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Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor.............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 12 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 19

Foodfinds..................... 22 Film...............................26 Musicbeat.....................27 Nightclubs/Casinos....... 28 This.Week.................... 33 Advice.Goddess............35 Free.Will.Astrology....... 38 15.Minutes.....................39 Bruce.Van.Dyke............39

Three

to the Rescue See Left Foot Forward, page 6.

UnedUcated kidS make great wage SLaveS See news, page 8.

AnimAl PlAneT See arts&culture, page 16.

ea k its en er al’s o ff ic e br g ey rn to at e th d d? W hy di as ho e sc ho o l bo ar W e th l ai n to s le o W n ru

WaR is GReat See Film, page 26.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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VolumE

20,

issuE

36

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octobER

23–29,

2014


ITALIAN IS GRAND.

FRIDAY, OCT. 24

SATURDAY, OCT. 25

SATURDAY, OCT. 25

GLORI TREVI 11/1 • JEFF TRACTA 11/15 • VIETNAMESE THANKSGIVING CONCERT 11/29 • PHILLIP PHILLIPS 12/3

VOTED BEST HOTEL IN RENO (775) 789-2000 • GrandSierraResort.com • 2 

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RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 23, 2014


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

Ebolanoia

Freedom of effin’ speech

the policy.

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. For a minute there, it seemed like Ebolanoia was going to take over the news for a very long time. It’s pretty obvious to me that those news commentators have only the lightest grounding in science fiction. Their worst-case scenarios didn’t even begin to approach the dystopic visions that jump into my head. First was “U.S. government moves into its ultimate plans to subjugate the people.” Think travel restrictions, quarantines and medical care rationing. Free travel is a hallmark of any free society, but to contain the spread of the disease, there would be random checkpoints to take temperatures. Then people on the enemies list or with fevers would be contained in climatecontrolled stockades to guarantee contact among the sick and subversive. It will only take a few thousands of active cases to overwhelm the U.S. medical system, so only those 1 percenters will get help, and that, we also know, is the key to increasing the odds of survival. The other sci-fi dystopian scenario is the death of half of all humans on the planet. Think a bit of unemployment is a bitch? Wait until everything that needs to be done can’t get done because there’s no one to do it. Whatever government or military force arises would enslave the rest— children, aging—to do the jobs that used to be done by masses yearning to be free. I can see the movie now: Young couple in love, trapped by overlords who choose families based on eugenics (after having their sexual ways with the youthful). Against all odds, they escape the Ebola-free archology, only to discover the “Outside” has become an Eden because global warming has been solved with the death of half of mankind and the collapse of the “free enterprise” society. Everything is there for the taking. They just move into an empty house on a defensible hill in Verdi. They even adopt a dog, which they name Bentley. But their paradise is only an illusion because they’re not alone, and marauding bands wander the Outside. But all the marauders have one thing in common: They’ve already survived Ebola.

Re “Profanity fails” (Letters to the Editor, Oct. 9): I just have to respond to your response to my recent letter commenting on Fred Speckmann’s maybe less than mature complaint about the F-word in the RN&R. I agree wholeheartedly with you that some with ulterior motives of restricting our rights will portray themselves as “protecting the children” or as only concerned with “how something is said,” but not everyone who complains about the place of profanity in newsprint is necessarily attempting to assail our free speech rights. And yes, I am well aware of such rights issues, and yes, partly because of my long association with reggae music, but not because of your notion that reggae has been attacked by censors because of what you called its “promotion of drugs,” which in reggae’s case refers only to its abashed support for cannabis in its many forms and uses, some of which you advertise and write about in the RN&R. In fact, it’s even being legalized here in the US to some extent, and its legalization is being seriously considered in Jamaica these days too. To use the broad term “drugs” for that particular herb perpetuates an untrue myth about reggae that does it a disservice. Off the top of my head I can’t think of a single reggae song singing the praises of any other type of substance, except a few vintage tunes about Jamaican rum perhaps (OK, I’ll give you “Red Red Wine), although such examples abound in pop and rock. And none of those, rock or reggae, have been subjected to much censorship on the airwaves. Although we all know that attacks on free speech and other rights do occur, it’s still OK to express a legitimate opinion about a policy of profanity in print without being assumed to be a rights assailant or somehow unaware of larger rights issues. Do you make room for such language in the RN&R just to keep the rights envelope expanded, which would be one good reason, or do you truly believe profanity is that often the best way to express or emphasize a point in writing, despite being offensive to some. I am curious, as are other readers, about your reasons for

T. Alan Moore Reno Editor’s note: I’m glad you responded, Tracy “Too Dred.” Back in pre-internet days, we rarely had conversations on the letters page. Pop music is censored every single day for language and concepts management disapproves of. The point of my response was not to say it was in any way OK to censor reggae, but just as a reference point that I knew you’d have knowledge of. Anyway, yes, we occasionally use profanity for both the reasons you mentioned, but primarily we use it because we know certain words have artistic or emotional connotations attached. Bottom line, we use it when we want to. That’s why they call it “freedom” of speech.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Touched by an angel Re “Tower of Power” (Notes from the Neon Babylon, Oct. 9): Thanks for the heads up. So some soul escaping from Africa passes through an airport, chalks up the sweating and headache to the flight across the pond from the old country cooped up in a stuffy cabin with a screaming toddler or two, and hangs onto the escalator rail for the ride down to the baggage claim. Everybody else who touches that rail, and then their nose, eyes, mouth in the next couple of hours could continue to spread the joy around freely. Just sayin’ it doesn’t look good for the home team. Your note about the transmission through touching common public surfaces is really crucial. Rick Woods Sparks

Support for the Education Initiative We’ve all heard the crying, “It’s not fair,” from opponents of the Education Initiative, primarily major corporations. They’ve done it before—in 2000 over the proposed net profits tax, in 2003 over Gov. Guinn’s gross receipts tax, and today over the Education Initiative’s tax.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Staff writer Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Woody Barlettani, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Eric Marks, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Design Melissa Bernard, Brad Coates, Kyle Shine Advertising Consultants Joseph “Joey” Davis, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage, Jessica Wilson Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office Manager/Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

—D. Brian Burghart

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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The opposition’s study by Applied Analysis shows that the proposed margin tax is equivalent to 0.56 percent of gross revenue; this is after considering deductions and credits. It is absolutely not true that the tax is “2 percent of gross revenue,” as the opposition claims on its website, on its videos, and during its debates. This is what they cry about. But they are crying over their own falsehoods. No business would need to pay 2 percent of its gross revenue. On average, businesses would pay 0.56 percent of gross revenues. With $1 million in revenue, a business would pay a $5,600 tax—a small tax. As a teacher, I recognize the importance of quality education. And I listen to the concerns of students who recognize that their education is insufficiently funded. Nevada voters, don’t listen to corporate crying. Take action to support K-12 students. Vote “Yes” on Question 3. Ellen Pillard Reno

What’s in a name? Re “Go ask Alice” (Editor’s note, Oct. 9): You named a dog Alice? That’s a person’s name. Charlie is too, of course, but is known to be more of a silly name, so OK for pet use. But Alice? Here’s a remedial quiz to test your knowledge of the difference between people and pets. 1. How many legs do children have? a) 4 b) 2 c) 6 d) 8 2. How many arms do dogs and cats have? a) 4 b) 2 c) 0 d) all of the above 3. You could name a dog “Shit Face,” and it wouldn’t care. True False 4. Pets are to children as: a) Apples are to oranges b) Rocks are to shells c) Chairs are to trains

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Anthony Clarke Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Steve Finlayson, Debbi Frenzi, Vicky Jewell, Joe Medeiros, Ron Neill, Christian Shearer, Marty Troye, Warren Tucker, Gary White, Joseph White, Margaret Underwood General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

d) Music is to scissors 5. A dog is a a) Domesticated bovine b) Primate c) Domesticated canine d) Tuna 6. Essay question A whiny child and a whiny dog are in a burning building, which do you save first, and why? April Pedersen Reno Editor’s note: I hate to break it to you, but we had a Brittany named April, too, which is not a person’s name, but a month’s. If you don’t believe me, you can ask my sister, Spot.

Low Highton Re “Age of Empire” (Feature story, Oct. 9): Is there not enough hate in the world that the article “Age of Empire” was published? I found the inaccurate diatribe against Israel to be especially vulgar. Jake Highton has spewed his vitriol on the Reno area since I moved here in 1999. He exemplifies the opinion that extreme liberalism is a mental disorder. Many leaders and agencies in our country are deluded and dangerous. Yet we the people do little to ask our elected leaders to enforce our voting desires. By acquiescence, you and I are responsible for the pathetic state of America in the world community. However, Israel? Excuse me, but that beleaguered country is a shining beacon of political correctness and liberal Western values. How Mr. Highton’s bigoted hate speech can be considered worthy of prime-time RN&R ink is truly a head-shaker. Emeritus or no, he is a sad, old, pathetic hater. Marsha Schiffman Reno

Correction Re “Fish out of water” (Green, Sept. 11): Scott Tyler was incorrectly identified Scott Taylor. We apologize for any misunderstandings or confusion our error may have caused.

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Sweetdeals Coordinator Alicia Brimhall Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalinn Jenkins 405 Marsh Ave., Third Floor Reno, NV 89509 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds to classifieds@newsreview.com

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MISCELLANY

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Brian Breneman

OCTOBER 23, 2014

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1

10/3/14

4:43 PM

Spooky Weekend

...................................................................................................

October 31, 2014 3:00 p.m - 7:00 p.m. on the Midway

Bring the whole family!

Free admission!

Free candy, treats, and child I.D. Free entertainment! Check out Caravan live on the Midway stage.

Non-perishable food items will be accepted to benefit the Food Bank of Northern Nevada.

www.fbnn.org

...................................................................................................

:SV[;V\YUHTLU[ November 1, 2014

WCSD Board of Trustees Legal Posting for Naming New Trustee The Washoe County School District Board of Trustees is inviting interested members of the community to apply for the seat being vacated by Trustee Dave Aiazzi. To apply, individuals must submit the following: Letter of intent; Resume or Curriculum Vitae; and a response to the following questions: 1. Why are you interested in serving on the WCSD Board of Trustees? 2. What experience, interests, training or other skills do you feel you would bring to the WCSD Board of Trustees? 3. What do you feel are the major challenges facing public education in Washoe County? 4. What do you believe are WCSD's strengths and weaknesses, and how do you believe WCSD could be improved? 5. What is the role of a WCSD Trustee? To be considered to fill the vacancy, the individual must be a qualified elector/eligible to vote and must meet the qualifications of residence within Washoe County, School Trustee District E, which is located in the northwest part of Reno. The Board of Trustees intend to review the applications at their Regular Meeting on October 28, 2014, and discuss the process and proposed timeline. For a map of School Trustee District E or for additional information, see the District’s website at www.washoeschools.net or contact the Office of the General Counsel at 775-348-0300. Applications may be submitted by email at Legal@washoeschools.net, or by mail at WCSD Office of the General Counsel, PO Box 30425, Reno, NV 89520-3425, or by th hand delivery at 425 East 9 Street, Reno, NV 89512. The abovereferenced information must be received by the District not later than Monday, October 27 at 5 p.m.

“My hamster had hives.” Votes count. Excuses don’t.

Noon - 6:00 p.m. at the One Club Complete details are available at the One Club. Must be 21 or older and a One Club member. Subject to NRS 463.362. Management reserves all rights. Circus Circus Hotel and Casino endorses responsible gaming. If you or someone you know has a problem gaming responsibly, please call the 24-hour Problem Gamblers HelpLine at 800.522.4700.

LearnMore@ www.WashoeCounty.US/Voters

775.329.0711 4 

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RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 23, 2014

CIRCUSRENO.COM

Recycle this paper

16013 RNR Trick or Treat ad 4.9x11.5 10-17-13.pdf

#BigVoteLittleExcuse


by Marina Palmieri

ThIS Modern World

by tom tomorrow

Did you ever trick someone for Halloween? Asked at Spirit Halloween, 4811 Keitzke Lane Melissa House Salesperson

Yes, a few years back I dressed up as a man—beard, a wig, pillows, the whole thing. I went into my husband’s work at O’Reilly Auto Parts and asked him for help. He helped me the whole time and had no idea it was me.

Roland Blais IT worker

When I was younger I use to volunteer at haunted houses. They would dress me up like a mannequin with blood all over me. I would just lie there, and when people got close enough, I would jump up and scare them.

Dianne Antonitch Salesperson

Just say yes Every election, the Reno News & Review makes recommendations for voters who are too lazy to do the minimum of research for themselves. We base our recommendations on our own coverage, other media reports, and in some cases, information the candidates submit to be included on our voters page. We don’t endorse in every race, primarily either because the candidates are equally good or equally bad. In some cases, like the sheriff’s race, the candidates are equally good but have completely different approaches. Question 1: Shall Nevada create a Court of Appeals that would decide appeals of District Court decisions in certain civil and criminal cases? Yes on Question 1. Question 2: Shall the Nevada Constitution be amended to remove the cap on mining industry taxes, a benefit enjoyed by no other industry? Yes on Question 2. Question 3: Shall the Nevada Revised Statutes be amended to create a 2 percent tax on a margin of the gross revenue of entities doing business in Nevada whose total revenue for any taxable year exceeds $1 million, the money going into the state Distributive School Account to be apportioned among Nevada’s school districts and charter schools? Yes on Question 3. U.S. House of Representatives, District 2, Kristen Spees. Governor: David Gibson, the Green candidate, was kept off the ballot because of Nevada’s exclusionary and anti-democracy election laws. We’re not going to change the laws, and we’re pretty sure we know who’ll

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ARTS&CULTURE

No, but I have been tricked. They pretended to crash my car. They told me it was totaled. When I got home it wasn’t actually totalled, it was just painted to look like it was. Thank goodness it wasn’t.

win, so we’re recommending a protest vote in the race for governor. Vote for None of these candidates. Lieutenant Governor, Lucy Flores; Secretary of State, Kate Marshall; State Treasurer, Kim Wallin; State Controller, Andrew Martin; Attorney General, Ross Miller. State Senate District 13, Debbie Smith; State Senate District 14, Joe Hunt; State Senate District 16, Ben Kieckhefer. State Assembly District 25, Pat Hickey; State Assembly District 26, Randy Kirner; State Assembly District 27, Teresa Benitez-Thompson; State Assembly District 30, Michael Sprinkle; State Assembly District 31, Richard “Skip” Daly; State Assembly District 32, John

Liam Price Salesperson

Yes, a couple of times. When people are over trying on masks, a lot of times they take pictures so I’ll put on a full mask and stand in the back of their picture. When they look at the picture, they see me but when they look back they don’t see me. I do it a few times. It is probably my favorite one.

Sharp Sampaga.

County Commission District 2, Terri Thomas; County Commission District 3, Kitty Jung. District Court Judge-Department 5, Family Court, Cynthia Lu; District Court Judge-Department 6, Lynne Simons; District Court Judge-Department 8, Lidia S. Stiglich; District Court Judge-Department 11, Family Court, Chuck Weller; District Court Judge-Department 14, Family Court, John P. Springgate. School Board Trustee-District C, Barbara Clark; School Board Trustee-District F, Veronica Frenkel. City of Reno Mayor, Hillary Schieve; City of Reno Council, Ward 2, Elisa Cafferata; City of Reno Council, Ward 4, Paul McKenzie. Justice of the Peace, Sparks, Department 1, Chet Adams. Ω

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Jeff Bentley Salesperson

I know I have been involved in some trickery in my day, but I can’t think of any at the moment.

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MISCELLANY

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OCTOBER 23, 2014

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Lift Nevada out of the darkness After a while, you just get exhausted from the lies. Each time I see another overthe-top opposition piece by the big business coalition organized against the Education Initiative, I want to shout: “Stop lying to me!” While purporting to be the defender by of small business, the Coalition Sheila Leslie is funded by transnational megacorporations including big gaming, big mining, and big retail, all of whom have contributed megabucks to the eternal cause of keeping their corporate taxes in Nevada low. Or more precisely stated, non-existent. They’ve rarely had to publicly defend themselves, preferring to use their influence with state politicians behind closed doors to ensure every effort to broaden the tax base and stabilize the state’s revenue fails. Cynics believe they want to keep our workforce poorly educated, a source of cheap labor. I think it’s more about sheer greed. They want to avoid contributing their fair share as long as they possibly can.

6   |  RN&R   | 

OCTOBER 23, 2014

The other day, I was chatting with a local small-business owner as we waited in line at the bank, and he told me he was leery of “that margins tax.” He hopes to gross over a million dollars this year in his retail business and said the 2 percent tax would hit him hard. I asked him which of the three deductions he intended to take, and he looked at me blankly and admitted he didn’t know much about them. I reminded him he has a choice of deductions to reduce his tax obligation: 30 percent of revenue, the cost of his employees, or the cost of goods sold. In Texas, a state with a similar margins tax and a thriving economy, most businesses are deducting the cost of goods sold, at an average rate of 83 percent, meaning they only pay the tax on the ‘margin,’ the remaining 17 percent of their revenue. He said he’d do the math and look at it again because he knows, with a new baby to constantly remind him, Nevada needs to increase its funding of education.

That leads to another lie the opponents of Question 3 are spreading, namely that the millions raised by the corporate tax won’t necessarily fund education. Question 3 requires the money raised to be deposited in the Distributive School Account (DSA), the budget mechanism used to exclusively fund K-12 education. Opponents claim the Legislature could then reduce the general fund dollars it allocates to the DSA, replacing them with the margins tax revenue, for no net increase. While this is possible, it’s extremely unlikely due to bi-partisan support for more education funding to pull Nevada out of last place. Opponents of Question 3 are also using their TV ads to scare Nevadans into believing they will lose their jobs if Question 3 passes, based on several studies that predict job loss—studies they paid for. Yet, in an independent review, the Reno Gazette-Journal found that

there is likely to be a net job gain after implementation. Seems the big business-funded studies did not calculate the jobs that will be created by the new revenue. And now we have the governor promising to “fix” the tax system in 2015. No details, of course. When asked if he envisions new taxes, he was coy: “You’ll find out.” Sandoval has also been warning his attention to revenue will come at a price, namely reforms like charter schools and vouchers, tired efforts to weaken public education that have been rejected by Democratic majorities in the Legislature for many years. So it’s on your shoulders, voters. Don’t be fooled by the lies and the exaggerated doomsday predictions from the big businesses whose motive is to avoid paying a corporate tax they pay in 47 other states. Vote yes on Question 3 and lift Nevada out of the darkness. Ω

Want to see why corporations prefer uneducated Nevadans? This is from the Bureau of Labor Statistics: http:// www.bls.gov/emp/ ep_chart_001.htm.


To vote or not to vote Early voting will have begun when you read this. The voter turnout in Nevada is expected to be dismal. People are realizing the most we can expect of government is that it doesn’t mess up too much, and it confines itself to only a modest amount of corruption. by Brendan I endorse the handful of Trainor libertarians and conservatives who can be relied on to hold the line on government growth and even propose new solutions now and then. James Settelmeyer (R, Senate 17, unchallenged), Jim Wheeler (R, Assembly 39), Don Gustavson (R, Senate 14), Ira Hansen (R, Assembly 32), and others are needed in office for their Northern Nevada point of view. Jill Dickman (R, Assembly 31) and Jeanne Herman (County Commission 5) can be powerful feminine voices for liberty. Apologies to any left out. Libertarian and IAP candidates: I wish you could win!

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

We need Pat Hickey (R, Assembly 25), whose leadership helped push the Republican needle to favor the new medical marijuana distribution system. The social issues are gone from the Nevada Republican Platform, but they will come up in the 2015 Legislature. Now that the Ninth Circuit has ruled that the Nevada Constitution’s definition of marriage as only between a man and woman is itself unconstitutional, there will have to be action to repeal it. The culture wars are over. Conservatives are beginning to understand that. They can do the most good by protecting religious minorities against liberal backlash. We need a better definition of what constitutes a public accommodation. Is the refusal of a Christian baker to create a wedding cake that features two grooms a violation of anyone’s rights? We have two tax proposals and one proposal for a new Nevada Appeals Court on the ballot. I oppose both new taxes. We

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need to get away from single industry taxes, but that does not mean we need a new broad-based tax in Nevada either. If public education is such a wonderful idea, why do we need to use the power of the state to finance it? Public education is the only business that complains about too many customers. Why not try more market-oriented approaches instead? Perhaps the education establishment will put a school choice initiative on the ballot in 2016! Well, the Soviet Union collapsed overnight, didn’t it? Mining is one of the best employers in the state, and the high income jobs it produces are vital for rural Nevada. Besides, why go after this tax once again when the entire issue of the federal public lands is being debated? The margin tax is a terrible idea. Proponents of the new tax, as always, say that it will “not be so bad” and even if the arguments of the opponents can seem a tad apocalyptic, it will negatively impact

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many small and medium businesses and stunt our economic recovery. Nevada taxes employments, now we want to go after gross income as well. What next, a stamp tax on all documents? The issue of a new Appeals Court is back again. The people have rejected five such proposals before. Judges say the Supreme Court is overworked, and justice suffers. They promise us that they will work out of abandoned offices and sleep on cots to keep the costs down. I am not convinced of that, but there can be other ways of alleviating the burdens. Perhaps the Legislature could appoint more judges. Maybe, just maybe, the Legislature could reduce the burdens on our justice system by repealing a bunch of unnecessary laws and allowing for more private conflict resolutions. One can dream. Ω

THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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OCTOBER 23, 2014

Have you looked at the Reno News & Review’s voter guide? www. newsreview.com/reno/ northern-nevadaelections

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Photo/Dennis Myers

Belinda Martinez at her  Sparks child care business.

Martinez deposed in safety case A trial date in four months has been set in a lawsuit against Washoe schools superintendent Pedro Martinez. The suit by Elkhorn Consulting names Martinez and the school district as defendants for interfering with contract rights. It will be heard in Nevada District Judge Connie Steinheimer’s courtroom unless a motion for summary dismissal succeeds. One such motion has already been denied. Elkhorn’s suit claims that in the midst of contracted school safety projects, Martinez directed several contractors on the project to “immediately cease their contractual relationship” with Elkhorn. The suit says Martinez knew contracts were in place and that his action was “intended to do harm” to the company and did cost immediate losses of $100,000 and possible forthcoming business. Martinez and school district capital projects director Mark Stanton were deposed in the case on Sept. 16. Elkhorn originally received contracts for work at all Washoe middle schools, plus Lemmon Valley, Mt. Rose, Booth, Corbett, Elmcrest and Hunter Lake elementary schools.

Shootist II A sequel to The Shootist, the John Wayne movie filmed in Carson City, might seem unlikely since the title character played by Wayne died at the end of the story. But the son of the author of the book on which the movie was based has written a sequel, anyway. The 1975 novel of the same name by Glendon Swarthout was basis for Wayne’s last movie. It told a tale of an aging and terminally ill gunfighter, John Bernard Books, who travels to Carson City to consult a doctor and end his days. In the case of The Shootist, the screenplay was written by Scott Hale and Miles Hood Swarthout, the author’s son, who has now published The Last Shootist. SPANISH SHOOTIST POSTER This portrays Gillom Rogers, a boy who idealized Books, as taking Books’ guns off his body and planning a career of his own as a gunfighter: “He now possessed J.B. Books’s matched Remingtons! Gillom Rogers slowed his walk, wondering where he would get a double-holster rig to house these legendary nickel-plated Remington .44s. Or should he have a silk vest made like Books’s, with leather holster pockets sewn on either side of the chest, angled forty-five degrees inward for a crosshanded draw? Too late to get J.B.’s.” Rogers, portrayed in the Wayne movie by Ron Howard, then follows a predictable path of spurning his mother’s college plans for him, getting into gunfights, meeting a beautiful dancer in Arizona, maturing under the influence of a good woman, and reconsidering his career choice. The elder Swarthout’s short stories and novels were the source of at least four other movies—7th Cavalry, They Came To Cordura, Bless the Beasts and Children, Where the Boys Are. His son has written several screenplays, including the 1978 teleplay of his father’s story, “A Christmas Gift AKA The Melodeon” (filmed as A Christmas to Remember starring Eva Marie Saint and Jason Robards).

—Dennis Myers

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OCTOBER 16, 2014

Money talks A once-popular ballot measure is now in doubt Tim Healion became one of downtown Reno’s better known business owners during the years that his by well-remembered Deux Gro Nez Dennis Myers coffeehouse operated on California Avenue. Now he manages another restaurant, this one in Midtown, and he is founder of Reno’s Tour de Nez race. These days, he has taken on another role, too. He’s been speaking up for ballot Question 3, which would create a 2 percent tax on business revenue in excess of $1 million.

“Nevada law lets the legislature divert education funds to other uses.” Question 3 opposing ballot argument Ballot Question 3, and other ballot measures, can be read at http:// nvsos.gov/index. aspx?page=1309.

“It’s an opportunity to invest in education,” Healion said. “That’s what this tax is about. And with the state being at the very bottom in per-pupil spending, I think that’s a good idea. My daughter’s in public education. You know, we get—as a businessperson—we get five calls a week over different charities and different opportunities for us to donate money to stuff. So here’s an opportunity to donate to education. It’s another way to look at it. And get the calculator out. If it’s not 2 percent of your gross, don’t worry.”

After the better part of two decades working for child care centers, Belinda Martinez went out on her own about six months ago, opening Itsy Bitsy Learning Center in Sparks. “I have a capacity for 80 children, and I have 40, so I have half my capacity, and I love this.” As a new business owner working toward a larger customer base, it might be thought that she would not invite any more expenses. But she does. She is backing Ballot Question 3. “I’m supporting Question 3 because I really think education is the key to success. It worked for me when I was younger and I have my own business now.” She said as a mother she has an up-close view of local schools. “I have two kids in Washoe County, and I see the classrooms. They don’t have enough materials. The teachers have so many kids. I think education needs more money.” Alex Sabogal is a partner in Credo Computers. He said he considers Question 3 an investment: “We as small-business owners are helping students on tight budgets, donating computers, supporting whoever wants to learn, and we welcome people into our business daily to try to teach the skills, attitude, ethics and integrity that are so important. … Better

student performance attracts businesses, better education is better income for households, better education means better health.” Given how many businesspeople—particularly owners of small businesses who hope to grow into the million-dollar bracket—are supporting Question 3, it’s surprising how little communication there has been between the two sides. The measure is sponsored by the Nevada State Education Association, a teachers group. It is being opposed by business groups such as chambers of commerce and the Nevada Taxpayers Association. But the teachers have not engaged in a very vigorous program of trying to convert business owners—who would be the most effective supporters in campaign commercials—leaving business outreach to an allied volunteer organization, the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada. Opponents have engaged in very little dialogue with the teachers. When town meeting-style presentations were put together for business groups on the measure earlier this year, they did not include supporters of the proposal. Carole Vilardo of the Nevada Taxpayers Association said there was no interest in hearing from the other side, that leaders of the opposition effort were solidly opposed to the measure.

Money talks Question 3 seeks to raise about $700 million a year for schools and dollars have had enormous impact on the race. The Coalition to Defeat the Margin Tax Initiative raised over $4 million this year. Most of that money has gone to a heavy schedule of anti-3 television ads, outspending opponents more than two-to-one. Almost exactly one year ago in a Harstad Strategic Research survey, supporters of the measure led by a margin of 57 to 38 percent. Money turned that around. Today, under the pounding of the television campaign, a Survey USA survey commissioned by the Las Vegas Review-Journal showed it losing 40-37, with nearly a fourth undecided. Supporters have raised less than a million dollars, though they have exceeded that in expenditures of about $1.5 million. One of the big issues that divides supporters and opponents is whether or not the money from the


Photo/Dennis Myers

North of center

Tim Healion is a familiar face in Reno’s Midtown.

With all of the media attention and campaign dollars going into the race for Reno story and photos by mayor, it can be easy to forget that Riley Snyder two other City Council seats are also up for grabs. While it hasn’t garnered as much attention, the race between county commissioner Bonnie Weber and labor activist Paul McKenzie in Ward 4 to succeed outgoing Councilmember Dwight Dortch has all the hallmarks of a classic faceoff, down to nasty attack ads, substantial partisan differences between candidates and closely reported donations.

“Everydimecollected fromthistaxwill godirectlytoK-12 education.” Question 3 supporting ballot argument tax would go to schools. A ballot argument drafted by opponents reads, “Promoters claim the tax is for education. But Nevada law lets the legislature divert education funds to other uses.” Supporters responded, “The opponents know every dime collected from this tax will go directly to K-12 education.” The language of the ballot measure itself reads that after the cost of administering the tax is set aside, all other revenue generated must be placed “in the State Distributive School Account in the

State General Fund. The money so deposited must be apportioned among the several school districts and charter schools of this State at the times and in the manner provided by law for the money in the State Distributive School Account.” Question 3 is the latest of several proposals the teachers have offered in the last decade to raise more money for schools. Large businesses found fault with each of them for different provisions. Ω WEBER

McKENZIE

Ward 4 contains the north valleys. And with only a few weeks to go until Election Day, the race is still open for the taking. Despite Weber’s name recognition, first-time candidate McKenzie is giving her a fight. The steelyhaired 54-year-old longtime labor representative and lobbyist currently serves as the secretary/treasurer of the local Building and Construction Trades Council. He’s a true, dyed-inthe-wool labor Democrat, down to a bumper sticker in his office equating anti-union voices to pro-Chinese activists. He’s well versed in labor issues, which has come back in to vogue in light of Tesla’s announced $5 billion lithium battery gigafactory. Despite disappointment with a lack of wage requirements, McKenzie said he’s optimistic that the electric car manufacturer will help spur more work for the construction industry in the near future. His plans if elected include encouraging businesses to use local contractors and workers, and to begin auctioning off excess city-owned property to deal with the city’s debt. Absent is any goal

Pump it up Photo/Dennis Myers

Cindy Tequilo (inset) shows off the pumpkins she bought at the Pumpkin Patch Harvest Festival at Sparks United Methodist Church. The event also included a crafts fair, local vendors and food court.

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to restructure pension arrangements between public employee unions and the city itself, which McKenzie calls necessary to continue smooth operations. “Most people that complain about public employees having a PERS plan are jealous because they don’t have the same thing,” he said. That’s a line of reasoning that Weber rejects entirely. “We can’t pay people $80 an hour, which is what Mr. McKenzie would like to do,” she said. “We don’t have the funding. We don’t have the resources to do that.” Weber’s campaign is primarily focused on her conservative background and 12 years in the county commission, where she served as vice chair for 11 years and worked with a number of local elected officials on transportation and other issues. But Weber’s name recognition cuts both ways—a local political action committee called Citizens for Responsible Local Government created an attack website against Weber accusing her of being an extreme “Tea Party Republican,” a charge Weber denies. Though short on detailed answers due to a claimed lack of inside knowledge on city issues, Weber does have a general plan if elected. She wants to negotiate an automatic aid agreement between the city and county fire services and is open to the idea of reconsolidating the departments after the messy deconsolidation in 2012. Weber’s plan for fixing the city budget is generally conservative, and she said she’s open to re-negotiating pension plans and salaries of city employees. She will also attempt to buck the fate of a county commissioner, Kitty Jung, attempting to jump to the City Council two years ago. She said her longer tenure and personal differences will help her avoid the same fate. In terms of finance, McKenzie outraised Weber by slightly more than $6,000 for the most recent reporting period, and combined the candidates have put together around $141,000 since the campaign began. Weber won July’s primary with about 36 percent of the vote over McKenzie, who attracted around 24 percent. Neither candidate said they have conducted internal polling since the primary. Ω

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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Itʼs happen ing in

ACTIVITIES SCHEELS LADIES MONTH: SAFELY HOUR

Don’t be the victim of a home invasion or sexual assault! Arm yourself with knowledge and power, and then pass it on to every woman you know! Th, 10/23, 6-7PM, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

FRESHEN UP FOR PR’S FUTURE

It’s time to catch up, get ahead and ensure your position at the top of the PR game. “Freshen Up for PR’s Future - A Workshop for Today’s Practitioners for Tomorrow” is a half-day workshop that will help you put it all in your wheelhouse: crisis management, national media placement, Wordpress, video integration and more. F, 10/24, 11AM6PM, $150.00 JA Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

PUTTING YOUR GARDEN TO BED

Presented by Mark Mercier. Learn what you need to do to winterize your garden and yard. Please RSVP. Sa, 10/25, 11AM, Class is free, but a donation of a can of food for the local food bank is appreciated. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551

FOOD TRUCK DRIVE-IN

Food Truck Drive-In comes to Victorian Square on the 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month through October. 5PM to 9PM. Enjoy the finest in mobile cuisine including Hawaiian fusion, desserts, hot dogs, pulled pork nachos and much more! After dinner, head to Saint Mary’s Ampitheater for a free movie at 8PM. This week’s movie (October 25) is Ghostbusters. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave, free.

PUMPKINPALOOZA

Downtown Sparks will be celebrating all things pumpkin from 11 AM. to 5 PM., Sunday, Oct. 26, when the Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living kicks off PumpkinPalooza 2014. For more information, visit www.pumpkinpalooza.org. When: Su, 10/26, 11AM5PM free. Victorian Square, 1555 Victorian Ave.

PIRATES, PINS & PINTS

Join our 2nd Annual Pirates, Pins and Pints, a bowl-a-thon benefiting Seniors in Service (sponsor of the Foster Grandparent, Senior Companion and Caregiver Respite Voucher Programs.) This is a family-friendly event where costumes and creative team names are encouraged! This is a fun event and a good time to get your “Pirate” on while helping a senior volunteer-based local organization! Su,

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10/26, 12-3PM, $25 per player or $100 for four-person team. Coconut Bowl at Wild Island, 250 Wild Island Ct. (775) 359-2927

TRICK OR TREAT SAFELY AT SCHEELS

This Halloween you are invited to wear your costume to Scheels and participate in a Halloween Scavenger Hunt throughout the store! You will earn candy, perform tricks, and have a great time! Ferris Wheel rides will be free. F, 10/31, 3-5PM. Free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

RENO SKI & RECREATION CLUB

The Reno Ski and Recreation Club holds its general meeting. Hear the most current information about the Reno Ski & Recreation Club, upcoming trips and activities. The group meets the second Tuesday of each month. For socializing and dinner, members start arriving around 6PM. Meeting begins at 7PM. Second Tu of every month, 6PM, free. Cantina Los Tres Hombres, 926 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-6262

SCHEELS RUNNING CLUB

Run with expert pacers and enjoy running in a group. Tu, 6:30PM through 12/9, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700

CROCHET CONNECTION

Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway. (775) 424-1800

FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB

The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. First Sa of every month, 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

CONVERSATION CAFE

CJ SIMMONS

W-Sa, 7PM through 10/25. Opens 10/22, no cover. JA Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

RICK HAMMOND

Su, 10/26, 3PM, no cover. CBQ, 1330 Scheels Dr. (775) 359-1109

KENNY FRYE BAND AT GILLEY’S

Four big nights of four shows at Gilley’s. Kenny Frye Band will be crankin’ it up for a show you don’t want to miss! W, 10/29, 7PM, Th, 10/30, 7PM, F, 10/31, 7PM and Sa, 11/1, 7PM, no cover. JA Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

ACOUSTIC WONDERLAND

This is a singer/song writer Showcase. Come down to Paddy’s and bring your acoustic instruments. Sign ups are at 7:30PM and music begins at 8PM. M-Su, 8PM. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

DJ RAZZ

Come dance the night away to DJ RAZZ! You can even karaoke if you like. Ladies Night every Friday night. Drink Specials all night. F, 9PM. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

BIKINI BULL RIDING

DJ and Bikini Bull Riding Competition. Su, 5 & 9PM through 12/28, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 LOCALS NIGHT Locals Night, DJ. M, 5PM through 12/29, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

LIVE MONDAYS WITH TANY JANE

The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month, 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

Open mic night every Monday at 8PM, hosted by Tany Jane. M, 8PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 3551030

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP

CLASSIC ROCK NIGHT

This class is for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC ACOUSTIPHONICS

Sa, 10/25, 9PM, no cover. CBQ, 1330 Scheels Dr. (775) 359-1109

Classic rock night with DJ. Tu, 5PM through 12/30, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

OPEN JAM WITH TAZER & FRIENDS

W, 8PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

LADIES NIGHT & TOUGHEST COWBOY

Ladies Night w/live music and Toughest Cowboy Competition. DJ

breaks until midnight. W, 7 & 9PM through 12/31, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

A SINGERS-SONGWRITERS SHOWCASE

Bring yourself, your instrument and your song. We look forward to hearing and seeing you there! Th, 8PM through 12/18, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

LIVE MUSIC & LATE NIGHT DJ

Live music with late-night DJ. F, 5PM-2AM & 7-11PM through 12/26, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

LIVE MUSIC & LATE NIGHT DJ

Live music with late-night DJ. Sa, 5PM-2AM & 7PM-midnight through 12/27, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

KARAOKE KARAOKE WITH ERNESTO

Great new karaoke venue in the Legends shopping center. You’re welcome to bring your own CD+G disc to play your songs (KJ discretion). Karaoke service by Ernesto representing Serano Entertainment. Show ends promptly at midnight, so come early to sing. Drop by and say hi, for those who know me from my karaoke events. I look forward to meeting new singers. F, 9PM through 10/24, no cover. CBQ, 1330 Scheels Dr. (775) 359-1109

KARAOKE COMES TO SIDELINES

Every Monday Night!!! M, 8PM. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030

KARAOKE WITH BOBBY DEE

Tu, 8PM, no cover. Morelli’s G Street Saloon, 2285 G St. (775) 3558281

KARAOKE

Th-Sa, 9PM, no cover. Bottom’s Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way (775) 359-3677


Photo/Sage Leehey

Trees line the University of Nevada, Reno quad where various events and spring graduation are held.

Planting roots University en route to being recognized as a Tree Campus USA Fall has begun, and one of the best places in the city of Reno to see leaves changing colors is the University of Nevada, Reno campus. “UNR is just an excellent example of an arboretum, which is a living by Sage Leehey tree museum—that’s how I state it anyway—for Reno,” said Steve Churchillo, city of Reno urban forester and UNR Arboretum Board s age l@ member. He added that Idlewild Park is a great place for seeing the news review.c om leaves change, too. [Full disclosure: RN&R editor D. Brian Burghart is also on the Arboretum Board.] And on Oct. 25 at 8:30 a.m., the campus will get about 10 to 12 additional trees. As part of an ongoing initiative to become a Tree Campus USA—a program and designation from the Arbor Day Foundation—and Nevada Shade Tree Week, the UNR Arboretum Board and the City of Reno have partnered up to plant trees at the Nevada Early Intervention Services’ Early Head Start facility on the north end of campus. “Reno is a Tree City USA … and this will be the first year—after they submit this application to National Arbor Day Foundation—that UNR can become a Tree Campus USA,” Churchillo said. Nevada Shade Tree Week runs from Oct. 24 to Nov. 2 and was established years ago by the Nevada Shade Tree Council as a fall celebration similar to the national holiday of Arbor Day in the spring. To apply to become a Tree Campus USA, the campus must have a campus tree advisory committee, a campus tree care plan, a verification of dedicated annual expenditures on the campus tree plan, an involvement in an Arbor Day observance, and an institution of a service learning project aimed at engaging the student body, according to the Arbor Day For more information, visit www.arborday. Foundation’s website. The event on Oct. 25 will count as a service learnorg/programs/ ing project for this process. There will be volunteers helping with the treecampususa. planting on Saturday from UNR’s Phi Delta Theta fraternity and others. Churchillo said the city’s Urban Forestry Division aims “to promote the proper care and proper planting of trees throughout Reno and to let people know that there are significant mature trees throughout our city, particularly on the campus” and that the recognitions of Tree City USA and Tree Campus USA help in achieving that mission. He also said that the proper care component is especially important in Reno. “It’s always a challenge to plant and keep trees alive in an arid climate,” Churchillo said. “Most of the trees that grow here, almost every species that is here does not grow here naturally. They are not native to Reno or Nevada. ... The big message is that we want to make sure people water their trees throughout the summer. Without irrigation, our trees would not survive for the most part.” The Arbor Day Foundation has similar goals in mind with the Tree Campus USA program. “By meeting the annual standards and being recognized as a Tree Campus USA college, you will create a campus that not only helps to benefit and create a more sustainable environment, but instills pride in the students, faculty and community,” reads a statement on their website. Ω

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BOARD Why did the attorney general’s office break its oWn rules to get the Washoe school board?

O

n July 22, two Washoe County School Board members—Barbara Clark and Barbara McLaury—and board attorney Randy Drake approached Superintendent of Schools Pedro Martinez to inform him of questions raised anonymously about his credentials as a certified public accountant and of an initial inquiry in Illinois that raised additional questions. In a badly handled day, the three eventually drew the other members of the board into the matter as the superintendent tried to negotiate a severance package and then allegedly threatened to orchestrate a public support campaign reaching from the governor to the Obama cabinet. Before the matter was resolved, Martinez left the school district offices and began orchestrating that campaign and so never knew what the outcome was. He wasn’t the only one who didn’t know the ending. Although the first answer to the first question at a subsequent board news conference said the superintendent had not been fired, many reporters arrived late and reported he was fired anyway, extrapolating from what board members didn’t say.

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Inexplicably, the board did not say it had put Martinez on paid leave, only that he was “relieved of his duties.” It was one in a series of blunders. Martinez, who until then had been the target of harsh attacks for his firing of a popular schools police chief, quickly mobilized supporters who cast him as a victim. There was little question that open meeting law matters were at issue. Partway through the day, the two board members and lawyer effectively added the matter of Martinez’s CPA credentials to the activities of a board meeting already underway, though no such agenda item had been posted. There was language in the open meeting law that such requirements could be waived in an emergency, and while the CPA matter had jolted everyone involved—“That was a big shock to everybody,” deputy superintendent Tracy Davies said—and what board members described as the superintendent’s unprofessional demeanor did the same, whether it qualified as an emergency was a judgment call. From the first moment, the city’s daily newspaper tried to generate public outrage, and some television reporters took their cue from the newspaper—though others were skeptical of Martinez. Seemingly, few wanted to wait until the facts emerged before taking positions and excoriating the board, which barely defended itself—though when, at the end of July, the board filed a blockbuster court document containing its bill of particulars against Martinez, the newspaper deemphasized it. The participating school board members were subsequently charged under the open meeting law and accepted fines (paid from their personal funds). Much of the adverse reaction to the school board’s actions resulted from the one-sided situation—board members failing to explain themselves while vituperation poured down on them. There were several hints that

that the public did not have some information. One source says the board members were instructed to remain silent so they did not give Martinez ammunition in any possible lawsuit. That poisonous instruction reportedly came from board counsel Randy Drake.

Framing the issues

On Aug. 5, the Reno Gazette-Journal published an article by Anjeanette Damon that singled out two school board members in particular: The story was one of the flurry of RGJ coverage that helped set the tone in the community, and deserves a close look as a sample of that effort, since the newspaper’s campaign made it a player in the dispute as much as a newsgatherer. “Tucked away from public view, deliberating on the future of the district’s leadership with no prior notice to the public or the individual in question, alarm bells should have been sounding in at least one trustee’s head. Howard Rosenberg had been in a very similar position just about a decade ago when he sat on the University Board of Regents, which chose to fire a college president in a [2003] closed meeting. That saga didn’t end well for the board. They were found guilty of a Nevada open meeting law violation, the university system lost more than a half million dollars in legal settlements and a high-profile battle ensued at the state Legislature. ... Perhaps, however, Rosenberg’s history on the subject should have given him pause as [the board was] arriving at their decision. ‘He should’ve been well aware of what the requirements were,’ said Barry Smith, executive director of the Nevada Press Association. Rosenberg did not return phone calls seeking comment.” The story seems to suggest Rosenberg should have greater familiarity with open meeting law that other school board members,


GAMES BY DENNIS MYERS

which Damon confirms. “I think that my story on Howard Rosenberg and Dave Aiazzi stands for itself,” she said, adding that she believed their experience would give them “familiarity” with the law. But why assume that knowledge on the strength of a single case before the board of regents 11 years earlier? And since Rosenberg was unavailable, why not interview someone else who had been in a similar situation? We called Reno Mayor Bob Cashell, reaching him in New York City. He had chaired the Nevada Board of Regents in 1981 when it had a major open meeting law problem. And Cashell has presided over the Reno City Council for 12 years. Does that make him familiar with the open meeting law? “No,” Cashell responded. “I think I know the open meeting law, but sometimes things come up and luckily you’ve got a good attorney who keeps us on the straight and narrow. And once the attorney tells us something we usually follow the attorney’s rules. We always listen to our attorney.” If there’s doubt, what would Cashell do? “Usually check with the attorney,” he said. “Our attorney at City Hall usually tells us when we’re getting off base. They’ll draw us back in.” And as it happens, Rosenberg said that’s just what he did on July 22—checked with the lawyer. Rosenberg: “Randy [Drake, board legal counsel] explained to us at the very beginning while [the superintendent] was still there that this was a meeting between the trustees and their attorney. We could discuss. We could ask for information, but under no circumstances was any action to be taken. And I asked him point blank, I said, ‘Are we violating the open meeting law?’ He said, ‘Absolutely not. You don’t have to worry about that. If, indeed, you’re even coming close, I’ll stop you before you get there.’ So I was relatively comfortable.” In that same article about Rosenberg, Damon wrote about another school board member OPINION

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by Aiazzi that Damon put inside quotation marks included the term. Aiazzi told us, “I doubt I would have used that term. To me pretext means an ulterior motive or that we knew what we were going to do in advance. We didn’t know about the problem until Barbara Clark brought it to our attention.” In the 2003 Board of Regents meeting that Damon said should have taught Rosenberg all about open meeting law, two people were fired— a community college president and his advisor. In that case, Rosenberg

who had served on another public board—David Aiazzi, former Reno city councilmember. And Aiazzi said he asked the lawyer’s advice, too. Aiazzi: “And so while he [Martinez] was gone, we had some discussion. I asked Randy Drake particularly whether we could have this discussion here today. He said as long as … we feel that there’s going to be some action taken against the superintendent it will probably involve a lawsuit. So we are talking potential litigation. And as long as we only talk about this issue, it won’t be about his

school board “should have known” the open meeting law. The GazetteJournal certainly has led opinion in that direction, with the result that letters like this have appeared in that newspaper: “You cannot tell me any of the board members didn’t know and understand the open meeting law, and the attorney should not take all the blame. Every elected official should know, understand and be responsible for the open meeting laws or they shouldn’t be in office. ... Ignorance of

an open meeting manual to explain the nuances of the law. It is 131 pages long. Should public officials know what is in it, too? Consider this: The open meeting statutes are only one set of laws the school board members must deal with. Under the section of Nevada law dealing with education, Title 34 of Nevada Revised Statures, there are 19 chapters of statutes, just one of which—the section headed “Pupils”—runs 41,484 words. Should the board know those chapters in detail, too? The open meeting law is a tool of my trade as a reporter. I have not only used it, I have dealt with changing and amending it. My first involvement was at the 1975 Nevada Legislature, when I worked on applying the open meeting law to the Legislature itself and co-authored an article on the subject for Nevada Government Today magazine. In the years since then, I have testified on open meeting amendments and filed open meeting complaints. And after 40 years working with and using it, I don’t know the open meeting law well. I always turn to those who do. Maybe I “should” know the law, but it is highly detailed, and there is a lot of case law (court rulings) affecting its meaning. In fact, I can count on one hand the people in this state who do know the law in detail—and none of them are reporters. There is one person in this state I always turn to for information on the open meeting law. I’ll go further. When I served as Nevada’s chief deputy secretary of state, I had to use the statutes on things like uniform commercial code and trademarks. But I needed a lawyer to explain them, and six weeks after I left the job, I would have been hard pressed to remember those statutes. Consider this, too: Legal counsel are mentioned 19 times in the open meeting law manual but are never mentioned in the index. The attorney

“PuBlic BodiES Should BE EncouRaGEd to REly uPon advicE of counSEl and not BE PuniShEd foR doinG So.” Catherine Cortez Masto Nevada attorney general

voted against the firing and objected to the board’s conduct in firing the men without allowing them a hearing. He told us, “Both of them should be accorded the right to listen to the charges against them and be able to talk to us” (“Without a hearing,” RN&R, Dec. 25, 2003). At that time, we reported, “During the closed [regents] meeting, there were five attorneys present in the room. Three were the regents’ official counsels—Tom Ray and his deputies, Mary Dugan and Walter Ayres. They reportedly counseled the regents that their actions were legal.”

character or conduct. It’s about this one thing that we have to see where we’re going to proceed.” These quotes were taken from the attorney general’s office investigative interviews of the school board members, so the AG’s office had this information. In her story, Damon also wrote of Aiazzi, “Aiazzi disputes that the legal course of action in the Martinez case was obvious at the time. Boards are allowed to meet privately to consider pending litigation or discuss legal matters with their lawyers. Aiazzi contends that was the pretext of the board’s decision to meet privately.” “Pretext” is a pejorative, which Damon used to characterize Aiazzi’s thinking. “I disagree,” she told us. “I don’t thinkit’s a pejorative. ... that wasn’t my intention.” The Random House Dictionary defines the term as “a false reason put forward to conceal the true one.” None of the statements

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ART OF THE STATE

Shoulda known

This reporter once heard Rosenberg say that the school board must post an agenda six days in advance. It would be nice if that was the case, but it’s not. Three days is the requirement. There has been considerable comment to the effect that the members of the |

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the law is no excuse.” As it happens, ignorance of the law is an excuse, according to the attorney general’s office, if the ignorance derives from legal advice. A 1981 Nevada attorney general’s opinion established this doctrine as an office practice, and that policy has been part of the AG office’s procedure ever since. But we’ll get back to that in a moment. First, let’s look at whether board members “should” have known the law. There are 8,659 words in the Nevada open meeting law. They are not easy to decipher. Some of them are subjective, some are legal terms not in common use, and some parts of the law are not even contained in the statute at all. For instance, the Nevada Supreme Court has imposed a “balancing test” on the law that is not even mentioned in the law. Simply reading those 8,659 words doesn’t fully inform a public official. So the attorney general’s office produces

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Howard Rosenberg and Dave Aiazzi (right): They asked the right questions.

Washoe schools superintendent Pedro Martinez: He organized a public support campaign.

Washoe school board lawyer Randy Drake: He was everywhere. PHOTOS BY DENNIS MYERS

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general’s office may have some discomfort in dealing with the role of their fellow attorneys as public counsel.

Lawyers

On that fateful July 22 this year, Washoe School Board lawyer Randy Drake was seemingly everywhere that was relevant and germane to the open meeting issues. Drake was one of the people who informed the superintendent that questions had been raised about his accounting credentials. When the superintendent started talking about resigning and the conditions he would want fulfilled before he departed, it was Drake who conducted much of the negotiation with Martinez and informed board members of the superintendent’s bargaining positions—including informing them of the final impasse. It was Drake who School Board President Barbara Clark consulted on whether to call a public meeting on the matter. It was Drake who Rosenberg and Aiazzi asked for advice on whether they were within the law. It was from Drake that the members of the school board gained the impression that Martinez had walked out of the building and off the job. Drake was involved in deciding what would be announced to the public. He may have told the board members not to fully inform the public in order not to weaken their legal position. At no point, according to the board members, did he advise them that they were in violation of the open meeting law, either in the early events when three people were involved, or later when the full school board was drawn in—though they said they asked. • SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER BARBARA CLARK:

“And then I talked with Randy about whether or not we could call a legal meeting because it’s not my role as an individual trustee to see whether or not this was an issue with the board or not, so we went ahead and called a legal meeting. ... He [Drake] indicated it was fine to have this conversation regarding this issue.” • QUESTION: “[D]id Randy as counsel give you legal advice as to what to do OPINION

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The Las Vegas Review-Journal filed an open meeting complaint, and the attorney general’s office investigated. It concluded that the open meeting law had been violated. But Attorney General Richard Bryan said that because their lawyer had not advised the members that they were in violation of the law, the state would not proceed with action so long as the Regents subsequently took corrective action. (The Washoe School Board this year corrected its action by voiding it.) Bryan also made clear that the members of a public body need not ask their counsel if they were in violation of the law, as Rosenberg and Aiazzi did. Rather, Bryan wrote, it was the lawyer’s job, if he was present, to alert the members when he observed violations of the law:

or what not to do? All I want you to do is answer yes or no.” CLARK: “No.”

• QUESTION: “Had you received any advice from your legal counsel during this meeting? ...” SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER BARBARA McLAURY:

“No.” • QUESTION: “Had you been given—did you receive any legal advice from your legal counsel?” SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER JOHN MAYER: “I don’t believe so. ... Yes, he said this is a lawyer/client meeting.”

A couple of members of the board said Drake did offer advice, but one of them, Lisa Ruggerio, said it was routine—“Just business as usual.” According to the statements gathered by the attorney general’s office, two school board members asked Drake directly if they were outside the open meeting law. When Rosenberg broached the question, Drake said he would keep them out of trouble. When we asked Drake about the matter, he declined comment. “I can’t go on the record about that,” he said. “That’s confidential information.”

penalties to discourage participation by individuals on state and local government public bodies. Volunteers and elected officials need not fear civil or criminal charges, based on their participation, because of an inadvertent OML violation. Indeed, the Legislature intended to encourage public participation, despite inadvertent violations. Inadvertent violations may be ‘cured’ if the public body takes corrective action, either during the meeting or by rescheduling the matter in question to a future agenda. “Legislative penalties are directly aimed at the knowing violation. Where counsel does render advice regarding matters ongoing during a public body meeting, failure to heed that advice can lead to a finding that a deliberate violation occurred. Under today’s OML, failure to heed the advice of counsel could lead to prosecution and/or a civil penalty.” It turns out that heeding that advice can also lead to prosecution and penalty. There was nothing in the AG interviews of other board members that contradicted the accounts of Aiazzi and Rosenberg that they asked their lawyer if they were out of bounds and received his negative response. Why did the attorney general’s office prosecute the school board in spite of its own policy? Taylor did not return calls seeking comment, so we cannot know for certain. It might have something to do with the fact that the AG’s office— made up of public counsel—has a natural reluctance to look on the public’s lawyers as sources of problems, as indicated by deemphasizing the role of public counsel in the open meeting manual. It may also have something to do with the fact that there was a powerful newspaper that wanted the scalps of the members of the school board throwing its weight around, and its pressure on the attorney general’s office—and on its readers—was intense. Ω

“2. Knowledge by a member of a public body that the meeting is in violation of the open meeting law. The [1981] opinion held that, when members of a public body rely on advice of counsel, they should not be held to know that a violation occurred.” That advice, it says further, is something “upon which a member can rely as to whether ... the meeting is in violation of the open meeting law.” • Last year, in responding to an open meeting complaint about the Washoe Board of Health, Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto wrote, “The Board relied on advice of counsel. ... This was not an OML violation. As early as 1981, this office has recognized that public bodies should be encouraged to rely upon advice of counsel and not

“we aLways LisTen To our aTTorney.” Bob Cashell Reno mayor

1981: The sTaTe poLicy

Remember that meeting held by the Nevada Board of Regents when Bob Cashell chaired the regents? It happened on January 12, 1981, and led to a basic policy change in how some open meeting law complaints are handled, a shift directly affecting this case. There had been some bitter conflicts in those years among the regents, and one member proposed that they go into closed session to discuss the competence of—themselves. Normally closed meetings to discuss competence are held for employees or appointees of the board, so the board lawyer was asked if the closed meeting would be legal. “Yes, you can do that,” lawyer Larry Lessly said. The room was cleared, and only the regents were inside. This item had not been posted on the agenda and neither the lawyer nor anyone else told the regents to keep a record of the closed meeting. There were actually two closed sessions, morning and afternoon, the second one convened by Cashell.

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“At no point were the members of the board of regents advised by the general counsel for the university that the procedures they followed in closing the meeting and their failure to keep minutes of the closed meeting were in violation of the requirements of the open meeting law. In the opinion of this office, reliance on advice provided to the board of regents by its legal counsel ... does not indicate an intent to knowingly or willfully violate the law. Thus, though it is necessary to take strong corrective action to prevent any further violation of the open meeting law by the board of regents, a criminal prosecution is not permissible.” This became a permanent state policy. Subsequently, the language was entered in the open meeting manual. In the 11th edition (June 2012), prepared by the current attorney general and staff, that opinion and policy still stands: |

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be punished for doing so. In [1981] the Office of the Attorney General opined [that] when members of a public body rely on advice of counsel, they should not be held to know that a violation occurred.” • Deputy attorney general George Taylor brought the charges against the members of the Washoe school board. In the June 12, 2013, edition of Nevada Lawyer magazine—16 months before he took that action— Taylor wrote that elected officials can incur liability if they ignore agency lawyers: “But, is the public body member’s conduct and individual participation in a public meeting protected, by the presence of counsel, from the penalties set out in the OML for violations? As discussed below, public body members may be protected from penalties if the member has sought advice of counsel and acted in accordance with the advice. “The Legislature did not enact

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The open meeting probe interviews of each of the school board members and Superintendent Martinez are available from the Nevda attorney general’s office, and they are e-mailable. |

OCTOBER 23, 2014

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Kate Clark’s “Licking the Plate” sculpture is made from clay and a male kudu.

with some of the artists featured in Late Harvest, the main exhibit in the museum’s feature gallery that corresponds with the conference. The exhibit opened on Sept. 27 and will run until Jan. 18, 2015. Curated by NMA’s Joanne Northrup and Adam Duncan Harris of the National Museum of Wildlife Art, Late Harvest features more than 30 artists. “This exhibition unites radically different modes of artistic production that share a common focus on animals,” writes Northrup. “Canonincal wildlife paintings from the 19th and 20th centuries are juxtaposed with contemporary art that incorporates taxidermy.” The start of the exhibit is flooded with light from Brigitte Zieger’s Shooting Wallpaper, a looping animated film in which an illustrated woman, camouflaged in toile wallpaper, makes shooting motions. After that, the exhibition darkens considerably, both in color

Attendees mingled around a horse fabricated out of horse hide, wax, wood and iron—a piece by Berlinde De Bruyckere.

The Nevada Museum of Art’s Art + Environment Conference attracted artists, critics, scientists and writers from around the world

T

ARTICLE & PHOTOS BY ASHLEY HENNEFER

he future is interdisciplinary, creating inextricable links among nature and technology, design and science. And so, too, is the past, but somewhere along the timeline of humanity, that connection seemed lost. Reclaiming and reembracing that overlap is the overarching message of this year’s Art + Environment Conference, a global event hosted at the Nevada Museum of Art.

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The conference occurs every three years; the first was held in 2008. The three-day conference is comprised of a featured exhibit and a series of talks hosted by visiting artists. “Themes of the exhibition are connected to the themes of the conference,” said David Walker, NMA executive director. According to the museum, these themes explore three relationships: that between human and animals,

between human and the world’s ecosystems, and between art and science. Walker notes the conference’s unique logo—the letters “a + e” are spelled out in furry typography as a way to indicate the conference’s emphasis on living creatures. In attendance were artists, critics, scientists and writers from around the world. On the opening night, attendees were given a chance to mingle

and in tone. Several of the walls are painted in dark shades of red and green—evoking colors of blood and earth, made especially clear by the art paired with it. Although much of the show’s work is by contemporary artists, several pieces harken back to more classical styles of art. This is evident through pieces such as Damien Hirst’s “The Kingdom of the Father,” a large installation comprised of real, preserved butterflies. The result is three cathedral window-shaped designs that, from a distance, look like stained glass. It’s striking and beautiful, and startling when the realization comes—that it’s made from dead insects. This kind of work has gotten Hirst into hot water before with animal rights activists; he’s used other animal parts for art pieces, and an installation at Tate Modern in 2012 resulted in more than 9,000 butterfly deaths when their captivity was the display itself, and was not a conducive

environment to their survival. But some argue that his art brings attention to the many animals killed regularly through other human activity. And yet it raises some questions—for a conference that explores concepts and encourages discussion about sustainability, does art that causes death of animals go against the point? In fact, the whole show might make animal lovers simultaneously upset and introspective. The abundance of taxidermy takes a bit of getting used to—like a log cabin filled with hunting trophies, it’s unnerving to stand in a museum and be surrounded by animal carcasses. But there’s also a bit of peace knowing that many of the bodies have been preserved in beautiful pieces of art, and were acquired after the animals had died of natural causes. Northrup addressed these ideas in the first talk of the conference, “Friend or Faux? Animals as Contemporary Art.”


“How do animals in these artworks function as agents of nature or symbols of culture, and where do we place ourselves in this network of meaning?” she asked. H arv est se ason For sculptor Kate Clark, whose piece “Licking the Plate” is featured on the cover of the book accompanying the exhibit, working with animal bodies is logistically difficult. In her art, Clark creates human faces out of clay and affixes them to taxidermy. “Licking the Plate” was commissioned for Late Harvest, and consists of a youthful-looking female face on the body of a male kudu. It’s reminiscent of centaurs from mythology, and the features are lifelike, including eyes that look like they’ll blink at any second. “This is the biggest one I’ve ever done,” she said of the piece. “This was custom for the show. I’ve also done a cougar before this, but it wasn’t quite as large.” The sculpture is set against a backdrop of a forest. “I’ve never done a background before,” said Clark, and notes that it was inspired by Jean Baptiste Oudry, a French 18th-century painter. The backdrop gives the sculpture some context, and it mirrors some of the neighboring paintings of stags from the early 1900s. Despite how frequently she works with animals, Clark said, “I’m not at all a taxidermist.” She sculpts the faces from clay, and uses patches of the animal’s skin to fill in the skin on the face. “I have to be very careful.” The title of the show, Late Harvest, has multiple meanings in the context of the art it represents. The act of harvesting natural resources has been vital to human civilization for centuries. Harvesting the “late,” in this sense, refers partly to the deceased animals, but also to the notion of harvesting a lifestyle that has long since passed. Is it too late to reclaim harmony with nature? The show inspires more questions than it answers. One that permeates throughout is the concept of wildness. What does it mean to be wild? Is it the order of nature and the relentless cycle of hunting, birth and death? Is it human, creating carnage and waste without consideration or need? Or are they one and the same? These questions were explored, in part, through the speaker presentations during the OPINION

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conference. Back-to-back talks were held all day on Oct. 10 and 11, and attendees were given opportunities to ask questions of the visiting artists, critics and scientists. The terms “geoaesthetic” and “posthumanism” were used frequently. Depending on the artist, these words take on different meanings. Geoaesthetic refers to the physical features and landmarks of an ecosystem. Posthumanism, in essence, explores what it means to be human. For Ingar Dragset—one half of artist team Elmgreen and Dragset—geoaesthetics can be impacted by human creations. Perhaps best known for their Prada Marfa installation in the Texas desert, Elmgreen and Dragset create architectural structures that are intended to be satirical and thought-provoking. Dragset says that art pertaining to environmental issues doesn’t have to be serious to be effective. “Actual humor is a way of survival,” he said. “Humor is a way to communicate, to enter into a dialogue about something difficult.” Artist David Brooks looks at landscape in the context of species. He travels the world with geologists and scientists, and does conservation work in communities. He’s especially interested in the interactions local communities have with wildlife. He says this connection is meaningful with all creatures, including fish, whose history is often closely linked with that of a town or city. “When they’re holding that fish in their hand, they’re thinking of the millions of years that went into that,” said Brooks. Brooks said it’s important to think of animals, including fish, as “individual living breathing beings before they become statistics.” Brooks was one of several artists who emphasized the importance of understanding places and animals as they are individually, and placing that in the big picture of what sustainability can be in the future. Perhaps the same idea can be applied to humans, too—it’s not the numbers that will change our habits or our experiences. The relationship between humans and animals, and subsequently, humans and the natural world, is impacted most strongly through our innate pull toward it. Ω

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Late Harvest is open at the Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., until January 18, 2015. For more information, visit nevadaart.org. |

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This message brought to you by the Washoe County Health District with grant funding from the CDC through the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health. |

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OCTOBER 23, 2014

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Photo/Brad Bynum

Uncanny X-woman

Artist Jill Colbert alongside a detail from her mural in the Reno Art Works gallery.

Jill Colbert All through high school and college, Jill Colbert was, in her own words, “a sketchbook junkie. by I would go through four sketchbooks a Brad Bynum month. After I graduated college, I realized I should probably sell those drawings rather bradb@ news review.c om than keep them in a little book.” The 23-year-old artist was born in Truckee, California, and grew up in Incline Village, where she lives now. She has a BFA in illustration from Savannah College of Art and Design. She works as an illustrator, does fine art, and, in an unusual twist, the artist’s reception manages metal bands. for Experience the “Most of my clients for illustration are uncanny is at reno art actually musicians,” she said. She’s done Works, 1995 dickerson album covers, posters, T-shirts and more road, on Friday, oct. for some high-profile hard rock and heavy 24, at 7 p.m. For more information, visit metal bands, like Halestorm, Sevendust, www.manfishinc.com. and former coal Chamber bassist Chela Rhea Harper. She started building up a network of connections, which helped her develop contacts for selling her art but also lent itself to band management. She manages three bands: locals Seductive Rage and Blood Agent, and Toronto band Dark Before Dawn.

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Growing up and during college, she studied a lot of pop surrealist work, but she says she takes most of her inspiration from the music that she listens to while working. “Sometimes I’ll just have it in the background,” she said. “I’ll listen to particular artists if I want to be inspired by something. Or if I’m working for a particular artist, I will only play their music in a constant loop, because I want it to have as much influence as possible.” She has an exhibition at Reno Art Works, 1995 Dickerson Road, this month. The artist’s reception is Friday, Oct. 24, at 7 p.m. The title of the show, Experience the Uncanny, references the humanoid figures that appear throughout the show. None of them are straightforward portraits of people, but rather contorted illustrations of mutants, demons, faeries, aliens and more. One piece in the exhibition is “Tree Spirit,” a wood sprite in a contorted position, rendered in black, white and apple green. “Human, but not—because drawing normal people is boring,”she said. “When you see something like antlers or horns on

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a person, it just has that uncanny or surreal feeling to it. And it’s not a scared feeling. At least when I see it, I’m in awe of it.” The show consists of many small works—acrylic paintings, pen and ink drawings, digital illustrations—mounted on the walls and linked by larger, site-specific murals painted directly on the gallery walls. Those temporary murals, only up for the duration of the exhibition, add an ephemeral quality to the show. Eyeballs, trees, birds, and antlers are other recurring images alongside the uncanny human-but-nothuman figures. In some ways, Colbert might match the archetype of Ally Sheedy’s character in The

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Breakfast Club, the introverted, outsider girl, up in her own head, making her art for own amusement. Even though she’s now a young professional with a degree, Colbert and her artwork exude the exuberance of a teenage misfit. “I do a lot of creepy stuff, and I do a lot of really fat, chubby, colorful animals,” she said. She recently had an exhibition at Never Ender that focused on the colorful animals. Her current show at Reno Art Works focuses on her “creepy” side, though animals still make plenty of appearances. Another recurring image is a half-man, half-fish; her art company is called Manfish Inc. She has work for sale at the exhibition for a variety of budgets, and she also has prints, buttons and stickers for sale—$5 items, similar to the merchandise the bands she manages sell. She says she always has new work. “I work really fast,” she said. “I literally can’t stop drawing.” Ω

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3 GIRLS- Cab, Pinot, Red Blend 750ML $9.99 3 GIRLS- Chardonnay 750ML $8.99 AFFRESCO - Moscato D’Asti 750ML $9.99 ANTINORI - Toscana Red 750ML $16.99 APOTHIC-Red & White & Dark 750ML $7.99 BAREFOOT 750ML $4.99 BAREFOOT 1.5L $8.49 BAREFOOT- Bubbly 750ML $7.49 BEAULIEU CENT- Cab, Merlot, Chard 750ML $3.99 BELLE GLOS - Clark & Telephone Pinot Noir 750ML $34.99 BELLE GLOS - Meiomi Pinot Noir 750ML $17.99 BERINGER Fnders Estate - Chard, or Merlot 750ML $6.99 BERINGER Founders Estate - Cab Sauv 750ML $6.99 BLACK RIDGE - Cab Sauv, Chard, Merlot 750ML $5.99 BLK RDGE - Moscato, Pinot Grig, Red Blnd 750ML $5.99 CAPOSALDO- Sparkling 750ML $8.99 CH ST JEAN - Calif Cab Sauv and Merlot 750ML $9.99 CH ST JEAN - Sonoma Chardonnay 750ML $9.99 CHAT STE MICHELLE - Gewurz, Dry Riesling 750ML $6.99

SEAGRAMS VODKA 1.75L $13.99 SHELLBACK RUM 750ML $9.49 SKYY - all types 1.75L $19.99 SMIRNOFF - assorted 1.75L $18.99 SMIRNOFF - assorted 750ML $11.99 SOBIESKI 1.75L $19.99 SOBIESKI - assorted 750ML $8.99 SOUTHERN COMFORT 1.75L $20.99 SOUTHERN COMFORT 750ML $10.99 STOLICHNAYA 750ML $18.99 STOLICHNAYA 1.75L $28.99 SVEDKA 750ML $9.99 SVEDKA 1.75L $16.99 TANQUERAY 1.75L $31.99 TEMPLETON - Rye 750ML $36.99 THREE OLIVES- assorted vodka 750ML $15.99 THREE OLIVES- assorted vodka 1.75L $18.99 TIPPY COW 750ML $12.99 TITO’S VODKA 1.75L $31.99 TITO’S VODKA 750ML $17.99 TUACA - Traditional, 750ML $15.99 TY KU 750ML $17.99 UV VODKA - Assorted 750ML $8.99 VINIQ- Shimmery Liqueur 750ML $15.99 WILD TURKEY - 101 750ML $16.99 WOLFSCHMIDT 1.75L $10.99

CHAT STE MICHELLE - Cab Sauv or Merlot 750ML $12.99 CHAT STE MICHELLE - Chard 750ML $7.99 CHAT STE MICHELLE - Riesling 750ML $5.99 CK MONDAVI 1.5L $8.49 CLICQUOT - Brut 750ML $44.99 CLOS DU BOIS- Chard 750ML $7.99 COLUMBIA CREST Grand Est - Cab Sauv 750ML $7.99 COLUMBIA CREST Grand Estates - Chard 750ML $7.99 COLUMBIA CREST Grand Estates - Merlot 750ML $7.99 CONUNDRUM - White 750ML $14.99 DECOY MERLOT 750ML $18.99 DOM PERIGNON 750ML $199.99 EDNA VALLEY- Merlot, Sauv Blanc 750ML $9.49 EDNA VALLEY- Chard, Cabernet 750ML $9.49 FERRARI CARANO - Cab Sauv 750ML $26.99 FERRARI CARANO - Chard 750ML $17.99 FERRARI CARANO - Fume Blanc 750ML $9.99 FERRARI CARANO - Merlot 750ML $15.49 FERRARI CARANO - Siena 750ML $16.99 FETZER - Cab Sauv, Chard, Merlot, Malbec 1.5L $9.99

FETZER - Gewurztraminer, Pinot Grigio, 1.5L $9.99 FREIXENET- Cord Neg Brut, Ex Dry 750ML $8.49 GHOST PINES- Cab, Mer, Red Bl, Pinot 750ML $15.99 GHOST PINES-Chard, Zin 750ML $12.99 GLORIA FERRER- Brut, Blanc De Noir 750ML $15.99 GNARLY HEAD - Cab, Authentic Red 750ML $9.49 GNARLY HEAD - Chard, Pinot Grigio 750ML $6.99 GNARLY HEAD - Zinfandel 750ML $5.99 GROTH - Sauv Blanc 750ML $15.99 IF YOO SEE KAY - Red 750ML $16.99 INTO ZIN - Zinfandel 750ML $8.99 J - Sparkling Cuvee 750ML $19.99 J LOHR- CHARD-RVRSTN 750ML $9.99 JORDAN - Chard 750ML $19.99 JOSH CELLARS - Cab Sauv 750ML $11.99 JOSH CELLARS - Chard 750ML $9.99 KALI HART - Chard 750ML $12.99 KALI HART - Pinot Noir 750ML $14.99 KEND-JACK - Avant Chard,Sauv Blanc 750ML $11.99 KEND-JACK - Red Blend 750ML $11.99 KEND-JACK - Summation Red. White 750ML $10.99 KEND-JACK - Vintners Reserve Chard 750ML $10.99 KENWOOD- Merlot, Chard, Sauv Blanc, Zin 750ML $7.99

ALASKAN - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 ALASKAN - 6 packs 12oz $6.99 AMSTEL Lt - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 ANCHOR - 6 Packs 12oz $7.99 ANGRY ORCHARD - 12 packs 12oz $13.99 ANGRY ORCHARD - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 BASS - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 BECKS - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 BLUE MOON - 12 packs 12oz $14.99 BROOKLYN - 12 pack Cans 12oz $12.99 BUD - Lime-A-Rita 12 pk Can 8oz $10.99 BUD - Straw-Ber-Rita 12 pk Can 8oz $10.99 BUD - Cran-Brrr-Rita 12 pk Can 8oz $10.99 BUD - Lt Lime or Platinum - 18pks 12oz $15.99 BUD - Lt Lime, or Platinum - 12 packs 12oz $10.99 BUD FAMILY - 18 packs asst 12oz $15.99 BUD FAMILY - 8 packs asst 16oz $6.99 COMMON CIDR- 4 Packs 12oz $6.99 COORS, COORS Light - 12 packs 12oz $10.99 COORS, COORS Light - 18 packs 12oz $15.99 CORONA - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 DESCHUTES- 6 Packs 12oz $6.99 DOS EQUIS - 12 packs 12oz $10.99

KIM CRAWFORD - Sauv Blanc 750ML $10.99 LA CREMA - Chardonnay 750ML $15.99 LAMPLIGHTER CAB, CHARD, RED 750ML $6.49 LAVA CAP - Chard, Barbera, Red Blend 750ML $15.99 LAVA CAP- Cab 750ML $15.99 LAVA CAP- Sangiovese 750ML $16.99 LAVA CAP- Zinfandel 750ML $17.99 LAYER CAKE - Cab Sauv, Garnacha, Malbec 750ML $12.99 LAYER CAKE - Primitivo, or Shiraz 750ML $12.99 LEESE FITCH - Cab Sauv, Chard, Merlot 750ML $8.99 LEESE FITCH - Pinot Noir, or Zinfandel 750ML $8.99 LEESE FITCH - Sauv Blanc 750ML $7.99 LINE 39 - Cab Sauv, Chard, Merlot 750ML $7.49 LINE 39 - Petite Sirah, Pinot Noir, Sauv Blanc 750ML $7.49 MARTINI & ROSSI ASTI 750ML $11.99 MOET CHANDON - Imperial 750ML $38.99 NAPA CELLARS- chardonnay, Zinfandel 750ML $12.99 NEW AGE - White, Rose, Red 750ML $7.99 NOBLE VINES - 337 Cab Sauv 750ML $9.99 OLD SOUL - Zinfandel 750ML $10.99 PINE RIDGE - Chardonnay 750ML $20.99

DRAKES- 6 Packs 12oz $7.99 GOOSE ISLAND - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 GREAT BASIN - Icky IPA 12 Pack Cans 12oz $14.99 GREAT BASIN - Icky IPA - 6 packs 12oz $6.99 GREAT BASIN - Wild Horse Pale Ale - 6 pks 12oz $6.99 GREAT BASIN - Outlaw Oatmeal Stout- 6 pks 12oz $6.99 HEINEKEN - Regular or Light - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 HIGH LIFE - 12 packs 12oz $7.49 HOEGAARDEN - 12 pack bottles 12oz $13.99 HOEGAARDEN - 10 pack cans 14.9oz $13.99 KEYSTONE - 18 pack cans 12oz $11.99 KONA - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 KONA - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 LEFT COAST- Hop juice, Asylum, Voodoo st 4pk 12oz $8.49 LEFT COAST- Trestles, Una mas 4pk 12oz $7.49 LOST COAST- 6 Packs 12oz $6.99 MAGIC HAT- 12 Pack Cans 12oz $12.99 MICHELOB Ultra - 18 packs 12oz $15.99 MIKES HARD CIDER - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 MILLER - MGD, MGD 64, or LITE 12 pk cans/bltl 12oz $10.99 MILLER - MGD, MGD 64, or LITE 18 pk cans/blt 12oz $15.99

PINE RIDGE - Chenin/Viognier 750ML $10.99 PINE RIDGE - Napa Cab Sauv 750ML $31.99 PIPER SONOMA - Brut 750ML $12.99 PLUNGERHEAD - Zinfandel 750ML $10.99 RED GUITAR 750ML $6.99 ROEDERER ESTATE - Brut 750ML $16.99 ROMBAUER - Chardonnay 750ML $32.99 ROW 11- Pinot Noir 750ML $11.99 SANTA MARGARITA - Pinot Grigio 750ML $20.99 SCHRAMSBERG - Blanc de Blancs 750ML $27.99 SEGHESIO - Sonoma Zinfandel 750ML $16.99 SEVEN DEADLY ZINS 750ML $12.99 SILVER OAK - Alexander Cab Sauv 750ML $68.99 SIMI- Cab Sauv 750ML $14.99 SOFIA - Blanc De Blanc 750ML $14.99 THE SEEKER- Mix & Match 750ML $10.99 TOASTED HEAD 750ML $6.99 WENTE - Riva Ranch Chard 750ML $12.99 WHITEHALL LANE- Res Cabernet 750ML $59.99 WHITEHALL LANE- Sauv Blanc 750ML $13.99 WOODBRIDGE - Cab, Chard 1.5L $9.99

MODELO ESPECIAL - 12 pack bottle/Cans 12oz $13.99 NATURAL - 18 packs 12oz $11.99 NEW BELGIUM - 12 pack bottles/Cans 12oz $13.99 NEW BELGIUM - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 NEWCASTLE - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 NINKASI-6 Packs 12oz $7.99 PAULANER OCT FEST LAGER 12PK 12oz $14.99 REDHOOK - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 ROLLING ROCK - 12 packs 12oz $7.99 SAM ADAMS - 12 packs 12oz $13.99 SAM ADAMS - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 SESSION - 12 packs 11oz $9.99 SHOCK TOP - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 ST PAULI GIRL- 6 Packs 12oz $6.99 STELLA ARTOIS - 12 Pk bottles 12oz $13.99 STELLA ARTOIS - 10 Pk cans 14.9oz $13.99 STRONGBOW - Cider 4 packs 14.9oz $6.99 STRONGBOW - Cider 6 packs 12oz $6.99 TECATE - 18 packs 12oz $15.99 WIDMER - 12 packs 12oz $12.99

RENO 3480 Lakeside - 825.0244 | Fourth & Keystone - 323.6277 | 4700 N. Virginia - 322.0588 | 10870 S. Virginia - 853-2367 SPARKS 2990 Sullivan - 337.2367 | CARSON CITY 444 E. Williams - 885.9463 | www.bensfinewineandspirits.com

PLEASE USE OUR PRODUCTS IN MODERATION

PRICES VALID THRU 10/31/14

6 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS FEATURING WINE, SPIRITS, AND BEER OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

|   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   october 23, 2014 

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RN&R  

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LY LOCAL & OWNED ED T OPERA

The

BEST BUYS are at

BEN’S 1800 - Coconut, Silver, or Reposado 750ML $21.99 ABSOLUT - 80 proof/Flavors 750ML $18.99 ABSOLUT - 80 proof/Flavors 1.75L $33.99 ANGELS ENVY 750ML $44.99 AVIATION 750ML $19.99 B&B 750ML $29.99 BACARDI - Flavors 1.75L $19.99 BACARDI - Flavors 750ML $11.99 BACARDI - Gold, Light, Select 1.75L $19.99 BACARDI - Gold, Light, Select 750ML $11.99 BAILEYS 750ML $16.99 BALLANTINES 1.75L $28.99 BALVENIE - 12 Year Old 750ML $47.99 BARENJAGER 750ML $23.99 BASIL HAYDEN 750ML $35.99 BEEFEATER 1.75L $23.99 BELVEDERE 750ML $21.99 BLACK VELVET 1.75L $12.99 BLUE CHAIR BAY RUM - assorted 750ML $15.99 BLUE CHAIR BAY RUM - assorted 1.75L $25.99 BOMBAY 1.75L $25.99 BOMBAY - Saphire 1.75L $34.99 BOODLES GIN 1.75L $29.99 BULLEIT - Bourbon or 95 Rye 750ML $22.99 BUSHMILLS - 10yr 750ML $35.99 BUSHMILLS - 16yr 750ML $66.99 BUSHMILLS - BlackBush 750ML $34.99 BUSHMILLS - Honey 750ML $21.99

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OCTOBER 23, 2014

BUSHMILLS - Irish 750ML $17.99 CAMARENA- Reposado, Silver 750ML $14.99 CAMARENA- Reposado, Silver 1.75L $25.99 CANADIAN CLUB 1.75L $19.99 CANADIAN MIST 1.75L $16.99 CAPT MORGAN - Black Spice 1.75L $28.99 CAPT MORGAN - Spiced 1.75L $20.99 CAPT MORGAN - Spiced 750ML $14.99 CAROLANS - Irish Cream 750ML $9.99 CAROLANS - Irish Cream 1.75L $20.99 CASA PACIFIC - 100% Blue Agave Anejo 750ML $14.99 CASA PACIFIC - 100% Blue Agave Blanco 750ML $12.99 CASA PACIFIC - Blue Agave Reposado 750ML $12.99 CAZADORES - Reposado 750ML $21.99 CELTIC CROSSING 750ML $17.99 CHOPIN - Black 750ML $21.99 CHRISTIAN BROTHERS 1.75L $15.99 CIROC SNAP FROST 750ML $23.99 CLONTARF - Black Label 750ML $17.99 COINTREAU 750ML $29.99 CORRALEJO - Reposado 750ML $19.99 COURVOISIER - VS 750ML $26.99 CROWN ROYAL - Traditional 1.75L $42.99 CROWN ROYAL - Traditional or Maple 750ML $22.99 CROWN ROYAL - X.O. 750ML $45.99 CROWN ROYAL XR 750ML $99.99 CRUZAN 750ML $9.99 CRUZAN 1.75L $11.99

CUERVO - Authentic RTD 1.75L $11.99 CUERVO - Gold and Silver 1.75L $24.99 CUERVO - Gold and Silver 750ML $10.99 DEVOTION VODKA 750ML $15.99 DISARONNO 750ML $16.99 DON JULIO - 1942 750ML $96.99 DON JULIO - Blanco 750ML $37.99 EL REFORMADOR - Blanco 750ML $25.99 EL REFORMADOR - Reposado 750ML $29.99 FIREBALL - Cinnamon Whiskey 1.75L $24.99 FIREBALL - Cinnamon Whiskey 750ML $15.99 FRANGELICO 750ML $20.99 GENTLEMAN JACK 750ML $22.99 GERA Vodka 1.75L $21.99 GERA Vodka 750ML $10.49 GLENFIDDICH - 12 Year Old 750ML $29.99 GLENLIVET - 12 Year Single Malt 750ML $30.99 GLENMORANGIE - 10 Year Old Single Malt 750ML $36.99 GORDONS - Regular 1.75L $10.99 GOSLING - Black Seal 750ML $12.99 GRAND MARNIER 750ML $29.99 GREY GOOSE - Flavors 750ML $25.99 GREY GOOSE - Traditional 750ML $25.99 HERENCIA - 100% Agave Blanco 750ML $21.99 JACK DANIELS - Traditional or Honey 1.75L $36.99 JACK DANIELS - Traditional or Honey 750ML $20.99 JAGERMEISTER 1.75L $40.99

JAGERMEISTER - Traditional, Spice 750ML $14.99 JAMESON - Irish 750ML $20.99 JEFFERSON’S - Reserve 15 Year 750ML $45.99 JEFFERSONS BOURBON 750ML $26.99 JIM BEAM - Black 750ML $18.99 JIM BEAM - Devils Cut 750ML $18.99 JIM BEAM - Jacobs Ghost 750ML $18.99 JIM BEAM - White Label 750ML $15.99 JIM BEAM - White Label 1.75L $26.99 JOHNNIE WALKER - Black 750ML $29.99 JOHNNIE WALKER - RED 1.75L $30.99 KAHLUA 750ML $12.99 KESSLER - Blended Whiskey 1.75L $11.49 KETEL ONE 750ML $23.99 KETEL ONE 1.75L $32.99 KIRK & SWEENEY - Dominican Rum 750ML $29.99 KNAPPOGUE 12YR 750ML $38.99 KNOB CREEK 750ML $27.99 MACALLAN - 12 Year Old Single Malt 750ML $49.99 MAKERS MARK 750ML $26.99 MALIBU 750ML $12.99 MASTERSON’S - 10 Year Rye 750ML $49.99 MASTERSON’S - Barley Whiskey 750ML $49.99 MASTERSON’S - Wheat Whiskey 750ML $49.99 MIDNIGHT MOON 750ML $20.99 MILAGRO- Silver 750ML $21.99 NEW AMSTERDAM 1.75L $16.99 NEW AMSTERDAM 750ML $9.99

NEW AMSTERDAM 1.75L $16.99 NEW AMSTERDAM 750ML $9.99 OLE SMOKY MOONSHINE 750ML $19.99 PARROT BAY 750ML $11.99 PATRON - Anejo 1.75L $109.99 PATRON - Citronge 750ML $14.99 PATRON - Reposado 1.75L $105.99 PATRON - Silver 750ML $37.99 PATRON - XO Café 750ML $14.99 PENDLETON - Canadian 1.75L $45.99 PENDLETON - Canadian 750ML $21.99 PINNACLE - assorted Vodka 1.75L $16.99 PINNACLE - assorted Vodka 750ML $7.99 POTTERS - Canadian 1.75L $12.99 POTTERS Brandy 1.75L $15.99 POTTERS Gin 1.75L $10.99 POTTERS Rum - Gold or Silver 1.75L $12.49 POTTERS Tequila - Gold 1.75L $16.99 POTTERS Vodka 1.75L $9.99 PYRAT - XO Reserve 750ML $14.99 RICH & RARE 1.75L $12.99 RUM CHATA - Cream 750ML $18.99 SAILOR JERRY - Spiced 750ML $16.99 SAUZA - Gold 750ML $9.99 SAUZA - Gold or Silver 1.75L $17.99 SAUZA - Hornitos Reposado 750ML $19.99 SEAGRAMS GIN 750ML $8.99 SEAGRAMS V.O. 1.75L $19.99

3 GIRLS- Cab, Pinot, Red Blend 750ML $9.99 3 GIRLS- Chardonnay 750ML $8.99 AFFRESCO - Moscato D’Asti 750ML $9.99 ANTINORI - Toscana Red 750ML $16.99 APOTHIC-Red & White & Dark 750ML $7.99 BAREFOOT 750ML $4.99 BAREFOOT 1.5L $8.49 BAREFOOT- Bubbly 750ML $7.49 BEAULIEU CENT- Cab, Merlot, Chard 750ML $3.99 BELLE GLOS - Clark & Telephone Pinot Noir 750ML $34.99 BELLE GLOS - Meiomi Pinot Noir 750ML $17.99 BERINGER Fnders Estate - Chard, or Merlot 750ML $6.99 BERINGER Founders Estate - Cab Sauv 750ML $6.99 BLACK RIDGE - Cab Sauv, Chard, Merlot 750ML $5.99 BLK RDGE - Moscato, Pinot Grig, Red Blnd 750ML $5.99 CAPOSALDO- Sparkling 750ML $8.99 CH ST JEAN - Calif Cab Sauv and Merlot 750ML $9.99 CH ST JEAN - Sonoma Chardonnay 750ML $9.99 CHAT STE MICHELLE - Gewurz, Dry Riesling 750ML $6.99

SEAGRAMS VODKA 1.75L $13.99 SHELLBACK RUM 750ML $9.49 SKYY - all types 1.75L $19.99 SMIRNOFF - assorted 1.75L $18.99 SMIRNOFF - assorted 750ML $11.99 SOBIESKI 1.75L $19.99 SOBIESKI - assorted 750ML $8.99 SOUTHERN COMFORT 1.75L $20.99 SOUTHERN COMFORT 750ML $10.99 STOLICHNAYA 750ML $18.99 STOLICHNAYA 1.75L $28.99 SVEDKA 750ML $9.99 SVEDKA 1.75L $16.99 TANQUERAY 1.75L $31.99 TEMPLETON - Rye 750ML $36.99 THREE OLIVES- assorted vodka 750ML $15.99 THREE OLIVES- assorted vodka 1.75L $18.99 TIPPY COW 750ML $12.99 TITO’S VODKA 1.75L $31.99 TITO’S VODKA 750ML $17.99 TUACA - Traditional, 750ML $15.99 TY KU 750ML $17.99 UV VODKA - Assorted 750ML $8.99 VINIQ- Shimmery Liqueur 750ML $15.99 WILD TURKEY - 101 750ML $16.99 WOLFSCHMIDT 1.75L $10.99

CHAT STE MICHELLE - Cab Sauv or Merlot 750ML $12.99 CHAT STE MICHELLE - Chard 750ML $7.99 CHAT STE MICHELLE - Riesling 750ML $5.99 CK MONDAVI 1.5L $8.49 CLICQUOT - Brut 750ML $44.99 CLOS DU BOIS- Chard 750ML $7.99 COLUMBIA CREST Grand Est - Cab Sauv 750ML $7.99 COLUMBIA CREST Grand Estates - Chard 750ML $7.99 COLUMBIA CREST Grand Estates - Merlot 750ML $7.99 CONUNDRUM - White 750ML $14.99 DECOY MERLOT 750ML $18.99 DOM PERIGNON 750ML $199.99 EDNA VALLEY- Merlot, Sauv Blanc 750ML $9.49 EDNA VALLEY- Chard, Cabernet 750ML $9.49 FERRARI CARANO - Cab Sauv 750ML $26.99 FERRARI CARANO - Chard 750ML $17.99 FERRARI CARANO - Fume Blanc 750ML $9.99 FERRARI CARANO - Merlot 750ML $15.49 FERRARI CARANO - Siena 750ML $16.99 FETZER - Cab Sauv, Chard, Merlot, Malbec 1.5L $9.99

FETZER - Gewurztraminer, Pinot Grigio, 1.5L $9.99 FREIXENET- Cord Neg Brut, Ex Dry 750ML $8.49 GHOST PINES- Cab, Mer, Red Bl, Pinot 750ML $15.99 GHOST PINES-Chard, Zin 750ML $12.99 GLORIA FERRER- Brut, Blanc De Noir 750ML $15.99 GNARLY HEAD - Cab, Authentic Red 750ML $9.49 GNARLY HEAD - Chard, Pinot Grigio 750ML $6.99 GNARLY HEAD - Zinfandel 750ML $5.99 GROTH - Sauv Blanc 750ML $15.99 IF YOO SEE KAY - Red 750ML $16.99 INTO ZIN - Zinfandel 750ML $8.99 J - Sparkling Cuvee 750ML $19.99 J LOHR- CHARD-RVRSTN 750ML $9.99 JORDAN - Chard 750ML $19.99 JOSH CELLARS - Cab Sauv 750ML $11.99 JOSH CELLARS - Chard 750ML $9.99 KALI HART - Chard 750ML $12.99 KALI HART - Pinot Noir 750ML $14.99 KEND-JACK - Avant Chard,Sauv Blanc 750ML $11.99 KEND-JACK - Red Blend 750ML $11.99 KEND-JACK - Summation Red. White 750ML $10.99 KEND-JACK - Vintners Reserve Chard 750ML $10.99 KENWOOD- Merlot, Chard, Sauv Blanc, Zin 750ML $7.99

ALASKAN - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 ALASKAN - 6 packs 12oz $6.99 AMSTEL Lt - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 ANCHOR - 6 Packs 12oz $7.99 ANGRY ORCHARD - 12 packs 12oz $13.99 ANGRY ORCHARD - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 BASS - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 BECKS - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 BLUE MOON - 12 packs 12oz $14.99 BROOKLYN - 12 pack Cans 12oz $12.99 BUD - Lime-A-Rita 12 pk Can 8oz $10.99 BUD - Straw-Ber-Rita 12 pk Can 8oz $10.99 BUD - Cran-Brrr-Rita 12 pk Can 8oz $10.99 BUD - Lt Lime or Platinum - 18pks 12oz $15.99 BUD - Lt Lime, or Platinum - 12 packs 12oz $10.99 BUD FAMILY - 18 packs asst 12oz $15.99 BUD FAMILY - 8 packs asst 16oz $6.99 COMMON CIDR- 4 Packs 12oz $6.99 COORS, COORS Light - 12 packs 12oz $10.99 COORS, COORS Light - 18 packs 12oz $15.99 CORONA - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 DESCHUTES- 6 Packs 12oz $6.99 DOS EQUIS - 12 packs 12oz $10.99

KIM CRAWFORD - Sauv Blanc 750ML $10.99 LA CREMA - Chardonnay 750ML $15.99 LAMPLIGHTER CAB, CHARD, RED 750ML $6.49 LAVA CAP - Chard, Barbera, Red Blend 750ML $15.99 LAVA CAP- Cab 750ML $15.99 LAVA CAP- Sangiovese 750ML $16.99 LAVA CAP- Zinfandel 750ML $17.99 LAYER CAKE - Cab Sauv, Garnacha, Malbec 750ML $12.99 LAYER CAKE - Primitivo, or Shiraz 750ML $12.99 LEESE FITCH - Cab Sauv, Chard, Merlot 750ML $8.99 LEESE FITCH - Pinot Noir, or Zinfandel 750ML $8.99 LEESE FITCH - Sauv Blanc 750ML $7.99 LINE 39 - Cab Sauv, Chard, Merlot 750ML $7.49 LINE 39 - Petite Sirah, Pinot Noir, Sauv Blanc 750ML $7.49 MARTINI & ROSSI ASTI 750ML $11.99 MOET CHANDON - Imperial 750ML $38.99 NAPA CELLARS- chardonnay, Zinfandel 750ML $12.99 NEW AGE - White, Rose, Red 750ML $7.99 NOBLE VINES - 337 Cab Sauv 750ML $9.99 OLD SOUL - Zinfandel 750ML $10.99 PINE RIDGE - Chardonnay 750ML $20.99

DRAKES- 6 Packs 12oz $7.99 GOOSE ISLAND - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 GREAT BASIN - Icky IPA 12 Pack Cans 12oz $14.99 GREAT BASIN - Icky IPA - 6 packs 12oz $6.99 GREAT BASIN - Wild Horse Pale Ale - 6 pks 12oz $6.99 GREAT BASIN - Outlaw Oatmeal Stout- 6 pks 12oz $6.99 HEINEKEN - Regular or Light - 12 packs 12oz $11.99 HIGH LIFE - 12 packs 12oz $7.49 HOEGAARDEN - 12 pack bottles 12oz $13.99 HOEGAARDEN - 10 pack cans 14.9oz $13.99 KEYSTONE - 18 pack cans 12oz $11.99 KONA - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 KONA - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 LEFT COAST- Hop juice, Asylum, Voodoo st 4pk 12oz $8.49 LEFT COAST- Trestles, Una mas 4pk 12oz $7.49 LOST COAST- 6 Packs 12oz $6.99 MAGIC HAT- 12 Pack Cans 12oz $12.99 MICHELOB Ultra - 18 packs 12oz $15.99 MIKES HARD CIDER - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 MILLER - MGD, MGD 64, or LITE 12 pk cans/bltl 12oz $10.99 MILLER - MGD, MGD 64, or LITE 18 pk cans/blt 12oz $15.99

PINE RIDGE - Chenin/Viognier 750ML $10.99 PINE RIDGE - Napa Cab Sauv 750ML $31.99 PIPER SONOMA - Brut 750ML $12.99 PLUNGERHEAD - Zinfandel 750ML $10.99 RED GUITAR 750ML $6.99 ROEDERER ESTATE - Brut 750ML $16.99 ROMBAUER - Chardonnay 750ML $32.99 ROW 11- Pinot Noir 750ML $11.99 SANTA MARGARITA - Pinot Grigio 750ML $20.99 SCHRAMSBERG - Blanc de Blancs 750ML $27.99 SEGHESIO - Sonoma Zinfandel 750ML $16.99 SEVEN DEADLY ZINS 750ML $12.99 SILVER OAK - Alexander Cab Sauv 750ML $68.99 SIMI- Cab Sauv 750ML $14.99 SOFIA - Blanc De Blanc 750ML $14.99 THE SEEKER- Mix & Match 750ML $10.99 TOASTED HEAD 750ML $6.99 WENTE - Riva Ranch Chard 750ML $12.99 WHITEHALL LANE- Res Cabernet 750ML $59.99 WHITEHALL LANE- Sauv Blanc 750ML $13.99 WOODBRIDGE - Cab, Chard 1.5L $9.99

MODELO ESPECIAL - 12 pack bottle/Cans 12oz $13.99 NATURAL - 18 packs 12oz $11.99 NEW BELGIUM - 12 pack bottles/Cans 12oz $13.99 NEW BELGIUM - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 NEWCASTLE - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 NINKASI-6 Packs 12oz $7.99 PAULANER OCT FEST LAGER 12PK 12oz $14.99 REDHOOK - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 ROLLING ROCK - 12 packs 12oz $7.99 SAM ADAMS - 12 packs 12oz $13.99 SAM ADAMS - 6 packs 12oz $7.99 SESSION - 12 packs 11oz $9.99 SHOCK TOP - 12 packs 12oz $12.99 ST PAULI GIRL- 6 Packs 12oz $6.99 STELLA ARTOIS - 12 Pk bottles 12oz $13.99 STELLA ARTOIS - 10 Pk cans 14.9oz $13.99 STRONGBOW - Cider 4 packs 14.9oz $6.99 STRONGBOW - Cider 6 packs 12oz $6.99 TECATE - 18 packs 12oz $15.99 WIDMER - 12 packs 12oz $12.99

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PRICES VALID THRU 10/31/14

6 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS FEATURING WINE, SPIRITS, AND BEER OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

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RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

sushi all the time sushi all the time sushiall the time open 7 days a week

mon - sat 11:30am - 9:30pm 775.589.2067 775.589.2067 195 highway highway 50.,daily stateline 50., stateline highest quality &195 fresh fish / take-out orders welcome / full bar with hot & cold sake sun 11:30am - 9:00pm 1/2 mile1/2 north mileofnorth the casinos of the casinos Open 7 Days a Week / Monday - Saturday1507 11:30am 9:30pmSt./- Sunday - 9:00pm sushipiertahoe.com sushipiertahoe.com So. -Virginia Midtown,11:30am Reno - 775.825.5225 775.589.2067 195 highway 50., stateline 1/2 mile north of the casinos sushipiertahoe.com

1825 Silverada Blvd., 355-5835

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

all you can eat all you can eat all you can eat

highest quality & fresh fish daily, take-out

The Wok Chinese Restaurant This tidy, 60-seat Chinese eatery offers an extensive menu, like many Chinese restaurants, and pays very close by Dave Preston attention to the quality of ChineseAmerican cuisine it serves. Owner Marty Liu grew up in Szechuan Province and has a penchant for tasty food and proves it on the plate. All the food is prepared in a wok, a versatile round-bottomed cooking vessel originating from Guangdong Province in China. It’s one of the most common cooking utensils in China as well as in East Photo/AlliSon Young

highest quality highest&quality fresh fish & fresh dailyfish / take-out daily / take-out orders welcome orders welcome / full bar/ with full bar hot with & cold hotsake & cold sake Open 7 Days Opena7Week Days a/ Week Monday / Monday - Saturday - Saturday 11:30am 11:30am - 9:30pm - 9:30pm /with Sunday / 11:30am Sunday 11:30am - 9:00pm- 9:00pm orders welcome, full bar hot & cold sake

Wok of ages

that’s how we roll

Owner Marty Liu   prepares walnut  shrimp with shredded  lettuce and parsley  garnish at The Wok.

For more information, visit www.thewok chinesereno.com.

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and Southeast Asia. I learned to cook in one many years ago in San Francisco and know that the flavor, tastes and essence imparted by a hot wok on food during stir frying allows everything to take on golden flavors and great textures. Lunch is served from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., with a special 15-item menu ($6.95-$8.50) including egg rolls, crab cheese puffs, and pork or chicken chow mein. The same menu translates to dinner special, adding pork rice and chicken chow mein ($9.95-$11.50). The a la carte menu is grand with appetizers ($3.95$10.95), soups, chicken, pork, beef, seafood, egg foo young, chop suey, fried rice, chow mein, pan fried noodles, and chow fun, with prices ranging from $6.95 - $12.95. I started with a trio of appetizers: eight crab cheese puffs ($6.50), eight pot stickers ($6.95), and eight

walnut shrimp (13.95). The shrimp were lightly battered with a corn starch egg coating and wok fried, coated with honey and a sauce that was almost savory with a hint of heat. With the crispy walnuts and honey, it was a great treat for the taste buds. The pork-filled pot stickers were light. The housemade sauce used soy, ginger, rice vinegar and a little shallot. The cream cheese-filled crab puffs were light, airy and rich with generous crab meat. The lettuce wraps ($7.95) were filled with chicken and seasoned with cilantro, a hint of ginger, garlic and sprinkled with crispy rice noodles. It was full of flavor, and then I added the housemade hot chili oil, and now you’re talking Szechuan hot. The chili oil is made from vegetable oil, garlic, cilantro and Japanese red peppers. I’m not a huge fan of wings, but when done in a wok, I know from experience, these are not your bar food foibles. Eight garlic and eight salt-and-pepper wings ($8.50 ea.) appeared, and the smell alone sold me. Stir frying in a wok locks in flavor and moisture. The light sauce on the garlic wings had that Gilroy goodness without being overpowering, and the salt-and-pepper got the attention of my taste buds. This is classy tailgate material, and take-out is absolutely part of this dining habitat. My entrée was filet of fish in black bean sauce ($12.50). A flounder with the ever-so-lightly corn starch-egg batter wok fried and then gently bathed in succulent black bean sauce—douchi. Douchi is made by fermenting and salting black soybeans. The flavor is sharp, pungent and spicy in smell, with a taste that’s salty and somewhat bitter and sweet. But when used in stir fry, it mellows and complements the fish with a pleasing heartiness as your palate marries sea with earth. They offer two build-a-dinner options: Cantonese ($12.95 per person) and the Wok ($16.95 per person)—a lot of choices and a lot of food. The simple wine list includes by-the-glass ($5) and a half dozen beers ($4), Chinese, Japanese and domestic. For dessert ($4.50), I had a bodacious blueberry cheesecake with a graham cracker-butter crust and Philly cream cheese. Two amazing bites, and I was out for the count. Ω


The Department of Theatre & Dance

„

School of the Arts

ƻ,7(ǜ3(Ǩ,ƫ,&ƧDŽ1Ǩ(ǀ2ǛǑ6

Department of Theatre & Dance „ School of the Arts

University of Nevada, Reno October 24-25, 2014 FREE EVENT 5:00 P.M. Matthewson IGT Knowledge Center, Tower Entrance

7:00 P.M. Church Fine Arts Building, Front Door Gallery

Sierra Nevada Ballet Presents

Duke’s Place with the Reno Jazz Orchestra Carson City Community Center October 24, 2014 7:30 PM

Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts November 1, 2014 7:30 PM

An original story in dance celebrating the 150th of Nevada, choreographed and directed by Rosine Bena featuring Tap Star, Sam Weber, and the Reno Jazz Orchestra.

TICKETS START AT $22

City of Carson Redevelopment

Oct. 24th Tickets: 386-5456 or gina704@msn.com Nov. 1st Tickets: Pioneer Center Box Office E. L. Cord Hours Mon-Fri 11am - 6pm (866) 553-6605 or Foundation pioneercenter.com

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  SNB_DukesPlace_Qtrpg.indd 1

10/13/2014 1:16:58 PM

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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

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Tanks for the memories Fury Right in time for Halloween, writer-director David Ayer has come up with a genuine horror show in Fury, his take on a World War II tank crew trying to survive in the last days of the war. This film goes full bore in showing the horrors of war, with its very first scene depicting a brutal act of violence that shows Ayer is not playing games. His intentions are to show by the effects of war on a group of men who are Bob Grimm clinging to the last threads of sanity after years of claustrophobic, blood-soaked terror inside bgrimm@ newsreview.c om a tank. Brad Pitt leads the crew as Don “Wardaddy” Collier, a grizzled, scarred up individual resorting to arguably insane behavior as he treks across Nazi Germany. When he’s saddled with new recruit Norman (Logan Lerman), his behavior becomes a strange mix of paternal and completely unhinged.

4

"But ... what would Lee Marvin do?"

1 Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5

Other members of the crew include Boyd “Bible” Swan (Shia LaBeouf), Trini “Gordo” Garcia (Michael Pena) and Grady “Coon-Ass” Travis (Jon Bernthal). It’s arguable that Ayer created each of these characters as stereotypical odes to the John Wayne war movies of yore. However, that’s where the common thread to bravado-filled old timey war movies ends. While the word “cliché” might pop to mind looking at the description of these characters, be assured there is nothing clichéd about the way they are portrayed. Much of the film takes place inside the tank, with a few breaks, most notably a scene when Wardaddy introduces Logan to a nice German girl while he has some eggs. The carnage in the battle scenes is unrelenting. A sequence where a group of U.S. tanks go up against a superior German tank is as harrowing as moviemaking gets.

excellent

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OCTOBER 23, 2014

It all builds up to a final sequence where the tank breaks down, and Wardaddy decides he isn’t going to run away from a large group of enemy soldiers approaching. This comes off as somewhat of a suicide mission, with the crew deciding to fight it out alongside their leader. I have to believe that many allied soldiers made similar decisions in taking the Nazis down 70 years ago. Not every battle was planned, and the odds were often stacked against them. Ayer presents a scenario that’s crazy, but perhaps realistic in many ways. No movie could authentically depict the horror that men like those portrayed in this film went through. Ayer and company go to great lengths to show when a nightmare goes well beyond nightmare into something altogether hellish. This is something World War II soldiers went through every day, every minute. Pitt is just a few degrees removed from his Aldo Raine from Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds. It’s as if Aldo finished scalping Christoph Waltz, shaved his mustache, and joined a tank battalion. The Aldo comparison is mostly aesthetic and comes across in the accent Pitt employs. Wardaddy is totally lacking in humor. It’s a powerful characterization from an actor who rarely missteps. The tabloids have had a field day with the weird stuff LaBeouf did while making this movie: pulling out his tooth, Nicolas Cage style, refusing to shower and just acting super strange in general. Whatever weirdness he put cast and crew through results in his best screen work to date. As the preacher amongst the crew, LaBeouf is actually quite moving as a man who keeps his faith and finds immense joy in reciting scripture. This performance gives him a chance to get his once promising career back on track. Pena, who worked with Ayer before on End of Watch, is terrific, as usual, as are Lerman and Bernthal. Bernthal, like Pitt, calls upon a past character—the jerk he played on The Walking Dead—for inspiration. Stay away from Fury if you can’t handle onscreen gore. As stated above, this one is quite vicious right out of the gate and straight through its entire two-hour-plus running time. As action films go, it’s a real winner. As war films go, it’s one to be remembered. As horror films go, I doubt you’ll see anything scarier this month. Ω

2

A Walk Among the Tombstones

Liam Neeson plays a former policeman and recovering alcoholic in director Scott Frank’s sometimes interesting and always unpleasant serial killer drama. Neeson’s Matt Scudder, after accidentally killing a civilian during a shootout, has gone rogue since his days on the force. Eight years have passed, and while he’s quit drinking, he’s doing some pretty unsavory jobs as a private investigator. He gets pulled into the world of a drug dealer after his wife has been kidnapped, and a lot of bad, bad things start happening. Neeson is very good in the film, but the script, written by Frank and based on the novel by Lawrence Block, has too many cardboard characters. Worst of all is a homeless kid sidekick. There’s also the strungout heroin addict, the whispery-voiced abductor of women, and the creepy guy who tends the cemetery and keeps pigeons on the roof … and he knows something. I liked Neeson here, and I wouldn’t mind seeing the character again. Hopefully, the next film with this character—if there is one—trims the fat.

2

Dolphin Tale 2

Call this one The Empire Strikes Back of Dolphin Tale movies, in that it is slightly better than the original (not much—just slightly), and it has Tauntauns (actually, that’s not true). The likes of Morgan Freeman, Ashley Judd and Harry Connick Jr. rejoin annoying child actors Nathan Gamble and Cozi Zuehlsdorff (yes, the Cozi Zuehlsdorff) for another round of gooey sentimentality involving dolphins. This time out, and probably due to all of those current issues involving whales and dolphins in captivity, the story spends a lot of time on rehabbing and releasing animals rather than confining them for human amusement. In addition to Winter, the dolphin with the prosthetic tail, there’s a pretty awesome sea turtle and a kooky pelican that kids will love. The movie kind of works as educational fare, but when it drifts away from the aquarium tanks, it’s a real hell ride. It must be said that Harry Connick Jr. can’t act for beans, Ashley Judd’s career has really hit the skids, and Morgan Freeman just has no business being within a million miles of this film. Gamble and Zuehlsdorff (yes, the Cozi Zuehlsdorff) are, I’m sure, a couple of exquisite human beings, but watching them in a movie is an annoying, tedious task. I love the dolphins and aquatic life in this film. It’s the humans who drive me crazy.

3

The Equalizer

Based on a TV show from the ’80s that I never once watched, Denzel Washington plays Robert McCall, a quiet employee at a Home Depot-type store. Robert likes to go drink tea at a local diner and read his book, and it appears that there's very little to him. When a young prostitute (Chloe Grace Moretz) gets into trouble with Russian mobsters, Robert springs into action, and major details of his past are slowly revealed. Washington is pretty damned great in the role, playing a sweet, gentle man who can tear your face off in an instant without blinking an eye. The film is directed by Antoine Fuqua (Training Day), and while Fuqua resorts to a lot of visual clichés (slow motion, rain), he totally owns those clichés. Marton Csokas is good and scary as Teddy, the film’s main bad guy. His confrontations with Robert are quite memorable. The movie doesn’t offer much when it comes to new things, but it does provide solid entertainment through and through.

5

Gone Girl

David Fincher set out to make the nastiest, most poisonous movie about marriages gone bad ever made, and I think he succeeded. Fincher and Gillian Flynn, the author of the novel and screenplay, came up with a toxic cocktail, laced with dark humor, scabrous satire and blistering performances. On the day of his fifth anniversary, Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) returns to his home after sulking at the bar he owns with his sister (a funny Carrie Coon) to discover his wife, Amy (Rosamund Pike), is missing. Nick calls the police and the in-laws, and quickly finds himself sucked up in a media circus that leaves him dazed and confused. His demeanor in public is a strange combination of a malaise and ill-timed smiles. Yeah … he’s a suspect. Through a series of narrated flashbacks, we hear the story of the Flynne marriage from Amy’s perspective, chronicled in her diary. Then, at about the halfway point, the movie goes completely, wonderfully insane. For those unaware of the plot twist, my best advice to you is that you should accept it—even though

it’s totally bug nuts—sit back, and enjoy the rest of this messed-up ride. Anybody who goes to this movie thinking they’re going to see something grounded in reality will be setting themselves up for disappointment. Gone Girl is nightmarish fantasy, a hyper-sensationalized “what-if” that thrives on its implausibility. Had this movie tried to stick closer to reality, it would’ve killed too much of the fun. Pike, a British actress perhaps known best for Jack Reacher, gets the role of a lifetime with Amy, and she devours it. Affleck shows what’s been true all along in his career: He’s a fine actor capable of great nuance and a movie star of the highest order.

1

The Judge

The prospect of Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall sharing a movie together is, in a word, awesome. So what does director David Dobkin, with Downey as producer, do with such an opportunity? He gives us a movie so cliché-ridden that the occasional inspired moments scream out at us like a lost puppy yelping while being swarmed by rabid bats. Downey plays Hank Palmer, one of those typical movie lawyers who gets bad guys sprung free in Chicago and pisses, literally and figuratively, on lawyers trying to put bad men in jail. Just before he gets another baddie off the hook, a call comes in from home. It turns out his mom died while tending to her flowers, so Hank is off to his hometown for the funeral. In that hometown is his lousy dad, Joseph (Duvall), the town judge and a major league prick. Hank hates his dad. Oh boy, oh boy, does he hate him. Joseph hates his son. Gee willikers, does he hate that little son of a bitch. The reasons for their mutual hatred are slowly revealed, and not a one of those reasons comes as a surprise. Hank does the funeral, and is all ready to bolt and go deal with his newly developing divorce when he gets called back to town. Turns out dad’s Cadillac and, consequently, dad are being investigated in a possibly intentional vehicular homicide. You know what this means? Court drama! Downey Jr. and Duvall try their best to make something out of this, but their work is attached to a lame script that wants to be too many kinds of films at once. It’s overstuffed, boring, mawkish crap.

2

The Maze Runner

The maze in the title is a fun spectacle full of shifting walls and weird spider robots. When the movie is in the maze, it is good. When it’s out of the maze, it kind of stinks. Dylan O’Brien plays Thomas, a teenager transported to a camp surrounded by a large, constantly shifting maze. The camp is inhabited by other teens, including Alby (Aml Ameen), Newt (Thomas Brodie-Sangster) and Gally (Will Poulter). They are all clueless about why they have been put there and how to escape, but they do send a squad of “runners” into the maze to map it out and search its outer reaches. The searches are fruitless until the mysterious Thomas takes charge. The mystery of the maze is intriguing, but the payoff is blah. The Lord of the Flies drama between the leads is typical, boring stuff. I liked the design of the maze, and the maze turns out to be the film’s most interesting character. Second place goes to Poulter, who is a long way from the comic territory he staked out in We’re the Millers. Too bad the rest of the movie feels like a patchwork of many movies before.

1

Men, Women & Children

Director Jason Reitman delivers a terribly boring, lethargic and woefully predictable look at humans and the way they interact with the internet in a movie that winds up being nothing more than an ugly commercial for the Ashley Madison dating services. Adam Sandler plays a sex-addicted married man who jerks off to internet porn and eventually graduates to an escort service. Meanwhile, the wife (Rosemarie DeWitt) has started having sex with men she meets on Ashley Madison. Oooh … the internet is bad. Jennifer Garner plays a mother who obsessively stalks her own daughter’s (Kaitlyn Dever) internet activity, while Judy Greer plays a mom who has no problem creating a provocative website for her daughter (Olivia Crocicchia). That darned internet! Everybody in this movie is either maddeningly morose or completely deranged. Reitman might think he’s delivering some sort of time capsule movie showing us how technology is the destroyer of relationships and real human communications, but there is absolutely nothing provocative or probing about what he’s saying in this movie. It’s a total drag, squandering a talented cast and offering nothing new.


Wanderer Monica Houghton When she was living in Cleveland, Ohio, studying to become a composer, Monica Houghton found that what she missed by Kent Irwin most about Nevada was its blue skies, wide open spaces and grandiose mountains. She had gone to Ohio initially with a specific project in mind: an opera set in Virginia City, based on the writings of Mark Twain and Dan DeQuille. She finished that opera, The Big Bonanza, and found that she had to return to Reno, the place where she found the most inspiration from nature. Houghton grew up in a musical family. At first, she resisted learning piano, being forced into lessons at age 6. All it took was a Bach fugue and a Beethoven sonata for her to truly awaken to music. “That was when the lights came on,” said Houghton.

Photo/Kent IrwIn

compositions are moody, elemental meditations that are alternately cacophonous and harmonious, at times ethereal, always striving for a wide range of sound and feeling. Most of her works are written for relatively small arrangements of strings, woodwinds and piano. These pieces are mind-bending explorations of tone. They can be everything from serene to downright terrifying. “People have described it as haunting, evocative,” said Houghton. “But I never try and consciously address a feeling through my work. How do I put it in words? It feels something like Tom Hanks in Castaway, pounding on his chest, saying ‘I have made fire!’” Evading categorization is somewhat stock-in-trade for musicians of all kinds, but listening to Houghton’s work, it’s clear that her style attempts to push the boundaries. She uses discord in novel ways, by transforming something discordant into something melodious, and then turning it back again. Things that are initially menacing, ominous or creepy can turn into something pretty, and vice versa. “The one thing I would say unites my work is a sense of spirituality,” said Houghton. “I see music as a way to transcend the individual. Music brings people together.” For someone so interested in wide open space, Houghton’s music can often feel very claustrophobic. The cluttered elements provide contrast with more contemplative, spacious arrangements that incorporate many different world influences. Graduating from Harvard with a degree in Chinese Language and Literature imparts some Eastern influences on her style that can be heard from time to time. An avid hiker, Houghton recently returned from walking coast-to-coast from the Irish Sea to the North Sea in England. In music and in life she chooses to walk down unfamiliar paths, just to see where they end up. Of her compositions, Houghton has said that she prefers to explore regardless of the result. “Often it goes nowhere,” said Houghton. “But sometimes it goes somewhere.” Ω

Composer Monica Houghton at work on the piano.

Growing up in the 1960s also provided Houghton with a diverse range of music that opened her eyes to strange possibilities. Everyone from Joni Mitchell to the Beatles to Jimi Hendrix fascinated Houghton and allowed her to imagine less orthodox ways of putting sounds together, an orientation that would reveal itself in her work decades later. Although music has always been a part of her life, Houghton has only been composing for the last 20 years. Locally, her work has been performed everywhere from the University of Nevada, Reno, to the Nevada Museum of Art. It has been performed in Ohio and Oregon, and as far away as Shanghai. Houghton is inspired, as she puts it, by the “Three Bs”: Bach, Beethoven and Brahms, but her work itself isn’t strictly classical. Her

For more information, visit www.monica houghton.com.

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THURSDAY THURSDAY 10/23 10/23

FRIDAY FRIDAY 10/24 10/24

125 125 W. W. Third Third St., St., (775) (775) 323-5005 323-5005

Blues Blues jam jam w/Blue w/Blue Haven, Haven, 9:30pm, 9:30pm, no no cover cover

Comedy Comedy Showcase Showcase w/Anthony w/Anthony K, K, Brooke Brooke Mustache Kitty, 6pm, no cover Mustache Kitty, 6pm, no cover Unger, Unger, Paul Paul Spock, Spock, Cliff Cliff McGrady, McGrady, 9pm, 9pm, $5 $5

DG DG Kicks, Kicks, 9pm, 9pm, Tu, Tu, no no cover cover

55 STAR STAR SALOON SALOON

Karaoke, Karaoke, 10pm, 10pm, no no cover cover

DJ DJ Boogi, Boogi, 10pm, 10pm, no no cover cover before before 10pm, 10pm, $5 $5 after after

DJ DJ Boogi, Boogi, 10pm, 10pm, no no cover cover before before 10pm, 10pm, $5 $5 after after

Open Open Mic Mic w/Steve w/Steve Elegant, Elegant, 7pm, 7pm, Tu, Tu, no no cover cover Karaoke, Karaoke, 10pm, 10pm, Tu, Tu, W, W, no no cover cover

Vanna, Vanna, Sirens Sirens & & Sailors, Sailors, Sylar, Sylar, The The Jet Jet Stole Stole Home, Home, Our Our Devices, Devices, 7:30pm, 7:30pm, $13-$15 $13-$15

Raven, Raven, Blood Blood Agent, Agent, 8pm, 8pm, Tu, Tu, $10-$12 $10-$12 Music Music Trivia Trivia w/Chris w/Chris Payne, Payne, 9pm, 9pm, W, W, no no cover cover

3RD STREET STREET 3RD

132 132 West West St., St., (775) (775) 329-2878 329-2878

THE THE ALLEY ALLEY

906 906 Victorian Victorian Ave., Ave., Sparks; Sparks; (775) (775) 358-8891 358-8891

Loud Loud As As Folk Folk hosted hosted by by Spike Spike McGuire, McGuire, 7:30pm, 7:30pm, $5 $5 donation donation

SATURDAY SATURDAY 10/25 10/25

SUNDAY SUNDAY 10/26 10/26

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/27-10/29 10/27-10/29

BAR-M-BAR BAR-M-BAR

The The Psychedelic Psychedelic Furs Furs Oct. Oct. 25, 25, 7:30 7:30 p.m. p.m. Harrah’s Harrah’s Lake Lake Tahoe Tahoe 15 Highway 50 15 Highway 50 Stateline Stateline 588-6611 588-6611

Monday Monday Night Night Open Open Mic, Mic, 8pm, 8pm, M, M, no no cover cover

816 816 Highway Highway 40 40 West, West, Verdi; Verdi; (775) (775) 351-3206 351-3206

CBQ CBQ

1330 1330 Scheels Scheels Dr., Dr., Sparks; Sparks; (775) (775) 359-1109 359-1109

Karaoke Karaoke with with Ernesto, Ernesto, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

Acoustiphonics, Acoustiphonics, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

CEOL CEOL IRISH IRISH PUB PUB

Blarney Blarney Band, Band, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

Neil Neil O’Kane, O’Kane, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

538 538 S. S. Virginia Virginia St., St., (775) (775) 329-5558 329-5558

CHAPEL CHAPEL TAVERN TAVERN

1099 1099 S. S. Virginia Virginia St., St., (775) (775) 324-2244 324-2244

Sonic Sonic Mass Mass w/DJ w/DJ Tigerbunny, Tigerbunny, 7pm, 7pm, no no cover cover

COMMA COMMA COFFEE COFFEE

Comedy 3rd 3rd Street, Street, 125 125 W. W. Third Third St., St., 323-5005: 323-5005: Comedy Comedy Night Night & & Improv Improv w/Patrick w/Patrick Shillito, Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover W, 9pm, no cover Catch Catch aa Rising Rising Star, Star, Silver Silver Legacy, Legacy, 407 407 N. N. Virginia St., St., 329-4777: 329-4777: Gabriel Gabriel Rutledge, Rutledge, Virginia Th, Su, Su, 7:30pm, 7:30pm, $15.95; $15.95; Gilbert Gilbert Gottfried, Gottfried, Th, F-Sa, 7:30pm, 7:30pm, 9:30pm; 9:30pm; $28.50, $28.50, $35; $35; F-Sa, Harrison Greenbaum, Greenbaum, Tu-W, Tu-W, 7:30pm, 7:30pm, $15.95 $15.95 Harrison The The Improv Improv at at Harveys Harveys Cabaret, Cabaret, Harveys Harveys Lake Lake Tahoe, Tahoe, Stateline, Stateline, (800) (800) 553-1022: 553-1022: John Henton, Dana Eagle, Th, Th-F, John Henton, Dana Eagle, Th, Th-F, Su, Su, 9pm, 9pm, $25; $25; Sa, Sa, 8pm, 8pm, 10pm, 10pm, $30, $30, Kivi Kivi Rogers, Rogers, Avi Liberman, W, 9pm, $25 Avi Liberman, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy Comedy at at Pioneer Pioneer Reno-Tahoe Underground, 100 100 S. S. Virginia Virginia St., St., Underground, 686-6600: Tyler Boeh, 686-6600: Tyler Boeh, F,F, 6:30pm, 6:30pm, 9:30pm; 9:30pm; Sa, 8:30pm, $12-$15 Sa, 8:30pm, $12-$15

Drum Drum Circle Circle hosted hosted by by Lightfeather, Lightfeather, 6pm, 6pm, no no cover cover

COTTONWOOD COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT RESTAURANT & & BAR BAR

Sheila Sheila Ross Ross and and Friends, Friends, 7pm, 7pm, no no cover cover

Out Out of of the the Blue, Blue, 7pm, 7pm, no no cover cover

DAVIDSON’S DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY DISTILLERY

Frazzled, Frazzled, 9:30pm, 9:30pm, no no cover cover

Death Death Plant, Plant, Ostracized, Ostracized, Residual Residual Darkness, Darkness, Seductive Seductive Rage, Rage, 9:30pm, 9:30pm, no no cover cover

Karaoke Karaoke with with Lisa Lisa Lisa, Lisa, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

Karaoke Karaoke with with Miss Miss Amanda, Amanda, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

275 275 E. E. Fourth Fourth St., St., (775) (775) 324-1917 324-1917

EL EL CORTEZ CORTEZ LOUNGE LOUNGE

235 235 W. W. Second Second St., St., (775) (775) 324-4255 324-4255

Karaoke Karaoke with with Lisa Lisa Lisa, Lisa, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

FUEGO FUEGO

CW CW and and Mr. Mr. Spoons, Spoons, noon, noon, M, M, no no cover cover

THE THE GRID GRID BAR BAR & & GRILL GRILL

8545 8545 N. N. Lake Lake Blvd., Blvd., Kings Kings Beach; Beach; (530) (530) 546-0300 546-0300

HARRY’S HARRY’S SPORTS SPORTS BAR BAR & & GRILL GRILL 1100 1100 E. E. Plumb Plumb Ln., Ln., (775) (775) 828-7665 828-7665

HELLFIRE HELLFIRE SALOON SALOON

Greg Greg Austin, Austin, 8:30pm, 8:30pm, no no cover cover

9825 9825 S. S. Virginia Virginia St., St., (775) (775) 622-8878 622-8878

HIMMEL HIMMEL HAUS HAUS

Karaoke Karaoke w/Nitesong w/Nitesong Productions, Productions, 9pm, 9pm, Tu, Tu, Open Open Mic/Ladies Mic/Ladies Night, Night, 8:30pm, 8:30pm, W, W, no no cover cover Karaoke Karaoke with with Lisa Lisa Lisa, Lisa, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

Karaoke Karaoke w/Lisa w/Lisa Lisa, Lisa, 9pm, 9pm, M, M, w/Miss w/Miss Sophie, Sophie, 9pm, 9pm, Tu, Tu, w/Miss w/Miss Amanda, Amanda, 9pm, 9pm, W, W, no no cover cover

Karaoke Karaoke w/Andrew, w/Andrew, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

Bass Bass Heavy, Heavy, 9pm, 9pm, W, W, $TBA $TBA

DJ DJ and and karaoke, karaoke, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

Open Open mic, mic, 7pm, 7pm, no no cover cover

VooDoo VooDoo Dogz, Dogz, 9pm, 9pm, no no cover cover

Goin Goin Country, Country, 8pm, 8pm, W, W, no no cover cover Open Open Mic Mic Night, Night, 9pm, 9pm, M, M, no no cover cover Trivia Trivia Night, Night, 9pm, 9pm, W, W, no no cover cover

3819 3819 Saddle Saddle Rd., Rd., South South Lake Lake Tahoe; Tahoe; (530) (530) 314-7665 314-7665 140 140 Vesta Vesta St., St., (775) (775) 742-1858 742-1858

Richard Richard Blair, Blair, 7pm, 7pm, no no cover cover

Live Live flamenco flamenco guitar guitar music, music, 5:30pm, no 5:30pm, no cover cover

170 170 S. S. Virginia Virginia St., St., (775) (775) 322-1800 322-1800

THE THE HOLLAND HOLLAND PROJECT PROJECT

Traditional Traditional Irish Irish Tune Tune Session, Session, 7pm, Tu, Tu, no no cover 7pm, cover

Good Good Friday Friday with with rotating rotating DJs, DJs, 10pm, 10pm, no no cover cover

312 312 S. S. Carson Carson St., St., Carson Carson City; City; (775) (775) 883-2662 883-2662 10142 10142 Rue Rue Hilltop, Hilltop, Truckee; Truckee; (530) (530) 587-5711 587-5711

Rick Rick Hammond, Hammond, 3pm, 3pm, no no cover cover

Spoken Spoken Views Views Costume Costume Cover Cover poetry poetry slam/open slam/open mic, mic, 7:30pm, 7:30pm, $5-$10 $5-$10

JAVA JAVA JUNGLE JUNGLE

246 246 W. W. First First St., St., (775) (775) 329-4484 329-4484

YOUR HEALTH SHOULDN’T DEPEND ON YOUR INCOME.

Halloween Halloween Show, Show, 6pm, 6pm, $3 $3 w/costume, w/costume, $5 $5 without without

Iceage, Iceage, Helm, Helm, Spitting Spitting Image, Image, 8pm, 8pm, W, W, $10 $10 Outspoken: Outspoken: Open Open Mic Mic Night, Night, 7pm, M, M, no no cover 7pm, cover

american & latin music for all occasions 775.412.8873 info@josethedj.com www.josethedj.com

THESE DON’T MIX THES

HOPES N O R T H E R N N E VA D A

28 28

||

RN&R RN&R

|| OCTOBER OCTOBER 23, 23, 2014 2014

your partner in health.

Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

Think you If yo


THURSDAY THURSDAY 10/23 10/23

JUB JUB JUB’S JUB’S THIRST THIRST PARLOR PARLOR 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

FRIDAY FRIDAY 10/24 10/24

SATURDAY SATURDAY 10/25 10/25

SUNDAY SUNDAY 10/26 10/26

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/27-10/29 10/27-10/29 2) Blazin Mics!, 10pm, M, no cover 2) Blazin Mics!, 10pm, M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 1) Showroom 2) Main Bar 1) Showroom 2) Main Bar

KNITTING FACTORY KNITTING HOUSE FACTORY CONCERT CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Gramatik, Probcause, Freddy Todd, Gramatik, Probcause, Freddy Todd, 8pm, $20-$25 8pm, $20-$25

Fright Fest Halloween Party Fright Fest Halloween w/DJs Kentot, A-kran, Party Mario B, w/DJs$15 Kentot, A-kran, Mario B, 10pm, 10pm, $15

The Boom: Doshy vs Conrank, The Boom: 8pm, $8 Doshy vs Conrank, 8pm, $8

MOODY’S MOODY’S BISTRO BISTRO BAR BAR & & BEATS BEATS 10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688

Paul Covarelli Group, 8:30pm, no cover Paul Covarelli Group, 8:30pm, no cover

Mat Marucci Trio, 8:30pm, no cover Mat Marucci Trio, 8:30pm, no cover

Steve LaBellas’ New Orleans Tribute, Steve LaBellas’ New Orleans Tribute, 8:30pm, no cover 8:30pm, no cover

PADDY PADDY & & IRENE’S IRENE’S IRISH IRISH PUB PUB 906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484

Acoustic Wonderland, Acoustic Wonderland, 8pm, no cover 8pm, no cover

DJ Razz, 9pm, no cover DJ Razz, 9pm, no cover

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688

906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484

POLO POLO LOUNGE LOUNGE 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Gemini, 9pm, no cover Gemini, 9pm, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

In This Moment, Starset, Twelve Foot In This3Moment, Starset, Foot Ninja, Pill Morning, 7pm,Twelve $25-$40 Ninja, 3 Pill Morning, 7pm, $25-$40

Bassjackers Bassjackers

Gemini, 9pm, no cover Gemini, 9pm, no cover

RED RED DOG DOG SALOON SALOON 76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474 RUBEN’S RUBEN’S CANTINA CANTINA 1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

P Poost st sh shoow wss oon nlin re linee b g byy ri n regis g a t iste te ri n g a t w w www w.n .neew wsr sreevvie iew /r w.c .coom m e a /reen d lin noo.. D e is D e th a d ee lin e Fr is id ay th b e fo Friday before re p pu ub blic lica ati tioon n..

Karaoke, 8pm, no cover Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

RYAN’S RYAN’S SALOON SALOON 924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SE7EN SE7EN TEAHOUSE/BAR TEAHOUSE/BAR 148 West St., (775) 284-3363

Bluegrass/Americana Open Bluegrass/Americana Open Performance Jam, 7pm, no cover Performance Jam, 7pm, no cover

148 West St., (775) 284-3363

ST. ST. JAMES JAMES INFIRMARY INFIRMARY 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484 STUDIO STUDIO ON ON 4TH 4TH 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 737-9776

Liam Kyle Cahill, Travis Hayes, Liam Kyle Cahill, Travis Josiah Knight, 8pm, $5 Hayes, Josiah Knight, 8pm, $5

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 737-9776

AA TO TO ZEN ZEN GIFTS GIFTS & & THRIFT THRIFT 1801 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 461-3311

1801 N. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 461-3311

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Stiff Kitty Burlesque and Cabaret: Stiff Kitty, 8pm, Burlesque and Cabaret: Purrzilla $15-$20 Purrzilla, 8pm, $15-$20

Stiff Kitty Burlesque and Cabaret: Stiff Kitty, 8pm, Burlesque and Cabaret: Purrzilla $15-$20 Purrzilla, 8pm, $15-$20

Open Mic Night, 7pm, no cover Open Mic Night, 7pm, no cover

Canyon Band, 7pm, $5 Canyon Band, 7pm, $5

VASSAR VASSAR LOUNGE LOUNGE 1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

WILD WILD RIVER RIVER GRILLE GRILLE 17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

WILDFLOWER WILDFLOWER VILLAGE VILLAGE 4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769

1) The Writer’s Block Open Mic, 1) The Writer’s Block OpenDawn, Mic, 6:30pm, no cover 3) Red

1) Reno Music Project Open Mic, 1) Reno Music Project Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover 6:30pm, no cover

6:30pm, no cover Dawn, 4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769 Di Carlo, 6pm,3)noRed cover 1) Golden Rose Cafe 2) Green Fairy Pub 3) Cabaret Jack 1) Golden Rose Cafe 2) Green Fairy Pub 3) Cabaret Jack Di Carlo, 6pm, no cover

JS P

Strange on the Range Bluegrass Jam, Strange on the Range Bluegrass Jam, 7pm, no cover 7pm, no cover

Recycle this paper

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1) Tex & Mary Carlson, 6pm, Tu, Wildflower 1) Tex & Mary 6pm,Mic, Tu, 8:30pm, Wildflower Comedy PowerCarlson, Hour Open Tu, Comedy Hour Open Mic,M, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover Power 3) Lee Jones, 6:30pm, no cover no cover 3) Lee Jones, 6:30pm, M, no cover

GOTTFRIED

Y A D R U T A S Y EVER CASH $ TING STAR

2) Jam with Jack Di Carlo 2) Jam Jack5pm, Di Carlo and Redwith Dawn, no cover and Red Dawn, 5pm, no cover

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OCTOBER 24 – 25 BACK IN RENO AFTER 1 4 YEARS!

UR TRY O A COBR ! K DRIN NEWS NEWS

Oct. 29, 8 p.m. Oct. 29, 8 p.m. The Holland Project The Holland Project 140 Vesta St, 140 Vesta St, 742-1858 742-1858

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

| |

Iceage Iceage

Koolwater Karaoke, 7pm, W, no cover Koolwater Karaoke, 7pm, W, no cover

1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

OPINION OPINION

Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, W, no cover Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, W, no cover Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover Dance party, 9pm, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

Oct. 28, 9 p.m. Oct. 28, 9 p.m. Knitting Factory Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St, 211 N. Virginia St, 323-5648 323-5648

Corky Bennett, 8pm, W, no cover Corky Bennett, 8pm, W, no cover Lonesome Wayne Trio, 1pm, no cover Lonesome Wayne 1pm, no cover Deep Groove, 5pm,Trio, no cover Deep Groove, 5pm, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

Bassjackers, Dyro, 9pm, Tu, $25-$50 Bassjackers, Dyro, 9pm, Tu, $25-$50

| |

GREEN GREEN

| |

FEATURE STORY FEATURE STORY

1290-H E. PLUMB LANE • RENO • 775-828-7227 | |

ARTS&CULTURE ARTS&CULTURE

| |

IN ROTATION IN ROTATION

| |

ART OF THE STATE ART OF THE STATE

| |

FOODFINDS FOODFINDS

| |

FILM FILM

| |

MUSICBEAT MUSICBEAT

| |

775-325-7401 • WWW.CATCHARISINGSTAR.COM | THIS WEEK | MISCELLANY | OCTOBER 23, 2014 | RN&R | 29 | THIS WEEK | MISCELLANY | OCTOBER 23, 2014 | RN&R |

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

29


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 10/23

FRIDAY 10/24

SATURDAY 10/25

SUNDAY 10/26

2) Cook Book, 8pm, no cover

1) Thunder From Down Under, 8pm, $35-$45 2) Cook Book, 4pm, Rebekah Chase Band, 10pm, no cover

1) Thunder From Down Under, 8pm, $35-$45 2) Cook Book, 4pm, Rebekah Chase Band, 10pm, no cover

2) Rebekah Chase Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Midnight Express, 8pm, no cover

2) Midnight Express, 8pm, no cover

2) Bazooka Zoo, The Sauce, 10pm, no cover

2) Dustbowl Revival, 10pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

2) Midnight Express, 7pm, no cover 1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) TJ’s Corral

Dustbowl Revival Oct. 25, 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO RESORT CASINO

Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: Th, 7pm, no cover Hangar Bar, 10603 Stead Blvd., Stead, 677-7088: Karaoke Kat, Sa, 9pm, no cover Murphy’s Law Irish Pub, 180 W. Peckham Lane, Ste. 1070, 823-9977: Steve Starr Karaoke, F, 9pm, no cover

1) Spectra, 7pm, $25.95+ 2) Atomika, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Spectra, 7pm, $25.95+ 2) Atomika, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Post Bop Theater, 10pm, no cover

1) Spectra, 7pm, 9:30pm, $25.95+ 2) Atomika, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Denielle’s Zombie Birthday Bash, 9pm, $15 4) Post Bop Theater, 10pm, no cover

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

1) Michael Jackson—A Thrilling Tribute, 7pm, $15-$30 2) Locals Night w/DJ 2Wice, 10pm, no cover w/local ID; $15 after midnight

1) Sara Evans, 9pm, $27.50-$66 2) DJ Pauly D, 10pm, $10-$30

1) Paquita la Del Barrio, 8pm, $50-$100 2) Lex Nightclub Saturdays w/DJ Enfo, 10pm, $15-$30 3) County Social Saturdays w/DJ Jamie G, 10pm, no cover

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub 3) Center Stage Lounge

3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

1) The Psychedelic Furs, 7:30pm, $42.35 2) DJ Rick Gee, DJ SN1, 10pm, $20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

HARRAH’S RENO

1) Two Kings, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 2) DJ/dancing, 10pm, no cover 3) Carolyn Dolan, 8pm, no cover 5) Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular, 7pm, $24-$35

1) Two Kings, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 3) DJ R-Boogie, 8pm, no cover 4) Superlicious, 7pm, no cover 5) Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular, 7pm, $24-$35

1) Two Kings, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50

2) Audioboxx, 9:30pm, no cover

2) Audioboxx, 10pm, no cover

2) Audioboxx, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ Chris English, 10pm, no cover

2) Cash Only, 9:30pm, M, Reggie Hall, 9:30pm, Tu, Dyer Maker, 9:30pm, W, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, CJ Simmons, 7pm,

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, 11pm, no cover CJ Simmons, 7pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, 11pm, no cover CJ Simmons, 7pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover Bikini Bull Riding Competition, 9pm, no cover

3) Ladies Night/Toughest Cowboy Competition, Kenny Frye Band, 7pm, W, no cover

1) Blue13 Dance Company, 7:30pm, $8-$23 3) Boogie Nights, 9pm, $10 4) Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

1) 36th Annual Freaker’s Ball w/Pop Fiction, 8pm, $25-$30 3) The Male Room, 8pm, $23, Boogie Nights, 9pm, $10

2) The Novelists, 8pm, no cover 3) Fixx Fridays, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm

2) The Novelists, 8pm, no cover

2) Kyle Williams, 6pm, no cover

2) Kyle Williams, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Jonathan Lee, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 9pm, no cover 4) Emerald City, 9pm, no cover

1) Olivia Newton-John, 8pm, $67.50-$82.50 2) Jonathan Lee, 9pm, no cover 2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover 4) Emerald City, 9pm, no cover

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) Two Kings, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

HARVEYS LAKE TAHOE

18 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) Outdoor Arena 2) Cabo Wabo Cantina Lounge

Ponderosa Saloon, 106 South C St., Virginia City, 847-7210: Steel Rockin’ Karaoke, F, 7:30pm, no cover

JA NUGGET

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Ste. 103, Sparks, 356-6000: F-Sa, 9pm, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 no cover 1) Celebrity Showroom 2) Rose Ballroom 3) Gilley’s 55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) The Zone 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge

2) The Novelists, 7pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

2) Bonzai Thursdays w/DJ Trivia,

8pm, no cover 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) University of Aura, 9pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge

30

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RN&R

| OCTOBER 23, 2014

2) Henhouse Prowlers, 6pm, Tu, W, no cover

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Live 4) Stadium Bar

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 1) Grand Theater 2) Lex Nightclub 3) Sports Book 4) Cantina

Karaoke

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 10/27-10/29

1) Spectra, 7pm, $25.95+ 2) Atomika, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Spectra, 7pm Tu, W, $25.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, Halloween party w/DJ Chris English, 10pm Tu, no cover 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm W, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover Country-Rock Bingo w/Jeff Gregg, 9pm, W, no cover


SAVINGS SO GOOD, IT’S ScAry! rN&r reADerS cAN PUrcHASe GIFT cArDS FOr UP TO 60% OFF! Junkee Clothing Exchange: Get used and vintage clothing for the perfect Halloween costume at 60% off ! $10.00 gift certificate for just $4.00!

National Automobile Museum Over 200 eye-popping cars and four authentic street scenes representing each quarter of the 20th century! $10 Adult admission for just $5.00. $8.00 Senior admission for just $4.00!

Slaughterhouse Fright Fest has partnered with the Reno Aces to bring Northern Nevada~s #1 Haunted Attraction to the Reno Aces Ballpark, with free parking! $22.00 Speed pass for just $11.00!

Need 2 Speed Reno’s ultimate arena of adventure challenge and competition. Burn some rubber and compete against your friends, family or coworkers! $23.00 race Pass for just $11.50!

Noble Pie Parlor Award-winning pizza, wings, large craft beer selection and specialty cocktails. Noble Pie Parlor has won 1st Place Peoples Choice Award 3 years running at the 3rd largest wing competition in the world! $10.00 Gift card for just $5.00! Ryan’s Saloon & Broiler Serving Reno for over 40 years, Ryan’s brings you quality drink & food at a reasonable price with a welcoming atmosphere. $10.00 Gift card for only $5.00!

RN&R

w w w. n e w s r e v i e w. c o m OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM 

|   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   october 23, 2014 

| 

RN&R  

| 

31


COME SEE US IN MIDTOWN! • Our 35th year in business • CDs, vinyl, DVDs, Tapes, VHS • In or out of print, we’ll order for cost + a few bucks • Buy, sell, trade (Selling? Call 1st!) • Knitting Factory and Alley ticket outlet

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Reno

MEDICAL A MARIJUAN CARDS Work Dire ctly With a physicia no neeD to n run all ov CALL to er toWn D A y 775-87 hoLIStIC 0-1545 hEALth www.ho listichea CENtER of RE No lthCente rofReno .com

introductory special for new clients $50 foR a 50 MiNuTeSS MaSSage SCHeDuLe youR appoiNTMeNT ToDay

accepting new patients call 775.853.7669 | www.Renewed-Health.org 15 McCabe Dr Ste 203 | Reno, NV | Lic. #NVMT 5894, #NVMT2936

WindSync Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014 | 7:30 p.m. | Nightingale Concert Hall This renowned Houston-based woodwind quintet isn’t your traditional chamber ensemble. They’re a classically trained group with pop-rock sensibilities and growing rockstar status. And their singular, push-the-limits virtuosity is reframing chamber performance: They range across the stage like, well. . . rockstars, respectfully breathing fresh new life into revered old-world traditions. Tickets: Adult $24/ Senior $20/ Student and youth $12

(775) 784-4ART | Buy tickets online at www.unr.edu/pas 32 

| 

RN&R   | 

october 23, 2014


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno weekly PIcks

Fa l l D a n C e F e s t i va l The University of Nevada, Reno Department of Theater and Dance presents its fall dance showcase with a new format. Faculty and student choreographers will present site-specific dance works to be performed in two different on-campus locations, bringing performance off the stage and into the architecture of everyday life. Audiences will meet at a designated building and will “tour” the space, viewing performances in different environments which will allow them to see familiar and cherished campus environments in a new light. Admission is free. Performances are at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 24-25, at UNR, 1664 N. Virginia St. Call 784-4278 or visit www.unr. edu/arts/calendar.

snaFU Con The fifth annual anime convention features a gaming department, artists, panels, events, contests and more. The gathering takes place Friday through Sunday, Oct. 24-26, at the Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St. Weekend passes are $40 at the door. Day badges are $20. Visit http:// snafucon.com.

CaRson CReepy F i l m F e s t i va l Reno C R aw l Zombie

Teams who entered a one-week film and costume competition for this festival will present their final products this Saturday, Oct. 25, at the Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511. W. King St., Carson City. The judged screening begins at 6 p.m., followed by the costume contest and awards ceremony. Some of the films will be shown on public access television. Admission is $5. Call 883-1976 or visit www.breweryarts.org.

wnparty in do are ready to the largest of The undead e on r fo . once again town Reno in the nation bar crawls ed k in em dr th r efe zombi bars will of r 50 different ve co no d More than an ests, stume cont ght age 21 specials, co res of the ni tu ea cr l al b crawl com pu charge to a are carrying . ho m w p. r 8 de at ol and awl begins e cup. The cr t locamemorativ several star at , 25 t. Oc , ay g 4th rd on tu on Sa town and al ntown, Mid Reno e th to tions in Dow ad the crawl, he re fo tyle Be -s . et ob Stre e flash m icipate in th m. You p. 7 at Arch to part ch Ar d e Under the ive cups an Thriller Danc mmemorat co $5 se 0 S. 96 , ge an can purcha ch ng Ex , nkee Clothi ld Emporium maps at Ju ting Pot Wor el M e Th ., s in on ti ca lo Virginia St r othe inia St., and ll 342-9565 1049 S. Virg rson City. Ca Ca d an ks om. l.c w Reno, Spar ra biec ://renozom or visit http ey Lang ll e K —

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p U m p k i n pa l o o Z a Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living presents its annual pumpkin celebration featuring a Pumpkin Derby, children’s costume parade, storytelling, carnival-style games, pie-eating, pumpkin seed-spitting, marshmallow-shooting and mummywrapping contests, live music and more. The fun takes place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 26, along Victorian Avenue in downtown Sparks. Admission is free. Call 353-3599 or visit www.pumpkinpalooza.org.

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OCTOBER 23, 2014

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Knight terrors I’m a woman in my early 30s. I was laid off after my employer lost a big account. I’ve found a new job, but it’s not on my career path and it pays terribly. Still, it’s a job and it pays. I live with my boyfriend, and we’ve always split the expenses, but he’s trying to persuade me to keep looking for something better and to let him pay the bills until I find it. He keeps saying he’s “happy to do that,” but I just can’t stomach it. I’ve always supported myself and taken pride in not being the sort of woman who sponges off a man, and I’m not ready to start now. If only giving you a hand financially worked like giving medicine to a dog, then your boyfriend could just grind up some money and sneak it into your food. He’s offering to help you not because he thinks you can’t manage by yourself but because he thinks you shouldn’t have to. That’s what being in a relationship means—two coming together as one, not one going it alone while the other one waits in the parking lot. Though being independent is great if you’re the lone survivor of a shipwreck or your car swerves off a lonely mountain road and you need to eat the passenger seat to survive, if spurning your boyfriend’s help is any sort of a pattern, it’s probably hurting your relationship. By refusing to show the vulnerability it takes to accept help, you keep the relationship on a “So, what’s for dinner?” level emotionally and tell your boyfriend he isn’t really needed. In time, this should lead him to the obvious question: “Well then, why am I still here?” OPINION

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ARTS&CULTURE

Sometimes, aggressive self-reliance is really fear in a Wonder Woman suit. Our “attachment” style—our way of relating to those close to us—traces back to our mother’s (or other primary caregiver’s) responsiveness to our needs as infants. If you could count on her to soothe you when you were distressed, you end up “securely attached,” meaning you have a strong psychological base and feel comfortable relying on others. If, however, she was unavailable or rejecting, you become “avoidantly attached” and develop a habit of self-protective distancing. The good news is, even if Mommy was the next best thing to an ice floe, there’s no need to resign yourself to the effects of that. Research finds that a loving partner can help you break out of avoidant attachment by continually behaving in supportive ways that challenge your belief that you can’t count on anybody. You, in turn, need to risk revealing your emotions and needs and trusting that your boyfriend will be there for you—perhaps starting with accepting his offer of a financial cushion. Over time, as you see that you actually can rely on him, you should develop a more secure foundation—and come to understand that true strength involves being confident that you can walk tall but sometimes being OK with curling up in a fetal position. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com). |

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OCTOBER 23, 2014

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OCTOBER 23, 2014


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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   october 23, 2014  |  

RN&R  

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by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The driest

place on the planet is the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. It gets about a half-inch of rain per year. And yet in 2011, archaeologists discovered that it’s also home to a site containing the fossilized skeletons of numerous whales and other ancient sea creatures. I’m detecting a metaphorically comparable anomaly in your vicinity, Aries. A seemingly arid, empty part of your life harbors buried secrets that are available for you to explore. If you follow the clues, you may discover rich pickings that will inspire you to revise your history.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Business-

Think Free

man Warren Buffet is worth $65.1 billion, but regularly gives away 27 percent of his fortune to charity. Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates owns $78 billion, and donates 36 percent. Then there are the members of the Walton family, owners of Walmart, where 100 million Americans shop weekly. The Waltons have $136 billion, of which they contribute .04 percent to good causes. You are not wealthy in the same way these people are, Taurus. Your riches consist of resources like your skills, relationships, emotional intelligence, creative power, and capacity for love. My invitation to you is to be extra generous with those assets—not as lavish as Buffet or Gates, perhaps, but much more than the Waltons. You are in a phase when giving your gifts is one of the best things you can do to bolster your own health, wealth, and well-being.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You have two

options. You can be in denial about your real feelings and ignore what needs to be fixed and wait for trouble to come find you. Or else you can vow to be resilient and summon your feistiest curiosity and go out searching for trouble. The difference between these two approaches is dramatic. If you mope and sigh and hide, the messy trouble that arrives will be indigestible. But if you are brave and proactive, the interesting trouble you get will ultimately evolve into a blessing.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Astronauts

on the International Space Station never wash their underwear. They don’t have enough water at their disposal to waste on a luxury like that. Instead, they fling the dirty laundry out into space. As it falls to Earth, it burns up in the atmosphere. I wish you had an amenity like that right now. In fact, I wish you had a host of amenities like that. If there was ever a time when you should be liberated from having to wash your underwear, make your bed, sweep the floor, and do the dishes, it would be now. Why? Because there are much better ways to spend your time. You’ve got sacred quests to embark on, heroic adventures to accomplish, historical turning points to initiate.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What are those new

whisperings in your head? Are they messages from your inner teacher? Beacons beamed back through time from the Future You? Clues from the wise parts of your unconscious mind? Whatever they are, Leo, pay attention. These signals from the Great Beyond may not be clear yet, but if you are sufficiently patient, they will eventually tell you how to take advantage of a big plot twist. But here’s a caveat: Don’t automatically believe every single thing the whisperings tell you. Their counsel may not be 100-percent accurate. Be both receptive and discerning toward them.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the English-

speaking world, a sundae is a luxurious dessert that features ice cream topped with sweet treats like syrup, sprinkles, and fruits. In Korea, a sundae is something very different. It consists of a cow’s or pig’s intestines crammed with noodles, barley, and pig’s blood. I expect that in the coming week you will be faced with a decision that has metaphorical similarities to the choice between a sundae and a sundae. Make sure you are quite clear about the true nature of each option.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The average

serving of pasta on a typical American’s plate is almost 480 percent bigger than what’s recommended as a healthy portion. So says a research paper titled “The Contribution of Expanding Portion Sizes to the U.S. Obesity Epidemic,” by Lisa R. Young and Marion Nestle. Muffins are 333 percent larger than they need to be, the authors say, and steaks are 224 percent excessive. Don’t get caught up in this trend, Libra. Get what you need, but not way, way more than what you need. For that matter, be judicious in your approach to all of life’s necessities. The coming phase is a time when you will thrive by applying the Goldilocks principle: neither too much nor too little, but just right.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Children

are the most desirable opponents at Scrabble,” declares Scorpio author Fran Lebowitz, “as they are both easy to beat and fun to cheat.” I don’t wholeheartedly endorse that advice for you in the coming days, Scorpio. But would you consider a milder version of it? Let’s propose, instead, that you simply seek easy victories to boost your confidence and hone your skills. By this time next week, if all goes well, you will be ready to take on more ambitious challenges.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

You are entering a phase when you will have more luck than usual as you try to banish parasitic influences, unworthy burdens, and lost causes. Here are some projects you might want to work on: 1. Bid farewell to anyone who brings out the worst in you; 2. Heal the twisted effect an adversary has had on you; 3. Get rid of any object that symbolizes failure or pathology; 4. Declare your independence from a situation that wastes your time or drains your resources; 5. Shed any guilt you feel for taking good care of yourself; 6. Stop a bad habit cold turkey.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Are

you ready to be as affable as a Sagittarius, as charismatic as a Leo, as empathetic as a Cancerian, and as vigorous an instigator as an Aries? No? You’re not? You’re afraid that would require you to push yourself too far outside your comfort zone? OK, then. Are you willing to be half as affable as a Sagittarius, half as charismatic as a Leo, half as empathetic as a Cancerian, and half as inspiring an instigator as an Aries? Or even a quarter as much? I hope you will at least stretch yourself in these directions, Capricorn, because doing so would allow you to take maximum advantage of the spectacular social opportunities that will be available for you in the next four weeks.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the

coming weeks I hope you will find practical ways to express your new-found freedom. All the explorations and experiments you have enjoyed recently were fun and provocative, but now it’s time to use the insights they sparked to upgrade your life back in the daily grind. Please don’t misunderstand what I’m saying. I love it when you are dreamy and excitable and farseeing, and would never ask you to tone down those attractive qualities. But I am also rooting for you to bring the high-flying parts of you down to earth so that you can reap the full benefits of the bounty they have stirred up. If you work to become more well-grounded, I predict that you will be situated in a new power spot by December 1.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The heavy

metal band known as Hatebeak broadened the definition of what constitutes music. Its lead singer was Waldo, an African Grey parrot. A review by Aquarius Records called Waldo’s squawks “completely and stupidly brilliant.” For Hatebeak’s second album, they collaborated with animal rights’ activists in the band Caninus, whose lead vocalists were two pitbull terriers, Basil and Budgie. In the coming weeks, Pisces, I’d love to see you get inspired by these experiments. I think you will generate interesting results as you explore expansive, even unprecedented approaches in your own chosen field.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.

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OCTOBER 23, 2014


by Marina Palmieri

Scholars

so we are able to award a $1,000 scholarship each year. If we were able to raise the endowment to the $44,000 level, then we would be able to award two $1,000 scholarships each year.

Dr. Berch Berberoglu, sociology professor and chair of the Department of Sociology, has been teaching and conducting research at the University of Nevada, Reno for the past 37 years. He has worked with the Aybek family to create a memorial scholarship endowment for Neslihan Aybek, a former UNR international student from Turkey who unexpectedly passed away in May 2011 at the age of 31.

What is the story behind the Neslihan Aybek Memorial Scholarship? Neslihan was one of my students from Turkey majoring in sociology. She graduated in 2004 with a bachelor’s degree in sociology. Then she went back to Turkey and worked at a couple of schools teaching English to students from 2004 to 2011. In May 2011, I went to Istanbul for a few days to deliver a keynote speech at a conference for a few days, but I wasn’t able to see her. Upon my return to the U.S., one of her professors here at UNR told me she had died suddenly from an aortic aneurysm. I was stunned. Within days of the sad news, I felt we had to do something in her memory. So I started thinking about it and contacted her parents and thought a memorial scholarship endowment would be a good thing to remember her forever.

How much is the endowment? The minimum amount to start an endowment is $10,000. Neslihan’s parents and I

Who is eligible for the scholarship? It has to be a full-time female international student from Turkey with a 3.0 GPA. It’s open to any major, not necessarily in sociology. But it has to be a female student from Turkey, as Neslihan herself was.

In the last week of September, three teenage boys died. No, they weren’t unarmed black boys shot by twitchy, freaked-out cops, which is refreshing. No, they weren’t victims of Ebola, which still, as I write this on October 20, has killed exactly zero Americans who haven’t traveled to West Africa. You’d think our media would at least wait for a double digit death count before going into full set-hair-onfire frenzy, but no, it made a special exception for this wacky bug. Must have been a slow news week in the Apocalypse Department at the Associated Press. No, these three lads were all killed playing high school football. Not that we want to say that too loudly. Wouldn’t want any parents refusing to sign those high school permission forms for their boys. I used to call football our national religion. Now, I think it’s moved onward and upward. Now, it’s our national fetish. That

OPINION

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Our goal right now is to raise the endowment to the $22,000 level, and later, in couple of years, to double that amount to $44,000. The higher the level we reach with the endowment the more scholarships we would be able to award. This is a collaborative effort and we would like everyone to chip in no matter the amount and be part of the effort. It’s for a good cause. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye I thought of George and his message of that night as I watched the recent Ebola hearings in Congress. Good lord, there were a bunch of reprehensible jerkoffs up there on the committee, grilling the various doctors on the current status of the virus. So these are the clowns, dolts, and ding dongs that we’ve sent to Washington to run the richest government on Earth, eh? Well, good luck to us. Hell, it’s a wonder things work as well as they do! • And hey, baseball announcers! The pitcher for the Giants is named Bumgarner, and there ain’t no damn “D” anywhere in his name! You got it? So tired of hearing these mouthbreathers call him BumgarDner! I swear these yokels gonna make me triple up on the Xanax during the games Mad Bum pitches in The Series! Ω

sounds about right, doesn’t it? And you know we love our fetishes way more than we love our religions. • Quite a few years ago, I saw George Carlin at the Silver Legacy. It was a memorable show, and curiously, it was the jokes and laughs that were the least memorable things about it. Oh, there were plenty of those, for sure, but what sticks with me, all these years later, is the way Carlin finished up that night. Because George spent the last 10 or 15 minutes of the performance basically chewing us out for the situation with our federal government. It was quite the righteous diatribe, cool enough to where I wasn’t offended at all as he made his point, which was simply that “if we think Washington sucks, it’s our fault, since we’re the dopes who sent all these turkeys to run the government. So quit pissing and moaning about all these slimebags and do something about it.” I found it not just memorable, but inspirational and powerful. ARTS&CULTURE

w w w. n e w s r e v i e w.c o m

What is your plan for the future of this endowed scholarship?

Although the last two scholarships we awarded (in 2013 and 2014) were $500 each, the UNR Foundation is now stipulating that the scholarship amount should be raised to $1,000 each. So to get $1000 interest from the endowment, we need to have $22,000 invested. So the $11,000 we now have has to go to $22,000 to accomplish this. We are doing our best to raise another $11,000 for the endowment

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They can log on to the UNR Foundation website http://giving.unr.edu and click the blue button “Make a Gift to Nevada” on the upper right hand corner, immediately a page pops up and right in the middle, where the gift amount is shown there is the “designation.” In clicking the down arrow, you will see that the third fund is the “Neslihan Aybek Memorial Endowed Scholarship.” After selecting that and deciding on the amount to give, the gift can be paid by credit card and from here it goes straight to the UNR Foundation.

Did you raise the full amount for this year’s scholarship?

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Where do people send their contribution to the endowment?

made the initial contributions to the fund and soon several others followed. We raised $3,500 in a few months. When we announced this throughout the community, others joined in the effort and soon we were able to meet our initial goal of $10,000. The fund is now at $11,000. The UNR Foundation invests the money and it brings in about $500 per year at around 4.5 percent return annually. We thought this way, we’ll have $500 every year, and we can at least give out one scholarship a year to a student and honor her name that way.

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OCTOBER 23, 2014

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R 2014 10 23