R-2013-04-11

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Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Chanelle.Bessette........... 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 16 Art.of.the.State............. 19

Foodfinds..................... 20 Film.............................. 22 Musicbeat.................... 24 Nightclubs/Casinos........25 This.Week.....................29 Free.Will.Astrology....... 34 15.Minutes.....................35 Bruce.Van.Dyke............35

Lower ED See News, page 8.

what thE fRack? See Green, page 11.

The Song RemainS The Same See Arts&Culture, page 16.

It’s Only ROck ’n’ ROll See Musicbeat, page 24.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

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VolumE 19, issuE 8

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apRil 11-17, 2013


What’s Your Leg Pain Trying to Tell You? According to the American Heart Association, about 7.1 million adults, including one in three over age 70, have peripheral artery disease (PAD). The association also says that people with PAD are four-to-ďŹ ve-times more at risk for heart disease and stroke and are likely to go undiagnosed. That’s because many people dismiss one of the primary symptoms — troublesome leg pain — as arthritis or part of the aging process and not as the very serious health concern that it is. Don’t ever ignore your health symptoms. Write them down and bring them to the attention of your doctor.

What Does PAD Feel Like? The symptoms include, but are not limited to, the following: ĆŒÉ„É„ $)É„*-É„ - (+$)"É„$)É„/# É„' ".É„*-É„#$+.É„2#$' É„2 '&$)"É„ that subsides after a few minutes of rest ĆŒÉ„É„ 0( ) ..É„*-É„2 &) ..É„$)É„/# É„' "É„*-É„!**/ ĆŒÉ„ #$)"É„$)É„/# É„!**/É„2#$' É„ /É„- ./ ĆŒÉ„É„ É„' "É„*-É„!**/É„/# /É„! '.É„ *' -É„/# )É„/# É„- ./É„*!É„/# É„ * 4 ĆŒÉ„ **/É„.*- .É„/# /É„2*)Ć–/É„# ' If you experience these symptoms, do not ignore them. PAD is a serious medical condition that requires treatment. In most cases, PAD can be managed with lifestyle changes or drug therapy. In advanced cases, surgical procedures can help open or bypass blocked arteries.

Dr. Truong is board certiďŹ ed in internal medicine and cardiology and is board eligible in interventional cardiology. He obtained his undergraduate degree at the University of Nevada, Reno where he received the “Nevada Henry Albert Senior Public Service Awardâ€?. He studied medicine at the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, Missouri. He completed his residency in internal medicine and pediatric medicine at University of Oklahoma College of Medicine in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he received the “Ralph and Frances McGill Foundation Awardâ€? for teaching excellence. Later, he studied general cardiology and was named “Fellow of the Yearâ€? at Oklahoma State University College of Medicine. He went on to complete fellowships in interventional cardiology and peripheral vascular medicine at Largo Medical Center in Tampa, Florida. Dr. Truong grew up in the Reno area and always knew that he would one day return and give back to this wonderful community that has given him so much. In his free time, he enjoys impressionist art, classical music, biking, camping and skiing.

Prevention is Great Medicine Some lifestyle changes can help prevent the condition: ĆŒÉ„É„ 0$/É„.(*&$)"ƆɄ (*& -.É„# 1 É„ É„#$"# -É„-$.&É„!*-É„ É„ and a higher risk for heart disease and stroke if they already have PAD. ĆŒÉ„É„ $)/ $)É„ É„# '/#4É„2 $"#/ƆɄ $(É„!*-É„ É„ * 4É„( ..É„ $) 3É„Ƨ ƨÉ„*!ɄŴŜɄ*-É„' ..É„/*É„ 1*$ É„ 1 '*+$)"É„ ƇɄ diabetes, high blood pressure and other serious health conditions. ĆŒÉ„É„ /É„(*1$)"ƆɄ '&É„/*É„4*0-É„ * /*-É„ *0/É„ 3 - $. É„ programs that may help protect your heart and reduce PAD symptoms. ĆŒÉ„É„ *)/-*'É„4*0-É„ '** É„+- ..0- É„ ) É„ #*' ./ -*'É„2$/#É„ your physician’s guidance.

Thomas Truong, DO

Assess Your Risk Online Don’t wait to ďŹ nd out if you’re at risk for PAD. Visit NNMC.com/assessments to complete a quick, online assessment.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Truong, call 775-352-5300.

ŴžźšÉ„ ƆɄ - / -É„ 4ƇɄ 0$/ É„ŴŲšÉ„ĆŚÉ„ + -&.ƇɄ É„ĆŚÉ„ŚŚšĆ?žšŴĆ?šžŲŲÉ„ĆŚÉ„222Ɔ Ɔ *( Information is provided for educational purposes only, and is not intended to constitute medical advice or to be relied upon for the treatment of any particular condition. If you have concerns or questions about speciďŹ c symptoms that may affect your health, please contact your healthcare provider.

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Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

You’ll think what you’re told

In defense of Fox

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. It’s funny how real life and real-life art sometimes collide. We live in a world where literally everything that human beings know, all of science, all of spirituality, all of ... everything, could be available to all of humanity on the internet. There’s already a lot out there, far more than any single human could comprehend. But isn’t it weird how much is not available, and the way the information that’s on there is presented in a way that prevents regular users like you and me from accessing it? For example, I want to know who was arrested in the United States on April 8, 2002, and every person arrested in the United States every day since. (And by the way, this is a purely hypothetical situation, I don’t care about arrests.) Arrests are public information, right? They are public information because Americans don’t want to live in a country where the government can take people and disappear them. So, if everything can be put on the internet, and if I accept the assumption that public information should be available, but that some things—schematics for Little Boy, or the genome and construction instructions for Ebola—should not be available, how would it be decided what should not be on the internet? What wouldn’t be available to the public would be information that some power-that-be decides is dangerous—information that would have bad repercussions for the entity that controls the information. That suggests that the information available is not the most powerful information. But the data that is available is so vast that determining what is missing is beyond anyone’s ability. This concept isn’t that profound. The marketplace theory of democracy is that if presented with all the information, Americans will make the right decisions. These days, though, we’re only told what powerful entities want us to factor into our thinking. If it’s not available, it’s because somebody doesn’t want us to make informed decisions.

Re “Carrey it on” (Notes from the Neon Babylon, April 4): No one, least of all Fox News commentator Greg Gutfeld, is denying Jim Carrey’s right to make a sarcastic and insulting video spouting a bunch of nonsense, but Gutfeld clearly felt that the vulgar insulting commentary about Charlton Heston was uncalled for. Cheap, insulting and vulgar jokes about a deceased and revered individual and respected actor—when as an actor, Carrey could definitely not fill Heston’s shoes—will bring out criticism. The fact that Bruce Van Dyke tries to defend Carrey and tries to set him up as some kind of intellectual is sad indeed. He seems to forget that Carrey’s threats against Gutfeld and Fox News are a bunch of hot air. Carrey threatens lawsuits, while knowing very well that he has nothing to sue about. Carrey’s intellect is clearly displayed in his use of the name “Fux” News as a “clever” substitute for Fox. It’s even sadder that Van Dyke tries to demean Fox News as the “fourth network.” I’d like to remind him that Fox News is number one in the ratings, with double to triple the number of viewers as numbers two and three. I understand that Van Dyke has every right as a liberal writer to express his opinion, but believers in the Second Amendment seldom would use the types of names that he claims liberals are being called. Of course the only truth he states in his column is the statement at the end of his “Carrey it on” column when he wrote, “At least, not anytime soon.” As usual, liberals can dish it out, but seldom can take it. Fred Speckmann Reno

What he said Re “Krolicki backs pipeline” (Upfront, April 4): If Lt. Gov. Brian Krolicki wants the tar-sands oil from the Keystone XL pipeline so badly, why not build the refineries in the same location where we get the oil? That way, we

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will be able to use our resources, and the impact on the environment will be at a minimum. Our politicians need to think outside of their circle. Harvey Salinger Reno

Half in jest, wholly in earnest Re “Legalize everything” (Editorial, April 4): My favorite Abe Lincoln quote is, “A prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principles upon which our government was founded.” I agree with him in that and agree with you that in the matters of personal liberty these laws are perversions. In addition, the repeal of 18th Amendment ended a great majority of gang violence—the ’20s is when drive-bys were first invented. By using this same approach to other drugs—since alcohol is a drug—a similar cessation of gang violence should happen. What I disagree with is the misuse of the words “logical” and “reason.” As for “logical,” you didn’t make any case whatsoever, you just changed some words and said it was logical. If one would like to have a logical conversation about this very emotional topic I would first address the parameters. This would mean defining that a marriage is among humans. Going along anthropological lines, a marriage is a union of one man and one woman for the purpose of producing and caring for children and forming a cohesive bond in society. Then next step in a logical conversation, since there are people that disagree with my assertion, is to square the concept of marriage against very intimate friendship. Then, once those parameters are in place, you can start to test the theory. For instance, you said that “people should be able to marry who they want.” Perhaps, but would you support the idea of incest? What if an 18-year-old daughter and her 50-yearold father wanted to marry? What if it could be proven that a goat had true affection for someone, should they be able to marry? Why not? Are not same-sex arrangements not

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Editorial Intern Sage Leehey Contributors Amy Alkon, Chanelle Bessette, Megan Berner, Matthew Craggs, Mark Dunagan, Marvin Gonzalez, Bob Grimm, Michael Grimm, Sheila Leslie, Dave Preston, Jessica Santina, K.J. Sullivan, Kris Vagner, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

—D. Brian Burghart

brian b@ n ewsreview . com

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the same abandonment of human culture that could also not expect offspring from? As far as “reason,” you’re overlooking some obvious issues. Firstly, if someone drove faster the maximum posted allowable speed limit seven years ago, that was an event that began and ended seven years ago. An illegal alien does not break the law by simply crossing a border between two states and then that act has ended—each day the illegal alien is still breaking the law because he is within the state illegally. To put your “statute of limitations (SOL)” argument to a logical test would be something like this: If someone has stolen an item once, then the SOL will begin the countdown the day after the item was stolen. If someone steals an item every day for seven straight years and is apprehended one day past the SOL for the first item stolen seven years ago, one cannot reasonably say that the SOL has passed ... perhaps it passed for the first instance, but not any of the rest. I would enjoy going into this in much more detail, but this comment is getting fairly large. Let me know if you’d like to have a five-pint discussion out in town, as I really enjoy talking to people with different thought processes. Matt Stern Fallon Editor’s note: To continue the argument in the spirit with which the editorial was written, this letter would be considered a logical fallacy of relevance, as the editorial stipulated marriage “among people,” acknowledged the immigration law was broken, and suggested the writer was stoned when the editorial was written. Specifically, though, the editorial would suffer from the logical fallacy of ambiguity, a straw man argument, because the meaning of the words was plain (if inelegant) when the Nevada Constitution excluded same-sex marriage, etc. On a meta-level, we were just saying we think these various prohibitions are stupid, so the editorial was written in an ironic way. Sure, a couple pints after the semester would be great.

Assistant Distribution Manager Ron Neill Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Sean Karp, John Miller, Jesse Pike, David Richards, Martin Troye, Warren Tucker, Matthew Veach, Sam White General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Ronsenquist

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Two men for every woman Re “Legalize everything” (Editorial, April 4): The practice of polygamy, the popular name for one man with many wives, comes down to us from the dark ages when women had no rights and were considered chattel. There is no equality in such a relationship, where one man is served by many women, each of whom is rival for his attention to them and their children. In present-day polygamous groups, only the first, therefore legal, wife and her children are entitled to share in the man’s health and dental insurance, life insurance, medical benefits, tax benefits and pensions, etc. The remaining women and their children are on their own and face poverty. As well, while the man can enjoy a sex fest every night with many different sexual partners, the women have to line up and wait their turn in his bedroom, much like cows waiting to be serviced by a bull. At least in same-sex marriage, the relationship is between two equals who have equal rights and equal responsibilities, and who equally share each other’s property. Polygamy reduces women to second-class citizenship, which is why the organization “Women Living Under Muslim Law” is petitioning their governments to end this ancient misogynistic practice ... and who would know better than they? Time to kick this ancient practice into the garbage can of history, along with the thumbscrew and the rack. The year is 2013 AD, not 2013 BC, and women—in the First World but sadly not in the Third World—are now legally considered men’s equals. Jancis M. Andrews Sechelt, BC, Canada

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Web site www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and feature story design: Hayley Doshay

APRIL 11, 2013

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special aDVeRTising secTion

It’s happen ing in

EVENTS CALL FOR ARTISTS – WESTERN HERITAGE FESTIVAL The Sparks Museum and Cultural Center is seeking artists and crafters whose works portray elements of western heritage and folklife for a Western Heritage Festival on May 11, 2013, at Victorian Square in Sparks, Nevada. Wanted: Western furniture and home accessories, handcrafted works in leather, metal and wood, jewelry and fashion, Western-themed art, antiques, saddles and tack, textile arts and baskets. Exhibit Space (10 x 10 outdoor booth): $65 before April 15; $75 after April 15. Deadline: April 29, 2013. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave.(775) 355-1144 CALL FOR ARTISTS – ARTS IN BLOOM The 11th Annual Arts in Bloom Art & Wine Festival is seeking 35 local and regional Fine Artists for our event on Saturday, July 20, 2013 at Victorian Square in Sparks. Exhibit and sell your art, receive an Artist Profile in the RN&R and be a part of a long-running, popular community event. Cost is $150, including space and canopy. For an application and more info: johnm@newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440, ext. 3515.

ACTIVITIES TIMELESS TREASURES: A CELEBRATION OF NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE This colorful exhibit captures the vibrant spirit of Native American culture and includes paintings, pottery, arrowheads, cradle boards, baskets, musical instruments and more. Tu-Su through 5/26, $5/adults; under age 12 free. Sparks Heritage Museum, 814 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-1144 GRAFTING FRUIT TREES Presented by Michel Janik, expert apple grower. Learn simple techniques of grafting apple trees. Each participant will do six (6) trees to take home. Sa, 4/13, 9AM & 1PM, $40. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551 ROSE PRUNING Presented by Reno Rose Society. Learn pruning and general care of all types of roses for beautiful blooms for years to come. Please RSVP. Sa, 4/13, 11AM & 1PM, free with canned food donation. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551 ART ADVENTURES FOR KIDS It’s painting, collage, clay and more! Explore different media and techniques weekly. Give your child a sound base for a lifelong appreciation of the arts. Th, 4/18, 4-5PM, $45 for six classes. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385 FUN WITH DRAWING Give your child a lifelong gift learning the fundamentals of drawing. Your child will learn value, shading and an introduction to perspective while developing techniques. Th, 4/18, 5:15-6:15PM, $45 for six classes. Alf Sorensen Community Center, 1400 Baring Blvd. (775) 353-2385

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! AMERICAN YOUTH SOCCER Annual registration for the local American Youth Soccer Organization (AYSO) Region 166 Fall 2013 season. Everyone Plays philosophy. Sa, 4/20, 9AM-1PM, Tu, 4/30, 5:30-8:30PM, Sa, 5/4, 9AM-1PM, W, 5/15, 5:30-8:30PM and Sa, 6/1, 9AM-1PM. $100 per child until May 31; $135 per child after May 31. Mendive Middle School, 1900 Whitewood Dr. (775) 353-5780 SPRING FLING Come see what’s new and visit with product representatives while enjoying hot dogs and refreshments. Specials throughout. Sa, 4/20, 9AM-4PM and Su, 4/21, 9AM-4PM, free. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551 EVERYTHING TOMATO Presented by Brad-Wild Boar Nursery. Learn from one of the top producer of unique tomato varieties and how to grow and produce delicious tomatoes. Sa, 4/20, 11AM & 1PM, free with canned food donation. Rail City Garden Center, 1720 Brierley Way (775) 355-1551

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC LIVE MONDAYS WITH TANY JANE Open Mic Night every Mon night at 8PM, hosted by Tany Jane. M, 8PM through 9/30, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 BLACK AND BLUES JAM Tu, 8:30PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 3551030 SNOW WHITE Brüka Theatre for Children presents its touring children’s theater production based on the Brothers Grimm fairy tale. W, 4/10, 10am, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200 and Tu, 4/23, 6PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800 COUNTRY AT THE CABARET The Casino Cabaret will come alive with the best in country music and dancing for “Country at the Cabaret” fearuring DJ Jamie G. W, 7PM and Sa, 9PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 MICHAEL POWERS Th, 4/11, 5:30PM, F, 4/12, 6PM and Sa, 4/13, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 MIDNIGHT RIDERS Th, 4/11, 7PM, F, 4/12, 8PM, Sa, 4/13, 8PM and Su, 4/14, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 LIVE JAZZ Vocal and instrumental jazz from “The Great American Songbook”, performed by First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz. Fridays, 6PM through 12/27, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks, NV 89441 (775) 657-8659

Follow me to Sparks - where it’s

happening now! SHAKA F, 4/12, 6PM, Sa, 4/13, 6PM and Su, 4/14, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 RENO UKEFEST: LEO KOTTKE AND VICTORIA VOX Leo Kottke is one of the most iconic guitar players of all time, and Victoria Vox is rapidly becoming iconic for her ukulele skills. F, 4/12, 8PM, $32. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 ALIAS SMITH Hard, fast and fun! F, 4/12, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd.(775) 355-1030 LIL REV UKELELE ALL-STARS Part of Reno Ukulele Festival’s Accoustic Weekend Sa, 4/13, 8PM, $26. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave.(775) 356-3300 ALEX MILLER W, 4/17, 5:30PM, Th, 4/18, 6PM and F, 4/19, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 STEPPEN STONZ Th, 4/18, 7PM, F, 4/19, 8PM, Sa, 4/20, 8PM and Su, 4/21, 7PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 TYLER STAFFORD F, 4/19, 6PM, Sa, 4/20, 6PM and Su, 4/21, 6PM, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 ZERO JONES F, 4/19, 9PM, no cover. Sidelines Bar & Nightclub, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 355-1030 LADIES 80S WITH DJ LARRY WILLIAMS Ladies ’ with DJ Larry Williams, every Thursday! Th, 7PM through 10/4, no cover. John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300 BILL DAVIS Sa, 6PM, no cover. Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen, 1180 Scheels Dr. (775) 657-8659 KARAOKE ASPEN GLEN bAR Every Sat night. Hosted by Mike Millard of Cycorockstar Entertainment. Sa, 9PM-2AM through 9/14. Aspen Glen Bar, 5215 Vista Blvd. 89436 / (775) 354-2400 SPIRO’S F, 9PM, no cover. 1475 E. Prater Way (775) 356-6000 THE ROPER DANCEHALL & SALOON Country music dance lessons and karaoke, Th, 7:30PM, no cover. 670 Greenbrae Dr. (775) 742-0861 OPEN MIC GREAT bASIN bREWING Open mic comedy. Th, 9PM, no cover, 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

GET INVOLVED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY! CITY OF SPARKS Mayor: Geno Martini. Council members: Julia Ratti, Ed Lawson, Ron Smith, Mike Carrigan, Ron Schmitt. City Manager: Shaun Carey. Parks & Recreation Director: Tracy Domingues. Mayor and Council members can be reached at 3532311 or through the City of Sparks website. WEb RESOURCES: www.sparksitshappeninghere.com www.cityofsparks.com www.sparksrec.com THis secTion is pRoViDeD as a pUBlic seRVice BY THe Reno neWs & ReVieW anD is noT FUnDeD oR aFFiliaTeD WiTH THe ciTY oF spaRKs


by Sage Leehey

This ModeRn WoRLd

by tom tomorrow

How would you change Reno’s image? Asked at Barnes & Noble Robert Cummins Retiree

I think it needs more green. The old mall [Park Lane] is just all pavement. It should be made into a park. We need more parks and green. It would be good for our air, too.

Ruth Cummins Librarian

I think they should get rid of a lot of the derelict buildings. Tear them down. It would make Reno look a lot nicer. They could replace it with more green spaces or housing to make the city look cleaner.

Brett Goodman X-ray Technologist

I would like to see the schools improve. Once the schools improve, the future generations improve, and then Reno will improve. Something really needs to happen on the education level.

Mining pays more As an exploration geologist knowledgeable about the equivalent industries. The government is trying mining industry, I argue that your March 14 to extract more money out of mining and to do article, “A special case,” uses inappropriate so wishes to remove tax protections from the analogies and misinformation. In summary, state constitution in order to manipulate it. This mining pays more tax than equivalent industries. is both unnecessary and harmful. In metals exploration, you typically need First, Nevada has control of the deductions 1,000 projects to obtain one success (discovery). and just started to control these. Why remove Then, engineering, metallurgical and environthis from the constitution if the government has mental studies costing tens of millions of dollars not applied the tools it has? Second, mining must determine if mining is economically and requires a long and stable tax environment to put environmentally feasible. up high risk capital. Removing by If this stage is passed, mining from the constitution Richard Bedell mine permitting and and allowing government to The government construction begins, at a manipulate the tax would create is trying to extract cost of a hundred million an immediate decrease in capital Richard Bedell is an dollars (at the low end) to investment in Nevada. I can more money out of exploration geologist. several billions of dollars. speak directly to the estimated mining. The minimum time $577 million invested in Nevada from discovery to mining exploration in 2012. is 12 years, with a chance Your article refers to of failure at each stage. Compare this to the Wyoming’s higher tax for oil, gas and coal. analogy used in the article of a sandwich shop The risk in metals would be greatly diminished where you buy your bread in the morning and if we could drill one good hole and then pump sell it for profit a few hours later. The sandwich it out like they do for petroleum. Coal beds shop employs a few people at minimum wage are sedimentary units with large tonnages and while a mine can create hundreds of jobs that are continuity. Metals, and particularly gold, are far the highest paid in the state. The sandwich shop smaller deposits and less predictable. is retail, and mining is wholesale. There are no At the end of the day, we want a strong other wholesalers in the state who pay additional tax base in Nevada. A yes vote on SJR 15 will taxes, but mining does. Therefore, mining pays provide fewer taxes, not just from direct investmore than its share. The 5 percent net proceeds ment but from the loss of high paying jobs. Ω tax that is special to mining is additional to OPINION

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Carol Merjil Retiree

Maybe advertise the open, green spaces more. I’ve had to search for them in the past. When people think of Reno, they think of gambling. They think of shows. I don’t think they think of the green spaces.

Amy Young Teacher

I like that it’s small. I’m from Southern California. The more things that come here, the more it reminds me of there. I would rather it remain small. I’ve seen a lot of growth in the 16 years that I’ve been here, and I liked it better before. I wouldn’t want anything to come here to attract more people, honestly.

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Let’s have sex education You have to wonder about Nevada sometimes. You’d think a libertarian state, proud of its history of quickie divorces and legalized prostitution, would not be squeamish about providing comprehensive sex education as part of its school curriculum. You’d be wrong. by Perhaps the word “comprehensive” Sheila Leslie is the problem. According to Janine Hansen, who appeared recently on Ralston Reports, “comprehensive means radical.” Meanwhile, Annette Magnus of Planned Parenthood of Southern Nevada gave her definition of comprehensive as “it’ll cover a wide range of topics.” You know, updated topics like sexting, cyberbullying and dating violence. Although Nevada law currently requires all school districts to teach sex education, it doesn’t stipulate that said education must be medically accurate and age-appropriate, setting aside national standards so local school boards can determine how comprehensive they want their sexual education. This means some districts focus on abstinence-only as the best approach

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despite decades of Nevada ranking among the highest states for teen pregnancy. Others leave it up to individual teachers or schools to decide what’s important and what’s not. AB 230, sponsored by David Bobzien, D-Reno, and a host of other progressive legislators, implements comprehensive, medically accurate, age-appropriate sexual health education with the goal of reducing Nevada’s fourth highest in the country rating, with over 7,000 teen pregnancies a year. The bill is a top priority of Planned Parenthood and other health organizations that view its passage as the best method of reducing teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The groups point out that young people, ages 15 to 24, represent about 25 percent of the sexually experienced population, but acquire nearly half of all new STDs. In 2009, young people, ages 13 to 29, made up 39 percent of all new HIV infections. AB 230 directs school districts to create a community advisory board to consider and recommend a

curriculum to be approved by the local school board and allows the district to approve additional professionals to teach the course. It also requires the State Board of Education to create standards for medically accurate instruction on sexuality, healthy relationships and sexual responsibility. Dating violence continues to plague teen relationships, often carrying over to the adult years and contributing to Nevada’s first-in-thenation status of women murdered by men, most often an intimate partner. One evaluation of an adolescent dating violence prevention program, “Safe Dates,” found that including this issue as part of comprehensive sex education reduced physical and sexual dating violence by 60 percent. Education works. When the bill was heard last week in front of packed hearing rooms in Las Vegas and Carson City, there were passionate speeches on both sides, including a state assemblywoman who talked about growing up in a family of 13, led by a single father, with sisters who were all teen mothers. She had

an abortion at 16 because no one had reached out to her on the subject and suggested there was another way. The capital press corps largely ignored the four-and-a-half hour hearing, leaving news coverage to a liberal blogger, Emmily Bristol, also known on Twitter as TheSinCitySiren who posted a lengthy piece that evening on her blog (http://sincitysiren.wordpress. com/2013/04/02/lower_ed/). In a stunning display of stuckin-the-dark-ages thinking, scores of people testified against the bill, leaving one to wonder if they’d read the card on the table that reminds witnesses it’s a misdemeanor not to tell the truth when testifying. Apparently, their version of the truth includes debunked theories that abortion causes breast cancer, or misinformation such as condoms don’t prevent sexually transmitted disease or pregnancy. One suggested the bill was intended to brainwash kids to want abortions and to put “certain ideas” in their heads to encourage homosexuality. Sounds to me like a lot of people need remedial sex education. Ω

For information regarding the national standards for sex education from the American Association for Health Education, see www.aahperd. org/aahe/advocacy/ pressreleases/ education.cfm.


Let’s have sex education The April 1 legislative hearing for Assembly Bill 230 was one that will affect generations of Nevadans to come. More casually known as the sex education bill, the act seeks “to establish a comprehensive, age-appropriate and medically accurate course of instruction” in regard to not only the by Chanelle Bessette act of reproduction but also for STD protection, birth control, defining sexual consent, human trafficking, the effectiveness of abstinence as a method of preventing STDs and pregnancy, developing healthy relationships, recognizing abuse, the effects of drug use and alcohol on responsible decision making, the electronic transmission of sexually explicit material, and other related subjects. In an ideal world, parents would teach their children all the facts of life they need to survive as adults as well as encourage their children to wait until they are physically, financially and emotionally ready to start having sex. But Nevada is currently ranked as number three in the nation for teen pregnancies, and Nevada

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also has one of the worst dropout rates in the country (currently hovering around 38 percent). As a Libertarian, I personally support a comprehensive, objective sexual education plan, and I am impressed with the variety of topics that the bill seeks to institute into curriculum. While social conservatives may fret about teenagers receiving any kind of instruction about sex that isn’t “abstinence only,” the fact is that teenagers and college-aged students are going to have sex, and it’s important to teach the difference between safe sex and risky behavior. Perhaps one of the most important developments that has happened in the relatively recent history of comprehensive sex ed is the push to define sexual consent. While clearcut cases of rape already occur far too often—such as the recent incident in Steubenville, Ohio—there are also the blurrier gray areas that people don’t like to talk about. For example, if a man and woman are drinking together and seem attracted

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to each other and one of them blacks out, it may be difficult for the other person to tell that a loss of mental faculties has happened. If they have sex, it may be considered rape, even if both parties were giving indications of consent at the time that intercourse occurred. With prior in-depth education about the laws regarding consent, individuals will be better equipped to understand the consequences of their actions as well as what to do if a boundary line is crossed. In this same vein, the act intends to educate on all aspects of domestic violence, sexual assault and abuse. In Nevada, human trafficking is a huge issue, so education on the seriousness of human trafficking is an important step to end the sexual exploitation that goes along with it. Further, the push for education on recognizing healthy and unhealthy relationships—and how to intervene in the latter—is another important topic of discussion that students may or may not be getting at home. I remember that when I

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studied sex ed back in high school, the program I was in taught us about how to be effective interventionists if our friends or family were in abusive or controlling relationships. I still remember the signs that I was taught in that class and have since been able to help several friends get through difficult times. Finally, the relatively new topic of the distribution of sexually explicit images and materials between peers—better known as ‘sexting’—will continue to be more and more important as technology improves. Minors have engaged in this activity at an alarming rate, and they need to understand the consequences. Sex education creates wellinformed citizens of our state and of the world. By encouraging that a generation be protected with knowledge, we can ensure that they will be protected in other ways. Ω

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Keep up with AB 230 here: http://www. leg.state.nv.us/ Session/77th2013/ Reports/history. cfm?billname=AB230.

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Photo/Dennis Myers

In the balcony of the Senate hall, Nevada Board  of Regents chair Jason Geddes checks messages  while listening to debates. Geddes is a former  legislator himself.

A return to fast The Nevada Senate last week voted to raise the state’s highway speed limit to 85 miles per hour. Sen. Debbie Smith of Washoe County said she opposed the measure because people tend to do the speed limit and then some, which would mean some drivers doing more than 85. Sen. Pat Spearman of Clark County agreed with Smith and added that the National Transportation Safety Board has released a study showing Nevada’s small county highways—where high speeds are routine—are twice as dangerous as its urban highways. But the measure passed 15-6. Senate Bill 191 is sponsored by Sen. Don Gustavson, whose district includes Esmeralda, Humboldt, Lander, Mineral and Pershing counties, and parts of Washoe and Nye. Gustavson said state highway officials have flexibility in where 85 zones are posted. “You won’t see this through the spaghetti bowl,” he said. Until 1973, Nevada didn’t even have GUSTAVSON a highway speed limit, instead requiring “safe and reasonable” driving. One exception was part of World War II when the Legislature imposed a 35 mph speed limit to reduce wear on tires and save rubber, a crucial and scarce war commodity because natural rubber sources were controlled by the Axis powers and production of synthetic rubber did not become sufficient until late in the war. (By coincidence, on the same day that the Senate voted on an 85 mph limit last week, the capital newspaper, the Appeal, carried an item in its “This day in history” feature on the 1943 Legislature’s enactment of the 35 mph limit.) During the 1973 oil embargo, the Nixon administration imposed a national speed limit of 55 mph on states to save fuel, threatening to withhold highway funding unless states complied. When the crisis eased, the National Safety Council wanted the national speed limit retained for other reasons. Once imposed, every state was stuck with it. On long, flat, straight, dry highways that crossed western expanses like Nevada’s, the double nickel was a major grievance. In 1981, the Nevada Legislature protested by making speeds between 55 and 70 an offense only for “energy wasting.” Only above 70 could drivers be ticketed for speeding. Law enforcement agencies mostly ignored the 55 to 70 speeders. “We don’t write energy wasting tickets,” said a Douglas County sheriff. The 1980 Republican National Convention adopted a plank proposed by Nevada delegate Cliff McCorkle that called for repeal of the speed limit, but Ronald Reagan’s subsequent victory that year did not result in change. In 1987, Congress enacted, and Reagan signed, a 65 mph speed limit, still holding onto federal authority to decide the issue. On July 1, 1986, acting on a 1985 enactment of the Legislature, Nevada raised the speed limit to 70 and tentatively posted it on a section of Interstate 80 near Fernley. The Federal Highway Administration promptly said it would pull $100 million in highway funds from the state, and the state dropped the 70. In February 1990, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear a Nevada challenge to the legality of the national speed limit. Then in 1995, Congress repealed—and President Clinton signed—a repeal of federal speed limits, restoring authority over the issue to state governments. In December 1995, a 70 mph speed limit was posted on state highways. The state never went back to the wide open days. Utah has raised its limit to 75 and, on certain stretches, to 80.

—Dennis Myers

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smiled but said it still meant a commitment by the Legislature. “It was a recognition,” he said. “I mean, it wasn’t funded last session, and it’s been tough economic times, but creation of the Knowledge Fund has been in this building for 10 years, and it never got traction until last session, and now we have the governor looking to put money in it, we have some legislators looking to put money in it, and they’re starting to see the value of research and what it can mean to businesses that they want, as part of the economic plan.”

How it works

Legacy Draconian 2007-2009 campus cuts still hamper state economic development When the 1981 Nevada Legislature was meeting and the state’s higher education budget was being heard by by the budget committees, there was Dennis Myers a clash over how much time instructors were spending in the classroom. That led some campus spokespeople to defend the time spent by faculty on research. During that dispute, Reno Evening Gazette writer Bruce Bledsoe published a column in which he imagined a state legislator: “And he cried, ‘Abomination!’ as he woke to his clock radio and began to prepare for the day.

“They’re starting to see the value of research and what it can mean to businesses.” Jason Geddes nevada regents chair

‘Where has research ever gotten us?’ he demanded as he eased off his whiskers with his electric shaver and brightened his memorable smile with his electric toothbrush. ‘What has it done for me?’ he demanded as he slipped his polyester wrinkleproof, no-iron shirt over his smallpox-vaccinated arm and sat down to his packaged cereal and pasteurized milk. … [H]e opened his wallet to

dig out his car key. He paused a moment to kiss the photograph of his elder sister, dead from polio in the 1950s, and paused a longer moment to look fondly at another photograph of his father, dead from a deformed heart valve, also in the 1950s. Then, pulling forth a printout of some notes from a high-speed computer, he got into his car and set off for Carson City.” Three decades later, classroom time is not at issue, but research is. So is the role of the state’s higher education system in economic development. On the surface, everything about the matter seems rosy. Ask legislators and campus officials, and they say everyone is clear on the linkage between economic development and higher education. “I think a great number of them are,” said Nevada Board of Regents chair Jason Geddes. “I think with [Assembly Bill] 449 in the last session and the creation of the Knowledge Fund, there was a lot of interest that stemmed out of that SRI/Brookings report that to have any economic development future, you had to include higher education for workplace development, research and business startups.” The Knowledge Fund was created to fund academic research with commerical application. Reminded that the lawmakers created the fund but put no money in it, Geddes

But there are other views below the surface. Reluctance to offend legislators and a gag rule imposed on the higher education system by Chancellor Dan Klaich have silenced some players on and off campus who believe there are plenty of lawmakers who do not get the linkage between higher education and the state’s economy. (The gag was supposed to apply only to a funding formula but seems to have chilled discussion beyond that.) One legislator who spoke on condition of not being named said, “There are members here who barely believe in higher education, never mind higher education in economic development. Fortunately, they’re a minority, even in their own party, but they’re a drag on things. But they’re not the real problem. There are more of us who know of the importance in the abstract because we’ve heard it mentioned, but don’t really know how it works or what happens between the campuses and businesses. And if we are vague on it, certainly the public is.” Here’s an example: Over several years, NV Energy provided three-quarters of a million dollars for a renewable energy program, which included development of a geothermal lab on the Redfield campus and a partnership with another corporation, Ormat Geothermal (“Campuses aid business,” RN&R, Feb. 19, 2009). Together with state funding, it made the University of Nevada, Reno a significant institution in a curriculum that was new in higher education, and provided NV Energy with a source of trained professionals. It was an exchange that benefited both sides. There was also an additional project in which the state’s community colleges would train technicians for renewable projects. “We took this concept and, in a short time, got it from an idea to the classroom,” said NV Energy president Jeff Ceccarelli at the time.


Recycle this paper

But the state portion of the funding is essential in these exchanges, and so the consequences of the devastating hit taken by the higher education system during Jim Gibbons’ governorship—higher ed was reduced by a third—live on. The state is widely regarded in business circles as non-competitive with other small Western states. One prominent faculty member whose department is heavily involved in research said, “I honestly don’t think this Legislature is going to make any difference in economic development because it has never done anything to repair the system. Higher education in this state was badly damaged under Gibbons. We don’t have the talent we once had and providing a Knowledge Fund to this injured system is like putting a bird feeder up in a tree for a bird with a broken wing. We just can’t reach the goal. This system is broken.” On the other hand, he’s afraid of a retooling of any kind at this point—the halfway point of the Legislature passed last week—because even if the campuses gained something, it would likely be taken from other programs. Planning for this needed to happen well before the

lawmakers went into session, he said. When Gibbons’ successor, Gov. Brian Sandoval, embraced Gibbons’ no-new-taxes stance, rebuilding higher education in Nevada to the point where it was before the recession—or to a competitive position with other states in the Intermountain West— became extremely difficult if not impossible. When Gibbons proposed some of his most severe cuts four years ago, Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada director Chuck Alvey gave voice to the concern of many businesspeople: “And when you’re going for those high-quality jobs, generally they’re looking for strong higher [education] and K-12 system. And so it’s hard to recruit out-of-state companies if you don’t have a strong higher ed system.” It’s a sentiment that still resonates today, but there is little indication that things will change anytime soon—particularly if some lawmakers are fuzzy on the concept. Ω

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PHOTO/SAGE LEEHEY

Dawn Harris studies in the Center for Molecular Medicine between classes.

Educational Workshops

All fracked up

Running throughout the day in two locations. Attend at least 2 workshops during the day and receive one of 600 prizes from the Prize Gallery!

Conservation Zone Workshops

The possibility of fracking in Nevada awakens environmental activists

This area will include local organization booths with fun, interactive and educational activities for kids and adults. There will also be a “Picnic for Earth” area with available picnic blankets so that visitors can relax on this beautiful day. Great Basin Bird Observatory – Bird Identification and Research. Sponsored by

To frack or not to frack? This question is asked by more and more people as decisions are being made about whether hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, by Noble Energy Inc. will be allowed in northeastern Nevada. by Sage Leehey While the public is divided on this issue, Dawn Harris, founder of the Frack Free Nevada website and Facebook page and a University of s age l@ Nevada, Reno student, believes fracking is dangerous and should be news review.c om stopped—at least until further research can be done. “It’s our water and our air,” Harris said. “We cannot survive without it. We need to protect these things.” The main issue Harris has with fracking is that there has not been enough research done on the topic for various reasons. She wants the practice to halt. “I think that we need to have a moratorium until there’s science that can say what the effects are,” Harris said. “A pharmaceutical company cannot issue a drug unless it’s tested. Why is this industry allowed to perform all of these actions without any testing to prove that it is safe?” Through her own research, Harris has spoken to people in areas where fracking has been done to see how it has affected them. She has found various health issues. She stated that the industry claims these are not scientific, only anecdotal, but Harris doesn’t feel this is reason to dismiss these findings. “It’s a very wealthy, very powerful industry, and they want to protect their interests,” Harris said. “The people experiencing the problems are just everyday citizens. They don’t have anything to gain by standing up and saying, ‘Hey, I’m having nosebleeds, and my horses’ hair is falling out. The horses are having nosebleeds. Livestock is dying. And my children have asthma now.’” Harris is currently looking into the implications of fracking on public health through her personal and university studies. Although Harris does not agree with the practice of fracking, her goal is to raise awareness and general knowledge of fracking so people can make educated decisions about it. Harris reached out to the Sustainable Energy Network on campus to get Gasland and Rooted Lands—documentaries on fracking—shown on campus April 2 and 7 as part of this. The Senate Committee Harris wants the public to realize the issue of fracking is not a matter on Natural Resources of choosing sides but choosing what’s good for the country’s health and will hear a bill, S.B. future. She believes the industry has created a division in the public to 390, that will ensure deal with this issue, pitting people against each other who aren’t necesthat hydraulic sarily at odds. fracturing in Nevada does not happen “They put people who are trying to have money to raise their families without environmental against people who are trying to protect our air, water, soil and our way protections. For more of life,” Harris said. “If we didn’t have that division, if we could see information about we are all on the same side trying to protect our basic rights to raise our the bill, go to www. leg.state.nv.us/ families and eat good quality food and drink clean water and breathe Session/77th2013/ clean air, the industry wouldn’t be able to stand.” Reports/history. When reached by email to comment on the issue, Noble Energy said it cfm?ID=917. would provide responses to our questions, but at press time, has not. Ω OPINION

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The Great Basin Workshops Focusing on the Great Basin region – wildlife, ecology, natural resources, issues, etc. • Reno Herpetological Society – Reptiles – lizards and turtles • Plastic Free Reno - Make your own reusable bag from a T-Shirt • River School Farm – Backyard gardening and worm soil

2013 Earth Week: April 15-19, 11AM-2PM The University of Nevada’s Earth Week will help kick-off Reno Earth Day! Learn about options for more sustainable living through educational programs and demonstrations focusing on sustainability and examples of green campus and community resources. Visit the Reno Earth Day booth at UNR’s Earth Week on Thursday, April 18th for a special token which can be redeemed for a prize at the big event on Sunday. For more info on UNR’s Earth Week and a complete schedule of events, scan:

Little Explorers’ Expedition Something special at Reno Earth Day this year, especially for kids, The Little Explorers’ Expedition is a treasure map game, mapping out many of the kids’ activities throughout the event. The map will highlight all types of activities from arts and crafts to planting seeds, role playing and storytelling to learning games and exercises. Activities cater to kids ages 3-12 and all include some type of interaction for 5-15 minutes. Kids completing at least 5 of the activities on the map can turn in their maps for a special treasure at the Reno Earth Day Prize Gallery. This integrated approach allows families to remain together in what is considered a family event. Please come show your support and feedback, and bring the kids for an exciting and educational adventure!

Animalia Kingdom The Animalia Kingdom is a pet friendly zone, with doggie day care available for you to utilize while you visit the rest of the event! You’ll find pony rides, dogs and cats available for adoption, education booths on area animal organizations and a pet fashion show (sign up by calling 775-771-1828). Sponsored by

Reno Earth Day

10am-6pm, Sunday, April 21st Idlewild Park, Reno For more info: www.RenoEarthDay.com Sponsorships/Donations: 775.762.0651 Vending/Exhibiting/Performing: 775.771.1828 FILM

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B E ST

THE HISTORY AND FUTURE OF FRIENDS OF BLACK ROCK / HIGH ROCK

MAY 7

T

P R I C E BY

AHOE

Friends of Black Rock / High Rock assists in the management of the Black Rock Desert High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trail National Conservation Area (NCA). Education on fostering stewardship and preserving the regions unique character is a key focus, with boots on the ground action on the landscape. Straight from our mission statement, education requires an understanding of the fragility of the region and human impacts on wildlife, water, and ecosystems. Communication with cattle ranchers, ohv enthusiasts, hunters, campers and recreating families is part of the daily work at Friends. In 1999, this non-profit was established under the vision of the founding Board Susan L. Weeks, Susan Lynn, John Ryczkowski and Garth Elliot. The board’s field work showed such strength as to open the door for a BLM grant to assist in funding projects in the NCA which continues today. Friends is now in it’s fourteenth year and more strongly focuses it’s work in spring assessments due to drought issues which are facing wildlife and plant life in this area of northwestern Nevada. Executive Director, Karen Dallett, is completing her first year and is excited about this refocus, “For many years, Friends hosted the Visitor Contact Trailer every weekend from April to October sharing the wealth of cultural, wildlife and recreational information. Friends work has always been collaborative with the BLM and other partnering conservation non-profits at the annual Black Rock Rendezvous, at Steven’s Camp, Coyote Dunes, and hosting an interpretative camp annually at Burning Man. Friends managed the creation of the interpretative panels at the new Black Rock Field Station which tells an amazing story of emigrants, native peoples and nature. Now, we’re ready to be boots back on the ground in 2013 and beyond. The past was impressive,” Karen says, “Friends future is even more so.” Board President, Debbie Lassiter and Vice President ,Will Roger Peterson, whole heartedly agree with this fresh focus. New staff member Stephanie McKnight, a botanist in ecological restoration, will lead the charge in the field for twenty-five volunteer projects from trail and land cleanups, drought and wildlife monitoring, and educational trips in 2013. Over 150,000 people come to this NCA annually to hunt, bike, hike and play on the Lahontan lake bed floor, known as the playa and surrounding lands. These 1.2 million acres of public lands needs attention and Friends of Black Rock High Rock is there to be a force in helping mitigate impacts from all directions. Ms Dallett states, “It’s an honor to work on this landscape and be active in inspiring individuals to protect, and preserve this land for generations which are yet to come.”

Find out more about Friends of Black Rock High Rock today, www.blackrockdesert.org or call 775.557.2900.

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Forget the ‘deal of the day’! Visit www.newsreview.com

Photo by Bill Kozitsky


For years, a Few

Nevada lawmakers have protested the state’s Lake Tahoe management agreement with California, threatening legislation to pull out of the accord to control development there. They were a minority, but now, for the first time, that threat is no longer a line on the sandy shore. The Nevada Legislature has poured a concrete divorce date of Oct. 1, 2015, unless Nevada’s demands are met. As that concrete sets, preparations are already underway for the divorce.

All five counties around the lake are developing individual plans for approval by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA). Douglas County is first in line and expects to have its development plans ready within 60 to 90 days. Also, environmental groups like the Sierra Club and Friends of the West Shore are suing to stop the TRPA from allowing implementation of a new plan. It’s complicated. But as is often the case, it all boils down to money and politics.

water under the bridge Let’s start at the south end of the lake. Driving over the ridge reveals the splendor of the basin, mostly trees and that magnificent body of water reflecting the sky. But we can’t see the forest for the trees. According to the Tahoe Transportation District, on an average day there are 200,000 people milling around in that forest. That population nearly matches Reno’s. On a peak day, it’s 400,000, nearly all of Washoe County. This urban forest is not far from gridlock. In fact, just down the hill, the town of Truckee has begun discussions to study gridlock prevention. “All of a sudden we are a small metropolitan area on two-lane highways all trying to circumnavigate Tahoe,” says Curtis Hasty of the Tahoe Transportation District. “That’s a big challenge.” The reality check continues as we stop at the Truckee River Marsh. Half of the 1,200-acre marsh is developed as the Tahoe Keys. The other half is still marshland, but it’s all dried up as a result of the Keys development, according to the California Tahoe Conservancy, a California state agency.

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“ love on the rocks”

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photos by ky plaskon

Signs of development: the stalled convention center project near the California-Nevada border  at Stateline, tourists and locals visiting the South Lake Tahoe Recreation Area, and the Landing  Resort and Spa, formerly the Royal Valhalla Motor Lodge.

It also reports that more than 75 percent of all the wetlands in Lake Tahoe are gone. “They are developed because they are flat, and they are easy to build on,” said Upper Truckee Marsh restoration project manager Scott Carroll. “So we have airports, golf courses, subdivisions, casinos and other such kind of developments.” The loss of marshes is detrimental to the clarity of the lake because they filter out fine particles from the water from urban areas before it gets to the lake. There are a lot of fine particles getting into Tahoe. According to the EPA-approved 2010 Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) report, 348,000,000,000,000,000,000 (348 quintillion) particles flow into the lake each year from urban runoff alone. That’s more than a million trillion fine particles, and urban sources add up to more than twice all other sources of fine particles combined. California’s 68 miles of roads at Lake Tahoe are to blame for a lot of these particles. The report cites highways and municipalities as needing to reduce particles in the water by roughly 70 percent if they want to achieve clarity goals. It will take 65 years to do it. The report calls for more filtration basins, water treatment and vacuuming up sand that is put on the road in the winter. To figure out where to focus the runoff cleanup efforts, the US Geological Survey’s Stream and Groundwater Survey for Lake Tahoe in 1997 is a good place to start. It looked at nine spots on the lake over 19 years. Some two-and-ahalf tons of sediment per day were coming from Nevada and 11.6 tons from California. If we follow one of those million trillion particles, we will see what it’s doing to the lake. We can see 75.3 feet, according to this year’s lake clarity survey from the University of California, Davis. It’s the clearest it’s been in a decade. But wade a little deeper into the university’s data, and you see the clarity has hovered in the 64-to-80 foot range for the past 35 years. Just two years ago, the water was only four inches from its cloudiest average on record. The UC 14   |  RN&R   |

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Davis release also reports, “Researchers say the persistent trend is one of declining summer clarity.” The TMDL report also shows a projected trend of clarity decline through 2020, though not as rapid a decline as in the past. Back in the ’60s clarity was in the 100-foot range. So how did all this happen? Head up to Squaw Valley Resort. Displayed high on the entrance to the resort are the Olympic rings above the eternal torch that burns like the scar it left on the area. In the fervor leading up to the 1960 Olympics, strip malls and hotels were built at Olympic pace. Many of the hotels are now run-down, as cheap as $25 a night and have a lot of vacancies. This kind of urban sprawl requires more driving, includes more rooftops and parking lots that allow water to pick up sediment and flow unchecked into the lake. “It’s a 1960s development pattern,” said Steve Frish of the Sierra Business Council in Truckee. “We need to tear all that stuff out and start over.” Some say the Olympic degradation of the lake’s environment calls for Olympic revitalization, and that is why a new Olympics is the solution. “We aren’t as dumb as we were back then,” said Frish. He says Nevada and California should team up and design a proposal to the International Olympic Committee to repair the damage of the past Olympics with the first sustainable Olympics in history. “The Olympic Committee would absolutely be receptive to that.”

x

DammeD progress

While visions of embarking on an Olympic sustainability voyage dance in our heads, the reality is that even jumping over a minor puddle has become seemingly insurmountable. Peter Guilfoyle is a good example of the obstacles. He lives on the Nevada side of Tahoe in a tall house on the side of a hill in the trees. He has been trying to expand his deck just 500

feet for 26 years and can’t because of TRPA development restrictions. “I think it is foolish,” he said. “I don’t see what harm it is going to do anybody. It is just a deck. I mean, how is it going to affect the lake or the birds or the beavers or whatever? OK? I don’t understand it.” Russ Erwin is Guilfoyle’s contractor and has tried to get a lot of projects through the TRPA: “It was difficult to get plans through. It was slow. The timing was just awful as far as getting plans through. They were not honoring their own deadlines and so Nevada said unless we get a more efficient process, it is not fair to our local constituents.” He said things have changed recently after demand for change grew loud enough and had enough financial and power broker support in 2011 to pass SB271 in the Nevada Legislature. It demands reforms that change the entire development dynamic at the lake or else Nevada would pull out of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency. The environmental community shuddered and scrambled to blow the dust off their boat and meet in the middle with a development plan that works for business and environmentalists. “The bill was a fairly reckless way to deal with this problem,” Kyle Davis of the Nevada Conservation League told the Senate Committee on Natural Resources. But, he and other environmentalists in the basin made compromises and a new updated plan was born a year later. Under the plan, local counties are submitting area plans to the TRPA for approval. The counties could then approve smaller projects and do it faster than the single agency. That also means that some projects would end up in state courts rather than federal. One part of the new plan is aimed at restoring wetlands. The TRPA would create incentives to remove some of the 8,000 properties currently in wetlands and transfer development credits to less sensitive areas. The TRPA has already been doing a similar development transfer credit for 20 years, just not in wetlands. “It is one of the most successful programs we have, but it has not resulted in restoration of

wetlands,” said Cowan. “What we are saying now is we want to focus it on wetlands.” Another change is allowing mixed use and more dense development to cut down on paved surfaces. Those changes were approved by the TRPA. But some serious challenges linger. The plan also called for three changes that require the approval of California and Congress. One is changes to TRPA voting requirements: Eight board members for a quorum, a “yes” vote from any nine members can change the regional plan and four members from each state are needed to approve a project instead of five. A second requirement is that the new plan must take into consideration economic changes at the lake and a third requirement is that people who sue over a project must provide the burden of proof that projects they oppose are violating the regional plan. Currently, the people who are sued over a project have to prove that the project meets environmental standards . . . and sued they were. The Friends of the West Shore and nation’s oldest and largest environmental group, the Sierra Club, filed suit against all this in February. That suit will require the TRPA to prove that the plan fits with its environmental mission. Clearly, all the environmentalists were not in the same boat on this one, and so far, there hasn’t been much public discussion about that. “To me, it is the fascinating issue in journalism that is not getting covered,” said Frish of the Sierra Business Council. Sitting under his portrait of Teddy Roosevelt, he says this whole decline of the environment in Lake Tahoe and debate about how to fix the lake is ground zero of a rift that has been developing within the environmental community. It is about a “subset of people in the environmental community: modernist verses traditionalist.”

stormy weather “There was a lot of talk as we headed in this direction of the lawsuit, [talk] of the need to save the compact,” said Trent Orr of Earth Justice,


the non-profit environmental law firm hired by the Sierra Club and Friends of the West Shore to sue. “I know some of our sister environmental organizations made a political judgment that saving the compact was more important than having the compact adequately enforced. That is kind of a policy and political call, and we think that is wrong.” The suit opposes more dense development, and Orr says the new plan will result in more total development in the Basin. “They are actively encouraging measures that will bring more vehicles into the Basin,” he said. “So unless they can get a handle on restricting vehicle traffic, it is going to get worse. You can’t develop your way out of that sort of problem.” But Frish says you can’t sue your way out of the problem either. “Litigation has a legitimate role in reducing environmental impacts, no doubt about it,” he said. “The issue I have today is that I actually think that what litigation does is that it stops bad things from happening: ‘Let’s put up a dam against the flood of industrial revolution and stop it here.’ The problem is that [litigation] doesn’t stop the gradual deterioration of the environment, and what we really need is new systems and new approaches that restore the environment rather than accepting the point that we have degraded the environment, and it is always going to be that way.” He offered what he sees as the real modernist solution, partnerships to use best-known development practices: “We need to start restoring the environment and creating new economies off of that. We can create a restoration economy that invests in wetland restoration and watershed restoration and looking at forest

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management and changing the economy so that it meets environmental goals. That is the path that we should be taking.” He says that denser development is smarter development in terms of environmental impact. But is Lake Tahoe the right place for it? The clock is ticking.

Resort representative from R&R Partners Mike Draper told the chairman to let the clock keep ticking and see how it’s working: “I would love to come back to you in two years, and we have actually been able to measure projects against this.”

“We need to start restoring the environment and creating neW economies off of that.” Steve Frish Sierra Business Council A bill in the Legislature would slow that clock, taking SB271 and its threat to dissolve the compact off the table. That bill is called SB 229. On April 2, the Senate Committee on Natural Resources tried to wrap their head around all these players and issues. There was testimony from environmentalists on the developers side, citizens asking Nevada to recommit to the compact, questions about the Sierra Club’s lawsuit, but no one from the Sierra Club was there, and the political question of whether California and Congress will approve what Nevada wants in the next two years. (The governor can extend the deadline another two years to 2017 if Congress and California seem to be moving forward.)

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Meanwhile, the Sierra Club is keeping an eye on new projects as well. “Certainly the groundwork is laid that if something big and dreadful is going to be approved under this [new plan], the suit would allow us to go to court and say this should be enjoined until the court makes its final decision,” Orr said. “If you have an agency (TRPA) that is ignoring what it is supposed to do and acting contrary to its mission, then the compact (between Nevada and California) is not worth the paper it is written on basically.” Cowan of the TRPA said that 63 percent of the environmental thresholds in Tahoe are in compliance or moving in the right direction. He also says TRPA has developed successful

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invasive species and wildfire fire fuel-reduction programs. The compact is worth a lot in terms of those kinds of programs and the money they hatch. Congress is considering the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act, which would result in a combined investment of $1 billion to the region according to Cowan. “Lake Tahoe’s ability to attract continuing financial support from the federal government rests almost solely on partnerships and the regional framework,” he said. “Uncertainty breeds uncertainty. So it can be surmised that without the partnership and the compact, continued federal funding is at risk.” Nevada’s threat to pull out has certainly stirred up debate. “There is a lot to be gained by just listening and looking for those areas of common ground,” said Assemblymember David Bobzien. “No compacts were ever forged by one party by thinking they can overrun the other by the volume of the merits of their argument. Everyone is going to have to do a little bit of listening.” If you listen closely, you might hear the trickle of beach sand through a crystal clear hour glass, and if the last grain runs through, an era of bi-state cooperation will end. The final grain may rest on the governor’s finger in four years. For now, according to testimony from two Nevada state agencies, he is in favor of keeping that carrot on the stick and seeing where it leads environmentalists, developers, California, Congress and the future of Lake Tahoe. “The developers, the gaming interests, the environmental community, I have talked to all of them,” Bobzien said. “People are engaged, people are having conversations, whether people are moving off their positions remains to be seen. People have a lot on the line with this.” Ω

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Photo/Allison Young

For some folks, the local karaoke scene is a culture unto itself BY LAURA DAVIS

K

araoke, in the literal sense, is a Japanese term translated to mean “empty orchestra.” But to many of us, it means the end of a long night of bar-hopping, generally resulting in an embarrassing video on YouTube featuring a very sloppy rendition of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin’.” While it may just be the means to a drunken end for the casual karaoke-er, there’s a side to the pastime that goes much deeper, to a whole culture in fact. Like everything else the Japanese have given us—sushi, sumo wrestling, anime hairstyles—what was initially just a fad has stuck around like white on rice since the ’80s. What is it about karaoke that makes it so popular? It’s a combination of things. It’s the fact that it’s an immediate party the moment that first drunk fellow starts belting “Baby Got Back.” It’s the fact that it welcomes all types. It offers immediate acceptance—you’ll get clapped one way or another. Whether it’s because you’re just that good, or because the audience is just that glad you’re getting off the stage. It’s the one sport where the worst players are the most respected—hey, they had the balls to get up there. Reno in itself is no stranger to the popular bar staple. Every night of the week a venue can be found playing host, making it the ultimate breeding grounds for our own little karaoke subculture. One of the biggest names in the area is Steve Starr. A resident “K.J.,” as they call it in karaoke terms, Steve Starr has played host for 24 years. He does it all without even having to advertise. “The people created that,” Starr says, in reference to his monopolistic reputation in the K.J.

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world. “It’s because I bring a show. I’m an entertainer. If there’s no one singing, I’ll sing to keep the party going.” Starr, who has a background in stage performing, everything from DJ-ing at the Men’s Club, to stand-up comedy, to fronting a cover band, can not only put on a show encouraging others to belt their hearts out, but he carries quite the tune himself. Featuring a velvety Motown vocal strength that melts hearts, including his wife, whom he met at one of his shows. “Karaoke makes it easy,” Starr confirms of his work’s love connection abilities. “It gives people courage. And whether you’re singing well or not, you just give ’em a look, sing a few words, and the rest is history.” Starr’s extensive song collection has also earned him his golden reputation. “We download new music every day. My selection is incredible. If there’s a song I don’t have, I bet people a drink that the next time they see me, I’ll have it. I’ve only spent about $60 over 24 years.” Starr loves the people, in tune and out. Some great talent comes to his show, but his trick for coping when it gets bad? “I got five kids at home,” he says. “I know how to tune things out.”

The singer, not the song

As for the Reno vocalists you may not see headlining their own shows at the Grand Sierra Resort or John Ascuaga’s Nugget, you can catch them on a regular basis at some of the favorite local karaoke haunts. From as far as Truckee to slightly hidden corners like The Point on Fourth Street, to the initial infamous singing and watering hole, West Second Street Bar. These are

truly the biggest little stars. Taking a trip toward Tahoe leads to a stop at Truckee’s Tourist Club, known fondly as “T-Club”—where you’re likely to run into the town celebrity, “Sweets.” While he surely has a given name, no one knows it. And if you ask, you’ll likely get the response—true or not, you decide— that he can’t reveal it, because he used to be in the CIA. When it comes to karaoke, like his name suggests, 64-year-old Sweets is good with the ladies. Walking up to the stage accompanied by catcalls and high-fives, the first words he belts out are, “Ladies, I hope you wore your panties tonight ’cause they’re about to be droppin’!” And while there may not be a waterfall of women’s lingerie in hot pursuit, Sweets does bring the house down with such classics as Ray Price’s “For the Good Times” and Righteous Brothers’ “Unchained Melody.” “It’s all from the heart,” he says. “If I don’t feel it, I don’t sing it. I’m old school. OG. Triple OG … OG is old guy.” But for a triple OG, he still knows how to bust a move. When things get a bit too hot to handle, you can cool off with a country line-dance down at The Point. While country may be the unofficial sound of this karaoke spot, it’s décor is that of the Rat Pack days, with the stage being in the “Dean Martin Lounge.” Owned by local musician Paul Jones, The Point is the favorite stage of their resident celebrity karaoke-er, “The Cowboy,” aka Bryan Jon. With his go-to songs, Toby Keith’s “Whiskey Girl” and Kenny Chesney’s “Come Over,” he gets the crowd moving their feet and taking shots. “This one goes out to all the girls who are drinkin’ whiskey tonight—are you ready?” the Cowboy will ask from under his wide-brimmed hat before kicking into what feels like a private Bryan Jon concert. “For a karaoke singer to be able to get

“Any place I go, I give it my all,” says karaoke enthusiast AC/DC Joe, who goes to up to four places a night.

up and have people sing along, dance, or shed a tear because of a memory, I love that,” he says. “There’s nothing like being able to come here and have people watch and participate.” For a walk on the wild side, in both location sense and song selection—one has to simply go downtown, to one of the first karaoke spots in Reno, West Second Street Bar. Here, if you come late enough, you will likely get your ears pierced by the impressively high vocals of karaoke scene staple “AC/DC Joe.” Wearing an AC/DC band shirt is the only giveaway one gets from the unassuming man, who got his start in music from being around his dad’s mariachi band as a child. When he grabs the mic and starts peeling around the bar belting, “Shoot to Thrill,” amid fans howling, “Give it to ‘em Joe!” you know you’re in for a night—as your eardrums will remind you the next day. “Any place I go, I give it my all, I let ’em have it,” says Joe, who goes to up to four venues a night. “I meet a lot of good people. AC/DC gave me that.” That’s a sentiment which, at the end of the night, is a constant among karaoke singers and lovers alike. It’s not about the song selection, or the show, or even the $1 Budweisers at CalNeva. It’s about that pat on the back, and the encouragement to put your name in for a second round. The people are the high note of karaoke, confirming it’s not a passing fad, but a culture. Ω

For listings of local karaoke nights, check out the nightclub grid (page 27) in every issue of the Reno news & Review.


SUOR ANGELICA By Giacomo Puccini

ARTS

365

April 19 & 20 7:30 p.m. April 21 2:00 p.m. n

n

Nightingale Concert Hall Church Fine Arts Building Albert R. Lee, Artistic Director Jason Altieri, Conductor University Symphony Orchestra

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For Tickets: www.UNR.edu/Music or call (775) 784–3555

For Tickets: www.UNR.edu/Music or call (775) 784–3555

— The Ne vada Chamber Oper a Presents —

A program of the School of the Arts, Department of Music.

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PhoTo/Allison Young

The kids are alright

Mirror, mirror: Cody Hamilton as Cousin Kevin, Elijah Frederick as Young Tommy, Adam Semas as Tommy, Jesse M. Briggs as Mrs. Walker, and Ryan A. Kelly as Captain Walker in TMCC’s Tommy.

The Who’s Tommy From the minute the house lights dimmed for the opening-night performance of The Who’s by Tommy, the energy was nonstop and infecJessica Santina tious. Despite a bizarre, depressing story with several narrative flaws, as well as technical glitches that plagued the performance, the Truckee Meadows Community College troupe and the band that performs live for the duration of the show maintained such high energy that the audience was carried swiftly along in the current of enthusiasm. The story goes like this: Mr. Walker TMCC Performing Arts presents The Who’s goes to World War II, leaving Mrs. Walker Tommy, directed by and their son, Tommy. Back home, Paul Aberasturi, at everyone thinks Mr. Walker is killed. the neil J. Redfield Mrs. Walker takes a lover. The war ends. Performing Arts Mr. Walker comes home to find his wife Center, 505 Keystone Ave., on April 13, 18, in the arms of another man. Mrs. Walker 19, 20 at 7:30 p.m., realizes Tommy has entered the room. To and April 14, 21 at 2 avert his eyes, she turns Tommy toward the p.m. For tickets or

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more information, visit www.tmcc.edu/ vparts/season schedule/ or call 789-5671.

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wall, where he faces a mirror and sees Mr. Walker shoot his wife’s lover. Mr. Walker is tried for murder and cleared, but it’s too late for Tommy, who was struck deaf, dumb and blind by the trauma. The Walkers are exhausted, and repeatedly leave Tommy with relatives who abuse him, sexually and physically. But eventually Tommy discovers he has one talent: The boy plays a mean pinball. But the story is sort of secondary to the music. From beginning to end of one of the first true rock operas, the story is conveyed through The Who’s powerful, driving music, with hits like “Pinball Wizard” and “Tommy, Can You Hear Me?” And unfortunately, no, we couldn’t hear anyone over the music in several places. Tommy is loud, which is tough when following the story means hearing the songs’ lyrics. It was made worse when a couple of microphones stopped working. But glitches like this didn’t stop the cast members, who belted tunes and threw their whole bodies into elaborate, impressive choreography, changing costumes in a

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frenzy and even climbing onto precariously narrow, high spaces. I really appreciated the complexity of the staging and scenery in helping to convey the plot visually, since the lyrics in so many of the songs in the show just don’t make a whole lot of sense (when I could hear them). Special kudos go out to the band: Ted Owens, Chris Portugal, Josh Yelle, Justin Katausky, Rob Shader and Miguel Henares. Obviously, the music plays the lead role here. It’s enormously percussion-heavy and maintains a high degree of energy throughout, so sustaining that energy is impressive. Two performances I particularly enjoyed were those of both young men

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playing Tommy: Elijah Frederick in the boyhood role, and Adam Semas as the grown-up. Frederick handles the show’s sensitive issues with grace, despite speaking hardly a word. And Semas’ vocal power is remarkable. He kept up with the music’s volume while jumping on rafters for some challenging choreography. Oh, and he looks great shirtless, too. Any role Jenny O plays has memorability and charisma. Here, as the gypsy (“The Acid Queen”) who promises to cure Tommy with drugs and her sexual wiles, she ably carried the soulful song that’s been performed by the likes of Tina Turner and Patti LaBelle. The show itself, I admit, I’m not crazy about. It’s riddled with narrative flaws (So Mrs. Walker immediately embraces the husband who just shot her lover? Really? And they just go home and expect to pick up where they left off?) Much of the music, in my opinion, feels dated and forgettable. But TMCC’s production is packed with style, talent and heart. Ω

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Reubens. The meat was generous and tender, with fresh sauerkraut and a nice smear of Thousand Island on swirled rye bread—thumbs up to this one. Next, fish tacos ($4.95) with fresh pico de gallo and a creamy chipotle sauce. Beer-battered cod in a mini corn soft taco—it reminded me of the taco stands on the docks in Cabo, fresh, flavorful and very satisfying. Then, I had the combo platter ($10.95), and it has ribs, a quarter of a chicken, Louisiana hot links and tri-tip, a hunk of homemade cornbread, potato salad, and baked beans. It was easily enough for two. Chef Schuh has a right-proper smoker the size of a Volkswagen and used oak for the smoky flavor. The ribs were tender, moist, flavorful and not greasy. The chicken was succulent and smoky. The tri-tip melted in my mouth. There’s a proper wine list, with by-the-glass ($2.50), but this is a beer haven with a selection of more than two dozen draft, microbrew and bottled beers. I tasted three custom house brews—an amber, a honey blonde and an IPA. I found the amber caramel colored, bready, maltforward, with delayed tones of hops. Earthy sweet aroma. Good winter earthiness. The honey blonde was my favorite. It pours a clear golden with a small white head with light grain aroma. Taste begins with some honey sweetness, then a nectar, bready middle, and a lightly, earthy finish. The mouthfeel is light, medium carbonation. I’m not a big IPA guy, and this was the hoppy style they tend to be. The Ale House has a “tube” of beer, about three feet tall, with a tap ranging from 50 ml ($10) to 100 ml ($18)—what a party this can be! Arguably the primal importance of the alehouse lies in its role as a social center. It’s a place where the locals can meet up for an evening, talk, make friends, and wind down after a hard day’s work, and that’s exactly what the Ale House at Rail City is all about. Ω Photo/AlliSon Young

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The alehouse dates back to Roman times. From the 13th century onward, it became a significant part of communities. by Dave Preston By the 19th century, it was also an important social and entertainment davep@ center, where communal celebrane w s re v i e w . c o m tions increasingly took place—it was the hub of the small town. Fast forward to 2013, and that last sentence probably applies just as much today as it did then—except

the food and grog is now so much better. This is a nice space at the west end of the casino, seating 145, with a nice patio for warm weather that will hold a couple of dozen. I had one of the best servers I’ve seen in a long time—knowledgeable, cheerful and polite, and the food came fast and hot. Make no mistake, this is quality comfort food, and the portions are generous. Executive Chef Greg Schuh is a master of stick-to-yourrib cuisine and creates daily specials starting at $6.95. The restaurant offers a “pig out” ($49.95) that will serve up to six, and this includes barbecue, chicken, hot links, tri-tip and all the fixings. The menu ranges from $6.95 to $11.95 for a 14-ounce ribeye, and vegetables and a starch come with the meals. Offerings consist of steaks and seafood, traditional pub food, and a dozen appealing sandwiches (all $7.77) from burgers to a classic Reuben, my first taste. This is one of my all-time favorite sandwiches, and growing up back east in the big city, I enjoyed the best of the best, so I am particular when it comes to my


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KARAOKE NIGHTLY

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I’m a little disappointed I didn’t see any milk or creamed corn shooting out of zombie faces in the new Evil Dead. Sam Raimi, who directed the original schlock-fest, famously used those two foods in some of his gorier sequences, and it was gloriously disgusting. The Evil Dead remake is a totally different animal from Raimi’s deranged original and its by even more beloved sequels, Evil Dead 2 and Bob Grimm Army of Darkness. It’s a far more polished movie, prettier than any of those films, with b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m pretty people, pretty makeup and shiny camerawork. That said, the new take on this old story is good enough for a few scares. I wasn’t crazy about it, but, as an original Evil Dead fan, I felt it was a worthy entry to the franchise, and

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a nice jumping off point for a new Evil Dead series of movies. In some ways, it’s the best of the Evil Dead films when considering sheer quality, and it is the worst when considering the fun factor. I didn’t have the kind of sick fun I had while watching Evil Dead 2, nor did I have that sense of total doom I suffered while forcing the original The Evil Dead into my eyes. Director Fede Alvarez, making his feature debut, has made a humorless film for the most part. He also wusses out in a few key moments toward the end, which left me feeling a sense of relief—something I don’t want to be feeling when watching a serious Evil Dead movie. There’s no Ash (Bruce Campbell) along for the main story this time out. The central character is now Mia (Jane Levy), a heroin addict taken to a remote cabin by friends and family to detox. The group eventually finds their way into the basement, where they discover an infamous book that one shouldn’t read aloud.

Eric (Lou Taylor Pucci) does just that—then the forest does bad, invasive things to Mia, and things basically go downhill fast. I liked Eric and Mia, but wasn’t too crazy about David (Shiloh Fernandez), Mia’s brother. He’s a poorly written character, a mopey guy who failed to get me rooting for him. This is where Alvarez (who cowrote the script with a couple of folks, notably Diablo Cody) could’ve given us just a little Ash circaEvil Dead 2-attitude. David has some of the wimp factor of Ash in the original film—Ash changed a lot in the sequels—and he has a blue shirt. That’s about all the comparisons he warrants. The other actresses (Elizabeth Blackmore and Jessica Lucas) are just there to have bad things happen to them. Blackmore has an especially harrowing sequence with an electric carving knife, while Lucas takes shaving a little too far with a broken mirror shard. I will say this for the new Evil Dead: The gore effects are spectacular. There’s a lot of old-school practical makeup effects on the screen, and some true freak-out moments. When CGI is employed, it’s done well, but the stuff that will stick with you is plain, oldfashioned gooey stuff poured on performers and shooting out of their mouths. Levy and Pucci put this one over the top for me. They are very good and their characters work in the Evil Dead universe. Fernandez is the film’s biggest flaw. Somebody with more charisma or likability would’ve served the film better. Hey, it’s rare we get a good horror film these days. I’m putting the new Evil Dead just below Mama and Sinister as mildly recommended horror. I would also put this alongside the remake of The Hills Have Eyes as a remake that doesn’t necessarily damage the legacy of the original, like Rob Zombie’s terrible Halloween films. So, Evil Dead fans, breathe a sigh of relief. It’s not great, but it’s not a disaster either. Make sure to stay through the credits for a nice little treat and possible hints at story arcs for the future of the franchise. Ω


4

Ginger & Rosa

Elle Fanning delivers a stellar performance—with an excellent British accent, I might add—as Ginger in this film about two teenagers in Cold War England in the ’60s. Fanning runs the gamut here, showing all of the joy, anguish and fears of a girl living in an age where the world seems to be falling apart. Alice Englert is also terrific as Rosa, her more depressed best friend, while Alessandro Nivola and Christina Hendricks are also excellent as Ginger’s parents. The film goes a little off the rails in its final scenes, but it’s solid and steady for most of its running time, with Fanning showing she’s an actress to be reckoned with. Written and directed by Sally Potter, it’s a showcase for Fanning that should propel her into good future acting roles.

2

G.I. Joe: Retaliation

Yes, the sequel is an improvement over the original, but don’t get your hopes up too high. Dwayne Johnson joins something like his 18th franchise, as does Bruce Willis, in this confusing yet sometimes entertaining follow-up to G.I. Joe: The Sucky First Movie. There are some good action sequences, including a snowy cliff sword battle and the destruction of London. There’s also a lot of clatter about Cobra Commanders and Snake Eyes and a bunch of other toy names I simply lost track of. Channing Tatum and Johnson have a great rapport, and a whole movie with them together could’ve been fun. Unfortunately, Tatum makes an early exit, making way for The Smirk. Willis is OK here, but he doesn’t add all that much. Jonathan Pryce is fairly menacing as two characters: the President of the United States and his evil imposter. I’d tell you some plot details, but that would be a waste of space. Just know that if you plunk down for this you will see a couple of good action sequences and a whole lot of mindless crap.

1

The Host

From the toxic pen of Stephenie Meyer comes this atrocity about an alien race of psychedelic sperm “bonding” with humans and taking over their bodies and minds. In the future, the planet has been overrun excepting for pockets of resisters, one of them being Melanie (Saoirse Ronan). Melanie’s luck runs out, she’s bonded with an alien and becomes Wanda. Wanda starts hearing Melanie’s voice in her head, begins arguing with herself, and the film becomes just about the dumbest thing you will ever see. Wanda makes it out to a desert commune where her uncle (William Hurt) is harvesting wheat in a rock. She has two boys after her, one of them being Melanie’s ex and the other being somebody who just doesn’t mind getting it on with an alien as long as said alien is inhabiting a hot American girl’s body. Seriously, I can’t even believe this thing even happened. Stay away, for the good of your health and all of mankind.

2

Jack the Giant Slayer

Director Bryan Singer’s big budget take on the classic fairytale was delayed from last summer, and they should’ve left it in the vault. He’s put together a movie that lacks any real magic because the special effects are bad, and the performances are mostly flat. Nicholas Hoult, so good in Warm Bodies, plays the title character, a farm boy who gets some magic beans, lets them get wet and … ah, you know. Stanley Tucci and Ewan McGregor have supporting roles in what amounts to a whole lot of nothing that cost lots of money. The budget is something in the neighborhood of $200 million, and that budget must’ve gone to Moon Pies for everybody, because it doesn’t show on the screen. Too bad, because I was just telling somebody a couple of months ago how the world could really use a good movie about giants getting hit with stuff. Actually, that’s not true. I’m totally lying.

4

Jurassic Park 3D

Steven Spielberg’s dinosaur fantasy is still one of the best adventure films ever made, but the new 3-D retrofit winds up muting the presentation rather than expanding it. Unlike, say, James Cameron’s Titanic, which looked and felt like it was meant to be shot in 3-D, the presentation here feels forced. The color is diminished, and the scope seems “squished.” It’s not awful, and

OPINION

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I’ve seen worse 3-D, but it fails to enhance the film much. Some theaters are offering the movie in its original 2-D presentation, and I would recommend revisiting it in one of those theaters for sure. The combination of practical and computer effects to create the dinosaurs has easily stood the test of time. The dinosaurs continue to look amazing. Watching the 3-D version, I did notice that Jeff Goldblum sticks his tongue out a lot when he speaks. It’s creepy.

2

Olympus Has Fallen

Gerard Butler stars in one of the more ridiculous action films you will see this year. He’s a Secret Service agent on duty the night something very bad happens to the president (Aaron Eckhart), and he winds up with a desk job. When some nasty North Koreans hilariously infiltrate the White House and hold the president and his cabinet hostage in the bunker, it’s time for Gerard to dispense with the paper clips and pick up an automatic weapon! Yes, it’s Die Hard in the White House, or at least it wants to be. There’s some fun to be had here, but the movie has some tragic flaws, including terrible CGI and mawkish patriotic crap that distracts rather than making the heart swell (Melissa Leo screaming the Pledge of Allegiance as she is dragged to certain death comes to mind). You aren’t going to catch me calling this a good movie, but I won’t fault you for enjoying it to some degree if you choose to see it. It’s one of those “so bad it’s almost good” movies.

2

T h e R N & R i N v i T e s yo u To h av e

DINNER YOUR DOG with

Oz the Great and Powerful

James Franco is in over his head for Sam Raimi’s mostly lame prequel to The Wizard of Oz. The title character calls for somebody with that old school Hollywood charm like Robert Downey, Jr., or Johnny Depp. Franco looks like a kid playing dress up here, and he’s not even the worst thing about the movie. That would be Mila Kunis looking completely lost as the witch who will become that witch we all know from the original Oz. I’m sorry—that witch isn’t supposed to be all corseted and hot. As for Rachel Weisz, she fares best as yet another witch, while Michelle Williams is just serviceable as Glinda the Good Witch. Raimi relies heavily on CGI effects—big surprise—and they look pretty crappy for the most part. This is an underwhelming movie in much the same way his Spider-Man 3 missed the mark. It’s overblown, misguided and odd.

4

on Mondays!

Bring your dog on Mondays to the Wild River Grille for specially-prepared dog treats while you enjoy some of Reno’s best cuisine!

Silver Linings Playbook

Bradley Cooper is on fire as Pat, a troubled man recently out of a mental institution and obsessed with his ex-wife. He’s so obsessed hat he can’t see the value in Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a recently widowed neighbor trying to befriend him. Directed by David O. Russell, the movie is a funny, slick treatment of people with real problems that works because Russell and his performers find the right balance. Robert De Niro does his best work in years as Pat’s obsessive father, and Chris Tucker gets big laughs as Pat’s former mental institution buddy. Cooper and Lawrence make for one of the year’s most interesting screen couples. They are certainly unique. Russell is establishing himself as one of the industry’s most reliable and innovative directors.

1

Both you and your canine companion will enjoy a great meal, outside next to the beautiful Truckee River - and 10% of your check will be donated to the SPCA of Northern Nevada!

Spring Breakers

This looked like it would be fun. A movie full of bikini-clad starlets, including Vanessa Hudgens and Selena Gomez, going on a crime spree to raise money for a spring break trip, and then continuing the crime spree when they get to Florida. Director Harmony Korine blows a good opportunity for fun by making a repetitive, slow, sloppy movie with no script. James Franco shows up as a rapper/crime lord who can’t rap for dick and looks like an idiot. I was hoping Franco could bring some offbeat fun to the party, but all we get is him describing the contents of his room and making up stupid songs. This one feels like the director shot about fifteen minutes worth of worthy footage and stretched it out by repeating said footage or picking stuff up off the cutting room floor and throwing it back in. It’s getting some relatively decent critical acclaim, and this shocks me. This shocks me on many levels.

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THIS WEEK

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APRIL 11, 2013

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Raising Kane The Kanes One of the interesting challenges of writing about music is deciding how much, or how little, to rely on genre classifications. by Brad Bynum If you get too specific, and describe a particular group as, say, “contempob ra d b @ rary ambient post-punk j-pop crunkne w s re v i e w . c o m core.” Most readers worth their weight in vinyl will simply shake their heads in disgust and turn the page, as well they should. However, it’s possible to err too far in the other direction, and, without a basic signpost or two, be too vague: “This group plays music.”

Photo/Brad Bynum

“Hey Yeah”—not to be confused with Outkast’s iconic “Hey Ya!”— almost sounds like a Cars tune, complete with a drums-and-chantedchorus breakdown. It’s fun song, with a mood about 90 degrees removed from “If You Want,” which precedes it on the album. One of The Kanes’ many strengths is the ability to play songs with different moods but still sound cohesive. Springob plays with enough dexterity that the songs sound harmonically dense, even when Gilmore takes a solo, and drummer Mike Orris plays with flair that always serves the songs. Both members of the rhythm section sing harmony, which adds a nice element—they’re an old-fashioned vocal group as well as a rock trio. But Gilmore’s vocals are out front, and they have just a hint of grit that adds a bit of a blues feel to the music. He says that old bluesmen like Leadbelly and Robert Johnson are, like Nirvana and the Beatles, among his influences. “I like what they wrote about,” he says. “It’s real, but imaginative.” That description is also true of Gilmore’s songwriting, which has the cathartic quality essential to good rock music. He describes his lyrics as the things he wishes he’d say in conversation, but never does. “I write songs as therapy, to help me get through the day,” he says. “Hopefully, they help other people get through their day.” For Gilmore, songwriting is, in part, a way to sort out the complexities of mixed emotions. “When you experience something, you go back and forth about it,” he says. In that way, the lyrics are in unison with the music, which similarly changes in rhythm, tempo and texture—these guys are students of the art of loud-quiet-loud. Black Magic was recorded throughout 2012 by Scott Curtis at Stonehaven Studios in Sparks. The record release show, featuring fellow locals Drinking with Clowns, Scarlet Presence and Bazooka Zoo, will be a benefit show for the educational nonprofit Future Kind. Horror movie host Zomboo will be the evening’s master of ceremonies. The show, co-presented by KRZQ, is at the Knitting Factory on April 27. Ω

Rockin’ stockade:  Greg Gilmore, Mike  Orris and Adam  Springob are the  Kanes.

the record release show for the Kanes’ Black magic, featuring drinking with Clowns, Scarlet Presence, Bazooka Zoo and Zomboo, is at the Knitting Factory, 211 n. Virginia St., on april 27. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/ thekanesband.

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APRIL 11, 2013

In that way, the Kanes, a Reno band, is refreshing. The Kanes is a rock band (period). Sure, it’s possible to get more specific—there’s a heavy dose of Nirvana’s Nevermind, tempered with a jigger of LennonMcCartney songwriting, and stirred with ’70s classic-rock power-trio dynamics—but you, the reader, don’t need that. All you need to know is that The Kanes play rock music, and if you like rock music, you’ll probably like the Kanes, because the members play a pure distillation of rock music that has broad appeal. The songs from the band’s new album, Black Magic, have enough hooks to reel in casual listeners, but enough musicality to keep more attentive music nerds interested as well. “If You Want” goes from midtempo to fast in a way that recalls a bluesier, stomping Nirvana, but then, in the coup de grace, the song lurches into a slow and heavy Black Sabbathlike riff. “It’s like three songs in one,” says lead vocalist-guitarist Greg Gilmore. “I like when time changes flow into each other,” says bassist and harmony vocalist Adam Springob.


THURSDAY 4/11 1UP 214 W. Commercial Row, (775) 329-9444

3RD STREET 125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

FRIDAY 4/12

’90s Night, 10pm, no cover

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

906 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-8891

BAR-M-BAR 816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

CHAPEL TAVERN

Freestyle firespinning, 9pm, no cover

The Bradfords, 9pm, no cover

Sonic Mass w/DJ Tigerbunny, 7pm, no cover

Good Friday with rotating DJs, 10pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

Mark Diorio, 11:15am, no cover

Steven Hanson and Friends, 7pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Moon Gravy, 8pm, no cover

Leftover Crack, Rats in the Wall, Old Glory, Volition, Juicy Karkass, 7:30pm, $15

1099 S. Virginia St., (775) 324-2244

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/15-4/17 1up Wednesday, 10pm, W, no cover

Betty Rocker, Feather Merchants, Candyshoppe, 8pm, no cover

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover Voodoo Glow Skulls, Left Alone, 10 Cent Mistake, 7:30pm, W, $10, $12

Burning Dance Night, 8pm, no cover

The RN&R no longer a ccepts emailed or phoned-in listings. Post show s online by registering at www.ne wsreview.c om/reno. Deadline is the Friday b efore publication .

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

SUNDAY 4/14

EDM Thursday, 10pm, no cover

THE ALLEY

CEOL IRISH PUB

SATURDAY 4/13

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Local Natives April 13, 7:30 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Highway 50 Stateline 588-6611

Celtic Sessiuns, 7pm, Tu, no cover

CW and Mr. Spoons, noon, M, no cover

CORKSCROO BAR AND GRILL

Comedy

Open Mic and Art Show, 8:15pm, M, no cover

10 E. Ninth St., (775) 284-7270

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY 275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

FAT CAT BAR & GRILL 599 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City; (530) 583-3355

Merle Jagger, No Lover, 9:30pm, no cover

No Lover, Take Down, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, no cover Open mic, 9pm, W, no cover Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, no cover

Reggae Night, 9pm, M, Open Mic w/host Lucas Arizu, 9pm, Tu, no cover

Karaoke Night, 10pm, no cover

FUEGO

Karaoke w/Lisa Lisa, 9pm, M, Tu, no cover Karaoke w/Miss Amber, 9pm, W, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL JAVA JUNGLE

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: The Utility Players, Th, 7:30pm, $12, $16; Tony D’Andrea, F, 8pm, $13, $16; Hypnot!c with Dan Kimm, F, 9:30pm; $13, $16; Hootchy Kootchy Girls Vintage Cabaret Spring Fling, Sa, 6pm, 9:30pm, $20, $22

Java Jungle Sunday Music Showcase, 7pm, no cover

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

JAZZ, A LOUISIANA KITCHEN 1180 Scheels Dr., Sparks; (775) 657-8659

First Take featuring Rick (SAX) Metz, 6pm, no cover

JUB JUB’S THIRST PARLOR

A Surrogate Band, 9pm, $3, $5

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

Bill Davis, 6pm, no cover

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Patrick Garrity, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 9:30pm, $17.95; Mike Pace, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95 The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Chris Porter, Jodi Borello, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30

Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

Keith Alan Hartranft, 1pm, no cover Open mic, 9pm, M, no cover

OA NIE KLEY’ N A

Amy Ginder

OPENS FRIDAY at BRÜKA THEATER

SAT 4/13 9:30PM

S

Sophie Moeller

GREAT GRANDSON

TUES 9PM

COME UP FOR FUN

LIVE MUSIC 7PM-9PM Karaoke OPINION

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

Cami Thompson

WED 9PM

OPEN MIC

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Directed by Mary Bennett Musical Director - Bill Quinby APRIL 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27 MAY 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 2013 at 8 PM Matinee: April 28 at 2 PM Tickets (In Advance): $18 Students/ Seniors $20 General All Tickets: $25 At the Door

Lacey Mattison

MERLE JAGGER ★ LIVE ★

Written by Cheryl Benge, Christy Brandt, Rosanna E. Coppedge, Valeri Fagan, Ross Fresse, Mark Houston, Sandee Johnson & Peggy Pharr Wilson

Produced in Association With Music Theatre International

Marti Creveling

DOWN

Classic Rock

TAKE

A Musical Comedy

Music and Lyrics by Mark Houston

Bernadette Garcia

FRI 4/12 M 9:30P

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

775-323-3221 • www.bruka.org Brüka Theatre 99 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89501 |

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KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 1) Main Stage 2) Top Shelf Lounge

THURSDAY 4/11

FRIDAY 4/12

2) Boggan, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Suicidal Tendencies, Wake the Dead, 1) The Jet Stole Home, Lion I Am, Brave Madball, Infecto Skeletons, 7:30pm, $20-$22 Coast, Saving Alleya, 7:30pm, $8-$14 2) Mike Madnuss, 11:30pm, no cover 2) Erik Lobe, 11:30pm, no cover

KNUCKLEHEADS BAR & GRILL

GWAR

PIZZA BARON

Acoustic Open Mic hosted by Roger Scime, 8pm, no cover

THE POINT

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 7pm, no cover

3001 W. Fourth St., (775) 322-3001

April 14, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

POLO LOUNGE

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

PONDEROSA SALOON

106 S. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7210

RAW BAR LAKE TAHOE

31 Highway 50, Stateline; (775) 580-6029

Live music/DJs, 8pm, $0-$15

THE RED ROOM

9825 S. Virginia St., (775) 853-5003

RISE NIGHTCLUB

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

April 17, 7:30 p.m. The Alley 906 Victorian Ave. Sparks 358-8891

1) 2 Chainz, 9pm, Tu, $27.50-$200 Open Mic/College Night, 8pm, Tu, no cover Steve Starr Karaoke, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke hosted by Gina Jones, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Gemini, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Rockin’ Steel, 7:30pm, no cover

Crown Electric, 1pm, Lady and the Tramps, 8pm, no cover

Smoke Signalz, 9pm, $5, no cover charge for women

DJ Battles, 9pm, $5-$15

Strangeworld, 9:30pm, $5

Gemini Rising, 8:30pm, $5

Corky Bennett, 7pm, W, no cover

Reggae Vibes, 8pm, $0-$15

Karaoke, 8pm, M, Mixtape DJ/iPod jam session, 8pm, Tu, live music/DJs, 8pm, W, $0-$15

Hip Hop and R&B Night, 10pm, $5; no cover charge for women before midnight

Karaoke w/DJ Hustler, 9pm, Tu, no cover

RYAN’S SALOON

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Live jazz, 7:30pm, W, no cover

SIDELINES BAR & NIGHTCLUB

Alias Smith, 9pm, no cover

Open Mic Night, 8pm, M, no cover Black and Blues Jam, 8:30pm, Tu, no cover

924 S. Wells Ave., (775) 323-4142

Voodoo Glow Skulls

1) GWAR, Wilson, Warbeast, 8pm, $21-$45

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/15-4/17

Fusion Fridays w/DJs Kentot, Fredy G, 10pm, Rise Culture Night, 10pm, $10 $10; no charge for women until midnight

210 N. Sierra St., (775) 786-0833

RUBEN’S CANTINA

SUNDAY 4/14

Downtime, Cyanate, Otis, Bloodgeon, Scat, 7pm, $5

405 Vine St., (775) 323-6500

1155 W. Fourth St., (775) 329-4481

SATURDAY 4/13

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 355-1030

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY STREGA BAR

Sunday Night Strega Mic, 9pm, no cover

310 S. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-9911

STUDIO ON 4TH

Ryan Parker, Lonely Planet Travel, Crush, 8pm, $5

Polyester party w/KOS, Mike Mason, Shawn Measner, Penn7, Nikki Smiles, 9pm, $8

WALDEN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Love Like Wes, Mason Frey, 7pm, no cover

Reno Music Project Acoustic Open Mic, 6:30pm, no cover

432 E. Fourth St., (775) 410-5993 3940 Mayberry Dr., (775) 787-3307

Strange on the Range, 7pm, M, no cover Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

WILD RIVER GRILLE

Standup Tuesdays Comedy Open Mic, 7:30pm, Tu, Open Mic, 7pm, W, no cover

Colin Ross, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

WINTER WIN W INT NTER TER R MU M MUSIC USIC CS SE SERIES ERIE RIES RIES

Thursday, Thursd Th day ay, Ap Apri April rilil 11

W/ Ze Zepruder, eprud der,, C Crush, Failing Plan B, Memory Mem mory Mote el.l Get Get FREE FREE Tickets From The Bands!! Ban nds!! Motel.

FREE F FRE E SHOW!!!

Friday, Frid Fr i ay, April 12

W/ C Can Ca Candyshoppe, nd dys ys y hop ho pe, Betty Rocker, Feat Feather her Merchants Light M h t | $2 Coors C Li ht Special S i l

APRIL 12th A Surrogate Band {A Peculiar Tribute to Pink Floyd}

LEFTOVER CRACK

Saturday, April 13

W/ Rats in The Wall, Old Glory, Volition, Juicy Karkass

VOODOO GLOW SKULLS

Wednesday, April 17

APRIL 13th Eternity Heaven and Hell APRIL 19th The Tides April 26th Bazooka Zoo Weapons of Mass Creation Candy Shoppe APRIL 27th Translation Audio The Mice Post War Big Remote

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APRIL 11, 2013

W/ Left Alone, 10 Cent Mistake, Frontier City Sounds

PAIN CLINIC

Friday, April 19

Thrashed, Smashed And Trashed Movie Premiere Free Show Following: Pain Clinic, Up Against It, Ostacized, Deathplant

WESTON BUCK

Saturday, April 20

W/ Frankie Robert, Levi Maddox, Mista D, and Toc Roc JUST ANNOUNCED: 4/26 NEWSTED

(OF METALLICA), 5/4 TAPROOT, 5/18 THE DWARVES, 5/23 SUBHUMANS w/ TOTAL CHAOS, TSOL 5/25

GET PRE-SALE TICKETS NOW: April 13 — Left Over Crack April 17 — Voodoo Glow Skulls April 20 — Weston Buck April 25 — Built To Spill April 26 — Newsted May 4 — Taproot

TheAlleySparks.com (775) 358.8891 906 Victorian Ave, Sparks NV Facebook.TheAlleySparks.com

- Thursday 4/11 -

James Douglas Band DooRS opEN @ 9pm / 21+

- Friday 4/12 -

The Novelist DooRS opEN @ 7pm / 21+

- Thursday 4/25 -

Julio Bravo followed by Community Affect

DooRS opEN @ 7pm / 21+

- Saturday 5/4 -

Flash Back

DooRS opEN @ 8pm / 21+

555 East 4th St, Reno • BodegaNights555@gmail.com


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CARSON VALLEY INN

1627 Hwy. 395, Minden; (775) 782-9711 1) Valley Ballroom 2) Cabaret Lounge

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

ELDORADO HOTEL CASINO

345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) BuBinga Lounge 4) Roxy’s Bar & Lounge

THURSDAY 4/11

FRIDAY 4/12

SATURDAY 4/13

SUNDAY 4/14

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/15-4/17

2) American Made Band, 8pm, no cover

2) American Made Band, 4pm, Joey Carmon Band, 10pm, no cover

2) American Made Band, 4pm, Joey Carmon Band, 10pm, no cover

2) Joey Carmon Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Kid and Nic Show, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) John Covert’s Crystal Image Band, 7pm, no cover

2) John Covert’s Crystal Image Band, 8pm, no cover

2) John Covert’s Crystal Image Band, 8pm, no cover

2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, no cover

2) Paul Covarelli, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

1) Diego’s Umbrella, 10pm, no cover

1) Keyser Soze, Mojo Green, 9pm, no cover

1) Crash Kings, 10pm, no cover 2) Foobz, Gurbtron, 11:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 8pm, $21.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Skyy High Fridays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 7pm, 9:30pm, $21.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10:30pm, no cover 3) Addiction Saturdays, 9pm, $10 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

1) Magique, 7pm, $21.95+ 2) Steele Breeze, 10pm, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, no cover

2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Atomika, 10pm, W, no cover 4) Live piano, jazz, 4:30pm, W, no cover

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Casino Center Stage 3) Peek Nightclub

1) Local Natives, 7:30pm, $28.60

HARRAH’S RENO

219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

JOHN ASCUAGA’S NUGGET

2) Midnight Riders, 7pm, no cover 3) Michael Powers, 5:30pm, no cover 5) Ladies ’80s w/DJ Larry Williams, 7pm, no cover

1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Showroom 2) Cabaret 3) Orozko 4) Rose Ballroom 5) Trader Dick’s

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Lingerie Bowling w/DJ Williams, 7pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

1) Leo Kottke, Victoria Vox, 8pm, $32 2) Midnight Riders, 8pm, no cover 3) Michael Powers, 6pm, no cover

1) Lil’ Rev and the Ukulele All-Stars, 8pm, $26 2) Midnight Riders, 8pm, Country at the 2) Midnight Riders, 7pm, no cover Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 9pm, no cover 5) Shaka, 6pm, no cover 3) Michael Powers, 6pm, no cover

2) Country at the Cabaret w/DJ Jamie G, 7pm, W, no cover 3) Alex Miller, 5:30pm, W, no cover

3) Boogie Nights at Blu, 8pm, $5-$10, free w/’70s or ’80s attire

2) Local guest DJs, 10pm, W, no cover

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35

Bottoms Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way, Sparks, 359-3677: Th-Sa, 9pm, no cover Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks, 359-3526: F, Tu, 7pm; Su, 2pm, no cover Celtic Knot Pub, 541 E. Moana Lane, 829-8886: J.P. and Super Fun Entertainment, Th, 8pm, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

2) John Ponzo, 7pm, no cover 3) 3-D Thursdays w/DJs Max, Chris English, Kronyak, 10pm, $20

2) Decoy, 9pm, no cover 3) Salsa dancing with BB of Salsa Reno, 7pm, $10 after 8pm, DJs Chris English, (((XM))) Freddie, 10pm, $20

2) Decoy, 9pm, no cover 3) Rogue Saturdays, 10pm, $20

3) Fashion Friday, 7pm, no cover

1) Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlán, 8pm, $40-$90 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5

OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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FILM

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2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Midnight Mass, 9pm, no cover

MUSICBEAT

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NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Flowing Tide Pub, 465 S. Meadows Pkwy., Ste. 5, 284-7707; 4690 Longley Lane, Ste. 30, (775) 284-7610: Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Sneakers Bar & Grill, 3923 S. McCarran Blvd., 829-8770: Karaoke w/Mark, Sa, 8:30pm, no cover

2) Wesley Orsolic, 7pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Wesley Orsolic, 7pm, no cover

SILVER LEGACY

3) Ladies Night & Karaoke, 7pm, 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar Social Network Night, 9pm, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge 5) Drinx Lounge

April 13, 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Club 14 Highway 28 Crystal Bay 833-6333

Karaoke

1) The Four Tenors, 8pm, $25, $35 2) Lingerie Bowling w/DJ Williams, 7pm, no cover 3) Club Sapphire w/DJ I, 9pm, no cover

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Onsen Beach & Nightclub 5) Convention Center 6) Outdoor Event Center

Crash Kings

|

2) Gong Show Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover 3) Sin Biggest Little Locals Night, 4pm, M, Step This Way, 8pm, W, no cover 4) Jamie Rollins, 5pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

THIS WEEK

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MISCELLANY

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Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Sparks, 356-6000: Music & Karaoke, F, 9pm; Lovely Karaoke, Sa, 9pm, no cover Washoe Club, 112 S. C St., Virginia City, 847-4467: Gothic Productions Karaoke, Sa, Tu, 8pm, no cover

APRIL 11, 2013

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GADZ UKE! Reno Ukulele Festival

While it’s not technically in Reno, the festival will bring hundreds of ukulele players and enthusiasts to the area for four days of workshops, jamming circles, a marketplace to buy uke-related items and concerts featuring headliners Leo Kottke and Victoria Vox and The Lil Rev Show with Paul Luongo & Friends. The event kicks off on Thursday, April 11, with an early bird meet and greet at 6 p.m. in the Orozko Lounge at John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks. The main event takes place at the Nugget from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, April 12-13, and concludes on Sunday, April 14 with a group lesson and jam with Paul Luongo starting at 9:30 a.m. Admission is free to the public stage areas and marketplace. Leo Kottke and Victoria Vox perform at 8 p.m., April 12, at the Celebrity Showroom inside the Nugget. Tickets are $32. The Lil Rev Show starts at 8 p.m. on April 13 at the Celebrity Showroom. Tickets are $26. Call 356-3300 for tickets. For a schedule of festival events go to http://playuke.net.

For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno Building Women Career Fair Western Apprenticeship Coordinators Association, along with other organizations, will host the annual career fair for women, offering hands-on exhibits and interactive sessions with representatives from the city of Reno Public Works and NV Energy, as well as various local tradesmen. Participants must arrive by 8:30 a.m. On Friday, April 12, at TMCC/IGT Applied Technology Center, 475 Edison Way. While pre-registration ended on April 1, participants can still sign up at the gate. The event is free. Call 825-6866 or visit www.buildingtradejobs.org.

Six Women with Brain Death or Expiring Minds Want To Know Brüka Theatre presents this musical comedy and cult classic written from a mostly female standpoint. Described as “a fast-paced, take-no-prisoners satire of life and pop culture at the end of the millennium,” the play explores modern life through a series of bizarre yet humorous songs and sketches. Topics include TV soap operas, “genuine press-on nails,” Barbie and Ken’s secret fantasy life and what is and isn’t feminine. Brüka’s production will feature singer Cami Thompson along with a cast of local favorites. The play opens on Friday, April 12, at Brüka Theatre, 99 N. Virginia St. There will be an opening night champagne reception following the performance on April 12, as well as a talk-back session with the company following the matinee performance on April 28. Showtimes are 8 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday through May 18 with an 8 p.m. show on Wednesday, May 8, and 2 p.m. on Sunday, April 28. Tickets are $18-$25. Call 322-3221 or visit www.bruka.org.

Bill Martell Screenwriting Seminar Hollywood screenwriter Bill Martell will offer beginning and advanced writers some advice on how to write that next hit TV show. Martell has written more than 19 produced films, including three HBO Premier movies and several Cinemax Originals. He will teach two workshops on Saturday, April 13: a beginner’s class at 8:30 a.m., followed by an advanced class at p.m. The workshops take place at the KNPB Channel 5 Public Broadcasting studio, 1670 N. Virginia St., at the north end of the University of Nevada, Reno campus. The cost is $45 per workshop or $80 for both. Call 827-2808.

—Kelley Lang

1

Hootchy Kootchy Girls Spring Fling Hootchy Kootchy Girls Vintage Cabaret recreates the look and feel of the 1940s with another installation of its show that combines singing, dancing and comedy with a little old Hollywood glamor. The evening stars Isha Casagrande as master of ceremonies, Satine Rouge as the Dance Countess, dancers from the Hootchy Kootchy Girls class and guest stars Gavin Getsome and Chad Sweet. The adult-only show, which often sells out, starts at 6 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 13, at the Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St. Tickets are $20 in advance and $22 on the day of the show. Call 686-6600 or visit www.renotahoecomedy.com.

BRAP! Reno Noise Night Local musicians present “realtime interlaced improvisational sound performance” at the monthly experimental music gathering. Performances can include self-made instruments, tape loops, feedback networks, circuit bending, Powertools and whatever these creative folks can put together to make music. The show starts at 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 13, at Reno Art Works, 1995 Dickerson Road. Admission is a $3 donation. Call 391-0278 or visit www.facebook.com/#!/BRAPreno.

Reno Philharmonic Orchestra The Reno Phil winds down its Classix season with two shows featuring guest violinist Anne Akiko Meyers. Meyers will join the orchestra for a performance of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Concerto No. 3 in G Major for Violin and Orchestra. The program will also feature Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp Minor. The concert starts at 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 14, and 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 16, at the Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, 100 S. Virginia St. Tickets are $25-$74. On a related note, the Reno Philharmonic Youth Orchestra will also perform its Spring Concert at 6:30 p.m. On Monday, April 15, at the Pioneer Center. Tickets are $5-$10. Call 323-6393 or visit www.renophil.com. OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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THIS WEEK

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When you wish upon a sleazeball I was seeing a guy for four months—a guy I liked better than I’ve ever liked anyone. Two months in, he was calling me his girlfriend, putting me on the phone with his mom, and saying that I shouldn’t date other people. Yet I noticed he remained on the dating website where we met and was checking in there daily. I asked him whether he was seeing other girls on the site, and he said, “Only a friend I work with and she is older anyway.” When I’d ask whether he was sleeping with other girls, he’d always say no. Well, he left his email open on my computer, and I searched it and discovered he’d been contacting several women daily on the dating site and sleeping with at least one other woman. I contacted her and told her he’s contacting numerous other women so she’d know he’s a sociopath, a sex addict, a liar and a cheat. Now I’m thinking about warning other women he’s contacted. Is that crazy? Sticking to your preferred version of reality works when you’re 6. At 26 or 36, it tends to end badly. You, for example, tried to ignore the wildly obvious: A guy isn’t logging in at a dating site daily because his mouse gets lost on the way to the sports scores. Eventually, Reality popped up to ask you, “Am I really going to have to bite you?” So, you asked the guy whether he was seeing anybody from the site, and he said, “Only a friend I work with.” Note that this was not a no. To a woman seeking the truth, it sounds like what it was—a truth-flavored lie. But, determined 30   |  RN&R   |

APRIL 11, 2013

as you were to keep believing you’d found your Mr. Husband, you cut up all the red flags and did a remarkable job repurposing them into throw pillows. The fact that your suspicions finally got too big and stanky to ignore didn’t give you the right to plow through the guy’s email. People are entitled to privacy. Even scummy people. Even scummy people who are sleeping with you. If a guy’s level of sharing doesn’t match your need to know, find the door—not an opportune moment to go all Nancy Drew on his Gmail. Railing about what a bad guy your ex is and contacting every woman he ever said “‘sup?” to on some dating site is a great idea, as it will keep you far too busy to admit that you made it possible for him to skeeve you. (Your not wanting to know coincided rather neatly with his wanting to keep his options open.) You can’t control whether somebody lies to you. You can only control whether you do—and whether you treat reality like the 50-foot brick wall it is or pretend, for as long as you can, that it comes with an elastic waistband like fat men’s pants.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


OPINION

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NEWS

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GREEN

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FEATURE STORY

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ARTS&CULTURE

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ART OF THE STATE

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FOODFINDS

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Help us celebrate 51 years of jazz ~ 1962-2013! Always the best in JAZZ —

concerts, competitions & clinics! Thursday, April 25 Dave Douglas with The Collective 7:30 p.m., Nightingale Concert Hall

Friday, April 26 Festival Competition and Clinics 8 a.m.- 6 p.m., University campus

Matt Wilson’s Arts & Crafts 7:30 p.m., Lawlor Events Center

Saturday, April 27 Festival Competition and Clinics 8 a.m.- 5 p.m., University campus

Festival Showcase and Awards Ceremony 6:30 p.m., Lawlor Events Center

Festival and Ticket Information:

April 25-27, 2013

(775) 784-4046 jazz@unr.edu www.unr.edu/rjf

Jazz Fan Pass!

General $60 / Senior $50

Provides entrance to all festival events, call (775) 784-4278 to order.

Be a jazz volunteer!

Want to earn a free concert ticket? Be a jazz volunteer! For details call (775) 219-0786 or email jjsteele@unr.edu. Funded in part by a grant from the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency,; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; and the City of Reno.

WALK TO CREATE A WORLD FREE OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

WALK MS: Reno/Sparks Saturday, May 4, 2013

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32   |   RN&R   |   April 11, 2013

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NEWS

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GREEN

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT Drug & Alcohol Problems? TLC Outpatient Clinic. Individual & Group Therapy, Substance Abuse, Yoga, Art & more. 480-577-1172 for information. Private Insurance or Reasonable Self-Pay / Personalized Treatment Plans. (AAN CAN)

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APRIL 11, 2013

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WIN TICKETS FOR THE

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APRIL 11, 2013

theologian Martin Luther (1483-1546) was a central figure in the rebellion against the Catholic Church that led to the Protestant Reformation. You’ll never guess where he was when he was struck by the epiphany that became the core axiom of his new religion. I’ll tell you: He was sitting on the toilet in the Wittenberg Monastery. The Holy Spirit gave him the crucial knowledge then and there, or so he testified. In this spirit, Aries, keep a very open mind about where you will be and what you will be doing when your illuminations arrive this week.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your task

is to uncover the semihappy ending that was hidden back in the story’s beginning. Once you do that, you may be able to create a graceful and honorable climax. In fact, I don’t think you will be able to bring about the semihappy ending any other way. It’s crucial that you return to the original flash of inspiration—the time when all the plot lines that eventually developed were first germinating. You need to remember fate’s primal promise. You’ve got to read the signs you missed in the early going.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you play

poker, the odds are one in 649,740 that you will get a royal flush. That’s an ace, king, queen, jack and 10 of one suit. As for drawing a straight flush—any five consecutive cards of one suit—the odds are one in 72,192. Judging from the current astrological omens, Gemini, I’d say your chance of getting one of those hands is far better than usual—maybe one in 88,000 for the royal flush and one in 8,888 for the straight flush. But those still aren’t great odds. On the other hand, getting a flush—all five cards of the same suit— is normally one in 509, but these days, it’s pretty likely for you. The moral of the story, not just for when you’re playing cards, but in whatever you do: Expect really good luck, but not miraculous, out-of-this-world luck. you stand, be the soul of that place,” wrote the poet Rumi. This is excellent advice for you right now, Cancerian. You are nearing the peak of your power to express yourself with beautiful accuracy. You have more skill than usual at understanding and conveying the interesting truth. As a result, you’re in a position to wield extra influence. People are receptive to being moved by your heartfelt intelligence. So, please do more than simply push for greater efficiency, order and discipline. Those things are good, but I hope you will also be a radiant role model who exemplifies what it means to be soulful.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Golden Rock is a

Buddhist holy site in Myanmar. It’s a small pagoda built on top of a giant boulder that in turn seems to be precariously balanced at the edge of a down-sloping bed of rock. How does the boulder remain stationary? Why doesn’t it roll off the edge? It appears to defy gravity. Legend says that it’s held in place by a single strand of hair from the Buddha’s head. I suspect that many of you Leos will soon have access to a tricky asset with resemblances to that magic strand. True, it might be merely metaphorical. But if used correctly, it could become a key element in a future foundation.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s soul-

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searching season: a good time to go in search of your soul. To aid your quest, I’ll offer a few lines from “A Few Words on the Soul,” a poem by Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska: “We have a soul at times. / No one’s got it non-stop, / for keeps. / Day after day, / year after year / may pass without it. … For every thousand conversations, / it participates in one, / if even that, / since it prefers silence. … It’s picky: it doesn’t like seeing us in crowds, / our hustling for a dubious advantage / and creaky machinations make it sick. / Joy and sorrow / aren’t two different feelings for it. / It attends us / only when the two are joined. / We can count on it / when we’re sure of nothing / and curious about everything. / … It won’t say where it comes from / or when it’s taking off again, / though it’s clearly expecting such questions. / We need it / but apparently / it needs us / for some reason too.” (Translation by Stanislaw Baranczak and Clare Cavanagh. Read the whole poem at http://tinyurl.com/ searchsoul.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I’ve never

believed in God,” said Mexican painter Diego Rivera, “but I believe in Picasso.” My poet-musician friend Tanya has a similar philosophy. “I don’t believe in God, or even Goddess, for that matter,” she says. “But I do believe in Patti Smith.” Do you have a God substitute, Libra? Or, if you do have faith in a Cosmic Wow, is there also a more approachable, second-tier source of divinity you love? According to my reading of the astrological omens, you would really benefit from feeling an intimate kind of reverence right now—a tender devotion for something higher and brighter that awakens the sleeping part of your lust for life.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): This would

be an excellent time to stage staring contests with yourself in the mirror. There’s a high likelihood that you will win every time. I think you’ll also have great success whenever you try to read your own mind. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ve got an uncanny knack for plucking buried secrets and self-deceptions out of their hiding places. One more thing, Scorpio: Have you ever considered how fun it might be to wash your own brain and kick your own butt? Now would be an excellent time to experiment with those radical acts of healing.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“It’s so hard to forget pain, but it’s even harder to remember sweetness,” writes novelist Chuck Palahniuk. “We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace.” Your assignment in the coming days, Sagittarius, is to prove Palahniuk wrong. As the surges of sweetness flow through you, as your secret joy ripens into bright blooming bliss, imprint the sensations on your memory. Vow to remember them for the rest of your life. Make these breakthrough moments into talismans that will serve as magical spells whenever you need rejuvenation in the future.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Phi-

losopher Ludwig Wittgenstein had his priorities straight. This is what he said about his profession: “In philosophy the race is won by the one who can run slowest—the one who crosses the finish line last.” It’s my belief, Capricorn, that a similar rule should apply to you in the coming days—no matter what project you’re working on or goal you’re trying to accomplish. Proceed slowly enough to be absolutely thorough, meticulous and conscientious. As you make your way to the finish line, be as deep as you dare.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In Samuel

Beckett’s novel Molloy, the main character talks about a long overland journey he took on foot and by bicycle. Before the trip, he had read somewhere that when people are lost in a forest, they often imagine they’re moving in a straight line when in fact they’re going in a circle. That’s why, during his own travels, he intentionally walked in a circle, hoping thereby to go straight. Although this might sound like a loopy strategy, Aquarius, I think it will make sense for you to adopt in the coming week. Your apparent path may be very different, maybe even opposite, to your actual path.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Are you in

competition with someone who is doing mediocre work? Do you find it incomprehensible that anyone would pay attention to that weak expression instead of flocking to your beautiful vibe? If so, here’s my advice. Withdraw your attention from your inferior opponent. Don’t waste a minute feeling jealous or resentful or incredulous. Instead, concentrate your energy on making your production so strong and smart and irresistible that you simply overshadow and overwhelm your rival’s.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by D. Brian Burghart

Making solutions

still keep services open for these at-risk and homeless kids.

Can kids just show up there? Yeah. Kids just show up. We have a little participation agreement where they say, we’re going to behave while in the building, and we’re going to act in a positive manner, but besides that, we don’t really require too much. All the resources are free for the kids. It’s been fantastic since we became volunteer run because kids didn’t understand that concept of what a volunteer was. We explained it to them and explained our financial situation and then they got it and then they were, “How can I volunteer?” We have about two-and-a-half acres and no custodial staff. So our kids help with taking out the trash, mopping the floors, sweeping, cleaning up. Whatever we need, they’re always willing to help. We’re open Monday through Friday, and sometimes we’ll open up on Saturdays. Even on Saturdays, we’ll get about five or six people just come up. Last few weekends, there have been about five middle-school girls come up to me and say, “Can we volunteer?” They just live in neighborhood, and they’ll come in and mop the floors, and they’ll clean the kitchen. They’re just eager to help and eager to learn. It’s really been a great experience. It’s been stressful to go from having employees and partners that have money and keys to the building to becoming entirely volunteer-run, but it’s been one of those opportunities since we had the courage to push forward. We’ve seen the community blossom. We’ve seen more resources come in. We’ve seen people really put in a lot of extra effort. Seeing the positive response from the kids has been fantastic. Ω

Palkin Zed Project Solution last week had an open house with the Reno Bighorns that featured basketball, hip-hop music and dancing, art and food that exploded expectations, raising some $22,000 in their first fundraiser in 10 years. The facility as located at 1090 Bresson Ave., and can be reached at 870-1112, or through www.projectsolution.org. Palkin Zed is executive director.

company, what we do, and just knew a little about my background and needed some help to revamp the nonprofit. They were having some issues so they asked me to come in and clean up a few prior problems and find some more resources.

What’s Project Solution?

Which company did they find you through?

Project Solution is a nonprofit that helps homeless and at-risk kids in Reno. We start with kids as young as 8 or as old as 24. We’ve got a recreational facility off of Vassar and Wells. We provide recreational services after school, [and] educational resources. We really want to teach job skills and training and entrepreneurship, but really right now, we just provide a safe place for kids to go to after school where they can hang out with their friends, play basketball, learn some dance, do some art, get some help on their homework. We want to increase a lot of our programs and start offering gardening classes and cooking classes and just more services.

How did you get involved in this? I got involved about two years ago when people from the board of directors from Project Solutions kind of heard about my

They found out about JDRow. We do business development and strategic marketing consulting mostly to engineering companies and startups. ... And that point, the nonprofit needed a new strategy to come up with a new direction. We had very few kids coming to the building and only had one service, which was open-gym basketball. Over time, we added over 30 services, trickled in more kids, made a bigger impact, we’ve been trucking forward, improving the services and getting more resources in for these kids. Since December of 2012, we’ve become completely volunteer-run. We lost one of our partners who provided us employees. They had to leave because of budget issues. And so we didn’t have any employees to provide the services so it became completely volunteer-run with people of different ages [and with], community members stepping in to help with the facility to ensure we could

Chasing technology You know, the best thing about losing your iPhone is that you no longer have to worry about losing your iPhone. You finally lost the damned thing! The pressure’s off! What a relief! Yep, on my recent journey through southern Utah, I did indeed lose my beloved phone. To this day, I still can’t believe I actually lost the damned thing—any minute now, I’m gonna remember where I absentmindedly tossed/stashed/hid the poor little gizmo. Or that its location might finally be revealed to me in some kind of lucid dream. But it still remains real gone, thus making me a temporary throwback to that stone age time known as “The ’90s.” Urk. But in my frantic search for my darling doodad, I came upon something that all my iPhone brethren should be aware of—an amazing app called Find My iPhone. It’s truly an impressive ally to have on your side. I was in a motel room in beautiful downtown Hanksville, Utah, after an afternoon of backtracking and OPINION

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searching in vain. (The last time I remember the phone in my hand was in Natural Bridges National Monument, where I had taken a stunningly fabulous, Ansel Adams-esque photo of a raven in a dead tree. Allow me to humbly assert that its disappearance is a loss for humanity at large. C’est la vie!) I had finally given up and taken the next step, which was to connect to the motel’s wi-fi on my iPad and ask, “What Do I Do When I Lose My iPhone?” (I noticed about this time that losers of iPhones go through the exact same KublerRossian “Denial-Anger-BargainingDepression-Acceptance cycle that those facing imminent death do.) Google said, “download the Find My iPhone app.” Once installed, it took this rockin’ little program less than a minute to find my iPad, and show, via Google map, that it was indeed in Hanksville. No, no, no, I instructed, find my damned iPHONE. In a flash, this techno-sleuth then informed me the phone was off and couldn’t be found. But that the next

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time it came online, the app could (1) play a loud tone to help me find it in case it was still in my car/bag, (2) flash a message on the phone’s screen, informing whomever may have found it to call me at the number I entered, or (3) blow the thing up. That is, erase all its data. I opted for options 1 and 2, holding off on the third, in hopes that perhaps someone might find the phone and turn it into the N.B.N.M. Visitor Center (still no word). But the point here, fellow Apple eaters, is that there is some way cool and very Big Brotherish technology at your command to help you locate and maybe even retrieve your iBaby. It’s awesome, impressive, and yes, a bit spooky, when you ponder it. But one day, it might save you a pile of hassle. Remember, to download this app, you have to be living in The Cloud. And obviously, if you’re traveling with only one iOS, you’re gonna be SOL. So there’s that. Ω |

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APRIL 11, 2013

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