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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 28 THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 2020 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

LIVING

EDGE Sixteen months post-Camp Fire, refugees struggle onward BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA PAGE 18

8 WETLANDS POLLUTED, PART II 11 ELECTION COVERAGE 22 BLUES FAMILY LEGACY


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY

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INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 28 • March 5, 2020 OPINION 

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES 

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES 

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS  15 Minutes

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COVER STORY  

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ARTS & CULTURE 

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

REAL ESTATE  

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CLASSIFIEDS  

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ON ThE cOVEr: DEsigN by TiNa FlyNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Contributing Editor Evan Tuchinsky Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Trevor Whitney Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Rachel Bush Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Neesa Sonoquie, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Sonia Lockler, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Michael Gardner, Andrew Garske, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Randall Morrison, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, Barbara Wise, David Wyles 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview .com

N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editors Derek McDow, Thea Rood N&R Publications Writers/Photographers Allen Pierleoni, Anne Stokes N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Julia Ballantyne, Greta Beekhuis, Chris Cohen, Joseph Engle, Laura Golino, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy Art of Information Director Serene Lusano President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., chico, ca 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Not-so-Super Tuesday Butte County’s new vote-by-mail election hit some

major snags on Super Tuesday, frustrating voters and sending packing a number of them who’d otherwise have submitted their ballots. This newspaper stopped into the Bell Memorial Union on the Chico State campus two hours after the vote center at that location had officially closed—only to find around 50 would-be voters awaiting assistance. According to Candace Grubbs, the county’s clerkrecorder and registrar, two other Chico locations had late lines, at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds and at the Masonic Lodge. That’s three of the five vote centers in the county’s most populous city and 13 overall. One of the issues stems from no-party preference (aka decline to state) voters being confused by having to request a ballot listing a particular party’s candidates in order to participate in the presidential primary. Under California’s “open primary” system, that’s not required for any other race—and, further complicating the matter, not every political party welcomes unaffiliated voters. (The California Democratic Party, for instance, accepts non-Democrats; state Republicans don’t.) Grubbs sees same-day registration as a factor. She also figures voters concerned about candidates dropping out—as Democrats Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar and

Tom Steyer did just before Super Tuesday—prompted some to wait till the last minute. Mostly, she told Evan Tuchinsky for our election coverage (see Newslines, page 11), Grubbs sees “procrastination” as the bugaboo. Whatever the reason, or reasons, behind the lines, the Elections Office needs to adapt. Clearly, demand for assistance demonstrates the need for more staffing at vote centers—perhaps also the need for more vote centers. Just as clear, the outreach Grubbs’ department conducted, via traditional media and social media, didn’t reach enough voters; they’ll need to expand their efforts. County elections staff may well find other aspects to upgrade, and we trust Grubbs will implement the necessary changes. We caution the county not to look at this single election, or the primary combined with November’s general election, as the ultimate data point. Super Tuesday presents lessons to learn, and things may run smoothly this fall with corrective measures from local and state elections officials. But there’s always a new election looming. The late rush Tuesday night may have been an anomaly, a kink in the new system. We suspect it’s perpetual. Voting early is an opportunity, not a requirement. Some will always wait—it’s their right. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

hatred and fear not welcome here Cis aonglaring social media, in the news and at public meetings example of the power of moral panic. I hico is in crisis mode. The hysteria we are seeing

feel anything but safe when I see hundreds of protesters parading around, aggressively posturing and screaming “Save our town!” When moral panic devolves into “us vs. them,” there has to be a “them” on which to direct hate. The easiest group to target is, of course, the unhoused population. by Risk perception defies reality, Lauren Kohler yet the fear-mongers have been The author, a chico relentlessly posting videos about State psychology graduate, is a busi- how unsafe our city has become. As ness manager and one of them summarized it: “The organizer with the people that we see walking around chico Democratic Socialists of america. I wouldn’t call ‘homeless.’ I’d call them transients; they don’t have any fear of approaching anybody and asking them for money, threatening people, defecating, urinating, trespassing, and theft.” Using the word “transient” to describe people

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strips them of their humanity and turns them into a one-dimensional label. In that moment, they are not thought of as a member of our community, but rather as an inhuman other. It’s not even an accurate word to describe the majority of Chico’s unsheltered and housing-insecure population. The most appropriate definition of “transient” in the Merriam-Webster dictionary is “passing through or by a place with only a brief stay or sojourn.” Most of Chico’s unhoused folks have lived in Chico or Butte County for a long time, and many did so before they became homeless. Check out the 2019 Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care’s point-in-time survey for more information (buttehomelesscoc.com). We are one community. Housing insecure and unsheltered individuals are part of the Chico community. Using the word “transients” pushes them aside and justifies their criminalization and our inaction. I focus so much on that one word because it’s a microcosm of what’s happening on a macro scale in the city that I love. Thinly veiled hatred and fear have no place here, and combating it starts with a little bit of humanity in the way we talk about people. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Through the cracks As unbelievable as it may seem, though it’s been 16 months since the Camp Fire, there are people who lost housing and are still living in tents. They’re tucked into private properties off the beaten track. Some are in cars, and move from place to place, as to not draw attention to themselves. Others are holed up in dilapidated RVs lacking proper electricity and sanitation. The situation reveals a major disconnect in the post-disaster landscape: Much of Butte County has moved into a recovery phase at the same time that thousands remain stuck in relief mode, struggling like hell to simply have a roof over their heads and meet basic needs. Many were living hand-to-mouth prior to the fire—just able to afford an apartment or mobile home, for example. Some the CN&R has met lived with family or friends. They may not have been thriving in the way that most of us would define that word, but they were getting by. Life is so much more precarious now. RVs aren’t meant to be permanent dwellings, and that goes doubly for tents and vehicles, which expose occupants to extreme heat and cold. The CN&R’s Ashiah Scharaga spoke to a few of them and several recovery experts for this week’s excellent cover story that lays bare the extent of the issue. Thanks to data from the Magalia Community Church, which runs a vital relief center, we know how many people visit and their living situation. We’re talking about hundreds per day, but it’s important to bear in mind that the house of worship doesn’t see everyone who’s living on the edge—just those seeking resources there. Another data set indicating how bad things are is the demand for disaster case managers—nearly 3,000 people are on a waitlist. That is, one and a quarter years after the fire, a population about as large as the town of Paradise is today hasn’t consulted with the professionals charged with helping survivors get back on their feet. These are people who in many cases don’t qualify for disaster aid, including short-term housing through the Federal Emergency Management Agency. They have slipped through the cracks. Indeed, they’re surviving thanks to stop-gap measures—for housing, food and other needs—often in place thanks only to private helper groups or donations from big-hearted individuals. I shudder to think about what would happen if the Magalia Community Church had to close up shop. It would be devastating. At the same time, I wonder how long the church will be able to sustain its efforts. What’s missing are the long-term solutions to help this population stabilize. One of the biggest barriers, of course, is this region’s lack of affordable housing. Approximately 14,000 homes were destroyed by the fire, and many of them were mobile homes and other units with modest rents. Eventually, $1 billion in Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery funds will be allocated to regions of the state affected by wildfires in 2018. The big questions are how that money will be allocated among the affected counties and for what projects. I suspect pet projects, including those to spur economic development, will be floated. Simply put, government officials must prioritize affordable housing. Doing anything else is irresponsible given what we know.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

‘Flaccid leadership’  Re “Partisan jabs convolute the debate” (Editorial, Feb. 6) and “Contentious and divisive” (Letters, by Scott Huber, Feb. 27): Partisan jabs convolute the debate?!? Politicians, bureaucrats, the ruling elite, petite bourgeoisie and professional-managerial class refuse to accept the imminent threat of ecological, economic and social collapse, and the existential threat climate change poses. Neoliberal fundamentalism is a bipartisan affair that ignores the social costs of unrestrained capital. Moreover, this naive desire for civility and both-sides-isms obscures the spectacle of an astroturf political stunt bordering on a lynch mob. That kind of irrational fear is manipulated to some pretty horrific ends, and it’s your job to undermine it. On the subject of flaccid leadership, Huber’s letter last week was a sad technocratic defense of the indefensible. What services can we conjure without funding? Will housing magically appear because

the business community finds a heart? Yeah, right. As an affluent white man, Huber can’t see how police terrorize the exclusively poor (especially black and brown) underclass. Criminalizing poor people is wrong, even dressed with platitudes. His vote was a grotesque betrayal of his supporters who wanted a humane approach to the housing catastrophe. He’s a fool who played right into the mob’s rope-burned hands. Steve Breedlove Chico

For many reasons, Councilman Scott Huber’s support of sit/ lie isn’t surprising. After all, he helped attempt to unseat Mayor Randall Stone months ago. A staunch proponent of landlords’ rights to evict tenants on a whim, Huber keeps us renters at risk of homelessness. Moreover, sit/lie defies the U.S. Constitution (Martin v. Boise). Huber’s stance thus opens Chico to costly lawsuits, while further

criminalizing human beings for being extremely poor. The maneuver ruins Chico’s reputation with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development—increased homelessness, the logical result. Plus, Huber broke council protocol by stating during the meeting that an email he’d just received swayed his vote. He was promised $10,000 for shelter, he announced. Huber suggests that social workers [should] partner with police to fix the problem, yet this is already happening. All levels of social services are stretched far beyond capacity. In fact, nearly 3,000 people are still on a waitlist for Camp Fire case managers. It’s incumbent upon Huber to respect council protocol and Chico leadership, and abide by the U.S. Constitution—at minimum. His failure to do so creates a bill we can’t afford. Far more devastating, higher numbers of human beings will LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS

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Re “Preparations” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Feb. 27): When U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar stepped to the podium, it’s clear his job wasn’t to outline a strategy to combat a global pandemic; it was to give President Trump fealty through kudos. At a recent campaign rally Trump exclaimed that coronavirus is a “new hoax” by Democrats and the media. His supporters believe the self-serving sewage that comes out of his mouth. In 2018, Trump axed 80 percent of the funding for U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention program devoted to global disease outbreaks, and eliminated the National Security Council position leading global health security and biodefense. He seeks further cuts to the CDC and National Institutes of Health budgets, and Medicaid funding. His leadership makes it easier to get sick and harder to get medical care. To Trump, the coronavirus threatens his re-election, not the health of Americans. U.S. commerce is endangered and Wall Street investors have factored in his incompetence, which is contributing to the market sell-off. Trump tapped Vice President Mike Pence, someone who substitutes moral pronouncements for scientific knowledge, to head up the response team. All statements and interviews by scientists must be approved by Pence. Soon after his appointment, Pence headed to Florida for a $25,000 a plate fundraiser. Roger S. Beadle Chico

The current crop of Democrat presidential hopefuls and their local ilk scare me far more than the coronavirus ever could. Ken Carlsen Durham

Chico’s bungled bike racks There are thousands of us in Chico who use bicycles for daily transportation. Theft or damage is 6 

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march 5, 2020

a constant worry. Vast resources are spent for parking cars, when we should be encouraging nonautomotive transportation, especially downtown. We need more and better bicycle parking. There is an obvious need for a parking space in front of the Upper Crust Bakery & Cafe, especially now that Bill’s Towne Lounge is across the street. There should be a space in front of Campus Bicycles—imagine a car dealership without any parking. The DMV has badly designed racks for bicycles, and they are installed backward, as so many of that type are all over town. Barnes & Noble has had its bicycle racks installed incorrectly, so as to be almost unusable, for at least 20 years. If car drivers had to put up with this sort of thing, you would hear the whining from here to the moon. In one of the potentially most bicycle-friendly towns in Northern California, we can do better. Nelson Kaiser Chico

Disappointing no-shows Recently, the local League of Women Voters (LWV) sponsored important candidate forums. Such forums offered voters a chance to get to know candidates running for elected office. Noticeably absent were key Republican incumbents, including Congressman Doug LaMalfa, state Sen. Brian Dahle and state Assemblywoman Megan Dahle. Their absence was conspicuous, disappointing and, in my opinion, inexcusable. After communicating with the LWV, I learned the following: Doug LaMalfa replied he would not attend such events during the primary season, but would participate during the run-up to the general election in November. As for Brian and Megan Dahle, neither offered the courtesy of a reply. According to the LWV: “Starting in December, as soon as the official list of candidates was ready, we tried to contact Megan and Brian Dahle by email and by phone with no response whatsoever. We also tried some personal calls. Our initial emails requested their availability, also with no

response.” While town halls, forums and press interviews may be annoying, inconvenient and perhaps even politically disadvantageous, they are an inherent part of holding public office and must be accommodated at every opportunity. Dare I say, if you can’t stand the heat, then get out of the political kitchen. Pete Stiglich Cottonwood

Here we go again The GOP-controlled Senate is celebrating the resurrection early this year. No, not Easter—rather they’re restoring the seemingly dead Burisma/Biden probe that Rudy Gulliani spent millions of taxpayer dollars on and that led to nothing but debunked dead-end streets. Since Feb. 7, no tweets, no Sunday talk shows, not a peep about the “rabbit hole” probe. Interestingly, at the time, Biden was trailing in the polls and lagging behind three other contenders in the Democratic primaries, including losses in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada. Fast-forward one month, and Biden suddenly won every county in the South Carolina primary, and was back in the race as a threat to Trump. Biden furthermore picked up endorsements from former Democratic rivals Amy Klobuchar, Pete Buttigieg and Beto O’Rourke, as well as heavyweights Rep. James Clyburn and retired Sen. Harry Reid. All of a sudden, on the same day that Biden won in South Carolina, Republican Sen. Ron Johnson thought it necessary to restore the seemingly dead Burisma probe, suggesting he would subpoena former Ukrainian diplomat Andrii Telizhenko to testify in the Senate about Hunter Biden’s corruption as a Burisma board member. This is where your taxpayer dollars go, folks. Once again, GOP hypocrisy never ceases to amaze. Ray Estes Redding

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE COMMERCIAL AIRLINE PURSUED

The U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded a $500,000 grant to the city of Chico to enhance Chico Municipal Airport services, according to a news release issued Monday (March 2). The Small Community Air Service Development Program grant comes as the city attempts to attract commercial air service. It will be applied toward the city’s “revenue guarantee fund,” a necessary component to incentivize an airline with guaranteed revenue during an initial start-up period. The city noted it also has applied for two other grants—$14 million from the Federal Aviation Administration to rehabilitate the airport’s runway, and a U.S. Economic Development Administration disaster recovery grant, which would assist with widening Cohasset Road from Eaton Road to Ryan Avenue.

‘They’re failing us’

OROVILLE CONSIDERS NEW TURF

Oroville has started the process of annexing Thermalito and neighborhoods surrounding Oroville Municipal Airport, which would expand the city’s footprint westward. The proposal, presented at the City Council meeting Tuesday night (March 3), comprises seven development areas—six along Oro Dam Boulevard West, the other along Larkin Road. (See this brief’s news review.com version for the map.) The westernmost neighborhood, covering 422 acres off Wilbur Road, sits outside the city’s current sphere of influence; its annexation requires approval by the Butte County Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCo). The council voted unanimously to have city staff review capacity for municipal services and hold community meetings.

COUNCIL EYES REMODEL RULES

The Chico City Council will reconsider an ordinance that was shot down two years ago. It proposes that homeowners choosing to renovate 50 percent or more of their home must pay for energy-conservation upgrades, including attic insulation, air and duct sealing, water heater upgrades, LED lighting and a “cool” roof with solar reflectance. The panel voted 5-2, with Councilmembers Kasey Reynolds and Sean Morgan against, to review an updated version of the ordinance at a future meeting. Mark Stemen (pictured), chairman of the city’s Climate Action Commission, said the city previously performed a cost-benefit analysis determining that the ordinance is costeffective. The upgrades “will pay for themselves in seven years for homes built before 1978 and 14 years for homes built after 1978.” 8

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MARCH 5, 2020

California Open Lands director says Butte County landfill managers treat wetlands like ‘toilet’

HCounty and drove down a dirt road at the Butte landfill south of Chico, heading olly Nielsen put her GMC pickup into gear

toward a 3-acre wetland preserve that has been established inside the facility. story and The on-site preserve photo by was created in 2007, Andre Byik allowing the Neal an d re b @ Road Recycling and n ew sr ev i ew. c o m Waste Facility to finish its expansion. The preserve—which is overseen by California Open Lands, a local nonprofit land trust— also has been a focus of the State Water Resources Control Board’s Office of Enforcement, which is investigating the landfill for allegedly discharging last winter about 24 million gallons of waste-contaminated stormwater into the preserve and a neighboring watershed (see “Dirtying the waters,” Newslines, Feb. 27). Nielsen, California Open Lands’ executive director, walked along the preserve’s cracked earth, pointing out dead and dying trees and the lack of vegetation, which has been replaced with weeds. The seasonal wetland had sustained various wildlife and plant species, including migratory waterfowl and tadpoles. Now, she said, the habitat is threatened.

During the CN&R’s visit to the site, Nielsen said Butte County, which owns and operates the landfill and manages the preserve, has been treating the wetland like a “toilet”—alleging the county knowingly allowed waste-contaminated water to flow into it, jeopardizing the watershed. The state water board’s investigation also has placed a spotlight on the landfill’s managers, raising questions about whether they had been forthright with water regulators about the stormwater discharges in February 2019 and their dealings with California Open Lands, which is pursuing civil action against the county in federal court. Nielsen said her experiences with management at the landfill have left her feeling disrespected, dismissed and deflated. “It’s this hubris of the management,” Nielsen said. “What gives them the right to think that they can just dump all of this contamination in our water supply thinking that, Oh, well. We’ll get away with it. No harm done. Nobody will ever find out.” Both Butte County Public Works Director Dennis Schmidt and County Counsel Bruce Alpert declined the CN&R’s multiple efforts to seek comment from the county. Eric Miller, site manager at the landfill, also said he could not comment.

Nielsen described the landfill’s wetland as

“degraded,” and said tests are underway to determine its health. Those results are pending. Meanwhile, regional and state water officials have been examining the landfill over the alleged unauthorized discharges of leachate—or wastecontaminated water—following rainstorms in February of last year. In August 2019, the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board issued a notice of violation to the county regarding noncompliance with its Waste Discharge Requirements Order. The violations included failure to immediately notify regulators of leachate seeps and unauthorized discharges of leachate, among others. Central Valley Water Board documents note that the county did not timely report that on the morning of Feb. 14, 2019, a mountain of waste at the landfill—known as Module 4—sustained multiple “leachate pop-outs,” leading to waste-contaminated water flowing into a nearby pond meant to capture stormwater runoff. Water from the then-contaminated pond was pumped to a ditch that drained into the landfill’s primary stormwater sedimentation basin, which includes the aforementioned wetland preserve, according to the documents. The basin at the time also was


Holly Nielsen, executive director of California Open Lands, shows wetlands area at the Butte County landfill on Neal Road.

discharging off-site into a neighboring property. The county informed the regional board that the pump was “shut down immediately.” About two weeks later, on Feb. 26, 2019, new leachate seeps were observed at Module 4, with more of the dirty liquid flowing into the nearby stormwater pond, according to the documents. The next day, staff again observed a pump transferring water from the contaminated pond to a ditch that drained into the sedimentation basin. The county reported that the problem had been corrected. Further investigation by the state water board’s Office of Enforcement, however, suggests that the pump transferring dirty water to the sedimentation basin and wetland preserve may not have been “immediately shut down” on Feb. 14, according to documents obtained by the CN&R. The documents indicate that landfill workers tasked with collecting stormwater samples saw the pump running that morning, transferring water from the pond, which had visible garbage in it, to the sedimentation basin and preserve. After collecting samples, the workers at about 11 a.m. directly notified two senior managers at the landfill about the pumping, saying it should be stopped. The managers “did not respond,” according to a summary of an interview conducted by state investigators with one of the workers. The worker, at 1:40 p.m. that same day, shut the pump off. That same worker, according the summary, about two weeks later saw the pump again running and transferring contaminated water from the same pond and ultimately to the preserve. The worker again reported the incident to the landfill’s manager and later told state investigators that the county knew of other options besides pumping the dirty water into the preserve, because those options had been discussed between the worker and senior managers, between Feb. 14-26, 2019. To California Open Lands’ Nielsen, management’s handling of the discharges was negligent, lazy and/or both. “Everyone who works here knows that you don’t put [contaminated] water in a wetland,” she said. “We trust our government officials to protect public health—to protect natural resources—and they’re failing. They’re failing us.” Ω

Pay to play? Council moves forward on plan to charge Upper Park parking fee; more to come on emergency shelters, syringe disposal

Chicoan Jesica Giannola is all for supporting

the maintenance of Upper Bidwell Park, but she doesn’t think charging citizens a parking fee is the way to do it. She told the City Council as much at its regular meeting this week, which fell on Super Tuesday (March 3). The council was considering whether to implement a fee—$2 for a daily parking pass or $25 for an annual pass, the idea being that the funds would help pay for park upkeep. Giannola advocated for a compromise: implementing a voluntary parking pass program that encourages donations. She’d happily support it, she said. “I know we need money to fix roads ... . But I’m concerned with excluding the population that can’t afford it, for whatever reason,” she added. Ultimately, the council voted 5-2—with Councilman Karl Ory and Councilwoman Ann Schwab dissenting—to direct staff to create an implementation plan that will be presented at a future meeting. It will include, among other things, details regarding who is exempt from the fee (such as seniors, veterans, families with kids, classrooms, and those who are disabled and/or low-income), with the caveat that they’d have to get an annual pass. Also, staff will break down how the city would enforce such a program, and the associated costs. Access and maintenance of Upper Park

Road have been recurring topics for much of the past decade. The city has weighed implementing a parking fee for years, even conducting a survey in 2018. At the time, a majority supported a modest fee. Prior to the council’s vote, Erik Gustafson, public works director of operations and maintenance, reminded the panel how Upper Park’s high volume of users—more than 400,000 vehicle trips in 2017—has degraded the road. The city hasn’t been able to afford proper maintenance, he explained. This fee could change that, bringing in as much as $750,000 to $800,000 annually to the city’s park fund, Gustafson added, which also could be used to improve parking. “The intent is really to develop something that’s going to maintain the infrastructure up there, because right now, we don’t have it,” he said. That was a convincing point for Vice Mayor Alex Brown. She said that while it

SIFT ER We’re in the money California has one of the healthiest economies in the country. That’s according to SeniorLiving.org, which ranked the nation’s 50 states—and District of Columbia—by examining such things as unemployment, average wages and gross domestic product (GDP). The Golden State ranked third, with an unemployment rate in November 2019 of 3.9 percent, an annual average wage in 2018 of about $59,000 and a per capita GDP in 2018 of $75,800. Massachusetts topped the list with an unemployment rate of 2.9 percent, an average wage of about $64,000 and a per capita GDP of $83,000. Colorado was second. The unhealthiest

of the bunch, according to the analysis, was Mississippi: The Hospitality State had an unemployment rate of 5.6 percent, an average wage of $39,400 and a per capita GDP of $38,500. A recently released Gallup poll showed 22 percent of Americans view the national economy as being in excellent shape, with only 8 percent saying the economy is poor.

Much of the unpaved portion of Upper Park Road has been closed to cars since 2012. Recently, however, the council voted to open the roadway past the Diversion Dam gate two days a week. CN&R FILE PHOTO

was difficult for her to support imposing more financial obligations on Chicoans, she didn’t see another option. “I want to see us pursue this and make it work because we are desperate for that funding, and we are not being good stewards of our natural resources,” she said. In contrast, Schwab said she was not in favor of penalizing people for making a healthy choice to be active outdoors. The fee-implementation plan also will include previous council direction regarding access. In December, the panel voted to close Upper Park Road two days a week, open its full length another two days, and allow entry to cars up to Salmon Hole the rest of the time. Irrespective of the fee, Upper Park Road will undergo some changes this year. The city will reconstruct approximately 4.4 miles of the road—from Horseshoe Lake to the park’s end—funded by a $700,000 grant from the State Water Resources Control Board. Also on Tuesday, the council voted to send sev-

eral of the night’s agenda items to the committee level or discuss them at a future council meeting. NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D MARCH 5, 2020

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Among them was the topic of public syringe disposal receptacles. It was the most inflammatory agenda item of the night, though debate was mild in comparison to prior meetings, which have drawn massive protests and dozens of speakers (see “Protests continue,” Newslines, Feb. 20). Five of the nine people who addressed the council spoke against the city installing any disposal containers. Kimberly Craven said she opposes syringe distribution, a program of the Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition. She told the panel that the coalition should be responsible for disposal, not the city. “I refuse to live in a city and condone all this drug-enabling [behavior],” she said. On the other side of the debate, Patrick Newman, of Chico Friends on the Street, noted that the state is experiencing a housing crisis and people are inevitably ending up on the streets. Society can choose to “go to war” with those people or implement measures to benefit everyone, he said. “This is the grown-up approach to this. If you say you don’t want to find needles around, then here we have … a partial solution to that,” he said. The council voted 4-3 to hold a full discussion on the topic at a future meeting. Councilmembers Ory, Sean Morgan and Kasey Reynolds dissented. In addition, the panel voted unanimously to have a conversation at a future meeting regarding how the city might help provide emergency shelter for homeless individuals, given Safe Space Winter Shelter’s recent closure. During his comments on the subject, Mayor Randall Stone said the city has been in property negotiations regarding a Work Training Center building at 2255 Fair St. He said several councilmembers are working on public-private partnerships, but it’s all happening “behind closed doors.” “Now that Safe Space is closed for the season, we know that there’s 60 people that are going out on the streets every single day in March. We know that we have people that are dying on our streets,” he said. “I want the public to know what it is that we are doing now, what has been proposed, and what are some of the options.” —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Your plumbing Two hours after closing time Tuesday night (March 3), at around 10 p.m., about 50 people still wait in line to vote at the Butte County vote center inside Chico State’s BMU. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

‘Long night’

to overcome that lead.” The initial 2-to-1 margin held for the election-night results released at 2:08 a.m., in which Kimmelshue led 6,703 votes to 3,261, or 67 percent to 33 percent. Grubbs estimated Wednesday that her office had approximately 11,000 ballots to count with 51,000 tallied. She will release the next report Friday (March 6) and the certified results March 27. Hilderbrand, speaking to the CN&R by phone Wednesday morning, echoed Grubbs’ view that the margin in her race will shrink, though “it’s a lot of ground to make up.” She expressed pride in her “grassroots” efforts. “I wish the two campaigns had stayed more focused on the issues facing Butte County,” Hilderbrand added. Kimmelshue, as his event wound down, acknowledged that the final count might narrow the margin but was “pleased that the voters of the 4th District would have that kind of confidence in me. I’m very humbled by the support.”

Late lines delay voting, election night results

Other local races

Around 8:30 p.m. Tuesday night (March 3), as big-

screen TVs inside the Butte Creek Country Club displayed Fox News coverage of Super Tuesday presidential primaries, people started growing restless. Nearly 100 had come out to support Tod Kimmelshue, a candidate for retiring Butte County Supervisor Steve Lambert’s seat in District 4, which runs from southwest Chico through Richvale and Gridley to the county’s southern border. Kimmelshue, a farmer and retired banker from Durham, faced Sue Hilderbrand, a political science professor, radio host and documentarian from Chico. Hilderbrand held two election-night events, at a restaurant in Gridley and a home in Chico. In previous elections, the office of Candace Grubbs, the county’s clerk-recorder and registrar, typically released the first batch of results online within a half-hour of polls closing at 8 p.m. But this was Butte County’s first election without polling places; voters now mail their ballots or drop them off at 13 vote centers countywide—the spots for same-day registration. Just after 9, Kimmelshue addressed the crowd: The county would not release results because people remained in line to vote. He thanked supporters, said he expected success—and “a long night.” At Chico State’s Bell Memorial Union, a late rush packed a second-floor room. Anybody at the vote center at the point it officially closed at 8 p.m. was able to stay. Approximately 50 people were still on queue around 10 p.m. Several people told the CN&R they had been waiting to cast their ballot for almost three hours. One woman said she saw many would-be voters

Tod Kimmelshue celebrates election results in his race for Butte County District 4 supervisor. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

leave because of the wait time. In a phone interview the next morning, Grubbs said three vote centers—all in Chico—had late lines: the BMU, Silver Dollar Fairgrounds and the Masonic Lodge. The BMU “was the worst,” she said, even though it had been open the longest, 10 days total. Her staff will meet next week to determine what happened. “I think we’re looking at multiple factors here,” Grubbs said, “but one of the biggest ones is procrastination.” The county put its first results online at 10:02 p.m. Half of Kimmelshue’s party had trailed away by then, but he announced to loud applause that the count—6,698 votes for him to 3,326 for Hilderbrand—would make it “impossible for her

County supervisor: Incumbents easily kept their seats in the two other districts with elections. Bill Connelly (District 1, Oroville area) won 79 percent of the vote against Ian Joseph Greene; Doug Teeter (District 5, Ridge area) got 65 percent against Henry Schleiger. District 5, which includes Camp Firedecimated Paradise and Butte Creek Canyon, drew around 6,200 ballots compared to roughly 16,000 in the 2016 race. Measure A: Voters rejected the parcel tax put forward by the Chico Area Recreation and Park District, with 55 percent opposed. Measure A would have funded improvements at district facilities but carried annual increases and would have run permanently. Assembly: Gallagher, the Yuba City Republican whose district covers most of Butte County, already knew his November opponent would be Chico Democrat Jim Henson. Tuesday night, he had a 2-to-1 advantage overall, though that 35 percent cushion was 22 percent in Butte County. Congress: Doug LaMalfa, the incumbent Republican from Richvale, will face Audrey Denney, a Democrat from Chico, in a rematch of the 2018 general election. In District 1, which spans 11 counties in northeast California, LaMalfa took 58 percent to Denney’s 36 percent. In Butte County, LaMalfa led 53 percent to 44 percent. Ashiah Scharaga contributed to this report.

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HEALTHLINES “I’ve gotten to know these communities, and I feel they’re not ‘rural’.... They’re thriving, wonderful places to be. I just want to show that.” —Kristy Bird MaKieve

rural rotations Local doctors aim to train, retain new colleagues by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

A State has a doctor shortage. Those who need a primary care physician often wind up

s too many local residents know, the North

on a waitlist, regardless of insurance plan. Specialty care—notably for mental health and arthritis, but also myriad other conditions—is heavily impacted as well. The Camp Fire made a tough situation tougher with the closure of Adventist Health Feather River Hospital and departure of around 50 practitioners (see “Medical migration,” cover story, March 14, 2019). We’re not alone: According to the Healthforce Center at UC San Francisco, a gap between supply and demand exists statewide and will continue to grow into the next decade. The number of primary care physicians could decrease by as much as 25 percent because not enough new doc-

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March 5, 2020

tors complete primary care residencies to replace those retiring. Newly minted medical grads, in all fields, tend to gravitate to bustling cities. To meet the need in underserved areas, including rural regions like Butte County, California lawmakers may expand the scope of authority for nurse practitioners, via a bill under consideration (see “Higher midlevels,” Healthlines, Feb. 20). The Butte-Glenn Medical Society (BGMS) has another idea: bring young doctors here to train—and, hopefully, practice. An affiliate of the California Medical Association, comprising physicians from Butte and Glenn counties, BGMS recently announced it had launched a regional initiative to host medical residents in Chico, Oroville and Redding. The so-named Northern California Medical Education Program also incorporates scholarships and mentoring to develop homegrown providers. Kristy Bird MaKieve, the medical society’s executive director, told the CN&R that starting a residency program requires

a significant investment of time, planning and resources—particularly challenging for a small regional hospital such as Enloe Medical Center. “It’s not just something where they can put a flag in the ground and say, ‘Residents, come here!’” she explained. “The Northern California Medical Education Program is really designed to support all of those efforts.” Even though Redding is located in Shasta County, the Butte-Glenn doctors’ group reached out to hospitals there—such as Shasta Regional Medical Center—in partnership. “We’ve really gone toward an alliance model for this program, because all the rural counties need to start residency programs,” MaKieve said. BGMS has requested $25 million in state funding; North State Assemblyman James Gallagher supports the program. MaKieve built a coalition of partners including California Health and Wellness, a MediCal insurer, and Physicians for a Healthy California, the state medical association’s charitable arm. “This really is a great, innovative idea from the [Butte-Glenn] Medical Society— really looking at the landscape, pulling stakeholders together, and talking about the need and how to fix the problem,” said Alissa Ko, director of Strategic Giving and Community Engagement for California Health and Wellness. “When Kristy had been talking to all the players and stakeholders, why her idea was so important to us is because [once residents get here] they typically tend to stay because they get to know the community and get to love the community as well. That’s why we decided to help partner [with] and support the program.” MaKieve understands the phenomenon. She

joined the Butte-Glenn Medical Society just over a year ago, having previously worked for the state medical association and for UC Davis. Married to an internal medicine physician, MaKieve lives in Sacramento and

commutes here three to four days a week. “Now that I’ve worked in Chico, spent time in Oroville, I’ve gotten to know these communities, and I feel they’re not ‘rural,’” she said. “They’re not like some dirt road with tumbleweeds. They’re thriving, wonderful places to be. “I just want to show that.” Having others experience this firsthand will make a difference, she said—and Ko agreed. So, too, did Dr. Paul Wassermann, a Chico pediatrician and BGMS board member, who said research bears this out. Indeed, a study in the journal American Family Physician reported 56 percent of family medicine residents stay within 100 miles of where they complete their program, including 39 percent who stay within 25 miles and 19 percent within 5 miles. California Health and Wellness recently partnered with four other nonprofits with similar programs for physicians and/or midlevels; however, they are too new to provide data suggesting potential results here, with initial graduates expected next year. BGMS determined that the area incorporating Butte, Glenn, Tehama and Shasta counties needs 30 to 60 residents over the next five years. The estimate comes from a task force that formed after Butte County Public Health released its Community Health Assessment in November. That analysis of data from Public Health and local hospitals—except Oroville, which released its own assessment—found access to care as the county’s top issue, followed by mental health (see “Community pulse,” Newslines, Nov. 14, 2019). In response, MaKieve said, BGMS is

aPPOINTMENT Run for running Cross some country by foot this weekend—5K or a half-marathon’s worth— and help raise some dough for local high school long-distance running programs. The annual Bidwell Classic goes down Saturday (March 7), at 8 a.m., starting at Sycamore Field in Bidwell Park. You can register online at fleetfeet.com until midnight the night before; and on race day, 6:307:30 a.m., at Fleet Feet (241 Main St.).


working with UC Davis School of Medicine to establish psychiatry training locally—aiming for year-long rotations. This dovetails with an overarching residency program UC Davis recently launched for rural communities between Sacramento and Portland. Additionally, California Northstate University College of Medicine in Elk Grove has committed to partnering with BGMS. “If we could get that residency here, I think it would be awesome,” Wassermann said. “I think we have a good hospital for that [in Chico], a good inpatient setting to get experience off of.” MaKieve said 14 medical residents per year “would be helpful” in Butte County, between Enloe and Oroville Hospital, and 10-15 in Redding. The numbers, attainable once the program hits “full stride,” depend on the specialties involved: Should surgeons not participate, Chico might accommodate only a handful in primary care and a couple in mental health. (Neither Enloe nor Oroville Hospital responded to requests for interviews.)

Visit bgmsonline.org and go to the “For Our community” tab to learn more about the Northern california Medical Education Program.

Wassermann noted several logistical considerations, such as how a teaching physician’s pace and workflow would be impacted by instructing and supervising residents. Yet, he added, “I think most of us are happy to teach; we feel it’s kind of an honor to be asked to help nurture, teach, pass along our experience.” Meanwhile, BGMS members are sowing seeds at home. The nonprofit converted its investment fund into an endowment for scholarships to pre-med students—one a high school senior in Butte County or Glenn County, one a Chico State senior—and physicians will start mentoring and outreach in junior high and high schools. “The goal [of these drives is] that if you’re from this area, you’re more likely to come back and be a physician if that’s the path you choose,” MaKieve said, “so let’s encourage more youth to pursue that.” Ω

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After professional snowboarder Kevin Pearce suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI), he found that practicing yoga and meditation improved his quality of life. Pearce is the founder of the Love Your Brain Foundation, an organization that teaches caregivers and those with TBI how to put “mindfulness, yoga, and community” to work in transforming the well-being of those suffering. Learn how it can help by attending a free Love Your Brain seminar Wednesday (March 11), 1-4:30 p.m., at Enloe Conference Center (1528 Esplanade), where there will be guided participation in yoga and meditation and a showing of a documentary on Pearce’s life called The Crash Reel. Pre-registration required. Contact the Brain Injury Coalition at 342-3118 or visit braininjury coalition.info

Show your support at www.independentjournalismfund.org

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March 5, 2020

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GREENWAYS

Message from Paradise Camp Fireinspired Earth Day Film Festival features workshop exploring community living as a rebuild alternative by

Andre Byik andre b@ n ewsrev iew. com

TeledthebydaythetheCamp town of Paradise was levFire. The narrator harkens

he film starts 50 years after Nov. 8, 2018,

back to the time before blaze, when residents lived in isolation or were suspicious of their neighbors. The disaster, the narrator recalls, changed the culture on and around the Ridge. Neighbors helped neighbors. Homes were opened up to survivors. And the town rebuilt in a more sustainable fashion, favoring local goods to corporate greed. The short film, A Message from the Future of Paradise, was created by Allen Myers and will be one of dozens of eco-themed films from around the world screened during The Earth Day Film Festival, which runs March 12-19 at the Pageant Theatre and other venues in Chico (see infobox). Special virtual reality presentations also are scheduled via University of the Pacific’s Media X program. Myers, a filmmaker and community organizer, was born and raised in Paradise and resides in Grass Valley. He founded and serves as director of the festival, which is in its sixth year and third in Chico. Myers told the CN&R that the event’s organizers this year have aimed to use the narrative power of film to inspire audiences to fall in love with the Earth and move folks to action. To that end, the festival has partnered with several service-based organizations, such as the Rebuild Paradise Foundation, the Camp Fire Restoration Project, Chico State, the local chapter of the Sunrise Movement and 350

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Butte County. During the event’s capstone event March 19, the documentary Not If, But When: Wildfire Solutions, a look at how to confront the rising risk of wildfires, will be screened—followed by a panel discussion with the filmmakers and local fire experts. “Film is a powerful tool,” Myers said, “to show not only where we are and where we’ve been, but [also] where we can go.” For Myers, the week-long event is personal. His mother was born in Paradise, too, and the home he grew up in was destroyed. Myers said in the wake of the fire, he has looked at rekindling old relationships and reconnecting with his hometown. “I just can’t imagine being anywhere else and doing this,” he said. “The work feels incredibly purposeful.” In Paradise, The Earth Day Film Festival also

will present a workshop (March 15 at 2 p.m. at Paradise Alliance Church) featuring Charles Durrett, a Nevada City-based architect and author, exploring how the concept of cohousing developments—intentional communities of private homes built around shared spaces—can be a part of the town’s post-Camp Fire rebuild. Durrett, who authored Creating Cohousing: Building Sustainable Communities, said such multifamily neighborhoods include private homes with their own kitchens and living spaces, but also substantial common areas such as dining rooms, child care facilities, workFilm fest:

Visit earthdayfilmfest.org for schedule and ticket information.

shops, guest rooms and music spaces, among others. In Chico, for example, the cohousing neighborhood Valley Oaks Village, located near Forest Avenue, was established in 1996 (see “A life together,” Greenways, May 12, 2016). Developments, he said, typically include a common building that residents share more often than those seen in condominium projects. Durrett, who lives in a cohousing neighborhood comprising about 80 residents, said his common house there typically sees about 450 “people hours” per week. “It fosters community—on steroids,” he said. “Where people support each other.” For example, Durrett recalled the wife of an elderly man who suffered a fall calling on her neighbors to help pick him up. He said in other cases, in-depth teaching and learning happens within the community, with residents sharing their expertise and knowledge. “It’s like a village in that way,” he said. The custom communities also allow residents to have a substantial role in the planning and management of their cohousing neighborhood, facilitating teamwork and even shortening the amount of time to complete a housing project, Durrett said. A recent cohousing development in Cotati—about an hour north of San Francisco—was completed in about three years, for example. More traditional projects surrounding that community were completed in five to seven years. A town such as Paradise, which lost about 11,000 homes in the fire, must imagine a variety of ways to rebuild, Durrett said. Neighborhoods comprising traditional, single-family homes likely will still dominate development on the Ridge, he said, but

cohousing projects could offer an alternative that helps survivors tackle the rebuild together, instead of on their own. The workshop, Durrett added, will attempt to show survivors options they may not have considered, from housing alternatives to political approaches involved with the rebuild effort. But the first step, he said, is to gain inspiration. “That’s why people should go to the film festival,” Durrett said. Ω

ECO EVENT

Climate ritual Sarah Pike, chair of the Department of Comparative Religion and Humanities at Chico State, wonders if recent youth climate strikes can be viewed as a form of ritual action for healing the planet. “Walking out is a ritualized activity connecting youth climate strikers with a long history of walkouts, such as civil rights and labor walkouts in the U.S., protests that fractured the taken-for granted reality and called something new into being,” she says. Hear the rest of her thoughts tonight (March 5), 5 p.m., during her talk Climate Strikes as Rituals to Save the Earth, in PAC 113 on the Chico State campus.


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Photo of Will figgins and daughter sarai by Josh cozine

ready for battle A lifelong Star Wars fan, Will Figgins remembers seeing the original trilogy in theaters as a kid. Ever since, he’s been drawn to it, almost as if by some, ahem, force. In fact, back in the early 2000s, Figgins worked with LucasArts (Star Wars creator George Lucas’ company) on the popular Star Wars Galaxies video game. Also a fan of martial arts, Figgins learned jeet kune do, a style of fighting developed by Bruce Lee. Figgins says he was taught in the 1990s directly by several of Lee’s students. He went on to open his own studio, Black Dragon Academy in Paradise, in 2004. More recently, Figgins has been looking to combine his martial arts skills and love for Star Wars by adding a Japanese sword-fighting class to his academy (at 1184 East Ave. in Chico post-Camp Fire) using replica lightsabers. In doing so, however, he found that most of those for sale were either low quality or extremely expensive, and decided to do something about it. Finding a proprietary supplier in China, he opened Rebel Sabers at the start of the year. There, he offers several styles of dueling-quality lightsabers with sounds. Check out his online store at rebelsabers. com.

How do your lightsabers compare to others? My main focus is more towards affordable dueling sabers. I do have some $450 ones, but they’re like the movie replicas. My “initiate series” starts at $89 and can handle light dueling. Other brands … go for $500 to $600. The $25 Disney ones you can get from toy stores, I’ve gotten into some serious wars with those with them not breaking, but they also don’t light up as much. They’re kind of

short and really lightweight, and so trying to do real techniques won’t really work.

What will your lightsaber class be like? It’s called SaberFit. The idea with it is you’ll be learning real Japanese traditional sword fighting with lightsabers, but it’s more in line with getting in shape. So it’s high intensity most of the time and like a cardio class. I ordered everyone’s sabers, and then they got stuck from the outbreak [of coronavirus], so we’re gonna start that as soon as they get here. They’re starting to ship now, so I imagine we’re probably gonna start the class in April.

Original vs. prequel vs. sequel trilogy? Weigh in. The originals are the gold standard—obviously—even Return of the Jedi with its more kid-friendly lightheartedness. I was a kid then, so it was all great. Then the prequels upped the ante on that. As an adult, when [The Phantom Menace] came out, I was definitely like, eh. ... All the lightsaber battles and Jedi stuff was awesome, and even the podracing. But then, just everything else was kind of like, eh. The next two, [Attack of the Clones] and [Revenge of the Sith]—both got better. I think Disney was playing it safe with The Force Awakens. It was good. It was just Star Wars rehashed, but it was good. Then the next one [The Last Jedi] was horrible. There’s some good things about it, but just as a movie, it’s horrible. I haven’t seen the third one [The Rise of Skywalker] because of that, but from what I hear they kind of redeem it a little. —JOsH COzine

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Stuck in survival mode

Despite the work of recovery groups, lack of affordable housing forces many Camp Fire refugees to live in cars, tents, RVs story and photos by ASHIAH SCHARAGA a s h i a h s @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

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uliette Chestang came back home to the Ridge in 2017. She’d been away for about 15 years, but after a long-term relationship didn’t work out, she turned to family for stability. She rented a room from her parents at their home in Magalia and got a seasonal job at a tax preparation company off the Skyway in Paradise. Things were looking up. Then the Camp Fire hit. And Chestang found her life upended again. Her parents lost everything and moved in with her sister, who’s raising a family. It was cramped, Chestang said, and she didn’t want to impose. So, for the past 16 months, her car has been home.

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Day-to-day, everything seems to take twice as much effort, she told the CN&R. To stay organized, Chestang categorizes and bags her belongings (socks, toiletries, bras, etc.). She’s implemented “a lot of campingstyle measures”—keeping cleaning wipes handy, for example—and has been eating more snacks and fast food than she ordinarily would. Starting over has been difficult, even with support from family and friends. Chestang submitted a claim through the Federal Emergency Management Agency after the disaster—ending up with just over $100, she said. Since then, Chestang has been unable to find employment or affordable housing. “My job is just surviving,” she said. “You don’t have time to think about long-term plans. You’re too overwhelmed by your immediate needs.”

A property in Magalia where several survivors have landed.

Chestang’s story isn’t uncommon. Sixteen

months after Nov. 8, 2018, many Camp Fire survivors—particularly those who are lowincome, under- or uninsured—are still stuck in survival mode. They’re living in cars, rundown RVs, even in tents scattered around the Ridge and elsewhere. Local service providers and government agencies are aware of the problem, but lack the resources to address the extent of the crisis fueled by a perfect storm of events—a disaster in a region already plagued by poverty and a housing shortage. The situation in Butte County is dire, its aftermath drawing parallels to that of Hurricane Katrina. Faced with no other options, many survivors have decided to relocate. But not everyone has the resources to start over in a new community.


For Chestang, it’s not as simple as getting in her car and driving away. The Ridge is her home. She grew up there, as have generations of her family. Moreover, her father has suffered multiple strokes since the fire, and she wants to be near him. “Without family, what else do you have?” she said. “I can’t very well just leave my family when they’re in this fucked-up position, too. It happened to all of us, and now we’ve all got to work together to get ourselves better. “We’re all hurting. I just don’t know how to get out of it yet.”

Shades of Hurricane Katrina Nicole LiBaire began her disaster recovery work in Louisiana three years after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and the surrounding area, killing more than 1,800 people. She founded and directed a statewide housing authority in order to distribute housing vouchers to survivors who would eventually come to live in 3,000 permanent supportive housing units throughout Louisiana. But that housing wasn’t built overnight. The challenges the state experienced when it came to managing recovery as people waited for places to live mirror what is happening in Butte County, LiBaire said. She’s been coming here over the past 14 months to work with the Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care through her role as a senior associate with the Technical Assistance Collaborative (TAC), a national nonprofit that helps communities implement policies related to health care and affordable housing, among other things. With the hurricane, LiBaire said, the shells of buildings were left standing. Years after the disaster, poor people were squatting in the flood-damaged structures. She met some of them while performing homeless census counts. “[The buildings] were so full of mold, and you’re talking years of just rot at that point—just nothing that anybody should live in,” she said. “But when you’re faced with living on the street, the fact that you might be able to get in and out of the

“We’re stuck in this relief mode for our community’s recovery because we can’t get people stably housed.” —Tara Sullivan-Hames

rain is a better option for you.” Like in Butte County, nonprofit and private organizations in Louisiana came together to try to fill the gaps, she said. Some people were able to get the help they needed to get housed and start over, but many were stuck either living in unsafe or unsuitable conditions not meant for long-term use, or were forced to move out of the area, LiBaire said. She predicts a similar outcome locally. “Sadly, what it means is people having to relocate,” she said. “And you’re talking about people that have probably lived in [Butte County] their entire life, and they probably don’t know what it takes to relocate

or have the means to relocate, nor do they want to, because this is where they’re from.” Ed Mayer, executive director for the Housing Authority of Butte County, said people have settled into traditionally temporary living situations because the region has a “severe demand for housing that doesn’t really exist.” The county was in the midst of a housing crisis before the fire, he noted. It was greatly amplified after tens of thousands of people across the Ridge lost their homes overnight. The rebuilding by well-insured homeowners—55 homes completed in Paradise and 24 in unincorporated Butte County thus far— doesn’t address the loss of rentals, including the dozens of razed mobile home parks, that previously housed the low-income population. There are affordable housing projects in the works countywide that could provide relief. The housing authority alone is involved with plans for 168 units for seniors, 112 units for families and 72 units for singles at new apartment complexes across Gridley, Chico, Orland and Oroville, Mayer said. The problem is that the timeline for completion is uncertain: Mayer said the projects are waiting on state and federal affordable housing grants, loans and subsidies, which typically are extremely competitive because of the statewide need. In the meantime, there are few local options for those in desperate need of help, he said.

Juliette Chestang has been living in her car since the Camp Fire.

Nowhere to go In the lobby of the Magalia Community Church’s recovery center, Doreen Fogle greets hundreds of Camp Fire survivors four days a week. The church has served as ground zero for volunteer relief post-Camp Fire, offering basic necessities such as food, clothing and toiletries. Chestang was there on a recent afternoon, gathering supplies for herself and her family. But first, she checked in at Fogle’s table in the lobby, where those seeking resources go through a brief intake process. According to data collected by the church, an average of 220 people per day have visited its recovery center since August. In January, for the first time, a slim majority reported finding housing (either purchasing a new home or securing a rental). However, many still are living in precarious situations, Fogle said. That same month, 605 told church officials they were living in an RV or trailer, 183 in a home with friends or family and 91 in temporary FEMA housing. At the same time, in the middle of winter, 92 reported living in vehicles, tents, sheds, shelters, hotels/motels or that they were couch surfing or living on the streets. Take, for example, a property in Magalia the CN&R visited in January. The temporary homes were packed tightly together, without traditional RV pads and hookups. Some parts of the parcel were impossible to walk through—residents laid wooden boards down to get across muddy ruts with massive puddles that had pooled up after recent storms and emitted an acrid smell. One resident, Tay Hodges, is disabled and uses a wheelchair. She told the CN&R she has nerve damage that causes such intense pain in her feet that it feels like “walking on broken glass or nails.” While she was quick to offer a smile, Hodges said she battles depression. Financial and health troubles, including diabetes, are almost always the trigger. Hodges and her boyfriend lived in a trailer park on the Ridge before the fire. It didn’t burn down, but they weren’t able to return, she said, and they received no assistance from FEMA. They ended up at the Red Cross shelter at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, but not for long. After they were kicked out with a little over $100 and nowhere to go, Hodges said, they stayed at random places, including a motel, a friend’s van and the city of Chico’s warming center. For most of the past year, they lived in a tent, first in Chico and then in Magalia. It was a humbling experience. “I peed and pooped in a cup,” Hodges said. “You wrapped a tarp around yourself and did what you had to do and that was it.” During that time, Hodges struggled to manage her diabetes and was briefly hospitalized. SURVIVAL C O N T I N U E D

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About five and half months ago, things improved when the couple secured an RV. It has a ceiling leak and broken pipes, but they told the CN&R they’re grateful—Hodges said her bed is comfortable, and they’re out of the elements. She doesn’t have much hope about finding long-term housing. The couple’s income is $1,000 per month from Hodge’s Supplemental Security Income check, and not much is left after expenses, she said. “Our biggest thing is we don’t have money,” Hodges said. “I can’t afford a rental.” Other residents of the makeshift community told the CN&R they have had a hard time finding a job, and that transportation is a major issue—they either don’t have a vehicle or what they do have is in disrepair. Like Hodges, they say finding an affordable place to rent in a better location seems improbable, if not impossible, considering the inflated post-disaster prices. Tyler Weist, his girlfriend and infant son ended up on the property for similar reasons. The couple used to live in a mobile home with Weist’s mother on his grandfather’s Magalia property, he said. After it burned, they moved around. The couple stayed at a Red Cross shelter in Glenn County for a while. Once it closed, they moved into an apartment in Chico with family, only to be displaced again when the lease wasn’t renewed. That’s when Weist found an old RV listed on Craigslist for $500. Weist said it leaks and the fridge and oven don’t work. One night, the family had to rush out because they feared an electrical fire was igniting.

It isn’t the first time the couple had lost everything—their apartment in Ventura burned down during the Thomas Fire in December 2017. That’s when they moved back to Magalia, where Weist spent most of his teenage years. In January, he told the CN&R he was looking to find work out of state in order to support the family. In the meantime, the couple had been scraping by on government assistance programs. “I’ve just been busting my ass trying to get back on top,” he told the CN&R. “My main goal is to get them out of here … in a more suitable, stable environment.”

Relief, not recovery Dozens of local organizations have been on the front line of disaster response, assembled through the collective called the Camp Fire Long Term Recovery Group. Comprising public entities, businesses, nonprofits, community groups and faith-based organizations, the group focuses on identifying and meeting ongoing and long-term needs post-Camp Fire. One organization in the recovery group is the call center Butte-Glenn 211, part of the nonprofit Help Central Inc., which connects locals to an array of social services and resources. The staff had crisis response experience back in 2017, when the Oroville Dam Spillway threatened to collapse, so operators were prepared when they began answering calls on Nov. 8, 2018, “as soon as people were starting to recognize there was smoke in the air,” said Tracey Gillihan, Butte-

Glenn 211’s call specialist team leader. They directed Ridge residents to evacuation routes and shelters. Afterward, the call center went through several phases. First, people phoned in with inquiries about whether their homes were still standing and when they could return. The staff often had to break the bad news that the caller’s house was gone. When relief services emerged, Butte-Glenn 211 directed people to distribution centers, emergency housing programs, free transportation services, medication assistance and more. The organization’s call and text volume has nearly quadrupled post-fire, said Executive Director Tara Sullivan-Hames. Through grant funding, the organization has tripled staffing to respond to the increased demand. It also operates a Camp Fire information text line with more than 10,000 subscribers and recently launched one targeting Gridley. There are plans to roll out ones for Magalia and Concow/Yankee Hill, too. Butte-Glenn 211 focuses on making a meaningful connection with clients and building trust, so that it is viewed as a valuable, accurate resource that can empower people during times of need, Sullivan-Hames said. What has made things difficult for the call center lately is that there is no strategic, longterm plan they can share with people who lack the resources to rebuild. “The trajectory of this disaster is not allowing the response to fully move into a The staff of Butte-Glenn 211 grew after the Camp Fire in order to handle a call and text volume that quadrupled, primarily due to survivors seeking resources. Pictured, from left: Tara Sullivan-Hames, Rina York, Tracey Gillihan and Molly Jolliff.

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Tyler Weist and his infant son pictured in January.

recovery mode, and yet that’s kind of where our government agencies have gone,” she said. “The recovery phase is really about being rehoused and stability,” she continued. “What’s happened with this response and this disaster [is] we don’t have housing, and so we’re just almost kind of stunted. We’re stuck in this relief mode for our community’s recovery because we can’t get people stably housed.” The high call volume remains to this day. Sullivan-Hames attributes it to the challenges of the recovery and lack of available resources: People still need help with housing, food, propane and transportation. This winter, Butte-Glenn 211 heard from survivors seeking tarps for leaking RVs and tents. “They’re very difficult calls because they’re super complex, and it kind of gets to my heart when I’m still giving people [resources for] these most basic of needs this far out. ... [It’s hard] to imagine having to live in that state for this long,” Gillihan said.

‘Long way to go’ In the aftermath of the Camp Fire, disaster case managers arrived to help people navigate their next steps. When federal government helpers left Butte County around June, community organizations stepped in to fill that role. There currently are 33 disaster case managers (12 part-time) tasked with helping survivors obtain housing locally, relocate


Reach out:

Butte-Glenn 211, a call center that provides referrals to local resources, assists Camp Fire survivors. Dial 211, text your zip code to 898211 or email helpcentral@ncen.org to get connected. Visit helpcentral.org to learn more.

and receive financial and employment assistance as well as emotional support and other resources. Some are FEMA-funded through Northern Valley Catholic Social Service and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, while others are volunteers or privately funded by the Butte Strong Fund. In January alone, the case managers closed 165 cases after helping clients achieve their recovery plans or receive financial assistance for housing. However, the unmet need is staggering. More than five times that amount—876 cases—remain open. Moreover, a waitlist established in August— nine months post-fire—includes 2,741 households that have yet to be assigned a case manager. The community needs to make it a high priority to help these people, SullivanHames, of Butte-Glenn 211, told the Butte County Board of Supervisors during a presentation at its Feb. 25 meeting. “Many survivors are confused and uncertain about their next steps, and they really are struggling to know how to navigate their recovery while they wait for a case manager,” she said. “Just having them wait for a case manager is not … a productive solution.” Shelby Boston, director of the Butte County Department of Employment and Social Services, was hoping to present some good news that day. Her department applied for an AmeriCorps and California Volunteers grant to hire more disaster case managers. Last month, the department was tentatively awarded a $1.1 million grant. The caveat: It’s contingent on matching funds. The county asked for and subsequently received an extension to reply to the offer in order to apply for $1.2 million from the Butte Strong Fund—a fire recovery fund held at the North Valley Community Foundation—to bring an additional 57 case managers on board. “I’m really hoping to find a solution and continue to move forward,” Boston told the CN&R. In general, grants have been awarded to help address the housing crunch post-Camp Fire, but they largely have been geared toward homeowners. The town of Paradise, for example, recently received $23 million in CalHome funds to distribute low-interest loans for rebuilding. Town of Paradise Housing Program Manager Kate Anderson said the municipality was home to approximately 36 mobile home parks that burned, and all of its subsi-

dized apartments—a total of 88 units—were destroyed. Most of the owners of the latter are planning to rebuild, and she’s heard of at least four mobile home parks that want to reopen and a few complexes that survived the fire and are reopening. However, Anderson acknowledged the gaps in resources for survivors, particularly renters, and said her department wants to explore how to create programs to incentivize the rebuild of rental housing and apartments. One resource that could help on that front is the $1 billion in federal Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery funds for California communities devastated by the 2018 wildfires. The money is earmarked specifically to address unmet housing, infrastructure and economic needs. The California Department of Housing and Community Development has until June 3 to finalize an action plan for disbursement of the funds, which will then be reviewed by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Casey Hatcher, deputy administrative

officer for Butte County, said that local jurisdictions don’t know how much they could receive or when. She added that the county still is waiting for such disaster recovery funds from the October 2017 Cherokee Fire, which burned more than 8,400 acres and destroyed six structures. The town of Paradise wants its renters, which include seniors and veterans, to be able to come back, Anderson said. The hardest part is that there’s nowhere for them to go while they wait for the rebuild because the market is so impacted. “While it’s good that we have some that we can help, it’s frustrating that we can’t help far more people,” she said. “We don’t want to keep losing people and have people give up hope.” The county’s Department of Employment and Social Services received a $1 million grant from the Butte Strong Fund in early 2019 to help people move on to the next phase of their recovery. The money has helped residents get water tanks and pay for repairs to vehicles and RVs, Boston said. It has helped people relocate, too.

Recently, a man who had lived in a metal cargo container for almost a year received assistance purchasing an RV that allowed him to rejoin his wife and her family in another state, Boston shared as an example. “He just texted me the other day, in fact, and he is doing well there and looking forward to coming back to Paradise in the spring,” Boston said. The couple plan to rebuild. While she has success stories like this to share, Boston also recognizes that many people are falling through the cracks. Many don’t qualify for traditional government assistance programs. Those who were sharing a home or couch surfing, for example, did not qualify for FEMA assistance because they were not on the lease or the property owner, Boston said. That means the community has to get creative, and continue trying to remove barriers, she said. “When those individuals come onto our radar, we try to help them as much as we can,” she said. “We can’t forget. We can’t leave people behind and think, ‘Oh, they’ll figure it out.’ … I think we’ve come a long way, but we have a long way to go.” Ω

Tay Hodges, a disabled survivor with diabetes, lived in a tent for much of the past year. She recently secured a leaky RV and says she cannot afford a rental on her limited income.

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Arts &Culture THIS WEEK

With a new Grammynominated album, Jimmie Vaughan is still living the dream PHOTO BY GAGE SKIDMORE

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W players, Texas has quite the legacy. The Lone Star State has given the world hen it comes to homegrown guitar

Blind Lemon Jefferson, T-Bone Walker, Lightnin’ Hopkins, by Freddy King, Albert Dave Gil Collins, Johnny Winter, de Rubio Billy Gibson and perhaps the greatest Preview: Jimmie Vaughn pair of blues-guitarperforms tonight, playing siblings ever, March 5, 7:30 p.m. Jimmie and Stevie Ray Tickets: $40 (6 p.m. Vaughan. buffet dinner is The younger brothadditional $17) er, of course, left the Sierra Nevada world too early when Big Room he died in a helicopter 1075 E. 20th St. crash in 1990 at the sierranevada.com age of 35. But Jimmie Vaughan has kept the family musical legacy alive and built on it, recording eight albums and touring as a solo artist and bandleader in the 30 years since he and Stevie Ray recorded their only collaboration—the Vaughan Brothers’ Family Style—in the months before his brother passed. Vaughan’s latest release is the 2020 Grammy-nominated Baby, Please Come Home, a collection of covers honoring a number of his idols, including Etta James, Lefty Frizzell, Fats Domino, Jimmy Reed and fellow Texan T-Bone Walker. When asked in a recent interview about the inspiration for this project, the Dallas-area native kept it simple. “It’s really just things that I like. I

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found out that, when I go into the studio, I like to pretend that I’m making 45s. All I have to do is find two or three songs and cut ’em. If I treat them like singles, I can try this or that and it just seems to take away the massive burden of coming up with a bunch of songs all at once, which is terrible. It sort of lets the air out of the room,” Vaughan said with a laugh. “The next thing you know, you have an album.” Vaughan’s distinctive punchy guitar twang is the glue holding together songs that reverberate with a juke-joint vibe that’s punctuated by horns and the occasional female vocal harmony. Covers of Bill Doggett’s slinky instrumental “Hold It” and Clarence Gatemouth Brown’s “Midnight Hour” sound like lost B-sides plucked from the vaults of legendary R&B imprints like Modern or Federal Records. Music has been a constant in the Texan’s life, thanks to backgrounds on both sides of his family, but it was a freak football injury that set him down his own musical path. “I had a friend of mine at school in junior high who said that if I wanted to have a girlfriend, I was going to have to play football. So I went out for football and I was not a particularly good athlete—I was lousy, as a matter of fact,” Vaughn said. A hard tackle and a broken collarbone later, and the then-12-year-old Vaughn was laid up for three months. “My parents, who both worked, didn’t

know what they were going to do with me for three months. So my dad told me to play guitar because I had just gotten one with three strings on it. … I’ve been playing ever since.” Of course, little Stevie Ray, who idolized his big brother, followed his lead. “People would come to the house and my father would say, ‘Jim, go get your guitar and play a song for our guests.’ I would go get the acoustic guitar and play something like Glen Miller’s ‘In the Mood.’ It wasn’t very long until Stevie would get his little guitar. … We’d play together and the guest would usually say something like, ‘You boys are really good. Maybe you can make a record together someday,’” Vaughn recalled. However, it wasn’t until after the two had each found separate success in the 1980s—Jimmie playing guitar with the Fabulous Thunderbirds and Stevie Ray leading Double Trouble—that they’d make Family Style, their only album together. Family tragedies aside, Vaughan says that his life has kind of worked out how he envisioned while recovering from that broken collarbone. “After a couple of days of trying to play guitar and [finding] it was pretty cool, I thought I might be able to make some records, earn some money, buy a car and split,” he said with a laugh. “I’ve just been fortunate. I’ve always wanted to make records, play guitar and be a blues singer, so my dreams have come true.” Ω

3D PRINTING: Learn about printing in the third dimension in the maker lab. Open to all ages. Thu, 3/5, 3pm. Free. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

EMPTY BOWLS: Purchase a handmade, ceramic bowl made by a local junior or senior high school student and enjoy a variety of delicious soups, bread, dessert and coffee prepared and donated by local Chico restaurants. All proceeds benefit the Torres Community Shelter. Thu, 3/5, 5pm. Second meal at 6:30pm. $12. Lincoln Center at Chico High School, 901 Esplanade.

KELLER WILLIAMS CAREER NIGHT: Local real estate experts offer a free look inside their business to anyone looking to get into the industry. Thu, 3/5, 5:30pm. Keller Williams Realty, 2080 E 20th Street, Ste. 170.

RITUALS TO SAVE THE EARTH: Dr. Sarah Pike, chair of the Department of Comparative Religion and Humanities at Chico State, asks what it could mean to think about recent youth climate strikes as a form of ritual action to save the Earth. Thu, 3/5, 5pm. PAC 113, Chico State.

SPACE ARCHAEOLOGY: A presentation on the subject by archaeologist and author Lisa Westwood. Thu, 3/5, 4pm. Free. Ayres 120, Chico State. 898-6192.

HISTORY OF CRAFT BEER

Saturday, March 7 Chico History Museum SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PaGE

WOMEN LIKE YOU

Friday, March 6 Bell Memorial Union Auditorium SEE FrIDaY, SPECIAL EVENTS

HISTORY OF CRAFT BEER: Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. founder Ken Grossman talks the technique, art and scale of brewing beer and his journey from garage to worldwide brand. Sat 3/7, 10am. $3-$5. Chico History Museum, 141 Salem St.

KIDS ART WORKSHOP: Kids age 5-12 are invited to paint, craft and create. Email arted. csu.chico@gmail.com to register. Sat 3/7, 10am. $10. Arts & Humanities 208, Chico State.

PV HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC GALA: Pleasant Valley High School Music benefit dinner with a concert and silent auction. Must be at least 21 to attend. Sat 3/7, 5:30pm. $60. Chico Masonic Family Center, 1110 W. East Ave. eventbrite. com

Music JIMMIE VAUGHAN: Texas guitarist/singer and older brother of the late Stevie Ray Vaughan is on tour in support of his new album, Baby, Please Come Home. Thu, 3/5, 7:30pm. $40$62. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Theater THE PORTUGUESE KID: A feisty romantic comedy by John Patrick Shanley, the Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Doubt and Outside Mullingar, and the Academy Award-winning screenwriter of Moonstruck. Directed by Jerry Miller. Thu, 3/5, 7:30pm. $12-$16. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS: An update of the 18th-century classic that follows a delightful servant named Truffaldino who becomes embroiled in the problems of two sets of lovers and gets more than he bargained for. Thu, 3/5, 7:30pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Chico State. 898-5152. csuchico. edu/soa

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Special Events B-THE UNDERWATER BUBBLE SHOW: Chico Performances presents this bubble circus and modern fairy tale about the journey of a kid who grows up and learns that he can still find joy in life. Fri, 3/6, 7:30pm. $15$39. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. chicoperformances.com

COMMUNITY GARDENING: All community members are welcome to drop on by and work on the Peace Garden. Fri, 3/6, 3pm. Chico Peace & Justice Center, 526 Broadway St. (530) 8939078. chicopeace.org

MIDDLE SCHOOL FILM FESTIVAL: Watch original short films created by Blue Oak students. Fri, 3/6, 5:30pm. Free. Blue Oak Charter School, 450 W. East Ave.

OROVILLE FIRST FRIDAY: Participating downtown businesses will prepare sample food and drinks representing countries from around the world. Fri, 3/6, 5pm. Downtown Oroville, 1360 Myers St., Oroville.

WOMEN LIKE YOU LEADERSHIP SYMPOSIUM: Distinguished female leaders will tell their personal stories of success and failure and share their experiences with controversial topics related to women’s issues. Presented by Associated Students Wildcat Leadership Institute Fri, 3/6, 10am. Free. BMU Auditorium, Chico State. as.csuchico.edu

Music TIM FLANNERY AND THE LUNATIC FRINGE: KZFR presents the former San Francisco Giants third base coach and longtime bluegrass musician. Partial benefit for the Love Harder Project and KZFR. Fri, 3/6, 7:30pm. $10-$20. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. brown papertickets.com

THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS: See Thursday. Fri, 3/6, 7:30pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Chico State. 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

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Special Events 3D PRINTING: See Thursday. Sat 3/7, 3pm. Free. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

BIDWELL CLASSIC: Half-marathon and 5K run to benefit high-school cross country. Sat 3/7, 8am. $30-$50. One-Mile Recreational Area, Bidwell Park. fleetfeet.com

BINGO FOR BALLET: Benefit for Chico Community Ballet. Sat 3/7, 6pm. $10. First Christian Church, 295 E. Washington Ave.

BREW FLOW: Local yoga instructor Chelsea West leads a relaxing day of vinyasa flow yoga followed by beer or wine. The 45-minute class is open to all skill levels. Sat 3/7, 11am. $15. The Commons, 2412 Park Ave. brew-flow. ticketleap.com

CARS AND COFFEE: Check out cool cars and converse with collectors and enthusiasts over a cup of joe. Sat 3/7, 8am. Free. Starbucks Coffee, 2009 Forest Ave.

COMEDY NIGHT: Stand-up comedy featuring

Theater THE PORTUGUESE KID: See Thursday. Fri, 3/6, 7:30pm. $12-$16. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

Butch Escobar, Victor Pacheco, Ian Kung, Don Ashby, Sydney Hupp and Travis Dowdy. Hosted by Dillon Collins. Sat, 3/7, 8pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

TEO GONZALEZ: Live set from the Mexican comedy icon also known as “El Comediante de la Cola de Caballo.” Sat 3/7, 8pm. $35$45. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

WOMEN IN BUSINESS SUMMIT: The conference includes breakout sessions on project management, salary negotiation, marketing, entrepreneurship, advice from powerful women in business (the keynote speaker is from Apple) and will include breakfast and lunch. Sat 3/7, 9am. $15. Colusa 100 A&B, Chico State. eventbrite.com

Music CLASSICAL GUITAR PROJECT: Chico State alum Matthew Fish returns along with fellow guitarist David Gonzalez to perform an eclectic program featuring pieces from Schumann, Debussy and de Lhoyer. Sat, 3/7, 7:30pm. $10-$20. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

OROVILLE COMMUNITY CONCERT: The Oroville Community Concert Band presents From Stage and Screen, featuring music from Mulan, West Side Story and Superman, as well as the playing of the big organ. Sat, 3/7, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovillestatetheatre.com

THE LOCO-MOTIVE BAND: Live classic rock and blues covers. Sat, 3/7, 4pm. Free. Dream Catcher Ranch & BBQ, Intersection of Highways 32 & 45, Hamilton City.

ThE SErVENT OF TWO MaSTErS Thursday-Sunday, March 5-8 Wismer Theatre

HIKE AT NIGHT: Meet at the Nature Center and take an evening stroll through Lower Bidwell Park. Please leave all pets at home. Sat 3/7, 7pm. Free. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.

SEE ThUrSDaY-SUNDaY, MUSIC

FrEE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the cN&r calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

THE PORTUGUESE KID: See Thursday. Sat, 3/7, 7:30pm. $12-$16. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS: See Thursday. Sat, 3/7, 2pm & 7:30pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Chico State. 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

8

SUN

Special Events DACHSHUND SUNDAY: All dogs are welcome, but bring your wiener if you’ve got one. Feel free to show up solo if you are without a canine companion and still in need of boops, snuggles and pets. Sun, 3/8, 1pm. Hooker Oak Park, 1928 Manzanita Ave.

FREE MOVIE: Call for movie title (891-2762). Sun, 3/8, 2pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. buttecounty.net

Music EMMA GARRAHY & WILL HARTMAN: Live music for brunch. Sun, 3/8, 11am. Free. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

OROVILLE COMMUNITY CONCERT: See Saturday. Sun, 3/8, 3:30pm. $5-$10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. orovillestatetheatre.com

SETH PRINZ: Local singer/songwriter. Sun, 3/8, 3pm. Free. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

SUNDAY SUPERJAM: Classic rock and blues covers by Loco-Motive and many others. Sun, 3/8, 2pm. Free. La Salles, 229 Broadway.

Theater THE PORTUGUESE KID: See Thursday. Sun, 3/8, 2pm. $12-$16. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

THIS WEEK cONTINUED ON PaGE 24

EDITOR’S PICK

GETTING LITTLE FEET WET: A seminar to help educators integrate nature education into all areas of their curriculum that gets kids outside. The first 10 registrants will qualify for a $50 stipend sponsored by Butte First 5. Sat 3/7, 9am. Free. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., 891-4671.

Theater

B-The Underwater Bubble Show looks like a blast. The Cirqu-du-Soleil-esque presentation with underwater scenes and lots of bubbles is both a feast for the eyes and the spirit—a show for kids and for adults who might need a reminder that it is possible to find joy in adulthood. It’s a modern fairy tale that follows Mr. B from the stress and constant distraction of modern life into the magical world of Bubblelandia. Dive in this Friday (March 6) at Laxson Auditorium.

March 5, 2020

CN&R

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team

Cn&r is Looking For • advertising ConsuLtant

THIS WEEK coNTINuEd froM PaGE 23

FINE ARTS

SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS: See Thursday Sun, 3/8, 2pm. $8-$20. Wismer Theatre, Chico State. 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

9

MoN

Special Events CHICO LIVE IMPROV: Local improv comedy troupe hosts various games every Monday and offers constructive criticism to anyone looking to improve. Mon, 3/9, 7pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.

WEST AFRICAN DANCE WITH BABA KAUNA: Practice traditional West African Dance with an experienced master teacher and live drums. All levels are welcome. Mon, 3/9, 5:30pm. $5-$10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

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TuE

• distribution driver the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Special Events ART COLLECTORS CONVERSATION: Panel discussion featuring gallarist Patricia Sweetow and artist Ramekon O’Arwisters on the direction art is taking in the early 21st century. Tue, 3/10, 6:30pm. $5-$8. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. 487-7272.

LarGE PrINT

Shows through April 4 Janet Turner Print Museum SEE arT

WOMEN OF WISDOM: An evening of intercul-

For more inFormation, visit www.newsreview.Com/ChiCo/jobs

equal opportunity employer

tural storytelling, learning, and hospitality inspired by Native American tribal communities throughout Northern California. Tue, 3/10, 4:30pm. Free. BMU Auditorium, Chico State. 898-4774. csuchico.edu

Music

Let’s ceLebrate!

BOY NAMED BANJO: Nashville country, alt-rock and folk-pop you can dance to. Tue, 3/10, 7:30pm. $15-$37. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

11

WEd

Special Events ASSOCIATED STUDENTS ELECTION CANDIDATE BBQ:

The Chico News & Review’s party guide covers a full range of parties and what you need to make them happen.

Look for Let’s CeLebrate! on stands or at the Cn&r offiCe: 353 e. seCond st. downtown ChiCo

Meet and eat with the 2020 student government candidates ahead of the 4/1 election day. Wed, 3/11, 11am. Trinity Commons, Chico State.

FIGURE DRAWING NIGHT: Join the Painting and Drawing Club every Wednesday evening. There will be a model posing during each session. All are welcome. Wed, 3/11, 6pm. $2-$5. Ayres 216, Chico State.

LOVE YOUR BRAIN: In recognition of Brain Injury month, the Chico Brain Injury Coalition and Passages Caregiver Resource Center offers a workshop that details evidencebased benefits of yoga and meditation for traumatic brain injury, a screening of the HBO Documentary Crash Reel, and guest speaker Sophia Da Silva. Prior registration required. Wed, 3/11, 1pm. Free. Enloe Conference Center, 1528 Esplanade. 342-3118

SHE DESIGNED THE LIFE SHE LOVES: Empower Me Art presents a workshop that will introduce young people to high-tech fabrication and design equipment and software in a hands-on, fun environment. Wed, 3/11, 9:30am. $15-$75. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E 3rd Street. empowermeart.org

for MorE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE oN PaGE 26

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March 5, 2020

Art 1078 GALLERY: Selections from Memphis and The Wechslers, works by the Portland fine-art photographer Jennifer Brommer. Through 3/15. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery. org

APOLLO SCHOOL OF MUSIC: Art at Apollo, NorCal Musicians Collective presents a group art show in multiple mediums. Music by Perfect Dark. Sat 3/7, 2pm. 936 Mangrove Ave.

AYRES HALL & THE ARTS & HUMANITIES BUILDING: Open Studios, for one day Chico State art classes and studios open to the public to show off student works. Wed, 3/11, 10am4pm. Chico State.

B-SO GALLERY: Leyendas Monstruosas, a revisiting of Latin American folklore through a modern lens featuring digital illustrations of monsters that haunt children’s dreams. Through 3/6. Next up: Shay Taylor, culminating exhibition for the Chico State art student. Through 3/13. Chico State, Ayres Hall, Room 105.

CHICO ART CENTER: Furlandia, the exhibit’s title refers to a mythical land inhabited only by animals. The characters are based on the animals at Ana Nelson and Phil Dynan’s Accidental Animal Rescue Center, where the two artists have taken in more than 430 animals in the past eight years. Reception Sat, 3/7, 2-4pm. Through 3/27. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY: Art by Kimberly Rachelle Ranalla, paintings by Northern California Artist and brain tumor survivor. Enloe Regional Cancer Center’s Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/17. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856. enloe.org

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Foreign Bodies, Bay Area artist Cathy Lu’s ceramic explorations of trans-cultural experiences through the appropriation and decontextualization of traditional Chinese art and its perception in the

West. Through 3/14. Arts & Humanties Building, Chico State. headleygallery csuchico.com

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Observe … The Creative Process, a unique exhibit where the process is the show, with Rachelle Montoya (mixed-media) and Ama Posey (painting) setting up studios and creating new works live. Closing reception 3/8, 5-7pm. Also: art collectors conversation with gallarist Patricia Sweetow and artist Ramekon O’Arwisters on the direction art is taking in the early 21st century. Tue, 3/10, 6:30pm. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

PARADISE ART CENTER: Something Different, works from artists who try a medium, subject matter, technique or a color scheme that they are unfamiliar with. Through 3/28. 5564 Almond St., Paradise.

THE TURNER: Large Print, an exhibit of some of the largest works in the Turner collection. Exhibition talk 3/12, 5:30pm in Zingg Recital Hall followed by a reception at The Turner. Through 4/4. Free. Chico State. 898-4476. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff for kids to explore, including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmers’ market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information Through 3/25. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Fire and Water Elements of Change, this exhibit curated by Museum Studies students observes our changing planet from an anthropological perspective, through two major elements: fire and water. Through 7/31. Also: Unbroken Traditions: Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker Family of Northern California. Through 5/15. Chico State.


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W romantic comedy The Portuguese Kid premiered offhen John Patrick Shanley’s

Broadway in 2017, New York City critics lambasted it as all com and no rom. One by Robert Speer called it “an underdeveloped doodle.” But audiReview: ences and reviewthe Portuguese Kid ers outside the shows thursdayBig Apple loved saturday, 7:30 p.m; it, saying it was sunday, 2 p.m., joyfully hilarious. through March 8. tickets: $12-$16 You can put the audiTheatre on ence at Theatre the Ridge on the Ridge’s 3735 Neal road, Paradise current produc877-5760 tion—including totr.org this reviewer, who attended on Friday (Feb. 28)—squarely in the latter group. Shanley’s play is a joke-a-thon, and charges that it lacks depth fail to acknowledge that its nonstop banter is often funny as hell and comes at a time when humor is a welcome anodyne to current events (which, in fact, get occasional humorous mention in the play). Shanley is best known as the author of the movie Moonstruck, the 1988 Oscar winner for Best Original Screenplay. He also has written numerous successful plays, including Doubt: A Parable, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and Tony

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$5 Value Award for Best Play in 2005, and later nominated for the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay in 2009. With The Portuguese Kid, Shanley is again mining the comedic vein he unearthed in Moonstruck, which focused on a group of working class Brooklynites jockeying for position in the search for love. The Portuguese Kid is set in Providence, Rhode Island. I’m not sure what kind of accent Providence residents have, but here—thanks to an excellent cast—the actors sound like characters out of The Sopranos, minus the hint of incipient violence. These people are comics, not killers. Veteran actor/director (and TOTR artistic director) Jerry Miller helmed the production and also plays a key role as low-rent lawyer Barry Dragonetti. Miller seems incapable of a bad performance, and when he’s playing off an actor as skilled as his wife, Teresa HurleyMiller, sparks fly. Hurley-Miller plays Atalanta Lagana, a sexy and wealthy middle-aged widow (she’s buried two husbands) who consults her old friend Barry for help selling her mansion. Atalanta carries a torch for Barry, as we learn when it’s revealed that she hollers his name while in the throes of sexual congress with her much younger boy toy, Freddie Imbrossi (Eric Ricketts). Shanley mines this quirk

Sparks fly between Barry Dragonetti (Jerry Miller) and Atalanta Lagana (Teresa Hurley-Miller) in The Portuguese Kid.

You pay $3.25

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for a truckload of laughs. A familiar storyline emerges, one involving mismatched couples. It soon becomes obvious that Barry and Atalanta don’t yet realize that they are right for each other. Atalanta is too much woman for Freddie, and Barry is married to a sexy, sharp-tongued but much younger Puerto Rican model, Patty Dragonetti (the excellent Erika Anne Soerensen). The only outlier to these romantic complexities is Fausta Dragonetti, Barry’s overbearing ogress of a mother (Judy Clemens, TOTR’s executive director). She loathes Atalanta and will do anything to keep her away from Barry, whom she calls a “sucker.” In one of the best lines in the play, she warns Atalanta to stay away from her son: “Take my advice. Get fat. Count your money. You’ve killed enough.” In his director’s note in the playbill, Miller warns attendees, “Like an intricate mosaic, The Portuguese Kid is assembled from jagged shards and broken things all held together with a non-stop stream of profanity. So, as you read this, take heed and run if phrases like ‘Jump’n fuck’n cocksuckers’ are going to set your teeth on edge. That’s just the world our characters inhabit.” Ω

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25


NIGHTLIFE

ThUrSDaY 3/5—WEDNESDaY 3/11

YEE-haWIN’ IN OUTEr SPacE

6FrIDaY

ANDY FRASCO & THE U.N.: Frantic, playful and unexpectedly raunchy feel-good music from LA. The band is on tour in support of its forthcoming album, Keep On Keepin’ On. Fri, 3/6, 9pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

For Los Angeles-based psych rock band Spindrift (pictured), there is more to music than touring and making albums. The band has produced two feature films and contributed to soundtracks for the likes of HBO’s East Bound & Down, the Quentin Tarantino-produced Hell Ride, and Viceland’s Hamilton’s Pharmacopeia. The group cites classic western films as influences alongside bands like The Doors and My Bloody Valentine. We reckon you ought to get down to Duffy’s Tavern this Friday (March 6), after sundown. Local crew WRVNG opens.

GARRET GRAY: Local songwriter formerly of alt-country crew The Perpetual Drifters. Zuri & Gillian open. Fri, 3/6, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

EZra BELL, | LO & BEhOLD

INFAMOUS: Live music. Fri, 3/6,

SEE ThUrSDaY

JOHNNY CASH TRIBUTE: An authen-

9pm. Free. Jen’s Place, 7126 Skyway, Paradise. (530)413-9130.

Tonight, March 5 Argus Bar + Patio

Ezra Bell

5ThUrSDaY

BOGG DOES BEETHOVEN: The local

modern jazz quartet will resurrect and reanimate tunes from the famed composer. Thu, 3/5, 6pm. Free. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

EZRA BELL: Portland indie/folk band is on tour in support of its forthcoming album, This Way to

tic, toe-tapping trip through the life of the country great. Fri, 3/6, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

THE PROOF: Christian hip-hop show Oblivion. Local support from Lo & Behold. Thu, 3/5, 8pm. $10. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

JIMMIE VAUGHAN: Texas guitarist/ singer and older brother of the late Stevie Ray Vaughan is on tour in support of his new album, Baby, Please Come Home. Thu, 3/5, 7:30pm. $40$62. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

SCOTT TECCA: The Montana singer/ songwriter plays country and classic rock tunes. Thu, 3/5, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

WHISKERS006: Solo, acoustic classic/ alternative rock covers and originals. Thu, 3/5, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

featuring Kingdom Muzic frontman Bryann Trejo and special guest Mike Servin. Jahai, Yung Lexx, J-Bliz and Sinsear round out the bill. Fri, 3/6, 6pm. $10. Arc Pavilion, 2040 Park Ave.

SPINDRIFT: LA psych rock band that fully embraces the cinematic aesthetic. WRVNG opens. Fri, 3/6, 9pm. $7. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

TIM FLANNERY AND THE LUNATIC FRINGE: KZFR presents the former San Francisco Giants third base coach and bluegrass musician. Partial benefit for the Love Harder Project and KZFR. Fri, 3/6, 7:30pm. $10-$20.

Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. brownpapertickets.com

TYLER DEVOLL: Live music. Fri,

3/6, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

M-F 9am-5pm Sat 10am-5pm Sun 10am-4pm

Equipment

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March 5, 2020


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22 TEO GONZALEZ Saturday, March 7 Gold Country Casino SEE SATURDAY

TRIPLE TREE: Local roots reggae

jams. Sat, 3/7, 8pm. $8. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

UP TO 11: Hard rock and classic heavy metal covers. Sat, 3/7, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

8SUNDAY

JASON ANGOVE: Live music. Sat,

3/7, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theex changeoroville.com

LOCAL SONGWRITER SHOWCASE: Live music from locals Cameron Ford,

Sunday Iris and Brandon Hilty. Sat, 3/7, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

ROULETTE BURLESQUE: Each spin of the roulette wheel by an audience member seals a performer’s fate. Which song are you going to get? Sat, 3/7, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

7SATURDAY

ARTHUR BUEZO: Live music by the

Brooklyn guitarist and singer. Sat, 3/7, 10pm. Free. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

CANA ROAD SOCIAL CLUB: Live blues/ rock. Sat, 3/7, 6pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

COMEDY NIGHT: Stand-up comedy featuring Butch Escobar, Victor Pacheco, Ian Kung, Don Ashby, Sydney Hupp and Travis Dowdy. Hosted by Dillon Collins. Sat, 3/7,

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Sign-ups from 8-9:15 p.m. Sun, 3/8. Free. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

REVERSO: A collaboration between American trombonist Ryan Keberle and Paris-based pianist Frank Woeste that combines chamber music and jazz. Sun, 3/8, 7pm. First Christian Church, 295 E. Washington Ave.

9MONDAY

SOUL POSSE IN PARADISE: Come

8pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.

FOREIGNER UNAUTHORIZED: One of the top Foreigner tribute bands in the country plays all the classics. Sat, 3/7, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

HOT POTATO TRIO: Acoustic jazz trio with violin, guitar, bass and vocals. Sat, 3/7, 7pm. Free. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive.

dance to live music from the local band. Sat, 3/7, 1pm. $8. Paradise Elks Lodge, 315 Ewald Court, Paradise.

TEO GONZALEZ: Live set from the Mexican comedy icon also known as “el comediante de la cola de caballo.” Sat, 3/7, 8pm. $35-$45. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcoun trycasino.com

THOSE DUDES: Dance to classic rock tunes from the ’60s-’80s. Sat, 3/7, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

NO ART PUNK SHOW: Touring bands The Cryptics (Dover, N.H.), Scowl (Santa Cruz) and Punitive Damage (Vancouver) along with locals Fall Children. Ask a punk. Mon, 3/9, 5:30pm. $5-$10.

10TUESDAY

BOY NAMED BANJO: Nashville country, alt-rock and folk-pop you can dance to. Tue, 3/10, 7:30pm. $15-$37. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Trivia hosted by Cameron Ford. Call in after 3:30pm to participate. Tue, 3/10, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

11WEDNESDAY

AFTER THIS JAZZ: Standard, Latin

and modern jazz featuring Shigemi Minetaka on keyboard and Gary Bourg on bass guitar. Wed, 3/11, 6pm. Free. The Allies Pub, 426 Broadway, Ste. 130.

DANCE NIGHT: Four lady DJs with large vinyl collections select a fresh slice of wax every Wednesday for your boogie pleasure. Wed, 3/11, 9pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

OPEN MIC IN OROVILLE: Floyd Vannata hosts every Wednesday. All performances welcome. Vendors and visual artists contact the venue beforehand if interested. Wed, 3/11, 7pm. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Hwy.

PETER WILSON: Live Music. Wed, 3/11,

6pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

GREEN GRASS TO BLUEGRASS

One, two, three championships and Tim Flannery is out of baseball. The retired major leaguer and recent San Francisco Giants third base coach is a full-time bluegrass musician these days—and on tour with his band, the Lunatic Fringe. The group will perform at Chico Women’s Club this Friday (March 6), as a partial benefit show for the Love Harder Project and KZFR community radio.

More than 50 pieces of PRESENTS

2020 Keep Chico

Weird

Art Show

weird art 1078 Gallery

1710 Park Ave., Chico

March 19-22 Reception: Thursday, March 19, 6-9 p.m., featuring live performances and the Best in Show award. Free admission Bonus performance: Sunday, March 22, an early show, 1-4 p.m., featuring four weird live music acts: • Loolowningen from Japan • Gentlemen Surfer from Sacramento • XDS and Donald Beaman from Chico $7 cover For more info visit: keepchicoweird.com

or facebook.com/keepchicoweird

MARCH 5, 2020

CN&R

27


REEL WORLD Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Boogeyman television

The Outsider

A finicky viewer looking for shows that kill

Iinsomething new or “binge-worthy” doesn’t grab me the first episode, I probably will abandon her and

am not a good TV buddy. My wife will vouch for this. If

the pets on the couch. I’m not a jerk about it. Mostly, it’s a matter of having only so much by time in my schedule, and evenings Jason Cassidy are prime time in more ways than j aso nc @ one. Even during things that I always new srev i ew. c o m love watching—basketball games, Frontline, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver—I’ll get up and go play my guitar, pay bills, or get involved in some other hobby/distraction/ chore that I’m not able to do at any other time of the day. As a rule, I allow myself only one or two regular shows a week, and lately there has been only one show permitted on the schedule: The Outsider on HBO. And it is awesome. I also tried HBO’s new McMillions docuseries on the McDonald’s Monopoly game scam, but it was just too slow. I can’t slog through six one-hour episodes when one two-hour documentary would’ve sufficed. And Amazon’s Hunters, with Al Pacino and his Nazi-killing superteam? Meh. It has a fun premise, impressive violence and dead Nazis going for it, but most of the characters are flat stereotypes and the dialogue is tedious. I’m out. (I even gave it two episodes!) So, The Outsider is it for now. Which fits what’s become my profile for acceptable night-time distraction: detectives looking for monsters who’ve done bad things to people, aka “murder porn” (not to be confused with “informative murder porn” from the South Park episode of the same name). Typically, the show will be British—some of my faves include Broadchurch, The Fall and The Missing (which I just found out has a spinoff featuring the main detective, called Baptiste, that’ll

28

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March 5, 2020

be streaming in the U.S. starting May 5)—but this miniseries is all American (with a couple of Brits and an Aussie playing key roles) and is based on Stephen King’s 2016 novel of the same name. The set-up: A little league baseball coach named Terry Maitland (Jason Batemen) is arrested for the brutal murder of a young boy. Hard evidence—eyewitnesses, security camera footage, DNA—points to his guilt. Other hard evidence—eyewitnesses, security camera footage, fingerprints—points to his innocence. Since it’s a King story, the truth behind the apparent mystery isn’t limited to “real world” possibilities, and right away a monster hiding in plain sight enters the story. And it is a deliciously slow-moving story, one that follows a loose team of interested parties—cops, private detectives, a lawyer and others touched by the killer— that comes together to track down the monster. The pace is a large part of its appeal, helping build a tension that’s made manifest in the slow-burning intensity of detective Ralph Anderson (the fantastic Australian actor Ben Mendelsohn), a man of logic who struggles mightily with not only his personal demons, but also the notion that monsters might exist outside of our imaginations. The whole cast is incredible—most especially English actress Cynthia Erivo as Holly Gibney, a private detective with a photographic memory and enhanced powers of perception, who is the first to discover the killer’s true nature. She is quirky, unflaggingly earnest and as endearing as hell. But she, like the detective and most every other character, also has demons. And the fact that the monster feeds on people’s pain means that the closer they get, the more their fears are drawn to the surface. It all comes down to a final showdown—airing this Sunday (March 8) at 9 p.m.—between that which we love and that which scares us the most. Stream the whole miniseries on either HBO or Hulu. Ω


FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Meredith J. Cooper, Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

his onscreen persona does have a surprising nuance. He makes much of the movie watchable, even heartwarming in places. But then Buck the dog bounces around like Scooby-Doo and kills the moment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Opening this week Emma.

Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey

An English adaptation of the Jane Austen novel of the same name. Anya Taylor-Joy stars as the title character, a young, beautiful woman in mid-19th-century England who meddles in the love lives of her friends and family. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

This latest offering from the DC Comics Extended Universe follows up Suicide Squad (2016), and finds the unhinged badass Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie) teaming with a new crew, an all-female band of superheroes trying to rescue a young girl from the Black Mask (Ewan McGregor). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Lodge

Critics have used the word “unsettling” to describe this horror flick set in a snowbound cabin where two kids are left alone with their dad’s new girlfriend who has a dark past. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Onward

Impractical Jokers: The Movie

The TruTV hidden-camera dare/prank/improv show gets the big-screen treatment. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Latest Pixar computer-animated feature follows two elf brothers living in suburbia on a quest for magic. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Rabid (1977)

Pageant’s March Late Show series is “Shocks to the System.” Each Friday and Saturday at 10 p.m., a different subversive-horror flick from the 1970s will be presented. This week (March 6-7): Rabid, one of body-horror originator David Cronenberg’s early films, about a woman who develops a post-op orifice in her armpit that she employs to feed on human victims. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

The Way Back

Ben Affleck stars as a one-time basketball phenom now battling demons and struggling with alcohol, who gets a chance at redemption by coaching a high school team. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing Bad Boys for Life

In this third installment in the trilogy, the buddy-cop duo (played by Will Smith and Martin Lawrence) reunite to fight a cartel mob boss. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

2

The Call of the Wild

A grumpy, growly Harrison Ford sporting a David Letterman beard stars alongside a CGI dog in this latest cinematic take on Jack London’s classic The Call of the Wild. Shooting for a safe PG, much of the violence—against humans and dogs alike—has been removed in favor of a more family-friendly take on the man-and-his-dog fable. Ford plays John Thornton, a grieving, boozing loner who has left his wife after the death of their son. He rescues Buck from sled-team drudgery and bonds with his new four-legged prospecting partner. Buck, the big house dog who was kidnapped from his California home and sold into pulling a mail sled in Alaska, is a curious enough technological creation. Buck doesn’t look bad; he just doesn’t look and act “real.” As Ford narrates the movie with his huffy grumble,

The Invisible Man

A horror adaptation of H.G. Wells’ novel of the same name, with Elizabeth Moss starring as a woman whose abusive partner (Oliver Jackson-Cohen) continues to terrorize her even though he appears to have disappeared. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

4

Jumanji: The Next Level

The whole gang is back for the sequel to Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (2017). This time around, they set out to save Spencer (Alex Wolff), who’s gone back into the game. Turns out, the sequel is more difficult, and they must embark on a new adventure with a new nemesis (played with perfect intensity by Rory McCann—GOT’s The Hound). To beef up the story, the familiar avatars (played by Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Black and Karen Gillan) get some new strengths and weaknesses, and are joined by a few new sidekicks (Awkwafina and a horse—don’t ask). In the human world, we get to meet Spencer’s grandfather (Danny DeVito) and his old business partner (Danny Glover), to add some “I’m too old for this...” humor to the mix. Add to that some new tricks and/or glitches—like the ability to switch characters mid-game—and fans of the first film are in for a fun ride. The adventure is nonstop, and I can’t count the number of times I laughed out loud in the theater. A perfect escape film for the wintertime blues. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —M.J.C.

My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising

The second Japanese animated film based on the manga series of the same name about a group of kids trying to become superheroes. Shown in two options: English overdub and Japanese with English subtitles. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Sonic the Hedgehog

James Marsden and Jim Carrey star in this live-action/animated adaptation of the famous video game, with Ben Schwartz (Parks and Recreation) voicing the title character. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

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March 5, 2020

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CHOW

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com, has become a must-read for organic gardeners by who want inspiDebbie ration as well as Arrington science-based tips on growing food. Wilhelmi’s best advice and loads of valuable information are distilled into Gardening for Geeks: All the Science You Need for Successful Organic Gardening (CompanionHouse Books). Just published, it is an updated and expanded version of her original 2013 book by the same name. “A lot of the updates were bringing people up to speed with climate change, how important and threatened pollinators are, how these changes affect the natural world around us,” she said in a phone interview. Wilhelmi also updated her pruning techniques and added more vegetables to her plant profiles. “The first edition, I stuck with easy to grow veggies,” she said. “This time, I added celery, cabbage, corn, cucumber, eggplant and watermelon. These crops are a little trickier and take some skill to get going.” Take watermelon, for example. “Timing is everything,” Wilhelmi

30

CN&R

MARCH 5, 2020

said. “Plant them too early, they just sit there. But if you don’t plant early enough, you’ll be eating watermelon in November.” A former professional dancer and model, Wilhelmi got into food gardening when she decided to become a vegetarian 27 years ago. “The more I learned about the food system, the more I wanted control of it,” said Wilhelmi, who lives and gardens in the West Los Angeles neighborhood of Mar Vista. “I dove into gardening. Now, I never want to do anything else. It became my living.” Wilhelmi teaches organic gardening through Santa Monica College’s community education program. Her book mirrors her class curriculum, covering the basics of soil, planning, planting and what to grow. She tackles pest management, irrigation, composting and more in informationpacked pages that make the science of gardening fun and easy to digest. It’s a great guide for beginners, but also has plenty of ideas for experienced gardeners. Wilhelmi believes in making

For the nerds:

For organic gardening resources visit gardenerd.com; and purchase Gardening for Geeks ($19.99) at foxchapelpublishing.com

the most of limited space. In just 300 square feet, she’s able to produce most of what she eats. Her favorite vegetables? “I love growing kale; I have 14 different varieties. I love how beautiful they look in the garden. They each have a different texture and flavor; some are better for chips, others better for salads. “For summer, I’m addicted to growing winter squash,” she added. “They’re so pretty. I love delicata squash; they’re delightful and delicious.” Her best tip for beginners: “Worm castings!” she said. “They solve a lot of problems. They’re really high in nutrients; a little goes a long ways. And they help with pest control, too.” Ω


ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

it’s time to

Discover

A guide to visiting and living in the North Valley

SPRING/ SUMMER 2019

FREE

A guide

to visiting

and livin

g in the

North Valle

FALL 2019 WINTER 2020

y

FRE E

INSIDE:

Fun family activities PAGE

62

INSIDE:

A tou downtow r of n Ch public ar ico’s t PAGE

the sticks Here’s a joke: What’s brown and sticky? A stick! (It’s not really

funny, which is why it’s so funny.) The stick joke never gets old to arts dEVo. Also, The stick never gets old to me. More than once I’ve blathered in this space about the cheap thrill I get when I return to the scene of some out-of-place oddity that I’ve previously stumbled upon and find that it’s still there. The longer it stays, the more intense the rush. I might get too excited. Worse, I’ve poisoned Mrs. dEVo with my passion for the inane. For example, if I asked her, “I wonder if The Stick is still there?” She would drop everything, and we would speed away in the car giggling like schoolkids on a weekend adventure. Where is The Stick? It’s caught in the power lines above West 20th The Stick Street off Park Avenue in Chico (see photo). Why is it such a big deal? It’s been there for more than three years!!! How? Why? It’s kind of wedged between a couple of lines, but it’s a small piece of dead wood, maybe 1-inch in diameter. It’s not a branch. It’s not even a limb. It’s a twig! Think about some of the strong winds we’ve had, the supercell storms, the brutal sun of three North Valley summers and the rains of three winters? It should not be possible. Yet it remains. Every time we are fiending for the best tater tots in town—at Park avenue Pub on the same block—and we round that corner, it’s always there, and I usually blurt out, “How!?” I simply like that it’s here with us, and I’ll be sad the day gravity finally takes it. I goofed around the web a bit trying to find something to add color to a column about sticks, and found a wonderful poem by English writer Mark Waldron (find his books online at bloodaxebooks.com) that, somewhat miraculously, gets the point across. Here’s the first part: “The stick” (an excerpt): Existence trumps nonexistence every time. It has/all the colors and all the shapes and all the moves/it is rude in its bounty and its grotesque reach that/overcomes all before it. This bit of stick I found in/the park was showing off because the dead can’t have it./ They can’t have any of it. It was sticky and prickled/with a showy, dazzling presence ... There’s also this whole other stick story at the center my and Mrs. DEVO’s life. It’s about stick (not to be confused with The Stick), the trekking pole that I found under a boulder during a grueling day-long hike up and down Half dome in yosemite national Park. With a hip injury hampering her descent, my wife’s trip was saved by Stick, which became something of a symbol of that and future outdoor excursions. I’d tell you about the song that celebrates our adventures together called “Stick” that the missus wrote for me and sang in front of bar full of friends and family for my 50th birthday, but then I’d just start crying … again.

sad breaking news On the CN&R’s deadline, I got word that two former Chicoans were among the 24 who were killed when tornadoes tore through Tennessee on Tuesday (March 3). albree sexton and Mike dolfini used to work at argus Bar + Patio in Chico before moving in 2018. According to a story in the Tennessean, the couple were leaving the Nashville bar where Dolfini worked when the tornado landed. Details are scant at this point, but I’ll share info on memorials, etc., as it’s made available.

On stands in September and March. Need extra copies for event guests? Call us at (530) 894-2300.

70

Discover xx

xx Discover

POETRY The Chico News & Review is now accepting entries.

99

Submit your poems— 99 words or fewer—today! Enter at newsreview.com/ poetry99, or send to poetry99@ newsreview.com. Please specify Poetry 99, age and division—Adult, High School (grades 9-12), Junior High (grades 6-8), Kids (fifth grade and younger)— in the subject field. And for all divisions except Adult, please include age.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, AT 11:59 P.M. For complete rules visit

newsreview.com/poetry99 On stands: April 2 And live: April 3, 6:30 p.m., at The Bookstore 118 Main St. March 5, 2020

CN&R

31


REAL ESTATE

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of February 17 - February 21, 2020 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home.

32

ADDRESS 107 Taige Way

TOWN Chico

PRICE $840,000

BR/BA 3/3

SQ. FT. 3418

ADDRESS 1285 W Lindo Ave

TOWN Chico

PRICE $323,000

BR/BA 3/1

SQ. FT. 1113

4258 Green Meadow Ln

Chico

$744,000

3/2

14015 Morning Glory Pl

Chico

$725,000

4/3

2402

1005 Rushmore Ave

Chico

$320,000

3/2

1170

2616

3520 Shadowtree Ln

Chico

$521,000

2105 Holly Ave

Chico

$320,000

3/3

1486

3/2

2283

3276 Rogue River Dr

Chico

22 Via Verona Cir

Chico

$271,000

3/3

2291

$480,000

4/2

2216

3235 Sespe Creek Way

3954 Spyglass Rd

Chico

$204,000

4/3

3006

Chico

$457,500

4/3

2096

127 W 1st Ave

Chico

$161,500

2/1

1240

2642 Chandese Ln

Chico

$456,000

3/2

1787

14876 Masterson Way

Magalia

$235,000

3/2

1712

296 Silver Lake Dr

Chico

$455,000

3/2

1708

14305 Culver Ct

Magalia

$230,000

2/2

1200

714 Burnt Ranch Way

Chico

$447,500

3/2

1867

1912 Feather Ave

Oroville

$309,000

3/2

1373

16 Kimberlee Ln

Chico

$400,000

3/2

1473

835 Thermalito Ave

Oroville

$244,000

3/1

1176

55 Skymountain Cir

Chico

$399,000

3/2

1564

1735 Boynton Ave

Oroville

$200,000

6/2

2136

10 Cosmo Dr

Chico

$385,000

3/2

1600

20 Canyon Highlands Dr

Oroville

$195,000

3/1

1155

1110 Shumard Oak Way

Chico

$380,000

3/3

1564

1710 Elgin St

Oroville

$170,000

3/1

840

1245 Yosemite Dr

Chico

$374,000

3/2

1396

2028 4th St

Oroville

$114,500

2/1

1130

573 Eaton Rd

Chico

$340,000

3/3

1571

973 Plumas Ave

Oroville

$104,000

2/1

1230

6 Mione Way

Chico

$340,000

3/1

1427

2110 Oro Bangor Hwy

Oroville

$99,000

2/1

589

592 Grand Smokey Ct

Chico

$340,000

3/2

1334

3335 Columbia Ave

Oroville

$75,000

4/1

1288

2815 Ceanothus Ave

Chico

$337,000

3/2

1435

5361 Breezewood Dr

Paradise

$465,000

3/2

2072

3 Thomas Ln

Chico

$336,500

3/1

1183

5777 Kenglo Dr

Paradise

$280,909

2/2

1381

CN&R

March 5, 2020


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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF March 5, 2020 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Progress

rarely unfolds in a glorious, ever-rising upward arc. The more usual pattern is gradual and uneven. Each modest ascent is followed by a phase of retrenchment and integration. In the best-case scenario, the most recent ascent reaches a higher level than the previous ascent. By my estimate, you’re in one of those periods of retrenchment and integration right now. It’s understandable if you feel a bit unenthusiastic about it. But I’m here to tell you that it’s crucial to your next ascent. Let it work its subtle magic.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You are

most likely to be in sweet alignment with cosmic rhythms if you regard the next three weeks as a time of graduation. I encourage you to take inventory of the lessons you’ve been studying since your birthday in 2019. How have you done in your efforts to foster interesting, synergistic intimacy? Are you more passionately devoted to what you love? Have you responded brightly as life has pushed you to upgrade the vigor and rigor of your commitments? Just for fun, give yourself a grade for those “classes,” as well as any others that have been important. Then— again, just for fun—draw up a homemade diploma for yourself to commemorate and honor your work.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Are you

ready to seize a more proactive role in shaping what happens in the environments you share with cohorts? Do you have any interest in exerting leadership to enhance the well-being of the groups that are important to you? Now is an excellent time to take brave actions that will raise the spirits and boost the fortunes of allies whose fates are intermingled with yours. I hope you’ll be a role model for the art of pleasing oneself while being of service others.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cancerian

author Lionel Trilling (1905–1975) was an influential intellectual and literary critic. One of his heroes was another influential intellectual and literary critic, Edmund Wilson. On one occasion, Trilling was using a urinal in a men’s room at the New School for Social Research in New York. Imagine how excited he was when Wilson, whom he had never met, arrived to use the urinal right next to his. Now imagine his further buoyancy when Wilson not only spoke to Trilling but also expressed familiarity with his work. I foresee similar luck or serendipity coming your way soon: seemingly unlikely encounters with interesting resources and happy accidents that inspire your self-confidence.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Poet Conee Berdera

delivered a poignant message to her most valuable possession: the flesh and blood vehicle that serves as sanctuary for all her yearnings, powers, and actions. “My beloved body,” she writes, “I am so sorry I did not love you enough.” Near the poem’s end she vows “to love and cherish” her body. I wish she would have been even more forceful, saying something like, “From now on, dear body, I promise to always know exactly what you need and give it to you with all my ingenuity and panache.” Would you consider making such a vow to your own most valuable possession? It’s a favorable time to do so.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Luckily, the

turning point you have arrived at doesn’t present you with 20 different possible futures. You don’t have to choose from among a welter of paths headed in disparate directions. There are only a few viable options to study and think about. Still, I’d like to see you further narrow down the alternatives. I hope you’ll use the process of elimination as you get even clearer about what you don’t want. Let your fine mind gather a wealth of detailed information and objective evidence, then hand over the final decision to your intuition.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Certain artists

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by rob brezsny their creations, or I’m not deep enough to fathom why their work is considered important. For example, I don’t enjoy or admire the operas of Wagner or the art of Mark Rothko. Same with the music of Drake or the novels of Raymond Carter or the art of Andy Warhol. The problem is with me, not them. I don’t try to claim they’re overrated or mediocre. Now I urge you to do what I just did, only on a broader scale. Acknowledge that some of the people and ideas and art and situations you can’t appreciate are not necessarily faulty or wrong or inadequate. Their value may simply be impossible for you to recognize. It’s a perfect time for you to undertake this humble work. I suspect it will be liberating.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio-

born Ralph Bakshi has made animated films and TV shows for more than 60 years. His work has been influential. “I’m the biggest ripped-off cartoonist in the history of the world,” he says. Milder versions of his experience are not uncommon for many Scorpios. People are prone to copying you and borrowing from you and even stealing from you. They don’t always consciously know they’re doing it, and they may not offer you proper appreciation. I’m guessing that something like this phenomenon may be happening for you right now. My advice? First, be pleased about how much clout you’re wielding. Second, if anyone is borrowing from you without making the proper acknowledgment, speak up about it.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): “Vainly I sought nourishment in shadows and errors,” wrote author Jorge Luis Borges. We have all been guilty of miscalculations like those. Each of us has sometimes put our faith in people and ideas that weren’t worthy of us. None of us is so wise that we always choose influences that provide the healthiest fuel. That’s the bad news. The good news is that you now have excellent instincts about where to find the best long-term nourishment.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Poet

Adrienne Rich wrote, “When a woman tells the truth she is creating the possibility for more truth around her.” I believe this same assertion is true about people of all genders. I also suspect that right now you are in a particularly pivotal position to be a candid revealer: to enhance and refine everyone’s truth-telling by being a paragon of honesty yourself. To achieve the best results, I encourage you to think creatively about what exactly it means for you to tell the deep and entire truth.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Through some odd Aquarian-like quirk, astrologers have come to harbor the apparently paradoxical view that your sign is ruled by both Saturn and Uranus. At first glance, that’s crazy! Saturn is the planet of discipline, responsibility, conservatism, diligence and order. Uranus is the planet of awakening, surprise, rebellion, barrier-breaking and liberation. How can you incorporate the energies of both? Well, that would require a lengthy explanation beyond the scope of this horoscope. But I will tell you this: During the rest of the year 2020, you will have more potential to successfully coordinate your inner Saturn and your inner Uranus than you have had in years. Homework: Meditate on how you will do just that.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 1637,

renowned English poet John Milton wrote “Lycidas,” a poetic elegy in honor of a friend. Reading it today, almost four centuries later, we are struck by how archaic and obscure the language is, with phrases such as “O ye laurels” and “Ah! who hath reft my dearest pledge?” A famous 20th-century Piscean poet named Robert Lowell was well-educated enough to understand Milton’s meaning, but also decided to “translate” all of “Lycidas” into plainspoken modern English. I’d love to see you engage in comparable activities during the coming weeks: updating the past; reshaping and reinterpreting your old stories; revising the ways you talk about and think about key memories.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. March 5, 2020

CN&R

33


CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

all advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of acceptance. Further, the News & r eview specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N& r is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&r assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

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The following person is doing business as STURBRIDGE CONSULTING at 1416 Dartwood Drive Chico, CA 95926. RALPH RAY GODWIN 1416 Dartwood Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RALPH RAY GODWIN Dated: February 3, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000129 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ABSOLUTE AMA at 1290 Notre Dame Blvd #52 Chico, CA 95928. AMANDA TEIBEL PO Box 4829 Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMANDA TEIBEL Dated: January 14, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000048 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BRAIN-FRIENDLY DYNAMICS, COLLABORATIVE COMMONS, WINTER CONSULTING at 101 Risa Way #94 Chico, CA 95973. BRAIN-FRIENDLY DYNAMICS 101 Risa Way #94 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SCOTT S. WINTER, PRESIDENT Dated: February 4, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000136 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as EYE OF JADE at 1238 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. EYE OF JADE INC. 1238 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: BENJAMIN LUCAS, CEO Dated: January 30, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000122 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO PROPERTY REPORTS SERVICE at 15 Terrace Drive Chico, CA 95926. GARY E DAVIDSON 15 Terrace Drive, Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GARY DAVIDSON Dated: January 23, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000086 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

1855 Jeni Ann Ct Durham, CA 95938. NORCAL FISH AND FOWL INC PO Box 846 Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JEFF GONZALES, OWNER Dated: February 7, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000151 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WHITE GLOVE CLEANING SERVICE at 3147 Chico Ave Chico, CA 95928. WHITE GLOVE CLEANING SERVICE INC 3147 Chico Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: TERESA CONTRERAS, OWNER Dated: February 7, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000150 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RING OF FIRE RANCHERO at 13610 Doe Mill Road Forest Ranch, CA 95942. BRIAN MCKNIGHT PO Box 980 Forest Ranch, CA 95942. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRIAN MCKNIGHT Dated: February 7, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000154 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BE YOUR CHANGE WELLNESS at 1731 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. LORA LYNNE JOHNSON 243 W 1st Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORA JOHNSON Dated: February 10, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000159 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LOOK AHEAD VETERINARY SERVICES at 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. KAYLA LUI INC 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KAYLA LUI, PRESIDENT Dated: February 7, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000153 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORCAL FISH AND FOWL GUIDE SERVICE at

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious businesss name LOOK AHEAD VETERINARY SERVICES at 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. MICHELE C WEAVER, DVM

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AND CRAIG A BROWN, DVM, INC. 1451 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELE WEAVER, PRESIDENT Dated: February 7, 2020 FBN Number: 2019-0000348 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name LITTLE LOVES CHILDCARE SERVICES LLC at 2220 Notre Dame Boulevard Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. LITTLE LOVES CHILDCARE SERVICES LLC 2220 Notre Dame Boulevard Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: SCHYLAR AIELLO, FOUNDER AND COORDINATOR Dated: January 9, 2020 FBN Number: 2019-0000955 Published: February 20,27, March 5,12, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CALIBEEONFIRE, FROZENFIREFIGHTER, ONECOMMONCENT, THE CONVEX CAVE at 1491 E 1st Ave Chico, CA 95926. TROY SCOTT CARTER 1491 E 1st Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TROY CARTER Dated: February 11, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000172 Published: February 20,27, March 5,12, 2020

FICITTIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICOS BEST, HAPPY REGGAE, MYSTIC ROOTS BAND, STAY POSITIVE PRODUCTIONS, STAY POSITIVE SOUND at 1441 Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. DAYNA WYMAN 738 Picaso Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAYNA WYMAN Dated: February 7, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000157 Published: February 20,27, March 5,12, 2020

FICITTIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PINE CREEK FLOWERS at 2506 Oak Way Chico, CA 95973. EMMA HARRIS 2506 Oak Way Chico, CA 95973. CRAIG PILUSO 2506 Oak Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: EMMA P HARRIS Dated: February 3, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000132 Published: February 20,27, March 5,12, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

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The following persons are doing business as HAIR BODY AND SOUL at 6607 Skyway Paradise, CA 95969. JEROLD L MILLER 14764 Vassar Ct Magalia, CA 95954. TERESA HURLEY MILLER 14764 Vassar Ct Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JERRY MILLER Dated: February 14, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000182 Publsihed: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO YARD GAMES, FIRESPICE at 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. SEAN PATRICK CASTLEMAN 739 Dias Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SEAN CASTLEMAN Dated: February 14, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000187 Published: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NOR CAL MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR at 10 Titleist Way Chico, CA 95928. NICHOLAS A SHAFFER 10 Titleist Way Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NICHOLAS SHAFFER Dated: February 13, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000180 Published: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KOOZIE KART at 2048 Renz Road Durham, CA 95938. MECHELLE GRAY 10021 Lott Road Durham, CA 95938. ROCHELLE HEATH 2048 Renz Road Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MECHELLE F GRAY Dated: February 19, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000195 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BROOD at 119 W 2nd St Chico, CA 95928. 4 LBS LLC 119 W 2nd St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: JIMMY LEE, MANAGER Dated: February 25, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000224 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as REBEL SABERS at 1212 Whitewood Way Chico, CA 95973. CHARLES WILLIAM FIGGINS IV 1212 Whitewood Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by this Legal Notice continues

an Individual. Signed: CHARLES W FIGGINS IV Dated: February 11, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000169 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SUB TERRA CONSULTING, HERITAGE RESOURCE TRAINING AND INVESTIGATIONS at 3153 Chico Avenue Chico, CA 95928. GREGORY GLENN WHITE PH.D, RPA 3153 Chico Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GREGORY G. WHITE, PHD, RPA Dated: February 10, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000167 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WUI SOLUTIONS LLC at 172 East Washington Ave Chico, CA 95926. WUI SOLUTIONS LLC 172 East Washington Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: THIBAULT HOPPE-GLOSSER, OWNER Dated: February 28, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000246 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BTCHN BIKES at 647 Eaton Rd Chico, CA 95973. TYLER REISWIG 1241 Honey Run Rd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TYLER REISWIG Dated: March 2, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000251 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KALN INC at 2080 E 20th Street Suite 170 Chico, CA 95928. BCHM CORPORATION 2080 E 20th Street Suite 170 Chico, CA 95928. ALISHA FICKERT 622 Lakewest Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ERICA THAU, PRESIDENT Dated: February 20, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000205 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GRASS PRO YARD CARE at 10 Cameo Drive #1 Chico, CA 95973. RICHARD MAURICE RENAUD II 10 Cameo Drive #1 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD RENAUD Dated: March 2, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000254

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Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE BEST FLOOR CARE COMPANY at 107 Eden Canyon Road Oroville, CA 95965. CHANON HOLTFRETER 1241 High Street Oroville, CA 95965. ALFRED RABINOWITZ 107 Eden Cayon Road Oroville, CA 95916. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ALFRED RABINOWITZ Dated: February 25, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000222 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. G&D SELF STORAGE 2687 Highway 99 Biggs, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #B20 - AMBER HINES - Tag number 6273276 Unit No. #B08 - VERONICA ELAINE RIOS CASTANEDA Tag number 6273279 Items: Miscellaneous stuff and clothing Date: Saturday, March 14, 2020 Auction to start at Gridley Self Storage at 10AM located at 1264 Highway 99 in Gridley, CA. Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Published: February 27, March 5, 2020

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. GRIDLEY SELF STORAGE 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #AX330 - AMBER HINES - Tag number 6273277 Items: Furniture and Miscellaneous items Unit No. #A017 - TANGUALIN CURRY - Tag number 6273268 Items: Miscellaneous stuff Unit No. #C068 - MIGUEL SANCHEZ - Tag number 6273284 Items: Cross bow, tools, compressor and miscellaneous Date: Saturday, March 14, 2020 Auction to start at Gridley Self this Legal Notice continues

Storage at 10AM located at 1264 Highway 99 in Gridley, CA. Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Published: February 27, March 5, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SIERRA MARIE WATSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SIERRA MARIE WATSON Proposed name: VICTORIA ROSE LANES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 11, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 15, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00093 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5,2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MOMNA AMER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MOMNA AMER Proposed name: MONA WILSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 18, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 27, 2020 this Legal Notice continues


Case Number: 20CV00208 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5,2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TRACY NICOLE HOLCOMB filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: TRACY NICOLE HOLCOMB Proposed name: TRACY NICOLE THOMAS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 25, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 31, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00292 Published: February 13,20,27, March 5,2020

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KAZI SHAMIM HASAN filed a petition with this

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VICTORIA KNOPPER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VICTORIA KNOPPER Proposed name: VICTORIA TRYON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: February 13, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00403 Published: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KAZI MUHAMMAD TAWHEED SARA TAIBAH Proposed name: TAWHEED HASAN TAIBAH HASAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 22, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: February 26, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00557 Published: March 5,12,19,26, 2020

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JENNIFER LYNN ORILEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JENNIFER LYNN ORILEY Proposed name: JENNIFER LYNN LYON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 15, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: February 13, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00411 Published: February 20,27, March 5,12, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JENNIFER KNIGHT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LANDON STRYKER LEE Proposed name: LANDON STRYKER KNIGHT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 25, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: January 27, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00206 Published: February 27, March 5,12,19, 2020

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