and dangerous for as long as your baseless superstitions keep killing people. Antitheism: the conscientious objection to OPINION

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I’ve done a tremendous amount of outreach to the community. I had a week and a half-long event at the university, which we called Puppymill Awareness Week, which we had sponsorship with the university on—the student union and the psychology department. I had two speaking engagements, and I had a booth that got 600 signatures over the course of a single day. [It’s over 13,300 now.] We had a huge rally where we had seven speakers on animal activism come and speak to large crowds on compassion in our community, and how when we look toward treating animals with the respect and dignity that they deserve, how that might make all of us treat each other that much better. [Also two of three of Reno’s puppy-sales stores have shut down.]

Now Through April 26th

Have you found that to be true? It’s my last-ditch effort. I’ve worked in human rights and animal rights since I was a kid. My mom got me engaged back in the late ’60s when Ronald Reagan was releasing the mentally ill into the community, without a safety net in many cases, and she took me to Sacramento, and we stood on the steps protesting Ronald Reagan when I was 10 years old. It hasn’t stopped since. I have my mom to thank for my compassion and my passion. To say whether we know for sure whether that’s true or not, I don’t know, but if we have a heart for the most helpless and the most voiceless of all on this planet—and the animals deserve that at the very least—I think it will change our hearts toward each other. The problem is we don’t have much time to lose. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye But, yes, this messy murder thing. It appears undeniable that this complex man also possessed a helluva temper. The guy was running hot. A neighbor reported that “every time I saw him in the parking lot, there was anger. He was very angry all the time.” Yes, there were moments he was fine, thoughtful and reasonable. He posted at many of those times. And there were moments when Craig Hicks … seethed. Remember that 1993 flick called Falling Down, the one where Michael Douglas flips out and goes postal? When all is said and done, when all the qualified and unqualified analysis is in and accounted for, I won’t be a bit surprised if this enraged man, beat down by years of schlubby mediocrity in this hard, hard world, just simply ... snapped. He lost it. And just like that, three people lost their lives, and Hicks threw his away. Ω

religion.” Far from the raging fundamentalist Christian I had assumed, he posted the following on December 25th. “Happy Pagan Holiday all, and Merry Christmas to those that worship the supposed son of the creator on a day in which he wasn’t born!” Hicks was a fervent advocate on behalf of LGBT and women’s rights, often commenting on their oppression in a nation ruled by stuffy patriarchs. “You say sexuality is a choice? At what point did you choose to be straight?” “We live in a society that teaches women to be careful not to get raped instead of teaching men not to rape.” When it came to Native Americans, Hicks was well aware of their pain. “Thanksgiving is a time to remember all that we have ... and the genocide it took to get it.” Another cause he often supported was kindness to animals, liking various animal welfare websites, including one to rescue pit bulls that had been trained as fighting dogs. Hell, at this point, I was ready to send a check to the guy’s congressional campaign fund! |

And what have you accomplished here?

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