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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 30 THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2020 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

REGARDING HENRY A Down syndrome journey BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY PAGE

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GOODBYE FOR NOW CN&R suspends publication amid coronavirus shutdown


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY

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CN&R 

March 19, 2020


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 30 • March 19, 2020 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 15 Minutes

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: HENRY DAUGHERTY ON FIRST DAY OF PRESCHOOL

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Trevor Whitney Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Rachel Bush Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Neesa Sonoquie, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Sonia Lockler, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Michael Gardner, Andrew Garske, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Randall Morrison, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, Barbara Wise, David Wyles 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com

N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editors Derek McDow, Thea Rood N&R Publications Writers/Photographers Shiavon Chatman, Allen Pierleoni, Anne Stokes N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Julia Ballantyne, Greta Beekhuis, Chris Cohen, Joseph Engle, Laura Golino, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy Art of Information Director Serene Lusano President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN.

MARCH 19, 2020

CN&R

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., chico, ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Look out for thy neighbor CNovember As the CN&R has documented repeatedly since 2018, Butte County residents too numerous rises have a way of bringing out the best in people.

to count rose above and beyond when the Camp Fire devastated whole communities. But critical conditions, such as the spread of the coronavirus, also bring out the worst in people: Witness the recent hoarding of toilet paper and cleaning supplies. The COVID-19 pandemic has most everyone worried. (We say “most everyone” because some live lives of obliviousness or disregard.) Government decrees this past week have restricted gatherings. Numbers of cases and fatalities keep escalating, though fortunately not locally—as of press time, Butte County remained at no confirmed cases. Many folks are hunkering down as if in a storm. In a way, we are in a storm. Reaction to the outbreak created a psychological tsunami. The coronavirus’ toll overseas has swirled fears over here. This week in Healthlines, Ashiah Scharaga speaks with practitioners of therapy and meditation to gain methods for coping. But the effects go beyond emotional distress. Our hometown is hurting financially. Local businesses, a vital source of sustenance for the community, have taken an abrupt hit as a result of

social distancing. Restaurants, bars, coffee houses, shops, theaters, schools, activity spaces—myriad establishments face hard times, for as long as health guidelines discourage public groups. We don’t need to give an economics lecture on how a business slowdown impacts jobs—it’s enough to say the ripple is ominous. In these uncertain times, there’s something we all can do to help: Look out for our neighbors. First and foremost, take note of those living around you, particularly elderly residents who have no one else to check on them. (The Camp Fire claimed the lives of seniors left behind, unaccounted for; let’s learn from that tragedy.) Schools provide day care and meals for thousands of children countywide, more than 13,000 in Chico alone, so offer to watch the kids next door when you’re home and their parents need to work. Little things like this go far. Beyond the block, support local businesses. We often raise this call, but it’s especially important now. If you can’t go out, buy a gift certificate—that infusion of cash will make a difference until the wave crests and you can visit the business again. Coronavirus concerns are legitimate. With sensible precautions and sensitive reactions, we’ll get through this together. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Nowhere to go without affordable housing Awhydumped into Chico from out of the area, which is we see so many wandering our streets. Wow, the n oft-repeated myth: Destitute people are being

B.S. meter is pegged in the red zone on this one. I say, after years of street-level conversation—a stint on the Butte County Continuum of Care, volunteering for the Point in Time homeless census, and documenting local homelessness via Without a Roof, etc.—that this story is a callous lie spun here, there and everywhere. Chico has an affordable housing stock dearth that, even pre-Camp Fire, was one of the most severe in by California. The disaster on Nov. 8, Bill Mash 2018, turned it into a massive housThe author, a chico ing shortage across all economic resident, hosts the means. Scores of people have Without a roof blog (woaroof.tumblr.com) exhausted post-disaster options and a radio program and ended up on our streets. More on KZFr discussing still are clinging to the couches and homelessness floor spaces of good Samaritans, and peace. loved ones and friends.

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March 19, 2020

Meanwhile, the criminalization of basic human functions—along with the efforts to push destitute people out of business areas, parks and watersheds— forces people to wander residential districts. Without affordable housing, they have nowhere to go. One example is a woman who approached me on my porch in the avenues several years ago on the same evening as a Chico City Council presentation on the dispersal brought about by enforcement of the sit/lie ordinance. She said she was homeless and not to fear her. I didn’t. She shared that she had just been pushed out of the downtown area. The woman said she’d lived on the Ridge with her mom, who told her she had a brain disease and kicked her out. The woman, perhaps 40 years of age, was clearly disabled. I comforted her the best I could with conversation, food, drink and a blanket. She sat out on my porch for most of the evening. I haven’t seen her since. When you see people in distress, comfort them, talk to them, ask them their name and learn their story. You’ll be a better human for it, and a myth-buster to boot. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Farewell for now Forgive me for stumbling here, but I’m still in shock. On Monday (March 16), I learned this newspaper would suspend publication and that our entire staff would be laid off in a matter of days. I stayed up until 5 a.m. trying to come up with a plan to save our region’s longest-serving alternative voice—a Chico institution— and carry on the legacy that a fine group of journalists and free thinkers started in August 1977. Know any billionaire First Amendment champions? Neither do I. Like other small businesses, the CN&R has been knocked hard and fast by the fallout from the coronavirus. Struggling amid the sweeping shutdowns, our advertisers pulled most of what they’d booked into the paper. Last week, we were profitable. This week, we’re not. It’s that simple for a company that runs on small margins, fueled by a passion for journalism more than the almighty dollar. This could be our last issue. And that, dear readers and supporters, would be a heart-breaker. What the exceptional journalists at this newspaper do, week in and week out, is unparalleled in the North State. I say that not to be egotistical but to underscore the craterlike hole the CN&R’s closure will leave in the local media landscape. Think back to our best work in recent years—our watchdog reporting related to local environmental issues, police shootings, city government and, more recently, the 300-plus stories we’ve written on the far-reaching and devastating effects of the Camp Fire. Last week, I learned that we were named finalists in nine categories in the annual California Journalism Awards contest, including for our unmatched local arts and entertainment coverage led by my dear friend, Arts Editor Jason Cassidy (aka Arts DEVO). We compete against the largest weekly newspapers in the state—publications with much larger circulations, resources and staffs. I can’t begin to express how grateful I am to have worked with Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper, Advertising Manager Jamie DeGarmo, Art Director Tina Flynn, retired Editor Robert Speer and Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky over the past 13 years. Or how proud I am of staff writers Ashiah Scharaga and Andre Byik, whose skillful, compassionate reporting has helped so many struggling fire survivors. The thought of not being able to continue this type of journalism—serving as an anchor in our community during this especially worrisome time—makes me incredibly sad. Suffice it to say, depriving myself of sleep did not result in a plan to sustain the operation through this disaster. It’s surreal not knowing whether this is a farewell for now or forever. After learning the devastating news, the CN&R’s reporters and editors did what we’ve always done in the face of a crisis—get to work. Sixteen months ago, that meant driving up to the still-burning Ridge. This week, it’s informing our community on the global threat that has taken away the jobs we love in our beloved community. It’s that type of unflinching response and dedication that sets this publication apart. I know I speak on behalf of our entire company—delivery drivers, salespeople, designers, and especially our owners, Jeff vonKaenel and Deborah Redmond—that we want nothing more than to continue serving our community. If you want to help us do that, you can make a donation at newsreview.com/chico/donate. No matter what happens, thank you, dear readers, for your many years of support.


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Councilmen clash  A critical need in difficult times such as those our community is experiencing now is confidence in our leadership; part of confidence is trust. There is a time for diplomatically choosing each word, and a time for speaking clearly and frankly. For myself, a time calling for clarity and frankness is when someone is speaking untruthfully about me. On Monday, March 16, in an interview with Action News Now, Mayor Randall Stone made an outrageous accusation about me: that “Congressman Doug LaMalfa, Councilmember Scott Huber and Assemblymember James Gallagher were all pushing these billboards out to the end of town talking about communicable diseases…” This statement about me is a bald-faced lie, with no basis in any reality or fact. It is far-fetched to the point of suggesting that Mr. Stone has become delusional. Whether out of vindictiveness,

political strategy, absence of research, or psychosis, Stone’s fabrications add up to a profound loss of trust and my confidence in his ability to lead this community. Scott Huber Chico

Editor’s note: The author is a member of the Chico City Council.

‘Real leaders would have...’ Re “Councilman’s comeback” (Letters, by Scott Huber, March 12): Scott Huber’s quip echoed a private letter. He wielded ad hominems and straw men to deflect from my legitimate criticism of City Council policy. He poisons the well, too, asserting that if solutions arising from deep analysis transcend pragmatism, they shouldn’t be respected. I do encourage your readers to “consider the source.” On Oct. 2, 2018, 37 days before the Camp Fire, I addressed the council (starting at 04:46 in the archive) and explained that if we

can’t acknowledge the converging economic, ecological and sociopolitical crises beginning to unfold, “we’re fucked.” Again, on Jan. 7, 2020 (about 00:37 in the archive), I took stock of how things had progressed. I warned of structural instabilities and imminent financial collapse simply waiting on a trigger like a pandemic. My exasperation lies in the council’s failure to understand the historical moment we are in and recognize there’s a clear choice ahead: socialism or barbarism. Real leaders would have found temporary space for hospital services, suspended rent and utility payments, and initiated food production across the city before suspending the legislature. This is just the beginning of a long and painful readjustment. There’s still time for emergent leadership. Together we can thrive. Steve Breedlove Chico

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

More on the mayor  I was recently informed of a rather bizarre message that was posted by our town’s mayor referencing the coronavirus. In a time where our community and country are encountering a dangerous disease and a potentially more dangerous streak of unreasonable and irrational panic, we need our leaders to set a better example. We need our leaders’ words and actions to embody and encourage empathy, compassion, consideration, understanding and the need to be useful to one another. Pompous and petty posts only perpetuate problematic predicaments. With our community still recovering from the trauma of the Camp Fire, emotionally reckless social media posts during yet another traumatic event only deepen our wounds and slow the healing our community so desperately desires. Mr. Mayor, please publicly apologize to your constituents and rise up to be the leader we need and elected you to be. Morgan Dietz Chico

A call to action Open letter to the Chico City Council and staff: We can reasonably anticipate the intersection of two phenomena: widespread homelessness and the COVID-19 pandemic. As such, the following suggestions are made with a view toward minimizing suffering and fatalities among the homeless: 1) The city should immediately deploy as many portable toilets and hand-sanitizing stations as possible. All restrooms should be open 24 hours, providing access to soap and water. 2) The homeless who “shelter in place” should be allowed to remain sheltered—especially in locations least visible to the public. 3) All enforcement of “social crime” violations should cease, along with arrests/jailing on infraction-generated failure-toappear warrants. Policing should pivot to a focus on serious crime, welfare checks and health-oriented assessments only. 4) The homeless should be monitored for adequate caloric intake. Staple/survival foods should be delivered to the streets if needed. Though providing services to the

homeless in various high-density facilities has been routine practice, dispersion in the public space is likely a more sensible approach. At very least, dispersion and selfsheltering/self-reliance should not be discouraged, either through lack of material support or law enforcement practices. Patrick Newman Chico

Help homeless seniors I recently met Janet, a reasonably dressed, sober, fully gray-haired woman who appeared to be 60. She had all her belongings in a torn trash bag beside her. Her husband had recently passed away, and she was tired of being homeless. We’re so focused on COVID-19 that we may have forgotten about the uptick in hepatitis A outbreaks. As long as we keep housing and shelter on the back burner, our community has more than one disease to be concerned about. What about the conditions that increase our vulnerability to outbreaks of diseases? Tiny home villages have the best potential to house the most amount of people—with distancing—for the least amount of money, in the least amount of time. If more of our seniors were housed this way, we would be more pandemic-resistant. Leaving so many seniors on the street—170 by last count—makes us more vulnerable to outbreaks of disease. We have a shelter crisis! The city has land. Chico Housing Action Team (CHAT) has a plan. If you really want a “clean and safe” Chico, help the city help CHAT start a tiny home village before next winter. Charles Withuhn Chico

Lock gate at Bear Hole  Re “Pay to play” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharga, March 5): The recent City Council decision to use the fees from parking and a grant to improve Upper Park Road seems like a good idea for emergency and fire personnel. As as far as opening up the road to the end for the general public, it is not. I can see having vehicle access as it is Tuesday through Saturday, but the gate should remain locked above Bear Hole. Upper Park used to have a live-ammunition shooting and

archery range. That seemed OK when Chico’s population was under 30,000, but it’s not with 100,000 or more people now living in the area. Anyone who has to deal with speeding, alcohol-related issues, broken bottles and trash knows this to be true. Who will be there to police the area? Who will pick up the garbage along the creek? Maybe another fee, eh? Steve Kasprzyk Chico

‘This insanity must end’ Much to the delight of his Deliverance, banjo-playing followers, Donald Trump pirated late President Ronald Reagan’s successful 1980 campaign slogan: “Let’s make America great again.” Apparently sometime before 1980, America was a great place. I’m sure Reagan wasn’t talking about the 1930 stock market crash that led to then-President Herbert Hoover’s Great Depression. How could Reagan call the attack on Pearl Harbor great? Was it the Korean War that saw thousands of American soldiers die? The disastrous Vietnam War? Flash-forward to Sept. 11, 2001, and the attack on the World Trade Center, resulting in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars (which still linger), and then to Trump’s “Great America” starting in 2016. Trump has given huge tax cuts to his billionaire friends and corporations, resulting in the worst stock market crash since 1987. Trickle-down economics didn’t work then, and it doesn’t work now. Republicans are quick to blame the coronavirus crisis for resulting in the cancellation of MLB, NBA, MLS and the NCAA tournament, as well as the closure of Disneyland, numerous schools, churches, etc., but I beg to differ. Why do these blind sheep follow this incompetent holding the Oval Office hostage—even to the edge of a cold civil war? This insanity must end. Vote. Ray Estes Redding

Fingers crossed Hopefully President Trump is starting to realize that you can’t B.S. a virus like you can the American people. Steve Kennedy Chico


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I have not changed my routine. I feel that I’m way too healthy to worry about it. I’ll go crazy staying at home.

Jason Andrew mortgage writer

I think time with your close friends and your cat is really important, so that’s what I’m doing. And I’m trying to get enough sleep.

Colin Cone So far, so good. I haven’t really seen any impacts for me and my life right now, but I am worried about the foreseeable future.

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CN&R

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE SHERIFF HALTS EVICTIONS

The Butte County Sheriff’s Office (BCSO) has halted residential evictions amid the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, Sheriff Kory Honea told the CN&R on Wednesday (March 18). The move came after Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday (March 16) issued an executive order that empowers local governments to temporarily ban evictions during the crisis. “We put evictions on hold for now,” Honea said. “[We] are still working through all the issues and seeking court guidelines.” BCSO also has taken steps to prepare for local cases of COVID-19, including isolation measures at the Butte County Jail and outfitting deputies with protective gear.

Filling voids

FEMA EXTENDS HOUSING DEADLINE

Temporary housing set up by the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the wake of the Camp Fire will remain in Butte County through at least May 12, 2021. On Friday (March 13), FEMA announced a one-year extension of the 18-month program, which was set to end on May 12. The largest communities are in Gridley and Chico. Since the fire, the federal agency has housed 684 families temporarily, and nearly 300 have moved on to permanent housing, according to a press release. FEMA is working with the California Office of Emergency Services, local officials and volunteers to find housing solutions for remaining families. So far, the agency has granted $84.1 million to survivors for rent, home repairs and property losses.

NVCF FUNDS COVID-19 TESTING

In the wake of the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, the North Valley Community Foundation has donated $250,000 to the Butte County Public Health Department to purchase lab equipment for testing. According to a press release, the foundation has set up a new funding mechanism—the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Rapid Response Fund—to help organizations prepare, respond rapidly and deploy resources in Butte, Glenn, Tehama and Colusa counties. A specific focus going forward will be on food security and health care for seniors, children and those experiencing homelessness. Go to tinyurl.com/NVCFCoronavirus for more information or to donate. “Equipping the Public Health lab with COVID-19 testing capabilities will expedite lab turnaround times for Butte County,” said Public Health Director Danette York (pictured) in a press release. “We are grateful to NVCF for this timely and generous donation.” 8

CN&R

MARCH 19, 2020

Coronavirus closures leave school officials racing to meet basic needs

Pnewscoachto break Vince Enserro had some tough to his student athletes last

leasant Valley High School track and field

Friday (March 13). Effective immediately, their season would be by Ashiah Scharaga suspended until April 15 due to the coronavias h i a h s @ rus COVID-19. n ew sr ev i ew. c o m “You could see the disappointment in the kids’ eyes,” Enserro told Stay connected: the CN&R. “Those kids Go to chicousd.org all put in a lot of hard for updates. work, and our season just got started.” This wouldn’t just impact them, however—all sports activities across Chico Unified School District (CUSD) got postponed. Meanwhile, other extracurricular activities, such as arts performances, have halted through March 31. Of course, since then, students and families across Chico have had to make even more adjustments as local educators respond to the escalating pandemic. As of press time, there were more than 7,000 cases in the United States, 97 of them fatal, including 598 cases and 13 deaths in California. Sunday night (March 15), on the eve

of the district’s regularly scheduled spring break, CUSD Superintendent Kelly Staley announced that in-person instruction would be canceled next week, March 23 through March 27. This announcement came on the heels of the Butte County Office of Education’s recommendation that same night that all schools countywide should close through the 27th “to protect our staff, as well as the safety and wellness of our students and families.” In this time of crisis, school officials have spoken daily, scrambling to plan not only for remote education opportunities but also how to provide critical services, such as supervision and meals. “None of it is as simple as, ‘Oh, we’ll just do everything online,’” Staley said. Mary Sakuma, superintendent of the Butte County Office of Education, said conversations on those plans changed dramatically Sunday evening. That’s when Gov. Gavin Newsom called for the chronically ill and seniors 65 and older to isolate. It quickly became clear the impact that guideline, among others, would have on local school districts and charter schools, Sakuma said. In one small district, for example, all bus drivers are either 65 or older or have

a medical condition that could put them at risk. School leaders had no idea how they’d make accommodations in time. “You can imagine it started to snowball, especially for [that district],” Sakuma said. “I’ll be candid—there are some plans that are still in the works. While we have been working on planning for possible closure, we really didn’t think we would have to make the decision this quickly.” In addition to CUSD, several other school dis-

tricts and area charter schools, including Oroville Union High School District and Oroville City Elementary School District, have announced closures for that same timeframe in recent days. The Glenn County Office of Education took its closure a step further, through April 17. While students are away, CUSD officials have rolled out plans to serve kids—first, by providing food service. Enserro, also CUSD’s director of nutrition, said the district’s bakery will prepare packed breakfasts and lunches. These will be available for all children 18 or younger, regardless of which school they attend, Monday through Friday, from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at four locations: Citrus and Chapman elementary


Chico Unified School District’s bakery will prepare and package breakfasts and lunches for students in need during campus closures. CN&R FILE PHOTO

Sharply divided Needle proposals in Chico, Oroville underscore broader differences

schools, and Chico Junior and Bidwell Junior high schools. It’ll be grab-and-go style: Families can walk up or drive up and receive the meals to take with them. Enserro said this is a modified version of the district’s summer meal program that incorporates social distancing. All students qualify, regardless of family income status. A significant portion of students—41 percent—already received free or reduced-cost meals. “This will be an easy way for us to serve kids and families without compounding the situation,” he said. “I want to make sure that all of our kids are taken care of, first and foremost.” When it comes to another critical need, student supervision, Staley said the district is not able to provide childcare “with the requirements for social distancing currently in place.” However, she recognizes that this is a real concern. Meanwhile, campuses will be sanitized. School officials currently are considering how to provide lessons, activities and/or reading materials electronically. All students in fifth through 12th grades have laptops they take home with them. However, that doesn’t address the needs of students without computers or those without access to the internet, Staley added. The district is considering setting up places for parents to safely pick up printed materials. “Whatever we do, both legally and ethically, we have to make sure it’s accessible to all students,” she said. As of press deadline, school officials still were ironing out long-term plans. Last Friday (March 13), Newsom signed an executive order stating that if schools close temporarily due to COVID-19, they will continue to receive funding to provide education, offer meals, pay employees and arrange for supervision “to the extent practicable.” Then, during a press conference Tuesday (March 17), Newsom remarked that California schools likely will remain closed for the rest of the school year. In response, Staley told the CN&R that statement was shocking. CUSD needs to meet the needs of the local community, she said, whether it be closure, distance/independent learning or—if Butte County remains COVID-19 free— a return to school for most students. “This is fluid and developing and we need to proceed in a calm, organized manner that will include much innovation,” she said. Ω

Last Thursday afternoon (March 12), the

Chico Area Recreation and Park District (CARD) called a special board meeting. That in itself isn’t so unusual, given how the coronavirus crisis has prompted public agencies to reassess their operations on short notice over the past week. What set this meeting apart given present circumstances: Coronavirus wasn’t on the agenda. The CARD directors met to consider the impacts on their parks of potential changes to city ordinances, slated for consideration Tuesday (March 17) by the Chico City Council—a meeting the council canceled during an emergency session the afternoon CARD met. Proposed by Vice Mayor Alex Brown, these revisions of the Offenses Against Public Property ordinance, adopted in 2015, include syringe possession. CARD prohibits needles—i.e., “drug paraphernalia”—in any of the facilities it owns or operates. Brown’s proposal, to align city code with state law, would delay until next year enforcement of city regulations against possessing needles without a medical reason; this violation can carry a charge of either a misdemeanor or an infraction. Teri DuBose, president of the advocacy group Citizens for a Safe Chico, urged CARD to oppose the ordinance changes. She’s been a vocal detractor of the syringe

SIFT ER Economic prognosis

access program, operated by the Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition (NVHRC), posting Facebook messages that include photos of needles she says she’s found in various places around town. In prepared comments to the CARD board, she said: “Well, we’re handing them out by the hundreds, so why have any restrictions against them?” (DuBose declined to speak to the CN&R.) CARD directors decided unanimously to reaffirm their agency’s rules and, on a 3-2 vote, formally oppose the city changing the ordinance. This division in Chico mirrors a split in Butte County, and the state, on the acceptance of syringe access programs. Cities such as Oroville are pushing back with ordinances banning them; other jurisdictions—Orange County and several of its cities—have fought in court. The Oroville City Council took the first step toward a citywide prohibition by introducing the ordinance at a special meeting March 10. That advanced with support from both conservative and progressive council members. Oroville City Administrator Bill LeGrone told the CN&R that the council will hold a public hearing “one way or another” April 7. That could feature partial or complete attendance via

As the coronavirus outbreak takes a toll on human health—sickening around 185,000 and killing more than 7,500 worldwide, as of press deadline—global economies have shuddered in response. Certain business sectors suffered immediately when travel bans grounded flights and anchored cruise ships, but slowdowns and shutdowns are spreading. Moody’s Investors Service, an international research and risk analysis firm, identified industries most and least vulnerable to conditions from the pandemic—most notably, transport restrictions. From Moody’s lists:

High risk

Moderate

Low risk

Apparel Automotive Global shipping Retail (non-food) Travel/hospitality

Agriculture Beverages Manufacturing Media Oil/gas

Construction Defense Food Real estate Telecoms

Protesters before the Feb. 18 Chico City Council meeting demonstrate discontent with syringe access locally. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

teleconferencing. He said council members tell him “they’re getting nothing but positive feedback” on the ordinance. “This is not a statement about what any other community is doing or is not doing,” LeGrone added by phone Tuesday. “This is merely our council saying for our community that they do not feel this type of program is a good fit for us.” California legislators in recent years passed a

series of Health and Safety codes, notably HSC 121349, that allow health departments to authorize services where “the conditions exist for the rapid spread of HIV, viral hepatitis, or any other potentially deadly or disabling infections that are spread through the sharing of used hypodermic needles and syringes.” The California Department of Public Health determined Chico to have this risk and authorized NVHRC. Myriad research has proven needle access reduces disease—for instance, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 studies found syringe programs to be “associated with decreases in the prevalence of HIV and [hepatitis C] and decreases in the incidence of HIV.” CDPH told the CN&R by email that it “consults with the county public health officer and local law enforcement leadership” during its review process for authorizing programs. That’s per state law and the case for NVHRC’s Chico application. By press deadline, CDPH did not answer NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D MARCH 19, 2020

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NEWSLINES whether it has challenged another city’s ban. Oroville City Attorney Scott Huber, a Roseville-based public law specialist, explained that the Orange County jurisdictions won their lawsuit under the California Environmental Quality Act and that the final ruling documents indicate CDPH did not contest other legal issues. The cities of Anaheim, Costa Mesa and Orange ban needle exchanges. The Chico City Council has not opposed NVHRC, though City Manager Mark Orme told the CN&R in an email that City Attorney Andrew Jared will give the council his legal opinion on its latitude under state law the same day Oroville next considers the issue. Huber said by phone that he knows his assessment could differ—“if lawyers didn’t disagree, there never would be any cases that go forward.” The California Attorney General’s Office told the CN&R that it’s “unable to provide legal advice or analysis,” deferring to CDPH, which also gave no definitive answer. Huber said cities have the right to permit or prohibit uses of land in any and all areas within their boundaries. Unless a law specifically overrides a local ordinance, the local rules stand. Huber said, in his reading of HSC 121349, legislators did not preempt municipalities on this matter. Tom Lando, CARD board chair and a consultant with Oroville’s city administration, said he supports both CARD’s push—which he voted for—and Oroville’s. NVHRC has ramped up efforts to curtail syringe waste, such as distributing and emptying “sharps” disposal containers (see “‘In a healthier place,’” Healthlines, Nov. 21). Established in July 2018, the nonprofit has long conducted community cleanups and provided health services. “My own belief is it is inappropriate, regardless how you feel about exchange programs, to have needles in parks,” Lando said. “I personally don’t agree on the path the city [of Chico] has taken,” he added—concurring with Oroville’s assessment that “it’s perfectly legitimate to say, ‘We’re not doing a needle exchange in our community.’ “Two different opinions.” —Evan Tuchinsky eva ntu c h insk y @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Jim Brobeck, water policy analyst for AquAlliance, is skeptical that state officials examining a proposed delta tunnel project will follow environmental regulations to protect Butte County’s natural resources. PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

from any tunnel project, he said, it should not bear any of the cost. Supervisor Bill Connelly, during the March 10 meeting, echoed that thought. “It should be at no cost to Northern California—our county,” said Connelly, whose district encompasses the Oroville area. “It should be the people that actually receive the water pay for it for once.” Jim Brobeck, water policy analyst for the

Tunnel tussle Butte County sounds alarm as state begins environmental review of delta water project

The nature of Butte County’s concerns over

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s scaled back delta tunnel project was made clear last Tuesday (March 10), when Supervisor Debra Lucero questioned a staffer from the state Department of Water Resources (DWR). Marcus Yee, an environmental project manager for the Delta Conveyance Project, told the Board of Supervisors that DWR completed all the initial scoping meetings— in which the agency sought input on the proposed project from affected communities— with a gathering just days earlier in Redding, which was the only such meeting in the North State. Comments would be incorporated into a pending enviSubmit comments: ronmental docuVisit water.ca.gov/deltaconveyance ment. for more information. Yee said DWR held eight meetings—most in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta area where construction would take place. “So, you had one in Northern California,” Lucero said. “Yes,” Yee replied. “Isn’t that where all the water is coming from?” the supervisor asked. “I think so,” the staffer answered.

“Yeah,” Lucero said. “Interesting. One meeting. OK.” The exchange came as DWR prepares an environmental impact report for the controversial water tunnel project, which Newsom last year downsized from two tunnels to one that would divert water from the Sacramento River for use south of the delta. The county had formally opposed the previous twintunnels project—known as the California WaterFix—and now is imploring the state to not repeat past mistakes, such as not adequately addressing local concerns regarding groundwater sustainability, the economy and project funding. DWR will accept comments on the project through Friday (March 20). The Delta Conveyance Project has been proposed to achieve several goals, according to DWR, which include addressing rising sea levels and other effects of climate change, shoring up reliability of water deliveries south of the delta and improving aquatic conditions in the estuary. Paul Gosselin, director of the Butte County Department of Water and Resource Conservation, told the CN&R that the county is calling upon the governor to take a fresh look at the delta tunnel project and not rely

upon past analysis related to the scrapped WaterFix proposal. That previous analysis, Gosselin said, showed such a project could devastate recreation at Lake Oroville and, in turn, hurt businesses reliant on the lake. The reservoir, which is managed by the state, could be drained to “dead pool” conditions for a significant period of time to supply State Water Project and Central Valley Project entities to the south, meaning the lake’s water level could dip below the dam’s outtake pumps and leave boat ramps inaccessible. Additional concerns over the project include potential reductions in surface water deliveries to local water districts, Gosselin said, which could force rice growers to turn to groundwater instead, further stressing the aquifer. And then there’s the problem of funding, the water director continued. The WaterFix had a price tag upward of $17 billion, and Gosselin suggested the new project may cost nearly the same, which wouldn’t “pencil out” for many water districts. At one point, more than half the cost of the twin-tunnels project was slated to be laid upon State Water Project contractors, of which Butte County is one. Because the county would not directly benefit

Chico-based advocacy group AquAlliance, sat under the valley oaks at Annie’s Glen a few days after the meeting. He noted the trees need access to underground water to survive, and if groundwater levels fall lower than 70 feet, the trees will be lost. One of Brobeck’s main goals, he said, is to maintain groundwater-dependent ecosystems, and a tunnel project in the delta could adversely affect ecosystems locally. Brobeck and AquAlliance—as well as other conservation groups—staged significant opposition to the WaterFix project, and he said Butte County government and residents should be opposed to the revised single-tunnel plan. “I think it’s a public relations improvement,” Brobeck said of the newly proposed project. “This new tunnel is still a huge tunnel.” The beneficiaries, he said, would largely be irrigation districts that supply water to farms that “feed the world.” “Approximately 100 farms get 80 percent of the water that’s coming out of Shasta and Oroville and the other reservoirs,” Brobeck said. “Twenty percent goes to the 30 million people” in cities south of the delta. The water analyst further noted his distrust of the state to operate water infrastructure in such a way that will safeguard local resources. He cited problems at the Oroville Dam complex, the so-called “crown jewel” of the State Water Project. The dam, he said, has cost local taxpayers millions of dollars in enforcement expenses, lost tax revenue and “then in terror when they don’t maintain it.” “I’m not at all assured that they’re going to follow environmental regulations to protect our natural resources,” Brobeck said, adding that during drought years, priorities change. “The main goal is to make sure that the farms south of the delta get their water.” —ANDRE BYIK a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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HEALTHLINES Jake Davis says meditation has helped him tap into an innate sense of calmness and gratitude, which is particularly useful when humanity experiences a threat like the coronavirus.

Peace of mind Mental approaches for coping with the coronavirus pandemic

story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ newsrev iew. com

LringReyman was waiting for the phone to at her Chico home to hear about her ast Friday morning (March 13), Silona

son’s health. He’s a college professor in the Middle Eastern country of Qatar, Reyman explained, and was in quarantine there due to exposure to the deadly coronavirus COVID-19. Over the weekend, Reyman learned her son tested negative, though would remain isolated for two weeks. As of press deadline, the virus had infected 185,000 and killed more than 7,500 people worldwide. Reyman told the CN&R she has been

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worried—and, like so many people during this pandemic, her worries have been based in uncertainty, or fear of the unknown. By now, many are well aware of the preventative measures to take to stay healthy and avoid transmission (see “How far is too far?,” Healthlines, March 12). But there are mental health impacts, too, which can breed a contagion of a different kind: a consuming fear that can evolve into anxiety and depression. One clear example is hoarding supplies—including, oddly, toilet paper. In Butte County and elsewhere, shoppers have emptied store shelves of provisions, leading some retailers to ration cases of water, cleaning products, paper towels and, yes, bathroom tissue. “This is what comes up for us out of no control over what’s going on, feeling helpless,” Reyman said.

As such, this is a time for people to develop and practice self-care methods that help them feel centered. Reyman finds a variety of approaches to be effective, from psychological to spiritual, including meditation. The latter has been especially helpful to Jake Davis, a Chicoan who began practicing Buddhism after surviving a near-death experience more than a decade ago. “Life is crazy… it definitely helps to have some structure, to have some [calming] practice,” he said. “Just to have that reprieve from mental chaos and emotional chaos is so helpful.” In her practice, Reyman suggests that

“It’s so easy, especially in the times we live in, to get knocked off-balance with the misery and the pain that’s all around us all the time. The key is to not escalate the anxiety and the panic.”

—Silona reyman

her clients cultivate a list of activities that help them maintain emotional well-being. Examples include calling a friend, dancing or other forms of exercising, writing or journaling, listening to music, taking a bubble bath, and meditation or prayer. People may need to get creative with their coping mechanisms, since activities may be limited or canceled due to the pandemic, she added. For example, if an exercise group’s meetings are postponed, people might want to explore finding a fun homeexercise routine. There’s no single answer, Reyman said. She likes to journal, study religious texts and meditate/pray. Those worried about friends and family should reach out, check in on them and tell them they are loved. While this pandemic is a reminder of the inevitability of death, Reyman said, it’s also a reminder for people to look at healthy ways to respect their bodies and lovingly connect with one another. For example, one of her daughters has called her frequently recently, asking about her health during the pandemic, and Reyman has been able to “cherish that nurturing.” “It’s so easy, especially in the times we live in, to get knocked off-balance with the misery and the pain that’s all around us all the time,” she said. “It’s really imperative to keep the perspective, we’re doing what we can do … and we’re strong, we can cope with this. “The key is to not escalate the anxiety and the panic. Like with my son,” she continued. “You don’t have to deny there’s cause for concern, but then take a deep breath and get your bearings and move forward.” Davis has found this to be true. He began

attending meditation classes 11 years ago at the Sky Creek Dharma Center in Chico after his brush with death. In 2008, he was driving a motorcycle 65 miles per hour in north Chico when he was hit head-on by a car. He should have died, he told the CN&R. As he recovered, which included learning to walk again, it became clear to him that “every day from here on out is a gift.” He started going to meditation groups at the Dharma Center at the urging of a friend. These two experiences dramatically changed his life. He went from always fretting about what he had to do next and which bills he had to pay, to being a person who, HEALTHLINES c o n t i n u e d

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March 19, 2020

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Further relaxation:

go to tinyurl.com/coVidcare for calmness tips published by psychology today.

your hands … do all those things. But all fear does is kind of eat you up, and it’s not helpful for you or for anybody else.” Reyman and Davis told the CN&R they are sympathetic to the emotional stress caused by life’s adversities—like every human being, they’ve endured personal tragedies and loss. Though selfcare, no matter the method, may seem simplistic, Reyman added, those practices are powerful. They can ground people and prevent us from nursing fear or a sense of hopelessness and despair that can lead to anxiety and depression. “It’s all part of the journey— even pandemics,” Davis added. “There’s beautiful things always all around [us] and we forget to look, we forget to notice. … I very intentionally look for the good in the world.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

Misinformation about COVID-19 seems to be spreading even faster than the coronavirus. Scientists are racing to learn all they can about it, but many knowledge gaps remain—and self-proclaimed “experts” keep jumping into the breach. Thanks to the internet, unscientific theories abound. Here, we invoke the spirit of TV’s MythBusters and correct some misconceptions. • Garlic does not prevent coronavirus. Nor does vitamin C or other immunity-boosting remedies; they just fortify your body’s defenses. • Flu vaccine does not protect against coronavirus. Influenza variants and COVID-19 are unrelated viruses. • Kids are susceptible. While the elderly and medically fragile are most vulnerable, anyone can contract COVID-19; younger people just are more likely to carry the disease than get seriously ill.

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Coronavirus myth-busting

(at least temporarily)

through regular meditation practice, has been more readily able tap into his innate sense of calmness and gratitude. This isn’t just true for Davis: Studies have shown that because of neuroplasticity—the ability for the brain to change in response to experience—regular meditation or mindfulness practice can change the brain’s structure and function. Reyman added that this allows people to “much more easily tap into a calm state of being.” So, as coronavirus cases—and worldwide panic—have escalated, and Davis has noticed fearful thoughts creeping up on him, his experience with mindfulness practice has helped him change his perspective. He has been able to recognize those thoughts as impermanent mental chatter, and that he’s taken the steps he needed to stay safe. “We cause a lot of our own suffering through our thoughts. And it’s unnecessary,” he said. “Prudence keeps you safe: wash

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HEALTHLINES

• Hand driers and hot baths are not effective for prevention. The best way to eliminate viruses—which could reach your eyes, nose or mouth through touching—is frequently and thoroughly washing your hands.

Sources: World Health Organization, Harvard Medical School

March 19, 2020

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GREENWAYS

Electric car ‘sweet spot’ Chicoan finds ‘time to join the future’ is now with incentives, options by

Jake Jacobson

M She has a 45-mile commute to Red Bluff, and mine is 4 miles. We take more road trips y wife and I have lived in Chico 18 years.

than most people, but most of our driving is local. With gas prices consistently above $3 per gallon, I wondered, could an electric car work for us? I researched available vehicles, monetary incentives, and delved into the world of e-cars. It didn’t take long to realize that not only could we go electric, we also could do it affordably. Last year, we purchased a Nissan Leaf. So, why would anyone consider buying a car that has a range of only around 150 miles? Because it makes a ton of sense, due to economic incentives that created a “sweet spot” for e-car buyers, low vehicle maintenance costs and environmental benefits. About 90 percent of our driving is for errands, visiting friends, playing pickleball, commuting and the like. All of this is well within the electric car’s range. We have another vehicle for multiday trips, but if we want to use the e-car, we can; we just mix in 30-minute quick charges while having a meal or taking a break. The ability to charge your electric ride on trips is rapidly increasing. Charging stations, some of them free, are popping up all over as electric vehicles increase in popularity. Many are located at hotels and restaurants. I took advantage of a $7,500 federal tax credit for e-car buyers. That’s not a marginal deduction; it’s a dollar-for-dollar credit that lops $7,500 off your tax bill. It won’t be around forever: The full fed-

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eral credit is limited to the first 200,000 U.S. vehicle sales for each manufacturer. For Tesla buyers, the credit is already gone, and credits for General Motors models are beginning to phase out. I also received a state rebate of $2,500, a manufacturer’s rebate of $3,000 and an $800 rebate from PG&E. Not including sales tax and licensing, I bought a brand-new $32,500 car for $18,700. Tax credits and rebates are often put in place to reward behavior that benefits society and to encourage risk-taking. While shopping for an electric vehicle, I discovered there is currently a sweet spot for plug-in car purchasers. Here’s why: There are fewer risks and discomforts for an owner than there were a few years ago, but the incentives remain attractive. I am benefiting from being a somewhat early adopter, but I don’t consider myself a pioneer, like an e-car purchaser from, say, five or more years ago. I bought a proven, reliable vehicle that has been on the market for several years. We took a big leap by going all-electric, but it’s worth noting that plug-in hybrids are also eligible for tax credits and rebates. A plug-in hybrid is a gas/electric hybrid vehicle with a beefed-up electric component to enable less gas-powered driving. To see what’s available, and explore the incentives, go to plugstar.zappyride.com and click “Browse Cars.” I think you’ll be amazed at the variety of plug-in models that are available—everything from sports cars to SUVs. About the author:

Jake Jacobson is a senior project director for The Nature Conservancy, working with ranchers and other rural landowners on real estate transactions and other land conservation projects.

There are incentives available for leasing as well.

Jake Jacobson with his plug-in Nissan Leaf, for which he got more than 40 percent in savings just from e-car incentives. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

Happily, I learned the cost of maintaining an

electric car is much less than a gas-powered vehicle. The maintenance section in my owner’s manual is downright skimpy. For years to come, most of the maintenance will simply be checking brakes, rotating tires and changing brake fluid. There are no oil changes, no spark plugs to replace, no fuel filter changes and so on. There is no exhaust system, no gas tank and way fewer moving parts. The fact that I’ll never put a drop of gasoline in the car also provides huge savings. Not to come off as too Californian, but I also save a lot as a driver because we installed solar panels on our house a few years ago. We overbuilt the solar system not only to eliminate our monthly electric bills, but also to eventually charge an electric car or plug-in hybrid. So, our vehicle is essentially solarpowered, and the “fuel” is already paid for because of the previous solar investment. Sun-powered transportation—how cool is that? Don’t get me started on forking over cash money at a gas station to buy fossil fuel; that’s so 20th century! I work for a conservation organization, and I’ve had a lifelong passion for environmental issues, so I could harp on the environmental attributes ad nauseam. To spare you, I’ll simply say this: Like me, you’ve probably been stuck in complete gridlock and seen all the tailpipes pumping crap into our nasal passages, our lungs and our atmosphere. We’re sitting at a standstill, not moving forward, yet the crap keeps spewing out while we gaze, bleary-eyed, into the haze. We’re frustrated, mad, and we’re not going anywhere. Whether it’s a temporary traffic jam, or the

lack of political action on behalf of our health and the health of the planet, it’s reasonable to ask, “What are we doing just sitting here as the smoke thickens around us?” The transportation sector is a huge contributor of greenhouse gas emissions. Nearly all of us participate in that sector, but we don’t have to leave that sort of legacy. Even if you’re a climate change skeptic, it makes a lot of sense to drive an electric car. It’s time to join the future. Ω

ECO EVENT

SLEEP IN, BIRD OUT The Altacal Audubon Society wants you to get your rest. Hit the snooze button a couple times, brew some coffee, read in bed, then join your fellow birders at 10 a.m. for Slacker Saturday (March 21), a guided leisurely stroll to observe the wintering birds at the Genetic Resource Center (aka the Chico Seed Orchard). Take Cramer Lane off Morrow Lane and park near the gate at the end of the road. Check altacal.org to confirm.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 15 MINUTES Photo by andre byik

‘made from scratch’ It took only a day for chef Emin Tekin to fall in love with Chico. A friend teaching at Chico State invited the Bay Area restaurateur to the city last summer, and Tekin linked with property owner David Halimi through the mutual acquaintance. The pair got to talking about the restaurant space available at the old Pluto’s location downtown at the corner of East Second and Main streets, leading Tekin to open Oya Mediterranean Grill in that spot about two months ago. “It made me very happy that he had a location available,” he said. Tekin, who attended Le Cordon Bleu culinary school in San Francisco, has worked in the restaurant business since immigrating from eastern Turkey in 1999. He currently owns two restaurants— Oya and Oda Restaurant & Brewery in San Francisco— but he’s helped run several others with his brother over the last two decades. Oya offers up wraps and sandwiches—lamb and beef gyros, for example—as well as kebab plates plus vegan and vegetarian options. Visit oyamediterraneangrill.com for menu options. Oya is open normally 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, and 11 a.m.-9 p.m. on Sundays. Tekin and Oya Manager Jon Monroe (pictured right and left, respectively) recently sat down with the CN&R to talk about the new venture, which Monroe hopes will capture the feel of the Middle East and become a cultural hub.

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What does Oya mean? Tekin: Oya is anything handcrafted, hand-touched, made from scratch. … Our food is all handmade. We make everything from scratch. Nothing is from cans [or a] freezer. Everything is fresh. And Jon and I work very closely. He’s in the dining room and I’m in the kitchen. Monroe: There is always going to be something freshly made. Just come in and ask what the newest, freshest thing is. The other day it was kanafeh, which is a fantastic dessert handmade from top to bottom. Sometimes [Tekin is] building a gyro and it’ll just come out and it’ll be heating up and it’ll be the freshest slices of gyros you can get.

Why did you open in Chico? Tekin: I love the community. People are very outgoing. Very friendly. I’m a familyoriented local business. …

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I [also] thought that Chico doesn’t have the right Mediterranean food. Not too formal, not casual. Not fast-foodie. I went to a few restaurants and I found out that [some] restaurants are all about just business. We’re more about hospitality.

What makes Oya stand out? Monroe: I would say things like quality and service. We’re just trying to provide great Mediterranean food. … I’ve seen [Tekin] get meats and just throw them away because they’re not great, they’re not perfect. He always tries to get the best meat he can find; and then the marinades on them. So, even the lamb and beef gyro—he’ll get meat, slice it, mix it … and all of that is premarinated. Oh, it’s definitely a specialty. And the kebabs. Amazing. —Andre Byik a nd re b @new srev i ew. c o m

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Regarding Henry Struggles, triumphs, lessons from raising—advocating for—my son

by

Melissa Daugherty me lissad @ newsr ev iew.c o m

“H

e’s still the same person you brought home from the hospital.” My son’s first pediatrician said that to me and my husband, Matt, when he sat us down to let us know that the tiny baby I was holding in my arms had Down syndrome.

Henry was just a few weeks old at the time. Initially, the doctor thought this diagnosis was unlikely. When we spoke in the maternity ward, he indicated that Henry—who’d made his debut about three weeks before his due date— didn’t have most of the classic signs, including a single crease across his palm. Confirmation would have to come from a blood test. That took weeks. Two agonizingly long weeks. During that time, my mind raced. I knew a positive result would mean having a child with a learning disability, but that’s about it. I’d never known anyone with Down syndrome. In fact, though I’m ashamed to reveal this, I had never even met anyone with it. I’d come to find out that Down syndrome is a genetic disorder caused during conception by the formation of a third copy of the 21st chromosome and that the clinical terminology is trisomy 21. I also learned that the D in Down is capitalized because the condition is named for John Langdon Down, a British doctor who studied it back in the 1800s. But those details seem inconsequential now. More important: I had no idea that Down syndrome often is accompanied by a host of medical issues or that I was about to begin the most challenging and rewarding journey of my life—being a parent of a medically fragile child with a developmental delay. In honor of World Down Syndrome Day (March 21), after many years of contemplation, I’ve decided to share a small window into my family’s struggles and triumphs to Melissa Daugherty and 22-month-old Henry at Enloe Medical Center’s emergency room during one of his many bouts of pneumonia. PHOTO BY MATT DAUGHERTY

About the author:

Melissa Daugherty is editor-in-chief of the CN&R.

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Far left: Melissa Daugherty and 18-month-old Henry. PHOTO BY MATT DAUGHERTY

Matt Daugherty and Henry, 4, play at Five-Mile Recreation Area in Bidwell Park. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

sleep apnea and chronic congestion. Minor procedures for blocked tear ducts and hearing loss took place when Henry was still an infant. A month after he turned 2 years old, we spent a few nights in the hospital after a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. The surgeries alleviated the issues to a degree. Still, more often than not, he had a runny nose. Little did we know that more serious medical issues were ahead of us.

Open house

perhaps help other kids like Henry who are overlooked in the medical and educational realms.

But first, some background About a year after Matt and I got married, we started seriously considering having a baby. I was 35 at the time, and I remember going to see my gynecologist. I’m not sure that’s a thing other people do before trying to get pregnant. But for me, when it comes to major decisions—say, buying a car or a house—I’m cautious. Really, I was there for peace of mind. You know—to get a check-up to make sure all of the parts were in working order. When the doctor came into the exam room and saw me reading a pamphlet on conception for older women, he chuckled and said I wasn’t in that group. After a few tests, he gave me the green light I’d been hoping for. Within a few months, I was expecting. Partway into the pregnancy, though, something wasn’t right. I started having early contractions and, during a few trips to the hospital, Matt and I learned through tests that there were indications—“markers” in medical parlance—that something was wrong with the developing fetus. There were three of them, including short femurs (thigh bones). The caveat was that sometimes these so-called markers end up being nothing at all. I was referred to a laboratory in Sacramento that had more sophisticated ultrasound equipment—where the indicators were verified and amniocentesis was suggested. (That’s the test where a needle is inserted into the womb to collect amniotic fluid for genetic testing.) That afternoon, Matt and I spoke with a genetic counselor on-site. She asked questions about our family and medical history. The outcome: We were not at a greater risk of having children with birth defects.

At the time, amniocentesis was one of only a few surefire ways to get a diagnosis. But because of the slight increased risk of early labor, and the fact that I was already having contractions, we decided against it. On a Saturday afternoon in October, about three weeks before my due date, I visited the downtown farmers’ market and hours later went into labor. Right around 4 a.m. Sunday, I was holding 5-pound, 2-ounce Henry in my arms. Fast-forward two weeks and a life-changing blood test later, and Matt and I had a lot more on our plates than being new parents.

Crisis after crisis Not long thereafter, we received a referral for Henry to see a roving pediatric cardiologist who visited Chico once a month. As we learned, children with Down syndrome are prone to heart conditions. An echocardiogram confirmed that Henry had an atrial septal defect and multiple ventricular septal defects—holes in the walls between the heart’s two upper chambers and lower chambers, respectively. Fortunately, they were small enough that the doctor was confident they would close on their own. Otherwise, we’d have been looking at open-heart surgery. After that wave of relief, however, we were overwhelmed by one medical crisis after another. As first-time parents, Matt and I were in and out of the pediatrics office quite often. Looking back, I’m thankful about the paranoia. One weekend, after having been to the doctor days earlier and getting a diagnosis of a cold, 18-month-old Henry became lethargic. We rushed to Immediate Care and learned, after an X-ray and additional tests, he had not only pneumonia but also influenza. The treating physician was extremely straightforward about the risks associated with pneumonia. It’s nearly always the cause of

death in kids with Down syndrome, he told us. That encounter made us extra protective and taught me to trust my maternal instincts. Over the next couple of years, we ended up in Enloe Medical Center’s emergency room at least three times in the middle of the night, when urgent care centers are closed. Without exception, Henry was diagnosed with pneumonia. It was the “sneaky” kind, we were told. What was seen by X-ray couldn’t be heard using a stethoscope, doctors explained. Each time, the symptoms appeared suddenly. Within hours of seeming like his typical smiley self, Henry would turn into a rag doll, ribs showing as he labored for air. After treatment—typically IV antibiotics, a steroid injection and breathing treatments—he’d perk up almost as quickly as he’d crashed. Yet, had we not been attentive, it could have gone the other way. Every runny nose and fever put me on edge. Matt and I filled our medicine cabinet with rinses, ointments and various nasal aspirators. One was a bizarre, straw-like contraption with a mouthpiece designed to suck out snot. We became frequent fliers at multiple medical offices, including specialists such as a local otolaryngologist, James Lacey (an ear, nose and throat doctor who has since moved out of state). Henry was diagnosed with several respiratory-related problems, including

During those first years, a near-constant stream of traffic paraded in and out of our home. That’s because Henry’s Down syndrome diagnosis qualified him for early intervention—services such as physical therapy, nutrition aid and speech therapy. We were grateful for the expertise and support of these professionals, provided mainly through the Butte County Office of Education and Far Northern Regional Center, but having three or four people in and out of the house each week was exhausting. Over time, we became quite fond of these folks. One of them, physical therapist Marsha Ellsberg, noticed that one of Henry’s feet wasn’t flexing as it should. It was odd for a number of reasons, including that kids with Down syndrome tend to have low muscle tone and therefore are floppy. That makes it more difficult for them to reach developmental milestones, such as rolling over, crawling and walking. Indeed, Henry wasn’t able to walk unassisted until he was nearly 2 1/2. His pediatrician wasn’t too concerned initially. That changed over time, when we noticed his gait becoming rigid. For some reason, Henry’s knees stopped fully extending. As a result, he hunched forward and to the side. Meanwhile, a lump started forming on his inner left foot, and other limbs tightened as well. Henry’s neck seemed stiff a lot, especially if he fell asleep with his chin on his chest. During long drives, I turned around in my seat constantly to reposition him for fear that he’d wake up bawling. We took the same tack when Henry fell asleep on bike rides through Bidwell Park—Matt would reach his hand back to keep him upright in his seat. Crying was the main way Henry communicated with us back then. At first, Matt and I disagreed on the message. What I heard was that he was hurting, whereas Matt believed he was tired of being confined . Frustrated and stressed out, we’d

HENRY C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 2 0 MARCH 19, 2020

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HENRY C O N T I N U E D

The staff from Loma Vista School and Innovative Preschool, including Colleen Ehrhart (middle, squatting), congratulates Henry during his graduation from transitional kindergarten.

F R O M PA G E 1 9

argue about it every time we contemplated a trip out of town. Our solution was making a lot of pitstops so he could stretch. Matt took the lead on getting through the labyrinthine medical bureaucracy to get to the specialists—a local orthopedist and podiatrist, among others—we hoped would solve Henry’s mysterious developing issues.

PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

contemplation, we realized how reclusive we’d become and how much we needed a break. Headley came highly recommended from the daughter of one of Henry’s service providers—she ended up being a godsend, a true friend to Henry as well as Matt and me.

Letdown in Sacto

Henry’s village On Henry’s third birthday, he started attending preschool at Chico Unified School District’s Loma Vista School, which enrolls kids with developmental delays and other qualifying disabilities. About a month before that, he also began attending Innovative Preschool, a private nonprofit preschool located on the same campus. (Both now share a new site around the corner, on Manzanita Avenue.) Innovative looks a lot like a typical day-care center—filled with both educational supplies and toys—but is an inclusion program that brings together typical kids and those with special needs. Some children attend Innovative through its partnership with CUSD. Others enroll there as they would through other private preschools by paying tuition. Initially, Henry spent mornings in a Loma Vista class—a wonderful environment with a great teacher and support staff—and afternoons at Innovative as a private preschool enrollee. Later, he spent full days in the blended Innovative setting, learning from CUSD teachers during Loma Vista’s school hours and then supported by Innovative staff the remainder of the day. Curriculum was guided by an individual educational plan—commonly referred to as an IEP—that included not only educational benchmarks but also goals related to physical abilities, such as dressing oneself and strengthening mobility. By then, Henry had begun refusing to walk more than very short distances. The inclusion classroom model prepares attendees for elementary school while also teaching them to Dr. Kathleen Collins of Stanford Children’s Health examines Henry’s joints during an appointment last summer. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

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celebrate each other’s differences. For us, though, there was so much more to it. Our family became very close to Innovative’s staff, all of us dedicated to supporting Henry. I’ll never forget when one of them, then-Site Supervisor Colleen Ehrhart—or “Leen-Leen,” as Henry would say—showed up unprompted to the Chico Buddy Walk, a fundraiser for programs for kids with Down syndrome. She was there for our little family that day and throughout her tenure with the program. Like other adults, she was bewitched by our sweet social butterfly with the impish grin. Beloved on campus, Henry was, and continues to be, quite a charmer. He also has a rather mischievous side. According to Innovative Executive Director Cate Szczepanski, he is the longest enrollee in the history of the program, which allows kids to attend until they start first grade. We also became close with another staffer, Andie Headley, whose relationship with Henry actually predated her employment there. Headley first met him as a respite provider through the Arc of Butte County. Funded by Far Northern Regional Center, the service allows parents or guardians of people with disabilities to hire short-term caregivers, kind of like a babysitter. Parenting kids with special needs can be stressful and isolating. When Matt and I finally started using our respite allocation, after years of

In those early years in the academic setting, I could tell that certain educators frowned upon the fact that I often carried Henry. But whatever physical burden I may have endured from lugging him around was nothing compared with the weight I felt in my heart after future diagnoses that took years to uncover. Once we’d exhausted the resources in the local medical community, we were referred to a children’s hospital in Sacramento that we’d visited when Henry was an infant. This time, he was placed on a waitlist for a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. It took six months to see the doctor, and the outcome was disappointing. After all that time, we basically were told that Henry probably would grow out of his ailments, including a bunion. If he did not, we were informed, surgery would be an option when he was much older. He was about 3 1/2 years old at the time. We were skeptical and irked, because we believed there was more to the story. What irritated me further was the impression I got from the specialist that Henry’s issues—his rigidity and abnormal gait—weren’t interesting enough to warrant his attention. We left feeling dismissed and defeated. Two years later, we returned to the hospital. Henry’s condition had worsened, especially his neck. He was talking better by then and had explicitly told me that it hurt. That finally piqued the doctor’s interest. Matt and I were polite, but we also were assertive about Henry being evaluated further. An MRI was ordered, and we learned that he had atlantoaxial instability, also known as upper cervical instability, a condition that put him at increased risk of spinal injury. We absorbed the news with


Henry didn’t get his portrait taken in either kindergarten or first grade and wasn’t included in the class photo. That may seem like a little thing, but it’s indicative of the bigger picture: how kids like him often aren’t seen and thus get left behind. mixed emotions. On the one hand, after believing all along that something was seriously wrong, we finally felt heard. On the other, any sense of vindication was quickly replaced with terror. That’s because, in terms of medical intervention, the news was grim. The pediatric neurologists who were sent in to see us explained that surgery came with huge risks—a 20 percent mortality rate for people with Down syndrome, not from the operation itself but from the recovery. We again returned to Chico deflated. Henry was already at risk of falling, but now we knew that a bad spill could be devastating. Cue more anxiety about his well-being. But there wasn’t much we could do other than protect him as best as possible. The diagnosis was added to Henry’s individual health care plan at school. It called for, among other things, direct supervision at all times. We also had to shield him from other little-boy things that were too risky—sports, rough housing, bounce houses and big playground equipment. It’s why we’ve had to skip birthday parties at the local gymnastics club and trampoline park.

Imperfect inclusion It wasn’t long after the diagnosis that Henry transitioned into the greater Chico Unified elementary school environment, where he spent two years fully immersed in the general education setting among typical peers. A one-on-one aide accompanied Henry in the classroom, adapting curriculum and supporting him throughout his day, and his teachers were open-minded and kind. Even still, I know it wasn’t easy. For starters, Henry’s continued physical deterioration often made him cranky and tired. He’d some-

times moan, place his head on his desk, or crumple on the floor and refuse to participate. Other behaviors stemmed from sensory overload. He was fearful, for example, of the big, busy setup in the school’s gymnasium on picture day. In previous environments, at Innovative and Loma Vista, staff guided him through the process in a smaller, quieter setting. Henry’s peers realized he was different for the aforementioned reasons. But having known him since day one, they became accustomed to quirks that presented distractions at the start of the school year. The adults weren’t always as flexible or adaptive, however. For example, the school made no accommodations for him on picture day. Henry didn’t get his portrait taken in either kindergarten or first grade and wasn’t included in the class photo. That may seem like a little thing, but it’s indicative of the bigger picture: how kids like him often aren’t seen and thus get left behind. We witnessed that at the school in the years Henry was there. Kids attending the special day class were segregated in a portable building isolated from the campus core. They didn’t commingle to any notable degree—not even during recess— despite vast amounts of research showing that inclusion benefits all students, regardless of abilities. But leave it to our boy to find his own advocates. During Henry’s kindergarten year, a classmate’s father with mad Photoshop skills remedied the photographic omission. He used a picture I’d taken of Henry and replaced the background to match the one used by the school portrait company. He then replicated the Henry practices the ukulele in his first-grade classroom at his former elementary school. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

whole-class photo parents get when they order prints, and surprised Matt and me with it one day after school. I thanked him and wept in my car. Henry made his own way during those years. He had a lot of help from his wonderful aide, general ed teachers and even his classmates. He’d developed genuine friendships, which heartened Matt and me. That made the eventual decision to switch schools and opt for part-time inclusion all the more difficult.

Seen and heard Henry’s first-grade year was fraught with challenges, but it also resulted in a major medical breakthrough. Just weeks before the school year began, we had our first appointment at the Down Syndrome Clinic located within the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, part of Stanford Children’s Health, in Palo Alto. Matt had worked so hard over the years to get referrals, set up appointments and wrangle with our insurance carrier. We’d heard great things about Stanford, but we didn’t want to get our hopes up. During that initial visit, just a

few months shy of Henry’s seventh birthday, he was seen by numerous clinicians—doctors, including trainees, and other medical experts. One of the first to examine him was a pediatric occupational therapist. After trying to flex Henry’s limbs and fingers, she asked a question that none of the literally dozens of medical professionals we’d met had ever posed. “Has he seen a rheumatologist?” (That’s a specialist for joint diseases.) The answer, of course, was no. Among the many folks who met Henry that day was Kathleen Collins, a pediatric rheumatology fellow and one of the nicest physicians we’ve met on our long journey. Whether coincidental or causal, we’ve found that Stanford’s doctors have superior bedside manners than those at the other major medical facilities we’ve visited. It isn’t just their initial approach that’s impressed us, but also the followthrough. Collins examined him and ordered a battery of tests that confirmed Henry had advanced juvenile idiopathic arthritis. An autoimmune disease with no known cause, the condition causes pain, swelling and stiffness in the joints.

Next came a plan to control the inflammation, starting with an immediate course of prednisone, a steroid. Unfortunately, like others who experience negative side effects from the drug, Henry exhibited defiant behavior. We slowly weaned him off the medication before beginning a so-called biologic treatment called Humira, a weekly shot, as well as an additional anti-inflammatory medication. After years spent navigating a complex medical maze, with so many dead-ends, Matt and I finally felt Henry had been seen and heard. At last, our precious boy—our only child—was given the care he desperately needed and deserved. I’ll never forget seeing Collins’ eyes well up when she saw his progress after a few months. The treatment has been life-changing. Over the past 20 months, the swelling in his joints decreased, greatly improving his mobility. About a year ago, for the first time in Henry’s life, he started running and jumping. He finally could act like a kid. Awaiting him in our backyard was untouched play equipment Matt had built when Henry was an infant, long before we knew what sort of journey lie ahead of us. We’ve seen further progress in so many areas—improvements in fine and gross motor skills, speech development and literal height, as the disease had severely stunted his growth. “Mommy, carry me,” a phrase I heard so often, gave way to “Mommy, I did it!” These days, more often than not, I’m chasing after him. This past summer, after closely monitoring Henry’s progress, Collins informed us that her fellowship was ending. She was leaving Stanford and heading to a children’s hospital in her home state of Tennessee. We had one last appointment with her. It was a bittersweet goodbye filled with grateful hugs, lots of tears and hope for the future. There isn’t a perfect blueprint for parents when it comes to laying a path to ensure your children get what they need in the medical and educational realms. Chances are that journey will have many twists and turns. Among the many lessons I’ve learned thus far is that the greatest rewards come when you trust that you know what’s best for them— and never give up. Ω

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Arts &Culture “@dijondigon_,” by Cassius Soniquie

L A T POR Take a break from the news, and ‘allow yourself to be fully transported’ by local art “[A] sanctuary to deal with the chaos surrounding us.” That sounds nice right about now, doesn’t story and photos by it? With coroJason Cassidy novirus and its j asonc @ attendant uncernewsrev iew.c om tainty/anxiety/ fear making its Cafe walls: spread into the Portal, paintings by Lola Yang United States, Shows through we are all on March 30 edge. I certainly Naked Lounge didn’t expect to 118 W. Second St. find significant Through the Looking relief from the Glass, portraits by Cassius Sonoquie stress at a local Shows through April 1 coffee shop (in Blackbird fact, I probably 1431 Park Ave. made matters worse for my nervous system with my afternoon pick-me-up), but as promised in those words from the artist statement hanging on the wall at the Naked Lounge, there was a measure of “sanctu-

ary” to be found in the paintings on display. Lola Yang’s exhibit is titled Portal,, and her expressive figurative paintings are the sanctuaries she speaks of. She also gives the instructions to “please, allow yourself to be fully transported! I mean, really make sure that your energy is clear and grounded. … Allowin[g] each moment to be fresh and untainted by the last.” I didn’t let any of that sink in at first. I read the words, I glanced at the paintings on the wall on my way out, and then I went back to work. It wasn’t until I was at another cafe (and bookstore) across town— Blackbird—looking at another artist’s works, that her ideas hit me. It was quiet, nearly empty, and as I lingered in front of a captivating watercolor/gouache portrait of a peaceful-looking dude in a striped beanie and overalls (titled “@ dijondigon_”), I became lost in it. Did I clear my mind, allowing for “Mushroom Spirit,” by Lola Yang

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FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

a fresh untainted moment with the work? Or was 18-year-old Cassius Soniquie’s art so fresh that it drew me in and got me out of my head? Either way, it doesn’t matter. I became clearheaded. The pieces in Sonoquie’s Through the Looking Glass exhibit got my full attention, providing a welcome respite. The title of the show is a reference to the fact that most of the paintings/drawings are screenviews of people the artist follows on Instagram—from portraits of hip-looking young people to an angry looking clown (who is either dancing or practicing some form of martial art). They’re expressive and fun, and they provide a cool perspective of humanity by zooming in on the individual characters in the ever-widening world of connections being made in a digital community. After absorbing Sonoquie’s characters, I returned to the Naked Lounge to test out Yang’s Zen-structions while looking at her artwork. The show is made up of both representational and abstract pieces, and it’s with the latter—“intuitive landscapes,” as Yang describes them—that I was able to step through the portal. Her landscapes reward close inspection, with dark worlds revealing subtle figures in the thick brushstrokes. A wavy figure in the corner of “Campsite” mimics the curve of a tree’s trunk or a campfire flame. Eyeballs and a mélange of mysterious oddities hide in the folds of a bouquet in “Alien Floral.” But most satisfying, given the energy-clearing exercise, was “Mushroom Spirit,” a scene dominated by greens with what looks like foothills descending into a valley in the background. In the foreground, perched among rocks and vegetation, is a lone mushroom—or is it a monk with a big hat meditating in half lotus? Again, it doesn’t matter. What does is the fact that, for a few moments at least, my mind was still and I wasn’t swirling in the chaos. Ω

THIS WEEK 19

THU

3/21, 10am. Free. Genetic Resource Center, 2741 Cramer Lane.

Special Events

Theater

EARTH DAY FILM FESTIVAL: Final day of

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR: See Thursday. Sat, 3/21, 7:30pm. $20-$24.

From the Ground Up’s week of films and workshops with an ear toward being “active listeners in the ever-evolving story of the Earth.” Note: All remaining screenings have been moved online. Thu, 3/12. earthdayfilmfest. org

Theater JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR: A production of

Andrew Lloyd Weber’s classic rock opera that documents the last week of Jesus Christ’s life entirely through song. Thu, 3/19, 7:30pm. $20$24. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F., 894-3282, chicotheatercompany.com

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NOTE ON COVID-19

With restrictions on public events, bars and nightclubs in the wake of the cornonavirus scare, many local venues are temporarily closed and most shows have been canceled or postponed. Even events that are planned as of press deadline may have since been called off. Please contact venue to confirm details.

Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F., 894-3282, chicotheater company.com

EDITOR’S PICK

22

SUN

Theater JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR: See Thursday. Sun, 3/22, 2pm. $20-

$24. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F., 894-3282, chicotheatercompany.com

FOR MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 26

FRI

Theater JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR: See Thursday. Fri, 3/20, 7:30pm. $20-$24.

Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F., 894-3282, chicothe atercompany.com

NOT DARK YET

21

SAT

Special Events SLACKER SATURDAY: Walk the paths

and treat your eyes and ears to wintering birds on this leisurely morning stroll around the Genetic Resource Center. Sat

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@ newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Though most every public event has been canceled due to coronavirus concerns, there are a handful of local groups attempting to keep residents entertained during these stressful times. Chico Theater Company is trying to finish out the run of its current production (with limits on audience size to allow for social distancing) Jesus Christ Superstar (Thursday-Sunday, through April 5). If you have purchased tickets for the show and won’t be attending, consider donating your ticket price instead of asking for a refund. The coming weeks will be rough for community theaters and other arts organizations, and they can use all the help they can get.

MARCH 19, 2020

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2020 Postponed! Keep Chico

FINE ARTS UNBROKEN LEGACIES – NORTHERN CALIFORNIA GLASS ART Shows through April 26 Museum of Northern California Art

Weird

SEE ART

Art Show New dates:

June 18–21 1078 Gallery

1710 Park Ave., Chico Reception: Saturday, June 20, 6-9 p.m.

Art BLACKBIRD: Through the Looking Glass, artwork by Cassius Sonoquie. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Furlandia – Where the Animals Rule, zany portraits and 3-D pop-out paintings by Ana Nelson & Phil Dynan. Through 3/27. 450 Orange St., Ste. 6, chicoartcenter.com

For more info visit: keepchicoweird.com

or facebook.com/keepchicoweird

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HEALING ART GALLERY: Art by Kimberly Rachelle Ranalla, paintings by Northern California Artist and brain tumor survivor. Enloe Regional Cancer Center’s

Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/17. Free. 265 Cohasset Road., 332-3856. enloe.org

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Unbroken Legacies Northern California Art Glass, an exhibition of artists working with a variety of glass techniques. Through 4/26. 900 Esplanade. monca.org


CHOW

Let’s

Can we eat out?

celebrate!

As coronovirus guidelines take hold, many restaurants are still cooking … and they need your business

Oyourpandemic, you’re tired of eating canned chili in pajamas. Time to call on your favorite local

ne week into home isolation during the coronavirus

eatery and get something good to eat. As of press deadline, that’s still an option in Chico/California, but there are restrictions. On Monday (March 16), one day after Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that bars and nightclubs would have to close, he made the same declaration for diningin at restaurants. According to the latest coronavirus guidance from the California Department of Public Health, “restaurants should be closed for in-restaurant seated by Jason Cassidy dining, and should be open only to drive-through or other pick-up/ j aso nc@ delivery options.” newsrev i ew.c om This follows the previous state recommendation that restaurants cut occupancy in half and rearrange seating to allow for social distancing. At press time, many Chico establishments—Tackle Box Bar & Grill, Unwined Kitchen & Bar, Upper Crust Bakery & Cafe, and Cafe Coda, to name a few—still were allowing customers to dine-in, operating under that former guideline. When the situation inevitably changes, many places plan to continue offering food to-go and for delivery (usually via an outside service like Grubhub, Entree Express or FoodJets). And many restaurants are adding curbside takeout, which comes with the double advantage of being able to pay ahead by card (avoiding a physical exchange) and not having to go into the enclosed space of the restaurant. La Hacienda in north Chico has always had curbside pickup in its parking lot, and it just rolled out a generous enticement: Take a photo of yourself picking up your order of Mexican food, post it to Facebook, tag the restaurant, and get $20 off your next visit. Additionally, Red Tavern is offering curbside pickup from a discounted to-go menu—everything from a Red Tavern bacon burger ($14) to a grilled Allen Brothers filet mignon with asparagus, au gratin potatoes and Gorgonzola cream drizzle ($29). A note on the restaurant’s website (redtavern.com) reads: “Our goal is not to make money off of this situation; it is simply to stay in business and to continue paying our

Nobby’s cheeseburgers, fries and more are available for curbside pickup. PHOTO COURTESY OF NOBBY’S

amazing employees.” Others that have added curbside service include Bacio, Tender Loving Coffee, Nobby’s, Burban Kitchen, Fresh Twisted Cafe, Italian Cottage, Sicilian Cafe and the new Pizza Riot. There likely are more— check social media pages or ask when you call and order. Food trucks still are allowed to operate, under the same mandate as brick-and-mortars to “increase frequency of cleaning and sanitizing,” among other requirements. Locally, Drunken Dumpling, Truckaroni, Chicobi’s and The Lamb & The Wolf are active and posting their whereabouts on Facebook. And even though the debut of the Thursday Night Market has been postponed until April 16, the regular weekly Chico Certified Farmers’ Markets are still happening—both Wednesday, 8 a.m.-1 pm., at North Valley Plaza, and Saturday, 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m., in the parking lot at Second and Wall streets downtown. Of course, there are many local restaurants that have had to close during this time, including the trio of popular downtown establishments owned by local restaurateur Will Brady—The Banshee, B Street Public House and Bill’s Towne Lounge. A note posted on all three Facebook pages on Monday (April 16) reads: “We love our staff and community, so to help with this fight, we will be closing today until we as a country get this virus under control. … Be well and stay safe. We will reopen with a party like you’ve never seen!” Those closures mean around 130 people are now out of work, and that’s just three businesses. Many more local establishments and their employees are in perilous financial positions, and if you have it to give, one way to help is by buying gift certificates now. Some places have set up fundraising drives for helping out employees in limbo, and The Banshee/B Street/Bill’s has a GoFundMe “tip jar” for the staff that you can donate to at tinyurl.com/BradySpots. Ω

The Chico News & Review’s party guide covers a full range of parties and what you need to make them happen.

Look for it on stands now!

MARCH 19, 2020

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 3/19—WEDNESDAY 3/25

KYLE WILLIAMS Friday, Mar. 20 The Exchange, Oroville SEE FRIDAY

THIS WEEK:

21SATURDAY

KATIE BARTLETT: Singer/songwriter

live. Sat, 3/21, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

RIDGE STRONG: Red-dirt rock from

19THURSDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Live music. Thu, 3/19, 6pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

redtavern.com

Paradise. Sat, 3/21, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

SHANIA TWIN: Shania Twain tribute

band featuring Donna Huber. Sat, 3/21, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22

NOTE ON COVID-19

With restrictions on public events, bars and nightclubs in the wake of the cornonavirus scare, many local venues are temporarily closed and most shows have been canceled or postponed. Even events that are planned as of press deadline may have since been called off. Please contact venue to confirm details.

20FRIDAY 25WEDNESDAY

KALIMBA: Earth Wind and Fire tribute

band. Fri, 3/20, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino. com

KYLE WILLIAMS: Live music with

local singer/songwriter. Fri, 3/20, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

ROCKHOUNDS: Classic rock covers. Fri, 3/20, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino

OPEN MIC: Every Wednesday, hosted by Floyd Vannata, all performances welcome. Vendors and visual artists contact the venue beforehand if interested. Wed, 3/25, 7pm. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Hwy, Oroville.

STEVE COOK, JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON: Live music. Wed, 3/25,

6pm. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd.

& Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

M-F 9am-5pm Sat 10am-5pm Sun 10am-4pm

Equipment

26

CN&R

MARCH 19, 2020


em ic is Th e co ro na vi ru s pa nd es . di sr up ti ng al l ou r liv pu bl ic he al th of fic ia ls , Fo llo wi ng th e gu id an ce of in g ca nc el ed . As be e ar l al sm d an e rg la ev en ts ve rt is er s an d sp on so rs a re su lt, m an y of ou r ad su pp or t, to o. ar e pu llin g ba ck on th ei r t th e co ro na vi ru s ou ab ed rm fo in u yo ep To ke th e ot he r im po rt an t ou tb re ak , as we ll as al l . Pl ea se do na te at lp he ur yo ed ne we , ws lo ca l ne co /d on at e. ne w sr ev ie w .c om /c hi

We are not corporate media. We are 100% independent and need your help to continue reporting local stories and publishing your voices.

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March 19, 2020

Temergency. released last week, right in the midst of a national Not surprisingly, very few people wanted he Hunt can’t seem to catch a break. It finally got

to risk exposure to COVID-19 by sitting next to people in an enclosed space. by Originally set for release last year, Bob Grimm the film was postponed in the wake of the mass shootings in Dayton, bg ri m m @ new srev i ew. c o m Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, due to its violent nature. So, the studio picked March 2020 for a release, only to have its plans foiled again. While this is a fun B-movie, it certainly would’ve benefited from a limited release or streaming-service The Hunt Starring hilary Swank opening. It has its virtues, but you and Betty Gilpin. probably made the right choice stayDirected by craig ing home and watching Disney+. Zobel. cinemark 14, The film starts with a group of Feather river cinemas. hardcore liberals instant-messaging rated r. each other, goofing around with the idea of hunting “deplorables” for sport, à la The Most Dangerous Game, the 1924 book by Richard Connell that the film is loosely based on. Was it a joke? Will they actually hunt? As things turn out, a hunt is on, and those who voted for President Trump will be in the crosshairs. A dozen MAGA types wake up in a field, find a case of weapons and are immediately met with gunfire and arrows, forcing them to fight for their lives. Oh, my god. Pretty controversial, right? Nah, not really. The point of this movie is that too many people, from both the right and left, act like total a-holes when it comes to their political ideologies. (Hey, I count myself as one of them from time to time.) Just about every character in this film behaves badly, regardless

3

of political affiliation. The movie is a satire of our out-of-hand, social-media-fueled times. It’s funny (in places), bloody and suspenseful. There are moments when it feels like the filmmakers are saying, “Hey, we were just ragging on Republicans, but now we’ll rag on Democrats! So, don’t get too mad at us!” Those obvious attempts at balance drag the movie down a bit. The hunt in question is masterminded by Athena (played by Hilary Swank). You don’t see her for a large swath of the film, but she shows up eventually (and is involved in a great fight scene toward the end). The movie primarily belongs to Betty Gilpin (from GLOW on Netflix) as Crystal, who is on the hunted side, which is not good for the hunters. Betty can throw down, and there’s little that scares her. Gilpin has all the makings of an action hero. She has a great deadpan delivery to punctuate her smackdowns, and along with her arsenal of unique facial expressions, the sympathetic hero has a real depth behind her eyes. I’d say at least 80 percent of the reason I like this movie is because of Gilpin. Some familiar faces show up as well, including Ike Barinholtz, Ethan Suplee, Emma Roberts and Amy Madigan. However, don’t get too attached to anybody in this movie. Given the storyline, the cast thins out fast. Swank, a two-time Oscar winner, shows that she can bring the funk whether she’s working for Clint Eastwood (who directed her in Million Dollar Baby) or Craig Zobel (the director of this one). She creates a sinister villain in Athena, who is just as memorable as the protagonist. Due to the coronovirus, The Hunt is getting an early streaming release date and will be available to rent on the major TV platforms starting Friday (March 20). It’s the perfect selection for your quarantine watch list. Ω


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Quinn (Margot Robbie) teaming up with a new crew—an all-female band of superheroes trying to rescue a young girl from the Black Mask (Ewan McGregor). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Note on film listings: Many release dates for films have been pushed back due to COVID-19. Additionally, due to the fluid nature of efforts to slow its spread, further cancellations/closings are possible after press deadline. Please contact theaters to for the latest information.

3

The Hunt

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

The Invisible Man A horror adaptation of H.G. Wells’ novel of the same name, with Elizabeth Moss starring as a woman whose abusive partner (Oliver Jackson-Cohen) continues to terrorize her even though he appears to have disappeared. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing Bad Boys for Life In this third installment in the trilogy, the buddy-cop duo (played by Will Smith and Martin Lawrence) reunite to fight a cartel mob boss. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

I Still Believe

Bloodshot Based on the Valiant Comics character of the same name, with Vin Diesel starring as the Marine who is assassinated and then brought back to life and transformed by scientists into a superbeing with great strength and the ability to instantly heal. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

2

The Call of the Wild

A grumpy, growly Harrison Ford sporting a David Letterman beard stars alongside a CGI dog in this latest cinematic take on Jack London’s classic The Call of the Wild. Shooting for a safe PG, much of the violence—against humans and dogs alike—has been removed in favor of a more family-friendly take on the man-and-his-dog fable. Ford plays John Thornton, a grieving, boozing loner who has left his wife after the death of their son. He rescues Buck from sled-team drudgery and bonds with his new four-legged prospecting partner. Buck, the big house dog who was kidnapped from his California home and sold into pulling a mail sled in Alaska, is a curious enough technological creation. Buck doesn’t look bad; he just doesn’t look and act “real.” As Ford narrates the movie with his huffy grumble, his onscreen persona does have a surprising nuance. He makes much of the movie watchable, even heartwarming in places. But then Buck the dog bounces around like Scooby-Doo and kills the moment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Emma.

An English adaptation of the Jane Austen novel of the same name. Anya Taylor-Joy stars as the title character, a young, beautiful woman in mid-19th-century England who meddles in the love lives of her friends and family. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey This latest offering from the DC Comics Extended Universe follows up Suicide Squad (2016), and finds the unhinged badass Harley

The film, and the memoir it is based on, takes its title from a song by contemporary Christian musician Jeremy Camp, whose life story is told here, specifically the period during which his first wife was battling cancer. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

3Onward

A goofy ode to fatherhood, brotherhood and the geeky glory of Dungeons & Dragonstype fantasy role-playing games, Onward is a good time for kids and adults alike, and it packs a nice little sentimental punch in the final minutes. Ian Lightfoot and older brother Barley (voiced by Tom Holland and Chris Pratt, respectively) are living with their mom (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) in a suburban fantasy world inhabited by trolls, dragons and their own species, elves. On his 16th birthday, Ian gets a note from his long-dead father, whom he never met. Dad has bequeathed to the brothers a wizard’s staff, along with a spell incantation that can bring pops back for 24 hours. However, they manage to bring only the bottom half of his dad back before their magical staff stone explodes. This puts Barley and Ian on a quest to find another magical stone, conjure the half of dad that can actually see and speak, and spend some quality whole-dad time before he’s off into the great beyond. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Sonic the Hedgehog

James Marsden and Jim Carrey star in this live-action/animated adaptation of the famous video game, with Ben Schwartz (Parks and Recreation) voicing the title character. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

The Way Back Ben Affleck stars as a one-time basketball phenom, now battling demons and struggling with alcohol, who gets a chance at redemption by coaching a high school team. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

1 2 3 Poor

Fair

Good

4 5 Very Good

Excellent

March 19, 2020

CN&R

29


it’s time to

Discover

NEw EditioN oN stANds Now!

A FREE Guide for Visitors and Locals, too. On stands in September and March.

30

CN&R

March 19, 2020

ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

With all My heart No public, no paper. Seems pretty straightforward, right? Everything that brings us together in the physical world—fun, art, music, meetings, food, sports, work, school, booze—is gone for the time being. And if everything is shut down, what’s there to advertise? The answer to that question is the same as the answer to: “How much does it cost for a copy of a weekly newspaper that depends on ad revenue to operate?” Still, it’s hard to accept that—due to a dramatic loss of advertisers in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic—all three news & Reviews (Chico, Sacramento and Reno) have suspended publication until further notice. As arts editor, I watched helplessly as my entire beat shut down in the matter of a few days, and I had to cross off every story planned for the next four weeks. But at no point did I imagine this is where I’d be one week later: sitting at my computer and fighting back tears as I try to form a coherent goodbye. What will the future look like? I don’t know. So, I’m just going to get this out now in case I don’t get another chance. This job changed my life. As a poor, anxiety-ridden kid from the cultural desert of Redding, I was desperate to escape, get out and experience the world and maybe find a place in it where I could feel comfortable in my own skin. To have wound up in this arts editor chair in the middle of this fun, weird, always evolving arts-rich community is a miracle that far exceeded my teenage dreams. And I was damn lucky to get hired. When I applied for this job in 2003, I was a college dropout who’d skipped classes to study guitar, write poetry and put on rock shows. I had taken one journalism class, and my work history to that point was almost exclusively spent in restaurant kitchens. I never asked then-Editor Tom Gascoyne why he hired me. My guess is that it was a combo of two things: I could string words together in a fairly organized manner, and I knew and loved the local arts scene. And I devoured the opportunity like a hungry dog fearful that the bowl might be taken away. With no other blueprint to follow, I molded the position to suit my vision of completely owning the art scene in Chico. I tried to shine the spotlight in every corner and bring the hidden artists onto the stage alongside the big names, and cover the scene so completely that it and the CN&R became inseparable. Over time, that relationship between the paper and the community has become what defines me. I am forever grateful to Gascoyne for giving me a shot; and to Bob speer, devanie angel, Josh indar and Tom angel for schooling me in journalism; and to Tina Flynn for her creative kinship; and to Jeff vonKaenel and deborah Redmond for their commitment to, and sacrifices for, N&R’s vision; and to Mark Lore, Ken smith, alec Binyon, Brian Corbit, Mazi noble and Howard Hardee for being my righteous dudes; and to Melissa daugherty and Meredith J. Cooper for not letting bare-bones budgets keep them from speaking truth to power during trying times; and to Jamie deGarmo for being my partner in putting on kick-ass community events; and to Evan Tuchinsky for showing me kindness when I really needed it; and to Jane Corbett, Jen osa and Ruth alderson for keeping the parties lit; and to the inspiring young guns, andre Byik and the irrepressible ashiah scharaga; and to all the committed freelancers—most especially the nonpareil Peter Hogue, aka film critic Juan-Carlos selznick—and to all the presenters, artists and other passionate freaks of Chico; and to everyone I forgot in this rushed moment. I appreciate all of our friendships, and I love you with all my heart. And to the faithful readers, I am grateful for you, too, and I apologize if this comes across as a bit self-centered (what’s new?!) and insensitive considering the greater issues affecting so many who are impacted by this pandemic. It’s just that it’s a very sad day when one of the most important things in your world stops unexpectedly. And it is acutely painful to imagine that when the plays and concerts and community events do eventually return, there’s a chance the CN&R might not be part of the moment. But I am hopeful that the News & Review will find a way. A person would have lost a lot of money betting against the newspaper’s owners over the years. I know that all possibilities will be explored and that no matter where I end up, I will help the News & Review remain a vital source of independent journalism and a source of light for the community at a time when it’s most needed. Goodbye … for now.


Home

gArDen

Sticks and Stones Rocks in a garden can be attractive.

They can form paths or add accents. But rock mulch around trees? Not so cool. “This is not Phoenix,” said tree expert Pamela Frickmann Sanchez, education program manager for the Sacramento Tree Foundation. “Rocks are not mulch; rocks are rocks.” With conversions of lawns to water-wise landscapes, Northern California neighborhoods are getting pretty rocky. That concerns Sanchez and other experts who are dedicated to maintaining a vibrant urban forest and green spaces. In trying to cut down on water use, homeowners often replace lawn with cobbles or lava rock, which need no irrigation. That isolates former “lawn trees,” surrounding them with barren rock where there once was well-watered turf. Experts suggest a thick layer of mulch around almost any tree to conserve moisture and protect roots. With rocks, it appears the trees are mulched while cutting down on weeds; fulfilling two functions with each stone. But like concrete or other paving, rocks reflect and absorb heat. During the day, these stone groundcovers can significantly warm the soil while also reflecting heat onto nearby plants. Leaves become sunburned; twigs get toasted. Roots slowly bake. “Rock definitely increases the (soil) temperature,” Sanchez said. “It doesn’t insulate the soil or keep it cool. It doesn’t do much at all.” Instead of saving water, adding a layer of rocks around plants actually can drive water use up. Hotter soil means stressed (and thirstier) shrubs and trees. “You have to use more water to keep your plants alive,” Sanchez said. Covering a landscape with black rock is like paving the yard with black asphalt; everything seems hotter. Because it is; the black rock often gets 20 degrees warmer than the surrounding air if exposed to full sun. The effect can be particularly brutal in south- and west-facing gardens. Shade could mediate that heat effect. But as part of low-water landscapes, trees often are removed.

Wood chips -- not rocks -- make the best mulch for trees, Photo courtesy of sacramento tree foundation

“Trees are part of a water-wise landscape,” she said. “But so many of the plant suggestions (for drought-tolerant landscapes) are sun loving. Trees make shade. So people start to think, ‘I won’t have a tree.’” Landscapers recommend rock or stone because, like a lawn, a leafblower can be used to remove leaves and debris without disturbing the groundcover. Instead, Sanchez recommends letting the leaves stay pretty much where they fall. That’s what nature does. As for the mulch itself, take another cue from nature: Use chipped wood. That’s the go-to mulch for many tree experts, Sanchez noted. It’s heavy enough to stay in place, conserving moisture and cooling roots, while also adding nutrients to the soil. She recommends a layer 6 inches thick (or more) spread like a giant doughnut around the tree, leaving space in the middle next to the trunk. (That helps prevent crown rot.) Or get cheap wood chips from landscapers or tree cutters. “I always ask what kind of trees they’ve been chipping,” Sanchez said. “You don’t want anything with a lot of seeds; they’ll sprout. Personally, I avoid liquidamber.”

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This column is produced by N&R Publications, a division of News & Review separate from CN&R Editorial. For more information, visit www.nrpubs.com

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CN&R

March 19, 2020

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PRICE $715,000 $505,000 $445,500 $439,500 $435,000 $420,000 $417,000 $391,000 $389,000 $382,500 $355,000 $330,000 $330,000 $320,000 $299,000 $295,000 $292,000 $255,000 $225,591 $200,000 $188,000 $186,000

BR/BA 4/3 4/3 3/3 4/2 3/2 3/1 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/3 3/2 2/1 3/1 2/1 4/2 3/2 2/1 2/1 3/3 2/2 3/2

SQ. FT. 2942 2440 1510 1929 1896 1534 1558 1474 1708 1551 1965 1213 1264 1301 824 1391 1170 1027 1170 1555 936 1734

ADDRESS 1125 Sheridan Ave #24 1412 N Cherry St #10 975 Colorado St 64 Jackie Dr 1869 Wilma Way 9016 Stanford Ln 14979 Woodland Park Dr 151 Lariat Loop 253 Summit Ave 271 Canyon Highlands Dr 33 Skipper Ct 2031 12th St 166 Flying Cloud Dr 360 Glen Dr 15 Andora Cir 780 High St 34 Midway Dr 777 Gardella Ave 208 Redbud Dr 236 Redbud Dr 6359 Lancaster Dr 12211 S Stoneridge Cir

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF March 19, 2020 We interrupt your regularly scheduled

horoscopes to offer insights about the virus-driven turning point that the whole world is now experiencing. And while the coronavirus is the main driving force, it won’t be the only factor. Here’s the astrological lowdown: Throughout 2020, there’s a rare confluence of three planets in Capricorn: Pluto, Saturn and Jupiter. They are synergizing each other’s impacts in ways that confound us and rattle us. In the best-case scenario, they’ll also energize us to initiate brave transformations in our own personal lives as well as in our communities. I encourage you to respond to the convulsion by deepening your understanding of how profoundly interconnected we all are and upgrading the way you take care of yourself, the people you love and our natural world. In the horoscopes below, I suggest personal shifts that will be available to you during this once-in-a-lifetime blend of planetary energies.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Possible

crises: 1. Your power spot may be challenged or compromised. 2. Your master plan might unravel. 3. There could be disruptions in your ability to wield your influence. Potential opportunities: 1. You’ll be motivated to find an even more suitable power spot. 2. A revised master plan will coalesce. 3. You’ll be resourceful as you discover novel ways to wield your influence.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Possible

crises: 1. Your vision of the big picture of your life may dissipate. 2. Old reliable approaches to learning crucial lessons and expanding your mind could lose their effectiveness. Potential opportunities: 1. You’ll be inspired to develop an updated vision of the big picture of your life. 2. Creative new strategies for learning and expanding your mind will invigorate your personal growth.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Possible

crises: 1. There may be breakdowns in communication with people you care about. 2. Contracts and agreements could fray. 3. Sexual challenges might complicate love. Potential opportunities: 1. You’ll be inspired to reinvent the ways you communicate and connect. 2. Your willingness to revise agreements and contracts could make them work better for all concerned. 3. Sexual healing will be available.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Possible crises in the coming months: 1. Friends

and associates could change in ways that are uncomfortable for you. 2. Images and expectations that people have of you may not match your own images and expectations. Potential opportunities: 1. If you’re intelligent and compassionate as you deal with the transformations in your friends and associates, your relationships could be rejuvenated. 2. You might become braver and more forceful in expressing who you are and what you want.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Possible crises:

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1. Your job may not suit you as well as you wish. 2. A health issue could demand more of your attention than you’d like. Potential opportunities: 1. You’ll take innovative action to make your job work better for you. 2. In your efforts to solve a specific health issue, you’ll upgrade your entire approach to staying healthy long-term.

by rob brezsny VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Possible

crises: 1. Love may feel confusing or unpredictable. 2. You may come up against a block to your creativity. Potential opportunities: 1. You’ll be energized to generate new understandings about how to ensure that love works well for you. 2. Your frustration with a creative block will motivate you to uncover previously hidden keys to accessing creative inspiration.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Pos-

sible crises: 1. You may experience disturbances in your relationships with home and family. 2. You may falter in your ability to maintain a strong foundation. Potential opportunities: 1. Domestic disorder could inspire you to reinvent your approach to home and family, changing your life for the better. 2. Responding to a downturn in your stability and security, you’ll build a much stronger foundation.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Possible

crises: 1. There may be carelessness or a lack of skill in the ways you and your associates communicate and cultivate connectivity. 2. You may have problems blending elements that really need to be blended. Potential opportunities: 1. You’ll resolve to communicate and cultivate connectivity with a renewed panache and vigor. 2. You’ll dream up fresh approaches to blending elements that need to be blended.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): Possible crises: 1. Money may be problematic. 2. Your personal integrity might undergo a challenge. 3. You could get lax about translating your noble ideas into practical actions. Potential opportunities: 1. You’ll find inventive solutions for boosting your wealth. 2. You’ll take steps to ensure your ethical code is impeccable. 3. You’ll renew your commitment to translating your noble ideals into practical action.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Possible predicament: You may have an identity crisis. Who are you, anyway? What do you really want? What are your true intentions? Potential opportunity: You’ll purge self-doubts and fuzzy self-images. You’ll rise up with a fierce determination to define yourself with clarity and intensity and creativity.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Possi-

ble crises: 1. You’ll be at risk for botched endings. 2. You may be tempted to avoid solving long-term problems whose time is up. Potential opportunities: 1. You’ll make sure all endings are as graceful and complete as possible. 2. You’ll dive in and finally resolve longterm problems whose time is up.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Possible crises: 1. Due to worries about your

self-worth, you may not accept the help and support that are available. 2. Due to worries about your self-worth, you might fail to bravely take advantage of chances to reach a new level of success. Potential opportunities: 1. You’ll take dramatic action to enhance your sense of self-worth, empowering you to welcome the help and support you’re offered and take advantage of chances to reach a new level of success.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. March 19, 2020

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HAIR BODY AND SOUL at 6607 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. JEROLD L MILLER 14764 Vassar Ct Magalia, CA 95954. TERESA HURLEY MILLER 14764 Vassar Ct Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JERRY MILLER Dated: February 14, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000182 Publsihed: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO YARD GAMES, FIRESPICE at 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. SEAN PATRICK CASTLEMAN 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SEAN CASTLEMAN Dated: February 14, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000187 Published: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NOR CAL MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR at 10 Titleist Way Chico, CA 95928. NICHOLAS A SHAFFER 10 Titleist Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NICHOLAS SHAFFER Dated: February 13, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000180 Published: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KOOZIE KART at 2048 Renz Road Durham, CA 95938. MECHELLE GRAY 10021 Lott Road Durham, CA 95938. ROCHELLE HEATH 2048 Renz Road Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MECHELLE F GRAY Dated: February 19, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000195 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BROOD at 119 W 2nd St Chico, CA 95928. 4 LBS LLC 119 W 2nd St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: JIMMY LEE, MANAGER Dated: February 25, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000224 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as REBEL SABERS at 1212 Whitewood Way Chico, CA 95973. CHARLES WILLIAM FIGGINS IV 1212 Whitewood Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHARLES W FIGGINS IV Dated: February 11, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000169 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SUB TERRA CONSULTING, HERITAGE RESOURCE TRAINING AND INVESTIGATIONS at 3153 Chico Avenue Chico, CA 95928. GREGORY GLENN WHITE PH.D, RPA 3153 Chico Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GREGORY G. WHITE, PHD, RPA Dated: February 10, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000167 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WUI SOLUTIONS LLC at 172 East Washington Ave Chico, CA 95926. WUI SOLUTIONS LLC 172 East Washington Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: THIBAULT HOPPE-GLOSSER, OWNER Dated: February 28, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000246 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BTCHN BIKES at 647 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. TYLER REISWIG 1241 Honey Run Rd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TYLER REISWIG Dated: March 2, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000251 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KALN INC at 2080 E 20th Street Suite 170 Chico, CA 95928. BCHM CORPORATION 2080 E 20th Street Suite 170 Chico, CA 95928. ALISHA FICKERT 622 Lakewest Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ERICA THAU, PRESIDENT this Legal Notice continues

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Dated: February 20, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000205 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GRASS PRO YARD CARE at 10 Cameo Drive #1 Chico, CA 95973. RICHARD MAURICE RENAUD II 10 Cameo Drive #1 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD RENAUD Dated: March 2, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000254 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE BEST FLOOR CARE COMPANY at 107 Eden Canyon Road Oroville, CA 95965. CHANON HOLTFRETER 1241 High Street Oroville, CA 95965. ALFRED RABINOWITZ 107 Eden Cayon Road Oroville, CA 95916. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ALFRED RABINOWITZ Dated: February 25, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000222 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TWO22 SALON at 222 W 3rd Street Chico, CA 95928. SUNSHINE RAE STUART 1825 Mello Way Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SUNSHINE STUART Dated: February 18, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000191 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as POND PROS PLUS at 663 Lower Gulch Rd Oroville, CA 95965. CHRISTIAN POZAR 89 Maple Lane Chico, CA 95973. CHRIS STERNET 663 Lower Gulch Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: CHRIS STERNET Dated: January 31, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000124 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO CANNABIS COLLECTIVE, CHICO WELLNESS, CHICO WELLNESS COLLECTIVE at 730 Alhambra Suite 222 Sacramento, CA 95816. T W C Consulting Inc 730 Alhambra Suite 222 this Legal Notice continues

Sacramento, CA 95816. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JENNIFER PRATT, CEO Dated: February 18, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000193 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOWEN TREATMENT AND HEALING CENTER at 2770 Olive Hwy Suite D Oroville, CA 95966. DIANE MARROQUIN 1558 Bridge St #18 Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DIANE MARROQUIN Dated: February 25, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000226 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name BOWEN TREATMENT AND HEALING CENTER at 2770 Olive Highway Suite D Oroville, CA 95966. DIANE MARROQUIN 1558 Bridge St #18 Oroville, CA 95966. CAROL GISSELL 220 Rim Canyon Parkway Oroville, CA 95966. JOSEPH OSGOOD 220 Rim Canyon Prkwy Oroville, CA 95966. This business was conducted by Copartners. Signed: DIANE MARROQUIN Dated: February 25, 2020 FBN Number: 2019-0001229 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BENCHMARK BUILDING MAINTENANCE, CHICO COLLEGE LIVING, HILL PROPERTIES at 123 W 6th Street Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. APARTMENT EQUITIES, INC 123 W 6th Street Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: WENDY GRIGGS, SECRETARY Dated: February 28, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000245 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as INSPIRED LIFE COUNSELING at 468 Manzanita Ave Ste 6 Chico, CA 95926. JESSICA WILKERSON 9 Patches Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JESSICA WILKERSON Dated: March 3, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000266 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BIDWELL BLINDS at 47 Cobblestone Drive Chico, CA 95928. BRIAN MYRICK 400 Mission Ranch Blvd Apt 2 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRIAN MYRICK Dated: March 6, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000272 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MULTIFAMILY ASSET ADVISORS at 123 W 6th Street Ste. 130 Chico, CA 95928. TIM EDWARDS, TRUSTEE 670 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. WESLEY D HILL, TRUSTEE 643 Jardin Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: WESLEY D HILL Dated: Febraury 28, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000244 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AAA PLUS SERVICES, AAAA PLUS SERVICES, HIS HELPING HANDS at 238 W. 22nd Street Chico, CA 95928. RAYMOMD PAUL RUMMELL 238 W. 22nd Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: RAYMOND P. RUMMELL Dated: February 25, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000225 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JML INVESTMENTS LLC at 1022 Linden Street Unit 2 Chico, CA 95928. JML INVESTMENTS LLC 1022 Linden Street Unit 2 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: JUSTIN LISKA, MANAGING MEMBER Dated: March 3, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000265 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9,2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as COLLINS AND DENNY MARKET at 434 Plumas Avenue Oroville, CA 95965. GOLD STAR GROCERY, INC 4641 Redhill Way Turlock, CA 95382. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: HUSAM ABDULNOUR, PRESIDENT Dated: March 9, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000281 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WINGS DOWN PROMOTIONAL PRODUCTS at 206 Hobble Bush Lane Bangor, CA 95914. BRYAN K COWAN 206 Hobble Bush Lane Bangor, CA 95914. ROSLYN M COWAN 206 Hobble Bush Lane Bangor, CA 95914. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: BRYAN COWAN Dated: March 3, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000259 Published: March 19,26 April 2,9, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAMPOS PROPERTIES at 362 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. CAMPOS PROPERTIES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 362 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL D CAMPOS 774 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. NANCY CAMPOS 774 Hill View Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: NANCY CAMPOS Dated: March 6, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000273 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAL SIERRA UTILITY CLIMBERS at 840 Hengst Dr Chico, CA 95928. BLOSSOMING TREE ARBORIST LLC 840 Hengst Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: KENNA L.O. MORROW, CEO Dated: March 9, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000280 Published: March 19,26 April 2,9, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BARI JENKINS DESIGNS at 4275 VC Ave Oroville, CA 95966. JABARI JENKINS 4275 VC Ave Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JABARI JENKINS Dated: February 13, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000179 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HAIR HOUS at 136 W 3rd Street Chico, CA 95928. TONYA DURAN 1509 Ridgebrook Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by

this Legal Notice continues

an Individual. Signed: TONYA DURAN Dated: February 20, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000197 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CARE COACHING at 370 East 4th St Chico, CA 95926. LAUREN KAILANA WONG 4 Aldrin Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LAUREN WONG Dated: February 27, 2020 FBn Number: 2020-0000240 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LAS TAPATIAS #2 at 1148 W East Ave Ste H Chico, CA 95926. MA GUADALUPE CAZARES-DELGADO 75 Harvest Park #126 Chico, CA 95926. CARLOS CAZARES-PADILLA 1290 Notre Dame #79 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by Copartners. Signed: MA GUADALUPE CAZARES Dated: March 11, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000298 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO APPS at 702 Mangrove Ave 339 Chico, CA 95926. SCOTT ORTIZ 702 Mangrove Ave 339 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT ORTIZ Dated: March 13, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000305 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 133cc CASEY MICHAEL A 5x7 (Furniture, Totes, Bags) 278ss CASSIDY MICHAEL 6x10 (Boxes, Totes, Clothes) 426cc CRUMB DOUG 6x10 (Household items, Bags, Totes) 518cc BRITTANY HANSON 6x7 (Boxes, Totes) 314as TOPPING NANCIE/ JAMES (household items, bags, Boxes) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday March 28, 2020 Beginning at 1:00PM Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: March 12,19, 2020


this Legal Notice continues

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MONIQUE D’ANDRE LOCKHART filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MONIQUE D’ANDRE this Legal Notice continues

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TYEAUNA SHANAE HARRIS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: TYEAUNA SHANAE HARRIS Proposed name: TYEAUNA SHANAE ROBINSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 6, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 12, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00740 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JOHN LESLIE JONES, aka JOHN L. JONES, aka JOHN JONES To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN LESLIE JONES, aka JOHN L. JONES, aka JOHN JONES A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARY ANN SHINN in the Superior Court of this Legal Notice continues

California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARY ANN SHINN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 7, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 20PR00074 Published: March 12,19,26, 2020

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE MARILYN WADE WARRENS, also known as MARILYN JEAN WADE WARRENS, MARILYN W. WARRENS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARILYN WADE this Legal Notice continues

WARRENS, MARILYN WARRENS MARILYN JEAN WADE WARRENS, MARILYN W. WARRENS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: WADE P. WARRENS and GRANT E. WARRENS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: WADE P. WARRENS and GRANT E. WARRENS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: April 14, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: March 11, 2020 Case Number: 20PR00087 Published: March 19,26, April 2, 2020

We are suspending publication

this Legal Notice continues

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WILLIAM EVERETT BETHMAN

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VANEZA ANDERSON and SAFALO MCDANIEL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SAFALO DIMAR BE’TEE WOX MCDANIEL Proposed name: DIMAR ROCCO BE’TEE WOX MCDANIEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 6, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 9, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00716 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

LOCKHART Proposed name: MONIQUE D’ANDRE HILLS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 29, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P. CANDELA Dated: March 3, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00104 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

(at least temporarily)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KAZI SHAMIM HASAN filed a petition with this

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOSEPH WILLIAM STEMPINSKI filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JOSEPH WILLIAM SENDACKI Proposed name: JOSEPH WILLIAM STEMPINSKI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 15, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: MICHAEL P CANDELA Dated: March 2, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00618 Published: March 12,19,26, April 2, 2020

Proposed name: WILLIAM EVERETT MACKAY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 6, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: March 11, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00664 Published: March 19,26, April 2,9, 2020

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VICTORIA KNOPPER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VICTORIA KNOPPER Proposed name: VICTORIA TRYON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: February 13, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00403 Published: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KAZI MUHAMMAD TAWHEED SARA TAIBAH Proposed name: TAWHEED HASAN TAIBAH HASAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 22, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: February 26, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00557 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JENNIFER KNIGHT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LANDON STRYKER LEE Proposed name: LANDON STRYKER KNIGHT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 25, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: January 27, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00206 Published: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

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