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FREE CHICO’S NEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT SOURCE VOLUME 44, ISSUE 12 THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2021 CHICO.NEWSREVIEW.COM

SPECIAL

ISSUE

BUSINSUEASLS? AS U

With California poised for full reopening, Butte County attempts to restart its economy

NEW BUSINESS MODEL

HEALTHY COMMERCE

RETURN OF NIGHTLIFE?

NEW STAGE


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J UN E 3 , 2 02 1


INSIDE

CN&R

Vol. 44, Issue 12 • June 3, 2021

OPINION

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Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Business issue: New work model emerges . . 16 Business issue: To our future health . . . . . . 24

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BUSINESS

AS USUAL ?

FEATURE

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Business issue: Can local nightlife return?

ARTS & CULTURE

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June Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Brezsny’s Astrology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

35

YEARS IN BUSINESS

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor at large Melissa Daugherty Interim Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writers Ashiah Scharaga, Ken Smith Calendar Editor/Editorial Assistant Trevor Whitney

Contributors Alastair Bland, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Robert Speer Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Publications & Advertising Designers Cathy Arnold, Katelynn Mitrano, Jocelyn Parker Sales & Business Coordinator Jennifer Osa Advertising Consultant Ray Laager Distribution Lead Trevor Whitney Distribution Staff Michael Gardner, Drew Garske, Jackson Indar, Larry Smith, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, David Wyles

353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Mail PO Box 13370 Sacramento, CA 95813 Phone (530) 894-2300 Website chico.newsreview.com President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of Dollars & Sense Miranda Hansen Accounting Staff Gus Trevino Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins Got a News Tip? chiconewstips@newsreview.com Post Calendar Events chico.newsreview.com/calendar Want to Advertise? cnradinfo@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, AAN and AWN.

MORE ONLINE Find content available only at

chico.newsreview.com

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Commitment Each year at around this time, I write about the awards the CN&R picks up in the annual journalism competition put on by the California News Publishers’ Association. I give a rundown in Second & Flume, lavishing praise upon the paper’s small, hardworking staff. It’s something my predecessor, Robert Speer, used to do. And it’s a tradition I rolled with when I succeeded him in 2013. This is the first year since then—and I’m certain the first time since this paper began competing in the contest, the only one we regularly enter—that we’re unable to brag about bringing home honors. But it’s certainly not because the CN&R didn’t produce award-worthy coverage in 2020. Off the top of my head, I can think of many excellent stories (and Art Director Tina Flynn’s design) that would have been contenders. Like Ashiah Scharaga’s cover story about the massive backlog of Camp Fire survivors—literally thousands of people—awaiting disaster case managers some 16 months after the blaze, many living in near squalor in cars and RVs. Or Evan Tuchinsky’s great reporting on COVID-19 locally, along with myriad other topics, such as the controversial syringe program. Or Ken Smith’s continued in-depth, nuanced coverage of local homelessness. Then, of course, Jason Cassidy has been making sure the local arts scene isn’t forgotten—and doing so while serving as interim editor of this now-monthly publication. Alas, we didn’t submit any contest entries. See, it’s hard to justify spending money on submissions to a writing competition when we’re counting every precious dollar to keep the paper afloat through the pandemic. Despite operating with an extremely pared down staff, including yours truly working very part-time—one-quarter time, to be precise—the paper isn’t generating enough ad revenue. Even on the eve of the state’s reopening, we expect that’s going to be the case for the foreseeable future. Indeed, while we’re still trying to figure out a long-term plan—and a return to weekly print—we already know that we cannot rely solely upon advertising. You may have noticed a campaign about our spring fundraising drive. Several dedicated readers have already pledged to give the paper monthly donations—aid that has been critical to getting us this far—and we’re now hoping to increase the number that brings us closer to sustainability. This is a new model for the CN&R and newspapers in general, many of which are likewise exploring ways to keep their heads above water. Sadly, many have folded for good. For some people, it’s an easy sell. They understand that the work we do takes money, and how the CN&R is basically a for-profit business doing nonprofit work. I can’t think of a more accessible resource for people to get important local news. Seriously. The CN&R is free (read: available to anyone regardless of income), it’s distributed throughout Butte County (and also in Glenn and Tehama counties), and we even have a new smartphone-friendly website (good riddance to our former Jurassic-era platform). Thanks to everyone who has continued to support the CN&R, the region’s only long-term consistent source for local in-depth and investigative reporting, as well as the most comprehensive coverage of the arts. As a reminder, last year, among the nine honors we received in the California Journalism Awards, going up against the largest weekly papers in the state, three were for first place: Coverage of Business News, Arts & Entertainment Coverage, and Public Service. The latter was the biggie. It stemmed largely from a series of investigative stories, based on public records, that outlined the scope of the water contamination on the Ridge post-Camp Fire. It also included several editorials taking the state water board and other public agencies to task for failing to protect the public. In the CNPA’s glossy awards magazine, where the winners are listed, the CN&R was one of the few newspapers selected to be featured with its own story highlighting the award-winning work. I was interviewed by a reporter and spoke about the series, which, aside from the editorials, was written by Meredith J. Cooper. It was the kind of recognition usually reserved for big metro papers, newsrooms with dozens of reporters and editors. So, how is it that the CN&R was able to reveal what the huge national newspapers missed, though they were initially focused on the effects of the mega fire? It’s because this is our home and we are invested in it. Truly, there are much easier and better-paying jobs than working at a community newspaper. Yet we’re still committed. We’re still here. 4

CN&R

june 3, 2021

LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Focus on people Re: Editorial, “Admit failure and refocus on homelessness,” April 7, 2021. Chico’s homeless issue has been the focal point in our community recently due to the City Council’s poor follow through with creating stable housing for our residents. With Chico being known as a college town, it’s no surprise that part of this population also includes young adults. The CN&R editorial shared that there have been multiple proposals regarding designating land for camp-friendly sites, creating tiny homes or even using an old hotel to house the homeless, yet no concrete progress has been made. I agree with the editorial that this is the time for accountability. This topic isn’t new, and it’s time the City Council move forward with the promises made to bettering the living conditions of those struggling who have inevitably resorted to the streets of Chico as their only option. Not having stable housing is overwhelmingly stressful, which can lead to catalyzing and furthering substance use among folk who are homeless. Research done by the Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse supports that the damage done from trauma and fear of living on the streets is what drives youths to develop addictive patterns to cope with their situation. Anyone experiencing homelessness has a higher risk of suffering from poor mental health, which also can be linked to increased substance use. Samantha Rodriguez Chico

Leave the board be Today, it takes wisdom and the relentless pursuit of truth to discover what is really going on behind the heated rhetoric and emotion. A case in point is the current effort to recall four Chico Unified School District board members. COVID-19 caused severe disruption to all our lives. It created a worldwide emergency. The public health system was faced with great unknowns. To cope, public servants were called upon to make tough decisions.

Their decisions had to be made on the best scientific information about the virus that was available. Lives were at stake. Emotion could not trump reason. But a group of agitated parents came together for that very purpose. They wanted their children back in school, despite the unknowns and the risks to the community at large, in defiance of federal, state and local public health mandates. The school board is sworn to uphold laws. It is supposed to be nonpartisan. It is responsible to the entire Chico community, not only one vocal subgroup. Board member Matt Tennis is regularly being outvoted 4-1. The solution? Get rid of the four board members who disagree with him. Please see through this thinly veiled grab for power. Retain our experienced and dedicated school board. Elizabeth Griffin Chico

Editor’s note: The author served on the CUSD board from 2008-2020.

Bravo, inspiration! Regarding Inspire School of Arts and Sciences’ 7th annual video showcase, May 21, 2021: Of course, the creativity and performances were very different from last year; last year was very different. A series of splendid soliloquies proved the value of aloneness and introspection. The wisdom and awareness shown in the creative expression of these pieces was phenomenal. To see young people who benefited from the strangeness and isolation of the pandemic was wonderful. Bravo teachers and students! Inspiring indeed! Adrienne Hall Reno

Bring back art town Re: “The opening curtain,” Scene, April 7, 2021 (the first installment in the CN&R Bring Back the Arts series). I visited Chico in the early ’80s and was so impressed with its art scene and the town’s atmosphere (it LETTERS C o n t i n u e d

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GUEST COMMENT

Vaccination makes everyone safer hen I was given the opportunity to get the COVID-19

to protect myself, my family and members of my community. Everyone 12 years old and older now has that opportunity, and I encourage all who are eligible to take advantage and get vaccinated. Early in the pandemic, news of severe illness and death seemed like a constant. At the time, we had only nonpharmaceutical interventions like wearing a mask, washing by Danette York our hands and social distancing to protect ourselves. Now we The author is director of have multiple safe and effective Butte County vaccines with ample supply. Public Health. Many people feel that getting vaccinated is a personal choice, and I agree with them. But I firmly believe it’s the

right choice in this situation. Getting vaccinated does so much more than just protect you. It protects your loved ones, those who cannot get vaccinated and our community as a whole. It also helps our economy open up and stay open with healthy employees and patrons. Vaccinating makes everyone safer. COVID is real; sometimes it is mild with no symptoms, but sometimes it is severe and fatal. With safe, effective and free vaccines, we should not continue hearing devastating stories of loss and suffering, yet they continue across the globe, including right here in Butte County. Getting severe illness or dying from COVID is preventable! Finally, it is important for people to understand that just because we are able to start going back to some pre-pandemic “normal,” COVID has not gone away. For those who remain unvaccinated, the risk continues. The more people who choose to get vaccinated, the safer and more protected our community will be. Make the choice that is right for all of us: get vaccinated. Go to buttecounty.net/ph to find vaccine locations. Ω

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At Rape Crisis, we are no stranger to helping our survivors who struggle with PTSD

LETTERS

June is PTSD Awareness Month

• 24.4 Million People in the United States suffer from PTSD. • Approximately 50% of Adults living with PTSD also struggle with substance abuse • 94% of rape survivors will experience PTSD • 51% to 75% of women who who are survivors of intimate partner violence will experience PTSD • 100% of children who witness a parental homicide or sexual assault AND 90% of sexually violated children develop PTSD

SYMPTOMS OF PTSD: 1. Experienced traumatic event(s): Have you been sexually violated by an acquaintance, family member, intimate partner or stranger? 2. In the past month: Have you experienced nightmares about the event(s) or thought about the event(s) when you did not want to? 3. Avoidance: Have you tried hard not to think about the event(s) or went out of your way to avoid situation(s) that reminded you of the event(s)? 4. Hypervigilance: Have you been constantly on guard, watchful, or easily startled? 5. Isolation: Have you felt numb or detached from people, activities, or surroundings? 6. Self-Blame: Have you felt guilty or unable to stop blaming yourself or others for the event(s) or any problems the (event(s) may have caused?

c o N T i N U E D f r o m pa g E 4

was Pioneer Week, LOL) that I did what I was typically inclined to do in such circumstances: without a second thought, I went home, packed my bags, then moved to Chico and assimilated into its culture. As an artist throughout all these years, I was always happy and excited when it would grow and improve and disappointed when (in my opinion) it would wane. So I’m delighted and excited to be reading about bringing back the arts. Victor Youngblood Chico

• Anxiety • Avoidance • Depression • Distrust • Emotional Numbness • Fear • Flashbacks • Nightmares • Panic Attacks • Phobias • Poor Concentration • Self-blame • Substance Abuse • Suicidal Ideation

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CN&R

JUNE 3, 2021

Tom Nickell Chico

Editor’s note: The author is a former vice mayor of Chico.

Not not sarcastic I note that of California’s 53 U.S. Representatives, my favorite, Doug LaMalfa, and my second favorite, Tom McClintock, were the only California representatives to vote against the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act. Apparently, even Devin Nunes and Kevin McCarthy couldn’t stomach not voting for it. Good to see Butte County can pride itself in that Congressman LaMalfa, and Congressman McClintock from the neighboring district, have supported their like-minded colleagues Marjorie Taylor Greene, Matt Gaetz, Mo Brooks, Jim Jordan and Louie Gohmert, all great political thinkers of the 18th century.

PSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS OF PTSD:

out and faded and cannot be seen. You have 35 mph advisory signs in curves, which is crazy. The speed limit should be set at 25 mph. There should be crosswalks at all park entrances for citizens with more stop signs, so we can have a safe scenic and residential neighborhood. The city of Chico has opened the door for criminal and civil negligence and liability. I do not want a fatal accident that involves a child or an adult because of the unsafe roadway conditions.

Dean Carrier Eureka

Ban the bee killers The bees are dying, and we need to save them. There are 1,600 bee species in California, and 1 in 4 are imperiled. This is important because bees are major pollinators of foods we rely on. However, pesticides that harm bees, like neonics, are in everyday gardening products. Amazon.com is a major carrier of products with these harmful chemicals. Thankfully, we can petition Amazon to stop selling these items. This is a corporate solution that would take care of the problem at the source. We need support from readers of this paper like you to combat the pesticides killing the bees. Let’s call on Amazon to stop selling neonics and save the bees! Emily McCabe Durham

Scenic drive no more Vallombrosa Avenue was designated as a “scenic drive” in the general plan. Staff have made it a major highway in Chico. This roadway is unsafe for pedestrians, children, young families, senior citizens, bicyclists, walkers, school children going to the park on a day trip, wildlife and the environment. There has not been a speed study for 10 years. The speed limit of 35 mph is too fast for roadway conditions. It has been my experience that people drive 10 to 15 mph, or more, over the speed limit. This is based on my 25 years with the California Highway Patrol. I was a certified speed expert in three superior courts, including Butte County. There are no crosswalks, limit lines or lane lines; not enough stop signs or deer crossing signs; and all the advisory signs are rigt on the park entrances. The roadway paint is worn

Correction In “The one that got away” (Downstroke, May 6, 2021)—a news brief on “Old Brownie,” the large fish from the old Barth’s Sporting Goods store that’s now on display at the Chico History Museum—both the material of the sign and the nature of its disappearance were incorrect. Old Brownie is made of metal and it came down in 1986 when the building was sold. The errors have been corrected in the online version of the story.

Write a letter Tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@newsreview.com. Deadline for July print publication is June 22.


STREETALK

Will you continue to wear a mask after state drops the requirement?

KZFR and the CN&R is the perfect collaboration between two community-focused media outlets at a time when independent local journalism is more important than ever.

KZFR and the CN&R is the perfect collaborat two community-focused media outle at a time when independent local journalism is more

Asked at Thursday Night Market

Andrew Lemanek Dialysis tech

Even though I’m vaccinated, I will—indoors more so than outdoors. It’s not for me, but if it makes anyone else around me feel better, that’s what I’m going to continue wearing it for.

Amber Larson Career advisor

Probably yes. I just know that only 50 percent of California is vaccinated, and even though I’m vaccinated, I just don’t trust people, basically.

Amir Rezaii I.T. security engineer

Yes, absolutely. [For] protection of myself and my family—I have people [near me] with immune deficiencies. There’s not any reason to take a chance on it.

Benson Social justice worker

Absolutely. I’ve already thought about it. My friends have thought about it. We’re wearing our masks. I’m vaccinated; I was [among] the first in line. Yeah, I’m wearing my mask.

Local news and arts coverage presented much like the newspaper version of the CN&R, with interviews with the people in the stories and with the writers reporting them, updates and commentary on local issues, community dialogue, arts/music previews and reviews, and spotlights on upcoming community events and entertainment.

Hosted by CN&R Interim Editor, Jason Cassidy Tune in at 90.1 FM or stream online at kzfr.org

Local news and arts coverage presen like the newspaper version of the CN interviews with the people in the sto with the writers reporting them, upd and commentary on local issues, com dialogue, arts/music previews and re spotlights on upcoming community e entertainment.

Hosted by CN&R Interim Editor, Jaso

Tune in at 90.1 FM or stream online at

Thursdays, 5:30–6pm

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SPECIAL ISSUE

OPEN

Business as usual?

With California set to reopen fully on June 15, locals wonder what post-pandemic economy will look like for Butte County

D

uring the COVID-19 pandemic, the Chico News & Review has reported on restaurants that opened just as stay-home mandates were ordered (like vegan pizza makers Pizza Riot and new beermakers Mulberry Station Brewing Co.); highlighted entrepreneurs who lost jobs due to COVID and had to invent their own business (see the Panini Machini food bus); and documented the trials of local businesses of all stripes as they navigated closures, openings, capacity restrictions, grant applications, and health and safety requirements. Now, as Californians anticipate a full reopening on June 15, many in Butte County wonder what’s in store for the businesses in our area. For this special Business Issue, the CN&R spoke to wide range of locals—owners, business leaders and health officials— about the impact of the past year and what the immediate future holds for our local economy.

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JUNE 3, 2021

RETURN OF


NIGHTLIFE? After a tumultuous pandemic year, Chico's bars and clubs face uncertainty as state reopens

BY KEN SMITH kens@ newsr ev iew.c o m

A

rcher Lombardi kicked off 2020 ready for big changes. After nearly a decade dedicated to establishing The Maltese as one of Chico’s cornerstone bars and live performance venues, the business had reached a level of selfsustenance that encouraged him to shift focus. He and his partner invested in a Placer County farm and planned to start a family. Then COVID-19 came and bars went dark.

“The last year’s been really, really terrible for us, like it has been for so many people,” Lombardi said during a recent phone interview. Like other business owners, Lombardi struggled to make sense of constantly changing health guidelines, weighed the benefits and risks of applying for relief programs and is still navigating complicated application processes. Left: A lively crowd fills the outdoor patio area as The Maltese reopens for limited hours last month. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

Below: Archer Lombardi, owner of The Maltese, stops for a selfie in front of the bar during recent preparations for reopening.

The fact that the bar does not serve food made it ineligible for some aid, and a reliance on concerts, dance nights and drag shows—all events that bring many people close together—leaves its future uncertain, even as California is scheduled to relax COVID-related restrictions June 15. Other business owners in Chico’s nightclub scene had similar reports: The nature of their business made the pandemic especially difficult to survive, and it’s likely to be a long and complicated road back to normalcy. “I’ve basically blown through my life savings in the last 14 months,” said Lombardi, who is considering selling the bar. “I’m going to keep fighting for it, but I have to be open to the idea of moving on.”

Navigating the pandemic Lombardi said he’s included staff in discussions about the bar’s operations since the beginning of the pandemic. With consideration NIGHTLIFE C O N T I N U E D JUNE 3, 2021

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36

25

YEARS IN BUSINESS

YEARS IN BUSINESS

AFFORDABLE AUTOMOTIVE

COTTONPARTY

Affordable Automotive is owned and operated by Mike Button and his family, and has been located in Chico for 25 years. The goal at Affordable Automotive is to provide each customer with honest and reliable auto repairs and services. Voted “Best of Chico” seven times, Affordable Automotive’s reputation has been built on one satisfied customer at a time.

Cottonparty has been serving downtown Chico for 36 years. Angela Youngblood is the third owner of the business and is excited to continue cottonparty’s legacy of helping women feel great while wearing comfortable clothing.

Raised in Durham, Button always had a knack for fixing cars. After some time in college, and with inspiration from his father, Button opened his business in 1996 and today has three Chico locations and 16 employees to service and repair any automotive need: 2106 Park Avenue, 906 Nord Avenue, and the classic and custom repair shop, Affordable Automotive Central at 1023 W. 8th Street.

vehicle, and provides honest repairs and quality workmanship that are guaranteed with a three-year, 36,000-mile nationwide warranty. Affordable Automotive is dedicated to maintaining 100% customer satisfaction.

Youngblood purchased cottonparty at the beginning of 2020, after working for the previous owner for more than five years. While surviving her first year as a business owner during a pandemic was a difficult task, she feels grateful to our wonderful community for their continued support. “Working with women, I constantly hear all of the ways we internalize how the world looks at our bodies and all the ways we inherit negative self-image from our parents, peers, media, etc. I love helping women break down those negative internal narratives and find clothing that makes them feel great inside and out,” says Youngblood.

Affordable Automotive knows the importance of maintaining a safe, reliable

337 broadway a y

337 BROADWAY ST. CHICO | 530.893.4923 o p e n e v e r y d WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/COTTONPARTYCHICO

2106 PARK AVENUE | CHICO 530.892.1774 | CHICOAUTOMOTIVE.COM

1x6 (1-10 V)

1

4

YEAR IN BUSINESS

YEARS IN BUSINESS

GREEN BUSINESS

INSPIRE PHYSICAL THERAPY

JEEPTRAIL PRINT SHOP

Born and raised in Paradise, Alan Hivale, DPT started Inspire Physical Therapy, giving his patients the personalized care they deserve, with one-on-one therapy that he personally administrates from start to finish.

Jeeptrail Print Shop specializes in ecofriendly, water-based printing, using high quality ink components, to bring your vision to life.

To better serve the Chico community, Inspire Physical Therapy is a mobile concierge physical therapy practice, breaking the mold of the classic PT clinic. This innovative framework brings the treatment to your home, office or wherever works best for you, providing convenient and personalized care.

His passion is to help people recover from and prevent injury so they can continue to do activities they love. “Inspire Physical Therapy, where we come to you.”

The Inspire model provides you the unique opportunity to have individualized care in the privacy and comfort of your home or office. This model also allows Alan more time with each person to get his clients back to 100% and reach their goals. Alan is a sports enthusiast and specializes in golf, running, cycling and sports movement.

530.205.3719 WWW.INSPIREPTCHICO.COM 10

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Cottonparty carries women’s clothing in sizes small through large (4-16), with leatherextra gloves an emphasis on natural fiber and clothing jackets made in thealpaca U.S.A. It also has a wide variety of jewelry and accessories. cashmere socks & sweaters

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Jeeptrail is the screen print shop that loves innovative design, off-the-wall graphics and creative people. Owner and artist Tom Little is Chico’s small local printer inspired by small businesses, musicians, educators and creative customers. Little’s background includes: working rock musician, designing and creating skateboards and snowboards for professional athletes, and display fabrication for national retail brands. He expanded his T-shirt printing knowledge working for a leading manufacturer of graphic apparel. Producing over one million shirts annually was a highlight of his 25 years of print and production experiences.

His passion for the arts, small businesses, local artists, community organizations, musicians and bands brought him back to artistic roots to pursue his mission: making your image as good as it gets. Why the name Jeeptrail? … you’ll have to ask Tom.

701 WEST 11TH AVENUE | CHICO 530.415.6244 | WWW.JEEPTRAILPRINT.COM


Some local bars rely on live performances to attract customers, yet crowds of people present a potential concern coming off a pandemic. Pictured, clockwise from left: Jenny Don’t & The Spurs play a pre-pandemic show at The Maltese; the outdoor stage/soundsystem at Argus is revamped and ready for shows; the Pub Scouts—longstanding Duffy’s Friday happy hour performers—are set to return to the bar in late June.

NIGHTLIFE C O N T I N U E D

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for the safety of employees and patrons, he decided in March of last year that the bar would remain closed indefinitely. It just reopened in May with limited capacity (patrons are seated on the outdoor patio) and limited hours. “That put us in an awkward position for the most easily accessible, forgivable loans—the PPP [Paycheck Protection Program] loan,” he said of the decision to stay closed. “We would’ve been on the hook to pay employees, and pay them more than they would make on unemployment, with nothing for them to do. With the set of rules ever-changing, the risk factor of going that route and then not having the loan forgiven was too high.” Lombardi said the bar had been closed for several

months before receiving its first bit of aid, a $10,000 grant from the California Small Business Association. The business also received an EIDL (Economic Injury Disaster Loan) loan—which must be paid back, with interest. As expenses never stopped mounting, Lombardi said that money was spent swiftly after it arrived. Considering the bar’s commitment to the Chico community, Lombardi said he found it extra painful The Maltese was excluded from the first round of aid given to 80 local businesses from the Aaron Rodgers Small Business COVID-19 Fund, operated by the North Valley Community Foundation. Though some bars were included in that batch, they had to serve food to be eligible. “That whole prohibition

“I’m hoping that aid [Shuttered Venue Operator Grant] will dig me out of the massive hole I’m sitting at the bottom of.” —Archer Lombardi, owner, The Maltese

element of some of the funding really rubbed me the wrong way,” he said. The Maltese was included in a second round of businesses awarded money from the Rodgers’ fund, for which Lombardi said he is “100 percent grateful.” As of press time, Lombardi was eagerly awaiting the results of a Shuttered Venue

Operators Grant. Though hopeful, he described that application process as “another rigmarole” complete with website bugs, unexpected date changes and conflicting messages regarding the status of his application. “I’m hoping that aid will dig me out of the massive hole I’m sitting at the bottom of,”

Lombardi said. In separate interviews, two of Lombardi’s fellow local bar owners—Scott Baldwin of Argus Bar + Patio and Doug Roberts of Duffy’s Tavern— shared similar pandemic frustrations and the measures they took to survive. NIGHTLIFE C O N T I N U E D

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Both bars availed themselves of PPP loans, and both opened to some extent during the pandemic. Both also suffered substantial losses and are holding out hope that business returns with the June 15 reopening. Roberts said his first attempt at opening, last summer, was “an absolute nightmare.” “It was so restrictive, and working within the boundaries was impossible,” he added. “We had to serve food, so we partnered with [Main Street Pizza]. We were inside, with tables spread far out. “Usually, you just walk up to a bartender, order a drink, they make it and that’s that. But at that point, the bartender took a food and drink order, ran the order next door, went back to pick up the food and then served it. … The amount of labor for every order was just ridiculous. “Even though we had the PPP money, it just didn’t work out,” Roberts continued. “One day I ran the numbers, walked downstairs and said, ‘Last call. That’s it, we’re out.’” Duffy’s also delivered drink and cocktail makings locally, a model that Argus’ Baldwin dug even deeper into. “I actually bought a liquor store license so that I could launch an e-commerce site,” Baldwin said. With that, he started a monthly subscription site selling the necessary liquor and mixers to make craft cocktails, called the Argus Monster Crate (argusmon stercrate.com). The boxes are being shipped out for their eighth month to about 140 subscribers. Baldwin said he would need 500 to 1,000 subscribers to be truly successful; he’s committed to the new venture.

Back on stage Lombardi said his entire staff—which was already “small and like a family”— have returned since The Maltese opened its patio on weekends. He’s also hired two servers to facilitate the current setup, in which patrons are

“Even though we had the PPP money, it just didn’t work out ... One day I ran the numbers, walked downstairs and said, ‘Last call. That’s it, we’re out.’” —Doug Roberts, owner, Duffy’s Tavern

Top: Before COVID, band’s like Chico-based Radio Relapse enjoyed up-close interaction with the audience at The Maltese. What the future hold for live performances at the bar is uncertain. PHOTO BY KEN PORDES

Right: Pre-June 15, Duffy’s Tavern is open with outdoor seating and a reduced number of indoor tables. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

met at the door, led to the patio and served drinks. “I’m really hoping people will come out to support us, and to enjoy a cocktail on the patio, but what it boils down to is that’s not us … we’re a venue.” Although indoor gatherings will be allowed as of June 15, Lombardi said The Maltese will proceed with caution. He’s considering requiring vaccine cards for indoor events but realizes that’s a controversial and complicated undertaking. “We’re not going to do anything that makes staff or patrons feel unsafe,” he said. “Until all NIGHTLIFE C O N T I N U E D

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THE ALLIES PUB The Allies Pub is a British-themed pub hidden away in the heart of downtown Chico off of 5th Street. Walk through the courtyard next to the Bank of America parking lot, guarded by three horse heads, and you’ll be transported back to Victorian London. The beautiful patio with ivy-covered brick walls is naturally shaded by mature trees. The pub decor is reminiscent of British pubs and includes traditional hand-pulled beer engines.

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my employees are on board, we’re going to be safe and continue to watch out for community.” After restrictions on outdoor seating were loosened last year, Duffy’s secured a couple of parklets—sections of sidewalk and street for picnic tables set up behind road barriers—which Roberts said has been a boon to business in recent months. “We’re getting a lot of familiar faces back out and some new people have been showing up … weekends have been going well,” he said. “We owe a lot of that to the outdoor seating, which I hope we can continue.” Roberts said he’s inquired with the city, but has yet to receive a definitive answer, about whether outdoor seating will continue, but said doing so will require permits from both the city of Chico and the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Regarding live entertainment, Duffy’s manager Scott Barwick said the bar plans to start phasing weekly live musical performances by the Pub Scouts back into the schedule by the end of June and Wednesday Dance Nights in July. In order to stay afloat during the pandemic, Argus Bar + Patio started Monster Crate, a subscription service featuring home-delivered craft cocktail kits.

KNOCKOUT COLLISION REPAIR

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The first evening concert there will be held July 10, featuring locals The Empty Gate and Bay Area band Cindy. Barwick said there will likely be lessened capacity and restrictions on some level but that it’s too early to say what those might be. As for Baldwin at Argus, even with his ambitious delivery venture, his main focus is on the brick-andmortar bar’s future. Like Lombardi, he’s spent a lot of money and tremendous effort in recent years to establish the bar—especially its back patio area—as a music venue. He said at the time of the shutdown, Argus was hosting 60 shows a year and building momentum. When California opens up fully, he said the Argus is ready to rock. “They lift restrictions the 15th and our first show [with Pat Hull] is booked for the 17th,” he said. The concerts will be outdoors, and many restrictions—like masks— will be done. “We’ve taken this whole thing very seriously,” Baldwin said about the bar’s adherence to state mandates during the pandemic. “We’ll keep up the cleaning and a slightly less occupancy, but as for the rest … it’s all going away.” Ω FOR MORE BUSINESS, SEE

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BUSINESS

AS USUAL?

SHOT LOTTERY

In an effort to encourage people to get vaccinated against COVID-19, the state of California is offering big cash prizes and $50 vouchers. The $116.5 million “Vax for the Win” campaign was announced May 27. On June 15—the day the state will remove most COVID-related restrictions—10 randomly selected people who’ve received a vaccine shot will win $1.5 million each. Additionally, 30 people will win $50,000 prizes (15 each on June 4 and June 11). Furthermore, the first two million people vaccinated after May 27 will get $50 online spending cards or grocery vouchers. Winners must be at least 12 years old, live in California, not be incarcerated and have at least one vaccine shot; prizes will be awarded after winners finish their vaccine series. Visit buttecounty.net/ph/ COVID19/vaccine or myturn.ca.gov to book a vaccination appointment.

CITY PENSION BOND Q&A

As the city of Chico considers refinancing its pension debt with bonds, officials will bring the issue to citizens Tuesday afternoon (June 8, 2 p.m.) in a public informational meeting at City Council Chambers, also streamed online. The city’s employee pension obligation through the state is over $140 million with a 7 percent interest rate, according to Chico Administrative Services Director Scott Dowell. The City Council voted April 26 to start the legal process required to issue bonds to pay off part or all of that amount at a lower interest rate. The city contracted with both a law firm and a consulting firm specializing in pension obligation bonds; the latter will conduct the informational meeting. Tuesday’s session—set for two hours, in person and online via the city’s website, chico.ca.gov—will provide what City Manager Mark Orme told the CN&R by email is “an opportunity for the community to learn, ask questions and engage over the prospects of such a bond.” Orme (pictured) added that city officials have not decided whether to pursue this course: “The City of Chico continues to evaluate what options may be financially prudent to help manage through the pension obligations the city faces over the next decade.” 16

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New way of doing business Some adaptations made during pandemic prove beneficial to workers—and employers—as economy starts to fully reopen by

Ashiah Scharaga as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

W Build with Ferguson (build.com) transitioned all of its employees to a hen the COVID-19 pandemic began,

work-from-home model. It was an intensive process, General Manager Bryce Koch told the CN&R via a Microsoft Teams video meeting. Build’s IT team

worked 12 hours a day for two weeks to help get more than 600 associates set up and ready to go. Like many businesses, Build, an online-based home improvement retailer, made this move to keep employees safe and follow governmental restrictions put in place at the height of the pandemic. However, even as those restrictions have lifted, Build has kept its office on Otterson Drive in Chico vacant. The pandemic allowed Build to

expand in many ways, making infrastructure upgrades to physical office space as well as creating more workfrom-home positions. A major focus of these upgrades includes features to make remote work more efficient and effective, while enabling smoother connections for virtual meetings. The company also kept on-demand physical work spaces for employees to operate on a hybrid schedule, working in the office part of the week and the rest from their home.


Fight The Bite!

Left: Amy Velazquez, director of business services for the Alliance for Workforce Development, works from her home office during the pandemic. PHOTO COURTESY OF AMY VELAZQUEZ

Right: Bryce Koch, general manager of Build with Ferguson, says his team found many benefits in working remotely. PHOTO COURTESY OF BUILD WITH FERGUSON

Build isn’t the only employer making changes. The pandemic has altered how people are conducting business in Butte County, and it hasn’t all been negative. Companies and public agencies have implemented schedule flexibility and remote work opportunities. Some have offered higher wages. Leaders in the business community see this shift as beneficial for employers in the long run, too, and say many of the changes are likely here to stay, even as the last of the pandemic’s restrictions are lifted. For Build, the pandemic brought with it a significant increase in demand for its products and services. At first, people sought protective equipment and freezers, then home goods and décor. “Early on it was more preparing for an unknown world,” Koch said, “then it shifted to upgrading and improving [the] living space.” Even with this increase in work load, the company experienced an increase in productivity from its employees in their Build with Ferguson set up employees with home work stations. While the Chico office will reopen next month, employees have the option to continue working from home. PHOTO COURTESY OF BUILD WITH FERGUSON

• AVOID DAWN AND DUSK • DRAIN STANDING WATER • WEAR REPELLENT new work-from-home environments. An overwhelming majority have expressed a desire to continue working from home in some capacity, Koch said. They have enjoyed having more freedom to structure their day and space. “All companies are looking at how their workforce can work, and they’re moving to that more adaptive, flexible environNEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D

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Butte County Director of Child Support Services Sean Farrell has used Zoom and video recordings to keep his department connected during the pandemic. Teleworking has worked well for the county, with productivity increasing by 38 percent in one division. PHOTO COURTESY OF SEAN FARRELL

decided to return to the office as pandemic restrictions were lifted. It’s not only been a popular option for employees, it’s worked well for the county, Farrell said. Job performance from March 2020 through April 2021 improved by 38 percent in the operations division, which includes case managers. Shelby Boston, director of the county’s Department of Employment and Social Services, has seen similar positive changes within her department when it comes to productivity, as well. She actually began gearing up to shift divisions of her department, such as its call center, to remote work even before the pandemic. Her team had conducted staff surveys and began drafting a work-from-home Flex office policy. When the pandemic hit, “it basically Similar to what Build experienced, when fast-tracked our implementation plan,” she the COVID-19 pandemic began, Butte said. County offices had to adapt quickly. Boston said that overall, many employTeleworking allowed the county to ees have felt supcontinue to provide ported throughout the essential services pandemic, and having safely, according to “All companies the ability to continue Sheri Waters, director from home are looking at how working of human resources. has played an imporThe county adopted a their workforce tant role. voluntary teleworking “They find it’s policy that has no suncan work, and helped them with their set date—and will conwork-life balance, they’re moving tinue to explore remote and they appreciate work options moving to that more not having to come in forward, Waters said, adaptive, flexible every day physically “because of the posito the office, and they tive feedback we’ve environment, feel they get a lot more gotten from employees work done when they and from some departand we’ll be are working remotely,” ments.” she said. doing the same. In Child Support Boston has appreciServices, for example, This is not a ated the flexibility, as which is made up of well. She has a son short-term 100 employees, 75 perin high school who cent of the department change.” doesn’t drive, and shifted to working from busing isn’t available —Bryce Koch, general manager, home, according to where they live. She Build with Ferguson Director Sean Farrell. has worked remotely Only about 5 percent ment, and we’ll be doing the same,” Koch told the CN&R. “This is not a short-term change.” The Chico Chamber of Commerce is hearing similar things from its members. Chamber President/CEO Katy Thoma said companies have shared with the chamber that having their workforce at home has increased productivity, and some are eyeing cost savings long-term by potentially reducing their commercial office space. (Many are waiting until life stabilizes before making that call, she added.) “So it’s really been a win-win, not only for the worker but also for the company as well,” Thoma said.

Rushing Around Town… CIOPPINO AND BOLAWRAPS

What is the connection between a spicy Italian tomato and fish soup with a “less than lethal” life-saving tool used by police departments throughout the country? Drones vs. BolaWrap? In April 2021, Chico Police Chief Madden accepted the donation of $26,000 to purchase five drones and related equipment. These donations came from Chicoans who raised money from an Italian Cioppino dinner. In January of this year, I offered a $5,000 donation to Chief Madden, Mayor Coolidge, and Manager Orme, to purchase four BolaWraps together with BolaWrap training for CPD. The BolaWrap is a proven non-lethal tool used by police departments across California. This tool saves lives, check out the YouTube videos of the BolaWrap in action. The BolaWrap could have saved Tyler Rushing’s life. Why is my donation ofthis life-saving device being ignored? So far, no response from Madden or any city official. Isn’t it time for Chico police to employ nonlethal tools to dis-arm and or de-escalate police confrontations? PS: Over 56,000 viewers, worldwide, have watched the video of my son Tyler Rushing being killed in Chico on July 23,2017. The video link is below.

https://youtu.be/gEBwhGF7KA0

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The Comeback! After a year of loss, the CN&R’s annual celebration of all the good stuff in Chico is ready to come back. The reopening of the state has begun, and local businesses, our community and this newspaper are off to the races.

2021

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OF CHICO ADVERTISERS: To be a part of this event, please contact us at chicobestof@newsreview.com

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chicobestof.com Vote from July 1 – Sept. 5


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NAVIGATE TODAY’S LEGAL CHALLENGES

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Shelby Boston, director of Butte County’s Department of Employment and Social Services, says that many employees have felt supported throughout the pandemic, and that having the ability to continue working from home has played an important role. CN&R FILE PHOTO

twice a week during the school year to be able to drive him to and from campus. “That would have never been something I would have been able to do [before],” she said. The shift has translated into cost savings as well. The department cut $200,000 from its travel budget this year—many staff trainings and management meetings hosted outside the county, for example, became virtual. The county directed that surplus back to employees, allowing them to participate in a vacation buy-back program.

Incentive plans Another pandemic-inspired change for the better is the offering of higher wages/ better benefits packages, according to Amy Velazquez, director of business services for the Alliance for Workforce Development. Velazquez and her team provide jobseekers with training and resources to help them gain employment. They assist businesses, too, providing them with job development support and subsidies to train new hires. All of these services are free to clients, funded by the California Employment Development Department and the U.S. Department of Labor. The Alliance for Workforce Development has been very busy lately because everybody is hiring and nobody can find candidates, Velazquez told the CN&R via telephone from her home

office. One way the organization has helped connect employers and job seekers is by providing wage subsidies to support training. For example, they might have a welder who has successfully completed a job program, she said, but doesn’t have field experience. The organization could offer to pay a prospective employer half of that person’s wages for their first six months on the job. This helps make the investment more attractive for employers, she said. In the current job market, employers have had to be more competitive, Velazquez said. As a result, she has seen small companies offer entry-level positions starting at $15 per hour that typically would have been listed at $13 an hour pre-pandemic. Those same companies are offering pay increases in three to six months based on job performance, she said. “They’re offering a much more competitive wage, I think, in response to the pandemic and sheer need for staff,” she said. “I’ve seen a lot of employers be more flexible with their schedules, with their benefits package and paid time off, just to try to make it as lucrative as possible.” However, Velazquez said unemployed workers shouldn’t wait too long to enter the market. “We do project that as vaccines roll out and other things end—mask mandates, reopening restrictions, rent moratorium, additional $300 in weekly [unemployment] benefits, extensions, and [limits on] schools reopening full-time—there will be a large increase in unemployed [individuals] suddenly rushing to hit the job market,” she said. The wage increases might be tough on small local businesses at first but will be more beneficial for everyone in the long run, Velazquez said, resulting in “happier workplaces [and] more loyal employees” ultimately creating a more productive work environment with less turnover. “I know that that’s hard on a lot of businesses and there’s a lot of pushback, but in the big picture, we’re seeing employers offer more sustainable wages, which for us is our goal,” she said. “Employees are getting paid wages that with our housing prices are a little more promising.” Ω

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AS USUAL?

Healthy outlook Full reopening prompts cautious optimism about medical impact by

Evan Tuchinsky evant@ n ewsrev iew.c om

ByearsMadison Bear Garden. Fifteen ago, he worked in the randon Keith has deep roots at

kitchen, in view of customers who ordered burgers and fries from a window overlooking the grills before heading to the bar to get drinks. The Bear has long been an 24

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up close and personal business— much like its sister restaurant Mom’s, catty-corner across Salem and West Second streets. COVID-19 changed that. Upon reopening after last spring’s shutdown, the Bear made adjustments beyond the prescriptions laid out by Butte County and state officials for hygiene and seating. Patrons placed food and drink orders with a bartender separated from them by a plexiglass shield. Facemasked servers brought food to tables outside.

A cordon of other tables for to-go orders and delivery services kept visitors distanced from the kitchen window. The restaurant relaxed some of the stricter measures as the county moved through the tier system: Diners once again claim their meals from the kitchen crew and no longer must follow a defined path to minimize contact with others. Other measures remain, such as one-stop ordering at the bar and heightened sanitation. Keith—chief financial

officer for the Bear and Mom’s the past 10 years—said these and modifications including touchless mobile pay are now ingrained. “We’re going to continue as we have since March of 2020 to follow the local health officials, the state health officials and the federal health mandates,” Keith said. “Some of the things [both restaurants changed] have been for the better.” New ‘rules’:

The California Department of Public Health has established the following framework for the June 15 reopening: Capacity—no restrictions Physical distancing—no minimums Face coverings—as set by CDPH and CDC guidelines Vaccine/COVID-negative verification— mandatory for indoor mega events (5,000+), recommended for outdoor mega events (10,000+) Go to cdph.ca.gov for more information.

Chico’s Saturday Farmers Market draws a mixed response, during the noon hour May 22, to its request that patrons wear face coverings. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

When state officials allow the economy to fully reopen June 15, restaurants and other businesses anticipate essentially taking the COVID-safety practices they’ve employed for months to a larger scale. As of yet, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has not radically changed requirements (see infobox); nor has Butte County Public Health, which by policy takes its cues from CDPH and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Cal/ OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) is expected to release revised COVID-19 protocols for workplaces in the next few days. Local health officials approach the reopening with cau-


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Homeowners Insurance tious optimism. “As things open up, I encourage people to get out there and enjoy themselves and see people they haven’t been able to see or congregate with for a while,” County Public Health Director Danette York told the CN&R by phone. “But be careful about it and don’t go to the extremes. If you’re going to be in a crowd, wear your face coverings— even if you’re vaccinated, take that extra precaution—and keep your social distancing going…. We want Dr. Marcia Nelson, family practice physician and Enloe Medical Center’s vice president of medical affairs, says vaccination is key for this reopening. CN&R FILE PHOTO

to not revert back and have another surge. Protect yourself and your community by doing those mitigations.” Gov. Gavin Newsom made his order for reopening the economy contingent on vaccination access, COVID cases and hospitalization rates. As of May 29, before Memorial weekend, Butte County had 12,017 residents contract coronavirus since the start of the pandemic, 189 of whom died, including a young adult last week. Public Health reported 434 new cases in 30 days, on par with the previous 30 days’ total (437). The county had ranked among

Like other downtown Chico restaurants during the pandemic, Madison Bear Garden moved some seating to open-air parklets set up behind traffic barricades, supplementing patio tables. PHOTO COURTESY OF MADISON BEAR GARDEN

the state’s top 10 in vaccination rates early this year but, after that initial rush, slipped to bottom half. Approximately a third of Butte County residents are fully vaccinated and just under 40 percent have gotten one dose. That number may be well short of the population projection for communal protection known as herd immunity (see “Shot at normalcy?” on chico.newsreview.com), which NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D

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NEWSLINES

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

is generally accepted as around 75 percent. However, having anyone vaccinated represents a key difference from previous attempts at reopening, when subsequent surges led state officials to reimpose restrictions. “I’m cautiously optimistic, but that all depends on how people embrace getting COVID vaccines,” said Dr. Marcia Nelson, a family practice physician in Chico and Enloe Medical Center’s vice president of medical affairs. “The COVID vaccines have proven to be extraordinarily effective; they’re also very, very safe. “We owe it to ourselves and we owe it to our community—we owe it to the people that we love—to get our vaccines.”

Seeking clarity The biggest health-related concern for restaurants and retailers has been uncertainty. The Bear’s Keith, and Katy Thoma, president/ CEO of the Chico Chamber of Commerce, both said that businesses have found themselves on shifting sands due to fast-issued updates. They feel more confident approaching June 15, with the caveat of the past year. “I think now it’s pretty clear nothing is going to change until June 15,” Thoma said by phone, “but that’s a few weeks. We’re not sure of anything. But I don’t think things are going to change all that much operationally.” With the chamber serving as a conduit of information from Public Health to businesses, Thoma has kept current on the regulations and in contact with business owners. She’s had no significant revisions to communicate in months, she said, and local establishments have relayed few concerns ahead of the reopening. Keith anticipates questions about face coverings in particular, since California, including Butte County, continued the face-covering mandate after the CDC relaxed its recommendation last month. (Check buttecounty.net/ publichealth/buttereopens for the latest.) “We’ve experienced confusion, depending

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Brandon Keith, chief financial officer of Madison Bear Garden and Mom’s, says the Bear in particular has adapted its frontof-house operations to meet COVID-safety protocols. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

on the customer, the last 15-plus months,” Keith said. “That’s nobody’s fault other than there’s changing information daily. So, I would expect that there will continue to be confusion; our goal is just to communicate to our employees and to our guests, as nicely as possible and as clearly as possible, what the current operating environment is.” Worse than confusion, though, is reversion. Keith said he hopes the June 15 reopening sticks—that there isn’t another shutdown or constriction. “Those experiences are more painful,” he added, “starting and stopping.” Health officials obviously want to avoid that dire condition as well. Dr. Linda Lewis, Butte County Public Health’s epidemiologist, told the CN&R that she’s concerned about the impacts of another surge. “The more cases we have, the more likely we’re going to have variants emerge that may be more difficult to deal with,” she said, “and the more likely we are to lose people.” Nelson said Enloe already has surge scenarios in place and, come the reopening, patients at the hospital and its clinics should notice no difference in procedures. She also noted that surges have tended to follow two weeks from broad exposure, such as a holiday. She’d already marked her mental calendar to check case numbers after Memorial Day weekend and the Fourth of July—now she’s adding June 15 to her list. “It’s like you’re standing at the ocean watching the waves come in,” Nelson said, adding: “We can do it right or we can do it wrong, this reopening. Doing it right means getting our vaccines—otherwise we’re leaving ourselves vulnerable and running the risk of spreading serious, often lethal illness to people we care about. So we can do it right or Ω we can do it wrong.”


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COVID 19 has been stressful for many of us in Butte County as well as for many others around the world. Stress over a prolonged period of time can cause or make worse pre-existing conditions people might have as well. As a result, people can experience a significant increase in mental health challenges (anger, depression, anxiety, and fear) as well as increased substance use (drugs and or alcohol). If you or someone that you know is struggling with any of these issues there is help available. Reaching out for help is not a sign of personal failure or weakness. It is the right thing to do. Every day, millions of people face challenges related to mental health and substance use. You are not alone, and we are here to help. Butte County Behavioral Health has a mission to "Partner with individuals, families and the community for recovery from serious mental health and substance use issues and to promote wellness, resiliency and hope."

Now, more than ever, it is critical to pay attention to your mental wellness. If you or a loved one would like more information on local treatment and services, dial 2-1-1 to speak with someone for assistance.

Need help? If you have Medi-Cal and are interested in accessing services with Behavioral Health for mental health or substance use treatment or if you are in crisis: Please call our Access line (available 7 days a week 24 hours a day). 800.334.6622 or 530.891.2810 Services are provided in Chico, Paradise, Oroville, Gridley. Support can be provided by phone, video, or in-person Additional resources are also available at buttecounty.net/ behavioralhealth

800.334.6622 or 530.891.2810 www.buttecounty.net/behavioralhealth/

JUNE 3, 2021

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Arts &Culture THE LADIES FOURSOME: See Thurs., June 3. Sat, 6/5, 2pm. $20. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicothe atercompany.com

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT Fridays all summer Chico City Plaza

June 11: Big Mo & the Full Moon Band PHOTO BY KEN PORDES

OFF THE RECORD: Local pop/rock cover band live. Limited capacity. Sat, 6/5. Free. Meram Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

SUN6 STEVEN SCHULTZ: Local pop/folk/country. Sun, 6/6, 3pm. Free. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120. simpletix.com

TUE8 TRIVIA: Weekly trivia on the back patio hosted by Cameron Ford/Dillon Collins. Sign up at 5:30pm. Tue, 6/8, 6pm. Free. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

WED9 OPEN MIC COMEDY AT STUDIO INN: Weekly open mic, signups at 7pm. Wed, 6/9, 8pm. The Studio Inn Lounge, 2582

JUNE ALL MONTH Art 1078 GALLERY: Call for art: Chico Print Party. Gallery is

accepting submissions for the upcoming exhibition, which celebrates all things print. Through 7/2. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

CHICO ART CENTER: California Contemporary Sculpture, work by 20 Californians juried by Bay Area artist and educator Linda Fleming. Through 6/20. 450 Orange St. chicoartcen ter.com

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Stitching California, works from

over 40 artists working in California and neighboring states highlight our state’s natural beauty in all of its glory—including its darker side: drought, flood and fire. Through 6/5. 625 Esplanade. csuchico.edu

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Pride Art Show, featur-

ing a wide variety of local queer, trans, and allied artists’ works. Reception: 6/4, 6-9pm. Through 6/9. Also: Safe Haven, a group show on our sense of space and the complex social issues surrounding homelessness. June 10-Aug. 1. Opening reception: 6/10, 5:30-8pm. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

Esplanade.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: The downtown community event

is back! Farm-fresh produce, local arts and crafts, food trucks, downtown restaurants, and music from local artists. Thursdays, 6pm. Downtown Chico. downtownchico.com

THU3 DRAWN TO CHICO: Join Open Studios artists in sketching downtown Chico cityscapes. Next up: the City Plaza. Bring your own materials to sketch. Traditional and digital media welcome. Thu, 6/3, 6pm. chicoartcenter.com

THE LADIES FOURSOME: A fast-paced comedy about three

close friends and a stranger bonding over a round of golf after attending a mutual friend’s funeral. Thu, 6/3, 7:30pm. $20. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Weekly open mic hosted by Dillon Collins. Thu, 6/3, 8pm. The Lab Bar & Grill, 250 Cohasset Road.

SUPER TROOPERS AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 2001 crime comedy. Thu, 6/3, 8:30pm. $25-$35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

TRIVIA NIGHT: Teams of up to five compete for intellectual dominance and glory. Hosted by Joe Griffith. Thu, 6/3, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave. thecommonschico.com

Events FARMERS MARKETS: Butte County’s markets are open and sell-

ing fresh produce and more. Chico: Downtown (Saturdays, 7:30am-1pm & Thursdays, 6-9pm); North Valley Plaza (Wednesdays, 8am-1pm); Chico State University Farm (Fridays, noon-4 p.m.). Paradise: Alliance Church (Tuesdays, 7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; “Farmers Market Mobile” in Paradise, 1397 South Park Drive (Thursdays, 2pm).

PLANT GIVEAWAY AND SALE: Plants are available for purchase,

but free for veterans and their families. All proceeds help to sustain the Veterans Garden Project. Pub Scouts will be playing Celtic music on Saturdays. Sat., 9am, at Third & Flume and Sun., 9am, AG Mart (1334 Park Ave.). 530-2281308. veteransgardenproject.org

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CHICO PRIDE – ART SHOW RECEPTION: Opening celebration for group art show. Fri, 6-9pm. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

THE CROODS – A NEW AGE AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 2020 ani-

mated comedy starring Cloris Leachman, Clark Duke, Ryan Reynolds, Nicolas Cage and Emma Stone. Fri, 6/4, 8:30pm. $25 - $35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

DJ COOTDOG & DJ LOIS: Music, booze, and food from Golden State Smokery. Fri, 6/4, 9pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave. thecommonschico.com

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERTS: Live local music every week at the

City Plaza. This week: classic rock and country covers with The Retrotones. Fri, 6/4, 7pm. Free. Chico City Plaza, 132 W. Fourth St.. downtownchico.com

THE LADIES FOURSOME: See Thurs., June 3. Fri, 6/4, 7:30pm. $20. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

LOW FLYING BIRDS: Live, local outlaw bluegrass at the Barn. Fri, 6/4, 5pm. Free. The Barn at Meriam Park, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

SOUL POSSE: Local cover band. Fri, 6/4, 6pm. Free. Secret

Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120. 828-8040. simpletix.com

Multiple venues

2412 Park Ave. thecommonschico.com

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Weekly open mic hosted by Dillon Collins. Thu, 6/10, 8pm. The Lab Bar & Grill, 250 Cohasset Road. CHICO PRIDE – MOVIE NIGHT & DRAG BINGO: Bingo, refreshments, merch and a screening of To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar. Thu, 6/10, 8:30pm. $25-$35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

FRI11 DJ COOTDOG & DJ LOIS: Music, booze and food from Golden State Smokery. Fri, 6/11, 9pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave. thecommonschico.com

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERTS: Live local music every week at the

City Plaza. This week: blues and southern rock with Big Mo & The Full Moon Band. Fri, 6/11, 7pm. Free. Chico City Plaza, 132 W. Fourth St.. downtownchico.com

HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER’S STONE AT THE DRIVE IN: The first film in the fantasy series, starring Daniel Radcliffe. Fri, 6/11, 8:30pm. $25-$35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

SAT5

SAT12

AFTER THIS JAZZ: Live jazz by Shigemi Minetaka and Gary

GOLD NUGGET CRAFT FAIRE: A variety of crafts by artisans

Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

June 4-10 & June 26

MUSIC BINGO: It’s exactly what it sounds like: bingo with music. Thu, 6/10, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium,

RODEO FLAT: Local country/Americana trio. Fri, 6/11, 9pm. $5.

BLACKOUT BETTY: Local cover band. Sat, 6/5, 9pm. $5. Tackle

CHICO PRIDE 2021

THU10

TYLER DEVOLL: The local singer/songwriter serenades the brunch crowd. Fri, 6/4, 5pm. Free. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Bourg of After This Jazz with a special guest. Reservations via the pub website are recommended due to limited seating. Sat, 6/5, 1pm. Free. The Allies Pub, 426 Broadway, Ste. 130. britishbulldogbrewery.com/the-allies-pub.html

FLUME STREET MARKET: Local arts, crafts and live music

on the corner of 8th and Flume streets. Hosted by Wellspring Art Collective and Chico Art Studio. Saturdays, 11am. Chico Art Studio, 740 Flume St.

FRI4

BLU EGYPTIAN: Release party for debut CD by local jam crew. Sat, 6/5, 6pm. The Union, 2053 Montgomery St., Oroville.

THE ITALIAN JOB AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 2003 heist film starring Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron, Donald Sutherland and Jason Statham. Sat, 6/5, 8:30pm. $25-$35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

from all over the West, plus an assortment of food vendors. Sat, 6/12, 8pm. paradiseprpd.com

OCEAN’S ELEVEN AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 2001 heist film starring George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Don Cheadle,

Andy García, Bernie Mac and Julia Roberts. Sat, 6/12, 8:30pm. $25 - $35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

SAMARIA & PAUL: Live tunes by the local duo. Reservations

via the pub website are recommended due to limited seating. Sat, 6/12, 1pm. Free. The Allies Pub, 420 Broadway, Ste. 130. britishbulldogbrewery.com/the-allies-pub.html

TOWNSHIP: Northern California country and blues tunes. Sat, 6/12, 9pm. Free. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.


IS YOUR EVENT ONLINE? 10:30am. $40-$50 (for four people, $5 each additional). Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, 335 W. Sacramento Ave. 891-3090. inspirechico.org

DJ COOTDOG & DJ LOIS: Music, booze and food from Golden State Smokery. Fri, 6/25, 9pm. The Commons Social

GOOD OL’ BOYZ: Country rap/rock. Sat, 6/19, 9pm. Tackle Box,

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERTS: Live local music every week at the

379 E. Park Ave.

THEATRE ON THE POND: See Friday, June 19. Sat, 6/19, 6:30pm. $100. Chapelle de L’Artiste Chateau & Retreat, 3300 Inspiration Lane, Paradise. totr.org

SUN20 TWO SKIES WIDE: Local singer/songwriter duo. Sun, 6/20, 3pm. Free. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St.,

June 18-19

Chapelle de L’Artiste

Ste. 120. simpletix.com

TUE22 TRIVIA: Weekly trivia on the back patio hosted by Cameron Ford/Dillon Collins. Sign up at 5:30pm. Tue, 6/22, 6pm. Free. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Suite 120. simpletix.com

WED23 OPEN MIC COMEDY AT STUDIO INN: Weekly open mic, sign-ups at 7pm. Wed, 6/23, 8pm. The Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

SUN13 JESI NAOMI CREATIVES: Northern California singer/songwriter. Sun, 6/13, 3pm. Free. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Suite 120. simpletix.com

TUE15 ALICE IN WONDERLAND: A student-written original production based on Lewis Carroll’s classic tale. Tue, 6/15, 10:30am. $40-$50 (for four people, $5 each additional).

Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, 335 W. Sacramento Ave. 891-3090. inspirechico.org

TRIVIA: Weekly trivia on the back patio hosted by Cameron Ford/Dillon Collins. Sign up at 5:30pm. Tue, 6/15, 6pm. Free. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

WED16

PAT HULL: Local singer/songwriter live on the back patio. Thu, 6/17. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St. TALLADEGA NIGHTS AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 2006 comedy starring Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly. Thu, 6/17, 8:30pm. $25-$35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark. com

TRIVIA NIGHT: Teams of up-to-five compete for intellectual dominance and glory. Hosted by Joe Griffith. Thu, 6/17, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave. thecommonschico.com

FRI18 ALICE IN WONDERLAND: See Tues., June 15. Fri, 6/18, 6pm & 8:30pm. $40-$50 (for four people, $5 each additional).

Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, 335 W. Sacramento Ave. 891-3090. inspirechico.org

BLACK PANTHER AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 2018 Marvel film starring Chadwick Boseman. Fri, 6/18, 8:30pm. $25-$35. Meriam

ALICE IN WONDERLAND: See Tues., June 15. Wed, 6/16, 10:30am. $40-$50 (for four people, $5 each additional).

OPEN MIC COMEDY AT STUDIO INN: Weekly open mic, sign-ups at 7pm. Wed, 6/16, 8pm. The Studio Inn Lounge, 2582

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERTS: Live local music every week at the City Plaza. This week: blues with Kevin Daly. Fri, 6/18, 7pm. Free. Chico City Plaza, 132 W. Fourth St.. down

PARTY IN THE PARK: A weekly summer celebration of com-

THEATRE ON THE POND: A two-night benefit for Theatre on the

Esplanade.

munity and commerce with live music, produce, craft and vendors. Wed, 6/16, 5:30pm. ParadiseChamber.com

THU17 ALICE IN WONDERLAND: See Tuesday, June 15. Thu, 6/17, 6pm. $40-$50 (for four people, $5 each additional). Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, 335 W. Sacramento Ave. 8913090. inspirechico.org

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Weekly open mic hosted by Dillon Collins. Thu, 6/17, 8pm. The Lab Bar & Grill, 250 Cohasset Road.

PARTY IN THE PARK: A weekly summer celebration of com-

munity and commerce with live music, produce, craft and vendors. Wed, 6/23, 5:30pm. ParadiseChamber.com

THU24 COMEDIAN CHAD OPITZ: Unwined hosts nationally touring Bay Area comedian. Thu, 6/24, 7pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

FIELD OF DREAMS AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 1989 drama starring Kevin Costner. Thu, 6/24, 8:30pm. $25-$35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

MUSIC BINGO: It’s exactly what it sounds like: bingo with music. Thu, 6/24, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave. thecommonschico.com

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Weekly open mic hosted by Dillon Collins. Thu, 6/24, 8pm. The Lab Bar & Grill, 250 Cohasset

Empourium, 2412 Park Ave. thecommonschico.com

City Plaza. This week: Eclectic rock, blues, soul, funk and jazz with the Chuck Epperson Jr. Band. Fri, 6/18, 7pm. Free. Chico City Plaza, 132 W. Fourth St.. down townchico.com

THE LOCO MOTIVE BAND: Live, local pop/rock covers. Fri, 6/25, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. THE GREATEST SHOWMAN AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 2017 musi-

cal drama starring Hugh Jackman, Zac Efron, Michelle

Williams, Rebecca Ferguson and Zendaya. Fri, 6/25, 8:30pm. $25 - $35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

SAT26 CHICO PRIDE – POP-UP FAIR & FESTIVAL: An outdoor celebration for Pride Month with coffee, music, drag performances and goods from local vendors. Sat, 6/26, 10am. Stonewall Alliance Center, 358 E. Sixth St.

CHICO PRIDE – TEEN PRIDE DANCE: An outdoor party in the parking lot with silent disco and carnival games. Sat, 6/26, 6pm. Stonewall Alliance Center, 358 E. Sixth St. MEN IN BLACK AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 1997 comedy starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Sat, 6/26, 8:30pm. $25-$35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark. com

YART SALE: Used donated items for sale to raise money for the museum. Sat, 6/26, 9am. Free. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. 343-9778. monca.org

TUE29 TRIVIA: Weekly trivia on the back patio hosted by Cameron Ford/Dillon Collins. Sign up at 5:30pm. Tue, 6/29, 6pm. Free. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

WED30 PARTY IN THE PARK: A weekly summer celebration of com-

munity and commerce with live music, produce, craft and vendors. Wed, 6/30, 5:30pm. ParadiseChamber.com

Road.

Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

DJ COOTDOG & DJ LOIS: Music, booze, and food from Golden State Smokery. Fri, 6/18, 9pm. The Commons Social

Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, 335 W. Sacramento Ave. 891-3090. inspirechico.org

FRI25

BIG DADDY AT THE DRIVE-IN: The 1999 Adam Sandler comedy. Sat, 6/19, 8:30pm. $25 - $35. Meriam Park Drive-In, 1930 Market Place. meriampark.com

THEATRE ON THE POND

So is the CN&R calendar! Submit virtual and real-world events for the online calendar as well as the monthly print edition at chico.newsreview.com/calendar

Empourium, 2412 Park Ave. thecommonschico.com

EDITOR’S PICK

SOUNDTRACK TO REOPENING

townchico.com

Ridge, with announcement of productions for the 2021 season. Gourmet picnic dinner with music by local singer/ songwriter duo, The Bidwells. Fri, 6/18, 6:30pm. $100. Chapelle de L’Artiste Chateau & Retreat, 3300 Inspiration Lane, Paradise. totr.org

TYLER DEVOLL: The local singer/songwriter serenades the brunch crowd. Fri, 6/18, 5pm. Free. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.. facebook.com

SAT19 ALICE IN WONDERLAND: See Tues., June 15. Sat, 6/19,

On June 15, California will fully reopen from the COVID-19 shutdown. As of press deadline, that means that Chico venues with live music will be allowed to operate without capacity restrictions. The restaurants and other venues that have already been open have a jump on most of the bars and nightclubs with

live entertainment, and this month’s packed calendar of music happening at La Salles, The Barn, Secret Trail Brewing Co., The Allies Pub, The Union and The Tackle Box proves those venues are more than ready to rock. Jesi Naomi Creatives, live at Secret Trail on June 13.

JUNE 3, 2021

CN&R

29


SCENE

Staging community Amid pandemic, California Regional Theatre focuses on kids programs and revitalizing a downtown space

TRegional there’s what the folks at California Theatre have been up to.

here are pandemic projects, and then

Executive Director Bob Maness and company haven’t been learning how to bake bread, they’ve been spending it. The local theater group hired Billson Construction and has used its state-mandated downtime remodeling the space vacated by the Blue Room Theatre, which was forced to move out as revenues disappeared due the coronavirus shutdown. Maness said that, between California Regional Theater (CRT) and the building’s owners, roughly $300,000 has been invested so far on by what will soon be Jason Cassidy called First Street j ason c @ Theatre. The restoranewsrev iew.c om tion includes opening up the main theater space to reveal the New season: large hall of the origCalifornia Regional inal Masonic Lodge Theatre will be announcing its upcoming season and adding a full bar later this month. Visit to create an events crtshows.com for center that will be updates. used by his company Bring Back the Arts: and can be rented out This feature is a part to other producers. of the Chico News & Over its nine Review’s Bring Back the years, CRT has Arts campaign, an interview series featuring the made a name for leaders of Butte County itself by putting arts and music venues on large-scale, discussing their efforts professional-theaterto recover from the caliber produccoronavirus pandemic. The Q&As are published in tions of Broadway the CN&R and broadcast musicals—such as during the Chico News Les Misérables and & Review radio show, Sweeney Todd—in Thursdays, 5-5:30 p.m., on KZFR, 90.1FM. the Center for the 30

CN&R

JUNE 3, 2021

Arts building on the Pleasant Valley High campus. The busy troupe was forced to put those regional shows, as well its smaller black-box productions, on hold due to COVID-19, and its expansive children’s theater program—made up of 200 or so students—dialed back its offerings to meet state requirements. All this meant that the new spot was able to get a lot of attention, and Maness is hopeful that it will be ready for a grand opening by the second week in September. With the smell of fresh paint strong in the air, the CN&R spoke to him in the transformed theater about the year that was and his hopes for a new future.

How did your company members respond to having to shut down due to the pandemic? We had just finished Little Women that February, so we hadn’t started our next regional show yet. So, we were OK as far as, “I don’t have to disappoint a lot of actors right now; I don’t have to cancel a show and do a lot of returns right now”—but our kids program was ongoing throughout the year,

Above: CRT produced Newsies at the Center for the Arts in fall of 2018. PHOTO BY JENNIFER REDEKER

Right: California Regional Theatre Executive Director Bob Maness stands in the main room of the new First Street Theatre, where the remodel of the former Blue Room black-box space is still in progress. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

and they were in the middle of Willie Wonka [& The Chocolate Factory], just having a blast. When it all hit, our hearts broke because these kids worked so hard and they were only about one month out from performance. There was nothing we could do. Even though that happened, it wasn’t but a week before our staff had gotten together and said, “What can we do? What’s next for us? What is possible?” It wasn’t about what we had, but what was possible. What was possible was doing Zoom with the kids. What was possible was—as we went further into less restrictions—doing classes spaced out with masks on, whether that was outside or it was inside. SCENE C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 3 2


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Clare Fisher Denise Fleming Laura Fletcher Steven Flowers Ramona Flynn Lorraine Forster Kris Foster Kristin Foster John & Janet Fournier Gary Francis Christopher Freemyers Dan Fregin Sandra Fricker Paul Friedlander Diane Friedman Stephen Fritter Lea Gadbois Marian Gage Mark & Cynthia Gailey Francine Gair Nicolette Gamache Celeste Garcia Matthew Garcia Maureen & Michael Garcia Bill Gardner Suzanne Garrett Kenneth Gates Nalani Geary Kim Gentry Cynthia Gerrie Scott Giannini Jesica Giannola Tovey Giezentanner Sharon Gillis David & Kathy Gipson Bradley Glanville Jay Goldberg Bryce Goldstein Diana Good Nancy Good Lucy & Richard Gould Judith Graves Diane Gray Jim Graydon Stephen Green Susan Green Sean Green David Guzzetti Linda Haddock James & Edith Haehn Deborah Halfpenny & Dan Eyde Kim Hamberg Bonny Hamilton Bonnie Hamilton Steven Hammond Matthew Hammons Linnea Hanson & Harold Carlson Jennifer Harris Lynn Haskell Jeannette Hassur Erik Havana Tom & Cheryl Hawk Alma Hayes Ryan Heimlich Kimberly Heines Jeri Heiser Judy Henderson Tyson Henry Christel Herda Ruben Heredia Rebecca Herring Reiner Scott Hodgkinson Terrence Hoffman Debra-Lou Hoffmann Janice Hofmann Andrew Holcombe

Kurt & Debra Holve Lindy Hoppough Leslie Howard Scott Howard Minjhing Hsieh Dennis Huff Susan Hughes Roger & Nancy Hull Debra Humes Dr. Ralph Huntsinger David Hurst Cathy Inzer Kathryn Jackson Richard & Giovanna Jackson Jake Jacobson John James Jeanette Jassur William Jennings Mary Jeppson Tony Jewett Brian Johnson Dan Johnson Janet Johnson Jim & Mary Johnson Leslie Johnson Megan Johnson Sharon Johnson George Johnston Thomas Jordan Timothy Jordan Jo Ellen Kaiser Alexandra Karacosta Robert Karch Stephen Kasprzyk Jennifer Kasza Henry & Logan Katka Dan Katz Ann Kauffman Annie Kavanagh So Keehn Beth Kelly Steve Kennedy Mark Kernes Judy Keswick Elizabeth Kieszkowski Zack Kincheloe Cheryl King Diana King Darlene Kirby Jeanine Kitchel Lana Kitchel Roger Klaves Ladona Knigge Marilyn Knox Bill Knudsen Lauren Kohler Larry & Maureen Krik Carol Krok John Kuhn Wendy Kuo Gary Kupp Michelle Ladcani

Nicole Lagrave Mark & Tomoko Lance Lisa Langley Steve Larned Frank Larose Scott Laursen Daniel Law Jana Lawton Jean Lebaron Tim Leefeldt Patricia Lennon Sarah Lerda Fredrick Lester David Lewis Kate Leyden D. & K. Lieberman Jeff Lindsay Anna Ling Jeffery Livingston Kenneth Logan Sally Loker Edith Lopez Chuck Lundgren Kaelin Lundgren Tanha Luvaas Lee Lyon Don Lytle Mercedes Macías Linda MacMichael Malama MacNeil Michael Magliari V.S. Maier Vic Makau Jilly Mandeson Bob Martin John Martin Kristy Martin Marilyn & Daniel Martin Stacie Martin Grace Marvin Keitha Mashaw Treva Mauch Edwards Day Alexandra Mayer Stuart Mayer Judy McCrary Paul McCreary Suzy McCreary Lisa McDaniel Olive McDonough Leah McKean Brandon McKie Oden McMillan Robert Meads Marv Megibow Lauren Meichtry Stephen Metzger Carol Meurer Richard Meyers Caroline & Gregory Miller Dave Miller Karen Miller

This is YOUR paper, and we will continue to serve our community together. Thank you.

Ryan Miller John Miller-George Shirley Mills Katie Milo V. & Silvia Milosevich Susan Minasian Peggy Mitchell Stephanie Mittman Ronald Morgan Abbie Moriarty Cathy Mueller Cynthia Muskin Richard Narad Christine Nelson Jaime Nelson Mary Nelson Charles Nelson & Paula Busch Pamela Nett-Kruger Jan Ng Gary Nielsen Chuck Niepoth Robert Nilsen Claudie Nooner Stephanie Norlie Leah Norling Jane Oberg Dexter O’Connell Maria Olson Jean & Nancy Oriol Sienna Orlando-Lalaguna John O’Shea Marie O’Sullivan Cecilia Pace Michael Panunto Jamie Parfrey Nancy Park Elena M. Patton Charles Nelson & Paula Busch Charles Peckham Diane Perrault Nathaniel Perry Christopher Phipps Robert Pierce Pat Plumb Ann Polivka Ann & James Ponzio Anthony Porter Harold Pringer Deborah Pruitt Alan Raetz Daphne Raitt Sal Ramirez Peter Ratner Janet Rechtman Cleo Reed Jannafer Reed John Reed Susan Reed Tom Reed Barbara Reed Marilyn Rees Rich Reiner Pam & Rick Reynolds Sandi Rice Michael Richman Reta Rickmers Mary Riley Ernesto Rivera Kate Roark Diane Robel Jess Robel Jeff Robel William Robie Joan Robins Drusilla Robinson Susan Ronan Larry Root Casey Rose

Wendy Rose Jennifer Rossovich William Rowe Dale Rudesill Scott Rushing Samuel Ruttenburg Yvonne Saavedra Rozemary Sabino-Blodget Susan Sagarese Bradley Sager Sarah Salisbury Gabriel Sandoval Robert Sandstedt Christy Santos Steve Santos Grant Sautner Jerry & Barbara Schacht Walter Schafer Leeann Schlaf Heather Schlaff Nancy Schleiger Brad Schreiber Frank Schulenburg John Scott Sherri Scott Kim Seidler Michael Seko Nancy Selby Bradley Sellers Linda Serrato Linda Sheppard Ron Sherman Diana Shuey Richard & Dana Silva Briggs Judy Simmons Ellen Simon Abbe Simpkins Regina Simpson Nowelle Sinclair Anna Skaggs Gabriella Smith Genevieve Smith Joe Smith Larry Smith Lawrence Smith & Max Zachai Christina Solomon Elaine Soost Lisa & Marc Sorensen Crista Souza Roy Spaeth Patrick Spielman Heather Springer Tao Stadler Roger Steel Jim Steele Elizabeth Stewart Pam Stoesser Becky & Robert Stofa Larry Strand Robert Streed Fred & Willo Stuart Linda Stukey Doug & Joy Sturm Tara Sullivan-Hames Tom Sundgren Kenneth Sutten Paul Switzer Clyde Switzer Jason Tannen Erin Tarabini Carole Taylor Jamie Taylor Susan Taylor Stephen Tchudi Susan Tchudi Jeanne Thatcher Waistell Charles Thistlethwaite Lorna Thomas

Heidi Thompson Brooks Thorlaksson Graham Thurgood Ron Tietz Hugh Tinling Andrew Tomaselli Shelley Townsell Linda Townsend Yparraguirre John Tozzi JL Trizzino Quintin Troester Kristin Uhlig Leanne Ulvang Bill Unger A. Christopher Urbach Charles & Carol Urbanowicz Richard Utter Kim V. Natalie Valencia Robert Van Fleet Derek Vanderbom Emily Vanneman Debra Vermette Barbara Vlamis Pamela Voekel Albert Vogel Camille Von Kaenel Brittany W. Erin Wade Laurens Walker Martin Wallace Jeremy Walsh Jane Wanderer Blaine Waterman Elaine & George Watkin Carol & John Watson Stacey Wear Catherine Webster Vicki Webster Tristan Weems Kim Weir Dorothy Weise Suzette Welch Eve Werner Jeffrey White Susan Wiesinger Emily Williams Joseph Wills J.T. & Retta Wilmarth Louis Wilner Marie Winslow Addison Winslow Nancy Wirtz Charles Withuhn Bruce Wohl Gordon Wolfe Kjerstin Wood Susan Wooldridge Charles & Denise Worth James Wortham Erica Wuestehube Marc Wysong Christopher Yates Monica Zukrow Paul Zwart M.L. A.D.M. Daniel Diane Fera Harold & Jean Karen Muria Pam Silkshop LLC Rosemarie Matthew & Todd

Our Spring Supporter Drive launched in May! Please support the CN&R’s local news and arts coverage as our community transitions out of lockdown - your help is needed now more than ever! CHICO.NEWSREVIEW.COM JUNE 3, 2021

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SCENE

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 3 0

We never wanted to stop—for the kids’ sake. These kids and these performers—adult and young—are too precious and too important to CRT to stop.

The CRT Kids program staged a COVID-safe performance of Peter Pan at the Center for the Arts in April.

How did the kids react to getting that outlet back during shutdowns?

PHOTO COURTESY OF CALIFORNIA REGIONAL THEATRE

They loved it. The kids were excited to start again. The kids were excited to do anything. And even though they had restrictions, they said, “We’ll do the restrictions, we’ll do what ever you say, we just want to be part of a show.”

Did you do any virtual productions? No, by the time we were ready for our next performance, the COVID stuff had lightened enough that they could do spacing and masks outside. So, we would do the show, film it, and then we’d give that to the parents, and the parents would get a chance to see their kids perform.

What was the regional show you had planned last fall? We were scheduled to West Side Story. We had rights for it, we were well into the audition phase of it. We decided that the best thing for the public and the best thing for the performers was to postpone. So, we postponed West Side Story through the fall, through the spring, and when we got through the spring, I said, “Let’s table it. Let’s just talk about it when it’s safe.” So, we’re just waiting until it’s a safe time to pick up. It’s such a large performance, a heavy-dance performance, where you have a lot of breathing

in masks. It just didn’t feel healthy or safe.

So, the theater has been able to financially weather the pandemic so far? We have gotten so much support from our community, so much support from our parents, our ticketholders, our patrons. Everyone has just come alongside—donated tickets back, donated anything that was, like, a registration, just donated it back to us without any refund asked for, and that just goes back to how beautiful this community is. We did get a few grants from the state of California, which was great. There’s a Shuttered Venue [Operators] Grant that we’ve applied

for. If we get [it], all of that money will go into projects like this, to the kids, wherever it can go to give back to the community. Because the voice of the arts is so important to who we are is a community.

How’d the First Street project come about? When we heard about [the Blue Room moving out], our hearts were grieved. We were so sad because we were losing another voice in the community—a very distinct voice. No one [does] what they do. We need all genres here in Chico. What I want to do is open an event venue where theater entities— like the Blue Room—who don’t have a home can come and perform.

Places like Legacy [Stage], who don’t have a regular home, can rent the space, come here and perform here. I will make no secret that California Regional Theatre owns this theater. However, the key is that is low, that’s a soft light, so to speak. The key is these people have a place to go and say, “We’re performing at First Street Theatre.” Our name doesn’t have to be connected to what their identity is.

Can you describe the scope of the remodel? The transformation has been pretty significant. We’ve done our best to bring this building back to its original architecture. We’ve taken out the ceilings and raised them back to their full height, which is at the highest height is 22 feet. We’ve tried to restore some of the beauty, which hasn’t been seen for awhile in the building, including crown moldings, the height of the windows. We’ve made a larger space in the lobby. We reset the bathrooms further back, making the lobby larger and the restrooms full size, bringing ADA compliance to the building. We’re bringing in state of the art lighting, state of the art sound, state of the art staging. We’ll actually be able to do a two-story set in the building, rather than just a one-story set. CRT adhered to state COVID mandates during pandemic as socially distanced directing staff reviewed prerecorded audition videos. PHOTO COURTESY OF CALIFORNIA REGIONAL THEATRE

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What does CRT plan to do in this space? This venue here at First Street is planned to be something that more than our entity uses. We’ll put in the first two or three shows, because it’s going to be really important for us to work out any bugs. Then after that, we want to open it up. As far as CRT goes, we’re just continuing to expand. Our CRT regional shows will still happen at the Center for the Arts. We’re looking at bringing Annie in there; we’re looking at bringing [The] Little Mermaid in there—shows that are very family-friendly. And then, of course, we have our children’s theater that brings up kids in the community as an afterschool kind of program. But then, at this venue here, we’ll express more cutting edge [productions]. We’re looking at do shows that are a little more edgy. We see this venue as an opportunity for a date night, too. We’re surrounded by downtown— beautiful restaurants, bars, nightlife. We’re just excited that we can be here.

What do you think the prospects are for the Chico arts community coming out of the pandemic? Excellent. It depends on the community and what they’re willing to do to bring it back—and the people I talk to, the people I know, want it to come back in tremendous ways. If it’s something we all work together toward, then we have an excellent chance. If we give up on it, we don’t. Ω


The following individuals stepped up to support independent journalism.

We are so grateful for your support. Laurie Aaron Joseph Acciaioli Maria Aguilar Kim Agur Karen Aikin Ron Aker Robert Alber Lory Allan Emily Alma Jeanette Alosi Davy Andrek Jean Andrews David & Lori Angel Ronald Angle Karen Ann Nelson Anthoine William & Cheryl Appleby James & Mary Aram Christina Archuleta Vicki Artzner Janet Ashley Laura Askim Wayland Augur Ted Baca Mat Bacior Shereen Baker Karen Balestieri Antoine Baptiste Florin Barnhart Kathleen Barrera Kathy Barrett Thomas Barrett Linda Bates Maureen Baumgartner Roger Beadle Claudia Beaty Norman Beecher Christianne Belles Daniel & Charlene Beltan Mary Kay Benson Kathy Berger Gordon Bergthold Bryan Bickley Robert Biehler John Bisignano Earline Blankinship Erica Blaschke Mark Bloom Barbara Boeger Jamie Boelter Stephen Bohnemeyer April Boone Daniel Botsford Janice Branch Vicky Breeden Marlene Brenden Janet Brennan Trish Briel Lindsay Briggs Diane Brobeck Dennis Broselle Caryl Brown Danielle Browning Cindy & Martin Buckley Terry Burgoyne Anika Burke Barbara Burke CJ Burkett John Burnham Carol Burr Robert Burton Lynne Bussey Philip Butler Sherry Butler Deborah Cady Vic Cantu Michael Capelle Caroline Carey

Jennifer Carey Mark Carlsten Doug Carroll Daniel Carter Linda Cartier Joel Castle Elen Castleberry Delena Cavaness Amanda Chambless Beth Chase Randy Chase Susan Chin Susan & Michael Christensen A. Christodoulides Jeanne Christopherson Judy Clemens Rosemarie Colson Felecia Commesso Gail Compton Christine Connerly Justin Cooper Paralee Cooper Jack Coots Keitha Corbit Danetta Cordova Robert Cottrell Helen Coupe Michael Coyle Roy Crabtree Mary Cree Joe Crispin Scott Cronk Marcel Daguerre Olivia Dakof Jessica Daly Nathan Daly Jude Darrin, Ph.D Mike & Marie D’Augelli Debra Daugherty Rob Davidson Marycarol Deane Michelle Deese Marie Demers Anthony Devine Ken Devol Lechia Dickinson Jodie Dillman Joseph Dimaggio Tim Dobbs Susan Dobra Graham Dobson Kenneth Doglio Carin Dorghalli Sophie Duckett Trudy Duisenberg Doug & Gayle Edgar Kristi Edwards Patricia Egan Andrew Elliott Henry Elliott Sharron C. Ellis Heather Ellison Richard Elsom Robyn Engel Craig & Dorcas Erickson Timothy Ervin Adele Etcheverry Sheets Tyler Evaro Nancy Evens Kathleen Faith Annette Faurote Kathy Favor Adam Fedeli Mitzi Felix Steve Ferreira Phillip Filbrandt Elizabeth Finch Greg Fischer

Clare Fisher Denise Fleming Laura Fletcher Steven Flowers Ramona Flynn Lorraine Forster Kris Foster Kristin Foster John & Janet Fournier Gary Francis Christopher Freemyers Dan Fregin Sandra Fricker Paul Friedlander Diane Friedman Stephen Fritter Lea Gadbois Marian Gage Mark & Cynthia Gailey Francine Gair Nicolette Gamache Celeste Garcia Matthew Garcia Maureen & Michael Garcia Bill Gardner Suzanne Garrett Kenneth Gates Nalani Geary Kim Gentry Cynthia Gerrie Scott Giannini Jesica Giannola Tovey Giezentanner Sharon Gillis David & Kathy Gipson Bradley Glanville Jay Goldberg Bryce Goldstein Diana Good Nancy Good Lucy & Richard Gould Judith Graves Diane Gray Jim Graydon Stephen Green Susan Green Sean Green David Guzzetti Linda Haddock James & Edith Haehn Deborah Halfpenny & Dan Eyde Kim Hamberg Bonny Hamilton Bonnie Hamilton Steven Hammond Matthew Hammons Linnea Hanson & Harold Carlson Jennifer Harris Lynn Haskell Jeannette Hassur Erik Havana Tom & Cheryl Hawk Alma Hayes Ryan Heimlich Kimberly Heines Jeri Heiser Judy Henderson Tyson Henry Christel Herda Ruben Heredia Rebecca Herring Reiner Scott Hodgkinson Terrence Hoffman Debra-Lou Hoffmann Janice Hofmann Andrew Holcombe

Kurt & Debra Holve Lindy Hoppough Leslie Howard Scott Howard Minjhing Hsieh Dennis Huff Susan Hughes Roger & Nancy Hull Debra Humes Dr. Ralph Huntsinger David Hurst Cathy Inzer Kathryn Jackson Richard & Giovanna Jackson Jake Jacobson John James Jeanette Jassur William Jennings Mary Jeppson Tony Jewett Brian Johnson Dan Johnson Janet Johnson Jim & Mary Johnson Leslie Johnson Megan Johnson Sharon Johnson George Johnston Thomas Jordan Timothy Jordan Jo Ellen Kaiser Alexandra Karacosta Robert Karch Stephen Kasprzyk Jennifer Kasza Henry & Logan Katka Dan Katz Ann Kauffman Annie Kavanagh So Keehn Beth Kelly Steve Kennedy Mark Kernes Judy Keswick Elizabeth Kieszkowski Zack Kincheloe Cheryl King Diana King Darlene Kirby Jeanine Kitchel Lana Kitchel Roger Klaves Ladona Knigge Marilyn Knox Bill Knudsen Lauren Kohler Larry & Maureen Krik Carol Krok John Kuhn Wendy Kuo Gary Kupp Michelle Ladcani

Nicole Lagrave Mark & Tomoko Lance Lisa Langley Steve Larned Frank Larose Scott Laursen Daniel Law Jana Lawton Jean Lebaron Tim Leefeldt Patricia Lennon Sarah Lerda Fredrick Lester David Lewis Kate Leyden D. & K. Lieberman Jeff Lindsay Anna Ling Jeffery Livingston Kenneth Logan Sally Loker Edith Lopez Chuck Lundgren Kaelin Lundgren Tanha Luvaas Lee Lyon Don Lytle Mercedes Macías Linda MacMichael Malama MacNeil Michael Magliari V.S. Maier Vic Makau Jilly Mandeson Bob Martin John Martin Kristy Martin Marilyn & Daniel Martin Stacie Martin Grace Marvin Keitha Mashaw Treva Mauch Edwards Day Alexandra Mayer Stuart Mayer Judy McCrary Paul McCreary Suzy McCreary Lisa McDaniel Olive McDonough Leah McKean Brandon McKie Oden McMillan Robert Meads Marv Megibow Lauren Meichtry Stephen Metzger Carol Meurer Richard Meyers Caroline & Gregory Miller Dave Miller Karen Miller

This is YOUR paper, and we will continue to serve our community together. Thank you.

Ryan Miller John Miller-George Shirley Mills Katie Milo V. & Silvia Milosevich Susan Minasian Peggy Mitchell Stephanie Mittman Ronald Morgan Abbie Moriarty Cathy Mueller Cynthia Muskin Richard Narad Christine Nelson Jaime Nelson Mary Nelson Charles Nelson & Paula Busch Pamela Nett-Kruger Jan Ng Gary Nielsen Chuck Niepoth Robert Nilsen Claudie Nooner Stephanie Norlie Leah Norling Jane Oberg Dexter O’Connell Maria Olson Jean & Nancy Oriol Sienna Orlando-Lalaguna John O’Shea Marie O’Sullivan Cecilia Pace Michael Panunto Jamie Parfrey Nancy Park Elena M. Patton Charles Nelson & Paula Busch Charles Peckham Diane Perrault Nathaniel Perry Christopher Phipps Robert Pierce Pat Plumb Ann Polivka Ann & James Ponzio Anthony Porter Harold Pringer Deborah Pruitt Alan Raetz Daphne Raitt Sal Ramirez Peter Ratner Janet Rechtman Cleo Reed Jannafer Reed John Reed Susan Reed Tom Reed Barbara Reed Marilyn Rees Rich Reiner Pam & Rick Reynolds Sandi Rice Michael Richman Reta Rickmers Mary Riley Ernesto Rivera Kate Roark Diane Robel Jess Robel Jeff Robel William Robie Joan Robins Drusilla Robinson Susan Ronan Larry Root Casey Rose

Wendy Rose Jennifer Rossovich William Rowe Dale Rudesill Scott Rushing Samuel Ruttenburg Yvonne Saavedra Rozemary Sabino-Blodget Susan Sagarese Bradley Sager Sarah Salisbury Gabriel Sandoval Robert Sandstedt Christy Santos Steve Santos Grant Sautner Jerry & Barbara Schacht Walter Schafer Leeann Schlaf Heather Schlaff Nancy Schleiger Brad Schreiber Frank Schulenburg John Scott Sherri Scott Kim Seidler Michael Seko Nancy Selby Bradley Sellers Linda Serrato Linda Sheppard Ron Sherman Diana Shuey Richard & Dana Silva Briggs Judy Simmons Ellen Simon Abbe Simpkins Regina Simpson Nowelle Sinclair Anna Skaggs Gabriella Smith Genevieve Smith Joe Smith Larry Smith Lawrence Smith & Max Zachai Christina Solomon Elaine Soost Lisa & Marc Sorensen Crista Souza Roy Spaeth Patrick Spielman Heather Springer Tao Stadler Roger Steel Jim Steele Elizabeth Stewart Pam Stoesser Becky & Robert Stofa Larry Strand Robert Streed Fred & Willo Stuart Linda Stukey Doug & Joy Sturm Tara Sullivan-Hames Tom Sundgren Kenneth Sutten Paul Switzer Clyde Switzer Jason Tannen Erin Tarabini Carole Taylor Jamie Taylor Susan Taylor Stephen Tchudi Susan Tchudi Jeanne Thatcher Waistell Charles Thistlethwaite Lorna Thomas

Heidi Thompson Brooks Thorlaksson Graham Thurgood Ron Tietz Hugh Tinling Andrew Tomaselli Shelley Townsell Linda Townsend Yparraguirre John Tozzi JL Trizzino Quintin Troester Kristin Uhlig Leanne Ulvang Bill Unger A. Christopher Urbach Charles & Carol Urbanowicz Richard Utter Kim V. Natalie Valencia Robert Van Fleet Derek Vanderbom Emily Vanneman Debra Vermette Barbara Vlamis Pamela Voekel Albert Vogel Camille Von Kaenel Brittany W. Erin Wade Laurens Walker Martin Wallace Jeremy Walsh Jane Wanderer Blaine Waterman Elaine & George Watkin Carol & John Watson Stacey Wear Catherine Webster Vicki Webster Tristan Weems Kim Weir Dorothy Weise Suzette Welch Eve Werner Jeffrey White Susan Wiesinger Emily Williams Joseph Wills J.T. & Retta Wilmarth Louis Wilner Marie Winslow Addison Winslow Nancy Wirtz Charles Withuhn Bruce Wohl Gordon Wolfe Kjerstin Wood Susan Wooldridge Charles & Denise Worth James Wortham Erica Wuestehube Marc Wysong Christopher Yates Monica Zukrow Paul Zwart M.L. A.D.M. Daniel Diane Fera Harold & Jean Karen Muria Pam Silkshop LLC Rosemarie Matthew & Todd

Our Spring Supporter Drive launched in May! Please support the CN&R’s local news and arts coverage as our community transitions out of lockdown - your help is needed now more than ever! CHICO.NEWSREVIEW.COM JUNE 3, 2021

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MUSIC

Chico summer jams An all-local playlist for your pandemic comedown

Tthatgreat unifier, marking a point in time all Americans all share—from

he song of the summer is, at its best, a

anthems about waterfalls that we endeavored not by to chase, to jams on old Jason town roads where booCassidy ties in Wranglers and jason c @ horses were led. newsrev iew.c om There have already been some great songs with potential mass appeal released in 2021—my personal picks so far are “Be Good” by Carsi Blanton (probably too chill for collective groovin’) and the bombastic “Serotonin” by Norway’s Girl in Red (which hasn’t caught on in America yet)—but at this point in a year where we are just coming out of our COVID hibernation, maybe striving for a musical connection on a smaller scale makes more sense for this summer? Besides, Chico’s pandemic-produced output has been impressive—in some cases more so than anything else I’ve heard over the past year.

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What follows are are 18 of my faves by locals from the past 12 months or so. We have peak millennial nostalgia, a hookup song set against the backdrop of a failing economy, a low-key anthem to love and more. There’s gotta be something to rally around!

literally burn.

“Covid, A Love Song” – Surrogate Bossa nova pop song perfection, with guest singer Lorna Such (of Lo & Behold) harmonizing through the end times with frontman Chris Keane.

“Harriet” – The Bidwells Also impossibly fun, this boogie-woogie-ish pop original by singer/songwriter couple Ben Ruttenburg and Samantha Francis somehow sounds like both a famous show tune and a bar-rock standard.

tinyurl.com/covidlovesong

“My Job” – Scout First of three electro-indie jams from Scout here. This one from Transformation, the first of three albums the prolific singer/ songwriter released in the past year. scoutthewise.bandcamp.com/album/transitioning

“Come Down” – Fera The sound of a thousand minstrels strumming acoustic guitars as the foothills

fera.bandcamp.com/album/aurelia

“My Oh My” – Michael Bone An impossibly fun ditty with looping piano riff and multiple vocal harmonies. michaelbone.bandcamp.com/album/10-vi

thesingingbidwells.com/music

“The Ocean” and “What is This (Ba Ba) Organ” – Esco Chris On his latest release, Chris “The Reggae Imposter” Zinna gives us a perfect soundtrack to endless summer heat: one breezy instrumental original followed by a bouncy and appropriately lazy cover of a 1969 track by The Reggae Boys. escochris.bandcamp.com/album/singles-

collection-quarantine-recordings

“Established Stache” – Cat Depot It takes a master to make something complex sound effortlessly beautiful, and this looping soundscape features two such players: guitar wiz Mathew Houghton and drum god Casey Deitz. kitkatsrecords.bandcamp.com/album/ peak-millennial-nostalgia

“Girls with Pearls” – Seven Mills Beautiful, mysterious piano-driven debut from 17-year-old on lockdown: “There is no relapse/I won’t sit in the laps/ Of girls with pearls/Only rings on their fingers/Hoping it lingers.” tinyurl.com/girlswithpearls

“Like I Love Me” – Scout A catchy vocal melody perfect for catching the sentiment of a mini anthem to self worth: “Do you love me like I love me?”


We’re open!

OPEN AT 5PM | TUESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY scoutthewise.bandcamp.com/album/dontforget-the-end

“Guilty” – Michael Bone A ton of drama packed into one 3 1/2-minute art-rock song. michaelbone.bandcamp.com/album/10-vii

“X-Files” – Furlough Fridays The turn-up-the-stereo by the pool jam of the summer. ffyeah.com/colibri-wp/music/

“Gravity” – Astronaut Ice Cream Electro-disco pop is allowed into the backyard party on genre alone. astronauticecream.bandcamp.com/album/blue

“Hank” – The Tightys I’ve said it before: This gritty guitar riff smells of weed and cheap beer, and that’s just what everyone’s summer needs. thetightys1.bandcamp.com/track/hank

“Rumba de Changó” – Blu Egyptian A hyper Latin-influenced jam that brings much-needed juice to Chico’s dance floor.

27 LOST DUTCHMAN DRIVE | NORTH CHICO 530.487.8557

bluegyptian.bandcamp.com/releases

“Apocalyptico” – West by Swan Is there such a thing as energetic stoner rock?

westbyswan.bandcamp.com/album/cancellation

“Hurry” – Lagrima A busted bottom-heavy slow jam for discordant times. Search spotify.com

ARTISANAL RETAIL SECTION

OFFERING LOCAL AND REGIONAL ITEMS

“Real Love” – Scout The third pandemic release from the prolific local songwriter ends with the unadorned title cut and the simplest— and best—notion there is. scoutthewise.bandcamp.com/album/ real-love-ep

MONDAY-FRIDAY 11-7 | SATURDAY 12-5 1903 PARK AVE | 530.345.7787 | BACIOCHICO.COM JUNE 3, 2021

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ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

Open Daily Noon - 9pm We appreciate the support of our community!

Enjoy our scrumptious food menu as you experience an ever changing collection of artisan beers. Come check out our new expansion! 2070 E 20th STE 160 Chico, CA 95928 PHONE: 530-894-BEER (2337)

JUST A NORMAL COLUMN Ahhh … This is nice. As Arts DEVO sits down to write this column, his mug is filled with coffee and his list—the source, the sauce, the juice that powers the Energy Dome—is filled with the stuff of this Chico life. There is always a notepad by my side for writing down the scene tidbits that drop across my path, and pre-pandemic, I would easily fill this space with the cherry pickings thereof. It’s been awhile since I had too many things to write about, so instead of the COVID-depression, band-fetish and puppy-dog blatherings of late, I’ll simply pour a little juice in the cup. Cheers! ART CAMP! Three local creatives have put their heads and skills together for three different beginner art classes in “an attempt to create an environment where adults can learn, share, and teach new creative skills, in a low-key and affordable setting.” This is what we all need. The camps range from four weeks ($60) to six weeks ($80), and the maiden classes are: Using LEDs with Zac Elstein (learn about basic electronics and current flows); Observational Painting with Michael Bone (learn to draw and paint what you see); Machine Sewing with Claire Fong (learn basic sewing techniques including how to operate a sewing machine). For more info on signups and location, email artcampchico@gmail.com and check ’em on Instagram @TheArtCamp. THEATRE ON THE POND Theatre on the Ridge is gearing up for a return in 2021, and to announce

jOiN us ON

the new season, the company is putting on two big parties, June 18 and June 19 at 6:30 p.m. The kick off celebration will take place waterside at Chapelle de L’Artiste in Paradise and will feature a choice of three different gourmet picnic dinners, champagne, beer, music by The Bidwells and a readers theater presention of The O’Malley Diaries.

NEW SCOUT! Um … What? Is? This? It is unpossible that I missed a new release by my favorite local artist. The internet says Scout’s third release in the past year dropped on Valentine’s Day. Though it’s somehow eluded me for more than three months, I am not mad at the Real Love EP, with five new fantastic electro-acoustic tunes—one instrumental and four with lyrics exploring the highs and lows of love—from the prolific home recorder. My current jams are the dark and jittery “H O U S E” and the lo-fi anthem title track that closes the EP: “Everything would be easier if everyone was open to be loved, like, really loved.” Damn straight. Feel the love at scoutthewise.bandcamp.com/album/real-love-ep. SILKSHOP ART SHOW The badasses at Silkshop Screen Printing—Cameron Harry and Nick Johnson, the duo who showed up for their community a year ago with their Print Aid benefit for locally owned businesses—are hosting their first art show. Longtime local artist Micah Black will be displaying paintings at the shop (2290 Ivy St., #110) on Saturday (June 5), 7-10 p.m., and Silkshop will be selling shirts with one of Black’s designs and donating proceeds to the North State Shelter Team’s Mobile Shower Trailer Project. Show up for art and showers, and scope out Silkshop’s shirt shop online at silkshopprint ing.com/shirtshop. IN-HOUSE TIDBITS A few items of note from the Chico News &

Review: • Best of Chico is coming back! After a one-year break, the newspaper’s signature special issue will return this October. The theme, naturally, is “Comeback”—a comeback for local businesses, a comeback for the community and a comeback for the CN&R! Voting starts Art by Micah Black July 1. • The CN&R Spring Supporter Drive has kicked off. If you got it to give, consider supporting the newspaper’s local news and arts coverage as our community begins to transition out of the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit chico.newsreview.com/give for more info. • CN&R at Pride: Chico Pride is back! With in-person events throughout June, including a Pop Up Fair and Festival June 26, 10 a.m.-2 pm., in the parking lot next to the Stonewall Alliance Center. There will be food, coffee, music, drag performances, and a bunch of vendors and sponsors, including the CN&R. Come say, “Hi!” Check out this issue’s calendar on page 28 for more info on Chico Pride events.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF JUNe 3, 2021

We need your support Help us continue reporting on important issues

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “There is

ecstasy in paying attention,” writes Aries author Anne Lamott. That’s always true for everyone, but it’s extra true for you Aries people. And it will be extra ultra especially true for you during the next 20 days. I hope you will dedicate yourself to celebrating and upgrading your perceptual abilities. I hope you will resolve to see and register everything just as it is in the present moment, fresh and unprecedented, not as it was in the past or will be in the future. For best results, banish all preconceptions that might interfere with your ability to notice what’s raw and real. If you practice these high arts with exhilarating diligence, you will be rewarded with influxes of ecstasy.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your guiding wisdom comes from Taurus author Annie Dillard. She writes, “I think it would be well, and proper, and obedient, and pure, to grasp your one necessity and not let it go, to dangle from it limp wherever it takes you.” I suspect that Dillard’s approach will enable you to maintain a righteous rhythm and make all the right moves during the coming weeks. If you agree with me, your crucial first step will be to identify the nature of your “one necessity.” Not two necessities. Just the single most important.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “All I want

The Chico News & Review’s wants to ensure that our team of dedicated journalists can continue working through one of the worst economic and health crises of the past century. With your recurring or one-time contribution, the CN&R can continue our award-winning coverage on the topics that impact the residents of Butte County, including COVID-19, the arts, homelessness, the fight for equality, and wildfire recovery and prevention.

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to be is normally insane,” said actor Marlon Brando. Yikes! I have a different perspective. I would never want to be normally insane because that state often tends to be sullen and desperate and miserable. My preferred goal is to be quite abnormally insane: exuberantly, robustly, creatively free of the toxic adjustments that our society tells us are necessary. I want to be cheerfully insane in the sense of not being tyrannized by conventional wisdom. I want to be proactively insane in the sense of obeying my souls’ impulses rather than conforming to people’s expectations. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I believe the coming weeks will be a fruitful time for you to be my kind of insane.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “It’s one

thing to make a mistake, it’s another to become wedded to it,” advised author Irena Karafilly. Let’s make that one of your key truths in the coming weeks. Now is a good time to offer yourself forgiveness and to move on from any wrong turns you’ve made. Here’s a second key truth, courtesy of composer Igor Stravinsky: “I have learned throughout my life as a composer chiefly through my mistakes and pursuits of false assumptions, not by my exposure to founts of wisdom and knowledge.” Third key truth, from Sufi teacher Pir Vilayat Inayat Khan: “Don’t be concerned about being disloyal to your pain by being joyous.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): According to my

analysis of the astrological omens, the number of perfect moments you will experience during the next two weeks could break all your previous records. And what do I mean by “perfect moments”? 1. Times when life brings you interesting events or feelings or thoughts that are novel and unique. 2. Pivotal points when you sense yourself undergoing a fundamental shift in attitude or a new way of understanding the world. 3. Leaping out of your own mind and into the mind of an animal or other person so as to have a pure vision of what their experience is like. 4. An absolute appreciation for yourself just the way you are right now.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “There is strong

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shadow where there is much light,” wrote Virgo author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749–1832). That’s a good metaphor for you these days. Since I suspect you are currently shining as brightly as you possibly can, I will urge you to become acutely aware of the shadows you cast. In other words, try to catch glimpses of the unripe and unformed parts of your nature, which may be more easily seen than usual. Now, while you’re relatively strong and vibrant, investigate what aspects of your inner world might need improvement, care, and healing.

by rob brezsNy LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to

physicists, it’s impossible for a human being to suck water up through a straw that’s more than 34 feet long. So please don’t even try to do that, either now or ever. If, however, you have a good reason to attempt to suck water up a 33-foot straw, now would be an excellent time to do so. Your physical strength should be at a peak, as is your capacity for succeeding at amazing, herculean tasks. How else might you direct your splendid abilities? What other ambitious feats could you pull off?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio poet

Ezra Pound had character flaws that bother me. But he also had a quality I admire: generosity in helping his friends and colleagues. Among the writers whose work he championed and promoted with gusto were 20thcentury literary icons James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, Hilda Doolittle, William Butler Yeats, Ernest Hemingway, William Carlos Williams and Robert Frost. Pound edited their work, arranged to get them published in periodicals and anthologies, connected them with patrons and editors, and even gave them money and clothes. In accordance with astrological omens, I encourage you to be like Ezra Pound in the coming weeks. Make an extra effort to support and boost your allies. Assist them in doing what they do well. To do so will be in your own best interest!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Poet Tess Gallagher praises those times “when desire has strengthened our bodies.” I want you to have an abundance of those moments during the coming weeks. And I expect that cultivating them will be an excellent healing strategy. So here’s my advice: Do whatever’s necessary to summon and celebrate the strong longings that will strengthen your body. Tease them into bountiful presence. Treasure them and pay reverence to them and wield them with gleeful passion.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “To live

is so startling it leaves little time for anything else,” observed poet Emily Dickinson. That’s the truth! Given how demanding it is to adjust to the nonstop challenges, distractions and opportunities of the daily rhythm, I’m impressed that any of us ever get any work done. According to my astrological analysis, you Capricorns are now experiencing a big outbreak of this phenomenon. It’s probably even harder than usual to get work done, simply because life keeps bringing you interesting surprises that require your ingenuity and resourcefulness. The good news is that these surges of ingenuity and resourcefulness will serve you very well when the hubbub settles down a bit and you get back to doing more work.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquari-

us-born August Strindberg (1849–1912) was a masterful and influential playwright. He also liked to dabble in painting and photography. His approach in those two fields was different from the polish he cultivated in his writing. “I am an amateur and I intend to stay that way,” he testified about his approach in the visual arts. “I reject all forms of professional cleverness or virtuosity.” Just for now, Aquarius, I recommend you experiment with the latter attitude in your own field. Your skill and earnestness will benefit from doses of playful innocence, even calculated naiveté.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Which of the

astrological signs feels the deepest feelings? I say it’s you Pisceans. You’re connoisseurs of deep feelings, as well as specialists in mysterious, multi-splendored, brusheswith-infinity feelings. And right now, you’re in the Deepest Feelings Phase of your personal cycle. I won’t be surprised if you feel a bit overwhelmed with the richness of it all. But that’s mostly a good thing that you should be grateful for—a privilege and a superpower! Now here’s advice from deep-feeling author Pearl Buck: “You cannot make yourself feel something you do not feel, but you can make yourself do right in spite of your feelings.”

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

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