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Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor.............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 19

Foodfinds..................... 20 Film.............................. 22 Musicbeat.................... 23 Nightclubs/Casinos....... 24 This.Week.....................27 Advice.Goddess........... 28 Free.Will.Astrology....... 30 15.Minutes..................... 31 Bruce.Van.Dyke............ 31

I’m on the board

See Left Foot Forward, page 6.

WaShoe SchooLS may be improving or maybe not See news, page 8.

Look to

stage left See arts&culture, page 16.

Ly m e D i s e a s e a n D ot h e r s t u f f

cut-rate

t h at w i L L r u i n yo u r D ay

james bond See Film, page 22.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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SEPTEMBER 4, 2014


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

I am the lizard king

Missed a couple

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. I want to thank everyone for the kind wishes regarding my Bell’s Palsy. I’d also like to thank the people who told me it doesn’t matter if it gets better because I look kind of bad-ass. I’m good with getting better, and it’s improving slowly but slowly. I’d also like to thank the people who expressed their schadenfreude that I deserve it because my lifestyle encourages physical inflammation. It’s not that they’re clueless. They’re not. But I already eat whole foods and avoid processed foods. I already take Omega 3s, 6s and 9s, and supplement fiber. I’m as regular as Big Ben, I swear. I personally think it’s more fun to think that it was a cosmic joke. I mean, 52 years old, and nobody ever wanted me on CNN before, and there I was with half a face. I looked truly bizarre. Did you see me with Jake Tapper? http://youtu. be/1wH5WGlsPNk Hilarious. I did wear the RN&R shirt. Represent! And you know something? I actually consider myself lucky. If I’d been on there with my regular face, I might have been worried about how I was coming off. As it was, I went in knowing I was going to look like an idiot, and despite the fact that I had makeup rubbed in my paralyzed eye, and I was in an unfamiliar environment, I wasn’t nervous, not in the way you’d expect me to be anyway. My luck is ludicrous and peculiar. I came home for lunch on Monday to the biggest lizard I ever saw sunning itself on my front porch. I’m basically a boy at heart—I mean, truly immature in hard-to-imagine ways—so I had to catch the thing. Turned out not to be an actual dinosaur, but a bearded dragon, not a lizard that exists in the wild around here. I named him Stay the fuck Away from Me, which Hunter thoughtfully turned into the acronym Sam. Kelly calls him Sinclair, after the gas stations that had the dinosaur on the logo. I don’t really want to keep him around, but I can’t give him away until I’m sure his owner isn’t one of my neighbors near Cashill Boulevard. Drop me a note if you need Sam in your life.

Re “Note for note” (Arts & Culture, Aug. 21): This was a great article! Thank you for all the mentions, but you missed a couple great luthiers who also live in the area who have wonderful shops and instruments. Firstly, Craig Dill is a well-trained and artistic luthier who has been open at least 10 years. He has hand made instruments as well as commercial instruments and bows. He can be reached at 673-3111. Secondly, I am also a luthier, Bruce McBeth; I just opened a classy, new violin shop in the Sparks area featuring hand made instruments of professional quality. Most importantly, I have conservatory level rental instruments of the violin family, accessories, sales and repairs. I also offer lessons for violin and viola and an extensive list of local, qualified teachers. You can reach me at McBeth Violins, 610 South 18th St., Sparks. Facebook/ McBeth violins 657-1874 A followup story on our local, luthier artists would be great.

brief presence in your lives will allow you to remember him through the rest of your lives. Never having known your son Ramsey, through your words, I too will remember him and so will the thousands of readers that have read your words. Fred Speckmann Reno

Land of the lost Why the feds own up to 85 percent of Nevada’s land has long been a head scratcher. They own more land in Nevada than in any other state in the Union. And not just a little more. The fed-owned 57 million acres in Nevada is nearly 10 percent of all federal land. And it’s nearly six times more than the feds own in all of the original 13 states combined. In 2013 our Legislature established a Land Management Task Force to examine the land ownership issue. The Task Force concluded that Nevada would benefit from a transfer of land from the feds to the state. However Assemblyman Paul Aizley (AD 41), who chairs the Legislative Committee on Public Lands, arbitrarily decided that the idea would not be discussed at a meeting of lawmakers. (Las Vegas Review Journal, Aug 28). The objections to his decision were immediate and bi-partisan. Call me skeptical, but this sounds like a page right out of the Harry Reid playbook. Are we looking at a high speed rail system? If you, like me, think Assemblyman Aizley’s actions don’t pass the sniff test, maybe a phone call to the Assemblyman is in order. Robert R. Kessler Las Vegas

Bruce McBeth Sparks

Rest in peace Re “Goodbye, Ramsey” (Guest comment, Aug. 21): Dear Mr. Farley, thank you for sharing such a touching, personal story about your son’s short life on this Earth. I’m sure that what you shared will help a parent who has or will go through a similar parting with a loved child. My belief in God convinces me that his return to be with God will be a blessing, and that despite the pain that your family feels at his loss, the memory of his brief time on Earth and the blessings that you have experienced from his

Take gov money, you might be a socialist

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Staff writer Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Woody Barlettani, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Eric Marks, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Design Melissa Bernard, Brad Coates, Kyle Shine Advertising Consultants Joseph “Joey” Davis, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office Manager/Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

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in the Boston marathon case. This man initially a police officer in California was dismissed? He has not been held accountable as far as I know, but they lied over and over about the manner of death. Keep up the good work! Nancy Epstein Arlington, Massachusetts

Another story I just heard you on CNN regarding the rate of homicides by police. The Michael Brown shooting has deja vu for me as the parent of Brandon Ray Brown, shot and killed in his mother’s home in Bothell, Washington, on July 10, 2011, by a Snohomish County Sheriff’s deputy. Brandon was physically disabled and suffered from mental illness. The District Attorney, Mark Roe, found the killing to be justified. There was nothing done, and the officer was not prosecuted or reprimanded for his action. The Herald Republic in Everett published the story of my son’s death with another local shooting of a young man making it sound as if there was an outstanding warrant for Brandon. I personally called the newspaper, and they refused to retract their story. Brandon was in the home not committing a crime and was unarmed yet was killed by a macho, overzealous officer. The officers were on site for less than 20 minutes. They did not ask for assistance from a mental health team, SWAT team for show of force, nor a canine unit. Their attempted extraction of Brandon from the home was incompetent and negligent. I would be happy to assist you in any way to slow down this epidemic of unjustified shootings by local law enforcement. I am retired and live in Tucson, Arizona, where police policy seems to be shoot first and ask questions later. Welcome to the Wild West. Dane Brown Tucson, Arizona

You’re welcome Re “Fatal Encounters” (Feature stories, 2014): Thank you for the work you are doing on the number of people killed by police. By exposing these numbers, the justification for these actions will have to be addressed. The underlying issues of power, control and racism are key. All police officers should be subject to a psychological exam. Why is someone killed when they could have been tazed, or shot in the leg? The overreach of police, and police brutality is not adequately addressed. None of these folks go to prison! Like the Boston FBI agent who killed the young man in Florida

If you use the coercive force of the IRS to reach into my paycheck and take money for your retirement and health care, even if you have

—D. Brian Burghart

OPINION

a half-million in the bank, even if you gave yourself that expensive lung cancer through heavy smoking, even if you devoted your life to railing against taxation and social programs, even if you personally invented the word “statist” ... you might be a statist! You also might be Ayn Rand, who accepted Medicare and Social Security benefits from 1976 to 1982. She pilfered a little bit each week from my MGM Grand paycheck, from that little box marked FICA. You see, Medicare and Social Security are direct transfer entitlements, meaning current contributors give to current beneficiaries. So “We the Working” all suffered while Alisa Zinov’yevna Rosenbaum aka Ayn Rand lined her New York City apartment with welfare loot. What a taker. Actually I’m glad those Medicare benefits gave her a firewall against medical bankruptcy. That’s just one of many decent things we can do for each other via government, a.k.a. the “state.” C.G. Green Reno

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Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Anthony Clarke Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Vicky Jewell, Joe Medeiros, Ron Neill, Clayton Porter, Christian Shearer, Marty Troye, Warren Tucker, Gary White, Joseph White, Margaret Underwood General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Sweetdeals Coordinator Alicia Brimhall Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalinn Jenkins 405 Marsh Ave., Third Floor Reno, NV 89509 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds to classifieds@newsreview.com

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Brian Breneman

SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

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Half off indoor cart racing!

rn&r readers receive 50% off gift certificates to reno’s ultimate racing arena! Do you have what it takes? Are you ready to race your friends and risk victory and defeat? If so, welcome to Need 2 Speed, Reno’s ultimate arena of adventure challenge and competition. Whether you’re planning a birthday party, corporate event or bachelor party, there’s no better place to call. $23 gift cards for $11.50

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RN&R

w w w. n e w s r e v i e w. c o m


by Dennis Myers

THis ModErn World

by tom tomorrow

Ready for summer to be over? Asked at Sparks Rib Cook-Off Jay Hammond Construction worker

Not really. It was a good summer, wasn’t too hot, wasn’t too cold. It thought it was pretty good.

Michelle Chrystal Teacher

No, I’m a teacher, and I like my summers. The only reason I want summer to be over is for the balloon race next weekend.

Chris Ovrid Engineering administrator

Sparks PD should stop hiding from the truth There have been a couple of local twitches on the front of our year-long series on deadly police violence in the United States. We’ll combine them into a single editorial. First, on Aug. 28, came the public admission that a member of the Sparks Police Department shot Darcie Latham. He shot her without knowing who he was aiming at or that the person he was shooting at was unarmed. It was a 50-50 chance, he was given bad intel, and we’re not second-guessing the decision, just pointing out the culpability on the part of local government when it comes to helping Latham reach a full recovery. While we acknowledge that it was a bad situation, and that the district attorney’s finding of justification is somewhat circuitous, our problem is the admission of deception from the Sparks Police. “Initial reports indicated Darcie Latham was shot by her mother Monica Ritchey,” Sparks Police Chief Brian Allen said, as quoted by Reno Gazette-Journal. “However, as preliminary interviews took place, it was learned by investigators that a Sparks Police Department officer shot Mrs. Latham in the upper leg region.” Initial reports contained that information because the Sparks Police Department released documents stating that Monica Ritchey shot her daughter. They’ve been available online here, http://bit.ly/Npjegh, since we ran the first installment of our Fatal Encounters series—a story about how government sets up roadblocks to prevent the public from knowing about deadly police violence. When other media—namely Joe Hart at KRNV, http:// bit.ly/1tXjHrF—followed up our report that Sparks Police were misleading the public, Sparks Police continued its evasions and omissions. What the hell is the problem with the truth over there, SPD? How does this reconcile with the sworn mission of police to uphold the law, including OPINION

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ARTS&CULTURE

No, I’m not. I just don’t like winter. I have to commute up Kingsbury Grade in the winter to Lake Tahoe, so yes, it gets old. So I look forward to summer.

the laws regarding the public’s right to know? Six months knowing the truth was out there, but unwilling to reassure the public with transparency and honesty? That was the whole point of one of Nevada’s foundational public records rulings, Donrey vs. Bradshaw, in which the Nevada Supreme Court found that officials should release information regarding ongoing investigations if the public had a heightened interest and should know the truth. We’ll keep complaining, but it’s become apparent that Sparks Police Chief Brian Allen is making up the rules as he goes along, and transparency—with regard to a school shooting, or public records responses, or police shootings—is irrelevent to him. He severely undermined public confidence in his leadership and agency over the last six months with deception by omission. The second thing, on Aug. 31, a suspect in a robbery at the Plumb Lane CVS was killed by Reno police. From a distance, this looks like the very reason we give our police officers the daunting authority and responsibility to protect Americans’ property and lives with guns. This was a tragic day for the family of the dead, but it’s also a tragedy for the officers’ involved and the officers’ involved families. As we learned last week in our story about the psychological effects on police who are forced to kill someone in the line of duty,”Police Psychology,” http://bit.ly/1qx874a, a supportive community is the most important thing we can offer to the officers. “We could do better. We could show them our support … support like ‘You’ve been through a trauma, and you still belong to this group, to this team, and if you made the right calls on this, we’ll support you on them,’” said Reno psychologist William Danton. Ω |

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Ginny De Los Santos Computer support person

No. It’s my favorite season, and it passes a little too quickly, although I’m looking forward to some rain.

Juanita French Hairstylist

No. I love the summer. I don’t like the winter. I’m a summer girl, outdoors. I like to enjoy the festivals and the water and just hanging out in the parks.

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Nevada owned and operated by business Nevada is not ready for prime time. And we won’t be relinquishing last place in virtually everything anytime soon. Our newspapers and universities bend and sway to the whims of Nevada Inc. (mining, gaming, big business) at every turn. The disconnect between what we can afford with no by corporate taxes and our aspirations Sheila Leslie is a gulf so wide, you’d have to be a delusional gambler to believe we’ll ever hit triple 7s. Consider the Las Vegas Sun, whose publisher Brian Greenspun recently joined the board of directors of Barrick Gold, the world’s largest gold producer. Despite what they teach in journalism school about avoiding conflicts of interest, Greenspun has no qualms about his newest venture, which should net him at least $200,000 a year. He says his newspaper will continue to independently cover Question 2 on November’s ballot, removing mining’s sweetheart tax protections from the state’s constitution.

Then consider the Reno GazetteJournal publisher, John Maher, who sees no conflict in his membership on the board of directors of the Chamber of Commerce, a group that spends most of its energy making sure the Legislature doesn’t approve any tax their big business members might have to pay. They much prefer raising the regressive sales tax so the rest of us shoulder their burden. The Gazette-Journal has a history of its publishers ignoring obvious conflicts to the consternation of its more ethical reporters. Remember Sue Clark-Johnson who joined the board of directors of Harrah’s in 1994? She saw no potential for a conflict between the newspaper and the state’s largest industry, though most journalism professionals certainly did. And then there’s the most recent disgraceful example of a public institution succumbing to the corporate will: the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. After a study was released that found a margins tax would produce $862 million that could infuse Nevada’s education budget and create 13,000

jobs in 2016, you could almost hear the thundering call Acting UNLV president Don Snyder received from a casino moguls threatening to withhold support for a dream stadium if the study by UNLV’s Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) wasn’t immediately renounced. That bombastic phone call was likely followed by a call from a casino lobbyist with a friendly idea to “fix” the problem. “Here’s what you do,” the lobbyist might have said. “Distance yourself from the study and say there’s so many questions about the methodology, you’ve decided to ask for a third-party review. That’ll be the end of it.” In an astounding news release, Snyder states the obvious, that the CBER study doesn’t represent the university’s views, as if the university should have an official position on a ballot question. Provost John White practically begs faculty with opposing views on the margins tax to denounce the CBER study. Then Snyder further embarrasses the university by proclaiming that

based on the “questionable methodology of the study” and the concerns of two faculty members, he’s sending the report to the Brookings Institute for “feedback” on its merit and quality. Guess who sits on the board of directors of Brookings? Nevada Inc.’s own Brian Greenspun. Paradoxically, Snyder and other political and business leaders insist UNLV is to become a Tier 1 university with big plans afoot for a medical school in Las Vegas and that brand-new stadium. But who’s going to pay the bill? Not Nevada Inc. They propose an even higher sales tax, paid by you and me. Meanwhile the miners and gamers and Chamber members smugly sit back in their comfy chairs and wait for the next opportunity to squash anyone or anything that might produce a corporate tax in Nevada, an approach that’s always worked well for them. That is, unless you send them a message through your vote for The Education Initiative, (Question 3), in November. Ω

It’s an oldie but a goodie. “Desperately Seeking Susan” http://www.pyramid. net/burghart/scj.html

All-wheel drive available on the MINI Cooper S Countryman ALL4 and MINI John Cooper Works Countryman ALL4. †MSRP does not include destination and handling charge of $795 and excludes license, registration, taxes, options and labor to install. Certain features maybe optional. Actual price determined by your authorized MINI dealer. *Offer not valid in Puerto Rico. Lease financing available on new 2014 MINI Cooper S Countryman ALL4 models, from participating MINI Dealers through MINI Financial Services through 09/02/14. Monthly lease payments of $227 per month for 36 months based on MSRP of $29,445 which includes Automatic Transmission and destination & handling fee of $795. $3,797 cash due at signing is based on $2,845 down payment, $227 first month payment, $725 acquisition fee, and $0 security deposit (not all customers will qualify for security deposit waiver). Tax, title, license, registration and dealer fees are additional fees due at signing. Program available from participating MINI Dealers to eligible, qualified customers with excellent credit history who meet MINI Financial Services credit requirements. Payments do not include applicable taxes. All figures presented are examples only. Actual MSRP may vary. Lessee responsible for insurance during the lease term and any excess wear and tear as defined in the lease contract, $.20/mile over 10,000 miles per year and a disposition fee of $350 at lease end. Purchase option at lease end (excluding tax, title and government fees) is $17,961. Qualified rate lock applicants must take delivery by 12/01/14. Offer includes a $750 Lease credit which is used to offset final contract price. Customer is responsible for all taxes on full contract amount. $1000 You-ification Credit offsets MSRP. $600 Dealer Contribution (if applicable) offsets MSRP. Dealer contribution may affect terms. Offer and credits valid through 09/30/14 and may be combined with other offers unless otherwise stated. Models pictured may be shown with metallic paint and/or additional accessories. All 2014 MINI Passenger Cars come standard with Boot to Bonnet No Cost Maintenance standard for 3 years or 36,000 miles, whichever comes first and begins on the original in-service date. Refer to the MINI Service and Warranty Information booklet for complete terms, conditions and limitations. Stop in for complete details.

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SEPTEMBER 4, 2014


Flores in love with state power Latino political power is growing in Nevada. Nevada’s Republican governor, Brian Sandoval, is Hispanic. Interestingly, the Democrats nominated Lucy Flores, their Hispanic Democratic superstar, to run for lieutenant governor. And the Koch brothers are coming to Nevada! by Brendan Trainor I wish I could like Lucy Flores, a compelling and talented candidate. Unfortunately, when she speaks, her words are infused with collectivism. She continuously mentions “community” or “ community leaders.” Seldom does she mention “individual choice” or “personal responsibility.” The only individual she really talks about is herself. The office of lieutenant governor has few duties in the Nevada Constitution. The primary function is extra constitutional, namely chairing the Nevada Tourism Commission. Ms Flores is not content with those duties. She is out to personally transform Nevada, with the help of community leaders of course. Flores wants to lead numerous committees, or initiatives,

or whatever she decides to call them, to tackle issues from immigration to education, from tax policy to women’s rights, from sustainable investment to climate change. Name your public policy problem, call Lucy, problems solved! She told Jon Ralston on Aug. 14 that unless the Constitution forbids it, she can do whatever she wants to do. This is the progressive take on limited government in a nutshell. A classical liberal believes that a public official should only do what the constitution authorizes the office to do. Flores even invoked that old Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, when she said she will use her office as a “bully pulpit” to enact her pet reforms. The problem with a bully pulpit is that there is a real bully—the police powers of the state—standing behind it. It is obvious that a grand strategy is being played. If Flores is elected, then Gov. Sandoval might think twice about leaving the state in her hands to run against Sen. Reid. But

El!l ages E FuRn for a

Reid may not run if the Republicans take the Senate, and he is relegated to the back bench. Then Lt. Gov. Flores could be a thorn in Gov Sandoval’s side, forcing him further to the left. Americans for Prosperity, the Koch Brothers’ libertarian Tea Party group, is moving into Nevada and laying infrastructure for the 2016 election. They also bring a Latino organization, Libre, to Nevada. Their money and resources are desperately needed. It is now September, and the Washoe County Republican Party does not have a director of minority outreach. Libre might provide Latinos a fresher voice for limited government than the GOP can. Sen. Reid spent last winter giving speeches blaming the Koch Brothers for every problem, real or imagined, in America. Personal attacks claiming the Koch Brothers are un-American, and out only to make themselves rich, are particularly

reprehensible. The Senator sold his Searchlight properties and purchased a $750,000 condominium in Las Vegas. He and his family have done quite well by doing good, as the Quakers say. Koch Industries is the only petro-chemical industry that has consistently opposed lucrative federal subsidies for ethanol. Even Al Gore has condemned ethanol subsidies because they result in wasted agricultural resources, causing unnecessary food price hikes that adversely impact the poor. Contrast the Kochs with Warren Buffet, a progressive favorite because Buffet says he thinks he should pay more taxes, but who made hundreds of millions using Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) money to take over Wells Fargo Bank. Nevadans now can decide whether they believe that the Koch brothers’ vision of free markets is better than Flores’ vision of croney government central planning. Latinos from now on will have a lot to say about Nevada’s future. Ω

— C e l e b r a t i n g 12 7 Ye a r s o f N e v a d a R o o t s —

• Master gardener demonstrations • Livestock exhibits 4-H activities • Farm tours • UAV (drone) exhibits • Tasting Nevadaproduced wines

NEVADA 2 014

F

FIELD DAY

• Wildlife tracking exhibits

Saturday, September 20th 9:00 am to 2:00 pm

Hosted by: Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station College of Agriculture, Biotechnology, and Natural Resources University of Nevada Cooperative Extension

UNR Main Station Field Lab • 5895 Clean Water Way, Reno

Registration required at: www.ag.unr.edu/fieldday

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Check out Truthout’s story about Libre: http://www.truthout.org/buzzflash/ commentary/ koch-brothers-librehispanic-voter/18478koch-brothers-librehispanic-voter

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PHOTO/Jeff J MiTcHell/THinksTOck

Special education students are occasionally the  subject of parent complaints in Washoe County.  It’s a touchy area when the matter becomes  public.

Two suits against school chief Washoe schools superintendent Pedro Martinez is facing trial in a lawsuit for allegedly interfering with school district contracts and targeting one business in particular. The suit was filed last year but never came to light during the dispute over Martinez being put on paid leave. It was reported last week for the first time by KTVN reporter Terri Russell. Also last week, former Washoe County School District police chief Mike Mieras finally went to court over his June 27 firing by Martinez, suing both the superintendent and the school district. The 2013 lawsuit involves seven architectural firms with school district contracts to upgrade school locks and other jobs. In September 2012, MARTINEZ shortly after he became superintendent, according to the suit, Martinez contacted each firm and told them to halt “their contractual relationship with plaintiff.” In the court filing, contractor Elkhorn Consulting said there was no reason or authority for “for Martinez to interfere” and that his order cost Elkhorn more than $100,000 and damaged it with future business contracts. The suit also says Martinez “intended to do harm” to Elkhorn. The school district’s attorney tried to get the suit dismissed but failed, and it is expected to go to trial in February. In the Mieras lawsuit, Martinez is accused of a retaliatory firing, claiming that over a two-year period, Mieras reported a number of allegedly improper actions by Martinez and the school district counsel involving violations of policy and criminal probes and was fired as a result. The suit says Martinez fired Mieras just short of 20 years in his pension plan, with the result that he vested at a lower rate, which will result in a lost of funds.

Toxic waters Nevada placed sixth in the nation in the toxicity of materials dumped in its waterways, according to Environment America, a research and policy organization. Nevada did not place in the top 10 states in the volume of toxic releases. It was when the releases were gauged for level of toxicity that the state went up near the top. Nevada scientist Glenn Miller said the annual report of toxic releases in the states by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency—which usually ran Nevada near the top—are not all that useful, because they rank states by sheer volume, and some substances pose little threat. In February, the EPA ranked Nevada second in its annual list. But Miller said while raw numbers on volume of releases may not be helpful, more detailed numbers can be. For instance, Environment America also reported that Nevada’s North Fork Humboldt River Watershed was the third worst in the United States when weighted by toxicity of releases. That watershed received the largest release of carcinogens among local watersheds in the United States and the most toxicant releases that foster developmental damage. This is of greater concern, he said, noting that mining waste dumps play a role. “You’ve got waste rock dumps, high elevation, lots of water,” he said, pointing to the Jerritt Canyon mine and waste site as an example. The result is that water carries toxins away and they migrate into waterways at lower elevations.

—Dennis Myers

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Compliant State: Special ed complaints on decline in Washoe The Washoe County School District is making steady progress on special education issues and is on the verge of being by in full compliance with federal Dennis Myers requirements, according to a Nevada Department of Education official. “Further, from my perspective along with evidence-based information, I believe Washoe County School District (WCSD) has made improvements in ensuring compliant practices relative to special education over the page year,” wrote state special education director Marva Cleven in an email message to Washoe County schools superintendent Pedro Martinez.

“I have confidence that the district will follow through.” Marva Cleven state special education director The message described changes for the better in Washoe County and said only a single nearly-completed response to a parental complaint prompted a letter from the state to WCSD about meeting a federal compliance deadline. Cleven wrote the message, a copy of which was obtained by the RN&R, after the Reno Gazette-Journal published an article portraying the special education situation in Washoe County as fairly confrontational and harsh between the state and the district.

The RGJ piece, reported by Siobhan McAndrew and published Aug. 28, ran under the headline “State tells school district to make changes or risk funding.” It described a letter sent to the school district by state schools superintendent Dale Erquiaga. The letter references the individual education program (IEP) drawn up in response to a complaint from a parent, Larry Dailey, about his daughter’s services. The RGJ article read in part, “In his letter to the school district, Erquiaga said the district did not follow a checklist to monitor the requirements laid out in Dailey’s daughter’s IEP. The letter mandates that training for all special education teachers, related service providers and representatives regarding the policies and procedures checklist be completed by the district by Sept. 30. It says by Oct. 1, the district must notify all parents of children with an IEP during the 2014-15 school year that there is checklist. It also mandates that the IEP checklist be implemented retroactively for all students at the same school as Dailey’s daughter from January to June and for those missed items provide compensatory education services. “Marva Cleven, the director of special education for Nevada Department of Education, said she has never seen a letter like this go out to a school district. She said it is a tough

message to the district to fix things that fell through the cracks. Despite a warning that says the district’s noncompliance could result in the loss of federal funds, she said that is unlikely. ‘That has never happened in Nevada,’ she said, but added there is no room for mistakes involving children with special needs.” When she read the RGJ article, an apparently angry Cleven fired off the message to Washoe Superintendent Martinez telling him that the article misrepresented her interview with McAndrew and that she had told the journalist that the state department has confidence that the Washoe district had made progress and would continue to do so. The reporter declined to respond in detail but said she stands by her reporting. Cleven’s message to Martinez said that of six corrective action plans (CAP) in response to six complaints against WCSD, the state had already received five CAPs and the sixth was “partially fulfilled.” All such complaints must be “100 percent” complete in order for compliance to be achieved, she wrote, and that sixth uncompleted CAP was the only reason the Erquiaga letter went out to the district. In an interview this week, Washoe special education director Frank Selvaggio said he received the Erquiaga letter on Aug. 22 and completed the last CAP and sent it off to the state on Aug. 26, two days before the RGJ article appeared. There are 8,400 special education children in the district and nine complaints have been filed with the state, six of them found to warrant action. “It says that we will respond appropriately when these things come up,” said Selvaggio, describing the content of the CAP. He said he could not respond in detail about specific complaints because of privacy concerns. He blamed himself for the last CAP not being delivered until Aug. 26, saying that an aide was burdened with work and he didn’t realize it until late. “We are making progress in several areas,” Selvaggio said. Cleven’s message to Martinez singled Selvaggio out for attention, saying that his work had brought the school district up to speed on special education issues. “Frank Selvaggio has been highly proactive in ensuring that compliance is at the forefront of district priorities,” Cleven wrote. “I began meeting monthly with Frank


beginning in October 2013, and we continue to make those meetings a priority. ... Through these monthly meetings we discussed ways in which he could make improvements including his idea of hiring a Compliance Officer within the Special Services Office.” She wrote that Selvaggio’s work contributed to “the very few numbers of complaints that were filed during last school year.” Other WCSD officials were also upset by the newspaper article and were sharp in their criticism. One said the article’s language was unnecessarily severe: “I don’t see where anything in there supports the way it is spun. No one in there says there is a rough relationship between us and the state office, but that’s the impression left.” Special education is one of the sources of friction between the Washoe County School Board and Martinez. School board members feel they have had to keep pushing Martinez to act in the field. In a July 29 court filing, they cited the problem as one of the reasons they put the superintendent on paid leave on July 21. The filing said Martinez ignored “repeated complaints” from parents—particularly parents of special education students, subjecting the school district to bad publicity.

The RGJ article prompted Cleven to write to Martinez that McAndrew “twisted my comments.” It also read: “Yes, it’s a tough letter to have to send and receive, which I shared with [McAndrew]. However, I never said that it’s a ‘tough message.’ I apologize for the spin that she placed [on] my comments, and I can assure you that my tone relative to the district was positive at all times,

“Wewillrespondappropriately whenthesethingscomeup.” Frank Selvaggio Washoe special education director and that I have confidence” that the district will follow through with all directive[s] in the enforcement action. It’s unfortunate that she didn’t include any of that in her article.” When contacted, McAndrew said, “My only comment I have is that I stand by my reporting that day, and we urge people to contact us if they have concerns.” She said the newspaper encourages readers to use letters to the editor and similar avenues when they are unhappy about news coverage. “We welcome that kind of feedback,” she said. Ω

Happy days

s

Photo/Dennis Myers

Not all pleasure at the Rib Cook-Off in Sparks came from the ribs. The event reportedly attracted several hundred thousand visitors. It has been held annually since 1989, and this is the first Cook-Off since the new owners took over the sponsoring Sparks Nugget.

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ART

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Volunteers from Bee Habitat gathered to document plant life at Idlewild Park Terrace on Aug. 30.

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Parks and rec Local parks going chemical free Members of the local organization Bee Habitat cringe at the sight of pesticides, herbicides and other chemicals being sprayed, especially in local parks, so they decided to do something about it. Now they have 28 parks—27 by Sage Leehey in Sparks and one in Reno—that will be converted to the pesticide-free designation. s age l@ Bee Habitat will also be doing the conversion work on these parks, news review.c om including assessing the current situations, bioremediation to rid the existent soil and plants of chemicals, permaculture design and new planting. The work started Aug. 30 at the Reno park, Idlewild Park Terrace. Volunteers from the organization came out to assess the current state of the park. “Every department has their own set of chemicals,” Sandy Rowley of Bee Habitat said. “It’s not just pesticides and herbicides. It’s fungicides, adulticides [for mosquitoes that carry West Nile Virus]. And each department isn’t aware of what the other department has already sprayed in that area. ... So we sat down [with Sparks, Reno and Washoe County officials] and our goal was to say that there are other solutions out there. There are other cities that have converted to pesticide-free in the country, so I know that we can do this. And at the end of the meeting, we had 28 parks.” The group has already hired a permaculture designer—Jana Vanderhaar—for the parks. Permaculture design is a way to design agriculture and landscaping of an area sustainably. Bee Habitat has also purchased organic plants and other materials in order to get this project going. Because of the work and funding the group has already put into this project—about $2,000 of members’ own money—the group has asked for official letters from both cities stating that they will not spray or use chemicals of any kind on these parks, even though they have already been told in meetings For more information, that this is the case. Rowley doesn’t want their hard work to go to waste. visit beehabitat.com. One of the main reasons Bee Habitat is so concerned with pesticides is because of the effect they are believed to have on bees. Many believe that pesticides with neonicotinoids are the main cause of Colony Collapse Disorder. If bees continue disappearing, as they have been rapidly since 2006, we all could end up hungry. Bees are one of the main pollinators of many food crops. (“Buzz kill,” RN&R Aug. 8, 2013.) The neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, is the most commonly used insecticide in the world. “It travels in the soil, so if you’re trying to have an organic yard … if your neighbor has plants that have been treated with neonics or they’re using Roundup or other products, and it rains … it ends up in your yard, it ends up in the waterways,” Rowley said. “It isn’t just big agriculture doing this.” Many of these chemicals are also potentially dangerous to humans as well, especially those with weakened immune systems, and since there is no existing way to check when areas are sprayed with these chemicals, Rowley worries about children and others in parks and other local areas. “We’re currently working with Eric Crump, who is in Washoe County Parks and Rec, to get one centralized database, for their own employees’ safety as well, that says who sprayed what, when, why, where and how much it cost,” Rowley said. “And that way, when another department sees a problem and wants to spray with TD4 or whatever chemical it is, they’re not going right after the Washoe County Health Department sprayed adulticide or anything like that.” Ω OPINION

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Anthony Arevalo Sculpture

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Itʼs happen ing in ACTIVITIES FALL BULB PLANTING Presented by Mark Mercier. Now is the time to plant bulbs for spring color. Selection, ideas and protection will be discussed. Please RSVP. Sa, 9/6, 11AM & 1PM, free, but a donation of a can of food for the local food bank is appreciated. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551 GREAT BASIN BREWING CO. FARMERS MARKET Nevada’s farmers, ranchers, food purveyors and artisans will converge at Great Basin Brewing Company for the late-season Nevada Grown farmers market. Th, 3:307:30PM through 9/25, free. Great Basin Brewing Co. 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 3557711 RENO SKI AND RECREATION CLUB The Reno Ski & Recreation Club invites active adults to its monthly meeting on Tues. Sept.9 at 5:30 PM. Learn about events including tennis, camping, kayaking & more. Tu, 9/9, 5:30PM, free. Wildcreek Pavilion at Wildcreek Golf Course, 3500 Sullivan Ln. (775) 6733100 BUILD AND BLING GOURD BIRDHOUSES Presented by Jack Fulton. Learn the techniques for building gourd birdhouses and making them look fabulous for your feathered friends. Great project for the whole family! Sa, 9/13, 11AM, $10 per gourd; all other supplies included. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551 SCHEELS RUNNING CLUB Run with expert pacers and enjoy running in a group Tu, 6:30PM through 12/9, free. Scheels, 1200 Scheels Dr. (775) 331-2700 CROCHET CONNECTION Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet

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enthusiasts. Th, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway. (775) 424-1800 FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. First Sa of every month, 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 CONVERSATION CAFE The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month, 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 FOOD TRUCK DRIVE-IN Food Truck Drive-In comes to Victorian Square on the 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month through October. 5PM to 9PM. Enjoy the finest in mobile cuisine including Hawaiian fusion, desserts, hot dogs, pulled pork nachos and much more! After dinner, head to Saint Mary’s Ampitheater for a free movie at 8PM. Next week’s movie (September 13) is Princess and the Frog. Victorian Square, Victorian Ave, free. CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP This class is for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC CALIFORNIA COWBOYS Th, 9/4, 7PM, F, 9/5, 7PM and Sa, 9/6, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 3563300 THE MARK CASTRO BAND Classic rock and pop duo F, 9/12, 6PM, no cover. Red Hawk Golf and Resort, 6600 N. Wingfield Pkwy.(775) 626-6000

BIKINI BULL RIDING DJ and Bikini Bull Riding Competition. Su, 5 & 9PM through 12/28, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 LOCALS NIGHT Locals Night, DJ. M, 5PM through 12/29, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 3563300 LIVE MONDAYS WITH TANY JANE Open mic night every Monday at 8PM, hosted by Tany Jane. M, 8PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 CLASSIC ROCK NIGHT Classic rock night with DJ. Tu, 5PM through 12/30, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 OPEN JAM WITH TAZER & FRIENDS W, 8PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 LADIES NIGHT & TOUGHEST COWBOY Ladies Night w/live music and Toughest Cowboy Competition. DJ breaks until midnight. W, 7 & 9PM through 12/31, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 ERIKA PAUL Enjoy Louisiana-style food and the soulful, breathtaking jazz sounds of Erika Paul on keyboards and vocals. Th, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 A SINGERS-SONGWRITERS SHOWCASE Bring yourself, your instrument and your song. We look forward to hearing and seeing you there! Th, 8PM through 12/18, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

LIVE MUSIC & LATE NIGHT DJ Live music with late-night DJ. F, 5PM-2AM & 7-11PM through 12/26, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 LIVE JAZZ Vocal and instrumental jazz from “The Great American Songbook”, performed by First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz. Fridays, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 BILL DAVIS Sa, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 LIVE MUSIC & LATE NIGHT DJ Live music with late-night DJ. Sa, 5PM-2AM & 7PMmidnight through 12/27, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 3563300

KARAOKE KARAOKE COMES TO SIDELINES Every Monday Night!!! M, 8PM. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 KARAOKE WITH BOBBY DEE Tu, 8PM, no cover. Morelli’s G Street Saloon, 2285 G St. (775) 355-8281 KARAOKE Th-Sa, 9PM, no cover. Bottom’s Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way (775) 359-3677


PHOTO/VIKTORCAP/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

TICKED OFF Ly m e D i s e a s e a n D o t h e r s t u f f t h at w i L L r u i n y o u r D ay BY tim hause rman

K

im Savage from Tahoe City has been fighting Lyme disease for years. Sometimes she feels fine, and then other times: “At work, I can’t make a complete sentence. Someone could order a coffee, and I can’t process it. I’m more than tired, my mind doesn’t work.” Savage initially got sick as a kid in New Hampshire, then got even sicker 12 years ago. Now to fight the Lyme she’s been through three rounds of long-term antibiotics, managing her diet, and enduring the painful weekly self-administered shots in the butt with immune system boosters that will hopefully help her fight the disease. “It’s so hard to cure it because you have to wipe it all out. If you don’t, something can come back and trigger it.” But as a single mom, she can’t miss work. And all her treatment has been out of pocket or in exchange for her artwork, because insurance doesn’t cover it. She hopes that someday her metal and neon art business can develop to the point that she doesn’t need to be tied to an hourly job, since sometimes she has difficulty

getting the energy to get to work, or feels like dying half way through the day. Those who suffer from chronic Lyme disease often feel tired and just want to sleep. Sometimes they sleep because of exhaustion and sometimes because their skin is crawling with pain. One patient refers to the pain as similar to having “all your hair pulled out of your head.” Severe light and noise sensitivity are additional symptoms, and sometimes an advanced state of confusion progresses to where they have difficulty remembering where they are. In fact, the long term pain and suffering combined with difficulty maintaining hope has led to suicide becoming not uncommon among Lyme sufferers. As blogger Leila says in “From Lyme to Limeade,” about the death of her friend with Lyme, “Heather’s deep-rooted feeling of being misunderstood, judged, and invalidated is something that Lymies know far too well. And it’s a horrible shame. We feel it from family members, society at large, and our own doctors.”

“ T I C K E D O F F ” continued on page 14

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“ T I C K E D O F F ” continued from page 13 PHOTO/DUNCAN SMITH/PHOTODISC/THINKSTOCK

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium, borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected Blacklegged Tick. Usually, the tick has to attach itself to your body and suck blood for at least 36 hours before the disease can be transferred. The symptoms may include: fever, headache, fatigue and a skin rash. If not treated early, it can spread to joints, the heart and nervous system. The disease is most prevalent in ticks in the Northeastern United States, including the town of Lyme, Connecticut, and in a few spots on the Northern California coast. When someone from Reno-Tahoe with chronic Lyme is asked, they often say that they’ve hiked the Appalachian Trail, or used to play in the woods in New England when they were kids. But there is no guarantee it couldn’t be contracted in the California foothills or a variety of other places where ticks thrive.

Borrelia Burgdorferi  is the bacterium that  causes Lyme disease.

Search for tomor row The key to curing Lyme disease is early treatment. If it’s hit hard with antibiotics just a few days after the tick is removed, the chances of kicking it to the curb are quite high. The problem is that many people do not even know they were bitten by a tick, or that the symptoms they feel years later were caused by a tick. For those with any of the symptoms of Lyme disease, even if they think they were not bitten by a tick, the key is to have the disease diagnosed as soon as possible. The more time it goes untreated, the more damage it can do. What many call chronic Lyme disease, the CDC calls Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS). It’s a condition for those who have undergone Lyme Disease treatment and still can’t get rid of the symptoms. The CDC says that 10-20 percent of patients treated with a 2-4 week course of antibiotics will have lingering symptoms of fatigue, pain, joint and muscle aches, which can last more than six months. The CDC website says, “But many patients have been fighting the disease for years … most medical experts believe that the lingering symptoms are a result of damage to tissues and the immune system that occurred during the infection. Some health providers tell patients that these symptoms reflect persistent infection with borrelia burgdorffieri.” When the CDC talks about “most” medical experts, they are talking about the opinions of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). When they are talking about “some health providers” they are referring to the views of the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). Both organizations are dedicated to researching a cure for Lyme, but they 14   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

have differing opinions on what the best current treatment should be. In general, the CDC has adhered to the opinion of the IDSA, and the insurance companies have followed suit, which is that “most cases of Lyme disease are successfully treated with a few weeks of antibiotics. Using antibiotics for a very long time (months or years) does not offer superior results and in fact can be dangerous, because it can cause potentially fatal complications. We sympathize with these patients’ suffering, but remain concerned that a diagnosis of so-called ‘chronic Lyme disease,’ suggesting that active infection is ongoing, is not supported by scientific evidence.” Meanwhile, ILADS is “dedicated to advancing the standard care for Lyme and its associated diseases and

improving physician understanding of how to treat Lyme. ILADS states that the tests for Lyme are unreliable and fail to accurately diagnose Lyme, and that “a preponderance of evidence indicates that active ongoing infections is the cause of persistent symptoms in chronic Lyme disease. Most cases of chronic Lyme require extended course of antibiotic therapy. Relapses occur. Retreatment may be required.” Thus, Lyme disease is hard to cure, with symptoms that are subjective, in that there is not an easy test to say that a particular symptom is tied to a particular disease, and the treatment plans of choice—in this case antibiotics— don’t always work. And just to make matters even more peachy, ticks transmit a whole soup of nasty diseases, so many patients who get a dose of

The CDC says that over 30 0,0 0 0 people are infec ted with Ly me disea se e a c h y e a r.

Lyme may also be getting other infections as well, which add to the painful mix of symptoms and the difficulty in diagnosing. The two organizations most prevalent in setting protocol for the disease vehemently disagree on the best method of treatment.

The Doctors Dr. Jeanne Plumb from the Truckee Tahoe Medical Group says that the first key is to have the disease accurately diagnosed. There is just one way to accurately test for Lyme disease, according to the CDC. It’s a two-step process. The first step is called an EIA test. If that is positive or inconclusive, then the WesternBlot test is done, which will tell you whether you have the disease. But the problem according to the ILADS folks is the tests are not 100 percent conclusive, and so it is then up to doctors to be able to accurately diagnose the illness. Unfortunately, ILADS has found that the average Lyme patient sees five doctors over two years before being diagnosed, which is understandable since the symptoms of Lyme are similar to the symptoms of a number of other illnesses.

Once a patient has been diagnosed with Lyme, the standard medical practice is a strong course of antibiotics. Up to this point, the treatment protocol is fairly standard and there is agreement in both the traditional (CDC, IDSA) and Lyme-literate medical communities (ILADS) about how to fix the problem. But once the antibiotics have been applied, and months and years go by and the symptoms are still there, what to do next is controversial. The CDC feels that long term use of antibiotics for those 10-20 percent who don’t respond to regular treatment is not effective. They believe that the first dose of antibiotics kills the bacteria, and that what patients are experiencing is the body’s response to the inflammation caused by the bacteria, not the bacteria itself. The CDC and IDSA believe that the inflammation damage to the body can take a long time to recover from and that if patients do not recover, they should be tested for other diseases with similar symptoms such as Fibromyalgia, Arthritis or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Meanwhile, the ILADS website says there is “much documentation demonstrating that short courses of antibiotic treatment fail to eradicate the Lyme spirochete.”


In the meantime, a bunch of hurting people want their lives back. That is why organizations such as ILADS have been working on alternative methods of treatment. As one provider says on their website, “The majority of women we see have already had extensive testing and treatment by other health care providers and have been told that there is nothing more that can be done for them.” Dr. Stephanie Riley treats a number of people with chronic Lyme. She says there are “a huge range of treatments, and a lot of controversy with chronic Lyme.” She says that patients often get under-treated and then the symptoms come back. Like Plumb, she says the sooner the treatment the better. But with chronic Lyme, the treatment varies with the individual. You “treat the person where they are. If they have been fighting it for 5 or 10 years, supporting their foundational health works. You are building the rest of their body to take over and manage the battle. There is really no set protocol. I have people that I treat for three months; they never look back and have no issues. And then I have people that get a little better, and then they backslide. And it can be incredibly frustrating and emotionally debilitating. It’s a complex issue because Lyme impacts a bunch of different symptoms.”

Days of Our Lives Meanwhile, there are people like this woman, who asked that her name not be revealed. In the last five years, she has lost her job and her house while fighting the disease. It took three years to diagnose it. She was in and out of the hospital and had a ton of inconclusive, expensive, and unnecessary tests. No one even considered the possibility it could be Lyme. She has fought tooth and nail to get disability to help

slowly, but much too slowly, getting better. What can be done for someone like her? The Infectious Diseases Society of America says, “Given that long-term antibiotic therapy has not been found to effectively treat symptoms that persist after the initial infection is cleared, IDSA supports additional research to determine safe and effective treatments for patients that experience such long-term symptoms. IDSA

Plumb agrees that more research by the FDA into finding a solution is necessary. “We have to practice evidence-based medicine. We need to make sure we’re truly helping ourselves, and find out what really works. Some of the alternative methods are being tested and some are panning out true, while a lot of them can’t be scientifically backed up. We want to recommend what we have science for.” Plumb believes

years without success, but extensive research on creating an effective one are still underway. So what is a Lyme sufferer to do? First, if at all possible, don’t get it. Those traveling to where there are ticks should check themselves frequently. If bitten by a tick, contact a medical provider immediately. Those with Lyme symptoms should get tested and start treatment right away. If it doesn’t go away, unfortunately, that’s when it gets challenging, and a long road towards a cure might be unavoidable. The CDC says that over 300,000 people are infected with Lyme disease each year. Hopefully, someday soon scientists will find a cure, so that those who have been fighting the disease for years can finally get their lives back. The Lyme to Limeade blogger sums it up—“The system is broken, plain and simple. And until more research is done to find better, more effective cures, and doctors are willing to step up and acknowledge chronic Lyme disease, and health insurance companies are willing to cover treatment, and families start validating the reality of the Lyme experience, people are going to keep taking their lives. I hate that I’m even writing that, but it’s true.” Ω

“ Heather ’s deep - r ooted feeling of being misunder s tood, judged, and invalidated is som e t hing t hat Ly mies k now f a r too we ll .” LeiLa Blogger, From Lyme to Limeade

will continue to periodically review its Lyme disease guidelines and update them as needed to reflect the best available scientific literature.” While the ILADS Lyme-literate folks would agree with the need for more research, they believe a continued course of antibiotics and more aggressive treatment is the best solution now.

her stay alive financially. She has her good days, and it’s on those days that people often tell her she looks too good to be sick, but a lot of days she is in pain and doesn’t have the energy or brain power to get out of bed. She’s tried anything and everything to fight the disease, and feels that she is

one area that could be looked into for research is the impact of the flora in our gut, and its connection to immune disorders, or our inability to fight the disease. Some also believe there is a hereditary connection, that some people are genetically more vulnerable to the infection. Efforts to create a vaccine have been ongoing for

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! E M I T W O SH GE A T S LL A F S ’ RENO

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EW REVI

Bells and whistles: University of Nevada Department of Theatre & Dance long with all the other things that start this time of year—school, football, the network TV schedule—most of the area’s theater companies are kicking off their seasons. And they’re bringing it big time, with new venues, exciting collaborations, and an impressive lineup so full of choices that your weekends might just be spoken for between now and Christmas.

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The University of Nevada, Reno’s Department of Theatre & Dance has, arguably, the most to be excited about this fall. Their season starts Oct. 10 with Love and Information by Caryl Churchill, which explores love and connection (or lack thereof) in the Information Age. It incorporates human-robot interaction, giving theater students a chance to collaborate with the University’s Robotics Research Lab. There will be robots on stage, people. Even more exciting is the $4 million renovation to the Redfield Proscenium Theatre, which reopens just before Thanksgiving in grand style with A Christmas Carol: The Musical. This family-friendly production will show off the new theater, from ghosts that fly to increased, stadium-style seating. Equally as thrilling, Reno boy-turned-New Yorker Adam Cates—fresh off

P h o T o /E

van  g star E includin ra Arts as  ,  d a e  D f Evil t Sier  crew a mbers o Cast me hearse for the e r ,  Harris erick directs.  ed John Fr

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his gig as associate choreographer for the 2014 Tony Awards’ Best Musical—will return to direct this holiday extravaganza. The show’s huge budget ensures it will be quite a spectacle. On October 24 and 25, catch an innovative fall dance performance, Site Specific Dance Works, during which dancers will perform in unexpected spaces around campus and travel mid-show with audiences, much like street performance. Admission is free; stay tuned for details about specific locations. Tickets and information: www.unr.edu/cla/theatredance.

an Oldie But a GOOdie: Reno Little Theater This last year brought milestone changes to Reno Little Theatre, with the company going from one paid staff member to three, including Chad Sweet from Goodluck Macbeth, who joins RLT as full-time technical director. Sweet reported for duty this summer, and gradually will be working to turn over the reins of GLM. Even more noteworthy is that this fall, RLT kicks off its 80th season. They’ll be celebrating all year long

Rks R ic M a

with an ambitious lineup, starting Sept. 12 with Tennessee Williams’ classic The Glass Menagerie. In a new twist, the story will be told as a memory play, through the recollections of the much older main character, Tom. Next comes the 80th anniversary celebration show slated for Oct. 11 and 12. This show brings people who have been involved with the organization over the last decade to come back, watch and participate. It will include scenes from some of the last decade’s most popular RLT shows. Starting Oct. 24 is John Logan’s Red, a two-person biographical drama that follows expressionist painter Mark Rothko as he reflects on his commission to create a painting for the Four Seasons restaurant and questions the nature of art with his assistant. Opening Nov. 28 is Christopher Durang’s comedy, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike. This send-off of Chekhov’s most memorable and dysfunctional characters is about cohabitating middle-aged siblings whose lives are interrupted when their movie-star sister and her much-younger lover return to sell the family home. Not a Chekhov fan? No worries, you’ll still find this one funny, per Durang’s usual zany style,

though fans will find plenty of Easter eggs. Finally, the year ends with comedic playwright Ken Ludwig’s family farce, ’Twas the Night Before Christmas, running days Dec. 5-14. It’s complete with adventure, mistaken identities, a little hip-hop, elves and all things naughty and nice. On top of all that, catch one of Reno’s improv troupes, The Jesters League, doing monthly shows at RLT. Tickets and information: www.renolittletheater.org.

nO Brainer: Goodluck Macbeth In the spirit of collaboration that’s running rampant this fall, Goodluck Macbeth presents the highly anticipated Evil Dead: The Musical Sept. 26-Oct. 31. It’s co-directed by former Truckee Meadows Community College Performing Arts Company manager John Frederick and local actor Ashley Marie James, and stars TMCC regular Evan Harris. Expect total camp in this mash-up of the first two ED movies, as well as plenty of splatter (ponchos and other supplies will be on sale). The rest of the season is still up for grabs, says the outgoing Sweet, but it’s expected that the company will be shifting more toward using the space as a venue for alternative programming, such as movies and sing-alongs. And returning in October is the


Spotlight Academy for Young Actors’ week-long day camp for grades 4-8, during which kids will create one-acts that they then perform at week’s end. Tickets and information: www.goodluckmacbeth.com.

EvEn dEadEr: TheatreWorks of Northern Nevada Reno comic actor and Utility Player Christopher Daniels, wrapping up his performance as Miss Ginger Divine in his one-woman show at Goodluck Macbeth, lends his writing talents to this fall’s TWNN fundraiser, the fifth annual Murder Mystery Dinner (and silent auction), Oct. 12 at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa. The show, Good Evening, Artown, is a comedy suitable for all ages about a band of actors trying to mount a Broadway show despite a tyrannical director—until someone, of course, dies, leaving the audience guessing whodunit. Come dressed as your favorite living or dead Hollywood icon—best costume gets a prize. This major yearly fundraiser supports the nonprofit’s outreach programs and classes for youth (ages 6-12, Thursday nights) and teens (ages 12-18, Monday nights). Tickets and information: www. twnn.org, call 240-6970 or like them on Facebook.

Mad world: TMCC Performing Arts Catch another collaboration in TMCC’s first show of the season, Reefer Madness: The Musical, running Oct. 10-26. This spoof on the 1936 propaganda film about the evils of marijuana became a cult classic in the ‘60s, when people realized just how far off its ridiculous claims were. With an enormous cast of 28, it’s co-directed by TMCC professor Carolyn Wray and Brüka Theatre’s Mary Bennett in a long-anticipated team-up. Next comes Seussical the Musical, a children’s show for Washoe County School District students, with two public performances Dec. 5 and 6. The fall semester winds down Dec. 10 with a multicultural TMCC choir performance. Tickets and information: www.tmcc.edu/vparts.

SEEing iS bEliEving: Brüka Theatre The 22nd season of Brüka (the “Believe” season) features a full, ambitious roster of shows, regardless of up-in-the-air plans for the Virginia Street Bridge overhaul. In case you don’t get enough of that special Brüka sauce at TMCC’s OPINION

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Reefer Madness, you can catch it a few times this fall at Carson City’s Brewery Arts Center or on the Brüka main stage. The company is growing a partnership with BAC, touring five of its smaller shows to BAC’s black box theater. The season starts with Rajiv Joseph’s Gruesome Playground Injuries, running Sept. 12-19 at Brüka and Sept. 26-27 at BAC. This sort-of love story follows two 8-year-olds who meet on the playground and bump into each other every few years at various emergency rooms and sick beds. Next comes Sam Shepard’s Fool for Love, running at Brüka Oct. 3-25. It explores a 15-year, love-hate, fascination-repulsion relationship. Late Night TV returns to Brüka two weekends in October with “The Halloween Episode”—an original, 30-minute sitcom written by Gary Cremeans and Mary Bennett, about the Dumass family from Sunny Valley, Nevada. Celebrate Nevada’s sesquicentennial with Bennett’s own original 50-minute show, NV 150. See Nevada’s entire 150-year history in 50 minutes, presented in collaboration with the Carson City Ghost Walk. It runs Nov. 1 at BAC and at Brüka Nov. 5-8. The year wraps up with Ham for the Holidays by Shad Willingham, running Dec. 5-21. In this old-timey farce, set on a December morning in 1939 at a small-town Georgia radio station, the staff is all in a tizzy over their special Christmas show guest, Orson Welles—if the freak blizzard doesn’t stop him from coming. This fall, Brüka also continues to expand its Artist in the House Series with workshops in dance creation with Alexander Biber; dramaturgy and directing with Tony Degeiso, actor movement with Holly Natwora and improv with Mary Bennett. Tickets and information: www.bruka.org.

a lovErly EvEning: Western Nevada Musical Theatre Company With two major productions each year, WNMTC’s fall features Tonyand Oscar-winner My Fair Lady for three weekends in November at the 750-seat Carson City Community Center. The beloved story of phonetics professor Henry Higgins and his protégé, lowly flower girl Eliza Doolittle, features a score with numerous memorable hits, performed by a live orchestra. Tickets and information: www.wnmtc.com or (866) 977-6849.

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"Short Words with Tower" an ink and graphite work by Justin Quinn.

Art history Dada Local: The Legacy of Dada Culture in Reno As historical art movements go, Dada is one of the more commonly misunderstood. It’s much by more difficult to describe the values, Brad Bynum aesthetics and goals of Dada than, say, cubism or even surrealism. Dada is often bradb@ news review.c om ambiguous and subject to debate—arguments about what it means is half the fun. Part of the point of Dada is to disrupt traditional, accepted modes of thought. Justin Quinn: Not Everything Means A text panel in one of the University Something and Dada of Nevada, Reno’s Student Galleries Local: The Legacy of South takes as close a stab at an accurate Dada Culture in Reno definition of Dada as possible: “From its are on display at the Student Galleries founding in 1916 in Zurich, Switzerland, the South, Jot Travis art movement Dada was elusive, playful, Building, University of experimental, simultaneously inclusive Nevada, Reno Galleries and exclusive, and overall committed to a through Oct. 17. Gallery talks by Dada sense of counterculture, attacking bourgeois Local artists: 5:30values and institutionalized notions of art.” 6:30 p.m., Thursday, UNR’s Student Galleries South—a Oct. 16, with a closing somewhat hidden set of galleries tucked reception from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Gallery talks away in the Jot Travis building currently by student curators: features three interrelated exhibitions Thursdays, 4-4:30 all connected to Dada. The first is Not p.m. (Sept. 4, 11, 18, Everything Means Something, a solo exhibi25 and Oct. 2, 9). tion by a Minnesota artist, Justin Quinn,

who creates large works that seem to deconstruct audience expectations of language by presenting what seem to be large graphic signs or even full-length novels—but only featuring, for example, the letter E. It seems like text should be present, but with the single letter repeated disrupts any attempt to create literal meaning. The second exhibition is called Dada Local: The Legacy of Dada Culture in Reno. It’s a group exhibition featuring work from a few different generations of Reno artists—including Edw Martinez, Mike Sarich, Erik Burke, Nick Larsen and Omar Pierce, Michelle Lassaline and Nancy Peppin. The work includes many different media—from paintings on canvas to found object sculptures, from videos to tapestries. Tying those two exhibitions together and creating a sense of context, is a gallery with historical information about Dada, including periodicals, photographs, books and films. The exhibitions were curated as a group project for a university class taught by UNR art history professor Brett Van

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Hoesen. Students in the class studied the history of Dada and original Dada artists, like George Grosz, Tristan Tzara and Hugo Ball, many of whom were very interdisciplinary and multimedia in their approaches to making art, and then found local examples of contemporary art descended from Dada. “People really misunderstand Dada and use the term very liberally as [meaning] anything goes, like, ‘That’s weird—Dada,’” said Forrest Pelsue, a student-curator, during a recent group interview. “‘This work doesn’t make sense? Well, that’s Dada, so it’s OK. But there’s this whole history that does have a meaning.”

Some of the contemporary local artists represented in the show say that Dada is an indirect influence on their work. “It might be several layers of removal,” said Larsen. “We might be looking at Edw Martinez, and he might be looking at the original Dada artists. Or punk is a good example.” The visual aesthetic of punk—satirical, politically charged collages and cut-ups can be seen as a descendent of Dada. One student in the class, Zara Wetterling, focused on the work of the Nada Dada artists, a loosely affiliated group of Northern Nevada artists who invoke the name of the 100-year-old art movement. Artist Carole Ann Rickets represents that group in the exhibition. Van Hoesen said she sees the legacy of Dada in Reno, a city she describes as “a place where competing concepts of culture co-exist, where what might be considered subcultures elsewhere contribute to a dynamic popular culture.” “Reno, or at least the students I work with, and their larger community, seem to be part of a world that in some ways is having an authentic engagement with what Dada as a historical movement was all about,” she said. Ω

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Signed, sealed, delivered The Postal Cafe 3115 Eastlake Blvd., Washoe Valley, (775) 849-2722 Recall the “Sunday drive,” wherein you and your family would take a leisurely drive through the countryside, burning by Todd South fossil fuels whilst enjoying fresh air and scenery bucolic? This American tradition began in the 1920s, but it was my mother who taught me the best journeys are those with no destination. More than once we discovered a roadside diner, ice cream stand, or other humble roadside attraction. These memories were in mind as my wife and I headed south on U.S. 395 during a weekend afternoon. Not the new highway extension of fancy bridges and view-blocking concrete. Photo/Allison Young

Owner Isabella  Benitez makes a  sandwich in the  kitchen.

For more information, visit postalcafenv.com.

20   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

Newly designated “ALT 395” is now blissfully free of traffic, so drive down that scenic, lonesome road until the Eastlake Boulevard turnoff, enjoy the elevated view past Little Washoe Lake, then mosey through the bedroom community of New Washoe City until you arrive at a labor of love known as The Postal Cafe. Beginning life as a filling station in the 1960s on South Virginia Street at the outskirts of Reno, this neo-Deco bit of architecture was moved to its

New Washoe City location in the '70s. Over the years, it became better known as the local post office and videotape rental shop, eventually falling into disrepair. In 2005, the garage and office space were converted to a coffee shop, while the postal contract lent the new diner its name (mail service ended earlier this year). The new owner, as of 2013, has a trained culinary background and has kept the kitschy-cool decor while adding her own touches. This place is homey and cute and just plain adorable. Local eggs are used in the kitchen and available to take home ($3.95 p/doz). Locally produced artwork is on display and available for sale. Colorful local patrons provided unintended entertainment for us city folk. It’s a two-woman shop, and they’re doing a pretty good job. You’re probably wondering, “But what about the food?” It’s diner fare, but it feels like you’re eating at Mom’s table for brunch. I started with a terrific, homemade cup of turkey veggie soup ($3.95), followed by a bacon blue cheese burger ($9.95), including fries. The seasoning and crispness of the crinkle-cut fries was perfect, requiring no extra condiment. The one-third pound burger was cooked medium-like-your-mom-made; I wasn’t asked, and I didn’t specify a “doneness” preference. Nothing fancy, but it hit that comfort food button. Similar were the biscuits and gravy breakfast my wife ordered ($8.95), with grilled deli ham in lieu of bacon and a potato/sweet potato mix of home fries. I’m not big on yams, but that mix was pretty damn delicious. With a pastry chef in charge, dessert was a prerequisite. This being a diner, the apple-bourbon bread pudding seemed a no-brainer. It was, however, the only misstep of the experience, as I couldn’t detect any sauce, bourbon or otherwise. There were copious apple chunks, and the pudding itself was fine. So, if you hadn’t told me to expect a sauce, this would have been just fine. I already knew that this place existed, so it wasn’t a true “Sunday drive” adventure. But I’d never eaten here before, so I’m going to count it as a discovery. And a welcome one at that. Ω


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21


Broken bond

5

Boyhood

The November Man The end of summer—that miserable time when Hollywood runs out of interesting tent pole movies and starts farting garbage out of its fat ass. Case in point: The November Man, a truly awful movie with Pierce Brosnan headlining. This movie gets a big theatrical release while being the sort of thing most TV executives by would look at and say, “Hey, ya know what? I Bob Grimm don’t want to air that rote piece of shit, even if it does have the former James Bond guy in it. bgrimm@ newsre view.c om It’s not good enough for TV, let alone theaters. Let’s just rerun The Wizard of Oz or America’s Got Talent again. Now … blow me!” Brosnan stars as Devereaux, a former CIA guy who winds up in places like Russia shooting people like nobody’s business and getting himself mixed up in their politics. For starters, there’s no way any American would get away with the crazy crap this guy does in this film. He’d get squashed like a bug the second he stepped out of his hotel room.

1

"Blah. James Blah."

1 Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

4

The film is rife with spy movie clichés. Devereaux has a wife and child who create “complications,” he has a former trainee he shepherded (Luke Bracey) on his trail, along with a couple of CIA heads of questionable character (Will Patton and Bill Smitrovich) messing with him. Yes, there is also the mysterious damsel in distress (Olga Kurylenko) that Devereaux must protect while dealing with his own serious drinking problem. It’s your basic “Who’s the real bad guy?” film, with everybody doing something relatively nasty at one time or another to keep things confusing. Brosnan’s character offs a lot of people, and even cuts an innocent woman’s femoral artery to make a dramatic point.

Very Good

5

2

The Giver

In a post-apocalyptic society, humans are being drugged into a state where they feel no emotion, are completely submissive and see no colors. When they hit their late teens, they are assigned their job for the rest of their life. Everybody’s equal, there is no war, all aspects of life are predestined. Lois Lowry’s novel had an interesting premise, but Phillip Noyce’s film simply feels and looks wrong. For starters, it comes off as a rip-off of Pleasantville, with the film slowly changing from black and white to color, while elements of the dystopian society come off like a dated Disney ride. As for the casting, it’s good to see the likes of Jeff Bridges and Meryl Streep on hand in pivotal roles, but the young leads (Brenton Thwaites and Odeya Rush) seem like they are overreaching. Taylor Swift shows up for a couple of minutes in a cameo, a cameo that is being marketed as a starring role and is mighty misleading for her fan base. Bridges is at least interesting as an old wise man storing all memories of past societies in his head. He’s tasked with passing his memories on to young Jonas (Thwaites), as if that isn’t going to cause some sort of problem. Noyce gives us some pretty pictures and a halfway decent cast, and basically doesn’t know what to do with it.

5

Guardians of the Galaxy

This is a goofy, dazzling, often hilarious convergence of inspired nuttiness. You’ll probably hear comparisons to the original Star Wars, The Fifth Element and The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai, and all of those comparisons would be plausible. It’s a blessedly new and crazy direction for the Marvel universe, and director James Gunn (Super, Slither) has taken a huge step towards the A-list. Also taking a giant leap toward the upper echelon of Hollywood royalty is Chris Pratt, who mixes great charm, rugged action hero bravado and premium comic timing as Peter Quill, a.k.a. Star-Lord. After a prologue that shows the Earthly origins of his character, Pratt sets the tone for the movie during the opening credits, grooving to his cassette-playing Sony Walkman on an alien planet and using squirrelly little critters as stand-in microphones. After unknowingly stealing a relic that could have the power to take down the entire universe, Quill finds himself in serious trouble. Events lead to his joining forces with a genetically enhanced Raccoon named Rocket (voice of Bradley Cooper), a gigantic tree person thing named Groot (voice of Vin Diesel), an angry, muscle-bound alien named Drax (Dave Bautista) and an ass-kicking green woman named Gamora (Zoe Saldana). Together, they become the Guardians of the Galaxy, an unlikely troupe of mischievous outcasts that plays like the Avengers meets the Marx Brothers. The cast, buoyed by a spirited script co-written by Gunn, keeps things zippy and always funny. Visually, the movie is a tremendous feat of special and makeup effects.

1

Let’s Be Cops

A couple of 30-something buddies (Jake Johnson, Damon Wayans, Jr.), bored with their humdrum lives, dress up as cops for a masquerade party and discover that things are pretty cool when people think you are the law. So they take the masquerade beyond the party

excellent

22 | RN&R |

Incidentally, that woman’s sole purpose is to provide the movie with a sex scene for Bracey. She shows up, gets naked, and then gets the femoral artery severed. Then she goes bye-bye. The way the screenwriters get her character into bed with Bracey is that her cat always winds up in his apartment. Being that his apartment’s door is always closed, her cat always getting in there is the result of some serious stalker behavior that the movie never really addresses. Bracey never says, “Say, your cat is always in my apartment, which means you had to open my door and put it there, unless your cat is a ghost cat that can pass through doors, which would be disturbing. I’m in the CIA, so I’m going to shoot you now because you are a freak, and I’m allergic to cats. Time to disappear!” She’s hot, so she gets away with it. Devereaux and company blow things up like crazy, shoot each other in the streets of Moscow and Belgrade, with no interruption from local authorities. This stuff is going down in public, and nobody with a Russian accent shows up and says, “This nonsense stops now. Go home imperialist pigs. Go home to your Sylvester Stallones, fancy mini phones and diet colas!” Nope, just a bunch of Americans having their way in territories that would surely skin them alive for their behavior. Director Roger Donaldson has had a strange career. The man should’ve been banned from anything to do with movies for making Cocktail back in 1988, and yet he continues to get work. He’s actually responsible for another suck-ass Brosnan flick, the miserable volcano epic Dante’s Peak. Somewhere in the midst of turning out all this crap, he also managed to make the very good The World’s Fastest Indian and Thirteen Days, so go figure. You would think that with the resources given to them, the Hollywood movie machine would be able to give us at least one quality film per week for an option at theaters. Nope, the well has already run dry this summer, and we will probably have to wait it out until October to see something really good. Ω

A lot can go wrong when you film a movie on and off for more than 12 years with the cast aging naturally. Cast members could die, the director could lose his drive and quit, etc. Writer-director Richard Linklater’s cinematic undertaking doesn’t have the ring of experimental or stunt filmmaking about it. It’s just a great looking, terrifically acted, tremendously moving film. It’s an amazing thing to see young Mason (Ellar Coltrane, who we first see set to the joyous strains of Coldplay’s “Yellow” on the soundtrack) go from a wide-eyed 5-year-old boy staring at the sky to an 18-year-old college student dealing with girls and big life decisions. It’s equally fascinating to watch Ethan Hawke, playing Mason’s father, go from Training Day Hawke to The Purge Hawke in the course of three hours. We also see Linklater’s daughter Lorelei playing Samantha, Mason’s sister, and Patricia Arquette as Mom, putting in her best performance since she graced the screen as Alabama in True Romance. All of the performers go through beautiful and awkward stages, aging before our eyes without the aid of special effects makeup. This is a movie that will only be made once. Nobody will ever pull anything like this off again. Linklater has made a permanent, monumental mark on cinematic history.

SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

and start chasing criminals and busting perps. Wayans, Jr., is the spitting image of his dad in every way, and it feels like this is a movie starring his dad after he’s time traveled from the past into the present for the shoot. Johnson, who has been making a name for himself in smart indie comedies (Safety Not Guaranteed, Drinking Buddies) tries to go big time with this vehicle, and fails miserably. The premise is insulting—not to mention a little dangerous—and it’s delivered with stale humor and bad performances all around. Director and co-writer Luke Greenfield (The Girl Next Door) has a made a movie more ugly than funny, and makes Johnson and Wayans, Jr., two funny guys, look like amateurs.

3

Lucy

What starts out as a potentially great movie winds up being a merely good one in the end. Scarlett Johansson stars as the title character, an American living in Taiwan who gets mixed up with the wrong people and winds up not only a drug mule, but a drug mule with a highly experimental drug placed inside her lower stomach. When the drugs start to leak, Lucy winds up using her brain to full capacity, not only resulting in her ability to control her body but also the forces around her. Luc Besson directs with his usual visual competence, and Johansson is great in the title role. The problem keeping the film from greatness is that it feels as if it’s going to some great place, and then suddenly ends at 89 minutes. Granted, it’s a good 89 minutes, but I was left feeling a bit unfulfilled. Morgan Freeman shows up as a scientist who knows a lot about brains, while Min-sik Choi (the original Oldboy) plays a true bastard of a bad guy. Surely, the premise is total bullshit, but the resultant mayhem is fun bullshit at that. I just wish Besson had a more complete story to tell.

2

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For

Robert Rodriguez returns to the world of Sin City and comes up with nothing in the way of advancement. It’s a batch of shorts based on the musings of Frank Miller, and not one of them offers anything better than what the original film provided. It’s a mostly tedious, worthless film from a director who seems to be running out of original ideas. Much of the cast returns, including Mickey Rourke and Bruce Willis, even though their characters died in the first movie. In the case of Rourke, his Marv segments are prequels, based on graphic novels that took place before his character got the electric chair. As for Willis, think The Sixth Sense. It’s a whole lot of people driving around a lot in a black and white film doing those deliberately paced, film noir voiceovers. What was once visually breathtaking has become visually blah—sort of like Mel Gibson—and none of the stories that comprise A Dame to Kill For merit interest. The film plays like a batch of outtakes from the first movie slapped together and put on display nearly a decade later. It’s also the second time this year that Eva Green has given a spectacular villainous performance in a film adapted from a Miller graphic novel that totally sucks around her (the first one being 300: Rise of an Empire). Rodriguez doesn’t have any films in major states of development for the future. Perhaps this is a good thing.

2

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Legions of Michael Bay haters have been jumping all over this Turtles reboot before it even hit the screen. It’s actually not a Michael Bay film; he only served as producer on this one. Jonathan Liebesman (Wrath of the Titans, Battle Los Angeles) is the director here, and he’s put something together that is far more coherent than the latest Bay-helmed Transformers movie. This is not to say that the movie is any good, because it actually isn’t, but it is markedly better than most of Bay’s output. Megan Fox plays April, a wannabe reporter who stumbles upon a vigilante force protecting Manhattan from an evil terrorist group. The vigilantes turn out to be the infamous turtles. The turtles, the result of scientific experiments, were raised in the sewers by a rat, and now they are ready to rise above the street surface and kick some ass. The film has some good moments, and the turtles eat some pizza and get some laughs. Fox is a bit of a bore in the central human role, Will Arnett is virtually wasted as her cameraman, and I’m sick and tired of William Fichtner playing bad guys. The special effects are OK, but the story offers nothing special. A sequel is already being prepared. A director with a better sense of wonder, and a better sense of humor, could do the franchise well.


Man of mystery Tea Haze Who is Tea Haze? Actually, the question might be, ‘What is Tea Haze?’ Is it just a stage name, made of clever word by Anna Hart play on a musical artist’s real name? Is it the artistic spawn of metaphysical reflection and cultural evolution? Or is Tea Haze simply another musical alter-ego created to excuse eccentricity and garner a certain mystique? Photo/AnnA hArt

The answer is “Yes” to all three, in varying degrees. The 24-year-old Todd Hayes is the man behind Tea Haze. He keeps any musical influences under wraps. Yet his work provides glimpses into the entire history of electronic music, from flashes reminiscent of the French form musique concrète, which originated in the early 20th-century, to traces of the darker, more recent witch house sub-genre. Overall, the style culminates to an intricate amalgamation of sounds, dialogue and melodic passages. However, Hayes says his influences aren’t important, and his identity is even less so. “I don’t want my music to be interpreted through the lenses of my influences or myself as a corporeal being,” says Tea Haze. Tea Haze has been creating music for at least three years, though it’s difficult to accurately quantify the amount of time he has spent making music, as he claims to have done it for as long he’s been inspired to do so. But whether it’s been three years or three months, he’s certainly defined his technique as strictly an original creation.

Electronic musician Tea Haze hides his face.

For more information, visit https:// soundcloud.com/ teahaze.

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While he is an electronic music artist, his collaboration with local rapper Evynn Tyler, better known as Franc Friday, has brought Hayes behind a drum set to play a live performance along with his synthesized music. “It started with [Hayes] and his sampler, and me nervously shouting into a microphone,” said Tyler in an email interview, describing their collaboration. “It’s evolved into us trying new things—my favorite being our playing with a live band, with Hayes on the drums and sampler and Sutafe Bogale (of the band PostWar) on the bass. In spite of its electronic origins, our music was always meant to be adapted to a live setting.” But in essence, Hayes deals in creation—not just of music, but of the idea of Tea Haze itself. Tea Haze exists as an irregularity. From a musical standpoint, he is visceral, crisp and unapologetically direct. But on a personal level, the entire project is shrouded in a veil of cagey mystery. Hayes consistently speaks, occasionally in third person, with evasive obscurity, via paradoxes, interminable proclamations of society, and even loosely quoting Yoda. It’s the kind of lofty, abstract thinking that teeters between madness and brilliance. “Tea Haze is me and is not me,” he said. “It embodies the contradictions in everything, and that everything exists and does not exist at the same time. … It’s a chemical soup of art. That’s what Tea Haze is. It’s the twisted genetic makeup of the society of cultures. It’s an embodiment of the time we live in.” Between “telekinetically beaming” his life experiences through music to a crowd, his belief that you can “catch” a depression, and being “in touch with the unknown,” it goes without saying that Tea Haze is a little unconventional, attempting to create a myth out of a man. So how much of this is the persona, and how much is the person? “I think all artists’ personas are reflections, a facet of themselves,” wrote Tyler. “And he is no different. Tea Haze is Todd Hayes and it isn’t him. … And honestly, I think that Tea Haze is more Todd than even he is aware of.” Ω

ART OF THE STATE

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THURSDAY 9/4 THURSDAY 9/4

3RD STREET 3RD 125 W. STREET Third St., (775) 323-5005

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, Blues jamnow/Blue 9:30pm, cover Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

5 STAR SALOON 5132STAR SALOON West St., (775) 329-2878

Karaoke, 10pm, no cover Karaoke, 10pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005 132 West St., (775) 329-2878

THE ALLEY THE ALLEYAve., Sparks; (775) 358-8891 906 Victorian

Porter Porter Robinson Robinson Sept. 4, 8:30 p.m. Sept. 4, 8:30 p.m. Knitting Factory Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648 323-5648

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

FRIDAY 9/5 FRIDAY 9/5

SATURDAY 9/6 SATURDAY 9/6

Hellbilly Bandits, 9pm, no cover Hellbilly Bandits, 9pm, no cover

Blue Haven, 9pm, no cover Blue Haven, 9pm, no cover

SUNDAY 9/7 SUNDAY 9/7

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

DJ Boogi, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, DJ Boogi, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after $5 after Traj Hardie’s Digital EP Release Party Traj Hardie’s EP Release and Birthday Digital Bash, 9pm, $5-$7 Party and Birthday Bash, 9pm, $5-$7

DJ Boogi, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, DJ Boogi, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after $5 after The Last Internationale, The LastBy Internationale, Busking Moonlight, 8pm, $10-$12 Busking By Moonlight, 8pm, $10-$12

Open Mic w/Steve Elegant, 7pm, Tu, no cover Open Mic10pm, w/Steve 7pm, Tu, no cover Karaoke, Tu,Elegant, W, no cover Karaoke, 10pm, Tu, W, no cover

BIGGEST LITTLE CITY CLUB BIGGEST CLUB 188 CaliforniaLITTLE Ave., (775)CITY 322-2480 188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

CARGO AT WHITNEY PEAK HOTEL CARGO AT WHITNEY PEAK HOTEL 255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400 255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

Kitten, Bomba Estereo, Jessica Hernandez Kitten, Bomba 7pm, Estereo, Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas, $20-$25 & The Deltas, 7pm, $20-$25

Shiny Toy Guns, Barcelona, Shiny ToyParty, Guns,7pm, Barcelona, Manican $20-$25 Manican Party, 7pm, $20-$25

CBQ CBQ 1330 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 359-1109

Rick Metz, 3pm, no cover Rick Metz, 3pm, no cover

1330 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 359-1109

CEOL IRISH PUB CEOL IRISHSt.,PUB 538 S. Virginia (775) 329-5558

The Grups, 9pm, no cover The Grups, 9pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

Comedy Comedy 3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: 3rd Comedy Street,Night 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, Comedy & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, Night no cover W, 9pm, no cover Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Catch a Rising SilverDante Legacy, Virginia St.,Star, 329-4777: and 407 N. Virginia St.,Su, 329-4777: Dante and Rebekah, Th, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, Rebekah, Th, Su, F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa,7:30pm, 7:30pm,$15.95; 10pm, $17.95; 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Stewie Stone, Tu-W, 7:30pm, $15.95 Stewie Stone, Tu-W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys The Lake Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: LakeDurst, Tahoe, Stateline, (800)Su,553-1022: Will David Gee, Th, Th-F, 9pm, $25; Will 8pm, Durst,10pm, David$30, Gee,Todd Th, Th-F, Sa, Glass,Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm,W,$30, Gene Pompa, 9pm,Todd $25 Glass, Gene Pompa, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Reno-Tahoe Comedy Underground, 100atS.Pioneer Virginia St., Underground, S. Virginia 686-6600: Kabir100 “Kabeezy” Singh,St., F, 686-6600: Kabir “Kabeezy” Singh, F, 8:30pm; Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $12-$15 8:30pm; Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $12-$15

CHAPEL TAVERN CHAPEL TAVERN 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover 7pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE COMMA 312 S. CarsonCOFFEE St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662 312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

Kylan Johnson, 6pm, no cover Kylan Johnson, 6pm, no cover

The Acoustamatics, 6pm, no cover The Acoustamatics, 6pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE EL CORTEZ LOUNGE 235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO FUEGO 170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

THE GOLDEN ROSE CAFE THE GOLDEN ROSE CAFE AT WILDFLOWER VILLAGE AT 4395WILDFLOWER W. Fourth St., (775)VILLAGE 747-8848 4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 747-8848

The Writer’s Block Open Mic, The Writer’s Block Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover 6:30pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL HARRY’S BAR & GRILL 1100 E. PlumbSPORTS Ln., (775) 828-7665

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Why Milan?

Call Now! 1.866.467.0094 950 Industrial Way| Sparks

MilanInstitute.edu

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Expires 11/30/14. Not valid with any other discount. Instructor supervised student massage spa.

For more information about our graduation rates, median loan debt of students who completed the program and other important information, please visit our website. | SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 | SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

Interested in a new career but don’t know where to start? Then check out Milan Institute, and explore the possibilities in healthcare, business and massage.

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Goin Country, 8pm, W, no cover Goin Country, 8pm, W, no cover

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Open mic, 7pm, no cover Open mic, 7pm, no cover

Notch 8, 9pm, no cover Notch 8, 9pm, no cover

Turn Your Natural Talent Into A Rewarding Career

Expires 11/30/14. Not valid with any other discount. Instructor supervised student salon.

Karaoke w/Nitesong Productions, 9pm, Tu, Karaoke w/Nitesong Productions, Tu, Open Mic/Ladies Night, 8:30pm, W,9pm, no cover Open Mic/Ladies Night, 8:30pm, W, no cover Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, W, no cover Karaoke w/Miss w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, W, Karaoke Sophie, 9pm, Tu,no nocover cover Karaoke w/Miss Sophie, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Wildflower Comedy Power Hour Wildflower ComedyTu, Power Hour Open Mic, 8:30pm, no cover Open Mic, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

DJ and karaoke, 9pm, no cover DJ and karaoke, 9pm, no cover

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 622-8878

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CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover CW and Spoons, M, $5 no cover Mile HighMr. Jazz Band, noon, 8pm, Tu, Mile High Jazz Band, 8pm, Tu, $5

Mark Castro Band, 10pm, no cover Mark Castro Band, 10pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

$FU\OLF1DLOV IXOOVHW 0RQ7KXUV

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Open Mic, Reno Music Project Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover 6:30pm, no cover

THE GRID THE 8545 N.GRID Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

+DLUFXW 0RQ7KXUV

Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover Karaoke with Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Traditional Irish Tune Session, Traditional Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, noIrish cover 7pm, Tu, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Student Salon Fall Specials

Post show Post shows online by s registe ng aotnline by registeri ng at www.neri ww ew wsr sre ev view /renwo.n w.c .co om m e a dlineieis /reno.. D D th e a e d lin Friday befo Friday before e is the publicationre publication. .

Mad Beaters, 9:30pm, no cover Mad Beaters, 9:30pm, no cover

HELLFIRE SALOON HELLFIRE 9825 S. VirginiaSALOON St., (775) 622-8878

| |

Nathan Grant, 9pm, no cover Nathan Grant, 9pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, Good with rotating DJs, 10pm, Friday no cover 10pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

24 24

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/8-9/10 MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/8-9/10

For more information about our graduation rates, median loan debt of students who completed the program and other important information, please visit our website.


THURSDAY 9/4

FRIDAY 9/5

SATURDAY 9/6

SUNDAY 9/7

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/8-9/10

HIMMEL HAUS

Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

JAVA JUNGLE

Outspoken: Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, no cover

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665 246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

First Take featuring Rick Metz, 6pm, no cover

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Shiny Toy Guns

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 1) Showroom 2) Main Bar

2) Blazin Mics!, 10pm, M, no cover

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Porter Robinson, Giraffage, Lemaitre, 8:30pm, $26-$50

The Bonfire Set, Hank Allen, Molly Seals, Blistered Earth, Soultorn, Rob & Tony, 8pm, $7 Hollywood Trashed, 8:30pm, $10-$21

LINCOLN LOUNGE

Sept. 5, 7 p.m. Cargo 255 N. Virginia St. 398-5400

Problem, Jon Conner, 7:30pm, M, $19-$45

London Is Calling, 9pm, no cover

302 E. Fourth St., (775) 323-5426

PADDY & IRENE’S IRISH PUB

Acoustic Wonderland, 8pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

DJ Steve Starr, 8pm, no cover

906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

RED DOG SALOON

Lonesome Wayne Trio, 1pm, no cover Deep Groove, 5pm, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Karaoke, 8pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, W, no cover Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

The Last Internationale

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SE7EN TEAHOUSE/BAR

Bluegrass/Americana Open Performance Jam, 7pm, no cover

148 West St., (775) 284-3363

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Karaoke, 8pm, M, Tuesday Jam and Open Mic w/Davis Nothere, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON 4TH

Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Ritual (industrial, EDM, ’80s, post punk), 9pm, $3 before 10pm, $5 after

The Yev, 9pm, $5

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 737-9776

Sept. 6, 8 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

VASSAR LOUNGE

Karaoke w/Rock N’J Entertainment, 8pm, no cover

1545 Vassar St., (775) 348-7197

WILD RIVER GRILLE

Koolwater Karaoke, 7pm, W, no cover Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

More than 100 career-building classes to choose from

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OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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IN ROTATION

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 9/4

FRIDAY 9/5

SATURDAY 9/6

2) Escalade, 8pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 4pm, no cover

2) Escalade, 4pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Matt Owen and The Eclectic Tuba, Danny ET, 10pm, no cover

2) Peter Joseph Burtt and the King Tide, 10pm, no cover

1) Spectra, 7pm, $25.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Spectra, 7pm, 9:30pm, $25.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover

2) Lex Nightclub Fridays w/DJ Rick Gee, 10pm, $15-$30

2) Lex Nightclub Saturdays w/DJ Enfo, 10pm, $15-$30 3) County Social Saturdays w/DJ Jamie G, 10pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover 1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) TJ’s Corral

The Verve Pipe Sept. 6, 7:30 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Highway 50 Stateline 588-6611

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO RESORT CASINO 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Live 4) Stadium Bar

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

1) Spectra, 7pm, $25.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover

2) Locals Night w/DJ 2Wice,

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 10pm, no cover w/local ID, 1) Grand Theater 2) Lex Nightclub 3) Sports Book $15 after midnight 4) Cantina 5) The Beach 6) Summit Pavilion

Karaoke Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: Th, 7pm, no cover Hangar Bar, 10603 Stead Blvd., Stead, 677-7088: Karaoke Kat, Sa, 9pm, no cover

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE HARRAH’S RENO

1) Broadway Showstoppers, 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 8pm, $33.40-$42.40 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center 3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, 11pm,

Murphy’s Law Irish Pub, 180 W. Peckham Lane, Ste. 1070, 823-9977: Steve Starr Karaoke, F, 9pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 California Cowboys, 7pm, no cover 1) Celebrity Showroom 2) Rose Ballroom 3) Gilley’s

Ponderosa Saloon, 106 South C St., Virginia City, 847-7210: Steel Rockin’ Karaoke, F, 7:30pm, no cover

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Outdoor Event Center 5) The Zone

MONTBLEU RESORT

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Ste. 103, Sparks, 356-6000: F-Sa, 9pm, no cover

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL

2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge

2) Rusty Maples, 7pm, no cover

345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Poolside

SILVER LEGACY

2) Bonzai Thursdays w/DJ Trivia,

8pm, no cover 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) University of Aura, 9pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge

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MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/8-9/10 2) Joey Carmon Band, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 6pm, no cover

2) Dale Poune, 6pm, M, no cover

1) Spectra, 7pm, $25.95+ 2) Left of Centre, 10:30pm, no cover

1) Spectra, 7pm, Tu, W, $25.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Garage Boys, 10:30pm, W, no cover

1) The Verve Pipe, 7:30pm, $38.50 2) DJ Rick Gee, DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

SUNDAY 9/7

1) Broadway Showstoppers, 8pm, $33.40-$42.40 2) DJ/dancing, 10pm, no cover 3) David Patrone, 8pm, no cover

1) Broadway Showstoppers, 8pm, $33.40-$42.40 2) DJ/dancing, 10pm, no cover 3) David Patrone, 8pm, no cover 4) DJ R-Boogie, 8pm, no cover

1) Broadway Showstoppers, 8pm, $33.40-$42.40

1) Broadway Showstoppers, 8pm, M, W, $33.40-$42.40

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, 11pm, California Cowboys, 7pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, 11pm, California Cowboys, 7pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, Bikini Bull Riding Competition, 9pm, no cover

3) Locals Night, 5pm, M, Classic Rock Nigh, 5pm, Tu, Toughest Cowboy Competition, 9pm, W, no cover

3) Boogie Nights, 9pm, $10 5) Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

3) The Male Room, 8pm, $23 3) Boogie Nights, 9pm, $10 5) Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

2) Rusty Maples, 8pm, no cover 3) Fixx Fridays, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm

2) Rusty Maples, 8pm, no cover 3) DJ Spider, 10pm, $20

2) Everett Coast, 6pm, no cover

2) Everett Coast, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) The Novelists, 7pm, no cover

1) The Novelists, 7pm, no cover

2) Chris Gardner Band, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 9pm, no cover 4) Maxxed Out, 9pm, no cover

1) Dwight Yoakam, 8pm, $65-$85 2) Chris Gardner Band, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Maxxed Out, 9pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover Country-Rock Bingo w/Jeff Gregg, 9pm, W, no cover


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

ON THE WIND CHEETAH RUN See the world’s fastest land animal in action as cheetahs run at top speeds off leash around the Animal Ark’s cheetah field. The big cats will go from 0 to 45 miles per hour in three seconds, with 22-foot strides and a top speed of 60 m.p.h. Reservations are required. Children must be at least 10 years old to attend this event, which begins at 5 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 7. Tickets are $30-$40. Animal Ark is located about 25 miles north of Reno at 1265 Deerlodge Road. Call (775) 970-3111 or visit www.animalark.org.

—Kelley Lang

Great Basin BrewinG Co. nevadaGrown Farmers’ market

the Great reno Balloon raCe

international Camel and ostriCh raCes

trails and vistas’ world ConCert and art hikes

The Sparks Farmers’ Market has closed for the season but residents can still enjoy the bounty of the harvest for one more month at this late-summer farmers’ market. The market is a partnership between the Great Basin Brewing Company, NevadaGrown and the Food Bank of Northern Nevada for Nevada’s farms, ranches and local independent businesses. Fresh produce, honey, meat, artisan beer and breads and packaged foods are a few of the featured items, in addition to arts and crafts from local Nevada businesses. The Food Bank of Northern Nevada returns with the Chicken Plop Drop, a fundraiser for its community food drive. Great Basin Brewing Co. will present free live music on its outdoor stage. The event takes place from 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 4 through Sept. 25, outside the brewery at 846 Victorian Ave. in downtown Sparks. Call (775) 351-2551 or visit http://greatbasinbrewingco.com.

More than 100 colorful hot air balloons will fill the morning sky above Reno during the 32nd annual race, which kicks off on Friday, Sept. 5. The festival, which attracts more than 100,000 people each year, is considered the world’s largest free hot-air ballooning event. One of its highlights is the Glow Show, in which several glowing balloons on the launch field light up the pre-dawn sky. The Glow Show begins at 5 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 6-7. A new attraction this year, the Super Glow Show, features more than 20 balloons glowing and twinkling to music across the field. This event will take place on Friday, Sept. 5, at 5:15 a.m. Following the Glow Show is Dawn Patrol, featuring a handful of balloons controlled by pilots who are qualified to fly in the dark. While the show may be lovely to watch, this event can be risky to the pilots since atmospheric conditions can change as the sun begins to rise. Dawn Patrol takes place on Saturday and Sunday starting at 5:30 a.m. Finally, there’s the T-6 formation flyover and the mass ascension of all hot air balloons each day of the race starting at 6:45 a.m. The gates are open from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. at Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St. Admission is free but parking is limited, so arrive early. Parking is also available at the University of Nevada, Reno’s north parking lots. Call 826-1181 or visit www.renoballoon.com.

The 55th annual event features amateur jockeys who will attempt to ride galloping camels, ostriches and zebras down a race track. The Virginia City tradition started off as a fictitious event created by a Territorial Enterprise editor in 1959, but it has since turned into one of the town’s biggest yearly attractions. Race weekend activities include the Camel Hump, in which camels pop into the town’s famous saloons on C Street to say hello to race attendees, as well as live entertainment at various venues in the historic mining town. Races begin at noon, Friday through Sunday, Sept. 5-7, at the arena at Silverland Inn & Suites, 100 E St., Virginia City. Tickets are $12-$50. Call 847-7500 or visit www.visitvirginiacitynv.com.

Trails and Vistas will close this year’s Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival with a dance performance and world music concert featuring dancers from Inner Rhythms Dance Theatre and music by violinist Scarlet Rivera, flutist Ann Licater and Afro-funk band SambaDá. The show begins at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 6, at Sand Harbor State Park, 2005 Highway 28, Incline Village. Tickets are $23-$65. Trails and Vista will also present their annual art hikes on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 6-7 at Spooner Lake, Nevada State Park, at the intersection of State Route 28 and U.S. Highway 50. “Meadows to Mountains—A cultural journey” features visual artists, original dance performances, storytelling and live music. Tickets are $15$40. Hikes begin at 9:30 a.m. both days and continue every 15 minutes until 12:15 p.m. on Saturday and 12:30 p.m. on Sunday. Visit www.trailsandvistas.org.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

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There is an “I” in team!

Join us to find out more when The Reno Tahoe Express Network hosts the 10th Annual

Carol Scofield

American Business Women's Day

Wednesday, September 24th 11AM-1PM Atlantis Casino Resort Spa • 3800 S. Virginia St., Reno

International speaker, healthcare professional and award-winning talk show host Carol Scofield will share her experiences as a team member, both personally and professionally! Carol will identify unique characters who traditionally show up on a team. Using facts and fun, she will give you tips, tools and techniques to thrive in a team environment and become a star as a team member. Her style of humor, storytelling and presentation leaves her audiences educated, inspired and empowered. Carol's work is relevant, doable and result-based for doing life in the 21st century. She is truly the “been there, done that” gal!

Join

our annual celebration recognizing the achievements of working women

Network

with other Northern Nevada business professionals

Experience

the dynamics of Carol Scofield in this fun, interactive and relevant presentation

Enjoy

lunch, drawings and door prizes

TICKETS

Reservation deadline is 9/17, no sales day of $40/each or $300/table of 8 Go to www.abwa-reno.com Email: abwdayreno@gmail.com SPONSORED IN PART BY

28   |  RN&R   | 

september 4, 2013

Beard death experience This adorable, smart, funny guy I’m dating was cleanshaven when we first met, but for the past three weeks, he hasn’t shaved much. He has this really weird facial hair pattern—like patches on his cheeks that haven’t filled in well—and I don’t find it attractive. I didn’t know how to bring this up, so I mentioned it to my roommate, and she volunteered to “casually” mention it. So, last week when he and I were having drinks before going out, she popped into the room and said, “Hey, man … still growing that beard? I think you look a lot better clean-shaven.” He seemed put off, and we went out to dinner shortly afterward, but the whole evening felt a bit weird. And he still has this patchy facial hair thing going on. Maybe his facial hair is just scared. Like the groundhog, it came up, saw its shadow, and ducked, terrified, back into his face. Nobody wants to be the one to tell a guy that his attempted sexy man scruff is a ringer for a Hobbit’s feet or plant life struggling up after a nuclear winter. But as uncomfortable as saying something would have been for you, it had to be far more uncomfortable for him to have your roommate do it, especially right in front of you. As psychologist and linguist Steven Pinker points out in The Stuff of Thought, we all know that people say stuff

behind our backs, but we can let it go unremarked—that is, if nobody knows that we know that something was said about us. But, Pinker explains, once some disparagement becomes “mutual knowledge”—when others know that we know what was said—we lose face if we don’t do anything about it. And unfortunately, in this case, after your roommate said something, probably the only thing he could do to avoid looking like her puppet boy was to stubbornly avoid shaving that comb-over he’s been rocking on his face. Let some time pass, and then tell him yourself, in a way that doesn’t come off like criticism. Pet his beard, and say you think he looks good that way but you love his skin and feeling his face is sexy. What he’ll hear: He’ll spend more time in bed with his chick if he spends more time in the bathroom with his Schick. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   September 4, 2014  |  

RN&R  

| 

29


by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I don’t usu-

ally do this kind of thing, but I’m going to suggest that you monitor the number six. My hypothesis is that six has been trying to grab your attention, perhaps even in askew or inconvenient ways. Its purpose? To nudge you to tune in to beneficial influences that you have been ignoring. I furthermore suspect that six is angling to show you clues about what is both the cause of your unscratchable itch and the cure for that itch. So lighten up and have fun with this absurd mystery, Aries. Without taking it too seriously, allow six to be your weird little teacher. Let it prick your intuition with quirky notions and outlandish speculations. If nothing comes of it, there will be no harm done. If it leads you to helpful discoveries, hallelujah

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In English,

the rare word “trouvaille” means a lucky find or an unexpected windfall. In French, “trouvaille” can refer to the same thing and even more: something interesting or exceptional that is discovered fortuitously; a fun or enlightening blessing that’s generated through the efforts of a vigorous imagination. Of course I can’t guarantee that you will experience a trouvaille or two (or even three) in the coming days, Taurus. But the conditions are as ripe as they can be for such a possibility.

Out of this world entertainment…

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Dutch

word epibreren means that even though you are goofing off, you are trying to create the impression that you are hard at work. I wouldn’t be totally opposed to you indulging in some major epibreren in the coming days. More importantly, the cosmos won’t exact any karmic repercussions for it. I suspect, in fact, that the cosmos is secretly conspiring for you to enjoy more slack and spaciousness that usual. You’re overdue to recharge your spiritual and emotional batteries, and that will require extra repose and quietude. If you have to engage in a bit of masquerade to get the ease you need, so be it.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When James

Franco began to learn his craft as an actor, he was young and poor. A gig at McDonald’s paid for his acting lessons and allowed him to earn a living. He also used his time on the job as an opportunity to build his skills as a performer. While serving customers burgers and fries, he practiced speaking to them in a variety of different accents. Now would be an excellent time for you to adopt a similar strategy, Cancerian. Even if you are not doing what you love to do full-time, you can and should take stronger measures to prepare yourself for that day when you will be doing more of what you love to do.

…with down to Earth savings!

LEO (July 23-August 22): Here are a few of

2014-15 University of Nevada, Reno Performing Arts Series

the major companies that got their starts in home garages: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mattel, Amazon, and Disney. Even if you’re not in full support of their business practices, you’ve got to admit that their humble origins didn’t limit their ability to become rich and powerful. As I meditate on the long-term astrological omens, I surmise you are now in a position to launch a project that could follow a similar arc. It would be more modest, of course. I don’t foresee you ultimately becoming an international corporation worth billions of dollars. But the success would be bigger than I think you can imagine.

Season Tickets Now Available

VIRGO (August 23-September 22): “I have

SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCK® ~ 40th ANNIVERSARY Vaud & the Villains WindSync The Wailin’ Jennys The Intergalactic Nemesis

www.unr.edu/pas | (775) 784-4278 30   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

90 Auto Center Dr.

a hypothesis that everyone is born with the same amount of luck,” says cartoonist Scott Adams. “But luck doesn’t appear to be spread evenly across a person’s life. Some people use up all of their luck early in life. Others start out in bad circumstances and finish strong.” How would you assess your own distribution of luck, Virgo? According to my projections, you are in a phase when luck is flowing stronger and deeper than usual. And I bet it will intensify in the coming weeks. I suggest you use it wisely—which is to say, with flair and aplomb and generosity.

LIBRA (September 23-October 22): When

my daughter Zoe was seven years old, she took horse-back riding lessons with a group of other young aspirants. On the third lesson, their instructor assigned them the task of carrying an egg in a spoon that

they clasped in their mouths as they sat facing backwards on a trotting horse. That seemingly improbable task reminds me of what you’re working on right now, Libra. Your balancing act isn’t quite as demanding, but it is testing you in ways you’re not accustomed to. My prognosis: You will master what’s required of you faster than the kids at Zoe’s horse camp. Every one of them broke at least eight eggs before succeeding. I suspect that three or four attempts will be enough for you.

SCORPIO (October 23-November 21):

Peter the Great was the Tsar of Russia from 1682 until 1725. Under his rule, his nation became a major empire. He also led a cultural revolution that brought modern Europeanstyle ideas and influences to Russia. But for our purposes right now, I want to call attention to one of his other accomplishments: The All-Joking, All-Drunken Council of Fools and Jesters. It was a club he organized with his allies to ensure there would always be an abundance of parties for him to enjoy. I don’t think you need alcohol as an essential part of your own efforts to sustain maximum revelry in the coming weeks, Scorpio. But I do suggest you convene a similar brain trust.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22-De-

cember 21): In Roald Dahl’s kids’ story James and the Giant Peach, 501 seagulls are needed to carry the giant peach from a spot near the Azores all the way across the Atlantic Ocean to New York City. But physics students at the U.K.’s University of Leicester have determined that such a modest contingent wouldn’t be nearly enough to achieve a successful airlift. By their calculations, there’d have to be a minimum of 2,425,907 seagulls involved. I urge you to consider the possibility that you, too, will require more power than you have estimated to accomplish your own magic feat. Certainly not almost 5,000 times more, as in the case of the seagulls. Fifteen percent more should be enough. (P.S. I’m almost positive you can rustle up that extra 15 percent.)

CAPRICORN (December 22-January

19): So far, 53 toys have been inducted into the Toy Hall of Fame. They include crayons, the jump rope, Mr. Potato Head, the yoyo, the rubber duckie, and dominoes. My favorite inductee—and the toy that is most symbolically useful to you right now—is the plain old cardboard box. Of all the world’s playthings, it is perhaps the one that requires and activates the most imagination. It can become a fort, a spaceship, a washing machine, a cave, a submarine, and many other exotic things. I think you need to be around influences akin to the cardboard box because they are likely to unleash your dormant creativity.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February 18):

I’m not opposed to you fighting a good fight. It’s quite possible you would become smarter and stronger by wrangling with a worthy adversary or struggling against a bad influence. The passion you summon to outwit an obstacle could bestow blessings not only on you but on other people, as well. But here’s a big caveat: I hope you will not get embroiled in a showdown with an imaginary foe. I pray that you will refrain from a futile combat with a slippery delusion. Choose your battles carefully, Aquarius.

PISCES (February 19-March 20): During

the next six weeks, I suggest you regard symbiosis as one of your key themes. Be alert for ways you can cultivate more interesting and intense forms of intimacy. Magnetize yourself to the joys of teamwork and collaboration. Which of your skills and talents are most useful to other people? Which are most likely to inspire your allies to offer you their best skills and talents? I suggest you highlight everything about yourself that is most likely to win you love, appreciation, and help.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


Think Free

by Sage Leehey Photo/Sage Leehey

Quarantine Rev. Fr. Elijah Bobby Washington is from Liberia but has been stranded in the United States for about three months because of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. He’s now in Reno staying with a friend and former missionary, Betty Bishop. He asks for thoughts and prayers for the people in West Africa. To contact him, email Bishop at bettyb3857@att.net.

What is your family doing to stay healthy?

Why are you in Reno? Actually, I came to the U.S. for a conference in Michigan, and after the conference I couldn’t come back because of the Ebola Virus. … Betty used to work for us as a missionary, and when I told her what is happening—I was out of money and I couldn’t stay where I’d been staying—she asked me to come to Reno and then she could help and see what we could do to help the people back home.

Any idea when you can get back? I don’t know. I have a friend who works for U.S. Airlines, and she’s trying to help me get a flight. I can get a flight on United to Brussels, but from Brussels into Liberia is a big problem. She’s trying to work it out, but I really don’t know what I’m going to do.

Who is waiting for you at home? My family, and I have a church, a Catholic church. I’m the parish priest and the parishioners are waiting for me. They didn’t know I was going to stay this long, so it’s made it difficult for them.

What are you doing now that your stay has been extended? I’m trying to talk to a lot of people. … I’m trying to create awareness for the situation back home because it’s a pretty bad state for the people in Liberia, but not only the people in Liberia. ... There’s a lot of deaths. … That is a serious thing. There’s no vaccine for the Ebola Virus. ... The prices of things have gone so high because there are no—nobody, nothing is going in, really, so it’s difficult for them. So I’m just trying to create awareness so that whoever wants to help the people back home can. It’s not just a Liberian thing; it’s not just a West African thing. It’s a global thing. Everybody needs to help because it’s going to spread.

Prior to you coming to the U.S., how was the situation? It had just started. It was in Guinea because that’s where it started from. … It hadn’t gotten widespread yet. … The hospitals and the clinics can’t—they’re afraid they

Police work As an old white coot, it pisses me off to see cops murdering young unarmed black men under the guise of “police work.” And if all these corpses are pissing me off, I can imagine how it’s all playing in places like Oakland, Chicago, and Detroit. What was ridiculously bizarre during those weeks in August when Ferguson was Ground Zero for the Hands Up Don’t Shoot movement was that cops just kept right on killing young unarmed black men. Business as usual. Michael Brown was murdered on Saturday August 9th. On Monday night the 11th, all of two days later, LA cops shot and killed 25-year-old Ezell Ford, an unarmed man diagnosed with bipolar schizophrenia. On Aug. 19, a 25-yearold man, Kajieme Powell, was shot to death in St. Louis. This killing was captured on cell phone video, and it’s greatly disturbing, because what we see isn’t what anyone would call good police work. What we see is an instant and merciless execution.

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

could get infected. They don’t have protective gear. They don’t have what it takes to contain the virus. So some of them won’t go to work. They stay home so they don’t get infected. There’s nowhere to go, so they just stay in their houses.

My little brother—I just talked to him this morning—what they do is they stay indoors. You don’t go to entertainment places. You don’t go to crowded places. That makes it pretty difficult for them because by interacting with people, by going to the farms, by going to the work places, they can really get some money to buy food, but now they can’t go out. It makes it more difficult for them. If you stay home, how are you going to survive? You have to go to work.

What was it like living in Liberia before the Ebola outbreak? We suffered from civil war for about 14 years, so the country was kind of picking up. People were trying to re-establish their lives again, even though things were not very fine for them, but people were starting to pick up their lives. But with the Ebola Virus, it takes them back to where they were before. Liberia is a poor country. We try to get up from where we were, but now, things have gone back. … In Africa, people come together as a group to do the farming and plow the land and plant together and everything, but now everybody is afraid of everybody. They can’t do work. If they can’t plant things for themselves, how are they going to survive for the next year to come? Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye boy, oh, boy, are these two cops happy to oblige. But, goddamn. For starters, no effort was made to elude this guy, which could have been accomplished had the cops simply stayed in the car. There were no attempts to disarm Powell, which could have been done quickly by any cop with a basic amount of karate or tae kwan do training. What about tasers? What about warning shots? What about a bullet in the thigh? Why are all these bodies just piling up on the streets of America? Why don’t these young black men ever get wounded? Why do they all somehow get dead? This is bad juju, man, the vile, ugly tumor that continues to fester on America’s soft, white underbelly, pumping it full of hateful malevolence. Ω

The Powell shooting is right there on YouTube for anybody who dares to watch. We see Powell setting up the two cans of Red Bull on the sidewalk that he just shoplifted so as to draw the cops. The police arrive, get out of the car, and face Powell. Within seconds, after Powell approaches them with a reported but not obvious steak knife, he’s dead on the ground, being shot 12 times by both cops. Twelve! It’s a hideous mess of what is essentially a municipal murder, and a glaring example of lazy, gun-based police work that would have been barely acceptable in Tombstone, Arizona, in 1873, much less modern America. Blowing a man up with bullets is supposed to be the last step. The place you get to when all else—negotiation, disarming, apprehension—fails. None of these intermediate steps were taken in the case of Kajieme Powell. The cops say Powell came at them with his big bad steak knife saying crazy stuff like “Shoot me” and “Kill me.” And |

ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

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RN&R

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Profile for News & Review

R 2014 09 04  

R 2014 09 04  

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