__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Essay.............................. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Art.of.the.State............. 19 Foodfinds..................... 20

Film.............................. 22 Musicbeat.....................25 Nightclubs/Casinos........26 This.Week.................... 30 Advice.Goddess........... 32 Free.Will.Astrology....... 34 15.Minutes.....................35 Bruce.Van.Dyke............35

e to Our autumnal guidlocal media focuses on music books, movies and

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

|

VolumE 19, issuE 31

|

sEptEmbER 19–25, 2013


775.789.2000

grandsierraresort.com 2 

| 

RN&R   | 

September 19, 2013

Rethink Your Choice.


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

It’s the simple things

We’re whores!

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. I want to write about one of life’s simplest pleasure. Man, I woke up this morning, and my bedroom was chilly. My girlfriend was all crêped up in her down blanket on the other side of my giant bed, and the floor fan was blowing on me, and the window fan was sucking in the relatively smoke-free air from my backyard where the sprinkler was cooling the earth and the air above it. I had slept so hard, I felt almost indescribably good. What is it about sleep? I’m almost never tired. In fact, I’m never tired except in between semesters when I satisfy my love of excess red wine. Truly and maybe obviously, drinking depressants is pretty much the only thing that can slow my engine down. I’m no Leonardo Da Vinci—who reportedly used polyphasic sleep, which is a type of sleep pattern that involves sleeping not more than 5 hours a day in 20-minute intervals—or a Leonardo Di Caprio either, but there’s just something about an energetic life that feels as though it bestows immeasurable energy. But still, that feeling of the nested warmth, and the coiling of an internal stretch that precedes throwing the sheet and blanket off and heading for the shower, I just don’t know that there’s a more simple pleasure. Well, a baby’s toothless grin comes pretty close, but then you have to clean up the poop. On the other hand, there are times when my circadian clock is running like a broken digital, and I’ll lay awake all night watching Netflix after Netflix. I can almost always attribute that to the energized life as well. It’s like one of those nickle-cadmium batteries that are always a little too full so they can’t be fully charged. That’s caused by batteries never being fully discharged. To push the analogy, if you never get exhausted, by exercise or wakefulness or whatever, you develop this “memory effect.” But I’ll bet you’re like me, and you’d rather dwell on a good sleep than lay in bed wondering why you can’t. —D. Brian Burghart

To Sen. Reid, that’s anarchy. What Senator Reid doesn’t appreciate is that his party’s Progressive type of governance—enabling Obamacare, years without passing a budget, national debt soaring to unimaginable heights, obstructing tax reform, oppressive bureaucratic regulations, selective law enforcement, destroying employment opportunities, etc.—makes “anarchy” an attractive alternative. The real issue, Sen. Reid, is the limits placed on federal power by the United States Constitution. And your reckless abandonment of those limits. Your oath of office said nothing about liberalism or the Barack Obama administration. Your oath was to support and defend the Constitution. You should review it once in a while. Sen. Reid, it’s your choice to equate putting government back into the Constitutional box with anarchy. But your discomfort tells me that the Tea Party is on the right track. One can only hope that their takeover of Congress succeeds. Robert R. Kessler Las Vegas Editor’s note: As numerous mythbusters like factcheck.org have reported, congressional staffers are not exempt from the Affordable Care Act. However, the Washington Post reports that congressional staffers are “ineligible for any tax credits or subsidies.”

Re “Nevada should accept nuclear waste” (The Liberty Belle, Aug. 29): Regarding Chanelle Bessette’s opinion supporting Yucca Mountain, I’d like to ask if she’d like her house to be the neighborhood’s waste storage facility? Would she like Washoe County to store all of Las Vegas’ garbage? And so long as we’re America’s nuclear waste dump, why not profit from taking the world’s nuclear waste. The issue here is ownership. I don’t put my garbage in my neighbor’s garbage can. If California or New York creates all this nuclear waste for all their nuclear power needs, why can’t they store their own waste? The argument about putting all the eggs in one basket makes no sense. Nevada is ranked fourth for seismic activity, and there is no such thing as fail proof. The feds have already irradiated Nevada with hundreds of nuclear explosions. The reason we have an electoral system and two senators per state is to give small states like us better representation so we don’t become the nation’s dumping grounds both literally and figuratively. If your argument is that we can profit from storing nuclear waste, well, prostitutes also profit from storing guys’ sausages. So let’s spread our legs for the country’s junk and make some money. Ed Park Reno

We’re wrong!

We’re losing!

Re “Lost & Found” (Feature story, Sept. 5): The series of photos you display with your article about “Lost & Found” is interesting, but the caption for the 4th Ward School photo is wrong. The 4th Ward School is an active and very interesting museum, and has been for a number of years. The St. Mary’s Art and Retreat center occupies a national historic landmark that used to be the old hospital building. I hope this was an error made while creating the web page, and not copied out of the book itself. That could cause questions about the accuracy of other information published. Nancy Humphries Gardnerville

Sen. Harry Reid claims that ‘anarchists’ have taken over Congress. “People who don’t believe in government—and that’s what the Tea Party is all about—are winning, and that’s a shame.” According to The Hill, what gives Sen. Reid the vapors is that one of his colleagues, Sen. David Vitter (R-LA) is holding up an energy bill until Harry Reid agrees to a vote on a Sen. Vitter amendment. Sen. Vitter wants to require congressional and executive branch staff to enroll in ObamaCare health exchanges. You know, like the rest of us.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Mark Dunagan, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

brian b@ n ewsreview . com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

We’re haters!

We’re for law abiding!

Re “We’re No. 1 in horrible indicators” (Left Foot Forward, Sept. 5): I suspect I may speak for more than a few Nevadans when I ask the obvious question: If you dislike our state so much and think it is so terrible, why don’t you move? David E. Palmer Reno

Re “Call off the dogs” (Editorial, Aug. 29): Mr. President, please do call off the dogs of war ... they’ve been howling for far too long! George W. in 2003 found himself between Iraq and a hard place. Our current President, O, finds himself in a Syria-ous international situation, and advocates a “limited strike” Translation: Bombing the heck out of someplace in Syria … but only for a little while! I am not saying that Syria should have used such weapons, if in fact they did, but using chemical weapons violates international law only when used against another nation. However, the United States would be violating international law should we bomb Syria. Mr. President, we have issues here at home. The never-ending state of warfare is costing us our Bill of Rights! Our previous president, W., signed the PATRIOT Act, which basically says we can watch you, and President Obama signed the NDAA, which says we can take you. The Bill of Rights is in tatters. Far more people here die from lack of access to health care every year than from chemical or terror attacks. Is this not a moral issue? Our national and trade deficits continue to bleed us dry. Mr. President, I beg you to drop the world cop thing, and re-focus here at home. It makes no sense to kill more Syrians because we don’t like the way they kill each other. What if some other country like Russia decided our lack of access to health care violated human rights and decided to bomb us? What if China decided we couldn’t pay back our debt to them, and did a no fly zone over San Francisco? What if India had decided they should do a “limited strike” on us because they were offended by Abu Ghraib? Just who do we think we are? Attacking Syria is a violation of international law. Better to find a diplomatic solution. Please end the never-ending wars, restore our Bill of Rights, and balance the budget! Erik Holland Reno

We’re in agreement! Re “A mockery and a sham” (Letters to the Editor, Sept. 5): I’ll bite on this too and probably bite everyone else a little bit as well: The writer is a jackass for thinking homosexuals have made a mockery of marriage. Heterosexuals, celebrity and reality television have done more than enough for me not to let other marriages influence me and to consider my marriage as sacred as I make it between my wife and myself. If he can’t see the truth in that, then he’s not only a jackass but a hermit and a fool (and probably a great premise for a reality show). As to government recognition of marriage, inequality to singles, and marriage for tax fraud? Yup ... the jackass is partially right. The United States government should have never gotten in the business of marriage, marital tax credits, marital benefits or marital recognition. Somewhere, sometime before I was born, the U.S. opted to get involved and as near as I can figure, they’ve been on the wrong side of civil rights and marriage, every time (until dragged kicking and screaming to a place where it can begin to recognize things like mixed religion marriages, interracial marriages and homosexual marriages). As far as I’m concerned, whatever ceremony you want to have as an expression of love for your partner, your neighbor or your local gas station attendant is no business of mine or the government, and I tend to think that would probably make it just a little more sacred for any of us who enter into it these days and even those who choose not to. Felix Polanski Reno

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

Business Nicole Jackson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

|

MISCELLANY

|

Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover & Feature story design: Hayley Doshay

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

3


Reno News & Review 4.93” x 11.5” (Half Page Vertical)

09-19-2013

THE ROBERT CRAY BAND Saturday, September 21

DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS Saturday, September 28

BLUE ÖYSTER CULT

Recycle this paper

2

Saturday, October 12

THE BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA

University of Nevada, Reno College of Liberal Arts School of the Arts Department of Music

Saturday, October 19

The Joy of Chamber Music

The world’s greatest classical musicians Nevada’s finest Chamber Music Series

LEON RUSSELL Saturday, October 26

GOV’T MULE

The

Third Season begins

September 27, Friday, 7:30 PM

David Shifrin, clarinet

Saturday, November 2 TICK E TS AVAIL ABLE AT TICK E T M ASTER.COM OR SOUTHSHOREROOM.COM.

See box office for details and age restrictions. Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

Soloist with the Symphonies of Detroit, Seattle, and Houston Former Artistic Dir. Lincoln Center CMS Professor, Yale University

| 

RN&R   | 

September 19, 2013

V1_101032.2_4.93x11.5_4c_Ad.indd 1

9/11/13 2:33 PM

Soloist with New York Philharmonic LA and San Francisco Symphonies Former Principal Violist NY Phil Professor, The Juilliard School

Get your 2013-2014 season tickets today to receive a 10 % discount! Other dates include: October 11, Friday November 8, Friday December 11, Wednesday

February 13, Thursday March 7, Friday April 17, Thursday

May 2, 2014, Friday Special Benet Recital with nine-time Grammy-award winning cellist David Finckel and pianist Wu Han 4 

Paul Neubauer, viola

Nightingale Concert Hall

Church Fine Arts Bldg. University of Nevada, Reno 1600 N. Virginia St. Reno, Nevada Adult: $25; Student: $5; Season Subscription: 10% off; Pick-three: 7% off phone: (Tue-Fri, 10a-2p) phone: (775)-784-3555 (Tue-Fri, 10a-2p)

web: www.argentaconcerts.org web:


by Dennis Myers

ThiS MoDeRn WoRLD

by tom tomorrow

Your favorite season? Asked at the Washoe County Library, 301 S. Center St. Jack Williams Job seeker

Winter. I like the cold, the snow. It’s nice out. I’m from New Jersey. I like the cold. Oh, there’s cold in New Jersey. I like the white, wintry, Christmas feeling.

T.J. Black Retiree

Spring. Newborn animals, and everything looks beautiful. Everything’s green, everything’s peaceful, and I just love watching the baby animals, especially ducks.

Cara Sherrill Library volunteer

No dollars for politics In 1993, when he was planning his first, unsuccessful, run for governor, state legislator Jim Gibbons didn’t have much going for him in terms of name recognition or a legislative record. So he decided to circulate an initiative petition to limit taxes as a way of building an organization and getting his name out. Instead of hiring a lawyer to draft his petition, Gibbons had it done for him by the Legislature Counsel Bureau, the staff arm of the Nevada Legislature. When Gov. Bob Miller wanted an opinion on whether he could run for a third term, he didn’t hire a lawyer to do it (or do it himself, since he was a lawyer). Instead, he asked the attorney general of Nevada to provide it, and she did. We were reminded of these kinds of incidents when the Reno city attorney and the City Council considered going to court to get a legal finding on whether termlimited city councilmembers can run for mayor. City Attorney John Kadlic said it was important to have an answer to the question before the ballots for the primary election are filed. No, it’s not. Every candidate faces uncertainties. The issue itself is important, but not at the cost of using public dollars for political purposes. If any non-incumbent candidate wanted an answer to a question affecting his possible candidacy, she or he would have to hire a lawyer. In addition, there would have to be a live controversy. That is, someone would have to file for office first. Courts are not in the habit of making decisions on legality until they have a case on which to rule. If public officials can get legal advice from courts on possibilities and contingencies, any citizen is entitled to the same service. OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

Summer, because I don’t like being cold, and although sometimes it’s hot, it’s nice to be able to splash in the pool and sit back and have a glass of lemonade.

Candidates who are already officeholders must follow exactly the same procedure as anyone else—file for office and take their chances. Kadlic is dead wrong when he says the matter must be settled before filing for office opens. Councilmember Neoma Jardon said the question should be settled before candidates start lining up support and raising money. Why? The unforeseen is part of the fortunes of war in politics. Fortunately, a minority of councilmembers stopped the idea. Moreover, this is not a new issue. This newspaper discussed it last year (“No comment,” RN&R, July 19, 2012). The attorney general issued a non-binding opinion on it in 2008. Longtime city councilmembers had many years to lobby (on their own dimes) the Nevada Legislature to seek amendments to clarify any ambiguity in term limits language. Failing that, if any councilmembers don’t want to take the risk, they should not run. Elected officials get too cozy with the perquisites of office and start thinking that all the resources of their offices are at their disposal. Congressmembers routinely use their offices for political purposes. In the Gibbons case, the counsel bureau itself encouraged him and other candidates to seek their free legal help. They were giving away resources they didn’t own, probably because they had become too accustomed to the culture of he legislative building, where a staffer takes her life—or job—in her hands by not laying out every perk and privilege a legislator expects. They all need to get back in touch with real life. Ω

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Andrew Alms LDS missionary

Spring, because it starts off everything new. You see the change, and it gives you time reflect and look at what’s new going on, and you can take it and put it into your life. It always gives me hope.

Ivora Crutcher Mother

Summer, because my kids are home, and we can go do things. We like the outdoors. We go to the parks and places where we can enjoy being outdoors.

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

5


Legacy of horror In the end, the kids got the last word. And who can blame them for claiming it? Last week, Katherine Reddick placed a paid obituary in the Reno Gazette-Journal that offered no kind words in memory of her mother, Marianne, who recently died in an area nursing home. Instead, the by obituary provided an incredibly Sheila Leslie scathing indictment of a mother, in a most public forum. Think I’m exaggerating? Reddick wrote, in part: “She is survived by her 6 of 8 children whom she spent her lifetime torturing in every way possible. While she neglected and abused her small children, she refused to allow anyone else to care or show compassion towards them. When they became adults she stalked and tortured anyone they dared to love. Everyone she met, adult or child was tortured by her cruelty and exposure to violence, criminal activity, vulgarity, and hatred of the gentle or kind human spirit.”

At first, controversy swirled around whether the obituary was a fake. It was submitted to the newspaper through a “self-service on-line portal,” since no doubt the flesh and blood people who used to write obituaries were victims of cost-cutting long ago. But quickly the facts emerged. Katherine Reddick was indeed a child removed from home at an early age, who grew up in foster care, finally leaving Nevada’s state orphanage (now closed), the Children’s Home in Carson City, in 1974 when she turned 18. Katherine and her brother Patrick Reddick from Minden described their childhood to the Reno GazetteJournal in horrifying detail. It included physical and emotional abuse, not just by their mother, but also in the various foster homes they were shuffled through. One of their siblings, William, died in foster care in Las Vegas when he was just 16 months old. Their mother’s parental rights were never terminated so they couldn’t be adopted and have

a chance at a childhood most of us take for granted. The siblings decided to place the obituary to bring attention to the crime of child abuse in the hope that other children will be protected as they were not. Patrick told the newspaper, “People may see this as something we did to shame our mother. But this is to bring shame to the issue of child abuse.” The Reddicks found the courage to voice their childhood rage and bring attention to the abomination of parental and systemic child abuse by revealing the very personal circumstances of their lives. We should thank them for that, hoping that the ugly obituary causes some parents to consider their own behavior. It’s worth noting that Nevada has made significant improvements in protecting children from abuse and neglect since the ’60s and ’70s, particularly through the hard work of visionary legislators such as former state Sen. Sue Wagner, who

advocated for children’s rights, and former Speaker Barbara Buckley who doggedly insisted on integrating county and state systems so children would not be lost in the maze. In Washoe County, we were fortunate to have a dedicated child welfare leader, May Shelton, who was unafraid to face the unpleasant facts of a system where too many children were dying and advocated successfully for a property tax increase dedicated to protecting children. The Reddicks’ harsh and unforgiving words are shocking only because we rarely hear the truth so clearly from children who suffer tremendous physical and psychic terror from the person who is supposed to love them the most. Their expressed wish that their mother will spend her days “in the after-life reliving each gesture of violence, cruelty, and shame that she delivered on her children” is a message every one of us should reflect upon to determine what we can personally do to ensure their pain is not visited upon the next generation. Ω

To read the entire obituary and hilarious commentary, check out Gawker: http:// gawker.com/thisbrutal-obituaryis-a-reminder-tobe-good-to-yourc-1286582748.

RENO SUBARU

Great Selection, Great Prices Every Day!!

‘04 BMW 325XI Heated Mirrors, AWD, Prem Sound, Alloys!

‘05 CADILLAC SRX V8 Heated Leather Seats, Panoramic Roof, Multi-CD!

#4PR10715

#50114214

7,998

$

‘08 TOYOTA 4RUNNER SR5 V8, Front Fog Lights, Auto! #8K006184

$

19,998

11,998

$

‘12 DODGE CHALLENGER SXT Heated Leather Seats, Keyless Start, Bluetooth! #CH187048

$

21,998

‘06 BMW X3 3.0I 3.0L V6, Auto, Memory Seat! #6WD33115

11,998

$

Fall in love with our Great Selection of Certified Pre-Owned Subaru. Pre-Owned. Pre-Loved. Prepared.

‘08 FORD EXPLORER XLT iPod®/MP3 Input, 4X4, CD Player, Alloys! #8UA29086

S KIETZKE LN

2270 Kietzke Lane 395

E MOANA LN

6   |  RN&R   | 

Price does not include $345 dealer doc fee, taxes and license fees. Offers expire 09/25/13. SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

16,998

$

‘11 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER Overhead Console, Cruise Control!

#B2418742

#BS082798

T [775] 200-1412 SHOP: LITHIARENOSUBARU.COM SALES HOURS Monday-Saturday 9:00am-8:00pm | Sunday 10:00am-6:00pm

13,498

#7X011154

‘11 SUBARU OUTBACK Certified Pre-Owned, AWD, 3.6 R Limited, Alloys!

LITHIA RENO SUBARU

E PLUMB LN

$

‘07 TOYOTA TUNDRA 5.7L V8, Low Miles!

$

27,698

$

28,698


Nevada’s killing fields Legal killing you rarely hear about Our state faces an annual epidemic of legally-sanctioned killing. You might think the human murder rate in places such as Oakland and by Chicago is appalling. What’s the target of Fred Voltz Nevada’s premeditated killing? Our state’s wildlife suffers from a relatively small number of human predators. Maximizing killing opportunities trumps all other considerations. Since wildlife can’t speak, contribute to political campaigns or vote in elections, its interests are ignored.

Nevada’s wildlife belongs to all Nevadans From a purely legal standpoint (Nevada Revised Statute 501.100), Nevada’s wildlife belongs to all Nevadans. Wildlife battle fire, drought, infrequent water sources and shelter, climate extremes, flash flooding, scarce food, human development steadily encroaching on traditional habitats, and human predators. Yet, whether you believe in evolution or some type of creation by an omnipresent force, Nevada’s wildlife existed long before humans intervened. A complicated, ingenious food chain sustains the various wildlife species. Unfortunately, Man disrupts that chain’s natural balance with organized wildlife killing, while rarely engaging in non-lethal coexistence. Many thousands are killed annually; they are not “harvested” (a euphemism human predators use to hide the ugly reality). Wildlife species ramp up procreation to offset the gratuitous killing, but cannot effectively compete against sophisticated weaponry, GPS locators, helicopters, gasoline-powered ATVs, video cameras, drones, leghold/conibear traps, or snares. Is it “sport” or “fun” when two competitors are unequally equipped and different rules apply, or simply lopsided slaughter? Shouldn’t Man coexist with wildlife? Shouldn’t the more than 96 percent of Nevadans without wildlife killing licenses have their opinions considered? Wildlife killers will soon be surveyed for their preferences at a minimum cost of $25,000, but we are told “there is no money” to objectively poll all Nevadans about wildlife’s fate.

Fred Voltz lives in Carson City and is involved in animal protection issues, retention of analog electric meters, statewide public library integration, and improving local government operations.

Skewed agenda Nevada’s Wildlife Commission consists of nine members appointed by the governor without legislative approval. Eight of the nine commissioners actively promote

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

wildlife killing interests. Their serial votes confirm that statement. Five of the eight are “sportsmen,” another often-used euphemism for licensed wildlife killer. Additionally, one is a farmer, one is a rancher and finally one is a “conservationist.” However, each enthusiastically supports and holds wildlife killing licenses. That leaves just one general public representative to potentially represent wildlife protection interests. State statute bars variation from this unrepresentative construct.

Shouldn’t Man coexist with wildlife? Shouldn’t the more than 96 percent of Nevadans without wildlife killing licenses have their opinions considered? Nevada’s Wildlife Department implements the Commission’s mandates. Its 243 employees further the culture of killing. “Conservation,” as defined by wildlife killers, consists of building up wildlife species’ populations so a killing season can be declared. The cycle repeats annually. Each of Nevada’s 17 counties has locally-appointed wildlife advisory boards reporting to the Commission. All but one of those board members must have held active wildlife killing licenses for three of the last five years. Collective result: No balanced, non-killing representation.

The sordid bear situation The Wildlife Commission approved a third consecutive bear hunt without sound reasoning, accurate numbers or credible science. Unaddressed is a principal cause of unwanted human/bear interaction: careless handling of human trash. The “best” information 15 years of public expenditures can produce is an estimate of 400 to 700 northern Nevada bears. This enormous variance disproves “bear overpopulation,” the official justification for a bear hunt.

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

Bears need considerable food and naturally seek out the easy sources. When humans fail to secure trash, bears will enter urban areas to find the attractive, free food. The Wildlife Commission has publicly subsidized over $200,000 to kill 25 bears (or over $8,000 per dead bear) in two years so wildlife killers can seize trophy animals.

Leghold, conibear and snare trapping Nevada has only 1,088 licensed trappers. Joel Blakeslee, Nevada Trappers’ Association President, recently stated trappers set up to 300 traps each. These hidden traps are effectively no different than roadside bombs planted in war zones. These traps catch wildlife by the foot, leg or snout, severely injuring and eventually killing them, while holding them powerless against the elements, other predators, and without food or water. Some wildlife eat through a limb trying to escape. Would we allow people to suffer this way? Shockingly, unlike 33 other states which require 24-hour trap inspection intervals, Nevada trappers need inspect their traps only once each 96 hours. The Commission’s Wildlife Committee will meet on Sept. 21 to consider changes because of a legislaturerequired review, but the Committee’s composition overwhelmingly represents trapper/killing interests without any general public representation. In fact, Jack Robb, the Reno-based chair of the Wildlife Commission, recently appointed a licensed trapper to the Committee and refused to appoint even one non-wildlife killing, general public member. Each trap lacks a unique registration or identifying number, just like a VIN number on a car. State statute currently prohibits such a common-sense step to determine total traps placed and accurately assign legal and financial responsibility. And what about the collateral damage to thousands of other wildlife (referred to as “trash animals”) caught in traps? They end up thrown to the side either seriously injured or already dead; more casualties from the culture of killing that dominates state wildlife policy. Domestic companion animals (dogs, cats) caught in traps add more to the casualty count.

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

For just $42 a year, trappers can kill an unlimited number of our wildlife, selling it for up to $600 each. Last year, trapping rules were revisited in the Spring Mountain/Mt. Charleston area of Clark County. Over 2 million people visit these public lands each year. One would reasonably expect no traps where so many people and companion animals recreate. Yet, the Wildlife Commission dismissed any of these safety considerations and arbitrarily established as little as a 200-foot buffer between trails and traps. An errant child, companion animal, or even a disoriented adult can easily stray in the wilderness. There have been numerous documented deaths of and serious injuries to companion animals because of inappropriately placed traps. Do we have to wait for a human death before reform occurs? Do civilized people allow such callous treatment of its wildlife and human safety? Is trapping an appropriate activity in the 21st century, or an archaic vestige of the 19 century’s wilderness existence?

What are your values? Wildlife Department budget statistics provided to the last Legislature prove eco-tourists seeking to view (not kill) Nevada’s wildlife in the wild generate more economic activity than the wildlife killers. Gov. Sandoval should be in the vanguard of protecting our wildlife and ensuring balanced policymaking on the Wildlife Commission he appoints. Instead, he has ignored the wholesale lack of wildlife protection and perpetuated wildlife exploitation. Is such a stance prudent leadership, or a cold calculus that defies the best interests of all Nevadans? Does our current public policy display respect for our state’s wildlife, or only concern for how it can be exploited for personal entertainment and personal financial profit? If you believe that Nevada’s wildlife has received a horrific deal from the people obligated to protect it, then let the governor’s wildlife advisor, Cory Hunt (cthunt@ gov.nv.gov), the governor’s administrative aide, Nikki Haag (n.haag@gov.nv.gov) and the Wildlife Commission’s administrative liaison, Suzanne Scourby (sscourby@ndow. org) know you want major changes in the way your wildlife is treated. You might contact your state legislators with the same Ω message.

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

7


Photo/Dennis Myers

Workers enter the NVEnergy building on Neil  Road. The familiar local company has an alliance  with computer giant Apple on creation of a solar  facility.

Back to down A summer dip in Nevada home foreclosures is at an end. RealtyTrac reported that notices of default rose 226 percent in August from July. June and July had both shown declines. Nevada also reclaimed its first-in-the-nation ranking. Meanwhile, the North Las Vegas City Council put an end to a plan to use condemnation to seize home loans for underwater homes (“Innovative mortgage plan launched,” June 27). The program was approved by the council on June 19 on a 4-1 vote. But after being threatened with lawsuits by bankers, insurers and real estate agents, it was killed on Sept. 11 by a 5-0 vote.

Obituary gets notice The Marianne Reddick obituary has become a story read around the world. The Reno Gazette-Journal ran a paid Sept. 10 obituary in which the recently deceased Marianne Theresa Johnson-Reddick was denounced, allegedly by one or more of her children, as evil and violent. The obituary ran in some copies of the print edition and was posted online but later removed. On February 15, 1970, the Nevada State Journal—forerunner of the Gazette Journal—reported that Academy Personnel Agency owner Marianne Reddick testified to the Nevada Equal Rights Commission that a local businessperson had chewed out one of her job counselors for sending a black applicant on a job referral. As a result, she said, she followed a practice of printing “whites only” on job referrals to spare African Americans the embarrassment of being rejected at restricted workplaces. On Sept. 11, Snopes—the online myth-busting site—added the Reddick incident to an already-posted story confirming the existence of a 2008 obituary in which a Dolores Aguilar was similarly denounced by her children. That obit ran in the Vallejo Times Herald. While the unusual language apparently got through unnoticed in the Reno newspaper, the Vallejo newspaper knowingly agreed to run the Aguilar obit after confirming the woman had died. Reddick’s children have received calls from everywhere, and while there has been considerable humorous treatment of the incident, it has also generated serious discussions of child abuse. Some readers were critical of the newspaper for not reposting it as an obituary once its authenticity was established. In an essay in the Sunday edition, publisher John Maher did not respond directly to explain why, but said the newspaper is “reviewing its obituary policy.”

Food photos offend A series of photos have been replaced at the Overlook Restaurant at the University of Nevada, Reno after customer complaints. It’s hard to know whether the photos were intended as art. At any rate, they generated complaints. They portrayed young people in several poses with food, some of them rather unattractive poses. One UNR staffer holding a to-go order and gazing at the photos said, “Well, I have only a few minutes each day to get out of the office and bring lunch back, so I don’t have time to go to some other place on campus. If I have to pay these prices, I’d just as soon not have to look at these [photos].” After initial resistance, the restaurant replaced the photos. That earned managers praise for being responsive to customers.

—Dennis Myers

8   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Applecart tipping? Critics claim Apple/NVEnergy partnership will put ratepayers at risk Critics of an Apple/NVEnergy solar energy project, including at least two labor unions, say it needs heavy scrutiny by from state utility regulators because of Dennis Myers Apple’s history of secrecy and deception in exchange for financial sweetheart deals paid for by the public. There are plans for Apple to construct an 18 megawatt photovoltaic solar plant in Yerington that will supply power to NVEnergy’s power grid, some of which would be used by Apple in its Reno and Truckee River Canyon facilities. “We believe that we should have more green energy,” said Laborers Union Local 169 business manager Richard “Skip” Daly. “We support Sierra Pacific Power [parent of NVEnergy]. We have no qualms or problems with them. And we don’t have any, really, problems with Apple wanting to build it. We just are concerned about the lack of transparency—gag orders, all secret again. And if we end up with a similar deal through the secrecy and nobody can know what’s going on—that we did with the data center stuff and the $89 million through the governor’s office—that causes us concern.” In June and July 2012, Apple cut to read the filings in the Public service a deal for tax breaks on a data center Commission case on the in exchange for facilities to be built Lyon County solar plant, in Reno and Sparks, a deal which go to http://puc.nv.gov/ was shrouded in secrecy. Use of code Dockets/Dockets/ and search for docket words and deceptive language in 13-07005. Warning: official documents, plus distribution it’s very slow and user of legally required information at unfriendly. the last minute, prevented members of the public and even some public officials who had to vote on the deal

from knowing about it until after a consensus had been formed among state and local governments in favor of the project (“Deception,” RN&R, July 5, 2012). The result was that Apple received the biggest chunk of welfare in state history—$89 million—in exchange for a data center that employs fewer than 50 people in full time jobs. Two hundred other employees are contract workers whose hours and benefits are uncertain. The public never had a chance to be involved. A filing by NVEnergy with the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) said the solar plant construction would have no impact on ratepayers. Daly doesn’t think the Public Utilities Commission should take their word for it, given Apple’s history of secrecy. “Apple’s going to finance it. From what I understand, Apple’s going to cut a deal and get discounted power, which benefits them. Sierra Pacific Power will eventually buy it back from them. And it will be paid for eventually by the ratepayers.” Plus, Daly said, the plant’s power will count for NV Energy against the amount of alternative energy it is legally required to provide. Another labor group, the Building and Construction Trades Council of Northern Nevada has petitioned the PUC to intervene in the case. Apple spokespeople could not be reached for comment, but NVEnergy’s Faye Andersen said there’s a lot of bad information floating around. “Apple will pay more for their desire to be green when it comes to energy,” she said in an email

message. “This is a program that was developed that would allow customers to pursue greener energy outside of what’s mandated by the state’s renewable portfolio standards. Apple wanted to have additional renewable energy for their company’s energy use in Nevada. Apple will pay their full retail rate (no discount) PLUS an additional amount for renewable energy. They are therefore subsidizing the cost of the plant to make sure all other customers are held harmless since renewable energy is more expensive. The structure of the project lowers the cost of the project for all parties and requires that NVE and Apple be involved. Apple takes responsibility for building it and its initial performance. It also allows NVE to operate the facility thereby limiting the impacts of an intermittent resource by optimizing its operation in conjuncture with the Ft. Churchill gas facility.” The arrangement makes it possible for NVEnergy to acquire the solar plant six years after it is constructed, which raises the question of why the utility isn’t building the plant and leaving Apple out of it. Would a computer company turn to a power utility to build a computer manufacturing plant? Daly, who is also a state legislator, said of the power utility, “We wonder why they wouldn’t just build it themselves. … One bill that was down in Carson City—I think it was S.B. 123—allowed them to build more of their own renewable energy.” The Apple/NVEnergy deal has caused talk among local energy experts. One calls it “inexplicable,” pointing out that NVEnergy has a long history of building its own plants and resisting any other plans. Since the simplest route to a solar plant is for NVEnergy to build it, bringing Apple aboard must have some effect that benefits someone, Daly suggests. And he suspects there is some financial incentive for the computer giant, which is known for expanding on other people’s money. There is a famous story about the city council in Apple’s corporate hometown, Cupertino, Calif., asking Steve Jobs for free wi-fi, and Jobs threatening to pull out of town and then saying, “Now, if we can get out of paying taxes, I’ll be glad to put up Wi-Fi.” The New York Times once ran an article titled, “How Apple Sidesteps Billions in Taxes.” When Apple came to Nevada, it was arriving in a state with no corporate tax, so it instantly saved California’s 8.84 corporate tax rate—yet it still shook


SEPTEMBER 21 EDGE NIGHTSPOT PRESENTS

officials down for the additional $89 million in tax breaks. According to testimony by Sierra Pacific exec Bobby Hollis before the Public Service Commission, “By partnering with a third party on the project, the company [Sierra Pacific] is able to avoid the normalization impact which would limit the tax credit benefit for its customers under a federal tax requirement. ... By undertaking the [purchase] option in a future year while the solar array is still fairly new, Sierra will be able to take advantage of tax benefits available at that time potentially yielding additional economic benefits.� Anderson added, “While we have historically built many of our fossil facilities, we typically contract for renewable facilities. Apple is the customer specifically requesting renewable energy, a more costly resource, so it is subsidizing the cost for other customers. Apple has also built several renewable facilities throughout the country for its other data centers. And just as a point of reference, the Valmy plant [a Sierra coal-fired plant built in 1979-1981] from the beginning was and still is a 50-50 partnership between Sierra Pacific and Idaho Power Company.� Daly still wants to know what’s in it, financially, for Apple. While both corporations emphasize Apple’s environmental commitment, it is not known as a green corporation. Under the subhead “Apple’s Been More Brown Than Green,� Mac WorldNews

reported this summer, “Apple has had a spotty record when it comes to being environmentally conscious, however. In 2011, a Greenpeace report listed Apple as being the worst environmental offender in the technology industry.â€? Incidents in China have led to complaints about Apple’s use of toxic materials. “The ratepayers are paying for Apple to get discounted power,â€? Daly said. But one energy consultant said even if Apple does get discount rates, it does not necessarily hurt ratepayers unless the discount is below cost. And the consultant said that would certainly be examined by the PUC. Daly wants all questions and implications of the deal explored by the PUC before various players get an economic stake in the project and make it impossible to stop. “Apple wants to keep it all secret until it’s done and then say, ’Oh, great, here it is—take it or leave it. ‌ Oh, we have the jobs, it’s just wonderful, we have jobs, we have green energy, it’s wonderful that we have green energy.’ Never mind that it may not be the best deal for the ratepayers long term. And that’s the transparency it lacks. ‌ And then it’s all about, ‘You can only have this if you do this.’ ‌ Of course we want the jobs. We need the jobs. It’s great to have the jobs. But how much are we paying for the jobs? We’re paying Apple to take us out on a date.â€? Ί

SEPTEMBER 21 3(33(50,//5(12Â&#x2021;69,5*,1,$675((7 ('*(#3(33(50,//5(12&20Â&#x2021;&29(5Â&#x2021;'225623(130 67</,6+1,*+7&/8%$77,5(Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;9,35(6(59$7,216'$11<878 Â&#x2021;('*(2)5(12&20Â&#x2021;)$&(%22.&20('*(5(12 7:,77(5&20('*(2)5(12Â&#x2021;,167$*5$0('*(2)5(12

Finally

Singer Songwriter Showcase

Terrace

Sept. 19tQN QN

Photo/Dennis Myers

VERBAL KINT & MY FLAG IS ON FIRE

Mark Sexton Band

LOUNGE

Sept. 20 - 21tQN -Midnight SPECTACULAR SOUL-FUNK

Tany Jane

PRESENTS

Sept. 22 - 25tQN QN DUO PLAYING CLASSIC POP & EVERYTHING IN-BETWEEN

Soul Night 4FQUtQN QN

STAX OF WAX AND DJ DBRUZ

A Spirit Hustler

Sept. 27 - 28tQN -Midnight

SEXY ENSEMBLE SERVING UP PROHIBITION SWING WITH A MODERN TWIST

Moonshine Muggers

Sept. 29 - Oct. 2tQN QN

SWINGING, JAZZY, BLUES GUITAR & VOCAL DUO

HIGH FIDELITY

t1&11&3.*--3&/0$0. t'"$&#00,$0.1&11&3.*--3&/0

It took a whileâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a long while (years!)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;but the spelling on the restrooms sign at the Siena Casino has finally been corrected. For those disappointed at the disappearance of one of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long-running jokes, they can take comfort from a bronze plaque mounted a few yards away from the Siena bathrooms. The plaque, on the Center Street bridge, misspells the name of Nevada suffrage leader Anne Martin. OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

t58*55&3$0.3&/01&11&3.*-t*/45"(3".1&11&3.*--3&/0 FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

47*3(*/*"45 MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

9


TRUCKEE TRUCKEE RIVER RIVER CLEANUP CLEANUP DAY DAY

SEPT. 28· 28 •8:30 8:30A.M. PICNIC FOLLOWS SEPT. A.M. -- NOON NOON •··Ã PICNIC FOLLOWS

VOLUNTEER AT KTMB.ORG OR CALL 851.5185

%LER&RIIHH&RÃ*UHDW%DVLQ%UHZLQJ&RÃ1DWXUH·V%DNHU\Ã1HYDGD'HSDUWPHQWRI:LOGOLIHÃ5HQR)LUH'HSDUWPHQW Bibo Coffee Co. · Great Basin Brewing Co. · Nature’s Bakery · Nevada Department of Wildlife · Reno Fire Department Bibo Team Coffee· Reno-Sparks Co. · Great Basin Brewing Co. · Nature’s· Starbucks Bakery · Nevada of Wildlife · RenoTours Fire Department :KLWHZDWHU5HVFXH7HDPÃ5HQR6SDUNV,QGLDQ&RORQ\Ã6DYHPDUWÃ6WDUEXFNVÃ7DKRH7UDLO%DUÃ7DKRH:KLWHZDWHU7RXUVÃ7KH&KDPEHUÃ7KH1DWXUH Whitewater Rescue Indian Colony · Savemart · Tahoe Department Trail Bar · Tahoe Whitewater · The Chamber · The Nature Whitewater Rescue Team · Reno-Sparks Indian Colony · Savemart Starbucks · Tahoe Trail Bar · Tahoe Whitewater Tours ·Regional The Chamber The Nature &RQVHUYDQF\7UXFNHH0HDGRZV:DWHUVKHG&RPPLWWHHÃ7UXFNHH5LYHU)O\)LVKHUVÃ7UXFNHH5LYHU)RXQGDWLRQÃ:HVWHUQ5HJLRQDO:DWHU&RPPLVVLRQ Conservancy Truckee Meadows Watershed Committee · Truckee· River Fly Fishers · Truckee River Foundation · Western Water· Commission Conservancy Truckee Meadows Watershed Committee · Truckee River Fly Fishers · Truckee River Foundation · Western Regional Water Commission

STORM DRAIN DRAIN STENCILING STENCILIN*IN INPARTNERSHIP PARTNERS+IPWITH WIT+CITY CITYOF OFRENO RENO· ÃONLY ONLYRAIN RAININ INTHE T+ESTORM STORMDRAINS DRAINS STORM STORM DRAIN STENCILING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CITY OF RENO · ONLY RAIN IN THE STORM DRAINS

10 

| 

RN&R   | 

September 19, 2013


PHOTO/SAGE LEEHEY

Pat Bruce has been working for Friends of Nevada Wilderness as Stewardship Program Director for almost eight years now.

Photo by John Tull

NEVADA’S SAGE-GROUSE CONSERVATION & WILDFIRES Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), an iconic species depending on sagebrush habitat for survival, and is headlining Nevada’s news. Under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for listing under the Endangered Species Act, understanding the role of fire in sagebrush ecosystems and the effect it has on sage grouse is an important component of the decision making process.

Public service National Public Lands Day

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

Second only to Alaska in the percentage of land that is publicly owned, Nevada has quite a bit of land to work on for the 20th anniversary of National Public Lands Day (NPLD) on Sept. 28. by Sage Leehey “Nevada is well over 80 percent public land,” said Pat Bruce, the Stewardship Program Director of Friends of Nevada Wilderness (FNW). s age l@ “We have some of the largest refuges in the lower 48, and all of that is news review.c om accessible to everybody in the country. And what wilderness allows is an experience in the outdoors that is free from mechanized intrusions, so wilderness in general offers solitude, primitive recreation and preserves view shed, watershed, clean air.” NPLD is a volunteer event during which people work on public lands cleaning up trash, removing invasive weeds and maintaining or building trails. FNW has been participating for several years and has four events planned for it this year. The Southern Nevada events are day trips to the Desert National Wildlife Rescue and the South McCullough Wilderness on the 28th, but the Northern Nevada events are weekend-long camping trips to Soldier Meadows in the Black Rock Desert to clean and restore the hot spring and to the Santa Rosa Mountains in Paradise Valley to remove an old, rusted fence. The Soldier Meadows trip will be the weekend before NPLD. All meals are provided on the camping trips, and gear can be borrowed from FNW for those who need it. Bruce said that working on public lands is very important because the government agencies that hold these lands need help because there is so much work to be done. For more information about volunteer events “We don’t receive direct federal funding, and most of our money for Friends of Nevada comes through private foundations and grants and membership,” Bruce Wilderness, visit www. said. “We do have some assistance agreements with the different agencies nevadawilderness.org/ that they’re able to put money into that. ... We can use it to get hundreds calendar_of_events. of volunteers out on the ground to make something happen, whereas they would only be able to pay two people.” Bruce likes to use public lands himself and thinks of them as a “resource and gift.” This event allows others to come out and experience these places in a fun and mutually beneficial manner. “Most of the projects that we do, you start and there’s a problem and by the end of the day, most times you can’t even see where the problem was anymore,” Bruce said. “So there’s that gratification, instant gratification for the completion of the project, but knowing that you’re giving back and you’re helping to keep America beautiful—to throw a cliché in there—it’s a worthy thing to do.” He added that the Soldier Meadows event—the one he’s running— will also have a Dutch oven cook-off, saying that “it’s a lot of fun to add a little competition to the weekend,” and that he wishes it was National Public Lands Week. “It’s a neat way to get out there and make something happen. … These things are long lasting impacts that you can have for one day of work,” Bruce said. “Taking a day, doing eight hours of work and spending a weekend with a lot of cool people and having good food—it’s free. It’s the cheapest vacation you can get.” Ω

THE THREAT OF FIRE Sage-grouse exclusively nest, breed and forage in sagebrush habitat. Wildfire intensity is increasing due to various anthropogenic effects, most notably the invasion of cheatgrass which appears in grain and hay feed for cattle. Short term effects from fire is devastating to a population when wildfires sweeps through their “sweet spot” for nesting.

CONSERVATION ACTIONS Optimum sagebrush habitat restoration techniques are being researched, as is the response of sage grouse populations to fire. In the meantime, native seed and plants that benefit sage grouse are being grown on a commercial level to help support immediate restoration after fires. Friends of Black Rock High Rock is committed to restoration of all wildlife habitat areas and for the sage grouse this fall in particular. In partnership with the Bureau of Land Management and Nevada Department of Wildlife, Friends has two fire restoration projects to rehabilitate over 29,000 acres of sage-grouse habitat destroyed by fire the summer of 2012.

YOU ARE NEEDED! RESTORE CRITICAL SAGE GROUSE HABITAT THIS FALL! Mon-Wed, Oct. 14-16: Lost Fire Native Plant Restoration #1 Join Friends for mid-week planting! Native sagebrush will be planted in areas impacted by the Lost Fire where primary sage grouse habitat was affected. Learn about sage grouse conservation efforts, fire restoration planting techniques, native plants and noxious weeds. This is the perfect place for an autumn family experience and camping weekend! Fri-Sat, Nov. 15-16: Lost Fire Native Plant Restoration #2 The weather may be chilly, but the Nevada Department of Wildlife and Bureau of Land Management has 10,000 bitterbrush seedlings to plant! This trip is an incredible opportunity to help restore an area impacted by the lost fire and improve habitat for sage grouse, pronghorn antelope and migratory birds. This trip will be for the heartiest of souls. Bring your warmest clothes, we’ll have hot cocoa and campfire stories and delicious food, for this weekend! Contact Friends of Black Rock High Rock at 775-557-2900 or go online to: blackrockdesert.org

INSPIRE - CONNECT - PROTECT

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO BECOME A MEMBER CALL@ 775.771.2900 OR GO TO BLACKROCKDESERT.ORG Photo courtesy of Grant Kaye

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

11


17339-RN&R 9-19 Ad.pdf

1

9/11/13

3:34 PM

A celebration of the 75th year of the Nevada Day Parade & kick-off event for the NV 150 Celebration!

at Sierra Gold and Sparky’s GAME DAY BEER SPECIALS 3ATURDAYAND3UNDAYsAM PM -ONDAYAND4HURSDAYsPM PM

$

2

50

$

12oz BOTTLE

250

12oz BOTTLE

GAME DAY FOOD SPECIALS 3ATURDAYAND3UNDAYsAM PM -ONDAYAND4HURSDAYsPM PM

699

$

One Pound Popcorn Shrimp One Pound Golden Chicken Nuggets BBQ Pork Sliders Chili Cheese Curly Fry Nachos

Governors Banquet 3rd Annual

Thursday, October 24, 2013 6:00pm No Host Bar | 7:00pm Dinner Service Live Auction & Silent Auction Special Guest Speakers | Live Entertainment

®

A portion of the proceeds to benefit the Children’s Cabinet of Nevada

Grand Sierra Resort Summit Pavilion 2500 E Second Street Reno, Nevada 89595

Tickets

$50 per person $450 for Table of 10 Semi-Formal Attire

Tickets available at Grand Sierra Resort Box Office, the Nevada Day Store and www.NevadaDay.com PRESENTED BY NEVADA DAY, INC. | A NON-PROFIT 501C3 ORGANIZATION | 775.882.2600

Join us for the 75th annual

NEVADA DAY PARADE Saturday, October 26, 2013 10:00am in Carson City

sierragoldreno.com

sparkysreno.com

Must be 21. Management reserves all rights. See bar host for details.

12 

| 

RN&R   | 

September 19, 2013

Learn more at

www.NevadaDay.com


EvEry yEar, the Reno News & Review focuses on “media” in our fall guide. Our conceit is, “Evenings are getting cooler, wouldn’t you like to just curl up in bed with a good tablet and read or watch movies or listen to music?” Well, let’s be logical about this. Autumn is actually one of the most beautiful seasons in northern Nevada: Evenings and nights are comfortable, the days have that crisp bite, colors are changing. It’s just a great time to be outside. But we know how you are: You start building a pile of books next to the bed for those cold winter nights. You’re probably sticking mental Post-its onto the back of your mind for the movies you’ll watch in front of the roaring fire in November. And who buys music seasonally? You’re probably like us, watching every Tuesday to see who has released new music. We’re just here to help with the planning.

by

D. Brian Burghart, BraD Bynum, Kelley lang anD Dennis myers

Our autumnal guide to media focuses on local books, movies and music

illustratiOns By hayley DOshay

“FOUR LOCALS ONLY”

continued on page 14

FaLL EvEnts EvEnts

will start at 4pm and continue until 10pm. sa, 9/28, 9am-5pm; su, 9/29, 9am-5pm. Free admission to faire; $20-$28 for dinner/dance. (775) 782-8696, http://genoanevada.org/candydancefaire.htm

art Bite meet the artist: laurie BrOWn: Brown discusses her photography that documents the edges of landscapes surrounding Las Vegas, Nev. F, 9/20, noon. $10; free for NMA members. Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St., 329-3333, www. nevadaart.org.

CarsOn City ghOst WalK: Hear about lingering spirits of Carson City’s past during this guided walking tour of the downtown district’s historic homes. Please arrive at least 10 minutes before the walk begins. All tours leave at 6:30pm unless otherwise noted. Tours depart from 3rd and Carson streets next to the St. Charles Hotel. For tickets go to http:// brownpapertickets.com. sa, 9/21, 6:30pm; sa, 10/19, 10am-2:30pm. $15 advance, $20 at the door.

CanDy DanCe arts anD CraFts Faire: More than 300 craft and food vendors offer their wares at the 93rd annual faire and fundraiser for the town of Genoa. The 2013 Candy Dance Dinner will be held on Saturday evening from 5:30 to 7:30pm at the Genoa Town Park on Nixon Street. The dance

Carson City Ghost Tour, Curry and West Third streets in Carson City, (775) 348-6279, http://carsoncityghostwalk.com. elDOraDO great italian FestiVal: The annual festival transforms downtown Reno into Little Italy with a grape stomp, sauce competition, farmers’ market, bocce ball, kids’ gelatoeating contest, Ferrari car display, buffet and live entertainment all weekend long. Free. sa, 10/12, 9:30am-6pm; su, 10/13, 9:30am5pm. Free. Eldorado Hotel Casino, 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700, www.eldoradoreno.com.

great Basin lOCal neVaDa Farmers’ marKet: Great Basin Brewing Company celebrates Nevada’s late-season harvests with a farmers’ market. The brewery will present free live music on its outdoor stage. th, 3:30-7:30pm through 9/26. Free. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave., Sparks, (775) 351-2551, www. nevadagrown.com. PumPKinPalOOZa 2013: Downtown Sparks celebrates all things pumpkin at the second annual festival and fundraiser for Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living. The weekend event includes the Pumpkin Derby, children’s costume parade, storytelling, zombie cheerleaders,

the Lighting of the Pumpkins, Zombie Prom, carnival-style games, pie-eating, pumpkin-seed spitting and mummy-wrapping contests, live music and Pumpkin Beauty Contest. sa, 10/19, noon; su, 10/20, noon. Victorian Square, 1555 Victorian Ave., Sparks, http://pumpkinpalooza.org. renO CeltiC CeleBratiOn: The annual event features Celtic music, dancing, games and more. sa-su, 10/5-10/6, 11am-5pm. $10-$15; free for children age 12 and younger. Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, www.renoceltic.org.

“Fall eVents” continued on on page 15

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

13


“FOUR LOCALS ONLY”

continued from page 13

Bedside

Books Waiting for the Cars

H

ere are some books by local authors that should be residing in the pile next to your bed for that moment when the internet goes down. all of these books have connections to students and professors from the university of nevada, reno.

by howard goldbaum and Wendell W. huffman You probably heard about how we did a 3-D issue for our Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada. In a way, Waiting for the Cars was the inspiration for that. This almost 500-page book features around 218 of Alfred A. Hart’s stereoscopic images of the Central Pacific Railroad between 1865 and 1869. Many readers will be familiar with the concept of stereoscopes, those old glasses into which a card with two very similar images would appear as one three-dimensional image when viewed through the glasses (sort of like those old View-Master toys we had when we were kids). This book uses that old technology, filtered through new digital technology, to create breathtaking images of that bygone era, but instead of looking through one of those wooden stereoscopes, you use the red and blue-lensed glasses included with the book. Somehow, Hart was able to capture the majesty of the railroad, one of the greatest technological achievements of the 1860s, and Howard Goldbaum, a university of Nevada, Reno journalism professor, was able to translate the medium into the modern era without losing the “historicity” of Hart’s work. Both are pretty amazing achievements. It’s available at Sundance Books and Music, but while I couldn’t find this book on Amazon, it’s available at www.waitingforthecars.com.

robert LaxaLt: the story of a storyteLLer by Warren Lerude If Nevada ever had a First Family, it was the Laxalts. Paul Laxalt was a U.S. senator who frequently got mentioned as a great friend to Ronald Reagan. His brother, Robert, is a towering figure in literature in this state, frequently mentioned in the same breath as Mark Twain and Walter van Tilburg Clark as one of the greatest writers Nevada has ever produced. Pulitzer-prize winning editor and 30-year fixture at the Donald W. Reynold’s School of Journalism Warren Lerude tells the story primarily from the collection of

14   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

by D. brian burghart

Laxalt’s papers at the UNR Archives and Special Collections, although the biography contains a distinct revenant of the 50-year friendship between Laxalt and Lerude, going into details in some places that would seem impossible except that the words went from Laxalts lips to Lerude’s ears. Actually, you’ve got to hand it to Lerude, it’s the details that probably didn’t come from the special collection that brings this story to life: war details, conversations, the price of a National Geographic in June 1966 (eight dollars a year or one dollar a copy), and this book represents an incredible amount of research and nose to the grindstone writing. This will undoubtedly go down as the premier biography of Bob Laxalt, but I’m at a loss to think of another lifelong Nevadan who has gotten a better scholarly treatment. At Sundance Books and Music or Amazon.com: ISBN-10: 1935709364

ViraL nation shaunta grimes I’m just like that person I described in the introduction to this Fall Guide: I squirrel away books that I’m planning to read sometime if the creek don’t rise. This is one of those. I met the author last semester in a speculative fiction class, and I was pretty impressed by her honest to goodness book deal (not to mention her dedication to the craft she expressed in the class.) I’ll be honest. Even though I’m an unwilling academic (or perhaps especially because), I secretly prefer books that hardly inform my mind at all, but take my imagination to

places it wouldn’t go on its own: magical fantasies, graphic novels, lesbian porn. My job makes me spend way too much time in the “real” world. Viral Nation falls into the Young Adult genre of fiction. It’s the story of a young autistic woman who lives on an Earth on which the population has been all but destroyed by a disease. The hero is also a time traveler. The world is run by an evil corporation. It’s the protagonist’s lot to try to expose the corporation’s hidden agenda, save her brother, save the world, and leave room for a sequel. Viral Nation is an easy, fun read, good to turn the brain off to, and a great reason to escape to places the workaday life won’t take you. At Sundance Books and Music or Amazon.com: ISBN-10: 0425265137

MenDing the Moon susan Palwick Since I restarted and then put on hiatus our books feature Western Lit, I’ve been highly impressed by the novels that have been written and published by teachers and former students from Nevada’s college system. Christopher Coake, Clair Vaye Watkins and Mark Maynard all produced books that I’d call “literature,” a sort of step above fiction, and yet the authors are still living. It’s a new and different way of viewing Reno’s authorial curriculum vitae. Now, Susan Palwick, whom I had as a teacher in the aforementioned speculative fiction class, is known primarily as a writer of science fiction and fantasy. In fact, She’s considered a top writer of the genre, but Mending the Moon is a departure from that. In fact, while it incorporates comic books and the way fantasy inhabits our lives, it falls under that heading of “literature,” although I’ll bet some science fiction purists would have issues with it. There are parts of this novel that are hard to read, not because they’re fantastic, and that turns people off, but because rape and murder are too real, and that turns some people off, too. But we all know the feeling we get when we answer the phone to the words, “I have terrible news.” At Sundance Books and Music or Amazon.com: ISBN10: 0765327589


Lights, camera, reno! OPINION

|

NEWS

FaLL eVents continued from page 13

By denniS MyeRS

r

eno, recently at least, is showing signs of being attractive to independent filmmakers. These movies may not be as satisfying to local tourism promoters as, say, Sister Act when it comes to showcasing the city, but if your concerns are a little less callow than that, here are some films that touch on Reno as both place and idea. They’re also a tribute to the ordeal of those who love to make movies and operate outside the major studios.

The WATeRhole There is a considerable dramatic history to portraying people sitting around a bar talking. There is William Saroyan’s The Time of Your Life, filmed with William Bendix in 1948 and performed live on television with Jackie Gleason in 1958. There have been several lesser known movies, like Trees Lounge (1996) with Chloë Sevigny and the comedy television series Cheers. The Waterhole shows several friends who hang out at a place called Murphy’s as one of them unwillingly prepares to leave the womb of college for the real world. The bar was played by Corrigan’s on Wells Avenue. The film was written and produced by Nathan Cole and directed by Ely Mennin, with a group of mostly little-known television actors (Jade Carter, Patrick J. Adams, Jessica Barth). Available on DVD.

ThiS iS MARTin BonneR With an audience award from Sundance, this film taps into the notion that the West is a place to get lost or reinvent oneself. After leaving the East and declaring bankruptcy, Martin Bonner becomes a volunteer exec at a charitable group. Bonner forms a friendship with someone moving in the other direction, a prisoner named Travis trying to get back into society. Variety: “Martin possesses an attractive sense of confidence and contentment, despite his troubles, which are underscored by the physical disorder of Nevada, the aesthetic nightmare of Reno and the movements of Sean McElwee’s camera. Furthermore, there’s a clear contrast between Martin and Travis, the older man gifted with a graceful bearing, the other a kind of Eeyore carrying his sins on his back.” Written and directed by Chad Hartigan (Luke and Brie Are on a First Date), stars Paul Eenhoorn, Richmond Arquette, Robert Longstreet. |

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

noWheRe nevAdA In the early days of moviemaking when new product was rare, some Reno locals started shooting their own movies to supply local theatres. This title is reminiscent of those days. Money was raised by local musicians, a local casting firm (its owner Juli Green co-produced) cast some of the best known local talent—Mary Bennett, Max Volume, Tom Gordon. “There’s not one person in any other city or state has anything to do with this picture,” said executive producer Brian Sutherland. The movie tells the story of a “street hustling, drug dealing, ding dong guy” (Sutherland’s description) who hooks up with a stripper. They leave their Reno scene and go on the road where they “run into a bunch of strange and wonderful characters. He’s being led astray by her and she has her reasons for wanting to get with him.” A road picture, a character study, and a coming-of-age story are all rolled into one. The underground drug and music scene in Reno is explored and Middlegate, a desolate wide spot in the road in Churchill County serves as the place where the story plays out.

RENO FOOD TRUCK FRIDAYS: This gathering of some of the area’s best gourmet food trucks offers different types of food to choose from, live music and a Tumblebus for the kids. Third F of every month, 5-9pm through 10/18; First F of every month, 5-9pm through 10/4. Free admission. Former RTC Citicenter, Fourth and Center streets, https://www.facebook. com/RenoFoodTruckFridays. RENO STREET FOOD: Gourmet food trucks and trailers, such as DishTruck, Brothers BBQ, Traffic Jam, among others, gather on Friday nights. Local musicians provide live entertainment each week. F, 5-9pm through 10/4. Idlewild Park, 1900 Idlewild Drive, (775) 825-2665, www.facebook.com/ RenoStreetFood. RIVERWALK DISTRICT WINE WALK: Visit any Riverwalk District Merchant on Wine Walk day to get a map of participating Wine Walk merchants. With a valid photo ID, you’ll receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet that allows you to sample wine at any participating merchant. Part of all proceeds are donated to a local charity. Third Sa of every month, 2-5pm. $20. The Riverwalk District, downtown Reno along The Riverwalk, (775) 825-9255, www.renoriver.org.

MAn fRoM Reno Filmed in San Francisco and finished with $50,000-plus raised online, this title is a thriller built around a sheriff who accidentally hits a Japanese man (several cast members are of Japanese descent) while driving in the fog one evening—the victim disappears from his hospital room—and a mystery writer who has an affair with a man from Reno. Directed by Dave Boyle (White on Rice), the soundtrack was composed by Reno native Micah Dahl Anderson. It’s in post-production and no release date has yet been set. Boyle said, “We’re anticipating a wide release in Japan and a smaller art house release stateside. Hopefully, Reno will be in the cards.” Stars Pepe Serna, Yuki Matsuzaki and Derrick O’Connor. Serna was important in the casting, Boyle told a film website: “Pepe is a longtime friend and collaborator, and cameoed in my first two movies when I was just getting my start. … Once the opportunity for Man from Reno came my way, I decided to tailor it for Pepe and luckily it worked out.”

ART OF THE STATE

“FOUR LY” LOCALS ON |

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

SAFE HAVEN RESCUE ZOO: Safe Haven Rescue Zoo is a wildlife sanctuary in Imlay, Nev., that provides rehabilitative services and permanent placement for wildlife in need. A portion of the sale of all paw- and tail-painted artworks, as well as other wildlife art, will go to benefit the Safe Haven Zoo. Sa, 9/21, 10am-6pm. Free admission. Art Source Gallery, 9748 S. Virginia St., (775) 535-7093. STREET VIBRATIONS FALL RALLY: The 18th annual celebration of music, metal and motorcycles includes tours, live entertainment, ride-in shows, stunt shows

continued on page 16 |

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

and more at several locations. W-Su through 9/29. Opens 9/25. Free for most events. Call or visit website for details. (775) 329-7469, http://roadshowsreno.com/ sv_fall.php. THE VIRGINIA CITY BELLYDANCE FESTIVAL: The first Virginia City Shimmy brings together the talents of musicians and dancers from Reno, Carson City, San Francisco, Sacramento and Southern California and beyond. Heading up this event is musician and composer John Bilezikjian. A bazaar with exotic wares, costumes, jewelry, music, drums, silks and scarves will take place during the festival from 11am5pm. Sa, 9/21, 11am-9pm; Su, 9/22, 11am-9pm. $8 admission; $25 gala show; $45-$80 for workshops. Piper’s Opera House, 12 N. B St. in Virginia City, (909) 223-9932, www.thevirginiacityshimmy.com. WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP OUTHOUSE RACES: The races pit teams of costumed outhouse racers against each other. One person rides and the remaining team members push, pull or drag the decorated outhouses down the racetrack. Sa, 10/5, 10am5pm; Su, 10/6, 10am-5pm. C Street, Downtown Virginia City, (775) 847-7500, www.visitvirginiacitynv.com.

art ARTISTS CO-OP OF RENO GALLERY: Sierra Watercolor Society Exhibit. The work of members of the Sierra Watercolor Society will be the featured exhibit during the month of September. SWS members will show new work in watercolor media. Through 9/30, 11am-4pm. Free. 627 Mill St., (775) 322-8896, www. artistsco-opgalleryreno.com.

“FALL EVENTS” continued on on page 17 SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

15


“FOUR LOCALS ONLY”

continued from page 15

In the key of fall

I

t surprises me how often people are dismissive of local music. People will say they love music, but they’ll have zero awareness of the great diversity of bands, singer-songwriters, rappers, orchestras and musicians in their own community. (These are often the same folks that, when asked what kind of music they like, will say “all kinds,” as though their iPhone carries Balinese gamelan music, Indian ragas and 17th century operas. Three or four classic rock albums, a couple of current hip-hop singles, and a Garth Brooks greatest hits mix does not constitute “all kinds” of music.) Sure, the inclusive, supportive attitude of much of the local scene means there’s a higher tolerance of mediocrity than would be found in more discriminating communities, but, that said, there’s some great music here in the valley.

Sun DamaGe Synthesize Her

For a couple of years, from May 2011 until this spring, I wrote a monthly column for the RN&R called “In the Mix.” In each column, I’d review two local albums, assigning them each a rating between 1 and 5. (By “album” I mean a collection of songs or other pieces of music, regardless of format—could be a vinyl record, a CD, a cassette or just streaming online.) I rated a lot of 2s and 3s, a few 4s, and a 1 or two. But no 5s—I didn’t hear an album by a local artist or band that I felt warranted a perfect score. (There are a couple of older Reno albums I’d say deserve that perfect score—Pontiac by the Atomiks; Bad Move Space Cadet by Zoinks!; Walk Together, Rock Together by 7 Seconds. …) 16   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Until recently. Sun Damage by Synthesize Her is a perfect 5 (See “Days of summer,” Musicbeat, Aug.22). Drawing on the swirling, psychedelic sounds of shoegazing bands like My Bloody Valentine and Swervedriver, multiinstrumentalist producer Alex Kortinsky and singersongwriter Alex Crowe have crafted a catchy, addictive album. Their recent first live show, which the members claim will be the only one, more or less fulfilled the promise of album, with an all-star band and amped up energy. In years past, our Fall Guide has been an opportunity, among other things, for me to recommend new national releases that seemed ideally suited for autumnal listening. Sun Damage is not that—it has a distinctly summer vibe. But, with this year’s focus on local media, I’d be remiss not to recommend Sun Damage, one of the best local albums in years.

SleeP leSS WHere THe HearT IS Buster Blue Sleep Less Where the Heart Is, the latest by folk band Buster Blue, one of the area’s more universally admired groups, is definitely a fall album. The happy, smiling people in their publicity photos and the upbeat atmosphere of their live shows belie how somber, bittersweet and downright sad the band is willing to be on record. Especially on their recent releases, like this and last year’s Still on Conway EP, they’ve matured into a band that can write heartbreakers—and present them in tasteful, spacious, Spartan settings. In fact, the group’s use of space is one of their more impressive attributes. Sometimes it feels like whole measures rest between notes. Unlike a lot of contemporary folk groups, there’s no frenzy or hurry here, just good songs played by six musicians playing very quietly. I love, for example, the melancholy reed instruments that open “Leave Me in Coeur d’Alene” or the falsetto vocal hook of “Streets of Laredo,” a song with the great, atypical, ear-grabbing lyric, “It’s not the time for bloodshed, but I always like the taste.”

We DrInk ToGeTHer Beercan!

Sometimes, after listening to something with as saturated emotional colors as Buster Blue, you want to listen to something upbeat, so I’ll end by talking about

fall eVentS continued from page 15 For more information, visit www.synthesizeher.bandcamp.com www.busterblue.com www.beercanreno.com www.thefleshhammers.com

By BraD Bynum a couple of fun recent local punk rock records. The first is Beercan!’s We Drink Together, a record whose opening lyric is a happy exclamation of “She likes beer!” It’s fraternal punk rock, derived from the Bad Religion and NOFX lineage, with quick rhythms, pinned-to-11 guitars, and fists-in-the-air gang vocals. These guys have been doing it so long they’ve really honed their craft. The sound is good, the songs are catchy, and the album is well suited for its intended purpose: drunken sing-alongs with your bestest buds.

BullSeye The Flesh Hammers

Reno band The Flesh Hammers draws on even older rock ’n’ roll traditions: leather-and-spikes punk, Cramps-style rockabilly, and ’60s style garage rock. On the band’s new, third album, Bullseye, the B-movie inspired song titles give a strong indication of what they’re about: “Monster Maker,” “The Devil Wears Wingtips” and “Woman in Prison.” There’s some classic CBGB’s era sounds. Derek Olijar’s guitar leads often sound like they come straight from the Stooges’ Raw Power or an early Dead Boys record. Rhythm guitarist Pamela Lee Campbell and bassis Blackie Crabtree both sing, telling tales of shooting guns and partying at Motel Six. The album artwork fills in some of the gaps of the story: the band members, dressed in black, holding guns, fresh from target practice in what is unmistakably the Nevada desert. This is music that comes from the place where we all live.

HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY: In Spite Of. Shared between the Holland Project Gallery and the Tahoe Gallery at Sierra Nevada College, the exhibition explores unconscious faith and everyday beliefs exhibition explores unconscious faith and everyday beliefs. The two-part exhibit includes works by Laura J. Bennett, Charly Bloomquist, Kaitlin Bryson, Joshua Chapman, Dane Haman, Chris Lanier, Michelle Lassaline, Edw Martinez, Kelsey Page, Omar Alan Pierce, Evie Woltil Richner, Becca Jane Rubinfeld, Tamara Valdez and Leigh Wells. Holland Project’s portion of the exhibit runs Sept. 9-27. Gallery hours are Tuesday-Friday, 3-6pm. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 9/27. Free; What Matters Most. Featured in the hallway gallery will be a series of altered object art installations by 15 Rainshadow Charter High School students. Each student’s installation will represent their life, interests and what it means to them to be a teenager. The exhibit explores the differences in young people’s lives and how objects can share so much. Tu-F, 3-6pm through 9/27. Free. 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858, www.hollandreno.org. NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART: Ashley Blalock: Keeping Up Appearances, W-Su through 3/9. Erika Osborne: The Back of the Map, W-Su through 11/17. Ulrike Arnold: Painting with Ground & Sky, W-Su through 11/17. Las Vegas Periphery, Views from the Edge: Photographs by Laurie Brown, W-Su through 11/3. Cecelia Condit: Within a Stone’s Throw, W-Su through 10/20. Hunt Rettig: Cracked and Absorbed, W-Su through 9/22. Frida Kahlo: Her Photos, W-Su through 2/16. Modernist Maverick: The Architecture of William L. Pereira, W-Su through 10/13. William Eggleston: Los Alamos, W-Su through 9/19. $1-$10. 160 W. Liberty St., (775) 329-3333, www.nevadaart.org. NORTH TAHOE ARTS CENTER: Paintings by Howard Friedman will be on display in the Main Gallery at North Tahoe Arts through September. Artwork by local plein air artists will be on


Recycle this paper display at the North Tahoe Arts Corison Loft Gallery. M, W-Su through 10/7. Free. 380 North Lake Blvd. Art Gallery & Gift Shop, Tahoe City, (530) 581-2787, www.northtahoearts.com. VFW BATTLE BORN POST 9211: Portraits of Veterans, a solo exhibit by high school student Jacob Lokshin. W-Sa, 2-7pm through 10/18. Free. 255 Burris Lane, (775) 825-7007.

Film LIFE KILLS ME: Life and death embrace in this comedy about a friendship. Tu, 9/24, 7pm. $7 non-members; $5 for members, bicyclists and students. Good Luck Macbeth Theater Company, 713 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-3716, www.artemisiamovies.org.

music THE IDAN RAICHEL PROJECT: The collective is known for its ambitious cross-cultural collaborations that changed Israeli popular music. Su, 10/13, 7:30pm. $25, $35. Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2285, www.renoisartown.com. RENO CHAMBER ORCHESTRA: This program begins with an arrangement of a work that had begun life in Johannes Brahms’s mind as a Fifth Symphony, the String Quintet Op. 111. Then young Grammy award-nominated virtuoso Caroline Goulding performs Bruch’s tuneful Scottish Fantasy. Theodore Kuchar conducts the concert, which concludes with Symphony No. 9 by Shostakovich. Sa, 10/19, 7:30pm; Su, 10/20, 2pm. $5-$45. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Building, University of Nevada, Reno, 1335 N. Virginia St., (775) 348-9413, www.renochamberorchestra.org YUVAL RON ENSEMBLE: Part of the University of Nevada, Reno’s Performing Arts Series. Th, 10/10, 7:30pm. $5-$24. Nightingale Concert Hall, Church Fine Arts Building, University of Nevada, Reno, 1335 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278, www.unr.edu/pas.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

Onstage THE ADDAMS FAMILY: Broadway Comes to Reno opens with this musical comedy. F, 11/29, 8pm; Sa, 11/30, 2 & 8pm; Su, 12/1, 2 & 7pm. $44-$79. Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St, (775) 686-6600, www.pioneercenter.com. ALL MY SONS: Reno Little Theater presents Arthur Miller’s drama. F, 10/25, 7:30pm; Sa, 10/26; Su, 10/27, 2pm; Th, 10/31, 7:30pm; F, 11/1, 7:30pm; Sa, 11/2, 7:30pm; Su, 11/3, 2pm; Th, 11/7, 7:30pm; F, 11/8, 7:30pm; Sa, 11/9, 7:30pm; Su, 11/10, 2pm. Reno Little Thater, 147 E. Pueblo St., (775) 329-0661, www.renolittletheater.org. THE COMEDY OF ERRORS: Nevada Repertory opens its season with this comedy by William Shakespeare. W-Sa, 7:30pm through 11/2. Opens 10/25; Su, 10/27, 1:30pm; Su, 11/3, 1:30pm. $5-$14. Redfield Studio Theatre, Church Fine Arts Building, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., (775) 784-4278. CREATURES: Brüka Theatre opens its season. Th-Sa, 8pm through 10/26. Opens 10/4; W, 10/23, 8pm; Su, 10/27, 2pm. $18-$25. Brüka Theatre, 99 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-3221, www.bruka.org. HOOTCHY KOOTCHY: BEST OF SHOW: The Hootchy Kootchy Girls Vintage Cabaret presents audience favorites. Sa, 9/21, 6 & 9:30pm. $20. Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St. Pioneer Center plaza on Virginia and Mill streets, (775) 762-9870, www.renotahoecomedy.com.

IN STOCK NOW AT MINI OF RENO

NEVADA OPERA: CARMEN: The Nevada Opera’s new production of Bizet’s Carmen celebrates Street Vibrations. F, 9/20, 7pm; Su, 9/22, 1pm. $30-$80. Eldorado Hotel Casino, 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-4046, http://nevadaopera.org.

MINI OF RENO 11505 SO VIRGINIA ST RENO, NV 89511 775-851-6464

MINIOFRENO.COM

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

17


RETHINK

INK

YOUR

Burn the Road to

Shorty’s Tavern $2 Rolling Rock $2.25 16oz Paps $1.25 Busch

TATTOO REMOVAL STARTING AT $50.

Sunday – Thursday: Buy 1 get 1 half off

267 VASSER STREET, RENO 775.322.0232 WWWW.INKPLANB.COM

Welcome All Bikers 2061 East 4th • Reno • 775.384.3015 12 to close 7 days a week

Reno HydRo in-stoRe lowpRiCe guaRantee! Huge seleCtion HelpFul & FRiendly staFF

our quality will impress you

$500 oFF Jobs of 1,000 sq ft or more.

We have unbelievable light package specials & sales all day, everyday!

Must present coupon. Offer expires 08/31/2013.

• Locally owned, all work done by our licensed crew • Specializing in eco-friendly, sustainable flooring • Solid & Engineered Hardwood, Laminate & Tile

quality Floors 4 less

775.284.8700 www.RenoHydro.com

Reno Costco Plaza 823-5315 • QF4L.com

artemisia moviehouse p r e s e n t s

Life Kills Me WE AIM FOR FUN Corporate events • Leagues Lessons • Birthday parties Event calendar at www.wastingarrows.com 8975 Double Diamond, Ste A8, Reno NV (775) 360.6556

cLean & affordaBLe fUrnitUre

• Our 35th year in business • CDs, vinyl, DVDs, Tapes, VHS • In or out of print, we’ll order for cost + a few bucks • Buy, sell, trade (Selling? Call 1st!) • Knitting Factory and Alley ticket outlet

qUaLitY USed fUrnitUre Since 1982

hUge SeLection! pick-Up & deLiverY! 780 S. virginia, reno 775.786.1002

BUY-SELL TRADE

AYS

NEW MIDTOWN STORE NOW OPEN ‘TIL 7PM WEEKD 822 S. Virginia (North of Junkee, South of Süp) 826-4119 • recrecreno.com

ABLE BAIL BONDS

We’re Able To Help!

open 7 days, 9:30am-6pm www.recycledfurniture.net

We're Able to Help

24 HOURS

1/2 PRICE S

FAST RELEASE CREDIT CARD RELEASE BY PHONE NATION WIDE PROMPT CONFIDENTIAL SERVICE COLLATERAL NOT ALWAYS NEEDED WE DO HOUSE CALLS HABLAMOS ESPANOL PAYMENTS ON APPROVED CREDIT NOTARY

MONDAYS, FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS 6PM–CLOSE

BRIAN JOHNSON · LICENSE #171783

329–9993

5635 Riggins Ct., #21 East on Neil Rd. exit from 395. 1/2 mi. R on Meadow Wood Ln, 1st R on Riggins Ct.

we BUY & SeLL

COME SEE US IN MIDTOWN!

www.ablebailbonds.net | ablebailbonds@sbcglobal.net 4430 Bennie Lane · Reno (By the jail, across from NAPA Auto Parts) 10

G i v e

h e r

e x a c t l y

10

she wants 11

12

11 12

’12

10

w h a t 12

GLM Theater Tuesday, September 24, 7pm 713 S. Virginia St NV Museum of Art Sunday, September 29, 2pm 160 W. Liberty St www.ArtemisiaMovies.org

WE DELIVER • WE CATER • WE AMAZE (775) 322.8540 • THEPUBNSUB.COM

12

lose weight or get fit for free! 12

11

11

Call below and learn how you can get fit for free in the 12 12 next 90 days, and earn awesome rewards along the way thanks to NORTH AMERICA’S #1 WEIGHT-LOSS 11 AND FITNESS CHALLENGE!

12

12

30% OFF an 11

y piece of diamond jewelr12y with this coupon. Some restrictions app ly.

11

11

11

12

12

11

ViSalus 12

Contact Info 775-343-9149 LifeChangeVi.bodybyvi.com

12

13

10

10

13

13

13

10

13

13

13

10

13

jewelry & loan

All skill levels welcome • Fun for the whole family!

11

’13 12

10 300 n virginia St, reno, nv 89501 | (775) 322–2863

13

12

12 13

13

13

12 13

13

12

Y O U R

F A S T E S T

F L I G H T

Freedom Free dom

to

When you get arrested, you need a fast, dependable, & courteous bail bondsman who will respect your confidentiality. Locally owned & operated since 1952. For reliable, 24/7, on-site personal service, call

Mac’s Bail Bonds 775.329.7888 Located directly across from the jail at 910 E. Parr Blvd, Reno Bail Bonds | Security Bonds | Insurance Se habla Español | License #8784 | MacsBailBondsReno.com

18 

| 

RN&R   | 

September 19, 2013

TREASURES, TRINKETS & TRASH 13

13

13

13

13

ROCK BLVD’S WICKED WAREHOUSE OF SAVINGS

10 %

UNdt SCHO iS A DIw iT TH ore 5 on $2

or m

• Furniture • Tools • Knives • Antiques

• Appliances • Store overstock • Household Goods • Yard Hardware

Open Tuesday to Saturday 10 – 6 • Sunday 11 – 4 380 S. Rock • Sparks, NV (corner of Rock & Hymer) 30,000 Sq Ft. of everything under the sun!


Photo\ALLISoN YoUNG

Beach slap

Jeanne Weiser as Aunt Dot and Marvin Gonzalez as Dan Crisp.

Building on Sand I’ve been writing about local theater for the RN&R for years. So it’s a bit embarrassing to admit by that, although I knew that the Goodluck Jessica Santina Macbeth Theatre Company got new digs in Midtown over a year ago, I only just made my first visit to the new space last weekend, for opening night of Building on Sand. GLM tends to be innovative and ambitious, and tries things few others have. To illustrate, this season features movie sing-along events (complete with props), quirky life-drawing events, and this latest Building on Sand: A production, a British farce by Claire Booker British Farce by the Sea is at Goodluck which is making its U.S. debut on the GLM Macbeth, 713 S. stage. And if you haven’t been to GLM’s Virginia St., Reno, new space either, I think it’s time you went. through oct. 19. For In the manner of Molière—or, dare I tickets or more inforsay it, a Benny Hill sketch—this seaside mation, visit www. goodluckmacbeth.org, farce involves lots of contrived situations, calling 322-3716. misunderstandings, naughty behavior and characters that are adorably weird.

4

1 2 3 4 5 FoUL

GooD

FAIR

WELL-DoNE

SUBLIMEDoN’t MISS

The play opens as five people arrive for a holiday by the sea in Sussex, England. They are Richard and Julliette Jenkins (Ian Sorensen and Amanda McHenry); Richard’s best friend, Dan Crisp (Marvin Gonzalez), a playboy who can’t seem to get enough tail; Dan’s latest conquest, a ditzy French girl named Berenice Dupont (Jessica Johnson); and Julliette’s Aunt Dot (Jeanne Weiser), a batty old woman who’s terrified of water and arrives at Sussex in a scuba mask, a snorkel and pink wellies. Social worker Julliette’s plan is to convince her aunt to give up her delusion that the ocean will flood England and get over her fear of the water, while everyone else gets to enjoy a little romp at the beach. Dot convinces herself that building the sand castle she dreamed of, with its four turrets and a portcullis, will prevent England from flooding, so the group builds one for her right away in the hope that she’ll chill out. With Dot squared away, Richard, an ineffectual lump of a man who carries hand sanitizer around in his ever-present fanny pack, can focus on other matters, such as

his insecurity about having a wife who’s too good for him (not to mention having a best friend as charismatic as Dan). He’s not convinced of her devotion, so he enlists Dan to administer a test of her loyalty: Turn that charm up to 11 and see if Julliette’s capable of adultery. And while Dan struts around in his mustache and running shorts trying to get Julliette to drop trow, Berenice tends to the increasingly emboldened Dot while masterminding her own happy ending. The play is seriously funny—I know this despite having missed several lines due to audience laughter. And I loved that even though the characters could have become

full auto machine gun

Recycle

IF YOU ARE THE PARENT OF A CHILD SUFFERING FROM ADDICTION,

try a

this paper

YOU ARE SUFFERING TOO.

caricatures, they weren’t, thanks to talented actors. For instance, Gonzalez (GLM’s playwright in residence this season) avoided making Dan Crisp a smarmy jerk, and instead made him oddly appealing—you kind of want boring old Julliette to fool around with him (a stark contrast from the wishy washy role Gonzalez played in this summer’s production of Art at Brüka). Weiser’s Aunt Dot is spacy and wonderfully weird. You just want to take whatever she’s on. And as Richard, Sorensen’s subtle facial expressions and awkward movements are so authentically dorky, it’s clear that physical comedy is his strong suit. There was slight awkwardness created by everyone’s fake accents, as well as what looked like first night jitters, just actors settling into their roles. Nonetheless, everyone watching laughed a lot, including myself, so I’m looking forward to seeing more at Goodluck Macbeth. I won’t take this much time away again. Ω

• Full-autos, semi-autos • Handguns and more

JTNN can help. We offer a weekly PARENT GROUP, Thursday’s at 6:30p.

• large quantities oF ammunition available • casH For used guns

505 S. Arlington Ave. Confidential, FREE, and run by a licensed counselor.

• bacHelor and bacHelorette parties • beginners and proFessionals welcome • bring your own gun or rent one oF ours

9425 Double R Blvd • Reno, Nevada 89521 775.284.8984 • Open 7 days a week www.SafeShotIndoorRange.com

775-324-7557

1/2 off CONCEALED CARRY CLASS W/ THIS AD!

Hot Club of San Francisco presents Cinema Vivant Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013 | 7:30 p.m. | Nightingale Concert Hall Imagine yourself in the idyllic French countryside of the 1930s, where a gypsy caravan sets up camp in a field outside of town, inviting locals out for an evening’s fun. The wanderers travel with a film projector, pointing it at the side of a barn. As the silent images flicker to life beneath the stars, gypsy musicians play their guitars and fiddles, matching every movement on the screen with passion, humor and virtuosity. Reviving this lost art of entertainment is Cinema Vivant, an evening of delightful classic silent films by pioneering filmmakers Ladislaw Starewicz and Charley Bowers, accompanied by the hottest live gypsy swing band on the planet, Hot Club of San Francisco. Viva la jazz manouche!

2013 14

Tickets: Adult $24/ Senior $20/ Student and youth $12

(775) 784-4ART | Buy tickets online at www.unr.edu/pas OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

19


Surf and turf Reef Sushi & Sake 50 N. Sierra St., Suite 106, 800-1388 I’ve lived in Reno a long time. Long enough to remember the days when the river was sort of a forgotten feature of by K.J. Sullivan downtown. I’m so glad that over the recent years, the river area has become a focal point to draw people downtown. Reef Sushi & Sake is using that draw to their advantage and opened space along the Truckee River about five months ago. Photo/AlliSoN YouNg

13

A busy, bustling recent night at Reef’s sushi bar.

For more information, visit reefsushi.com.

20   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Walking in for lunch with my friends Annette and Alys, I was impressed by the upscale décor, which has a rock waterfall feature, a long sushi bar, dark wooden tables and turquoise accent walls. We were escorted to a back table by the window, which gave us a nice view of the river. Reef has a great patio area outside as well. We settled in with our cucumber water—fancy!—and looked over the menu which offered unique items. I’ve eaten at a lot of sushi places around Reno, and this has to be one of the more creative menus I’ve seen. In order to try a variety of items, we opted to go for the allyou-can-eat dinner option ($25.95) as the lunch option ($18.95) offers restricted number of rolls. I felt the dinner price was a bit steep, but then I noticed they used real crab and all was forgiven. We decided to start with some appetizers. The choices were crazy, ranging from mussels to crab cakes. We went with endame and stuffed mushrooms. What? Stuffed mushrooms at a sushi place? Heck yes!

When the mushrooms arrived, they were breaded and stuffed with cream cheese and crab pieces. I could have just had these and some nigiri and been happy since the nigiri menu had some surprises like pepper and barbecue-seared tuna. We had to try the Surf and Turf which comes with lobster and tri-tip. Steak in my sushi? Reef was blowing my mind. The roll was definitely unique, but the tri-tip seemed to overpower the roll so I think smaller slices of the tri tip would have helped. We also tried a Diamondhead, which came with hamachi, scallops, asparagus and mango. The asparagus was sliced too thickly, but I loved the crunch and flavor of the asparagus paired with the sweetness of the mango. One of my favorites of the night was the spicy bomb which was tofu skin filled with spicy tuna, topped with chopped scallions. The sweetness of the tofu skin went nicely with the spiciness of the tuna. Reef also offers some rolls that are torched. I like to see things lit on fire, so we ordered the Pahoehoe, which was stuffed with scallops, crab and crystal shrimp and topped with salmon, then covered in unagi and Reef sauce and set ablaze. Unfortunately, the sauces overwhelmed all of the flavors of this roll and was far too rich. Overall, I think conceptually the rolls are great, they just seem to need a bit of fine tuning. Reef also suffers from some service issues. Our waiter, while extremely friendly, was MIA throughout the meal. Lunch took nearly two hours, and it wasn’t because we were eating a ton. At one point, Alys brought our second and final order to the bar herself, where she still stood ignored. Complimentary sake drinks were offered to make up for the lack of attention and let’s be honest, free alcohol helps everything, but they need to tighten up service. Reef Sushi & Sake is still fairly new, so hopefully they will sort out some of these issues because they have interesting food, a beautiful restaurant and a great location. Ω


Think Free

Now Open! for dinner 4pm–9pm friday & saturdays

THE BEST GIFTS IN LIFE ARE EDIBLE! SAVE

5

$

COUPON CODE: RNAR0713

At the old Deluxe Laundry building at the Wells Avenue roundabout. Affordable and healthy breakfast and lunch in a unique setting. Our menu features humanely raised bacon and sausage and many locally sourced and organic ingredients. OPEN 8am - 4pm, Tuesday - Sunday Dinner 4pm-9pm, Friday & Saturday

LIMITED

time only

Valid on any arrangement or dipped fruit box

NEW!

WATERMELON KIWI SUMMER BOUQUET™ with chocolate dipped strawberries and bananas

RENO | 5055 S. McCarran Blvd. | 775-825-3103 Now Open! SPARKS | 2868 Vista Blvd. | 775-351-1513

EdibleArrangements.com

20th

Celebrate with us

Offer valid at locations shown. Offer expires 11/30/13. Offer code must be used when placing order. Containers may vary. Delivery not available in all areas. Cannot be combined with any other offer, promotion, coupon or coupon code. Excludes tax and delivery. Not valid on previously purchased items. Acceptance and use of coupon is subject to all applicable laws. Void where prohibited. See store for details. EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS® & Design and all other marks noted are trademarks of Edible Arrangements, LLC. ©2013 Edible Arrangements, LLC. All rights reserved.

Sept 9th-22nd In Store Specials Car Washes Gas, Food & More!

Thank you for making our 10th anniversary a success

775.737.9735

facebook.com/cafedeluxereno cafedeluxereno.com

13

13

13

1690 S Wells Avenue #12 Reno, NV

13

13

13

Lots of Vegan and Gluten-Free options!

ry

a s r e v i Ann

3650 Lakeside Dr.

1507 So. Virginia Street, Midtown, Reno • 775.825.5225

ph: 826.4466 • fx: 826.6161 • Deli Open 5am-9pm • 7 days a week www.delitowneusa.com

13

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   September 19, 2013  |  

RN&R  

13

| 

21


- Funtime theater Presents -

Voices from the Past

Dysfunctional The Family

The Virginia City Cemetery comes alive with the 19th century Comstock residents. They share their stories, lives, and deaths. The performance will last 90 minutes as you walk through the cemetery with the widow of Silver Terrace as your guide.

Performances start Saturday, Sept 28th and runs each weekend until Sunday, Oct 13th.

Luc Bessonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Family tries to be too many movies at once, and none of them are any good. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an overcooked Mafia meatball comedy laced with jarringly inappropriate violence and jokes that only its writers would enjoy. It wants to be a comedy, but it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t funny. It wants to be a sometimes scary and realistic take on Mafia life, but it severely lacks tension. by It also wants to be a family drama, but because Bob Grimm none of its characters can be taken seriously, it lacks credibility. It also boasts an over-stylized, b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m fairytale quality that just makes the whole undertaking a weird, unbalanced experience. Robert De Niro plays Giovanni, a Mafia hitman who ratted out his co-workers and has been relocated with his family to Normandy, France, where he receives the new name Fred Blake. His wife, Maggie (Michelle Pfeiffer),

1

Two shows daily on Saturday & Sunday 10am & 1pm

AdmiSSiOn $20 For reservations call 775-240-5762 Bring this ad for a $2 discount on tickets

ZZZVSRUWVZHVWUHQRFRP

OPPEN OOPEN

HOURS HHO OOUURRSS GD\V D DZHH ZHHHHN ZHH HN HN N Â&#x2021;5HIRUPHU3LODWHV Â&#x2021;6WXGLR&\FOLQJ Â&#x2021;*URXS)LWQHVV&ODVVHV Â&#x2021;([WHQVLYH&DUGLR&HQWHU Â&#x2021;<RJD Â&#x2021;3HUVRQDO7UDLQLQJ Â&#x2021;$TXDWLFV3URJUDP featuring ,QGRRU6DOLQH/DS3RRO

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let me teach you a thing or two about camping!â&#x20AC;?

1

Â&#x2021;5DFTXHWEDOO +DQGEDOO Â&#x2021;.LGV&OXE Â&#x2021;

Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

e! e r Bring this ad to membership F

Very Good

2SHQ+RXUVÂ&#x2021;69LUJLQLD6W5HQR19Â&#x2021;

exceLLent

Free Fre F Fr ree re ee Guest Gue Gue Gu es stt Pass! Pas Pa as

Offer good with this ad. You must be a Ă&#x20AC;UVWWLPHJXHVW0XVWEH\HDUVROG /RFDOUHVLGHQWVRQO\

Guest Pass

ZZZVSRUWVZHVWUHQRFRP

22 â&#x20AC;&#x201A; |â&#x20AC;&#x201A; RN&R â&#x20AC;&#x201A; |â&#x20AC;&#x201A;

SEPTEMBERâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;19,â&#x20AC;&#x201A;2013

4 5

daughter Belle (Dianna Agron of Glee) and son Warren (John Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leo) all seem rather forgiving of Fredâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past evil ways, and take to their new town with varying degrees of acceptance and criminal behavior. Obviously, De Niro has mined this sort of material before with his mafia comedy Analyze This, and its sorry sequel, Analyze â&#x20AC;Ś Oh Stop It, Already! While he went with parody in the Analyze movies, he plays it straight and mellow in this one, except when Frank regresses into violent behavior when the plumber tries to screw him over. Then he goes into Travis Bickle mode, with the sort of violence that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel at home in a stylish comedy. One of the bigger films of Pfeifferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early career was Married to the Mob, and her Maggie character is essentially just a replay of her mafia girl in that one. A thick N.Y. accent and a lot of eye-rolling reminds of her past glory, but does little to make the new movie anything original or intriguing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shame, because Pfeiffer is an interesting actress who isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pulling down many good roles these days.

Agronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of the movie is perhaps the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most annoying and discordant. Her character is a high school virgin looking to lose it to a young man studying to be a teacher. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also capable of breaking your ass with a tennis racket if you try to take advantage of her in a public park. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a hopeless romantic who thinks suicide is the answer when her man rejects her. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a crack shot with a handgun when mobsters show up from the U.S. to end her. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a whole lot of things, and none of them make a lick of sense. As for Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leo, his story involves dealing with the bullies at school. He hatches some sort of plan involving sports trading cards that never truly gets spelled out, and finds himself in trouble for stuff thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never made clear. Like Agronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character, his story arc feels incomplete, misguided, unfulfilling and the antithesis of the intended funny. Besson made Leon: The Professional and The Fifth Element back in the day when he was good. He also made The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc and this movie when he was bad. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come to the conclusion that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a better visual artist than complete storyteller. When he puts words to his visuals, they just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t match. It worked well with The Fifth Element, which was a beautifully odd film, but his formula just doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work when applied to a giggly Mafioso story. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dopey subplot involving Giovanniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s yearning to be an author. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writing some hackneyed novel/memoir that raises the ire of the agent assigned to watch him in Normandy (Tommy Lee Jones, whose performance appears totally confused, as if heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in a movie that is supposed to be serious). At one point, the people in their small town invite Giovanni to some sort of film society screening to give commentary on a movie. That movie winds up being Goodfellas, which shouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve provided a chance for De Niro to perform some good self-parody. Besson blows this opportunity, and the moment winds up feeling desperate and muted. There are some other little nods to American mobster movies and TV shows that just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work. Vincent Pastore shows up as a character named Fat Willy. Pastore, of course, played Big Pussy on The Sopranos. So instead of being a large vagina he is now a big dick. Funny. The Family has an identity crisis. The performances arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t half bad. In fact, you could argue that De Niro and Pfeiffer are actually quite good in the thing. Unfortunately, they are slaves to a script that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what it is trying to say, and a director more interested in a film that looks pretty rather than one that is coherent. Ί


5

Blue Jasmine

There was a time in film history when Woody Allen was consistently making the best movies in the business. His latest, one of many movies he has made in the last 10 years, is that return to form that some of us former Allen fans have been waiting for, thanks in large part to a phenomenal central performance by the sure-to-be-Oscarnominated Cate Blanchett. Blanchett plays Jasmine, the wife of a Bernie Madoff-type financier (Alec Baldwin) who must relocate from New York to San Francisco after she is bankrupted and emotionally destroyed. She gulps martinis, criticizes her helpful sister (Sally Hawkins), and, quite frighteningly, is prone to bouts of talking to herself. Allen finds the dark humor in the story, and employs a supporting cast that includes comedians Bobby Cannavale, Louis C.K. and, most astonishingly, Andrew Dice Clay, who, doggone it, delivers one amazing performance as Ginger’s financially destroyed ex-husband, Augie. Above and beyond the humor, Allen makes his film a parable about how some deeds are irredeemable, and some folks are simply doomed. It’s as bittersweet as any movie you will see this, or any, year, for that matter. As far as the Allen film canon goes, it’s a top five installment. It’s one of those films where everything pulls together perfectly, with Blanchett at its powerful center.

4

Drinking Buddies

Olivia Wilde plays Kate, a microbrewery employee in a relationship with an OK but perhaps mismatched guy (Ron Livingston). Luke (Jake Johnson) is her coworker, the perfect guy for her, but he’s in a relationship with a nice girl (Anna Kendrick) that also doesn’t seem to be a perfect match. Writer-director Joe Swanberg takes this well-worn premise and does something altogether wonderful, funny and original with it. Wilde is a revelation in the main role. She’s had a lot of showy Hollywood roles and this is by far her most naturalistic and best movie effort to date. She’s sweet, funny, and just a little messed up. Johnson, so good in Safety Not Guaranteed, is equally good here, making Luke a more complex character than he first appears. Kendrick and Livingston are good in the less showy but equally important supporting roles. This is one of the summer’s more pleasant surprises. Swanberg has a funny cameo, and you might recognize him if you are one of the 12 people who went to see You’re Next. (Available for rent on iTunes and Amazon.com).

3

Lee Daniels’ The Butler

Director Lee Daniels, prominently mentioned in the film’s title after a much publicized lawsuit, delivers a fine emotional wallop with this historical epic very loosely based on the life of Eugene Allen, a butler at the White House for 34 years. Those going to this film for its true historical significance take note: the film contains much fiction. Allen is renamed Cecil (played by Forest Whitaker), and is given a fictional son in order to depict a family conflict regarding the Civil Rights movement. So, this film, which shows the butler interacting with presidents from Eisenhower (Robin Williams) thru Ronald Reagan (Alan Rickman), is mostly made up. That doesn’t hurt the film’s dramatic significance. It’s an ultimately moving experience. What does damage the film a bit is horrible makeup, especially a goofy fake nose for John Cusack as Richard Nixon. The makeup is sometimes so bad that the film turns into unintentional comedy when some characters are on screen. Whitaker holds the whole thing together, and Oprah Winfrey, in her first starring role since her excellent turn in Beloved, does strong work as Cecil’s wife. Other stars playing presidents include a relatively makeup-free James Marsden as John F. Kennedy, and an absolutely covered Liev Schreiber as Lyndon B. Johnson.

3

Riddick

Vin Diesel finally makes it back as the shiny-eyed ex-con who growls a lot in this OK retread of Pitch Black, the original film in the Riddick series. This one, mercifully, gets away from the drearily baroque dealings of The Chronicles of Riddick and gets Diesel back on a desolate planet battling weird monsters. The first half of the movie

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

has Diesel fighting scorpion-like beasties with the help of a CGI dog, and it’s actually pretty good. Things slow down in the middle when a bunch of bounty hunters show up and talk a lot, but they speed up again when the bounty hunters must also battle the monsters. Diesel, who I usually can’t stand, is actually in decent form for this one, obviously relishing the chance to revisit the character that made him a big star. Director David Twohy does a lot with a relatively meager budget, putting together a movie that looks good. While the movie isn’t anything to get all that excited about, it does manage to recapture a little of the spirit that made the first film fun.

5

The Spectacular Now

3

We’re the Millers

4

The World’s End

Miles Teller delivers his breakout performance as Sutter, a partying high school senior who everybody loves but nobody takes seriously, until well-balanced Aimee (Shailene Woodley) comes along. They start a complicated relationship that is ill advised at both ends, but sometimes that’s the best way to start a relationship. Teller is a marvel here, turning Sutter into something far from your average high school screw-up. Woodley, so good in The Descendants, is proving to be one of cinema’s great young actresses. This film is a unique and intelligent take on growing up. This is directed by James Ponsoldt, who piloted last year’s terrific Smashed, starring Mary Elizabeth Winstead, who appears here as Sutter’s sister. Ponsoldt is officially a force to be reckoned with, having made two of the best films of the last two years. Others in the cast include Jennifer Jason Leigh as Sutter’s mom, and Kyle Chandler as his idiot dad. And while he only has a couple of scenes, Bob Odenkirk is terrific as Sutter’s tolerant employer. To read a plot synopsis of this film is to make it seem ordinary. It’s far from ordinary. It’s spectacular.

Jason Sudeikis plays a small-time drug dealer who gets in over his head and is forced by his boss (Ed Helms) to smuggle drugs from Mexico. Realizing that border agents seem to go easy on families, he hires a fake family to make the trip in an RV. The family includes a wife (a stripper played by Jennifer Aniston), a daughter (a homeless girl played by Emma Roberts) and a son (a hapless neighbor played by Will Poulter). The film has a Vacation movie vibe, especially because Sudeikis is charming in a way that Chevy Chase was for a brief time in his career. Aniston plays a mighty good stripper for sure. She has another calling in case the whole acting thing doesn’t work out. Roberts gets perhaps her best role yet as Casey, delivering some great eye-rolling moments. As for Poulter, he steals scenes nearly every time he speaks, and his encounter with a tarantula is priceless. Sure, the movie gets a little gooey and sentimental by the time it plays out, but we’ve come to like the characters by then so it’s OK. It’s not a grand cinematic effort by any means, but it does provide some good laughs, with a fair share of them being quite shocking.

Simon Pegg and Nick Frost star as part of an old gang of friends getting back together to finish a pub crawl they failed to complete 20 years earlier in their hometown. Pegg plays King, the group leader and now slightly disturbed man-child, while Frost plays Andy, the group pessimist who’s still recovering from a partying incident years before. They start drinking pints, only to discover that blue-blooded robots have overrun their old town, so in addition to completing the crawl they must save the world. This is the third film from Pegg and director Edgar Wright after Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, and it is a worthy conclusion to their “Cornetto” trilogy (named for a brand of ice cream that appears in all three films). It delivers a lot of laughs, great action, and even serves a significant emotional punch. One of the summer movie season’s great surprises.

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

23


Recycle this paper

Farmers’ Market 2013 Schedule TUESDAYS AT THE SUMMIT RENO S. Virginia St./Mt. Rose Hwy 9am-2pm // June 4 - Sept 24

FRIDAYS AT TAMARACK JUNCTION CASINO RENO S. Virginia St. 8am-1pm // June 7 – Sept 27

SATURDAYS AT VILLAGE CENTER RENO Calif.Ave/Booth St. 8am-1pm // June 1 - Sept 28

SATURDAYS AT THE SUMMIT RENO

S. Virginia St./Mt.Rose Hwy 9am-2pm // June 1 - Sept 28

pINK pUMpKIN HARVEST FARMERS’ MARKET at The Summit, Reno Saturday October 5, 10am – 5pm

ELDORADO ITALIAN FESTIVAL Farmer’s Market October 12 & 13, 10am – 6pm

Contact Shirley at 775.746.5024

www.ShirleysFarmersMarkets.com or like us on Facebook at Facebook.com/shirleysfarmersmarketsnv

September 19, 2013

n

RN&R   | 

o io N strat gi Fee

| 

Re

n

o io N strat gi Fee

Re

24 


Urbane myth Wolpertinger A Wolpertinger is a Bavarian mythological creature. It’s something like the central European equivalent of the by Brad Bynum jackalope. One common depiction is a rabbit with fangs, antlers, bat wings bradb@ and duck feet. According to some news review.c om legends, the creature has a kryptonitelike weakness for beer. “It’s eclectic, a creature made from the parts of many different animals,” says Wolfgang Price, the bandleader, Photo/Brad Bynum

Wolpertinger: Wolfgang Price, Gary Kephart, Richard Washburn and Tom Plunkett are mythological creatures.

songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and lead vocalist of Wolpertinger, the Reno band. He named the band after the creature because the band is also eclectic. Price provides a succinct one-line description: “I think of it as if Mike Patton had somehow infiltrated into the National.” And indeed, Wolpertinger, at first blush, evokes the stately, writerly indie band the National. This is partly because of the warm, tasteful production on the group’s recordings, but mostly because Price’s airy baritone is similar in register and tone to the National’s Matt Berninger. But this would be a version of the National that smoked more weed and drank more sugary, heavily caffeinated soda. There’s the spirit of Patton, the vocal acrobat and genre-hopping jester of Mr. Bungle and Faith No More. Wolpertinger began as a collaboration between Price and multiinstrumentalist, producer and engineer Gary Kephart. “He and I were composing music for plays in the community,” says Price. “And one day he asked me, why don’t we work on some of your songs? So I sat down and wrote some.” Price says he’s always written songs, but wanted the songs for

For more information, or to hear Wolpertinger’s albums, visit wolpertinger. bandcamp.com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

this project to have a cohesive, coherent feel. “When working on something, I want it to have a purpose,” he says. At that time, Price was exploring another aspect of the band’s eponymous creature: a weakness for booze. “I was in the middle of a bad depression and alcohol binge,” he says. Wolpertinger’s first album, Lady Midday, which was released online in 2011, is a somber affair, with drinking references in every song. The band was rounded out with guitarist and vocalist Tom Plunkett and drummer Richard Washburn. That album’s title also comes from mythology: Lady Midday is a character from Eastern European mythology who’s essentially the personification of heat stroke. The group hasn’t played many shows. Washburn broke his ankle just before an early gig, and Plunkett, who many readers might recognize from local theater productions, is now finally cancer-free after a couple of rough years. It’s essentially a studio band, though the members’ theatrical backgrounds are apparent in some of the big gestures of the music. The band’s second full-length album, How We Are Alike, was released online earlier this month. Compared with Lady Midday, it’s more upbeat and more eclectic. But all the band members say that they’re largely drawn to the project because of the strength of Price’s songwriting. “I like all the references in the lyrics,” says Plunkett. “He writes great lyrics.” “It’s polarized in two different directions,” says Price of his songwriting. “One is trying to express something really human, trying to say something really authentic. And the other is that I’m a big fan of T.S. Eliot’s earlier poems, where he writes a lot with references to push his subject. … The idea of taking cultural icons or snippets of literature that express something and using it in connection with an idea or thought.” He cites “Nations,” a song with references to both Mark Twain and Taxi Driver, as an example. “Wolpertinger deals with a lot of different issues that I have that I try to address,” says Price. “One is that I get bored really easily, so I try to make music that allows you to not feel like you’re falling into a repetition. That’s one of the reasons that the music has so many different styles.” Ω ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

25


THURSDAY 9/19 1UP 214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET

FRIDAY 9/20

Collective Thursdays, 8pm, no cover

424 E. Fourth St., (775) 322-9422

THE ALLEY 906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

Star Lite Wranglers, 8:30pm, $5

BAR-M-BAR

Select Saturday, 10pm, no cover

CEOL IRISH PUB 538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN 1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Comedy

COMMA COFFEE

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Mark Pitta, Gilbert Lawand, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Allan Havey, Jann Karan, W, 9pm, $25

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE 235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

The Basterd Saints, 8pm, no cover

Mojo Green, 8:30pm, $5

Sean McGuinness, 9pm, no cover

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

World Dance Open Floor Night, 8pm, no cover The Old Way, 6pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

FUEGO

Spence Brothers Band, 9:30pm, no cover

Spence Brothers Band, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

NOBUNNY, Pookie & the Poodlez, Cumstain, Library Lady, 7:30pm, $7

Gap Dream, Colleen Green, White Fang, The Memories, The Cosmonauts, 7pm, M, $7

Dining

Fall Fundraiser SEPT. 21 SaT 10am-6Pm

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

ST

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

Canyon Jam, 8pm, no cover

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

For Safe Haven Rescue Zoo

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

HANGAR BAR

Just Desserts & Wine

not dinner

ROCKABILLY ROC OCKAB OC KAB KA AB A BILL LLY Y FROM FROM OM M JAPAN!! JA APAN PAN!! !!

Thursday, Th Thu r ay, rsd y September Septe Septembe mberr 19 19

STARLITE STAR LITE WRAN WRANGLERS WRANGLERS W/ Merchants,, W Los Los Pistoleros, Feather Merchants Flat Black Pharohs

for 36 years

T BASTERD SAINTS THE

Friday, F Fri r da d , September 20 day

W/ Sc Scattered, ca attter ered d Os O Ostracized, tracized Blasphemous Cre Creation

MOJO GREEN + DRINKING WITH CLOWNS

Burgers Bangers & Mash Roast Prime Rib & Yorkshire Pudding Shepherd’s Pie Fish & Chips Chocolate Bacon

Saturday, September 21 A NIGHT OF FUNK DE FUNK

ABANDON ALL SHIPS

Wednesday, September 25 W/ We Predict A Riot, She Has A Fashion Vice, Postwar

MORON BROS.

Thursday, September 26

W/ Priscilla Ford, Part Of The Problem, Me Time, FFG (Sacto.)

- HAPPY HOUR 4-7pm & 10pm-close

STREET VIBES PARTIES!!!

Friday, September 27

W/ Livitz Livitz, Beercan!, And Sil Shoda

Paintings by Animals for sale

www.SafeHavenWildlife.com

Don’t miss the Russian Diamond Ring Raffle! $

1,500

00

Value

Join us at

Art Source

9748 South Virginia St

(Left of Winco Foods) Reno • 828-3525 26 | RN&R | SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Saturday, September 28

- MON & TUE LADIES 2 FOR 1 WINE

JOIN US ON FACEBOOK, OR AT WWW.THEALLEYSPARKS.COM FOR DAILY + WEEKLY DRINK SPECIALS, CONTESTS, SHOW ANNOUNCEMENTS, AND MORE!!!

- FRI - SAT -

W/ Downtime, Undenied, Pain Clinic, Deathplant

GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW: Abandon All Ships – September 25 Hemlock – October 4 Cro-Mags – October 6 DRAG QUEEN BOXING – October 12 A SKYLIT DRIVE – October 19

TheAlleySparks.com (775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

Colin Ross, 6:30pm, W, no cover

Open Mic Jam, 9:30pm, M, karaoke, 9:30pm, Tu, open mic, 9:30pm, W, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Abandon All Ships, 7pm, W, $12

Green Weather, 6pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Al Lubel, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Helen Hong, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

Audio Sky, 9:30pm, no cover

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR

Audio Sky, 9:30pm, no cover

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Tony D’Andrea, F, 7pm, $13, $16; Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 9:30pm, $13, $16

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/23-9/25 Open Deck Wednesday, 8pm, W, no cover DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

ABBY’S HIGHWAY 40

Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m. The Holland Project 140 Vesta St. 742-1858

SUNDAY 9/22

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

NOBUNNY

SATURDAY 9/21

$1.00

SHOT SPECIALS

1555 S. Wells Ave Reno, NV www.Rapscallion.com (775) 323-1211 • (877) 932–3700 Open Monday – Friday 13 at 11:30am Saturday at 5pm

BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER 9AM TO CLOSE 13 NEW MENU ITEMS 13 COMING

SOON!

SIGN UP FOR REWARD BLASTER GET $10 13

13

13

4050 S. MC CARRAN BLVD, RENO NV 13 775.737.4440 • WWW.SPITFIRERENO.COM

13


THURSDAY 9/19

FRIDAY 9/20

SATURDAY 9/21

SUNDAY 9/22

JAVA JUNGLE

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/23-9/25

Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

Erika Paul, 6pm, no cover

1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Colorless Blue, 1pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

Open mic, 9pm M, no cover

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

Bro Safari, Etc! Etc!, 11:30pm, $25-$60

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Tech N9ne

Tech N9ne, Krizz Kaliko, 7pm, Tu, $33-$65

OTEP, 7pm, $16-$30

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Sept. 24, 7 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Open Mic/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

THE POINT 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE

Bobby G, 8pm, no cover

Bobby G, 8pm, Gemini w/Johnny Lipka & Gemini w/Johnny Lipka & Andrea, Andrea, 9pm, no cover 9pm, no cover

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

RED DOG SALOON

Localz, 8pm, no cover

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

Open Mic Night, 7pm, W, no cover

RED ROCK BAR

Comedy Night hosted by Brandon Lara, 9:30pm, no cover

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

RISE NIGHTCLUB

Maximum Volume Thursdays w/DJs Max, Foam Party & Bikini Contest, 10pm, Fierce, 11pm, $5-$10; no cover ages 21+ $5-$10; no cover for locals

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

Rise Culture Saturday, 10pm, $5-$10

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

RYAN’S SALOON 924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Alias Smith, 9pm, no cover

Zen Leprechaun, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Night w/Tany Jane, 8pm, M, Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Speed Demons, Casket, 9pm, $5

Karaoke Night, 7pm, Tu, no cover Open Mic Wednesdays, 7pm, W, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON 4TH

BOB FM Homegrown Showcase w/Scarlet Fangs on Fur, Riptide Bandits, TV1, Presence, The Kanes, Crush, 7:30pm, $5 Lex Royale, Swayze Crazy, 9pm, $5

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Abandon All Ships

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Sept. 25, 7 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

The Bonfire Set, Charlie Fish Taylor, 7pm, no cover

3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

HARD CIDER,

REG. PRICE

EASY PRICES

REG. PRICE

$9.49

REG. PRICE

$8.99

$9.49

STRONGBOW

MIKE’S HARD CIDER

WYDER’S CIDER

ANGRY ORCHARD

$8.49

$7.99

$7.99

$7.99

4 PACKS- 16 OZ

6 PACKS- 12 OZ

6 PACKS- 12 OZ

6 PACKS- 12 OZ

REG. PRICE

REG. PRICE

$8.99

REG. PRICE

AT BEN’S

$9.49

$16.49

REDD’S APPLE ALE WOODCHUCK ALE 12 PACKS- 12 OZ

6 PACKS- 12 OZ

$12.99

$6.99

6 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS FEATURING WINE, SPIRITS, AND BEER

THE

Best Buys ARE AT

RENO3480 Lakeside - 825.0244 | Fourth & Keystone - 323.6277 4700 N. Virginia - 322.0588 | 10870 S. Virginia - 853-2367 SPARKS 2990 Sullivan - 337.2367 | CARSON CITY 444 E. Williams - 885.9463 VISIT OUR WEBSITE BENSNEVADA.COM FOR 100’s MORE SPECIAL PRICES PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU 09-20-13 PLEASE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK: BEN’S FINE WINE AND SPIRITS OF NORTHERN NEVADA

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1966! OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

| MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

| THIS WEEK

|

PLEASE USE OUR PRODUCTS IN MODERATION

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

27


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

THURSDAY 9/19

FRIDAY 9/20

SATURDAY 9/21

SUNDAY 9/22

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/23-9/25

2) Palmore Brothers, 8pm, no cover

2) Palmore Brothers, 4pm, Midnight Riders, 10pm, no cover

2) Palmore Brothers, 4pm, Midnight Riders, 10pm, no cover

2) Midnight Riders, 8pm, no cover

2) Hindsight, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Decades, 7pm, no cover

2) Decades, 8pm, no cover

2) Decades, 8pm, no cover

1) Big Sam’s Funky Nation, 9pm, $17-$37

1) Purple Haze, 10pm, no cover 2) Benjah Ninjah, Mr. Rooney, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Nevada Opera: Carmen, 7pm, $30-$80 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 5) The Chris Costa Show, 8pm, no cover

1) Grease, 7pm, 9:30pm, $24.95+ 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 4) Ooh La La the Band, 10pm, no cover 5) The Chris Costa Show, 8pm, no cover

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge 3) Valley Sky Theatre

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

Super Diamond Sept. 21, 8 p.m. Harrah’s Reno 219 N. Center St. 788-2900

Karaoke Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge 5) Stadium Bar

1) Grease, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 5) The Chris Costa Show, 8pm, no cover

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

HARRAH’S RENO

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 8pm, $25, $35 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

2) DJ Chris English, 10pm, no cover

18 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) Outdoor Arena 2) Cabo Wabo Cantina Lounge

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

2) John Dawson Band, 7pm, no cover 3) Colin Ross, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Karaoke Night, 7pm, no cover

2) John Dawson Band, 4pm, 8pm, no cover 3) Colin Ross, 6pm, no cover 5) Thom and the Tikis, 6pm, no cover

3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

2) Mark Sexton Band, 8pm, no cover 1) Grasshopper, 8pm, $48-$188 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 2) Mark Sexton Band, 8pm, no cover 8:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, 3) Bubbles Benefit Party, 9pm, $40 DJ ((Fredie)), 10pm, $20

345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Poolside

Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 3) Social Network Night, 9pm, no cover 1) Grand Exposition Hall 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Drinx Lounge

28

|

RN&R

| SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

2) John Dawson Band, 4pm, Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 2) John Dawson Band, 7pm, no cover 3) Colin Ross, 6pm, no cover 5) Thom and the Tikis, 6pm, no cover 5) Thom and the Tikis, 6pm, no cover

2) Cash Only, 9:30pm, M, DJ JBIRD, 9:30pm Tu, no cover 2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm, W, no cover 3) Slim Man, 6pm W, no cover

2) Tany Jane, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

1) Grease, 7pm Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm Tu, Brazen, 10:30pm, W, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, W, no cover

1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Triple 7, 9pm, no cover 1) The Biggest Little Sideshow, 2) Triple 7, 9pm, no cover 8pm, $25, $35 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover 4) Super Diamond, 8pm, no cover

HARVEYS LAKE TAHOE

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

1) Nevada Opera: Carmen, 1pm, $30$80, Grease, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Audioboxx, 10:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Robert Cray Band, 7:30pm, $55 3) DJ SN1, 10pm, $20

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Blues Jam Wednesday, 7pm, W, no cover

2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Step This Way (dubstep, house), 8pm, W, no cover


OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

29


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

WHEN YOU’RE HOT, YOU’RE HOT Hot Jazz of San Francisco The Hot Club of San Francisco presents Cinema Vivant, an evening of silent films accompanied by live gypsy swing, as part of the University of Nevada, Reno’s Performing Arts Series. The quintet, a.k.a. Le Jazz Hot, plays “le jazz manouche” music of guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stéphane Grappelli, who pioneered the sound with their ensemble the Quintette du Hot Club de France during the 1930s. HGSF—featuring band leader/guitarist Paul Mehling, guitarists Isabelle Fontaine and Jeff Magidson, violinist Evan Price and stand-up bass player Clint Baker—will sonically transport audiences to a 1930s-era gypsy campsite in the French countryside where the travelers have set up a makeshift movie theater with a film projector screening silent movies on the side of the barn. The band

will provide the soundtrack to the silent films The Cameraman’s Revenge (1912) and The Mascot (1933) by Ladislaw Starewicz and There It Is (1928) by Charles Bowers. These two filmmakers made notable contributions to the medium: Starewicz was a pioneer in stopmotion animation and Bowers has been heralded as a comic genius for his surrealist shorts that combined animation with live action. Hot Club of San Francisco will play classic jazz tunes and original compositions to the films starting at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 19, at Nightingale Concert Hall in the Church Fine Arts Building, 1335 N. Virginia St., at the University of Nevada, Reno. Tickets are $5-$24. Call 784-4278 or visit www. unr.edu/pas.

—Kelley Lang

30   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Stella Natura: The Light of Ancestral Fires The neofolk/metal/experimental music festival is set in the heart of Tahoe National Forest’s Desolation Wilderness and features performances by Jarboe, Wardruna, Esoteric, Fire + Ice, StarGazer, Saturnalia Temple, Die Weisse Rose, Aldebaran, Munly & The Lupercalians and others on Sept. 20-22. The music begin at 3 p.m. on Friday and at noon on Saturday and Sunday. The gates open at 10 a.m. at Shinneyboo Creek Cabin Resort, 11820 Eagle Lake Road, Soda Springs, Calif. Tickets are $30-$175. Call (530) 401-3573 or visit www.ancestralfires.org.

A Band Called Death In collaboration with Brasserie St. James, the Holland Project will screen this documentary film about punk pioneers Death on Sunday, Sept. 22. The band was formed by three teen-aged brothers in the early 1970s, before punk rock exploded on both sides of the Atlantic. The trio moved beyond the humble environs of a spare bedroom in their family’s home in Detroit to performances at a few local gigs. Eventually, the brothers pressed a single in the hopes of getting signed. But in the era of Motown and emerging disco, record companies weren’t keen on signing a band whose music didn’t fit the mold—not to mention, Death wasn’t a name that sold records. The group disbanded before they completed one album, and the demo tape was stored away in an attic until it found an audience three decades later. The documentary chronicles the brothers’ journey from obscurity to the band’s new-found recognition as the first black punk band—if not the first punk band—in existence before there was music called punk rock. The film screens at 7 p.m. at Brasserie St. James, 901 S. Center St. Admission is free. Call 742-1858 or visit www.hollandreno.org.

Urban Farm Fest Local urban farms will come together to celebrate the urban growing movement, the harvest season and the autumnal equinox at this festival on Sunday, Sept. 22. River School Farm, Urban Roots, Earth Alchemy, Avanzino Farm and Loping Coyote Farms, along with the Local Food Network, present a day of food, festivities and fun. There will be games for all ages, a straw-bale fort, farm food for sale, a Local Food Network panel, an autumnal equinox ceremony, contra dancing, live music and more. The event begins at 3 p.m. at River Farm School, 777 White Fir St. Admission is free but donations are welcome. Call (775) 747-2222 or visit www. riverschoolfarm.org.


                       

            

   



                !  

  

Saturday, October 5, 2013 Atlantis Casino Resort Spa Emcee Amanda Sanchez KOLO 8 News Now

Kenn Pettiford, Pianist

SPCA of Northern Nevada Pet Care & Adoption Center

4950 Spectrum Blvd â&#x20AC;˘ Reno, Nevada Thrift Store â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 401 Vine St â&#x20AC;˘ Reno, Nevada Thrift Store II â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1270 East Plumb Lane â&#x20AC;˘ Reno, Nevada (775) 324â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7773 â&#x20AC;˘ spcanevada.org

For questions or sponsorship opportunities please call (775)324â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7773 x204 spcagala2013.eventbrite.com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

31


HOW TO MAKE A

BIG IMPACT WITH JUST ONE HOUR A WEEK

Ten years ago, John and Wendy Firestone were the perfect example of a busy couple. Both worked full-time while completing degrees at UNR. Hobbies like biking, rock climbing and skiing took up most of their spare time, but something was missing. “Both of us felt like we just wanted to do something to give back to our community, but were concerned we did not have enough time,” said Wendy, “Then we found out about being a ‘couples match’ through Big Brothers and Big Sisters. The program worked perfect for us. If one of us had too much homework or a work conflict, the other could still meet our commitment with our ‘Little Brother.’ But what kept us going with our ‘Little’ for the next ten years was that we were having a lot of fun. Watching him grow and change, improve in school and find new interests was an incredibly rewarding experience.” With just one hour a week, the Firestones made a big impact on the life of their “Little.” Against great odds, he graduated from Hug High School in 2012, and now has full time employment, living in his own house in Reno. “This kind of outcome is not surprising,” explains Liza Maupin, Chief Executive Officer of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Nevada. “This year, the agency will see 75 percent of its age-eligible ‘Littles’ graduate from high school compared with Washoe County School District’s graduation rate of 58 percent for similarly disadvantaged children who have not been matched with a Big Brother or Big Sister. “It sounds cliché, but after ten years of being his ‘Bigs,’ our ‘Little’ truly is part of our family,” said John. “He is twenty years old now and no longer in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program, but we still see him every week. It is a blessing to have him in our lives.” If you have just an hour a week and would like to make a lasting impact on the life of a child in need call 352-3202 or visit BBBSNN.org, and get ready to start something BIG!

445 West Moana Lane, Suite 200 Reno, NV 89509 775-352-3202 www.bbbsnn.org 32   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Going code turkey I broke up with a boyfriend a few years ago because I wasn’t getting what I wanted from him. I’d give him subtle cues, and when he didn’t respond in the ways I was hoping for, I blamed him for being thickheaded. I’ve ended many a relationship because of this. The dudes didn’t have a chance. I now see that we women can skip years of frustration by getting clear with our partners about what we need from them. Understanding this now, you’d think it would be simple for me to follow through. Yet, I’m continually surprised at how strong my “have him guess!” impulse can be. Letting a man in on my feelings actually takes a lot of courage and stretches me like nothing else. It isn’t hard for a boyfriend to make a woman happy instead of pissed off for days. He just needs the right answer to “Hey, honey, guess what it means when I put my hair in a ponytail and walk out of the room!” A guy gets to the point where he can’t be sure whether he’s in a relationship or a really long game of charades. (Either way, it helps if there are occasional breaks for angry sex.) Although men and women are psychologically similar in many ways, studies by social psychologist Judith A. Hall and others find that women are more accurate in sussing out the meaning of nonverbal cues. The problem is, we humans all have a tendency to assume others’ minds work just like our own. So you conclude that a guy is withholding and mean when he seems to ignore what you think should be obvious—that your left nostril flaring is code for “Tell me you love me right this second!” (Not to be mistaken for the flaring right nostril’s “Take out the trash or I’ll kill myself!”) To your credit, you took a hard look at yourself and admitted that you were wrong. As for why you’re having difficulty putting what you now understand into practice, Yale psychology professor Alan E. Kazdin explained on my radio show, “Knowing doesn’t control doing.” Doing actually takes doing—in your case, repeatedly pushing yourself to express your feelings, despite how uncomfortably vulnerable it makes you feel. Repeating behavior over time actually rewires the brain and, in Kazdin’s words, “locks” the new behaviors in. Eventually, healthier behavior should come more naturally to you—like recognizing, without animus, that the way to get your boyfriend to admire your sexy new haircut is by telling him you’ve gotten one, not by glaring out at him from under the subtly different slant of your bangs. (As every

woman needs to understand, his not noticing your new do doesn’t mean he’s stopped loving you; it means you haven’t shaved your head.)

Taking out the trashing I am online dating and assume people will Google me before we meet. Two years ago, I briefly got involved with a crazy woman. When I realized how nuts she was, I broke up with her. She started an internet campaign against me, posting horrible things about me online. These are obvious lies and clearly seem to be the rantings of a crazy person, but most are nearly impossible to get taken down. Should I casually mention these in an online chat with potential dates? (“Oh, by the way, if you read anything terrible about me online, it’s written by a crazy person.”) A person should get to know you a little before she learns you’re a 300-year-old incubus who poisoned our groundwater and killed the neighbors’ dog and made it look like a suicide. Since ranting crazies tend to sound, as the saying goes, a few balloons short of a parade, a prospective partner’s big worry is likely to be that sick drama is relationship-as-usual for you. The best way to dispel this fear is by letting someone see who you are before seeing who the internet says you are. Wait until after the first date to reveal your last name. (If questioned, plead online dating prudence.) Create a new email address you use for online dating only so no one can use your regular one to Google your identity. And then, on your date, you could casually mention the nutty former ex—ideally in a way that suggests the experience was very much out of character for you. Assuming you come off solid and balanced, this should help dispel any suspicions that your ex is nuts because you drove her there or that you have some scary tendencies yourself. Although women these days tend to be pleasantly surprised by chivalry, they are always looking to weed out the sort of man who’ll end their evening with a considerate offer like “Can I walk you to my trunk?” Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Online ads are

STILL

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing & Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

Train for a New Career in Healthcare, Massage or Business! Financial aid for those who qualify. Employment services for graduates. Day & Evening Classes. Milan Institute Sparks Campus 1-866-467-0094 Train for an Exciting Career in Beauty! Financial aid for those who qualify. Employment services for graduates. Day & Evening Classes. Milan Institute of Cosmetology Reno Campus Call Now 1-877-205-4113 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.easywork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN) Investment Research Analyst Schultz Financial Group Inc seeks Investment Research Analyst to identify/ verify/ research/analyze investment products and trades. Travel within the US to meet with individual clients when required. Worksite: Reno, NV. Mail resume to Ms. McCabe, Schultz Financial Group Inc,10765 Double R. Blvd. Ste. 200, Reno, NV 89521.

Attn Musicians move in specials on rehersal studios. Gate hrs 24hrs 7 days a week, Call Bergin Way Self Storage 775-322-8024

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Hundreds of Transmissions in Stock Free towing. 775-824-9595

READY FOR A NEW YOU? Are you wanting to lose weight and live healthier? Make an income by helping others do this? Join my challenge team today. 775-343-9149

more cars online

www.newsreview.com

Feel The Sensation & Relaxation Of Massage Swedish, Deep Tissue Call David 762-7796 Office $50 Outcall $75 Lic #NVMT1086

VIAGRA 100MG 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet shipping. Call 1-800-374-2619 Today! (AAN CAN)

Notice of caution to our Readers! Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

Recycle this paper

Increase your professional value or feed your passion. $349 Oct 12 & 13 in Reno. 9am-2:30pm Call 775-544-3435 or visit Schoolofwine.net.

KILL ROACHES Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Eliminate Roaches-Guaranteed. No Mess, Odorless, Long Lasting. Available at Ace Hardware, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN)

FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

SOMMELIER CERTIFICATION LEVEL 1

String Instrument Repair Expert music instrument service in the Reno area for over 30 years. 775-225-8297

Think Free

Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5

WARNING HOT GUYS!

Dating Easy made

Reno

775-246-8383 Beautiful Wom Women men Cold Beer Adult Entertainment Entertainme ent 30 minutes from Reno R NOW HIRING HIRIN NG NG GIRLS 18 YEARS S AND OLDER OLDER

775.323.7575

Reno

Carson City

Carson City

775.888.9100

775.888.9995

FREE

FREE to listen & reply to ads!

To Listen and Reply to Ads!

FREE CODE: Reno News For other local numbers call

775.334.6666

MegaMates.com

1-888-MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 3128

FREE CODE: Reno News For other local numbers:

1-888MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 2575

OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   feature story  |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   september 19, 2013  |  

RN&R  

| 

33


Looking for a job where you can

make a difference?

by rob brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “If Taylor

Swift is going to have six breakups a year,” observed comedian Bill Maher, “she needs to write a new song entitled ‘Maybe It’s Me.’” He was referring to Swift’s habit of using her romantic misadventures to stimulate her lyric-writing creativity. With that as your prompt, Aries, I’ll ask you to do some soul-searching about your own intimacy issues. How have you contributed to the problems you’ve had in getting the love and care you want? What unconscious behavior or conditioned responses have undermined your romantic satisfaction, and what could you do to transform them? The next eight weeks will be prime time to revolutionize your approach to relationships.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Philosopher

Alan Watts used to talk about how the whole world is wiggling all the time. Clouds, trees, sky, water, human beings: Everything’s constantly shimmying and jiggling and waggling. One of our problems, Watts said, is that we’re “always trying to straighten things out.” We feel nagging urges to deny or cover up or eliminate the wiggling. “Be orderly,” we command reality. “Be neat and composed and predictable.” But reality never obeys. It’s forever doing what it does best: flickering and fluctuating and flowing. In accordance with astrological omens, Taurus, I encourage you to rebel against any natural tendencies you might have to fight the eternal wiggle. Instead, celebrate it. Rejoice in it. Align yourself with it.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Author Elaine

Scarry defines “the basic impulse underlying education” as follows: the “willingness continually to revise one’s own location in order to place oneself in the path of beauty.” Consider making this your modus operandi in the coming weeks, Gemini. Always be on the lookout for signs that beauty is near. Do research to find out where beauty might be hiding, and where beauty is ripening. Learn all you can about what kinds of conditions attract beauty, and then create those conditions. Finally, hang around people who are often surrounded by beauty. This approach will be an excellent way to further your education.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Life is either

always a tight-rope or a feather bed. Give me the tight-rope.” So declared writer Edith Wharton. But she was an Aquarius and more temperamentally suited to the tight-rope. Many of you Cancerians, on the other hand, prefer to emphasize the feather-bed mode. I suspect that in the next nine months, however, you will be willing and even eager to spend more time on the tight-rope than is customary for you. To get primed for the excitement, I suggest you revel in some intense feather-bed action in the coming weeks. Charge up your internal batteries with an extra-special deluxe regimen of sweet self-care.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Half of a truth is

Consider working for a company which has published award-winning newspapers for over 18 years: The Reno News & Review. We have the resources of a large corporation, with the independence and flexibility of a small business. We foster creativity, excellence and participation, with everyone having a voice in strategic planning, ideas and the direction of the company. Our publication reflects our work environment: Decidedly NOT corporate. We are dedicated, hardworking and passionately focused on a common goal: Publishing a great newspaper every Thursday.

During a time when other media are experiencing declines in audience, we continue to sustain and even grow our share of market. Why? Our readers recognize and appreciate the value of our work. If you have outside sales experience and are looking to sink your teeth into something which makes a difference in your community, consider joining the RN&R team as an Advertising Consultant.

equAl OPPORTuNITy emPlOyeR

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM/RENO/JOBS 34   |  RN&R   | 

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

better than no truth at all, right? Wrong! If you latch on to the partially accurate story, you may stop looking for the rest of the story. And then you’re liable to make a premature decision based on insufficient data. The better alternative is to reject the partially accurate story and be willing to wait around in the dark until the complete revelation comes. That may be uncomfortable for a while. But when the full truth finally straggles in, you will be very glad you didn’t jump to unripe conclusions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A Chinese

entrepreneur named Nin Nan dreamed up a unique way to generate capital: He sold dead mosquitoes online for a dollar apiece, advertising them as useful for scientific research and decoration. Within two days, he received 10,000 orders. Let’s make him your patron saint and role model for the next few weeks, Virgo. May he inspire you to come up with novel ways to stimulate your cash flow. The planetary omens suggest that your originality is more likely than usual to generate concrete rewards.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The most

important thing is to find out what the most important thing is,” wrote Shunryu Suzuki in his book Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind. That’s your assignment for the next three weeks. Do whatever it takes to find out beyond any doubt what the most important thing is. Meditate naked an hour a day. Go on long walks in the wildest places you know. Convene intense conversations about yourself with the people who know you best. Create and sign a contract with yourself in which you vow to identify the experience you want more than any other experience on Earth. No waffling allowed, Libra. What is the single most important thing?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Sometime in

the next nine months you may feel moved to embark on an adventure that will transform the way you understand reality. Maybe you will choose to make a pilgrimage to a sacred sanctuary or wander further away from your familiar comforts than you ever have before. Right now is an excellent time to brainstorm about the possibilities. If you don’t feel ready to actually begin your quest, at least formulate a master plan for the magic moment when you will be ripe.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

In the indigenous culture of Hawaii, mana refers to a spiritual power that may abide in people, objects and natural locations. You can acquire more of it by acting with integrity and excellence, but you might lose some of it if your actions are careless or unfocused. For instance, a healer who does a mediocre job of curing her patients could lose the mana that made her a healer in the first place. I believe that similar principles hold true for non-Hawaiians. All of us have an ever-shifting relationship with the primal life force. What’s the current state of your own personal supply, Sagittarius? It’s time to make sure you’re taking full advantage of the mana you have been blessed with. Your motto: “Use it or lose it.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Have

you been getting enough? I doubt it. I think you should sneak a peek into the hiding place where your insatiable cravings are stored. If you’re brave enough, also take a look at your impossible demands and your unruly obsessions and your suppressed miracles. Please note: I’m not suggesting that you immediately unleash them all. I don’t mean you should impulsively instigate an adventure that could possibly quench your ravenous yearnings. But I do believe you will benefit from becoming better acquainted with them. You could develop a more honest relationship, which would ultimately make them more trustworthy.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t tape your thumbs to your hands and stalk around pretending to be a dinosaur. Don’t poke three holes in a large plastic garbage bag and wear it as a tunic while imagining that you are a feudal serf in a post-apocalyptic, sci-fi dystopia. Don’t use a felt-tip marker to draw corporate logos on your face to show everyone what brands of consumer goods you love. To be clear: I would love you to be extravagantly creative. I hope you will use your imagination in novel ways as you have fun playing with experimental scenarios. But please exercise a modicum of discernment as you wander way outside the box. Be at least 20 percent practical.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Take a lover

who looks at you like maybe you are magic,” said the poet Marty McConnell. That’s good advice, Pisces—not just in regards to your intimate relationships, but about all your other alliances, too. If you’re seeking a friend or consultant or business partner or jogging companion or new pet, show a preference for those creatures who look at you like maybe you are magic. You always need to be appreciated for the sweet mystery and catalytic mojo you bring to your partnerships, but you especially need that acknowledgment now.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by D. Brian Burghart

Wrote the book

there’s love, relationships and a lot of stories about finding god, but not religion, not church, you know. Like I write a story about a Catholic girl who is contemplating getting an abortion. What’s that like? If you’re Catholic, that’s harder. I have a gay boy growing up in the wild, wild West. So it was a little bit harder. These things kind of set it off. A mother and a heroin addict. Those are tough situations.

Laura Newman Having won our 95-word fiction contest more times than I can recall, Laura Newman took her writing to the next level by seeking out a publisher for her collection of short stories, Parallel to Paradise: Addiction & Other Love Stories. The book hits the stands Oct. 3. Also big news, one of the stories has been accepted for publication on the Huffington Post’s series Fifty Fiction. She’ll have a book reading at Recycled Records on Oct. 11, at 5 p.m., and Junkee on Oct. 12 at 2 p.m.

How are you? I am so excited. My book after all this time is finally going to be out in less than three weeks. It comes out October 3rd. I’ll have it in hand before October 3rd, but October 3rd the publisher will have it ready. I just finished most of the galleys this weekend. We’re getting really close. We’re not done with the back cover yet. I’ve got the front cover.

What’s the book about? It’s a book of short stories. That makes it a little more difficult to say what it’s about. My little tagline that I say on it, “It makes

I’ll say. What were the steps you took to get a publisher to notice you? the ordinary, askew.” There are stories: Georgia eats her blanket; Aiden gets drunk on red-eye and falls into wallpaper paste; Alice falls in love with a one-legged Mexican cowboy. So it’s actually a group of sort of “tough” stories. They’re definitely not intended for a young audience. They have a sense of lyricalness, a beauty to them, because I put people in really tough situations, or they put themselves in really tough situations, but they never lose their humanity. And I do have a lot of characters. It seems like it came out with a lot of characters that are addicts, but I don’t glorify them.

Except in the name of the book, Addiction & Other Love Stories. Yeah, but they’re not really glorified. They get better or they might die. As I was going through it with the publisher, the stuff I tend to write about is the stuff I tend to write about. There’s addiction, of course,

And ride mankind If you read my column last week, you saw laid out very clearly and cleanly the current stance of the modern isolationist, a stance that was recently clarified, crystallized and petrified into position by the horrible humiliation of Iraq. I felt pretty good about assuming this position, and, I think it’s safe to say, it’s one that many Americans currently hold. So damn, I must confess, I sure didn’t see that curveball coming out of left field, courtesy of the Russians! Seriously. Who would have guessed that Putin and Russia, of all people, were all of a sudden going to barge into the “let’s bomb them Syrians” drum circle and cool everybody out in the space of about four or five days? Don’t get me wrong. I’m not complaining. Not for a second. I don’t mind at all that the Russians came up with their surprise olive branch that made my position suddenly look weary, tired, frustrated, cynical, skeptical and cautious. Those are the inherent problems with isolationism, and those problems can be exposed OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

ARTS&CULTURE

That’s awesome! Will I recognize some? The first place winners, all of them, they’re in my book. They absolutely are. Especially the ones that have been winners. They’ve all been made into full-blown stories, including the one that’s going to be in the Huffington Post. Ω

∫y Bruce Van Dye

during those rare and refreshing occasions when people will holster their weapons and figure stuff out. Remember, before John Kerry made the offhand remark about the Syrians turning over their entire stockpile of chemical weapons that got this whole love train rolling, things were looking fairly tense. And I found myself in the bizarre position of actually being in agreement with all the kooks in Congress whose main mission in politics these days is to confound our president. You know, the guys who now can best be described not as Republicans in the traditional sense, but more accurately as Obstacularists. That’s a much more accurate take on these yohos. Usually, they get me all hot and steamy with just about everything they do. But this time, when contemplating the question of launching missiles at Assad, I found myself pulling for these jerks in terms of not giving Obama the votes he needed for his green light.

|

Very difficult. I wanted to be a writer since I was like 8; I’ve tried this before. I sat down and said, “I’m going to try one more time. So I went about it systematically. I wrote 101 publishers and agents. I got some good feedback, but mostly rejections or no answer at all. And my 101st query and last one was to the local press, Le Rue Press. And I sent it there because I figured she probably would have seen my work in the News & Review, and maybe that would make her take a second look at it. And she’s the one that said yes. ... I really think the News & Review helped me a lot. Most of my stories started out as News & Review 95-word stories.

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

Then, things changed. Very quickly. And Obama and Kerry look pretty good right now. OK, cool. After all, I did vote for these guys. Funny how, at times, one can take the high road by threatening to drop a few bombs. Funny how a country that has denied the very existence of its stash of chemical weapons can suddenly look in the back of the storage shed under the weed whacker and find some. Funny how everybody gets so bent out of shape about killing people with gas, but remains positively ho-hum about blowing people up with mortars, mines, missiles, napalm, white phosphorous, bunker busters, etc. etc. I also can’t help but wonder— what does this sudden niceness and peacemaking from Putin have to do with the nearness of his Winter Olympics, an event that is already looking troubled and vulnerable? Ω

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

American Business Women’s Day!

Wednesday, September 25, 2013 Atlantis Casino Resort Spa 3800 South Virginia Street, Reno

11:OO AM to 1:00 PM

Join our annual celebration recognizing the achievements of working women! » Network with other northern Nevada business professionals » Experience the dynamics of Liz Christoffersen in this fun, interactive and relevant presentation » Enjoy lunch, raffles and door prizes Liz Christoffersen, inspirational thought-leader and strategist, shares her knowledge and experience working with luxury and lifestyle brands worldwide. The experience of creating and implementing business strategies that deliver sustainable success despite economic conditions uniquely qualifies Liz to provide leadership and guidance to those who want to step out of the ordinary and embrace an extraordinary level of success. A passion for helping others and a zest for life, Liz energizes individuals and their organizations to create dynamic positive change. Whether speaking with executives in North America or on stage at a European business conference, her down-to-earth interpersonal style puts participants at ease and sets the stage for introspection and learning.

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

“Leadership: Professional & Personal Growth” presented by Keynote Speaker Liz Christoffersen

Tickets:

$40/each or $230/table of 6 Go to

ABWA-RENO.COM

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

|

RN&R

|

35


Natural American Spirit® is a registered trademark of Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Co. © SFNTC 3 2013

This is the only

cigarette

made with organic tobacco

grown by

t‹òĄ­›‹€šYò¾‹òø Companion plants, like this sunflower, lead to better soil, fewer pests, and more productive farming.

get your trial offer.

cigarettes Trial offer restricted to U.S. smokers 21 years of age or older. Offer void in MA and where prohibited. Additional restrictions may apply.

Reno News and Review 09-19-13.indd 1

TryAmericanSpirit.com or call 1-800-435-5515 CODE: 92547

8/12/13 11:36 AM

Profile for News & Review

R 2013 09 19  

R 2013 09 19