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Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Chanelle.Bessette........... 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 19

Foodfinds..................... 20 Film.............................. 22 Musicbeat.....................25 Nightclubs/Casinos........26 This.Week.................... 30 Advice.Goddess............ 31. Free.Will.Astrology....... 34 15.Minutes.....................35 Bruce.Van.Dyke............35

Economic DolDrums See News, page 8.

ProsPecting for mining comPanies’ heart of gold See Green, page 11.

A

Write hook

To The jaw See arts&Culture, page 16.

BEER

ThE gooD guy wins!

A new brewery on Fourth Street might signal the next phase of Reno’s beer evolution RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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See Film, page 22.

9-15,

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What’s Your Leg Pain Trying to Tell You? According to the American Heart Association, about 7.1 million adults, including one in three over age 70, have peripheral artery disease (PAD). The association also says that people with PAD are four-to-five-times more at risk for heart disease and stroke and are likely to go undiagnosed. That’s because many people dismiss one of the primary symptoms — troublesome leg pain — as arthritis or part of the aging process and not as the very serious health concern that it is. Don’t ever ignore your health symptoms. Write them down and bring them to the attention of your doctor.

What Does PAD Feel Like? The symptoms include, but are not limited to, the following: • Pain or cramping in the legs or hips while walking that subsides after a few minutes of rest • Numbness or weakness in the leg or foot • Aching in the foot while at rest • A leg or foot that feels colder than the rest of the body • Foot sores that won’t heal If you experience these symptoms, do not ignore them. PAD is a serious medical condition that requires treatment. In most cases, PAD can be managed with lifestyle changes or drug therapy. In advanced cases, surgical procedures can help open or bypass blocked arteries.

Dr. Truong is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology and is board eligible in interventional cardiology. He obtained his undergraduate degree at the University of Nevada, Reno where he received the “Nevada Henry Albert Senior Public Service Award”. He studied medicine at the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, Missouri. He completed his residency in internal medicine and pediatric medicine at University of Oklahoma College of Medicine in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he received the “Ralph and Frances McGill Foundation Award” for teaching excellence. Later, he studied general cardiology and was named “Fellow of the Year” at Oklahoma State University College of Medicine. He went on to complete fellowships in interventional cardiology and peripheral vascular medicine at Largo Medical Center in Tampa, Florida. Dr. Truong grew up in the Reno area and always knew that he would one day return and give back to this wonderful community that has given him so much. In his free time, he enjoys impressionist art, classical music, biking, camping and skiing.

Prevention is Great Medicine Some lifestyle changes can help prevent the condition: • Quit smoking. Smokers have a higher risk for PAD and a higher risk for heart disease and stroke if they already have PAD. • Maintain a healthy weight. Aim for a body mass index (BMI) of 24 or less to avoid developing PAD, diabetes, high blood pressure and other serious health conditions. • Get moving. Talk to your doctor about exercise programs that may help protect your heart and reduce PAD symptoms. • Control your blood pressure and cholesterol with your physician’s guidance.

Thomas Truong, DO

Assess Your Risk Online Don’t wait to find out if you’re at risk for PAD. Visit NNMC.com/assessment to complete a quick, online assessment.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Truong, call 775-352-5300.

2385 E. Prater Way, Suite 205 | Sparks, NV | 775-352-5300 | www.NNMC.com Information is provided for educational purposes only, and is not intended to constitute medical advice or to be relied upon for the treatment of any particular condition. If you have concerns or questions about specific symptoms that may affect your health, please contact your healthcare provider.

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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

The wind beneath my wings

We’re fracked

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. Being the editor of this newspaper is like having a Facebook account with 90,000 friends. Occasionally, I’ll use this column to throw out a question to see what the great washed have to say on the topic. (Although I hardly ever throw out an impenetrable comment pretending it’s for everyone when really it’s just for one person.) (Unless you count the jokes I write that I’m the only person who thinks are funny.) (Like that one.) So, anyway, I have a question. I had some wind damage done to a solar panel on my roof. I called the insurance company to make a claim. They didn’t send anyone out to look, just requiring an estimate from a contractor that included his diagnosis of what caused the damage. The insurance company began to harass me, making multiple snotty calls demanding the estimate, even after I told them that I was having a couple of people look at it, and that I was considering several options, including repair as opposed to replacement. They bugged me to the point I was actually considering withdrawing the claim just to stop the phone calls. I guess this is what passes as customer service, as opposed to just coming out and looking at the damage. Anyway, I sent them the first estimate I received, which was for a replacement panel that would look different than the other three that were on my house. They sent me a check for the amount over my deductible. After looking at all the options, I decided to repair it myself, working with individual contractors for the different parts. My question is, what’s my responsibility? Am I required to do the worse solution because I deposited the check? Do I send back the money that’s over what I actually pay? I am deeply distrustful of insurance companies, and I don’t want to get my ass in a sling, but I was totally upfront with them, and now I don’t want to be further inconvenienced. What do you think?

Re “All fracked up” (Green, April 11): If the allegations about hydraulic fracturing are true, we can expect major financial impacts to our state. • Seismic activity: direct impact to mining • Chemical exposure, explosions, leaks: Worker compensation claims will skyrocket • Public health impacts: Extreme burden to our already stressed healthcare system • Contaminated water, air and soil • Loss of water as resource: Out of control wildfires, cost of hauling water to replace lost resource • Fracking is exempt from the Superfund Act: Cost of clean up will fall on the state of Nevada If SB390 is approved in its current form, there will be no recourse for our state to offset the huge financial impacts that could occur. It is my belief SB390 needs to be revised to protect our state in the event the allegations about hydraulic fracturing are true. It is also my opinion that the best course of action for this to occur is to implement a moratorium in order to study this issue in depth prior to allowing the industry to conduct business in our state. The financial implications to the state of Nevada could be catastrophic if hydraulic fracturing is shown to be as dangerous as many scientific studies are claiming. Petition: http://org. credoaction.com/petitions/nevada-spublic-health-is-at-risk-we-want-amoratorium-on-hydraulic-fracturing . Dawn Harris Reno

Food for the future Re “Everything you wanted to know about GMOs” (Feature story, May 2): Our planet now holds about 7 billion human beings. Despite enormous progress—for the first time in history, a slim majority of those inhabitants can now be considered middle class—about 2 billion of those live on the brink of starvation. This growth will reach 8 billion by the middle of our century, when it is hoped continued economic progress

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will result in a leveling off of population growth, as economic security brings smaller families. When we look at the problem of feeding these billions, it’s clear that modern agricultural practices, including GMO foods, holds the most hope for averting mass starvations. Organic agriculture cannot be counted on due to its inability to raise yields per acre. Organic if nothing else is traditional, and study after study has confirmed that traditional agriculture has yields per acre of up to 30 percent less than modern agriculture does. So, if you promote organic food production, while working to inhibit modern practices, you are saying that you don’t care about the survival of about 2-4 billion humans over the next few decades. That may seem to be a strong statement, but I think it fits. The organic movement in the US and Europe is essentially an upper middle class Caucasian movement, and organic food, despite its trendiness, lingers at less than 5 percent of US food production. In other words, a niche market. Statements by leaders in the organic food industry that they want to label GMO in order to grow that market are therefore all the more self serving and frankly illustrate how the green movement is more about preserving a peculiar view of nature than preserving human lives. Not only has organic agricultural practices proven to be unable to keep up with human population growth, in fact if organic production were implemented on a large scale to even attempt to feed these hungry mouths, it would require putting many millions of acres of marginal farm land that is now wilderness to the plow. It would mean putting to the plow acreage roughly the size of South America! It is remarkable how modern agriculture has increased yields while banking land. If there is anything that is green, it would be forests and plains that man does not need to cultivate, but which nature can reclaim. Perhaps we see a real clash of visions here. It would seem that many Greens envision a future quite Jeffersonian, where small farmers dominate the planet. Decentralization

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

—D. Brian Burghart

brianb@ ne wsreview . com

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Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Consultants Meg Brown, Gina Odegard, Matt Odegard, Bev Savage Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Office/Distribution Manager/ Ad Coordinator Karen Brooke Executive Assistant/Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker

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is good, but although I am largely Jeffersonian in my beliefs, I would speculate that the alternative to their vision is one where there is a good deal more pristine uninhabited wilderness, but the rest is dominated by large agricultural enterprises, and then smaller rings of small farms, suburbs and highly populated cities. Farming is dawn to dusk, dirty and dangerous work. The truth is, throughout history, most people, when given the choice, prefer to live in cities and close to cities. Modern agriculture, including GMO’s, are best suited to this vision of urban and suburban living, with large, yes, dare I say, factory farms and suburbs, but the Green tradeoff being much more uninhabited wilderness where nature can thrive alongside the futuristic cities we will build. Brendan Trainor Reno

GMO News & Review Re “Everything you wanted to know about GMOs” (Feature story, May 2): “Everything” we wanted to know? Be careful with the claims of largesse. I think you might have missed a few points. Like that approximately 27 countries ban GMOs and more than 60 require labeling. Why doesn’t the US? Greed, maybe. And when more of the money-hungry folks wake up to the fact that these countries aren’t going to want to buy our GMO-laden products, then they’ll have a reason that seems to make sense to them, yes they will (at least on the labeling and transparency issues). And while you quoted Kiki Corbin bringing up the point about companies like Monsanto controlling their seeds, you missed the mark on what that really means to the world in that these companies are on their way to controlling all of the agricultural seed of these major world crops. If this isn’t slowed and controlled, they could do it. That is huge! Another point that was missed was that part of the problem with the Roundup Ready corn and soybeans (and other GM “improvements”)

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Sean Karp, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

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isn’t just with what we might be consuming, but also with what we are literally spreading to the wind. Plants from a GM crop field can’t help spreading some of the pollen from that field to the next. Monsanto and friends seem to think that the seed a neighboring farmer might save from corn that was cross-pollinated by the GM corn is now their property. Insert lawsuit here. Bye-bye family farm. So who are the remaining farmers going to be basically forced to turn to for their seed? And what about what happens when some other plant figures out a way to grab some of these new stylish genes for themselves? Scientist say this isn’t supposed to happen, but none of them really know for sure what nature can do. And though I’m no scientist, and I agree that all of this is ultimately caused by over population, I think you let Shintani overstate that the population is growing exponentially. Yes, we’ve more than doubled the world population since 1960, and while you can plug in small numbers to make Shintani’s statement mathematically correct, most people are going to think that this means we more than double our population each year, rather than in 50 or so years. It just seems unusual for a scientist to make an emotionally charged, inaccurate statement like that without an agenda. But yeah, population growth needs to reverse, or we’re all screwed. I also disagree with Shintani further, for myself, in that I don’t automatically distrust scientists. I do, however, distrust the people backing the scientists who are developing this stuff. Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. While I applaud you for bringing what information you did to the community’s attention, (especially the information on what Kiki Corbin and others are trying to start in Nevada), I wish the article was more comprehensive–maybe should have been a series of stories covering a couple of these issues in each, well, issue. Joel Lippert Reno

Business Mary Anderson, Tami Sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds & Talking Personals to N&R Classifieds, Reno Edition, 1015 20th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 or e-mail classifieds@ newsreview.com

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Priscilla Garcia

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by Sage Leehey

ThiS ModeRn WoR ld

by tom tomorrow

Why are you protesting today? Asked at Mayday protest in downtown Reno Theresa Navarro Activist

I’m here personally because I have worked on the immigration issue for about 20 years. Actually, when I was 9, I protested for Cesar Chavez in Los Angeles and wore my black band and stood in front of the Safeway store and told people not to buy the lettuce. And I have been doing this for many years here in Reno. I’m here today because I work with these people daily, and I see the problems. I see the separations of the families and the deportations. Barbara Stone Retiree

I don’t like what the government, the state of Nevada, what anybody has done with the immigrants. Some of them have been here all their lives. They’re not doing anything wrong, and they do pay taxes no matter what the Republicans say. And most of them are fine people. You find in any race you go to you’re going to have problems, but look at the white, American male. How many of them abuse their wives and abuse their children? Antonio Rangel Student

Watch for bikes May is National Bike to Work and School Month. It’s a tradition that has grown during the years we’ve been observing it in Reno, and as so many roads and streets in Reno have been adapted to bicycles, it’s apt to become an even greater year-round observance. But with those vulnerable bicyclists on the roads, everyone is required to be more aware of what’s on the road and what’s in the crosswalks, because a bicycle—no matter the attitude of the rider—never wins against a car. The first thing to be aware of is that bike riders have the same rights and responsibilities as people in automobiles, and they are subject to the same rules and regulations. There’s nothing more frustrating to people who ride intelligently and legally than to see some moron riding like the rules of the road don’t apply to him or her: ignoring traffic signs and signals, impeding traffic, acting like an ass. The second thing to be aware of is that motorists must be on the lookout for people on bicycles before turning, merging into bicycle lanes, or opening doors next to moving traffic. Bicyclists by law are entitled to a three-feet space when automobiles pass them. There’s nothing more frustrating to people who ride intelligently and legally than to see some moron driving like the rules of the road don’t apply to him or her: driving in a threatening manner, not obeying right-ofway rules for people on bikes, acting like an ass. The 3 Foot Passing Bill, SB248, which passed in 2011, “requires a driver of a motor vehicle to overtake and pass a bicycle or an electric bicycle proceeding

in the same direction by: (1) moving the vehicle into the immediate left lane, if there is more than one lane traveling in the same direction and it is safe to move into the lane; or (2) passing to the left of the bicycle or electric bicycle at a distance of not less than 3 feet from the bicycle or electric bicycle,” according to the Nevada Bicycle Coalition, http://nevadabike. wordpress.com. For those who are first-time bicycle commuters, there are four general safety rules that will generally keep you alive: 1) Always maintain control of your bicycle. This means avoiding road obstacles like gravel and generally keeping your hands on the handle bar. 2) Wear a helmet. Brain injuries are permanent. If you’re not lucky enough to die from head trauma, you may be a burden on your family for years to come. You’re not too cool for a helmet. 3) Let others see you. Wear bright colors, reflective fabrics, and use your hand signals to show which way you intend to go. 4) Always ride with traffic. Yes, forget what you might have learned in grade school, automobiles are less likely to run you down if you’re going the same direction. For individuals or businesses that want to sign up for Bike to Work Week, May 11-17, go to http://bikenevada.org/2013-registration. For people who want to find out where the Reno Bike Project will be serving pancakes on May 17, www.renobikeproject.com/2013/04/bike-to-work-daypancake-feed-may-17. Ω

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Well, I’m here today so we can march for the workers’ rights and immigration rights. I hope to accomplish that since we’re all here together. We can pull together as a community and make sure the government knows that we’re all here to work for our rights.

Joe Domitrovsh Activist

My wife is in the movement, so I’m here for that. Plus, I’m a veteran of the civil rights movements of the ’60s and because of curiosity. We’ve got to do something about the immigration situation, and I bet there were people in about 1500, the first peoples, the ones we call the Native Americans, who wished they would have had a stronger immigration policy to keep us out.

Jessica Ameris Kindergarten teacher

Well, the problem is there are a lot of people here that are illegal that want to be legal, and the process of becoming a legal citizen is so difficult. In our relationship, I’m a citizen, and it’s still difficult for us to work out our situation. We’re trying to make people recognize that families get split up a lot. There’s a chance that he may have to leave the country, if he got deported, and we couldn’t be together. NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

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Bills to watch as new deadlines approach As the smoke clears from the first big deadline, and the Legislature lurches towards the next one, keep your attention focused on some deserving bills that could make a difference for years to come. SB 457: Ward Voting. It seems so simple but yet the idea of complyby ing with the Voting Rights Act and Sheila Leslie allowing voters in “wards” to elect their own city councilperson has been derailed several times in recent years. The Republicans strongly prefer the present system, despite the clear violation of the Voting Rights Act, and Gov. Brian Sandoval used a technicality to veto the 2011 version of the bill. 2013 could be the year the Legislature makes cities respect the federal law and allows citizens in Carson City, Reno, Sparks and Henderson to elect their own representatives, by neighborhood. SB 203: Year-Round Reporting of Lobbyist Expenditures. There is so much wrong with Nevada’s system of reporting campaign contributions and “gifts,” it’s hard to know where to start cleaning

things up. Requiring lobbyists to report their direct expenditures on legislators every month of the year, not just during the four months of the legislative session, is a small but important step. The bill passed the Senate 21-0 this session, just as it did in 2011. Will the Assembly once again do the dirty deed and kill the bill or will legislators feel the pressure and stop the corruption? SB 213: Trapping. Hunters have long held sway in Carson City, even infiltrating conservation groups to promote their sport with the argument that they contribute to habitat preservation through hunting fees to ensure they have animals to kill for sport so they should get whatever they want. But the gritty recreational activity of trapping is often more about selling pelts and collecting bounties than true sport, especially since animals really don’t have much of a chance and often are badly wounded and endure torture for days on end. What’s changed in Nevada is the grassroots organizing of animal

lovers, especially those who enjoy hiking with their dogs off leash in wide open spaces and react vehemently when their dog—or increasingly, a small child—is caught in a hidden trap. This bill reactivates trap registration and forces the Wildlife Commission to negotiate timeframes for trap visitation. AB 230: Comprehensive, medically accurate, age-appropriate sex education seems like an obvious strategy in a state that consistently ranks high in the teen pregnancy sweepstakes, but the far-right wing of the Republican party sees it as a shield for Planned Parenthood’s “real” agenda: promoting homosexuality and abortion. Will the state Senate be able to hold to a party-line vote and pass the measure or will the religious right peel off some Mormon Democrats and defeat the bill? This one may go to the wire. AB 284: Domestic violence victims and their leases. Many victims, the majority of them women, don’t leave a dangerous home because they are afraid to

break a lease and face potentially serious legal and financial consequences. This bill requires a tenant to provide a landlord with written 30 days’ notice of early termination along with appropriate documentation of domestic violence, such as a court-issued protective order, police report, or affidavit from a third party. Eleven Assembly members thought the bill went too far and voted against it, despite Nevada’s horrific first-in-the-nation ranking of women killed by men. As for SB 49, the Secretary of State’s valiant attempt to enact comprehensive reform, when you’re arguing about whether legislators should be able to use campaign funds to purchase clothing suitable for legislative meetings, and you lose the argument, it’s time to pull the bill and work on a better strategy for 2015. Speak out and let your representative know how you feel at www.leg.state.nv.us. Ω

All shenanigans all the time: www.leg.state.nv.us.

Can the Constitution keep pace with modern America? B[jÊi^_jj^[heWZjeÓdZekj$

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Couple good economic outlook with caution When the Economic Forum meeting—a group of nonpartisan, independent financial experts—came before the Legislature on May 1, their news about the outlook for Nevada was positive. It seems that economic projections for the state are better than they have been in years, and by Chanelle Bessette the Forum expects Nevada to gain additional revenue over the next two years that will help fund Gov. Brian Sandoval’s various development projects. I almost want to knock on wood with what I’m about to ask, but is Nevada finally coming out of its economic crisis? While I am cautious not to get my hopes up, I can’t help but be excited by the news of our state’s nascent comeback. Not only is positive news coming from the halls of the Legislature in Carson City, Nevada is getting recognition on the national stage as well. The May 2013 edition of Fast Company magazine features a ranked list of the most innovative states that have “the most thriving startup

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communities.” Nevada is ranked No. 11, and on a separate sub-list, it is ranked No. 1 for percent of total employment from firms less than 3 years old. Nevada is also ranked No. 1 for its number of fundable entrepreneurs per million residents and No. 2 for fundable investors per million residents. Yessiree bob, it sure sounds like we are getting back on track. But it’s important to remember that success breeds complacency. Or, as the character Pete Campbell put it in Mad Men, “‘Stable’ is that step backwards between successful and failing.” A projected influx of revenue for Nevada sounds wonderful, but without thoughtful planning for resources and without investment in things that will make more money in the long run (like educational opportunities, jobs or low taxes for profitable businesses that move to Nevada), we could end up back at square one. This last weekend I had an opportunity to participate in the Reno-Tahoe WordCamp, an event

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dedicated to teaching all learning levels about how to use the blogging and website design platform WordPress. I was endlessly impressed by the people in Reno’s tech community who put aside their time and effort to teach others how to build their business and programming skills. It was an event all about collaboration and education. It’s events like these that inspire me about the future of Nevada, where people work hard to enable others to achieve and, in doing so, build their own sense of community. In addition, by retaining such talent in the Reno area, we are able to achieve a more cohesive citizenry, especially for Reno’s future in technology that seems to be flourishing more and more every year. I believe such events are an example of what can be achieved by hard work, efficiency and like-minded individuals. If these same principles are applied to developing Nevada’s economy, especially in the technological

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sector, then the potential influx of revenue could be an incredible boon. However, Nevada has gone through several years of cutbacks, layoffs and belt cinching, and it will be very tempting to revel in newfound economic prosperity and perhaps make unwise spending choices. The Economic Forum estimates that another $36.7 million will become available in tax revenue over the next two years, and while that might not sound like a lot (especially compared to Gov. Sandoval’s $6.5 billion budget), it’s hopeful evidence that Nevada is back on track to its pre-recession numbers. Innovation and collaboration have gotten us this far. With the encouragement of economic growth for new businesses and the rapidly growing technological development of the state, I anticipate a major shift in Nevada’s image over the next decade. Ω

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Curious about the Nevada Legislature’s Economic Forum? Check this out: https://leg.state. nv.us/Division/fiscal/ Economic%20Forum/

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Photo/Dennis Myers

Outside the meeting of the Nevada Economic  Forum, Nevada Taxpayers Association lobbyist  Carole Vilardo was interviewed by Nevada Appeal  reporter Geoff Dornan.

ALEC in Nevada spotlight For many years, the Nevada Legislature has paid $1,000 a year dues to the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), just as it does to groups like the National Conference of State Legislatures and the Council of State Governments. But in the case of ALEC, the lawmakers were actually making a contribution of taxpayer dollars to a right wing political group. This week Progress Now, a Nevada political group, released a report on the Nevada Legislature’s involvement with ALEC, including detailed lists of money accepted by Nevada legislators, side-by-side comparisons of ALEC bill drafts with bills introduced by those Nevada legislators, and a historical look at how Nevada came to be a cat’s paw for ALEC. ALEC is a political group created under section 501(3)(c) of the Internal Revenue code. Through it, right wing millionaires and corporations such as R.J. Reynolds, State Farm and Koch Industries indirectly influence state legislatures by cultivating certain legislators with briefings and education activities. This supposedly protects the organization from having to register under state lobbying registration laws and also keeps its hand hidden. Instead, it drafts model laws that its state legislator members take back to their states and pass laws friendly to ALEC’s corporate funders (“Corporate group gets scrutiny,” RN&R, July 28, 2011). Growing scrutiny of ALEC prompted by the higher public profile of the Koch brothers has led some corporate funders such as Bank of America, Bristol Meyers, Johnson & Johnson, Walmart and Wells Fargo to sever their ties with it. The Progress Now report can be read online at www.progressnownevada.org/blog/2013/05/alec-report.html.

Bar provides forum for mining Nevada Lawyer magazine, a publication of the State Bar of Nevada, has published an article titled “The Taxation of Mining.” The piece was written by James Wadhams, a lobbyist who is currently working for the Newmont Gold Corporation against a measure to eliminate a cap on mining taxes. Wadhams’ article is sympathetic to his mining clients and states as fact assertions that are a subject of debate in the Nevada Legislature. No competing article by critics of mining was included in the magazine. Editor John Zimmerman did not respond to an email seeking comment.

Pro and con Reports from the Clean Energy Project and the Nevada Policy Research Institute reached conflicting conclusions in similar reports. The NPRI is a conservative group which produced its own report. It called the state’s Renewable Energy Standard—which requires utilities to move steadily toward greater use of renewable sources for electric generation—a “scheme” that is “unlikley to deliver significant progress” in energy diversification but will drive rates higher and businesses out of state. The report was written by David Tuerck, Paul Bachman and Michael Head. CEP commissioned its report from Applied Analysis, a Las Vegas business research firm also used by the Nevada Mining Association. Its report conceded higher rates—at least for a time—but also said the energy standard will lead to “higher rates of employment, wage and salary payments and economic output.” The report was written by Jeremy Aguero of Applied Analysis. For decades, higher initial rates during transitions to renewables have been assumed, but energy analyst Arne Jung johann has written, “The rates are ‘degressive,’ meaning they decline over time to drive down future prices.”

—Dennis Myers 8   |  RN&R   | 

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The members of the Forum calculated their anxiously awaited prediction after spending six hours listening to economists, business analysts, and experts on government finance. The meeting was held in a packed legislative committee room, with a second room set up so that overflow audience members could watch the session on television. Influential banking and gambling lobbyist John Sande did not attend but said he received regular texts messages from inside the room, a method used by a number of lobbyists.

Services over goods

Back to earth Financial experts: No early economic comeback in Nevada The notion that Nevada’s economy is in recovery received a setback when the Nevada Economic Forum urged by caution in budget-building. Dennis Myers The Forum, whose predictions of state government income are binding on the state budget, said there will be only a small amount of additional state revenue over the amount already expected in the next two years—about $44 million, or less than a percentage point of the Forum’s November numbers.

“Are we recovering as fast as we’d like to? No.” Carole Vilardo nevada taxpayers Association The news turned attention to Senate Joint Resolution 15 of the 2011 Nevada Legislature, which—if approved again this year and then by voters next year—would remove a tax loophole for the mining industry in the state constitution. But otherwise, some observers said the underwhelming news was healthy for the state, because it brings some boosters who had been touting economic recovery back to earth. What recovery exists is clearly not robust. “To suggest that we’re prosperous or that we’ve recovered, whatever, this says otherwise,”

said Guy Rocha, a historian who has compared the current recession to the downturn that followed the decline of the Comstock Lode and is critical of policymakers for not doing enough to rebuild the state’s economy (“What will replace the casinos?” RN&R, July 29, 2010). Job creation has not been the priority in the 2013 Nevada Legislature that it was in the 2011 session. “Are we recovering as fast as we’d like to? No,” said fiscal expert Carole Vilardo of the Nevada Taxpayers Association. “Are we starting to recover? Yes, I think we are. But I think it will be slower than we would like.” Vilardo said expectations that the casino industry will come back to as substantial a place in the state economy as it had before the recession were mistaken. “The greatest part of the industry’s revenue is now coming more from non-gaming activities—shops, wrestling, and so on.” Sen. James Settlemeyer of Douglas County told the Reno Gazette-Journal, “It shows we are not recovered.” The Forum’s message could also sober journalists, who have been criticized for upbeat coverage of a downbeat economy, thus reducing any sense of urgency about Nevada’s situation (“Rose colored reporting,” RN&R, Nov. 24, 2011).

The Economic Forum was created in 1993, in part because of legislative suspicions that governors manipulated revenue predictions (known in bureaucratese as projections) in order to get programs approved.

“To suggest we’ve recovered ... this says otherwise.” Guy Rocha historian Governments must calculate their budgets based on predictions of what their income will be, which can be tricky. It is particularly difficult in Nevada. The unpredictable and highly unstable sales tax is a big part of the tax system. And the lawmakers must plan based on predictions two years in advance because they meet only every other year. (All but four states meet annually and pass one-year budgets, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.) A lot can change in an economy and a budget in two years. When Nevada first adopted a sales tax in the early 1950s to deal with an emergency-type situation in education as the baby boom hit the state’s schools, it was a sweeping tax that applied only to durable goods. But over the years it has been lifted on some items such as food, medical items, and commercial airline-related expenditures. During the same years, consumer spending slowly shifted from goods to services, which are not sales taxable. As a result, the sales tax needed to be raised to keep producing the same


on food in 1979 and to provide for different mining tax rates in 1989. With the highly publicized practice of Nevada shipping mental patients out of state on buses presumably halted and patients jamming mental PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

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amount of money. Lobbyists have successfully defeated efforts to extend the sales tax to services. A new effort to tax services is underway at the legislature this year. A sales tax on services is generally regarded as fairer than a sales tax on goods. Republicans have been more supportive of it than some Democrats. Vilardo marvels at the speed of change in taxation. It wasn’t that long ago, she said, that she was working on the Main Street Fairness Act at the federal level: “It would have allowed us to capture taxes from sales from the phone and catalog sales,” she said. Today, the urgency has shifted to online sales. “People are no longer buying the tangible items but downloading them,” she said, meaning they pay no sales tax on items that were sales taxable when sold in stores, and Nevada thus loses money it once would have received. On the issue of lifting the constitutional cap on mining taxation, the Legislature does have the option of scheduling a special election on the matter this year, as was done to remove the sales tax

During a break in its proceedings, members of the Nevada Economic Forum confer with staffers.

health facilities as a result of firings in the wake of the scandal, some lawmakers say it may not be possible to avoid a special session later this year to deal with the problem. Any solution, they said, will be expensive, and money is hard to come by after the Economic Forum report. Ω

Ramp closed PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

The eastbound on-ramp to Interstate 80 at Center Street was closed for more than an hour Monday as rescue workers tried to extract the driver of this car. Police said the car was traveling south on Center and turned onto the ramp against the red light, crossing the path of an oncoming car that had a green light. After the driver was removed from the vehicle, he was taken to Renown Hospital. The body of a dog killed in the wreck was also removed. OPINION

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THE RENO POPS ORCHESTRA PRESENTS...

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Robin Cobbey and David Toll of CRA standing on a hill overlooking the canyon where mining vehicles were passing through.

May 12, 2013

A landmark case Comstock Residents Association victorious in lawsuit

11:00 a.m - 2:00 p.m.

The Comstock Residents Association (CRA) recently received a summary judgment in their favor in their lawsuit against Storey County. This judgment was that Storey County did, in fact, have the authority to disallow the use of Highway by Sage Leehey 342 by Comstock Mining Inc. (CMI). “The position that the DA [William Maddox] has taken is that only s age l@ NDOT [Nevada Department of Transportation] can control the highway,” news review.c om said Robin Cobbey, president of the CRA. “We won on that because the SUP [special use permit] was regulating the mining, not the highway, and even NDOT will say they don’t have anything to do with this.” Although the CRA views the outcome of the lawsuit as a win, CMI Director of Communications Doug McQuide doesn’t believe the lawsuit actually made any changes. “We always questioned the merits of the lawsuit and never considered it material,” McQuide said. “The part that they see as a victory—that Storey County has the authority to regulate the highway. We had no issues with that. From our perspective, we couldn’t be more pleased with the ruling of the court. It didn’t necessarily benefit us, but it didn’t necessarily hurt us either.” The CRA lost on two points. First, they wanted an injunction to stop use of the highway, which became a nonissue during the trial when the Bureau of Land Management allowed CMI to use the haul road they had previously disallowed. Second, they protested against the procedure in which Storey County Manager Pat Whitten told CMI it could use the highway. Cobbey said CMI had many violations with the Nevada Division of To learn more Environmental Protection and the county. One was for dumping into a stream about the Comstock in spring 2011, a violation that should have voided the SUP that allowed them Residents Association to mine in the area. and this issue, visit “We went to Maddox in April 2011 to show him the violations, and he http://comstock residents.org . said from then on, they were going to be really stern and strict,” Toll said. “Two weeks later was that environmental violation. He never acknowledged it, but if he had stood up then, none of this mess would have happened.” Cobbey said she wants CMI to take the initiative to communicate and work with the community and look into the environmental impacts of their mining practices. Steve Funk, director of media services at Professional Business Intelligence Services, of which the CRA is a client, said he can’t understand why all this damage is being done to a historic area. “The thing that boggles my mind completely is that this is a historic landmark,” Funk said. “It’s an endangered area. They call it the Carson River Mercury Superfund Site because the land has been spoiled by previous mining efforts with mercury.” McQuide, on the other hand, believes that CMI has worked with the community and is trying to help the community as a whole. “We feel we’re completely engaged in the community with our long-term plans,” McQuide said. “We made a commitment to 1 percent royalties to reclamation of the surface mining activity and to a nonprofit foundation for historic preservation, primarily for the historic mining structures on the Comstock. If we pour 10 percent into gold, 1 percent goes into each of these commitments. Ultimately, ending up in millions of dollars.” Ω OPINION

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Wildlife, SteW SteW Ward ardS ard Ship S hip and education Come join us May 24-26, 2013 for the 9th annual Black Rock Rendezvous – a fun, free, family-friendly weekend celebrating the wildlife, landscape, and science of the Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon and Emigrant Trails. Join fellow Nevadans in the festivities with families from as far away as San Diego and New York City who have all come to enjoy the uniqueness of the West’s largest National Conservation Area, just two hours northeast of Reno. Set up camp surrounded by an awe-inspiring landscape filled with wildlife and history. Get ready to make some memories including hikes, educational tours, rocketeering and solar-cooked pizza for the kids, then dance the night away to softly strumming guitars as the campfires’ glows fade. Friends of Black Rock-High Rock, the Nevada Outdoors School and Friends of Nevada Wilderness are partnering with the Bureau of Land Management to present this year’s event, featuring: • Presentations with expert geologists, archeologists, rocketeers and botanists • Tours of archeology sites, the Emigrant Trail, Soldier Meadows, and Black Rock • All-ages group stewardship events • Dutch oven cook-off, raffle and music by Altered Ego • Geode hounding and foraging for native medicinal plants • Friends of Black Rock High Rock Annual Membership General Meeting …and the first ever Full Moon--Playa Slam! This is a Leave No Trace event, focused on exploring and education, embracing our shared roles as stewards of this unforgettable landscape – for the smallest snail and flower to the most majestic mountain. for more information: www.blackrockdesert/rendezvous.org or call 775.557.2900

Explore - Celebrate - Discover and Respect the Black Rock Desert.

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Photo by Chris Talbot


Eliot Hartley, Jesse Kleinedler and Scott Emond of Under the Rose Brewing Co.

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PhOTOsBy

BrAd BYnum

Allison Young

BRAdB@ nEwsREviEw.cOM

F

A new brewery on Fourth Street might signal the next phase of Reno’s beer evolution

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or one of my first RN&R feature stories—way, way back in 2005—I wrote a piece called “Strange brew” profiling the three local microbreweries then in town: Nevada pioneers Great Basin Brewing Co., casino-bound brewpub Brew Brothers and hip upstarts Silver Peak. “There is one great beacon of hope for those of us who value a unique regional identity: beer,” I wrote then with hyperbolic sincerity. “Nothing is more indicative of real community flavor than the local beers. Locally produced beer is the local water—the basic substance of life—handcrafted by local artisans into a potable art meant to elevate the palate and the spirit.” Heady stuff—pun intended—and my apologies for the self quote, but I needed a definite moment in the past to point toward and say, “Look how far we’ve come.”

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So, look how far we’ve come in eight years. Beer might not be the singular savior of Reno, but it is one of the few industries that has grown steadily in the last few years, while most others have struggled. Beer has become even more central to the cultural life of Reno—we’ve always been a town of drinkers, but now we’re a town of more discerning drinkers. Eight years ago, the average Reno beer drinker might have known the difference between a red ale and brown ale (one’s a little darker). Now, we wouldn’t think twice about ordering a fancy foreign style like a saison or a doppelbock. Great Basin and Silver Peak have expanded to multiple locations. Several new microbreweries have opened

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Eliot Hartley and Scott Emond have  done much of the brewery’s   construction themselves.

“a Beer to rememBer” continued from page 13

up—including the Brewer’s Cabinet and Brasserie Saint James—and many newer watering holes, like Chapel Tavern, Lincoln Lounge and Craft Wine and Beer, have put an emphasis on microbrews, imports and other specialty beers. In a way, microbreweries and brewpubs are also part of the local food movement—the idea, popular in progressive circles, that food should come from local sources. Perhaps the brewery might one day be as central to the typical American neighborhood as the park, the post office or the grocery store. There’s already local evidence of this: Great Basin is a cornerstone of downtown Sparks. Silver Peak’s second location on the corner of Sierra and First Streets is a key dining spot for downtown Reno and the Truckee River crowd. The original Silver Peak Brewery and Brasserie St. James are hubs of Midtown. South Reno has BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse (a nationwide chain, though that’s somewhat fitting with the corporate, red-state vibe of those suburbs). East Fourth Street is an area that seems poised for the sort of cultural renaissance that happened in Midtown over the last few years. Fourth Street already has a few great bars, as well as cultural amenities like the Reno Bike Project and the new Valley Arts Research Facility. And, come July, it will have a brewery: Under the Rose Brewing Company. Under the Rose, which is still under construction, is at 559 E. Fourth St., in a location that was once an auto body paint shop, just a couple of doors down from the Reno Bike Project. The building covers 7,250 square feet, with a ceiling that peaks 36 feet off the ground. Scott Emond’s business cards say “Beast Master,” but he’s the founder and president of Under the Rose. The brewery name might sound poetically obscure, until Emond explains that “Rose” refers to the nearby mountain. 14   |  RN&R   | 

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Under the Rose currently brews  small batches in these smaller  brew kettles.

He’s excited about the brewery’s location, Emond and Kleinedler moved to Reno six which he secured last October. years ago. He’s originally from Georgia, and “It has a great artists’ vibe,” he says of she’s from Michigan. They met in the New the neighborhood. “We want people to come York City area. in and stop by on a Saturday afternoon when “We came out here essentially for the they’re picking up a growler or a keg and mountains,” says Emond. “It was that time slowly introduce people to the whole idea of in Reno when Reno was starting to get Fourth Street, and how it is turning the corner, cool. People say, why do you live in Reno? and it is becoming this cool little area, rather Because the surrounding area is awesome! I than where all the prostitutes hang out.” love the hiking, Tahoe and everything. Then, “I think having any young, energetic busia couple years in, things really started to pop.” ness coming in and doing something that’s Not long after the couple moved here, a made of their own is going to help the neighfriend from Brooklyn came through town on borhood,” says Jeff Mitchell of the his way to Burning Man. Emond Reno Bike Project. “It being a had originally planned to go brewery and intentionally with him, but was unable inviting people into the to at the last minute. neighborhood is good Still, Emond offered for Fourth Street.” to give his friend, “Craft beer ... can Under the Rose who Emond says will be a brewery, is known by the be kind of snooty. not a brewpub, so mononym Boris, ... A lot of people don’t no food, though a ride out to the they will have playa. care. They just a tasting room, “Boris is want a beer.” with games, the coolest including bocce dude ever,” says ball and floor Emond. “He’s eliot hartley chess. got this mystique. e s o Under the R brewmaster “We’re He’s like mainly 5-foot-5 distribution,” maybe, says Emond. and walks “We want to around like support other he’s 6-4. He’s businesses. In the sense that, yeah, we’ll be from the Ukraine. I would never fuck with open til 7 here, but when we close at 7, we him. I’ve probably got 40 pounds on him, but send everybody to X bar and do bicycle tours. no way.” We’re closing down here, let’s go hit up these Through some mystical insight, Boris three pubs, and give them business.” decided to give Emond a homebrewing kit in “We’ll let you know where our beer is,” way of thanks for the ride from Reno to the says Jesse Kleinedler, Emond’s wife and the Black Rock Desert. brewery’s vice president. “Then I just started homebrewing and Many of the hippest area bars, like Chapel almost immediately I was like, this is amazTavern, Reno Public House and St. James ing!” he says. He met former Great Basin Infirmary have agreed to carry Under the Rose brewmaster Ryan Quinlan, who he credits beers, and Emond is in talks with others as with helping to launch him in the industry, well as a few restaurants. at the Reno Homebrewer shop on Dickerson

Road. He took an online course, helped out at Great Basin for some experience, and before long was the brewer at B.J.’s in South Reno. “So we ended up staying in Reno,” he says. “At that time we were ready to go anywhere to make brewing a career. Since then, I’ve kind of hopped around on a couple of different ventures, but ended up here.” Emond says he hopes to partner with nonprofits organizations in the future. He’s launching Under the Rose with his own funds, as well as some funds from family and friends, and is launching a Kickstarter campaign. As he’s been getting the brewery going, he’s also been working part-time at Craft Wine and Beer. “He was a very easy hire for me because he’s passionate about beer,” says Craft owner Ty Martin. “Being a specialty shop, we have so many new things coming in all the time, I really rely on my employees staying current on their own. We have a weekly staff meeting, we taste things all the time, we stay on top of education, but there’s so much happening and so much new stuff that if you’re not personally engaged in it, you can’t keep up. That’s why Scott’s so great, because this is what he wants to do and what he’s passionate about.”

By any other name

Emond describes the Under the Rose brews as “French cuisine with an American twist—that really classic, clean blend of flavors. There’s a lot going on but you don’t necessarily know it.” The beers hit a nice middle ground: It’s not like you have to dismantle the flavors with your mouth, but if you want to enjoy the complexity, there’s enough subtle nuance to award contemplation. Rather than naming their beers after clever cultural references or local geographic features, Under the Rose’s beers have simple, one-word names that identify the style and append the word “beer”: Kolschbeer and Saisonbeer are two initial offerings. “This also helps with the labeling because you have to say it’s a beer, and you have to say what kind of beer it is, so if we just name it Kolschbeer, it’s just done,” says Kleinedler.


Though some new brewing companies launch with a plan of specific styles to promote as a flagship beers, Under the Rose plans to take a different approach. “We’ll release two or three beers at a time, and each season we’ll pick up and drop brands accordingly,” says Emond. “And we’ll kind of have this really—head’s up, cheesy term— organic approach to the way we’re selling and marketing our beers. It’s a community-based thing. If people don’t want a certain beer we’re selling, we’re not going to sell that beer.” That said, the Kolschbeer, a German-style ale brewed at lager temperatures, seems to be an early favorite. It’s a light, refreshing beer with some subtle summer fruit flavors, like apple, but drinkable enough to throw back without navel-gazing. “This is our lawnmowing beer,” says Eliot Hartley, whose business card reads “Lord of the Mash”—i.e. brewmaster. “It’s an approachable beer. It’s a way of getting people into craft beer. In all honesty, it can be kind of snooty. At times resembling the wine world in certain ways. And a lot of people don’t care. They just want a beer.” Hartley’s originally from Indiana. He and Emond met when they both worked in “corporate America” at BJ’s. “It’s great experience,” says Emond of his time working at the chain brewpub. “You work on a 50-barrel production system. You understand the ins and outs of large scale production, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of a large corporation—what they’re doing right, what they’re doing wrong. Great learning experience.”

“There’s a lot of small businesses starting Martin praises his employee’s company’s up in Reno,” says Hartley. “I don’t know if brews as “very solid.” you want to call it a renaissance or what, but it “It’s very exciting to me especially having is enticing to be in a place where you can feel local products that are high quality,” he says. that energy. You see a lot of artists and local “That’s the key to me. Local, if it’s not very businesses. There’s a lot of startups and the good, is a pretty poor offering, but if a local community is pretty receptive to that. product is good and competitive, That’s why I’m here.” then it’s the best because you’re Hartley exudes the air of supporting people that a soft-spoken deep are usually going to thinker. enjoy your services as “The main well, be part of reason I like the community In a way, beer is the social that pays taxes. microbreweries cohesion it can The important and brewpubs are facilitate,” part is he says—a supporting also part of the local highfalutin people who food movement— way of saying are doing that it’s fun good work, the idea ... that food to party. “It’s working at a should come from one of those high level, and cornerstones to are passionate local sources. a community to about what they have a place where are doing—making people can come together sure those are the and they have a common people that stick thing they all appreciate. … I around because they raise the really think craft beer should game for everybody.” hold onto its blue collar approachability. Though it might seem that the local It’s something that should be accessible to beer scene has grown at an exponential rate, everybody. ... There are some beers that you everyone at Under the Rose believes that there’s can really into and talk about if you want to. It’s still for more breweries. really interesting and I geek out about that. But “Other breweries have been super supportI realize the vast majority of people just like to ive,” says Hartley. drink beer. Myself included there.” “I think it’s going to be great,” says Tom Young, owner of the Great Basin Brewing

Scott Weiland and the wildabouts

amy schumer M AY 2 5

M AY 2 4

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/ undertherosebrewing.

biggest little city.

the biggest stars in the Creedence Clearwater revisited

Co. “The laws in the state of Nevada are very difficult to deal with, especially when you’re a start-up brewery. I think we’d have a lot more breweries if it wasn’t for some of the stupid restrictive legislation we have in this state. So, I’m glad these guys are jumping in, and I think it’s only going to enhance the whole brewing scene in Nevada and make this place a little more of destination for great beers.” “It’s part of the international upswing in craft beers,” says Martin. “It’s not something that’s unique to Reno. But in Reno we have the benefit of being a small market that has some pretty active distributors, so we’re able to stay at the curve if not ahead of it. And because it’s a small market it seems really abundant.” “We all have a greater purpose,” says Kleinedler. “We all have a common enemy, and it’s the big MillerCoors, InBev, Budweiser. Our goal collectively is to broaden the craft brewery market share. And we’re all in it together, so we have this camaraderie in the industry.” “You go up to Portland or somewhere, and you see the possibility of having some place that’s seemingly oversaturated, says Hartley. “But really all those places have a substantial following. And everyone’s doing well up there and it drives up the quality of the product because there’s so many beers there the more places you have the more it does that. It raises the standard.” “How great to make Reno a beer town?” says Kleinedler. “Like, forget the casinos, have people come here for the beer.”

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There are workshops for wriTers of all sTripes in The reno/Tahoe area bY

Sean Barron

S

ay that you’re an author of some sort. You wrote a story or poem, a screenplay, or even a stage play. You’ve gone from kernel of idea to conception to hard copy in your hand. You’ve marked up that hard copy and revised, printed out another hard copy, marked that up, and revised. You’ve had your mother, father, sister, brother or significant other read your work and receive the standard response: “I really liked it. Great job!” Since you consider yourself a serious writer, you’re feeling a little underfed. You were looking for feedback. You really have no idea whether your work is good or bad. You’ve written for your audience of one, you’ve

brought your piece to what you imagine might be somewhere close to the finish line and put something that you yourself would want to read into the world. But how can you take it to the next level? What happens next? You get some formal training. You change your major to English, much to the chagrin of your CPA mother and father, while attending the University of Nevada, Reno or Truckee Meadows Community College or simply take an entry-level or even advanced creative writing course as an elective. You read a story or poem couched in the point of view of a sentient piece of chewing gum and another about anthropomorphic wolves feuding in medieval kingdoms. Every once in a while you read something from a peer that excites you. Something that challenges you to expand your own margins. Something that calls on you to become a better writer. This is the workshop setting at its best. But what happens after you graduate? What happens if you didn’t get into that competitive MFA program that costs tens of

thousands of dollars a semester? What happens when you no longer have the opportunity to sit in a room with 20 people who are willing to diligently discuss your work and the act and craft of writing itself? What happens if you’re a little too strapped for cash to drop a grand in order to participate in a graduate level workshop at your alma mater? By and large, it’s a common thing for a group of writers to band together in order to hone their craft outside of the college setting. People pledge to meet once or twice a month and, after two or three meetings, start dropping off. The shorter the member list, the quicker your writing group starts to look like a ghost town. But fear not, burgeoning Reno/Tahoe writers, there are groups that have been meeting for years and even decades right under your nose. The Reno/Tahoe area was listed as literary borough number 26 in Ploughshares’ online literary blog. Reno and its surrounding areas have a rich literary history. It includes, but is not limited to, Mark Twain’s stay in Virginia City and John

Steinbeck’s days as caretaker at Fallen Leaf Lake. (He also worked at a fish hatchery in Tahoe while writing his first novel.) Saul Bellow and Arthur Miller were neighbors at Donner Trail Ranch, which was a “divorce ranch” just minutes outside of Verdi.

WorkShop around As for Reno/Tahoe writing groups, the granddaddy of them all is the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley. This is a one week event for poets, prose writers, and screenwriters. The organization has been around for over 40 years and boasts famous alumni like Amy Tan and Michael Chabon. The Community offers workshops, one-on-one conferences, lectures, panels, readings, and discussions on craft. Because of the high level of writing, the admissions procedure is competitive. Applications and submissions must have arrived by April 5. Poetry, writer’s workshops, and screenwriting workshops, which take place between mid June and mid July, each cost around $850

Photo/Allison Young

Members of the Reno Screenwriters Group: Tony  Gonzalez, Pam Dulgar, Michael Gossette, Amy Thyr,  Lou Eftimoff and Rodger Lilley.

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Photo/AllisoN YouNg

THE WAKE-UP CALL 9–10AM WEEKDAYS

The Wake Up Call is Northern Nevada’s alternative morning show streaming live every weekday morning from 9-10am at the Bonanza Casino. With a mix of wacky news, tech tips, styling segments, movie reviews, event listings sponsored by the RN&R, this interactive morning show will keep you laughing for an entire hour long! Featured this week, technology host Ken McKim will have a wealth of tech tips for you in this ever changing tech world!

Some of the Ash Canyon Poets: Susan Priest, Robert Priest, Wayne Carlson, Kathy Walters, and Krista Lukas. The Ash Canyon Poets meet at the Business Resource Innovation Center, 108 E. Proctor St, Carson City.

and include six evening meals. Lodging will run an additional $325-$650, depending on a person’s willingness to share a room. If the price—which is perfectly reasonable, given what the organization has to offer—is a bit daunting, there are scholarships and financial aid available, should a person qualify. Working various jobs at the conference will also reduce overall fees. Carpooling is available as well. Some writers may like to meet more often than once a year. The Unnamed Writer’s Group once had a well-established community of writers, meeting the second Saturday of each month at 9 am at Evelyn Mount Community Center. The group has merged with Writers of the Purple Sage to create a new group called High Sierra Writers. Linda Enos can be contacted at 626-0982 for additional information. If screenwriting is more your form, the Reno Screenwriters is a great starting point. The group began in 2000 with four members and has continued through the years, increasing its member base to around 12 active writers. They meet monthly, and keep an extensive library—possibly the largest in Washoe County—of books on screenwriting as well as full-length screenplays and DVDs. The group requires a prescreening for people interested, where they will gauge interest and skill level. RSW also offers free consultations as a public service. Each member is required to sign a confidentiality agreement, which will help an aspiring writer be at ease, secure from fear of theft of any sort. Members range in age from early 30s to 70s, some with decades of writing experience. Generally a screenplay is about 120 pages for a two-hour movie, so

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LIVE FROM THE POLO LOUNGE 5–6PM WEDNESDAYS The music of Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, and Tony Bennett sung live by great Nevada entertainers. This week, Mr. Chris Costa sings and, as always, Corky Bennett, the King of Reno. It’s the hottest show on Internet TV worldwide!

the group attacks a script in parts, offering advice and critiques along the way. Once the manuscript is where it needs to be, the members will encourage the writer to enter contests, or even hire a professional consultant to assist with a final polish. They also assist with query letters, talking to agents, and pitching ideas. RSW will ensure a screenwriter is “good in a room.” Some of the work generated has piqued interest from Hollywood. The group also organizes one major seminar a year. Group funds and registration fees pay to bring a renowned writer to Reno. Recently, they were able to bring in Bill Martell, who has more than 19 produced films and HBO specials. Pam Dulgar is the contact person and can be reached at pamjoann@yahoo.com. Poets will have several resources in surrounding areas. Ash Canyon Poets meets once a week, every Friday night from 7-9 p.m. in Carson City. An interested poet can contact Krista Lukas at 392-0500 or kristalukas21@gmail.com. The Lone Mountain Writers meet at the Western Nevada Community College often and can be contacted at lonemtn@wncc.edu. Writers of any skill level can take advantage of these resources, whether they plan to pursue publication, or simply like to put words on a page, whether a writer is interested in receiving valuable feedback, or sharpening their own critical eye. So much of this process happens in the dark. These organizations can help put your work into the world. Ω

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For more inform, check out the Nevada Arts Council’s Nevada Writer’s Resources list at http:// nac.nevadaculture.org/?option=com_content&task =view&id=1134&itemid=367

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special aDVeRTising secTion

It’s happen ing in

EVENTS CALL FOR ARTISTS – ARTS IN bLOOM The 11th Annual Arts in Bloom Art & Wine Festival is seeking 35 local and regional Fine Artists for our event on Saturday, July 20, 2013 at Victorian Square in Sparks. Exhibit and sell your art, receive an Artist Profile in the RN&R and be a part of a long-running, popular community event. Cost is $150, including space, canopy, feature in RN&R program and on website. For an application and more info: johnm@newsreview. com or (775) 324-4440, ext. 3515.

ACTIVITIES WESTERN HERITAGE FESTIVAL Drawing from a rich heritage of ranching, railroading and mining, the Western Heritage Festival teaches visitors about the unique diversity of Nevada and the Reno area. Sa, 5/11, 11AM-6PM, free. Victorian Square, 1555 Victorian Ave. WALLY’S WORLD: LONELIEST ART COLLECTION Features 35 pieces of Nevada art from the unparalleled personal collection of Wally Cuchine.Tu-Sa, 11AM-4PM through 6/15. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-1144. bUILDING THE TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILROAD The Hidden Wonder of the World: The Transcontinental Railroad from Sacramento to Donner Summit. This award-winning documentary film is presented by the film’s author. F, 5/10, 7PM, free. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-1144. ORCHID EXPOSITION Presented by Dr. Shawn Abbott with the Nevada Orchid Society. Get all of your orchid questions answered and see an orchid potting demonstration. Sa, 5/11, 11AM & 1PM and Su, 5/12, 11AM. Free. Canned food donations for the local food bank is appreciated. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551. TIMELESS TREASURES: A CELEbRATION OF NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE This colorful exhibit captures the vibrant spirit of Native American culture and includes paintings, pottery, arrowheads, cradle boards, baskets, musical instruments and more. Tu-Su through 5/26, $5/adults; under age 12 free. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-1144.

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special aDVeRTising secTion

! AMERICAN YOUTH SOCCER Annual registration for the local American Youth Soccer Organization (AYSO) Region 166 Fall 2013 season. Everyone Plays philosophy. Tu, 4/30, 5:30-8:30PM, Sa, 5/4, 9AM-1PM, W, 5/15, 5:30-8:30PM and Sa, 6/1, 9AM-1PM. $100 per child until May 31; $135 per child after May 31. Mendive Middle School, 1900 Whitewood Dr. (775) 353-5780.

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC JOEL EDWARDS Th, 5/9, 5:30PM, F, 5/10, 6PM and Sa, 5/11, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300. bUDDY EMMER Th, 5/9, 7PM, F, 5/10, 8PM, Sa, 5/11, 8PM and Su, 5/12, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300. COUNTRY NIGHT WITH SILVERWING Get ready to have a rockin’ great country time! F, 5/10, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030. MOJO GREEN Sa, 5/11, 8PM, $15. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300. KYLE WOLVERTON & JOEY NAVARRO W, 5/15, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300. TODD bAUM Get your mom out and party with Todd Baum and the gang! Sa, 5/11, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030. CHILI SAUCE Th, 5/16, 7PM, F, 5/17, 8PM, Sa, 5/18, 8PM and Su, 5/19, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300. METAL ECHO RETURNS Powerhouse female-fronted Rock-Grunge-Metal tribute performing all your favorites from Iron Maiden to Soundgarden to Tool! Sa, 5/18, 9PM, F, 7/12, 9PM and F, 8/30, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030.

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now! CRUSH Dance to some power pop-punk! F, 5/24, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030. COUNTRY AT THE CAbARET The Casino Cabaret will come alive with the best in country music and dancing for “Country at the Cabaret” fearuring DJ Jamie G. W, 7PM and Sa, 9PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300. LIVE JAZZ Vocal and instrumental jazz from “The Great American Songbook”, performed by First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz. Fridays, 6PM through 12/27, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks, NV 89441 (775) 657-8659. COUNTRY NIGHT WITH SILVERWING Get ready to have a rockin’ great country time! F, 5/10, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030. LADIES 80S WITH DJ LARRY WILLIAMS Ladies ’ with DJ Larry Williams, every Thursday! Th, 7PM through 10/4, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300. bILL DAVIS Sa, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659. KARAOKE ASPEN GLEN bAR Every Sat night. Hosted by Mike Millard of Cycorockstar Entertainment. Sa, 9PM-2AM through 9/14. Aspen Glen Bar, 5215 Vista Blvd. 89436 / (775) 354-2400. SPIRO'S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000. THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861. OPEN MIC GREAT bASIN bREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711.

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY! CITY OF SPARKS Mayor: Geno Martini. Council members: Julia Ratti, Ed Lawson, Ron Smith, Mike Carrigan, Ron Schmitt. City Manager: Shaun Carey. Parks & Recreation Director: Tracy Domingues. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 3532311 or through the City of Sparks website. WEb RESOURCES: www.sparksitshappeninghere.com www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com THis secTion is pRoViDeD as a pUBlic seRVice BY THe Reno neWs & ReVieW anD is noT FUnDeD oR aFFiliaTeD WiTH THe ciTY oF spaRKs


Photo/Ashley hennefer

Down in the valley

Eric Brooks and Shawn Carney are two of the founders of the Valley Arts Research Facility.

Valley Arts Research Facility Artists Shawn Carney, Eric Brooks and Ryan Fassbender see potential for a new artistic by movement in a downtown building with Ashley Hennefer more than 70 years of history—but they first must peel away the crumbling layers before they can create it. The three men are the founders of the Valley Arts Research Facility, a new artist co-op housed in 420 Valley Road, the former home of Valley Print and Mail. Valley Arts was conceptualized in fall 2011—the research aspect of the project came later, almost as a joke, but now refers for more to the exchange of knowledge and creativity information, visit www.facebook.com/ that they hope will happen in the space. ValleyArts Carney, Brooks and Fassbender researchfacility. discussed the idea for a collective prior to finding a location, but then pitched the idea to the building’s owner, who agreed that a collective would be a good fit for the space. They’re in the process of establishing the project as a non-profit and running it as a co-op, offering rentable space for artists to set up shop and improve their abilities. “We want people here to not already be working artists,” Carney says. “We’re not

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curating the best of the region. We want this to be a place for people to hone their skills.” They’ve made it a priority to maintain the building’s historical features such as the hardwood floors—buried for years under carpet and linoleum—and a boxcar, left over from the days when the train tracks ran right up to the building. “It’s a renovation, not a remodel,” says Brooks. Carney says that it’s an important place for Reno’s past and future. “It’s part of the block known as ‘the block that built Reno,’” he says. The building’s 11,500 square feet are separated into two floors. The bottom floor will have a stage, a lending library and studio space. A room with a one-way mirror, which currently serves as a band practice space, is designated for performance art. The second floor will feature a gallery space, a lounge, a kitchen, some administrative offices and eventually, an artists’ loft. As of now, 18 artists are using the space. The founders want to focus on

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supporting local artists, but eventually want to build a partnership with artists in San Francisco to “bring Reno outside, and bring artists to Reno,” Carney says. Brooks, who spent many years as an artist in the Bay area and abroad, believes that downtown Reno is on the verge of change. He and Carney agree that within the next couple of years, more creative projects will fill the empty buildings on Fourth Street. “So much is possible here,” says Brooks. Carney also hopes that the collective’s presence downtown will draw attention to the city’s homeless population. He’s been talking to other local organizations about hosting food drives or skill-trade programs. Part of this, he says, is tapping into Reno’s youth and getting them involved.

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Although the facility is not yet officially open to the public, concerts and art shows have been open on an invite-only basis. The founders are hoping for an official opening in late summer, but there’s still quite a bit of work to be done on the building. “The next few months are going to have some surprises,” notes Brooks. “I’m pretty sure our true nature will be defined.” For Carney, it’s all part of a bigger goal. He envisions offering workshops on food availability, energy sustainability and artistic collaboration. “One of the long-term goals is social recovery and wellness,” he says. “We want there to be this side that’s encouraging and self-sustaining.” This also means that the founders don’t intend to be the only curators—they want to offer the space as an open community forum. “The sharing of creative processes is what we’re most excited about,” says Brooks. “It will be other people having a place to come to give them a sense of Ω family.”

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BEER P ANCAKES THE ALL-AMERICAN BREAKFAST

El Tumi 585 E. Moana Lane, 827-5454 Peruvian cuisine reflects local practices and ingredients including influences from the indigenous Inca and by Dave Preston cuisines brought in with immigrants such as Spanish, Chinese, Italian, German and Japanese. The three traditional staples of Peruvian cuisine are corn, potatoes and chili peppers. Staples brought by the Spanish include rice, wheat and meatsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;beef, pork and chicken.

Susanaâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Contreras,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; whoâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;co-ownsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Elâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Tumiâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; withâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;herâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; son,â&#x20AC;&#x201A;preparesâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Peruvianâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;dishâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ajiâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;deâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; gallina.â&#x20AC;&#x201A;

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HANDCRAFTED ARTISAN BREWMASTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BREAD Delicious + Baked Daily

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,&.<%HHU%UHDGĸ/RUHQ]R-DODSHQR&KHHVH%UHDG 'DPQ*RRG/RDI (Our Signature Seeded Bread)

Reno

Taps &T & Tanks

Sparks

5525 S. Virginia St. 775.284.7711

E. McCarran between Rock & Mira Loma 775.856.1177

846 Victorian Ave. 775.355.7711

greatbasinbrewingco.com 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201A; |â&#x20AC;&#x201A; RN&R â&#x20AC;&#x201A; |â&#x20AC;&#x201A;

MAYâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;9,â&#x20AC;&#x201A;2013

ground walnuts. This dish is traditionally served over rice, with boiled yellow potatoes and black olives. This was a thick, hearty, savory dish that had layers of flavors from garlic to Parmesan cheese to an almost sweetspicy finish on your palate. Then, I had ceviche de pescado ($12.95), marinated white fish. The fish was tilapia cut into small pieces marinated in lemon juice with tomatoes, peppers, onions, garlic, ginger, Peruvian spices and chopped cilantro. Unlike many ceviches, this was served on a plate atop a sweet potato with yellow corn on the side and finely sliced white onions on top with just a little of the marinade, not floating in a bowl with the marinade, like a more typical ceviche. The fish was tender, with citrus, garlic and a little heat. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no alcohol on the menu, but there are traditional Peruvian drinks like chicha morada ($2.45) made by boiling water with purple corn, fruits, cinnamon, cloves and, finally, sweetened with sugar and lime juice. In Peru, the purple corn has been used for centuries. Purple corn is fast approaching classification as a functional food, an integral component of the diet that provides energy and essential nutrients. Served over ice, it had a sweet, spicy taste and was refreshing. They also serve Inca Kola ($1.75), one of the most emblematic brands in Peru. Inca Kola stands as a pride symbol for the Peruvians. Also known as Inca Cola or â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Golden Kola,â&#x20AC;? itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a soft drink with a sweet soft flavor from an herb called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hierba Luisa.â&#x20AC;? The yellow, carbonated drink offered flavors like pineapple, a little bubblegum, and even some cream soda. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an acquired taste. Take a trip to South America with your palate at El Tumi. We are fortunate in Reno to have the ability to try different kinds of foods from different parts of the world. You should challenge yourself to try a different kind of food each month, whether it is another cultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s food or just that strange-looking fruit that is in the produce section. You never know what your new favorite food could be, so just get out there and try something new. Ί Photo/ALLison Young

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Peru the day

El tumi is open Monday through saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

El Tumi is a simple place that seats about 40. The menu has a nice selection of beef, chicken and seafood ranging from $6.95-$18.95. There are also soups, sandwiches and appetizers ($2.95-$8.95). The service is friendly and efficient. The first thing on the table was chips and salsa with huacatay, a native Peruvian herb related to marigold and tarragon, with an aroma somewhere between mint and basil. Among thousands of native herbs, huacatay has given Peruvian seasoning its unique zest from Incan to contemporary times. It was cool green in color and had just a bit of heat on the finish, very tasty. I started with a beef dish, lomo saltado ($11.95), which has Asian influences, consisting of strips of sirloin marinated in vinegar, soy sauce and spices, then stir-fried with red onions, parsley and tomatoes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s served over white rice with French fries that look more like potato wedges. The flavor was subtle and savory while the fries added another texture. Next, aji de gallina ($9.95), a chicken dish thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slightly spicy and bright yellow from the famous aji amarillo peppers, and rich from the unusual cream sauce made with


Join Us For The Great Basin Community Food Co-Op’s

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SATURDAY, MAY 11 VICTORIAN SQUARE, SPARKS

Saturday, May 18, 2013 • 9 am - 1 pm

Presented by

FeaturinG • Hungry Mother Organics • Churchill Butte Organics River School Farm • Avanzino Farms • Ecologica Farms Full Circle Compost and Many More! •

There will be dozens of local organic producers from Northern NV and beyond selling seedling starts: tomatoes, herbs, lettuce, squash, peppers, annuals, perennials, compost, worm tea and more! Fresh coffee & brunch will be served by the co-op. CASH only. We will be located in front of the co-op on Flint St. and also be taking over the entire street from Ridge St. to Court St.

This project was made possible through The Nevada Department of Agriculture with funding from the USDA, AMS Specialty Crop Block Grant.

Parking is available at surrounding businesses and down the street in the Tyco construction lot on the corner Flint and Liberty.

Contact Us: (775)324-6133 info@greatbasinfood.coop

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LIVE MUSIC | COWBOY POETRY CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES | ARTS & CRAFTS DUMMY ROPING | SADDLE MAKING WILD BURROS | SPINNING & WEAVING BASKET MAKING | SQUARE DANCING POW WOW DRUMMING | FOLKLIFE PROGRAMS

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we grow community. Made Possible by:

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|   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   MAY 9, 2013  WHFRNR.indd 1

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5/1/13 7:57 PM


Iron Man lives again! Iron Man 3 Shane Black, writer of such infamous screenplays as Lethal Weapon and Last Action Hero, made one of my all-time favorite directorial debuts with 2005’s Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. I thought it marked the arrival of a true directorial force. And then he just disappeared. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang featured the best Robert Downey Jr. performance ever put to by screen. (If you haven’t seen Kiss Kiss Bang Bob Grimm Bang, and you think I’m overdoing it with the compliments, just watch the movie.) Maybe b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m Downey agrees with that statement, because he pushed for Black as his director on Iron Man 3 and, thankfully, he got his wish. Iron Man 3 is as good as the first in the franchise, markedly better than the OK second installment, and just slightly inferior to last year’s The Avengers. Like Kiss Kiss Bang

4

Think Free

“Hey honey, will you bring me a tall, cold glass of motor oil? Thanks.”

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Bang, it features dark humor, and gives us a protagonist that is slightly unreliable. This movie shows us a Stark with the capacity for major slippage. The film opens with a few mistakes Tony Stark made a long time ago, before he went all iron, and sets us up for the perils Stark faces today. Chief among his enemies is The Mandarin (Ben Kingsley), a tripped-out version of Osama Bin Laden who executes Americans on TV and openly taunts the U.S. president (William Sadler). Another big enemy would be himself, because he’s battling panic attacks and insomnia after the events of The Avengers. These blows to his mental and physical capacity lead to major mishaps in his laboratory, and a pretty scary moment when one of his suits pounces on Pepper Potts (Gwyneth Paltrow) in their bedroom.

Chief among Stark’s flaws has always been his vanity, which leads to his calling out The Mandarin, resulting in all kinds of hellfire coming down on his West Coast compound. Stark winds up going deep undercover, at one point with a kid sidekick (Ty Simpkins). The kid sidekick stuff sounds like it would be lame, doesn’t it? Black and Downey have a way of taking conventional crap and having a lot of fun with it, so the kid is cool. In the intro flashback, we meet nerdy Aldrich Killian (Guy Pearce), who’s working on some really big genetics thing. Stark blows him off so he can sleep with Maya Hansen (Rebecca Hall), another scientist working on something she thinks will be for the good of man, but probably won’t be in the end. James Badge Dale and Stephanie Szostak are on hand as Mandarin assassins who have the power to heat up their bodies Human Torch-style and regenerate limbs when they’re lopped off. They remind a bit of Robert Patrick in Terminator 2. Paltrow is allowed to play a little more in this installment, with her Pepper going through all kinds of tribulations. Don Cheadle gets limited screen time as Colonel James Rhodes/War Machine/ Iron Patriot, but he certainly makes the most of it. As for The Mandarin, Kingsley has a lot of fun in ways you won’t expect. Simply said, The Mandarin is one of the more unique villains to arise from the Marvel movie franchises, and he takes some major detours from his comic book incarnation. The action scenes are stellar. One that involves a high altitude rescue after a bunch of people are sucked out of a plane is the best of the franchise thus far, and the finale involving multiple suits battling the flame guys is a rouser. And let it be said that Black manages an excellent balance of action and character development, with every major character in the film getting satisfactory screen time. Black and Downey are a great screen team, and that’s highly apparent in Iron Man 3. Next up for Tony Stark will be Avengers 2, then who knows after that. More than any other superhero franchise, this one is going to be a bitch to reboot when its leading man decides to hang it up. Ω


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Spike Lee tried to get a movie about American hero Jackie Robinson, starring Denzel Washington, off the ground for many years, but couldn’t make it happen. I get a feeling that Lee, who made one of the great biopics with Malcolm X, would’ve done something really special with the subject. This effort from director Brian Helgeland (Payback) is OK, even really good at times, but gets awfully hokey in too many moments. Chadwick Boseman is a great pick to play Robinson, as is Lucas Black as Pee Wee Reese. Harrison Ford delivers big time as Branch Rickey, the man who brought Robinson to the majors, and Christopher Meloni leaves the movie all too soon as Dodgers manager Leo Durocher, who was suspended the year Robinson made his debut. Boseman shines, even when the movie doesn’t, and it’s a lot of fun to see Ford do something this craggy and different. I’m thinking Robinson went through some major hell during his baseball times, and this movie only scratches the surface. It’s good, but it should’ve been great.

3

The Company You Keep

Robert Redford directs himself as an upstate New York lawyer with a past who must flee his life when a nosy journalist (Shia LaBeouf) discovers his true identity. The film gives us fictional characters that were former members of the very real Weather Underground, and they are played by the likes of Susan Sarandon, Nick Nolte and Julie Christie. LaBeouf does much of the heavy lifting, and it’s some of his better work in quite some time. Redford is just OK here, as is his movie. I can’t say it blew me away, but I didn’t dislike it, either. It’s just one of those movies that gets by with semicompetent directing and acting without truly wowing you. Others in the cast include Stanley Tucci, Chris Cooper, Terrence Howard, Richard Jenkins and Sam Elliott.

3

Evil Dead

The low-budget classic horror film gets a slick new remake and loses the iconic character of Ash in favor of a girl trying to kick heroin. Mia (Jane Levy) is trying to sober up, so friends and family take her out to a secluded cabin. They find a mysterious book in the basement, somebody reads it out loud, Mia goes for a walk in the woods, the woods treat her badly, and gore aplenty ensues. While Levy is fine in the central role, and Lou Taylor Pucci is good as one of the guys who should’ve gone to a hotel instead, the film has a few too many uninteresting characters. Shiloh Fernandez is a dud as Mia’s brother, and Elizabeth Blackmore is only there so somebody can cut her own arm off. Let it be said that moments such as the arm-cutting are well done. The film is a true gore fest. While it is OK, and doesn’t slander Sam Raimi’s original trilogy, it’s not a horror classic by any means. Like most good horror these days, it’s just good, and that is all.

4

Jurassic Park 3D

Steven Spielberg’s dinosaur fantasy is still one of the best adventure films ever made, but the new 3-D retrofit winds up muting the presentation rather than expanding it. Unlike, say, James Cameron’s Titanic, which looked and felt like it was meant to be shot in 3-D, the presentation here feels forced. The color is diminished, and the scope seems “squished.” It’s not awful, and I’ve seen worse 3-D, but it fails to enhance the film much. Some theaters are offering the movie in its original 2-D presentation, and I would recommend revisiting it in one of those theaters for sure. The combination of practical and computer effects to create the dinosaurs has easily stood the test of time. The dinosaurs continue to look amazing. Watching the 3-D version, I did notice that Jeff Goldblum sticks his tongue out a lot when he speaks. It’s creepy.

5

Mud

It’s official: Jeff Nichols, who gave us the brilliant Take Shelter, is a writer/ director who stands among the best of them. Matthew McConaughey plays the title character, a chipped-tooth, wild-haired drifter living in a boat in a tree along the Mississippi. Two kids, Ellis and Neckbone (Tye Sheridan of The Tree of Life, and Jacob Lofland) stumble

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GREEN

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upon him, and find themselves part of his strange and dangerous world. McConaughey is just catching wave after wave lately, and this is his best one yet. He makes Mud a little scary, yet charming and cunning. Sheridan and Lofland are terrific as the young friends who should probably stay away from guys living in boats in trees. The cast also boasts Reese Witherspoon, Michael Shannon and Sam Shepard, all of them equally great. Ladies and gentleman, we have the year’s first “excellent” movie. Jesus, it took long enough.

2

SweetdealS for the whole

Oblivion

Tom Cruise gives it his all, but his all isn’t enough to save this sci-fi effort from feeling like a bunch of movies you’ve seen before. He plays Jack, a man on a sweep-up mission of Earth 60 years after it was beat up by aliens. He has a lot of dreams featuring a dream woman (Olga Kurylenko) and the Empire State Building, and seems to feel right at home when visiting the planet. Thing is, he’s far too young to have been around when the Empire State Building stood tall—or is he? The movie wants to be clever, but you’ll see the big twist a mile away. As for the visuals, some work (the Empire State Building in ruins is cool) and some don’t (most of the other effects). Morgan Freeman shows up as a survivor dude who smokes cigars, which means he’s smoking cigars that are over 60 years old. He must’ve grabbed a thousand of them and the world’s greatest humidor as the apocalypse unfolded.

2

Oz the Great and Powerful

3

Pain & Gain

family

James Franco is in over his head for Sam Raimi’s mostly lame prequel to The Wizard of Oz. The title character calls for somebody with that old school Hollywood charm like Robert Downey, Jr., or Johnny Depp. Franco looks like a kid playing dress up here, and he’s not even the worst thing about the movie. That would be Mila Kunis looking completely lost as the witch who will become that witch we all know from the original Oz. I’m sorry—that witch isn’t supposed to be all corseted and hot. As for Rachel Weisz, she fares best as yet another witch, while Michelle Williams is just serviceable as Glinda the Good Witch. Raimi relies heavily on CGI effects—big surprise—and they look pretty crappy for the most part. This is an underwhelming movie in much the same way his Spider-Man 3 missed the mark. It’s overblown, misguided and odd.

Director Michael Bay delivers the rare decent film with this crazy concoction based on a true story. Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson and Anthony Mackie play a trio of bodybuilders who decide to kidnap a rich guy (Tony Shalhoub) and force him to sign over all of his assets. The kidnapping plot nets them the dough, but greed and general stupidity result in the plan going south and people dying. Bay uses the story, based on the real-life shenanigans of Daniel Lugo (Wahlberg) to poke fun at the ‘90s, give Wahlberg a chance to get laughs Wahlberg style, and provide Johnson with his best role yet. The movie contains all of that stuff that makes Bay such an annoying director (slo-mo, hyper-editing, etc.), but it works because the actors pull it off.

4

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The Place Beyond the Pines

Derek Cianfrance follows up his brilliant Blue Valentine with a film bigger in scope but still starring Ryan Gosling. Gosling plays Luke, a motorcycle stunt guy who finds out he has a kid and wants to be a part of his life. Problem is, the kid is the product of a one-night stand, and the mom (Eva Mendes) has moved on. Luke resorts to robbing banks, which culminates in a meeting with a rookie cop played by Bradley Cooper. The film then focuses on Cooper’s character for a segment before dealing with Luke and Avery’s kids (played by Dane DeHaan and Emory Cohen) when they are teens. The movie is long, but never boring, and it crackles most when Gosling is on screen. It’s all about the sins of the fathers, and Cianfrance presents it in a way that resonates. Also stars Ray Liotta and Ben Mendelsohn.

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MAY 9, 2013


Psychobilly path Los Pistoleros A friend once told me psychobilly was 80 percent fashion. I disagreed. Psychobilly, I by Fil Corbitt said, is 80 percent aesthetic—and there’s a big difference. It’s not how the band dresses that matters, it’s how the band creates an atmosphere. Psychobilly has a sort of haunted, fast, carelessly cool aura—a reckless mix of classic punk rock, rockabilly, surf reverb Photo/Brad Bynum

The drummer, Spencer Eldridge, has the heavyhandedness of a metal drummer, and every crack locked in with the slaps on the bass’s thick strings. Though the drums and bass were the backbone, what seemed to drive the sound is the guitar riffs. Guitarist and second vocalist Julio Giraldo dished out solid guitar lines, shooting from the lower strings up to the high notes with ease. He used simple scales to their fullest, and played his role well, complementing, not overshadowing, the rhythm section. Giraldo and Chamberlain swapped lead vocal responsibilities, bouncing between Giraldo’s more refined rock ’n’ roll, croon-like tone and Chamberlain’s scrappy, classic punk shout—similar to the melodic rasp of The Quakes’ Paul Roman. What surprised me most, though, was the tone of the practice. It was obvious they were enjoying it, but they were very serious. Los Pistoleros is a hardworking band. They spent the winter writing a brand new 17-song album, titled Devil in the Mirror, that they hope to release in the fall, and when I asked what shows they had coming up, they seem to have more than one every weekend. “We’re always writing,” said Andy 86, out in front of the house taking a smoke break. “Constantly working.” The effort definitely shows. They play with a dynamic that’s only achieved with a lot of practice. When Andy 86 took a drag from his cigarette, I noticed a black blood blister on his slapping hand. “Yeah, he used to bleed everywhere,” said Chamberlain. “It’s more calloused now,” said Andy 86. My friend’s initial argument—that psychobilly is 80 percent fashion—dismisses the genre as a gimmick. But it’s no more derivative than any other genre—psychobilly just doesn’t go out of its way to hide it. Los Pistoleros and the genre as a whole embrace the elements that created it and produces something honest from them. And that something is damned fun to listen to. Ω

and a B-rated horror movie, both in sound and look. Los Pistoleros, one of Reno’s go-to psychobilly bands, does the genre justice. When I walked into their practice space—a small house on Valley Road—I was told by a gal out front, “It’s the door on the left that says, ‘Stay the fuck out.’” I grabbed a handful of the old T-shirt that was functioning as a doorknob and slipped into a bedroom humid with sweat. It felt like they’d been practicing for hours. The band members briefly acknowledged my presence, but immediately jumped into another song, and ran through song after song while I sat on an amp. A small PA system was set up in the room and the speakers tipped over near the pillows on the bed. “This one’s called ‘Macabre,’” said Chris Chamberlain, the band’s guitarist and vocalist. They counted into a speedy beat led by the upright bassist, who goes by the name “Andy 86.” The upright bass is another part of that psychobilly aesthetic. The bass has to carry the beat with a rockabilly-like slapping. Psychobilly is a rhythmic music.

A fun band to hang out with: Spencer Edlridge, Chris Chamerlain, Andy 86 and Julio Giraldo.

Los Pistoleros perfrom on may 25 at Studio on 4th, 432 E. Fourth St. For more information, visit www. facebook.com/ LoSPIStoLEroS666.

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MAY 9, 2013

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25


THURSDAY 5/9 1UP 214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET

EDM Thursday, 10pm, no cover Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

Hellbound Glory, Sucka Punch, The Atomiks, Riptide Bandits, 8pm, $10

Yan Doe Album Release Party, 8:30pm, $5

BAR-M-BAR

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

CEOL IRISH PUB

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

The Clarke Brothers, 9pm, no cover

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

Mark Diorio, 11:15am, no cover

Steven Hanson and Friends, 7pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

CHAPEL TAVERN

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

CORKSCROO BAR AND GRILL

Comedy

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: John Henton, Sammy Obeid, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Charles Fleischer, Brant Hoffman, W, 9pm, $25 Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Utility Players, Th, 7;30pm, $12, $16; Tony D’Andrea, F, 7pm; Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 9:30pm, $13, $16; 50 Shades of Bea starring Adam Whitney as Bea Arthur, Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm, $15, $18

RN&R

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

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235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

FUEGO 170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Reno We Have a Problem, Na Na Nonchalant, 9pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

JAVA JUNGLE

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

MAY 9, 2013

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Open mic, 7pm, no cover Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Open Mic and Art Show, 8:15pm, M, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: ANT featuring Jackie Jones, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Ivan Pecel, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

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Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

Burning Dance Night, 8pm, no cover Blarney Band, 9pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/13-5/15 1up Wednesday, 10pm, W, no cover

Mark Castro Band, 9pm no cover

10 E. Ninth St., (775) 284-7270

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

26

SUNDAY 5/12

Hellbilly Bandits, 9:30pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

May 9, 8 p.m. Studio on 4th 432 E. Fourth St. 410-5993

SATURDAY 5/11 Golden Gate Bridge Art Car Fundraiser w/Miss Cooper, The Rhino, Lucky, 10pm, $10

Bazooka Zoo, 9:30pm, no cover

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

Jazz Gitan

FRIDAY 5/10

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Keith Alan Hartranft, 1pm, no cover Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover


THURSDAY 5/9

FRIDAY 5/10

KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE

SATURDAY 5/11

SUNDAY 5/12

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/13-5/15

Pain Clinic, Envirusment, Archea, Sinicle, Swimming for Solace w/Subdocta vs. Scattered, 7pm, $6 Boggan, New Car Smell, others, 7pm, $6

211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Tyler, The Creator, 8pm, Tu, $23-$45

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

Open Mic/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481 3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

POLO LOUNGE

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

RAW BAR LAKE TAHOE

Live music/DJs, 8pm, $0-$15

31 Highway 50, Stateline; (775) 580-6029

Jelly Bread

Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

RED DOG SALOON

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Smoke Signalz, 9pm, $5, no cover charge for women

DJ battles, 9pm, $5-$15

Lucky, 8pm, no cover

Lady and the Tramps, 8pm, no cover

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

RED ROCK BAR

241 S. Sierra St., (775) 324-2468

THE RED ROOM

Deception, 9:30pm, $5

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

RISE NIGHTCLUB

May 10, 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Reggae Vibes, 8pm, $0-$15

Karaoke, 8pm, M, Mixtape DJ/iPod jam session, 8pm, Tu, live music, 8pm, W, $0-$15

Comedy Night hosted by Brandon Lara, 9:30pm, no cover

Open mic hosted by Frankie Ferreira and Brian Depew, 7:30pm, M, no cover

Deception, 9:30pm, $5

Fusion Fridays w/DJs Kentot, Fredy G, 10pm, Rise Culture Night, 10pm, $10 $10; no charge for women until midnight

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

RUBEN’S CANTINA

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5, no charge for women before midnight

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

Tyler, The Creator

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

Silverwing, 9pm, no cover

Tazer, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Night w/Tany Jane, 8pm, M, Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Strange on the Range, 7pm M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STREGA BAR

May 14, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

STUDIO ON 4TH

Jazz Gitan, Adrian Bellue, 8pm, $5

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

Come LOL with US w/Adam Stone, Kinsie Damon, John Agar, 8pm, $20

HYPNOT!C-Soteria Benefit w/Dan Kimm, Josiah Night, Smiley Mikey, others, 5pm, $10

The Kimberly Trip, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

Standup Tues. Comedy Open Mic, 7:30pm, Tu, Blues Jam Wednesday, 7pm, W, no cover

Join us for the first

Old Southwest Street Fair

SERIES WINTER WIN NTER T R MU M MUSIC USIC C SE S ERIE RIES IES

Thursday, Th Thursd day ay,, Ma May y9

Machine Gun Have W/ Machin M ne Gu G un Vendetta, Reno We Ha ave A Problem, Voted Habituals. Prob blem, ble m, Vot V ed Best Band, The Habitu als. G Fr Get Free Tickets From Bands!

ALLEY PARTY THE E AL A LLEY L ANNIVERSARY PAR RTY

Friday, F Fr i ay, May 10 id

Fet: Hellbound Glory, Sucka Punch, The Atomiks, And Riptide Bandits

MAY 11TH

YAN DOE ALBUM RELEASE PARTY

Saturday, May 11

Burgers • Bangers Fish & Chips • Shepherd’s Pie Tantalizing Chocolate Bacon

RUBLES PLUNGE

MAY 17TH

W/ J French, And Ever And Ever

Betty Rocker

THE DWARVES

Marianarchy

OPEN MIC NITE

W/ A.D.D. Elephant Rifle, The Flesh Hammers

MAY 18TH

- SATURDAY -

W/ Dusty Miles And The Cryin' Shame, Spike Mcguire, Blood on The Land

Friday, May 17

- MON & TUE -

LADIES 2 FOR 1 WINE

Saturday, May 18

- WEDNESDAY -

PROXY LIVE

BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER 9AM TO CLOSE

CHELSEA CROWELL

Sunay, May 19

WE CELEBRATE ANOTHER YEAR and The RENO Return of HELLBOUND GLORY! PLUS Sucka Punch, The Atomiks, Riptide Bandits. May 10!!!

GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW: May 18 — The Dwarves May 23 — Subhumans May 25— TSOL May 28— For The Fallen Dreams June 12— Nekromantix June 14— L.A. Guns

- MAY 11TH -

SPITFIRE GOLF TOURNEY WASHOE GOLF COURSE. ALL PROCEEDS GO TO CARECHEST

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May 18th (Saturday) from 11am to 6pm

THESE DON’T MIX

Crafts | Jewelry | Soaps Plants & Garden | Art Native Beadwork & Paintings Glass Artists

Think you know your limits? Think again.

The Harvest and The Hunt Reno, We Have A Problem Slut Fungus, Frontier City Sounds Six Mile Station, Max Volume Band

(775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

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Kittenhead Vampirates, Merkin

Victory Calls, The Stereo Killers

TheAlleySparks.com

4050 S. MC CARRAN BLVD, RENO NV 775.737.4440 • WWW.SPITFIRERENO.COM

At the corner of California Ave. and Plumas St. in front of the Reno Bead Shop and Too Soul Tea Co.

Domino & The Derelicts

Hip Hop, R & B, And Comedy Fet: Yan Doe, Gatorz, Hooks And Punches, Plan C, J.M. Lace, Momatik, And More!

Steampunk Accessories Henna Art & Face Painting Food | Drinks 775.322.2225

Pinky Polanksi, Hella A Capella Spike & Jackson, Lighter Thief

ART OF THE STATE

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If you drink, don’t drive. PerIod.

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MAY 9, 2013

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ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

BOOMTOWN CASINO HOTEL

2100 Garson Rd., Verdi; (775) 345-6000 1) Event Center 2) Guitar Bar

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

THURSDAY 5/9

FRIDAY 5/10

SATURDAY 5/11

SUNDAY 5/12

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/13-5/15

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 8pm, no cover

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 4pm, Soul Experience, 10pm, no cover

2) Red Hot Smokin’ Aces, 4pm, Soul Experience, 10pm, no cover

2) Soul Experience, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Patrick Major, 6pm, no cover

2) Johnathan Barton, 4:30pm, Patrick Major, 6pm, Decoy, 10pm, no cover

2) Johnathan Barton, 4:30pm, Patrick Major, 6pm, Decoy, 10pm, no cover

2) Johnathan Barton, 4:30pm, Tany Jane, 6pm, no cover

2) Jason King, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 7pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) Steppen Stonz, 8pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, no cover

2) George Pickard, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Jelly Bread, Drop Theory, 9pm, no cover

1) Head for the Hills, 10pm, no cover 1) Menopause the Musical, 3pm, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Menopause the Musical, 7pm, Tu, W, $24.95+ 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Steele Breeze, 10pm, W, no cover

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

The Shins

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

May 11, 9 p.m. MontBleu Resort 55 Highway 50 Stateline (800) 648-3353

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

1) Menopause the Musical, 8pm, $24.95+ 1) Menopause the Musical, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 2) Garage Boys, 10pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Menopause the Musical, 3pm, 7pm, $24.95+ 2) Garage Boys, 10:30pm, no cover 3) DJ 2wice, 10pm, $10

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

Karaoke

HARRAH’S RENO

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

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RN&R

1) Super Diamond, 7:30pm, $27.50

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219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

2) Buddy Emmer, 7pm, no cover 3) Joel Edwards, 5:30pm, no cover 5) DJ Larry Williams, 7pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Lingerie Bowling w/DJ Williams, 7pm, Steele Breeze, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Lingerie Bowling w/DJ Williams, 7pm, Steele Breeze, 9pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35

2) Buddy Emmer, 8pm, no cover 3) Joel Edwards, 6pm, no cover

1) Mojo Green, 8pm, $15 2) Buddy Emmer, 8pm, Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 3) Joel Edwards, 6pm, no cover

2) Buddy Emmer, 7pm, no cover

2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm, W, no cover 3) Kyle Wolverton & Joey Navarro, 6pm, W, no cover

1) The Shins, Ra Ra Riot, 9pm, $32 3) Boogie Nights at Blu, 8pm, $5-$10, free w/’70s or ‘80s attire

3) Locals Appreciation Party w/Thrive, Weapon, DJ Bukue, 10pm, no cover

2) Local guest DJs, 10pm, W, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach & Nightclub 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

2) Schall Adams, 9pm, no cover 2) Schall Adams, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 3) Silver State Tattoo and Arts Festival 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm, DJ Chris English, After Party, 10pm, $20 DJ XM Fredie, 10pm, $20

2) Jackie Dauzat, 7pm, no cover

2) Jackie Dauzat, 7pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

3) Social Network Night, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover 4) Live music, 6:30pm, no cover

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Step This Way (dubstep, house), 8pm, W, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

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MAY 9, 2013

2) Live music/DJ, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Live music, 8:30pm, no cover


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Reno’s special events season kicks off this weekend with the two-day whitewater kayaking festival, which celebrates its 10th anniversary and a return to its original slot in May. Last year the event was held in June, which is usually a safer bet for warm, sunny weather as opposed the unpredictable temperatures that can occur in early May. But this year, organizers moved it back to May to take advantage of spring runoff as well as to better accommodate athletes’ schedules. Some of the world’s best kayakers will compete for top honors and prize money during the festival, which includes freestyle and slalom competitions, a stand-up paddleboard competition, a boatercross competition, an outdoor expo, outdoor yoga, food and drink vendors, a children’s play area and clinics and demonstrations presented by representatives from Cabela’s. Buster Blue, Whitney Myer, Mark Sexton Band, and Keyser Soze will perform on May 11. Oddly Enough, Groove Session and Jelly Bread will perform on May 12. The festival is open from 9 a.m.-6 p.m., May 11, and 9 a.m–4 p.m., May 12, at the Truckee River Whitewater Park at Wingfield Park, between Arlington Avenue and Virginia Street. Admission is free. Call 784-9400, ext. 119 or visit www.renoriverfestival.com.

—Kelley Lang

reno river Festival

Chili on the ComstoCk While kayakers will stay cool in the water, chili tasters will feel the heat at Virginia City’s chili cook-off. Forty chili cookers from across the West will compete for a spot in the International Chili Society World Finals in Las Vegas during the 30th annual event. Competitors will create their chili from scratch on Saturday morning and a winner will be chosen each day during the twoday event. There will be a people’s choice award, which includes cash and “Virginia City-style” prizes. The festival will also feature the Fireball Crawl and live music at various venues in downtown V.C., as well as a “Family Fun Zone” at the parking lot of the Delta Saloon. While admission is free, chili tasting tickets range from $5-$60. The Fireball Crawl will cost $10 for a map and a cup. The event takes place from 10 a.m.- 5 p.m., May 11-12, at the corner of C and Union streets. Call 847-7500 or visit http://chilionthe comstockvc.eventbrite.com/#.

30 | RN&R |

MaY 9, 2013

Western heritage Festival If you missed last weekend’s Genoa Cowboy Festival, you’ll get another chance to celebrate the history and legacy of Nevada’s cowboys, pioneers and indigenous peoples this weekend. The inaugural event, presented by the Sparks Museum & Cultural Center, will feature performances by cowboy poets and musicians Walt “Bimbo” Cheney, Janice Gilbertson and Richard Elloyan, as well as pow wow drummers, the Eagle Wing dancers and a folklorico dance troupe. There will be demonstrations in saddle making, Native American basket making, quilting, blacksmithing and other skills, as well as food and arts and crafts vendors. Pre-festival events will take place on May 10 at Sparks Museum & Cultural Center, Cantina Los Tres Hombres and Great Basin Brewing Co., with the main festival events taking place from 11 a.m.-6 p.m., May 11, at Lillard Railroad Park and along Victorian Avenue, between 14th Street and Pyramid Way in downtown Sparks. Admission is free. Call 355-1144 or visit http://sparksmuseum.org/event/ western-heritage-festival.

2nd annual steampunk exposition and national publiC rail City shoWdoWn gardens day Whether your interests involve Walking tour Old West cowboys, steam trains or steampunk fantasy, downtown Sparks will be the place to satisfy all three. Local steampunk and costume enthusiast organization High Desert Steam will hold its second expo featuring a shopping bazaar of handmade steampunk clothes and other accoutrements, classes on steampunk costume-making, Victorian shaving and clockwork character creation and the first Tea Duel Invitational Tournament between steampunk organizations. There will also be stilt walkers, fortune tellers, a fashion parade and show along and a sneak peak of the costumed characters who will participate in the Comstock Steam Invasion at Virginia City this fall. The expo will take place 10 a.m.-5 p.m., May 12, at the Sparks Museum & Cultural Center (a.k.a. Sparks Heritage Museum), 814 Victorian Ave. Sparks. Admission is free. Visit www.highdesertsteam.org.

While the Truckee Meadows landscape may look quite brown and barren to the eye of someone accustomed to the green and forested hills of the East Coast, there are oases both natural and manmade within the valley that boasts a variety of flora. The Wilbur D. May Arboretum and Botanical Garden Rancho at San Rafael Regional Park is one of these verdant gems in the high desert of Washoe County. The almost 27-year-old public park will celebrate National Public Gardens Day with a tour led by former May Arboretum director Ed Kleiner, who will take visitors along some of the 13-acre park’s walking paths and discuss the history behind the gardens as well as some of its unique plants. Walking or hiking shoes are recommended. The free tour begins at 10 a.m., May 10, at the May Arboretum inside the park, 1595 N. Sierra St. Call 785-4153.

argenta trio With theodore kuChar The University of Nevada, Reno faculty ensemble will be joined by maestro Theodore Kuchar on viola for its season finale of its Argenta Trio series. The program will feature Robert Schumann’s Piano Trio in F major, considered one of his happiest compositions, and Ferdinand Ries’ transcription for piano quartet of Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony, which supposedly will be the western U.S. premiere of this rare work. The concert begins at 2 p.m., May 12, at the Nightingale Concert Hall inside the Church Fine Arts Building, 1335 N. Virginia St., at UNR. Tickets are $20 general admission and $5 for student rush tickets. Call 784-3555 or visit www.unrsota.com.


Jerome Edwards, Board of Directors, Secretary

HOPES saved my life “I came to HOPES as a patient six years ago, being diagnosed as HIV positive and having AIDS. From the beginning, I have been treated with the utmost professionalism, and I have received the very best medical care possible, from experienced, high-caliber physicians. I am in very good health; my viral load is undetectable. I have also been treated with respect, friendliness, courtesy and with a very welcoming attitude from the entire staff. I know that this is true for all patients. Having AIDS and also being on the Board of Directors gives me a unique viewpoint, because I can look at the organization from all sides.

Smells like libertine spirit I got involved with my co-host on my web show—a woman in an “open relationship” with her live-in boyfriend of two years. Things were light and fun between us until we developed actual feelings for each other, and he got jealous, and she became guilty and torn. Two weeks ago, after we had an amazing date, she texted to say she was “falling apart” and quitting our show. She’s since made our friendship conditional on our not being involved anymore and my not questioning her quitting or discussing what happened. I either abide by these rules or “watch (her) walk away.” I said she was being emotionally manipulative, and she got really angry. She knows I care about her and want her in my life, but it seems unfair that I have to constantly worry about saying the wrong thing and having her cut and run. Monogamy might not be “natural,” but neither is watching your partner run around on you and being all “no problemo!” about it. A couple who decide to have an open relationship may tell themselves they can intellectualize their way around jealousy—and insecurity, possessiveness and other such fun—without really working through how, exactly, they’ll manage that. This guy, for example, maybe got so excited about “having his cake” that he neglected to consider what would happen if his girlfriend really, really liked her cake. These two actually had a responsibility to anybody they got involved with to do their open relationship OPINION

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homework and figure out that they could only manage “happily ever afternoon,” not “after.” It would be nice if she took responsibility now for failing to take responsibility then, maybe with an “I’m really sorry” and a “We probably shouldn’t see each other,” but she prefers to extend her history of denial with the notion that you can be “friends.” Oh, and P.S., feel free to ask her anything, as long as it’s about nothing more emotionally sensitive than the time. As for whether you should stick around and meet her terms, well, with friends like her, who needs bar fights? Also, it’s hard to stop wanting somebody when you don’t stop seeing them, at least for a while. It seems your time would be better spent pursuing a woman who doesn’t already have a boyfriend. You and she can try the sort of open relationship you’re looking for now— one sans conversational restrictions—as opposed to the sort that, for a good many people, works out like the hen becoming BFFs with the coyote. Eventually, somebody’s going to end up a pile of feathers.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

HOPES is in the process of becoming a community health center. I think it is excellent that it is now opening its doors to the general community. Now, patients of HOPES have access to primary medical care, chronic disease management, women’s health services, behavioral health and counseling, social services, a full-service pharmacy and more. HOPES saved my life, and I am truly grateful for its excellence.”

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Eliminate Pain WITHOUT A PRESCRIPTION! OsteoArthritis Sufferers

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Fast Acting, Effective Pain Relief The study clearly showed that the users of JointFlex experienced substantial pain relief shortly after application. The study conÚrmed what thousands of satisÚed JointFlex customers around the world already know...JointFlex helps you achieve a better quality of life because of its powerful and fast-acting pain relieving action. But there’s more!

LONG-TERM IMPROVING Pain Relief The users of JointFlex also experienced a totally unexpected and dramatic result. With continued use, a majority obtained long-term pain relief that ght-week study. continued to improve throughout the entire eight-week But that’s not all!

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Even more amazing, one-third of the JointFlex users had their pain gradually decrease to the point where it was completely or nearly completely eliminated! By using JointFlex daily as directed, you too may be able to substantially reduce or even eliminate that arthritis pain that’s been nagging you for years. The gradual and continual improvement in long-term pain relief observed in the JointFlex clinical study was found to be consistent with previous studies conducted with orally administered Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate.1 As with any medication individual results may vary. Highlights of the study are available by calling the toll free number or they can be viewed online at www.jointÛex.com.

How Does JointFlex Work? JointFlex formulation contains the active ingredient camphor plus Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate for skin conditioning. Only JointFlex offers the proprietary FUSOME® skin delivery system - this technology is believed to be a key factor in the amazing clinical results. This skin delivery system, available only from JointFlex, has been designed to deliver all beneÚcial ingredients quickly and safely to the skin. The JointFlex formula provides deep penetration and powerful relief when applied to areas where it hurts.2

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Now you can try JointFlex without any risk. Simply purchase a tube of JointFlex at your favorite store, online, or by phone. Your pain is guaranteed to reduce or disappear shortly after your Úrst application.

Is Pain Keeping You Awake at Night? If you are among the millions who cannot get a good night sleep because of nagging arthritis aches and pains, why not try JointFlex? You’ll get fast acting pain relief targeted directly where you need it, and by using JointFlex daily, you will get long-term continually IMPROVING pain relief or your money back. With JointFlex, you can Únally get a good night sleep. Plus, you can use JointFlex daily with conÚdence since there is no burning sensation, no lingering medicine smell and no greasy residue.

To experience the long-term beneÚts of JointFlex, continue to apply JointFlex daily, preferably twice a day. Use up the entire tube of JointFlex and watch your osteoarthritis pain gradually and continually reduce or disappear altogether. If you’re not completely amazed with the results, just send the tube and cash register receipt to us, even if the tube is empty, and we will mail you a refund. No questions asked.

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Available at Drug Stores & Supercenters! www.jointflex.com Use Only as Directed. FDA Drug Registration No. - NDC 16864-001 JointFlex is a trademark of Alterna LLC and FUSOME is a trademark of SmartScience Laboratories ©2010 Alterna LLC

JointFlex will be further studied to determine the mechanism of these dramatic results and to verify that they are not due to random chance alone. 2Use only as directed.

1

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OPINION   |   NEWS   |   GREEN   |   FEATURE STORY   |   ARTS&CULTURE   |   IN ROTATION   |   ART OF THE STATE   |   FOODFINDS   |   FILM  |   MUSICBEAT   |   NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS   |   THIS WEEK   |   MISCELLANY   |   MAY 9, 2013  |  

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33


by rob brezsny

SweetdealS for the whole

family

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The Tarahu-

mara Native American people of northwestern Mexico are renowned for their ability to run long distances. The best runners can cover 200 miles in two days. The paths they travel are not paved or smooth, either, but rather the rough canyon trails that stretch between their settlements. Let’s make them your inspirational role models in the coming week, Aries. I’m hoping that you will be as tough and tenacious as they are—that you will pace yourself for the long haul, calling on your instinctual strength to guide you.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You may

have only a dim idea about how your smartphone and computer work, but that doesn’t prevent you from using their many wonderful features. While you’re swimming, you know almost nothing about the physiological processes that are active inside you, and yet you have no problem making all the necessary movements. In that spirit, I’m not worried about whether or not you will grasp the deep inner meaning of events that will be unfolding in the coming week. Complete understanding isn’t absolutely necessary. All you need to do is trust your intuition to lead you in the direction of what’s interesting and educational.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I need not

sell my soul to buy bliss,” says a character in Charlotte Brontë’s 19th-century novel Jane Eyre. “I have an inward treasure born with me, which can keep me alive if all extraneous delights should be withheld, or offered only at a price I cannot afford to give.” This would be a great speech for you to memorize and periodically recite in the next two weeks. Do it in front of your mirror at least once a day to remind yourself of how amazingly resourceful you are. It will also help you resist the temptation to seek gifts from people who can’t or won’t give them to you.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): What is

the big adventure you’ve been postponing forever because it hasn’t been convenient? How about an intriguing possibility you have always wanted to experiment with but have consistently denied yourself? Or what about that nagging mystery you’ve been wishing you had the time and energy to solve? Wouldn’t your life change for the better if you finally dived in and explored it? In the next two weeks, Cancerian, I urge you to consider giving yourself permission to pursue something that fits one of those descriptions.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Right now, Leo, you

are a majestic and mysterious mess of raw power. You are a fresh, flaming fountain of pure charisma. Irresistible! That’s you! Unstoppable! You! Impossible to fool and immune to the false charms of heartfelt mediocrity! You! You! You! In your current condition, no one can obstruct you from seeing the naked truth about the big picture. And that’s why I am so sure that victory will soon be yours. You will overcome the fuzziness of your allies, the bad vibes of your adversaries, and your own inertia. Not all conquests are important and meaningful, but you will soon achieve the one that is.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A character

in Herman Hesse’s novel Demian says the following: “I live in my dreams. Other people live in dreams, but not in their own.” Whose dreams do you live in, Virgo? What is the source of the fantasies that dominate your imagination? Are they the authentic outpourings of your own soul? Or did they originate with your parents and teachers and lovers? Did they sneak into you from the movies and songs and books you love? Are they the skewed result of the emotional wounds you endured or the limitations you’ve gotten used to? Now is an excellent time to take inventory. Find out how close you are to living in your own dreams.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Charles Ives

GIft CertIfICateS froM reStaUraNtS, BarS, ClUBS, tattoo, retaIl, theater, SaloNS, SPaS, Golf, VaCatIoNS & More 34   |  RN&R   | 

MAY 9, 2013

was a renowned American composer who lived from 1874 to 1954. Because his music was experimental and idiosyncratic, it took a long time for him to get the appreciation he deserved. When he was 73 years old, he won the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for a symphony he had written when he was 30. I expect that in the near future you might be the beneficiary of a similar kind of mojo, Libra. A good deed you did or a smart move you made in the past will finally get at least some of the recognition or response you’ve always wanted.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “There are

no right answers to wrong questions,” says science-fiction writer Ursula K. Le Guin. And that’s why you must be so conscientious about coming up with the very best questions. Right, Scorpio? All your efforts to hunt down solutions will be for naught unless you frame your problems elegantly and accurately. Now here’s the very good news: Your skill at asking pertinent questions is at a peak. That’s why I suggest you make this Focused Inquiry Week. Crisply define three questions that will be important for you to address in the next seven months.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Charlie Parker was a great jazz musician. As a saxophonist and composer, he was an influential innovator. Unfortunately, he also had an expensive heroin addiction. It interfered with his ability to achieve financial stability. There’s a famous story about him showing a bystander two veins on his arm as he prepared to shoot up. “This one’s my Cadillac,” he confessed. “And this one’s my house.” I’m bringing this up, Sagittarius, in the hope that it will provide a healthy shock. Are you doing anything remotely like Charlie Parker? Are you pouring time and energy and money into an inferior form of pleasure or a trivial distraction that is undermining your ability to accomplish higher goals? If so, fix that glitch, please.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I hate

a song that makes you think that you are not any good,” said iconic songwriter Woody Guthrie. “I hate a song that makes you think that you are just born to lose. … Because you are too old or too young or too fat or too slim too ugly or too this or too that. Songs that run you down or poke fun at you. … I am out to sing songs that will prove to you that this is your world.” Amen, brother Woody! I have the same approach to writing horoscopes. And I’m happy to advise you, Capricorn, that you should have a similar attitude toward everything you put out and take in during the coming week. Just for now, reject all words, ideas and actions that demoralize and destroy. Treat yourself to a phase of relentless positivity.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “I know

not what my past still has in store for me,” testified the Indian spiritual poet Tukaram. I believe most of us can say the same thing, and here’s why: The events that happened to us once upon a time keep transforming as we ripen. They come to have different meanings in light of the ever-new experiences we have. What seemed like a setback when it first occurred may eventually reveal itself to have been the seed of a blessing. A wish fulfilled at a certain point in our history might come back to haunt us later on. I bring up these ideas, Aquarius, because I think you’re primed to reinterpret your own past.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): According

to legend, Jennifer Lopez’s butt is insured for $300 million. Bruce Springsteen has supposedly insured his voice for $31 million, and wine expert Angela Mount is said to have insured her taste buds for $16 million. In that spirit, Pisces, I encourage you to consider insuring your imagination. To be clear, I don’t anticipate that you will have occasion to collect any settlement. Nothing bad will happen. But taking this step could be a fun ritual that might drive home to you just how important your imagination will be in the coming weeks. Your power to make pictures in your mind will either make you crazy with unfounded fantasies and fearful delusions, or else it will help you visualize in detail the precise nature of the situations you want to create for yourself in the future.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Brad Bynum PHOTO/Brad Bynum

Cyclist Jeff Mitchell May 11 to 17 is Bike to Work Week. Jeff Mitchell is the program director of the Reno Bike Project. When I first tried to call him, he said, “Can I call you back in an hour? I’m teaching a kid to ride a bike.”

Why Bike to Work Week? Well, Bike to Work Week is part of a national Bike to Work Week movement supported by the League of American Cyclists. That’s why we’re focusing specifically on May 11 to 17. But just to give you some printable reasons to bike to work: I find that biking to work makes you more energetic. It connects you with your community more. It give you much needed exercise for those folks that work in office jobs that wouldn’t normally be getting it. Also, of course, there’s the air quality and the environmental impact that you have just by biking to work every day. If you visit the website bikenevada.org, there is a litany of reasons to ride your bike to work every day.

Why does it need a week? And why in the middle of May? Because often folks need a little bit of encouragement and a special reason to break a habit. May 11-17 typically has a really good weather pattern so that eliminates the barrier of entry that is poor weather. It’s also a time when people are still at work. Teachers that get off in the summer are still at work. And we give it a

What else is going on?

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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Today [May 2] was the first day of the Major Taylor program, and we’re insanely excited about it. … Major Taylor was the first ever African-American world champion of any sport, and he was a cyclist. So we’ve named our program after him. It’s an after-school ride club for at-risk high school-age kids to give them access to riding bikes that otherwise they wouldn’t have access to riding. So, for the last nine months, and today was the launch, and we had 11 kids riding 11 brand new bikes at the Evelyn Mount Community Center, and it worked out awesome.

week specifically to be kind of like a challenge to yourself. If you can do it for one week, chances are you can keep doing it.

In the past, you guys have done pancake breakfasts … We have more events this year than ever. … The official kickoff event is bike valet at the Aces Baseball Stadium on Sunday, May 12. It’s Mother’s Day. It’s a day game. The weather’s supposed to be beautiful, and it’s going to be a really easy way for folks to show up, ride bikes somewhere and get out there for the first time. We’ll park your bike for free, you can go in and enjoy the game and then ride home with your family. While there you can sign up for Bike to Work Week. You can visit all the tables for all the groups that help put Bike to Work Week, and it’ll be a really easy way to start the week off. Friday the 17th is the Reno Bike Project’s annual pancake feed, where from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. we’ll be shelling out flapjacks, bacon, fruit and coffee for free to anyone riding a bike. Also, there are a list of coffee shops

Making hay while the sun shines Last year, on Friday, May 22, it got real sunny in Germany. Cloudless, as a matter of fact. What happened next was impressive. Because all of the solar panels on the rooftops in that country began to cook, an amazing 22 gigawatts of electricity was produced. One gigawatt is 1,000 megawatts, or 1 billion watts. In other words, a lot of juice. In fact, those 22 GWs equalled half of the country’s energy needs. Half! Remember, we’re not talking about some tiny, equatorial, sunsplattered island country of dreadlocked ecotopians in grass huts here. We’re talking about an economic power of the first magnitude in the “First World,” a country that has a huge appetite for electricity. We’re also talking about freaking Germany, a northern land, the land of the frozen Visigoth. If Germany was in North America, it wouldn’t be a state. It occupies a Canadian latitude, so it would be up there with Alberta. This ain’t Florida or Arizona we’re talking about, in terms of regular sunny beatdowns.

on the website … any of those coffee shops that are listed, you can stop in and get a free cup of coffee if you have a bike helmet as proof that you’re riding your bike. ... There’s the commuter challenge. The commuter challenge is a challenge between businesses. We’re going to be giving out prizes from RTC through a random drawing. It’s a really great way to get your business recognized as a bicycle-friendly business and that means a happier workforce and a healthier workforce.

When I tried to call you earlier, you were teaching a kid to a ride a bike. How old was he? He was 17. And the other girl who was learning to ride a bike I think was 15. They had both never ridden bikes before, and we got to put them both on $800 Specialized Allezs and teach them how to ride bikes. It was totally awesome.

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ARTS&CULTURE

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Free

∫y Bruce Van Dye brucev@newsreview.com

minor players, that alternative energy fuels have a part to play in the Energy Picture of the 21st century, sure, but ultimately a rather small one. In the meantime, countries like Germany, Italy, Spain and Ireland heard similar stuff from their experts, said fine and thank you, and then proceeded to fire up programs like the aforementioned that encouraged a massive, populist movement, resulting in a country busily collecting solar power two, three, and 20 panels at a time. We’re not lame here in the USA when it comes to alternative energy research and action. Certainly not. But we’re a ways away from achieving what they did last year in Germany. Now when it comes to gigantic projects of solar and wind power, projects covering acres and acres of land, we’ve got some serious stuff goin’ down. More on them next week. Ω

And yet, it was able to fire up fully half of its energy needs via solar panels for one sunny day in May last year. How? Basically because German leaders pulled their heads out of their southern exits years ago, stopped accepting this jive about how solar power would never supply more than a smidge of the country’s energy needs, and then went ahead and made “50 percent from the sun” day happen. The main law—Germans declared that if any homeowner put one solar panel or 40 on his/her roof, that homeowner could feed that electricity into the grid and be paid accordingly. Obviously, German utility giants were slow getting their lobbyists paid off the week that little nugget was enacted. The German people, being a fairly intelligent bunch, responded with enthusiasm for the program, enough to where the significant results of 5/22/12 were made real. And a dramatic example was put on display. For years, we’ve heard our “energy experts” generally say that solar and wind power will always be

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RN&R

fa m i ly GUiDE SUMMER 2013

a special supplement to Reno news & Review

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may 9, 2013


A school as unique as your child. Teaching children how they learn best...The Washoe County School District’s WOLF School customizes an online education so that your children learn at their own pace and on their own schedule. ONLINE: WOLF is an accredited, tuition-free, full-time, online school. It provides students, grades Kindergarten through twelve, the ability to learn in a flexible, dynamic online environment with a curriculum that meets rigorous state education standards. WOLF offers gifted and talented, honors, and Advanced Placement courses. LOCAL: Students can take classes and participate in extracurricular activities at their neighborhood schools. With all of the resources of the Washoe County School District, WOLF students have access to full-time WCSD teachers, tutors, and field trips. FLEXIBLE: Students can work at their own pace at home, on the go, or even in our WOLF computer lab alongside other students and their teachers.

Call us to learn more at 775-333-6100 www.wolflearning.com 2 | SUMMER 2013 FAMILY GUIDE

| may 9, 2013 | a special su pple me nt to re no ne w s & re vie w

Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

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all In the

famIly

It’s begInnIng to look a lot lIke summer.

Reno is heating up, and tank tops, flip flops and shorts are starting to appear everywhere. Summer is a time where I find myself wanting to spend every moment I can outside, and it’s a time where I want to change my normal routine a bit and go on new adventures. That’s what this family guide is all about. We have a round-up of information about what Tahoe expert Tim Hauserman thinks are the best things for families to do outdoors up at Tahoe—from hiking in the Tahoe Meadows to zip lining at Granlibakken’s Tree Top Adventure Park. Mother and writer Jessica Santina shares some wisdom about the best places for day trips. We’ve also found some great ways for your kids to learn about sustainability and local farming in the area and some great bike trails to keep your family fit and healthy. And just in case you’re as short on cash as I am, we’ve looked into seven cheap family activities for summer. But we didn’t only focus on families with human children. We’ve also found fun and worthwhile events for you to take your four-legged kids to as well. And, just in time for the Reno River Festival, May 11-12, I spoke to kayak guru Charles Albright about kayaking and things families should know about the Truckee River. After reading this guide, you should be prepped and ready to fill your family’s summer free time with adventures. —Sage Leehey

TABLe OF CONTeNTs 5 6 7 9 10 12 14 15

Dog Days Summer on the cheap Down on the farm Water master I want to ride my bicycle Day trippers Sustainable summer Tahoe’s Great Outdoors

Editor D. Brian Burghart Project Editor sage leehey News Editor Dennis myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Designer Hayley Doshay Contributors Jessica santina, tim Hauserman, cambria roth Design Manager Kate murphy Advertising Sales meg Brown, Gina odegard, matt odegard, Bev savage Office/Distribution Manager Karen Brooke Exec. Assistant Operations Coordinator nanette Harker Assistant Distribution Manager ron neill Distribution Drivers sandra chhina, sean Karp, John miller, Jesse pike, David richards, martin troye, william tucker, matthew veach, sam white

General Manager John D. murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah redmond Director of Human Resources tanja poley Business Manager Grant rosenquist Credit and Collections Manager renee Briscoe Business nicole Jackson, tami sandoval Systems Manager Jonathan schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 708 North Center Street Reno, NV 89501 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post the rn&r is printed

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dog daYs

don’t leave fido out of the fun (or in the car) this summer

Your pooch is part of Your familY,

so finding activities that are dog friendly can be just as important as finding activities for your kids. (OK, well, maybe not quite.) The Reno area offers many great places for you and your furry friend to share your time and have some fun. Dine with your dog Dinner with your Dog is returning Monday nights this summer at Wild River Grille. You can eat on the riverside patio with your four-legged friend and 10 percent of your check will go to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) of Northern Nevada. And on this Sunday, starting at 5 p.m., Wild River Grille will be having “A Mother’s Day Dining Experience of a Different Breed” or “Doggie Moms Day.” This is an event for the mothers of dogs to come eat with their pooch on the patio. This event will also give 10 percent of your check to the SPCA, and mothers will be given a glass of champagne and a goodie bag for the pup with treats from Scraps Dog Company and Discount Pet. 4th Street Bistro is also dog-friendly. They allow leashed, friendly dogs in their outside dining area, and they focus on sustainable business practices and local sourcing. Freeman’s Natural Hotdogs also allows dogs in their outside seating and offers vegan and

organic options. Other dog friendly locations include Süp Restaurant, Emerald City Cafe, Squeeze In and many other restaurants in the area that have outdoor seating available. Humane Society events that give back On May 18 from 8 a.m. to noon, the Nevada Humane Society (NHS) will host its annual “Walk for Animals” to raise money to help feed homeless animals. Those participating in the walk are asked to seek pledges, and those who receive pledges of $30 or more will be entered to win prizes. This will be a two-mile walk, which four-legged friends on leashes can participate in, along with different contests, face painting, music and more. Contests will include Best Dressed Pets, Best Pet Tricks and Best Look-A-Likes. It will take place at the Sparks Marina Park, and parking will be free for the event. The Humane Society of TruckeeTahoe will also host an event to help feed homeless pets this summer. The “Truckee Duckee Derbee” on June 9 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the River Ranch is a fun rubber duck race down the Truckee River. Those who wish to participate can purchase ducks for $10 each to take part in the big race. There will also be a dog costume contest called “Dogz in Dudz.” The contest will take place at 2 p.m. with the race right after and raffles will continue until 5 p.m. Both these events are great ways to have fun with your dog and help out the community as well.

by sagE lEEhEY sagel@newsreview.com

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familY guidE summer 2013 | 5


have fun and save some cash

summer

by Sage Leehey s a ge l @new sr ev iew.c o m

on the cheap Summer allows for many fun family activities that fall on the price spectrum from free to expensive. Here are some of the best ways to have summer fun with your family while keeping a little cash for a rainy day.

BaseCamp at CommRow BaseCamp has a more than 7,000-squarefoot indoor bouldering park with a separate and safe kids’ area and the world’s tallest climbing wall outside at 164-feet tall. The outdoor wall is awesome in the beautiful summer weather. They are open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily and feature day passes, specials and membership packages. The normal day pass costs $8 per child under 12 years old, $12 per adult/youth over 13 years old and $10 per senior of 55 years old and over. Rental equipment is an additional $5. A day pass is $10 for students and includes the rental. The Family Package membership costs $299 per year for two parents and one child, one parent and two children or three children with a $60 initiation fee and each additional child costs $99. This is a fantastic way to keep your kids active and have fun in a new activity. See www.commrow.com/BaseCamp.asp.

various specialty food vendors, crafters and local farmers. These will be great outings for families to give back locally and have some fun together. See www.shirleysfarmersmarkets.com.

Sierra Safari Zoo The Sierra Safari Zoo is an exotic animal park that is staffed by volunteers who take care of the animals. This zoo is home to a liger, Kalika, which draws a lot of attention because of its scarcity. A liger is, as the name suggests, a cross between a tiger and a lion, just like Napolean Dynamite’s favorite animal. Admission is free for children 2 and under, $6 for children aged 3 to 12, $7 for adults and $6 for seniors 55 and older. However, the first Monday of every month features free admission, excluding holidays. Sierra Safari Zoo is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily from April 1 to Oct. 31.  See www.sierrasafarizoo.org.

Farmers’ Markets

Animal Ark

Shirley’s Farmers’ Markets take place throughout Reno and Sparks on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays weekly at various locations starting the first week of June. It’s located at the Summit Reno on Tuesdays and Saturdays, Victorian Square on Thursdays, Tamarack Junction Casino on Fridays, Village Center Reno on Saturdays and Lazy 5 Park Sparks on Saturdays. At each of these of these locations, as many of the other farmers’ markets throughout the area, there will be

The Animal Ark is also a zoo, but it is a wildlife sanctuary for non-releasable animals to provide them a home for life. It’s is open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Regular admission is free for children 2 and under, $6.50 for children 3 to 12, $9.50 for adults and $8 for seniors. Membership options are also available. The Animal Ark will be hosting the “Wolf Howl Night” on June 1 from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. From 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., the park will be open for normal

6 | spring 2013 FAMILY GUIDE |

may 9, 2 0 13 | a s p e c ial s up p l e ment to r eno news & r evi ew

visiting of the animals, and at 7 p.m., the event will begin. This is an educational event where you will hear the different howls of wolves and coyotes, and there will be a contest for human howling. The best human imitations will win prizes. This event is free to children under two, $12 for children, $15 for adults and $13.50 for seniors. See www.animalark.org.

This zoo is home to a liger, Kalika, which draws a lot of attention. Picnicking The cost of this activity is really up to you and what you decide to make or buy for your family to enjoy. A favorite location for a picnic is Wingfield Park downtown. It’s beautiful with wideopen areas perfect for a picnic blanket, and you can watch people kayak, canoe and float down the river and play in the park, which creates a fun and relaxed atmosphere. Rancho San Rafael Regional Park is also a great location for picnicking, especially in the beautiful arboretum. Picnicking at the Sparks Marina is another great place with some cooling water.

Float the Truckee River Floating the Truckee River is a Reno tradition. During summer days, the Truckee River Whitewater Park at Wingfield Park downtown is packed with people floating the river and having a great time. There are a few rental places down by the river or you can bring your own tube—or air mattress, in some cases—as a cheaper option. This is a great activity that’s fun for everyone. Just don’t forget your flotation devices as the Truckee can get wild with the early summer snowmelt. If you want to avoid crowds, coming in the morning, early afternoon or later in the evening is your best bet. You can even pair this activity with the above-mentioned picnicking plan and make a full day of floating, picnicking, tanning and hanging out in the great outdoors.

Camping at Pyramid Lake Overnight camping at Pyramid Lake only costs $9 per vehicle per night, and for three nights, it’s only $24. Pyramid Lake is great because it’s warmer than Tahoe and cleaner than Lahontan. During the day, you can swim and do other water sports, like jet skiing with a $19 daily permit or boating with a $9 daily permit (not a rental). Opposite the lake, there is great hiking as well. Cui-ui fish, native to Pyramid, spawn from April to June. This is a great chance to get your family into camping at a place with great weather and fun conditions. See www.pyramidlake.us.


RIvER by cAMbRIA RoTh

Families can get their Fun on at the river school Farm

ThE RIvER SchooL FARM In REno DoESn’T jUST GRow FooD. They connect with it. With an emphasis on organic, locally grown food, the farm seeks to provide the community with a product that’s more nutrient rich than anything found in a grocery store.

However, they believe that to be successful, people need to see where their food is grown and how to grow it themselves in a high desert climate. This process begins with families. “We are so disconnected from where our food comes from and it is something so simple, yet so vital,” says Monique Monteverde, River School Farm Director. “Families can come here and show their

photo by CambRia Roth

Down bY ThE

kids where our food comes from. These plants grow out of the dirt, and we think of dirt as dirty, but here we like to show people that dirt is the soil that feeds plants that feed us.” Every Friday through the summer is Farm Tour Friday at River School Farm and everyone is welcome, especially families. First, visitors have the opportunity to observe the bees that make locally grown honey. A beekeeper shows families a beehive and pulls out a frame for them to look at while learning about the process. Being an urban farm, River School grows food in small places like raised beds, tunnels and hoops that are protected from Reno’s weather. Tour guides take families through these growing spaces and show children how the food at the farm is grown. Another important aspect of growing organic food in the high desert is through compost soil, which is then put into landscapes. “We have a compost pile that kids love digging in for worms,” Monteverde said. “We want to show families how they can integrate compost into their own yards to help them build their soil and grow food.” Monteverde says one of the most exciting parts of the tour for children is seeing and petting the animals. Tour guides open the nest boxes of the chicken coop so that kids can check for fresh eggs. Next,

families are shown a friendly goat that they are allowed to pet and feed. “It’s great to show kids that while we are still in city limits in Reno, an urban farm is still possible,” Monteverde said. “It has a country feel, and they get that experience of meeting our chickens, petting our goat and seeing how food grows.” Another component on the farm for families is the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Program. Families can become members of the Summer Farm Share and receive a weekly box of fresh organic produce. “Growing local gets people engaged, it gets them connected to the Earth, their soil and the community,” Monteverde said. For more about the River School Farm, see www. riverschoolfarm.org .

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FAMILY GUIDE summer 2013 | 7


Kids Cafe Free Dinners for Children and Youth Ages 1-18 Weekdays at Many Schools in Our Community Call 331-3663 or visit www.fbnn.org for locations and times

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All classes aim at improving student’s abilities to plan, make decisions and think resourcefully through guided instructions that also teaches patience and follow through.

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WATER

MASTER

by sAGE LEEHEY SAGEL@NEWSREVIEW.

Summer is a great time to use one of our area’s greatest amenities, the Truckee River What are some issues that you see the Truckee currently facing?

Charles Albright is a kayak and canoe enthusiast who has been paddling since 1971. He is president of the Sierra Nevada Whitewater Club, which proposed the Truckee River Whitewater Park to the city of Reno and helped get it built. He’s been in Reno since 1976.

Tell me a little about the upcoming Reno River Festival. The River Fest is happening on May 11 and 12. They’ll have the freestyle event and a boatercross event, which is top to bottom as fast as possible. On Sunday, they’ll have the slaloms. It’s a big competition for a whole bunch of big names that come to town for the event for kayaking and canoeing. There will be concerts. There will probably [be] a dog jumping event. They’ve got so much going on, it’s insane. They’ve got double dutch. The island will be covered with vendors, plenty of food available and hordes of people here selling stuff. I’m helping run some events, like boatercross, and I’ll probably score the freestyle. And I’m running slaloms.

What’s your favorite part? Watching and participating in the different events. Slalom this year because I love

photo by sage leehey

Charles Albright is President for Life of Sierra Nevada Whitewater Club.

racing slalom …What’s fun about the boatercross is they’ll usually pick one or two gates that people have to go through. When you get four or five people trying to get through one gate, it becomes really fun to watch. It becomes combat mode. Last year, they had it out there on the North Channel, and they had a couple guys out there called “eight balls.” Their job was to mess you up, keep you from advancing down the river, and they were causing people to swim and stuff. It was really fun to watch.

What are the best things families can do on the Truckee? Laying around down here, having your kids swim. Having a picnic down here. It’s a fantastic place for that. A lot of people rent rafts or buy them from Kmart and take their families down the river. I would recommend life jackets, obviously. Summertime, it gets really popular for people to be out here running the river in tubes or small rafts. It’s just great to see, except that there’s a lot of trash involved, and people do a lot of drinking. But that’s probably the best thing that they can do. Here and Rock Park are great for kids. There are hordes of things to do here.

The issues surrounding the Truckee are primarily, for my use, is that first of all it’s a drought year. So we’re not going to have as much water, especially at the end of the season. If this were to happen for a year or two, this river wouldn’t flow. Back in ’92, this river did not flow. There was no water in it to flow. So we don’t want to have a situation like that because there are so many people that rely on the drinking water, and a lot of people, like me, need to paddle something. It just drives us nuts if we don’t have water. Past that, there’s over-usage. We live in a desert, so there’s only so much water in this river. A lot of it’s not getting out to Pyramid Lake, where it should go, and a lot of it, because of the Newlands Project and various laws, goes out to the Carson River drainage to be irrigation out by Fallon. That’s one of the big things. Also, pollution and people trashing the river is a big problem. Homeless people live all along this river, and they’ve got their camps. They throw their trash in the river, or it stays on shore. And the graffiti people have discovered tubing, and they take paint cans with them, so the rocks are now covered with graffiti upstream, too. There’s a lot of issues with humans here. There’s also a huge impact on the wildlife. There’s martins, other birds, ducks and also a lot of fish that live here. People come down here quite often to fish in the mornings. It’s great to see, but it’s a drain on that resource as well. It used to be that the Lahontan Cutthroat Trout came all the way from Pyramid Lake to Lake Tahoe to breed. There’s too many dams in the way now. There’s no way fish could ever get up this river unless you put it in a car and drive it up there. That’s a big bummer for what used to be the native species. The Rainbow

Trout, the carp in here, all those fish are not native. Any kind of fish that’s in here is getting hunted out. And there’s the danger of alien aquatic species that are hopping up all over the place, so the state made a new law that requires every single kayak, canoe, raft, inflatable kayak that’s going into any body of water in this state to pay for a decal that has to be on your boat. If you don’t have the decal, you can get fined. What’s that going to do to tourism? Somebody driving through from Idaho or Utah or back east going to California wants to stop at the whitewater park in Reno because they’re heard so much about it, but they’re going to have to pay 10 bucks for one time. I typically hand my boats out to anyone who wants to borrow them, and I teach handicapped people how to paddle. And I do all sorts of events for the public for free. In a typical year, at least 30 of my 100 boats get used on a body of water in Nevada. I’ve probably already used 10 or 15 of my boats for a decal, and that means I’ve got to pay $150 to the state per year for a permit, for a decal. That’s a tax that’s unfair in my opinion. The other thing that I think really sucks is that, you know all the tubes and little catboats fishermen use out on the lake? They don’t charge those. So that’s my big peeve of the year. It’s just overkill.

What do you think families should know or do about those things? The main thing is letting your kids know about it and getting them to help police up areas like this. So if you train your kids to pick up trash and you pick it up yourself, that’s great. As far as just coming down here and enjoying the place, just know you’re sharing it with, quite often on a weekend, a warm weekend here, a thousand people in this park.

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FAMILY GUIDE summer 2013 | 9


I WANT TO RIDE MY BICYCLE by CAMBRIA ROTH

NOrTHerN NeVADA bIKe TrAILs Are Here TO PumP yOu uP THERE’s A FUN yet nostalgic feeling that comes with

photo by cambria roth

The best way to enjoy your bike is to find a place to ride it.

riding a bicycle. You might remember the exhilaration as a child, taking off those training wheels for the first time, or using your bike as transportation. Biking is supposed to be a fun family activity, and with the easy trails throughout the Reno-Tahoe area, it can be. Since its creation in 2006, the Tahoe Pyramid Bikeway has become a feasible way for bikers and families to get out on a trail without having to go too far. In its entirety, the trail is a 116-mile journey from Lake Tahoe to Pyramid Lake. However, with kids, that journey seems quite far-fetched, so the 12-mile section of the bikeway from downtown Reno to Verdi is a great alternative. The trail is along the beautiful Truckee River and has been developed by Reno, Sparks and Washoe County. The bike-ped bridge over the Truckee River is in a great location, near Mayberry Crossing Park and River School Farm, which has beautiful artwork and gardens. The route has on-street bike lanes west of downtown Reno, but then a paved, separated path east to the end at Vista Boulevard.

Reno resident Amy Fitch’s son is too young to ride a bike, but she still straps him into the baby bike seat and takes him on this trail in north Reno. It’s perfect for beginning riders, and especially for families with kids as the trail isn’t too rocky and is fairly flat. Families can charge out-and-back for 7.5 miles, or, if feeling gutsy, add on an intermediate section for just under 10 miles. The intermediate section has a thrilling drop where beginners will prefer to walk rather than ride. Steamboat Ditch also has a canal filled with flowing water alongside the path, hence “ditch.” If your family is looking for a more relaxed and rural setting, the trail around the perimeter of Mira Loma Park in Southeast Reno is a great option. At the corner of Mira Loma Drive and McCarran Boulevard, Mira Loma Park features trees, expanses of grass and even a bridge over Boynton Slough. The path bordering the park allows for families to ride bikes, but also witness the fitness courses along the trail. Families can even take a break for kids to enjoy the playgrounds, ball fields and tennis and basketball courts that the park offers.

SPCA of Northern Nevada Makes a Big Impact on the Lives of Animals

SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT SECTION

The SPCA of Northern Nevada located on support the operations and programs of the Spectrum Blvd in Reno is commonly Stanley James Walker Pet Care and Adopreferred to as just the SPCA. There are tion Center. many SPCAs in the United States but here they operate on an independent basis and What makes the SPCA so unique is that it only locally. They are not funded by any shelters approximately 80 plus cats and 60 national organizations such as the ASPCA plus dogs with a save rate of 99.2%. This or government agencies. All funds raised means out of every 100 animals arriving at are generally from the shelter, 99.2 of them right here in northern What makes the SPCA so unique is it find a home. They offer Nevada. The SPCA shelters approximately 80 plus cats a low-cost Spay/Neuter is Reno’s first no-kill and 60 plus dogs with a save rate of Clinic and Vaccine animal shelter, Clinic and rehabilitate originally founded in 99.2%. This means that out of every dogs and cats with issues 1998 by a few 100 animals arriving at the shelter, so they become more individuals to rescue 99.2 of them find a home. adoptable. dogs and cats who were slated to be euthanized due to lack of There are several ways to support the space or seen as having issues that required SPCA: monetary donations such as more time to help resolve. It grew into the sponsorships, monthly giving, and fundraisorganization it is today with a staff of ers; donating gently used items to their two almost 40 concentrated in a new state-ofthrift stores, donating items needed on a the-art animal shelter in north Reno as well daily basis to run the shelter (a list can be as operating two thrift stores in Reno that found at spcanevada.org); and donating

10 | summer 2012 FAMILY GUIDE |

m ay 9, 2 013 | a sp ecial supplemen t to the ren o n ews & review

Stanley James Walker Pet Care & Adoption Center opened in June, 2011

your time to socialize, walk, brush or play with the many animals.

You can adopt your new family member from the SPCA at these 4 Reno locations:

The SPCA, Nevada Humane Society and Pet Network in partnership with Maddies® Fund is holding a pet adoption event Saturday, June 1st and Sunday, June 2nd. The event is being held to increase awareness of shelter animals and their need for loving homes and to shed light on the tireless efforts of the shelters and rescue organizations that work to save the lives of countless dogs and cats every day.

SPCA Pet Care and Adoption Center 4950 Spectrum Blvd. Saturday, June 1st - 11 am - 8 pm Sunday, June 2nd - 11 am - 7 pm SPCA Thrift Store II - 1270 E. Plumb Lane Saturday, June 1st - 9 am - 6 pm PetSmart - 6675 S. Virginia St Saturday, June 1st - 11 am - 3 pm PetSmart - 5110 Mae Anne Ave Saturday, June 1st - 11 am - 3 pm Sunday, June 2nd - 11 am - 3 pm For information call: (775) 324-7773


From DINOSAURS to ice age mammals to legends like BIGFOOT and Yeti. Come face-to-face with amazing full-size animatronics including a WOOLY MAMMOTH, saber-toothed tiger, dinosaurs, and SEA MONSTERS. Hands-on and interactive with several touch stations!

STOP BY TODAY! EXHIBIT CLOSES ND JUNE 2 ! Tickets are $9.00 Adults / $8.00 for Children and Seniors School and group tours are available For exhibit hours and more information: Call (775) 785â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5961 OR Visit www.maycenter.com

WILBUR D. MAY MUSEUM Rancho San Rafael Regional Park 1595 N. Sierra St, Reno

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FAMILY GUIDE SUMMER 2013 | 11


By JEssIcA sAntInA

greaT one-day geTaways for reno/sparks families MAnY oF MY GrEAtEst chILDhooD MEMorIEs are of day trips. My father, keen on foregoing expensive overnight stays, was a master at the one-day adventure. I vividly recall being awakened at 3 a.m. so that we could hop in the car for the five-and-a-half-hour drive from our home outside Atlanta to the beach at Hilton Head or Savannah, where we would lie around on towels and read, swim in the warm waters, eat succulent seafood meals and then drive home. These days, my husband and I embrace the day-trip tradition. Long before In-N-Out made it to Reno, we frequently drove to Auburn just for burgers and fries. And now that we have a 4-year-old daughter, a common day trip involves Ikea, lunch in Roseville and a brief Sacramento park excursion. The day trip is a marvel. It lets you shake off the dust of home, open your perspective and feel as if you’ve had a vacation, all without spending vacation dough. That is why we make an effort to squeeze one in whenever we can, especially in spring and summer. Here are some of our favorite day-trip destinations.

Train To Truckee

photo/Jessica santina

it might seem almost prosaic to mention lake Tahoe ...

Train travel is vastly underrated and underused. It’s cheap, it affords great scenery, there are electrical outlets for those who insist on plugging in, you can use your cell phone, the seats are comfy, and hello? Dining car, anyone? For families, it’s a dream. From Reno you can hop aboard the California Zephyr to Truckee for about $13 (kids’ tickets are less) at the downtown Reno Amtrak station at 8:30 a.m. After the one-hour scenic train ride alongside the Truckee River, you’ll disembark in

Truckee around 9:30 a.m. Now you can shop, stroll, dine or hit the TruckeeDonner Regional Park for a little play and picnic. After lunch, head on back to the train station, smack dab in the center of town and catch the 90-minute ride home at 2:30 p.m. You’ll be home before dinner time. For the money and convenience, it’s hard to beat. www.amtrak.com/california -zephyr-train

Tahoe Beaches I know, it’s almost prosaic at this point to mention Tahoe, but I’d like to point out two ideal spots for families. First is my personal favorite, Commons Beach in Tahoe City. There’s grass, which is cool and comfortable for picnicking. In the summer, there’s a free concert there every Sunday afternoon. There’s a shady playground. There are restrooms (for families, this may be the top criterion). There’s a great walking path. And you’re right downtown, in case you want to take a break to shop, grab lunch or find some ice cream. Or take a walk over to Fanny Bridge at the “Y” and show passing drivers your rear as you watch the duckand-trout show in the water below. Commons Beach: www. concertsatcommonsbeach.com

Taylor creek VisiTor cenTer This park, on the California side of Tahoe’s south shore, is an ideal day-trip spot any time of year, but it’s really best in October. That’s because the creek is home to Kokanee Salmon (landlocked Sockeye Salmon), which turn bright red and spawn in early fall. At Taylor Creek, the gentle, flat Rainbow Trail runs alongside and level with the creek. In fall, the shallow water (in some places

DAY t r I p p

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only inches deep) is full of hundreds, maybe thousands of red salmon spawning, making their way up the creek. Fish flop and wiggle so close you could touch them (don’t try to), and the “show” is free. But summer at Taylor Creek is lovely, too, with its great picnicking, biking and hiking spots for families. Not only does the Visitors Center offer gifts, concessions and restrooms, but the Rainbow Trail is flat and even, with plenty of shade and benches, so it’s an easy walk for kids or older folks, and it’s nice and wide. (I’ve easily pushed a stroller on the trail.) Even without the red salmon jumping in the stream, we’ve made summer visits to Taylor Creek and spotted wildlife—deer, fish, birds and big, fuzzy caterpillars. www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/ltbmu/ recarea/?recid=11785

It might surprise you to find Fallon on this list, but it really makes a great day trip for families because of its affordability, and because it’s close despite feeling a world away. One of our family’s favorite activities (again, great for fall, but also open and ideal for summer, too) is Lattin Farms. Not only can you pick up farm-fresh, organic produce, preserves and fresh, homemade baked goods at the produce stand, but you can picnic on the premises or pick your own produce as well. In late summer, we like berry- and tomato-picking; just grab a bucket and head out to the field, where working on the farm is actually fun. Little ones will love the cow train—a tractor pulling a series of hollow metal barrels made into “cars”—as well as the Critterville, where you can see chickens, rabbits, goats, pheasants and turkeys up close. And in October, Lattin Farms also hosts a corn maze, hayrides, a scarecrow factory and, of course, a pumpkin patch. Once you’re finished at Lattin Farms, take your breads, jams, fruits and veggies on a picnic at Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge in Lahontan Valley. This wildlife sanctuary has been designated a “globally important bird area,” as it’s home to more than 280 species of birds. During the Spring Wings Bird Festival May 17-19,

Bowers Mansion and davis Creek regional Park On a hot summer afternoon, there’s little else I feel like doing than lying on a blanket in the shade. On the grounds of Bowers Mansion in Washoe Valley, you’ll find expansive lawns shaded by huge, mature trees, so it’s just about the best picnic area around, and there are two playgrounds nearby. According to Eric Crump with Washoe County Parks, there’s exciting news this year: On May 18, the Bowers Mansion, which has been closed for years due to budget cuts, will reopen for weekends throughout summer. Tours of the historic mansion run every hour from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. Perhaps even more exciting is the June 8 return of the Bowers Mansion public pool, well-loved by area residents for its size and naturally heated spring-fed waters. Your family might also like the hike from the mansion to the Bowers family cemetery, a cool, potentially creepy walk that lets your imagination run wild. Bowers Mansion Regional Park: www.washoecounty.us/parks/ parkdetails~pkid=1 Davis Creek Regional Park: www.washoecounty.us/parks/ parkdetails~pkid=3

pers

Gift certificates make great gifts! Visit www.newsreview.com

Fallon and ChurChill County

visitors can take a variety of tours, via hiking or kayaking, of nature areas and marshlands. Decoy-carving contests, tours of Grimes Point, one of the largest and most accessible petroglyph areas in the country, and birds-of-prey educational talks for kids and adults are also part of the festival. On non-festival days, though facilities (i.e. restrooms) are limited at Stillwater, there is abundant hiking, overlook and picnic areas. And if it’s simply too hot to be outdoors, the recently updated and expanded Churchill County Museum offers hands-on activities for kids and interesting historical exhibits for adults. Lattin Farms: www.lattinfarms.com Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge: www.fws.gov/stillwater/ Grimes Point Trail: www.americantrails.org/ nationalrecreationtrails/blm/ grimespoint-nv.html Churchill County Museum: www.ccmuseum.org

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FaMiLy GUide suMMer 2013 | 13


4 | summer14 2012| summer familY guiDe | mayguiDe 9, 201 3 | amay spe9,cial e mecial nt t osuthe reno & review 2012 familY 201su 3 |ppl a spe p p lem entnews to the reno news

photo by sage leehey

photo by sage leehey

hector tinajero, david gibson hector tinajero, david gibson and alex gamboa of andtsLa. alex gamboa of tsLa.

sust ainable sust ainable

summer summer Face it. your are kids goingare to going get bored. Face kids it. your to get bored. but they but don’t have to stay way.that way. they don’t havethat to stay by sage leeheY s a geleeheY l @ newsr evsa iew.c o mnewsr ev iew.c o m by sage ge l@

This programThis alsoprogram teaches also students teaches students thosethose looking for for looking how to start their own business or business or how to start their own a summer camp that a summer campproject that in sustainability that will project in sustainability that will

will add lessons sustainability will in add lessons in sustainability help improvehelp ourimprove community our and community and and entrepreneurship to their child’s and entrepreneurship to their child’s the students’the personal skillpersonal sets andskill sets and students’ toolbox maytoolbox find themay Three Spheres find the Three Spheres résumés. Therésumés. programThe guarantees program guarantees Leadership Academy (TSLA) is (TSLA) 20-plus Leadership Academy is field20-plus trips, membership to field trips, membership to exactly whatexactly they’rewhat searching for.searchingBGCTM, they’re for. a T-shirt, a sustainability kit BGCTM, a T-shirt, a sustainability kit TSLA will have twowill sessions TSLA have two sessions for home andfor mentorship home andopportunities. mentorship opportunities. (June 10 to July 3 and Aug. (June 10 toJuly July8 3toand July 8 toTwo Aug.of the students from last year willlast year will Two of the students from 2) open for high school to students 2) open for students high school betoback as mentors. be back as mentors. learn throughlearn hands-on activities, through hands-on activities, Gibson said Gibson the program is still said the program is still guest speakers and field trips to field trips tobeing planned, guest speakers and butplanned, they willbut go they on will go on being local sustainable localbusinesses sustainableand businesses and many of the many same field and do trips and do of thetrips same field technologies.technologies. The camp runs TheMonday camp runs Monday many of the many same activities as they did as they did of the same activities through Friday from Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through from 9 a.m. to 4last p.m. year, including visiting Patagonia, last year, including visiting Patagonia, Envirolution,Envirolution, a local non-profit a local non-profit Sunvelope Solar and GBCFC. Sunvelope Solar and GBCFC. organizationorganization focused on sustainability focused on sustainability Gibson said Gibson they willsaid addthey a yoga will add a yoga and energy efficiency education, and energy efficiencyiseducation, is oncesession session a weekonce and incorporate a week and incorporate organizing and teachingand the teaching program,the program, organizing “a social aspect by getting “a social aspectmore by getting more but the Boysbut andthe Girls Club Truckee Boys andofGirls Club ofengaged Truckeein the local art musicart and music engaged in and the local Meadows (BGCTM) hosting it at Meadowsis(BGCTM) is hostingscene.” it at They’re alsoThey’re “trying to line scene.” also “trying to line their facility their and providing food for facility and providing food upfor somethingupwith the native tribes something with the native tribes students andstudents buses forand field trips.for field trips. buses to learn about history thehistory area of the area tothe learn aboutofthe EnvirolutionEnvirolution piloted this program piloted this program before whitebefore settlers.” white settlers.” last year withlast eight butstudents, but The programThe yearstudents, with eight costs $500, but program costs $500, but this year theythis plan to expand it to 20 year they plan expand itscholarships to 20 are available.are Gibson said Gibson said scholarships available. students in each session, according toaccording students in each session, to they wouldn’t turnwouldn’t anyone turn awayanyone if theyaway if they they Community Community Services Director David Services Director want Davidto participate. want to participate. Gibson. LastGibson. year, heLast saidyear, they he went said they went “We actually“We just actually had a grant justcome had a grant come on about 25 on field trips,25including theincluding about field trips, theprovideinscholarship in to to provide money scholarship money Great Basin Great Community Food Co-op Food to Basin Community Co-op low-income students,” said Lisa said Lisa to low-income students,” (GBCFC), the Reno Bike (GBCFC), theProject, Reno Bike Project, Godenick, a Godenick, fundraisingaAmeriCorps fundraising AmeriCorps Black Rock Black Solar and theSolar geothermal Rock and the geothermal volunteer. “And we’re “And hosting a movie volunteer. we’re hosting a movie plants of Peppermill CasinoHotel and Casino plants ofHotel Peppermill and infundraiser fundraiser May. Some the Some moneyof the money in of May. Ormat Technologies, Inc. Ormat Technologies, Inc. from that will go to TSLA.” from that will go to TSLA.” & review


tahoe’s Great

outDoors by tim hauserman

iT’s summer, for goodness sake, geT THose cHiLdren ouTside

an oFten seen Facebook post saYs:

“if you’re 10 years old, you have a laptop, iPod, facebook and a blackberry … dude, when i was 10, i only had one thing to play with … it was called ‘outside.’” in my opinion, those who grew up then were better off because of it. while kids playing outside surely develop their bodies and burn off calories, they also develop their creative minds by learning how to explore the world around them without an agenda.

Take a Hike Tips on hiking: Hiking, or you can call it walking if it sounds less intimidating, gives children a chance to explore our natural surroundings up close and personal. Be sure to allow your kids enough free reign to wander and explore. That is when the learning happens.

TaHoe meadows Tahoe Meadows is not only a humongous kids’ playground, but the Tahoe Rim Trail/Mt. Rose Trailhead is close to Reno. A 10-year-old might enjoy the fairly easy five-mile round-trip jaunt on the TRT to the sparkling waters of Galena Falls. Younger kids can enjoy a romp on the level, mile-long TRT interpretative trail that heads out from the Tahoe Meadows Trailhead, or hop onto one of the short meadow loops along Ophir Creek. To get there: The Mt. Rose and Tahoe Meadows Trailheads are on Highways 431, 17 miles west of its intersection with Highway 395. (Or is it Interstate 580? I’m so confused.)

Page meadows Kids will love tromping through this series of meadows bordered by aspen trees. Several easy access points are available that are just a short walk to the good stuff. See if the kids can spot the Basque sheepherders’ oven and some mildly risqué aspen wood carvings. They also might locate a handmade bench

placed along a side meadow in honor of a famous Tahoe skier. To get there: Take the Tahoe Rim Trail off of Ward Creek Boulevard, about 3 miles southwest of Tahoe City, or go to the end of Silver Tip in the Talmont Estates neighborhood.

sPooner Lake Just 10 miles from Carson City, the Spooner Lake Loop takes you through the aspens to the shores of marshy Spooner Lake. Older, more adventurous kids can take the trail four-miles to the more enticing shores of Marlette Lake. And if you don’t get around to taking this hike in the summer, that’s OK. The extensive groves of aspens turn it into a fall color extravaganza. To get there: The Spooner Lake Trail and Marlette Lake Trail begins at the Tahoe Rim Trail North trailhead at Spooner Summit on Highway 50.

aLmosT anywHere eLse It’s not as much the place as giving the kids the time and the freedom to explore their environment. If you want to push your outdoorsy envelope and really give your kids a chance to experience the outdoors, take them on a short backpacking trip to a beautiful mountain lake, and leave the technology at home. It just might be your best parent-child bonding experience ever.

Having escaped from some of the strictures and distractions that kids find in the civilized world, children learn personal responsibility in nature by actually having to use their brains, instead of technology. while our schools, in their frantic effort to produce kids who do well on tests, have replaced recess and physical education with more class time, many believe it is that time off from the books that help children’s (and adults’) minds recharge and work more effectively. since some kids (and their parents) are not experts at playing outside, i’ve come up with a few suggestions for places to go and things to do around Lake Tahoe to get the ball rolling.

geT ouT on THe river: A right of passage for any kid at Tahoe is rafting down the Truckee River. This easy adventure is fun not only because it involves lots of splashing, swimming and screaming, but because the busy family atmosphere of the float turns into super soaker heaven. Get your kid one of those long range water throwers and let them have at it with their newfound friends or competitors. Where to go: Truckee River Rafting by Mountain Air Sports, at the Y in Tahoe City. www.Truckeeriverrafting.com, (530) 583-1111.

geT ouT on THe Lake Building sand castles and throwing each other into the chilly waters of Lake Tahoe are excellent uses of a kid’s time, but how about bringing a kayak or paddleboard and having the kids head out onto Tahoe’s beautiful waters? Here are a few choice spots: On the West Shore, two great places to play in the sand are Meeks Bay Resort and Bliss State Park. Both have long and beautiful sandy beaches. From Bliss, kayak towards Emerald Bay and look for osprey nests. Be sure to arrive at the park early, as the lakeside parking lot needed to launch your kayak fills up early. At Meeks Bay, paddle out from shore to where the stark green water meets the deep blue. If the kids still have the energy, you can hike the lake hugging Rubicon Trail at Bliss State Park.

To hike at Meeks Bay, cross the highway to the Meeks Creek Trail into the Desolation Wilderness. Just a mile of easy walking through wildflower-dotted meadows brings you to the remains of a Girl Scout camp. Stronger kids could make the ten-mile round trip to the beautiful Crag Lake. To get there: Both beaches are on Highway 89. Meeks Bay is 10 miles south of Tahoe City. Bliss State Park is 17 miles south of Tahoe City. Another beach option is the Commons Beach in the center of Tahoe City. While not quite the glorious sandy refuge that is Meeks Bay or Bliss, it has a playground just above the lake and on Sunday afternoons the popular concerts on the beach make it a great place to play for both children and adults.

ZiP away Granlibakken’s Tree Top Adventure Park is a new and popular family activity. It’s a series of courses linking tree top to tree top via zip lines, bridges and lots of other fun challenges crazy people have come up with. There are beginner courses for those more than 4 years old and more advanced courses for teenagers and adults. The courses are demanding but, for an adventurous teenager, could be the highlight of their summer. To get there: Granlibakken sits at the end of Granlibakken Road, one mile south of Tahoe City on Highway 89.

a sp ec ial sup p lem ent to r eno new s & r ev i ew | may 9 , 20 13 |

FamiLY GuiDe summer 2013 | 15


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