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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 14 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

HEROES

Camp Fire SurvivorS help their communitieS recover PAGE

8 SNAKEMAN VS. PG&E 10 VILLAGE SQUABBLE

18

24 VINTAGE SOUL


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CN&R

NOVEMBER 27, 2019


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 14 • November 27, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Holiday Festivities Guide . . . . . . . 28 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF HONEY RUN COVERED BRIDGE BY JAMES RONAN DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultant Brian Corbit Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Jennifer Jenkins, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Allen Pierleoni, Thea Rood, Anne Stokes N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Julia Ballantyne, Greta Beekhuis, Chris Cohen, Joseph Engle, Laura Golino, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Art of Information Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Add neighborly shopping to your list There’s no denying that 2019 has been a rough year

for Butte County. The ripple effects from the Camp Fire keep coming in seemingly endless waves. For many in our community, housing and food insecurity remain issues. For others, repeated PG&E power outages have upended not only peace of mind but also pocketbooks. The latter has come in many forms: spoiled food, the cost of purchasing generators, loss of income, etc. It’s also made business as usual virtually impossible for affected shopkeepers. Take, for example, Ron’s Reptiles, the local business long operated by reptile and amphibian expert Ron Greenberg. After operating in rural Butte County for more than 15 years, including giving educational presentations at schools and special community events, Greenberg is preparing to pack up and move to Arizona (see Andre Byik’s report on page 8). This new normal simply isn’t tenable in his line of work—caring for delicate, exotic creatures that are reliant on warmth. Greenberg estimates he’s taken a financial hit of more than $13,000 due to animal losses and reduced hours resulting from PG&E’s outages. That doesn’t include the $10,000 he spent on generators. And now, adding insult to injury, the utility has planned maintenance and repairs in his

neighborhood this Saturday (Nov. 30), effectively forcing him to close his doors on what generally is the retail world’s most lucrative Saturday of the year. On the eve of Thanksgiving, the CN&R wants to recognize the small businesses that are the backbone of our economy. Our plea this year comes at the tail end of a tough year. Here’s our pitch: When you go out to spend your hard-earned money, please budget with the little guys in mind. This year is the 10th annual official Small Business Saturday, an alternative to the typical Black Friday and Cyber Monday madness. Before the term was co-opted and trademarked by one of the nation’s major credit card companies, in conjunction with a Washington, D.C.-based historic preservation nonprofit, it was used by small retailers for promotion year-round. Whatever you want to call it, the idea is to support mom-and-pop shops. Sure, mega-retailers provide jobs and local sales tax, but much of the money spent there goes to their out-of-state headquarters and to corporate salaries. Conversely, money spent at independent brick and mortars owned and operated by fellow residents tends to stay in the local economy. Think of shopping there as a way to be a good neighbor—a gift to them and the community, too. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Touch the sky W grandkids—and oh, by the way, their parents. We closed on our house the day before the Camp Fire and e moved to Chico last November to be near our

arrived six days into the conflagration. By now we are pretty settled into our home in the foothills, north of California Park. I’m from the Deep South— Alabama, Georgia—where the sky is punctuated by tree after tree, a background, rather than the main event. When we moved here, I joked with friends back East that our by house was near some large empty Janet E. fields, with very little fuel for fire Rechtman season. Two days into our drive The author, a West, a friend from Sacramento newcomer to Chico, texted, “You’ve picked a hell of a recently retired from the faculty time to move to Chico.” I wrote of University of back, “We just want to be closer Georgia, where she to you, my dear.” Indeed, we had taught nonprofit and deliberately avoided listening to the community leadership. news while we were on the road. That night, we found out about the

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fire. Five days later we arrived. On a recent evening, I sat outside and watched the sunset, the horizon streaked with smoke from the Ranch Fire. I felt the impassive power and awe-full generosity of our sky. The same sky that swallows up fire, tornadoes, hurricanes, atom bombs, and spits back sunshine, starlight, rain. Not background but the main event. It’s unbearable: this open mutuality of me and sky. I am saved by the connection to the people who share this sky with me. When I open myself to the sky, I connect with everyone else who abides on planet Earth. The good ones. The evil ones. The folk I know and those I’ve yet to meet. We’re all afloat in a sea we cannot see, and whether we sink or swim is a matter of indifference to that sea of sky. Our survival really matters only to us. It’s so huge, so cosmic, what can anyone do? Recycle. Go solar. Cook from scratch. Buy food in bulk. Drive a gas-saving car as little as humanly possible. What more? Maybe, more than one night, I might come out, watch the sunset, feel the connections, inhale the air, touch the sky. Something more. Nothing less. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Help the helpers Happy Thanksgiving week, dear readers. If you think back to last year around this time, you’ll recall the chaos in Chico. The tent city at Walmart. The RVs in seemingly every parking lot. Churches and the fairgrounds overflowing with evacuees. Over at the CN&R’s offices, we’d just published our annual Local Heroes issue. We’d done the interviews weeks earlier. In fact, the deadline for my staff to turn in their stories was Nov. 8, 2018. I expected to spend that day editing those pieces. The Camp Fire had other plans. The weeks that followed are somewhat of a blur with near-daily trips up to the Ridge to report on the devastation. Right before the holiday, I left for my in-laws’ home in Ventura County. My family needed the break. The North State was still blanketed in toxic smoke trapped by an inversion layer and my then7-year-old son had fallen ill from a respiratory infection. My lungs were in rough shape, too. Firefighters had recently doused the last flames of that region’s Woolsey Fire, but the air was relatively clear. It was such a relief to once again see blue skies. The three or four days we spent near the ocean provided the respite we desperately needed. Fast-forward to Local Heroes of 2019. Though the annual issue is always one of my favorites to put together, because we get to highlight community volunteers, this one is particularly special. That’s because the extraordinary helpers we’ve featured in these pages have gone above and beyond despite enduring great personal difficulties wrought by the Camp Fire. Every single one of them lost his or her home in the blaze. Their stories certainly put things into perspective. At this time of being mindful of the things we hold dear, they set quite an example.

HOW TO HELP Of course, there have been countless heroes over the past year. This newspaper has interviewed some of them. That includes the good folks at the Magalia Community Church, whom we wrote about in our Camp Fire anniversary issue (see “Ground zero,” Cover story, Nov. 7). We learned that nearly 4,000 families had visited that historic house of worship’s recovery center in September alone. A year after the disaster, the communities hardest hit are still very much in need of helpers. People are still struggling. Mightily in some cases. Food insecurity is one of the main issues. That’s why we at the CN&R are opening our doors this holiday season as a drop-off point for canned and dry goods. We want to help the helpers. And you can, too, by visiting our centrally located Chico office (at 353 E. Second St.) during business hours MondayFriday (9 a.m.-5 p.m.) with nonperishable food that we will deliver to the Ridge church. After a weekend trip to Costco, my first donations include an eight-pack of canned refried beans and fruit snacks for kids. Regular readers will recall that we organized a toiletries drive in years past for service providers, including the Torres Community Shelter. We won’t turn those things away this year, but food is the greatest need, so we’ve made it our central cause. Thanks, in advance, for your generous donations to our neighbors in need.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Four on impeachment Re “Blind eyes” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Nov. 21): Polls don’t matter. It is not OK. It’s no longer arguable. If you are not angry at Trump, you are no longer in touch with reality. You have no respect for truth. It is that simple now. In 1938, 99.5 percent of Germans turned out to vote 98.8 percent in favor of Hitler and Nazi principles. In the slaveowning South, before the Civil War, polls of eligible voters would doubtless have shown near-universal support for continued slavery of African-Americans. At some point rational people have to recognize something’s awry. A large segment of the populace is not just espousing contrasting views, it is just dead wrong. With a president even many staunch conservatives and lifelong Republicans concede lies like breathing, we need to stand firm and defend our democracy. Trump’s lies and crimes not only cost lives, they also devastate

every American principle. Regardless of poll percentages, he must be removed. Norman Beecher Chico

Recently Lindsey Graham advised Trump to handle the impeachment like Bill Clinton did and keep his gnat-like attention on the job. Clinton was impeached for using the power of his office to make an intern fellate him in the White House and lying about it. Instead of the irrefutable evidence that Trump used the power of his office and taxpayer money to force Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky to meddle in our election for Trump’s benefit (which hasn’t shaken any Republican support), the House needs to prove that Trump tried to force Zelensky to fellate him in the White House and lied about it, and it’s a done deal. Shouldn’t be hard. Sounds just like something Trump would think of, considering he has lied about 13,000 times since he took office,

and Zelensky “loves his ass” and “will do anything” Trump wants, according to Ambassador Gordon Sondland’s testimony. Rich Meyers Oroville

“In my windshield I see fear and faith. Rich and poor from town to town. One owns a Bible, one owns a safe. Neither walks on common ground. Tonight, I drive across America. Mister, can I talk with you. Tonight I drive across America. Oh say, can you see what I see through.” Words from a song written by Mark Germino for his 1995 CD, Rank and File, hit the mark today, as they did nearly a quarter of a century ago. We are living at a crossroads. The plain and simple choice is either to allow the current electoral and Russian-assisted president to be immune from law, or—forget it. The impeachment inquiry is showing that trying to run this country of checks, LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 balances and laws cannot be overthrown by an immature, wannabe mafia New York autocrat, aka DJT. We can see what needs to be seen through. Danny Wilson Oroville

Post-impeachment inquiry, I see the news media going off the pier. “It is a blowtorch,” “it is the end of Donald Trump,” etc. Really? Not from what I listened to the last two weeks. Most was hearsay, and gee, even one Democrat tried his best to say that was OK to use. Wow. Rep. Adam Schiff tried all he could to sink the Trump ship, but to no avail. The drama will continue no doubt with articles of impeachment; however, even Nancy Pelosi said you “need bipartisan support.” That won’t even come close in the Senate if it gets that far. In fact, they may lose some Democrat congressional support. Don’t you think after three years of trying, they should just give up and start working with the GOP to make America great again? All they seem to be doing is tearing our country apart. Time to stop this madness. Zane Libert Palermo

Oh, cynicism Re “Oh, Democrats” (Letters, by Ray Estes, Nov. 14): Ray Estes’ recent letter highlights a corrosive, misguided mindset that has permeated our national discourse for years. He describes the current slate of Democratic candidates as “nightmarish,” and sure to fail against Trump in 2020. At the same time, he laments the current administration’s inevitable slide into “dictatorship,” all while offering exactly zero solutions for success or change. He fails to see the tremendous opportunity for systemic change to a government that has drifted away from true representation of the people. Two of the leading candidates, Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, are true progressives who have spent much of their lives battling the oligarchs of American society on behalf of the rest of us. Mr. Estes disparages Sanders as an independent who is “four years older and unhealthy.” Bernie has been fighting for the poor and working class of this country for 6

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half a century. The integrity he has shown throughout his career is stunning, especially when compared to the craven party leadership of Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer. While others are content to line their pockets with lobbyist cash from massive companies, Bernie is intent on building a movement of actual human beings to turn things around. Patrick Spielman Chico

Bernie Sanders won the Michigan and Wisconsin 2016 primaries, winning a total of 23 primaries. Obama campaigned on hope and change, but he shortchanged ordinary Americans on change, so they lost hope and over 9 percent of them voted for Trump. Those voters are likely to vote for Sanders, being enthused by his integrity, authenticity and courage to deliver real change to make the lives of all working families better. Your beloved status quo has created obscene, colossal and growing income/wealth inequality where the richest .1 percent take in over 188 times the income of the bottom 90 percent. Change is coming and is very necessary. For those immersed in the impeachment, I suggest you read “The Brennan Dossier: All About a Prime Mover of Russiagate,” by Aaron Maté of RealClearInvestigations. The article links to sources, Maté is a credible journalist and RealClearInvestigations is a worthwhile site launched by Tom Kuntz, after 28 years as a New York Times editor. The recommended article shows that Trump/Russiagate was initiated by the CIA, and there may be serious mendacity involved that undermines U.S. democracy more than anything Trump has done. Lucy Cooke Butte Valley

Orwellian times Eric A. Blair possessed supernatural ability. His remarkable perception of the world we currently live in was faultlessly predicted in his book written in 1947. Blair warned of a world in which democracy failed and totalitarianism took control. A world not interested in the good of others, but interested

only in power. His book, Nineteen Eighty-Four, should send chills down the spine of anyone watching the Trump impeachment inquiry hearings this past week. He warned “the party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears.” Sound familiar? Is it any wonder that Trump is so enamored by ruthless dictators like Vladimir Putin, Bashar al-Assad, Kim Jong Un, etc.? Former news commentator Bill Moyers said he fears for the nation’s survival for the first time in his life. Hear, hear. Eric A. Blair, who used the pen name George Orwell, warned people like Trump’s emblazoned “poorly educated” supporters that they are “perfectly ready for dictatorial methods and systematic falsification of history, so long as they feel it is on their side.” If you want a picture of Trump’s future, imagine a boot stomping on a human face—forever. Ray Estes Redding

On the editor, recallers Re “An easy out” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Nov. 14): Nice editorial by Melissa Daugherty about the failed effort to recall two city councilmen. I would like to comment on the last two paragraphs of the article. Referring to our progressive council members as “lefties” strikes me as denigrating. I know each one personally and would certainly not describe any one of them as a “leftie” or left-wing. All are moderate in their approach to government and do their jobs with a degree of humility. Their rejection of Assemblyman James Gallagher’s anti-environment bill was an act of courage, not arrogance. Too much credit was given to the recall instigators. The failure of their recall was due to its lack of merit, not to the inexperience of its promoters. Their arrogance was apparent from the start, with their finger-snapping and bluster. They should be called on it. Robert Woods Forest Ranch More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

Give the Gift of Hope

Ring Big in 2019

Strangest food you’ve been served at a holiday meal?

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Asked in downtown Chico Chico.Salvationarmy.org Stephen Sommerkamp unemployed

A turkey stuffed with cannabis. It was [for] Thanksgiving. It was delicious. It was in my younger days, back before I stopped smoking cannabis. We called it “Danksgiving.”

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Jodi Foster student

The strangest thing I was served was bear meat. I thought it was just a roast, and then I tasted it and I was like, “Oh my god. What is this horrifying taste?” It literally tasted like trash. And I thought, “What do bears eat?”

Stuart Bowman programmer

I used to live in Finland and they served this thing called mämmi. It’s this holiday Easter food. It’s made out of molasses and some other ingredients and it’s wrapped up in a piece of birch bark. It tastes really sweet, like eating syrup basically.

Jenna Davis student

This is a really common one, but I still think it’s super weird: marshmallows on yams, especially when it’s canned yams with marshmallows on it.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE SO LONG, FAMILIAR FACES

It appears Chico’s Action News Now is changing its lineup. Last month, chief meteorologist Kris Kuyper announced he’s departing because “the station has decided to move in a different direction.” And earlier this week, anchor/ reporter Cecile Narboni (better known as Cecile Juliette) told viewers that she’s taken a job as a public information officer for Cal Fire’s San Mateo-Santa Cruz unit. Kuyper has advised Action News Now viewers about the weather for 12 years. He says via Facebook that he plans to stick around town to do weather consulting for the time being. Narboni said: “This is the last week of my career in journalism. It’s been an amazing, wild, tumultuous, exhilarating roller coaster. But it is time for a change.”

Snakebit business

12 ARRESTED IN CARTEL BUST

Last week, the Butte County Sheriff’s Office arrested 12 people they believe to be associated with a Mexican drug cartel operating in rural Brush Creek. Detectives with BCSO’s Special Enforcement Unit were serving search warrants at three properties along Bonnie Meadow Lane on Nov. 18, when they discovered more than 1,000 marijuana plants, hundreds of pounds of processed pot, assault rifles and almost $15,000 cash, according to a press release. Roberto Estrada and Nestor Ortiz were arrested on charges of maintaining a residence for drug sales and possession of marijuana for sale. Ten others face charges for cultivation. The investigation is ongoing.

DOC ARRESTED ON WEAPONS CHARGES

A Chico physician has been arrested on weapons violations after police found his car in the Sacramento River. Chico police officers helped California State Parks conduct a welfare check last Wednesday (Nov. 20) at a home on Roycott Lane, where they found Alfred Villasenor (pictured) allegedly positioned in an “ambush posture,” according to a police press release. Officers searched his home and found a semiautomatic rifle, an assault weapon, two manufactured handguns and ammunition. Villasenor was arrested on suspicion of violating a restraining order, illegal possession of a firearm and possession of an assault weapon. According to Villasenor’s profile on the Chico Direct Care website, the general practice doctor is a military veteran and family man. Court records show he’d been arrested on similar weapons charges in October. 8

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Owner of Ron’s Reptiles plans to shutter shop in wake of PG&E’s blackouts

TGreenberg. The frustrated owner of Ron’s Reptiles, he timing couldn’t be worse for Ron

the home-based business off Cohasset Road north of Chico, received notice last week story and photo by that PG&E intends to Andre Byik shut off his power on Saturday (Nov. 30)— an d re b @ n ew sr ev i ew. c o m one of the busiest days of the year for small businesses—to replace Liquidation sale: an electric power pole in Ron’s Reptiles will hold the area of his property closeout sales through at 44 Rock Creek Road. January at 44 Rock The planned hours Creek Road, Chico. of interruption: 8 a.m.3 p.m. Greenberg’s hours of operation: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Without power, Greenberg won’t be able to light his shop for customers. His portable generators and propane heater are just enough to keep his animals warm and run his well. “I’m well aware of the safety concerns and issues,” he told the CN&R “It’s not so much what they’re doing as how they’re doing it.” Greenberg says his frustration stems in part from his interaction with the utility about the upcoming maintenance work.

Calls placed to a number on his shut-off notice went unanswered for days. A heated visit to PG&E’s downtown Chico office ended with him being guided out by security. The message he received from customer service: to contact the California Public Utilities Commission. In other words, “tough luck.” It’s all become too much for Greenberg. He says he had already suffered significant business losses during PG&E’s previous public safety power shut-offs (PSPS) following the Camp Fire. His homeowner’s insurance also has doubled in the last year because of his assessed wildfire risk. And he’s grieving the recent loss of his wife and business partner of 41 years, Donna. Greenberg plans to shutter his shop in January, after more than 15 years in business—a move that he says has been sped up in the wake of PG&E’s intentional blackouts. “This PG&E thing has just overwhelmed me,” he said. “We went through four … public safety curtailments, which, in my opinion, is a bunch of smoke, and I don’t mean from a fire.” Everything in Greenberg’s shop is for sale, including more than 300 snakes, lizards, turtles and various products. His daughter Jamie says the family is leaving

the state for Arizona. “It’s done,” she said. “It’s like, you can’t live like this. It’s not fair to the animals. It’s not fair to a 72-year-old man who just lost his wife and is by himself. And there is nothing we can do about it. It’s just frustrating.” Paul Moreno, a Chico-based PG&E spokesman, said the power pole is scheduled for replacement because of its condition, and the utility wants to avoid any unexpected problems. “If the pole were to break, we’d have to do emergency repairs, which would take longer to complete than a planned job where we have [a] crew on-site with materials when the planned outage begins,” Moreno said. “We provided notice to our customers so they could make arrangements, such as using a generator.” About 600 customers—mostly residential—will be affected in parts of Chico, Cohasset and Richardson Springs, he said. PG&E has been contacted by only one customer to change the scheduled outage time—Greenberg. “We are sorry for any inconvenience caused by the planned outage, but with a planned outage customers can make arrangements ahead of time and we can prevent an unplanned power outage.”


Ron Greenberg, owner of Ron’s Reptiles off Cohasset Road north of Chico, intends to shutter his homebased business in the wake of PG&E’s intentional power shut-offs and personal tragedy.

Greenberg’s decision to close up shop

illustrates the economic toll of PG&E’s intentional blackouts, which have been occurring more frequently following the Camp Fire. Rough figures have pegged losses in the billions of dollars, though experts caution those are just estimates and say more work is being done to understand the economic consequences of power outages. Last month, Catherine Wolfram, a professor of business administration at UC Berkeley, analyzed the cost of the intentional PG&E blackout from Oct. 9-12 in a post on the school’s Energy Institute blog, finding estimated losses at about $1 billion. Wolfram conceded some calculations used were preliminary and crude. “In short, we really don’t know what the right number is for the value of lost load,” she wrote. “And, to make good decisions about the steps we should take to avoid outages, we need better estimates.” PG&E offered one-time on-bill credits of $100 for residential customers and $250 for business customers for the aforementioned large-scale PSPS for which the utility acknowledged rolled out with significant communications snafus. In Greenberg’s case, intentional blackouts have meant spending over $10,000 on generators and their maintenance. He says he is prepared to keep his animals alive, but that’s it. His business loses money every time a power shut-off occurs. Last month, an intentional blackout tragically intersected with his wife’s death, resulting in thousands of dollars in losses. Greenberg said his wife died in her sleep in the early morning hours of Oct. 5, before PG&E cut power later that night. In his distress, he failed to make arrangements to turn on a generator that powered circulation and exhaust fans in his rodent house, which is a small shack on his property. When he awoke the next day and saw the door to the shack was closed, his heart sank. More than 1,500 rats died because of the conditions inside. It was a significant loss that amounted to at least $13,100, he said. “I’m old,” he said. “I am sad. I am frustrated. I am pissed off. If there’s any way to experience all the emotions at the same time, I think I’m going through that. You just don’t lose somebody after 41 years ….” His eyes welled. Ω

Learning curve School bond backers have some selling to do, poll shows

California voters have resoundingly approved tens

of billions of dollars in state school construction bonds over the last two decades. But a new survey suggests that voters have yet to similarly warm up to the latest and heftiest proposal to come before them: a $15 billion state bond for public schools, community colleges and universities that will be decided on the March 3 presidential primary ballot. A poll by the Public Policy Institute of California, published this month, found that among likely voters surveyed, fewer than half— 48 percent—would vote for the state bond measure About this story: if the election were held It was originally produced today. for CalMatters.org, a nonprofit, nonpartisan Among the 999 likely media venture explaining voters who were polled, California policies and 36 percent said they would politics. vote no on what has been formally been dubbed the “Public Preschool, K-12, and College Health and Safety Bond Act of 2020,” and 16 percent said they did not know how they planned to vote. Support for the bond measure was much higher among Democrats (71 percent) than Republicans (24 percent) and independents (44 percent). “The fact that a school bond measure is polling below 50 percent among likely voters was a surprise because, generally speaking,

state school bond measures enjoy stronger support,” said PPIC President Mark Baldassare. “And we’re not seeing it just yet, meaning that the proponents have work to do to explain what this bond is about.” Proponents said they are not concerned about the early poll results for the school bond measure, which, coincidentally, will appear as “Proposition 13” on the March ballot. That’s not to be confused with the other, more widely known Prop. 13—the 1978 tax reform that education groups hope to overhaul in November to raise more revenue for cities and schools. The March Prop. 13 would earmark $9 billion toward modernization and construction projects for K-12 schools. Another $2 billion from the measure would go to

SIFT ER Medication insecurity on the rise The number of American adults who say they cannot afford prescribed medicine is on the rise, according to a recent Gallup poll in partnership with West Health, a group of nonprofit and nonpartisan organizations focused on lowering health care costs for seniors. This medication insecurity—meaning a household was unable to pay for prescribed medicine or drugs at least once in the past year—has increased significantly. It affected approximately 19 percent of Americans in January and 23 percent in September. That’s roughly 58 million adults. In addition, more than 13 percent of Americans say they know at

least one friend or family member who has died in the past five years after not being able to pay for needed medical treatment. Other poll highlights: The public isn’t impressed with the Trump administration on this front. Only 7 percent say it has accomplished “a great deal,” while 66 percent say it has accomplished “not very much/ none at all.”

New poll finds less than half of California voters support a new bond for schools. PHOTO BY MONKEYBUSINESSIMAGES/ISTOCK

community colleges and the state’s two public university systems. Crumbling classrooms have been an ongoing issue both on college campuses and in K-12 classrooms, where school closure data recently analyzed by CalMatters showed significant class time forfeited to facilities issues from bad plumbing to mold. Legislators approved putting the school bond measure on the ballot in the final hours of this year’s legislative session after they, education advocates and the governor’s office negotiated revisions to the state’s School Facilities Program. Those revisions made significant changes in how the state would distribute its school bond funds. Among them: an end to the first-come, first-served system used in the past, which critics said harmed poorer school districts’ chances of acquiring assistance, and a higher priority for health and safety projects addressing mold, asbestos, seismic safety and water quality. The changes also offered more support for small school districts applying for state bond money. Small school systems are disproportionately represented among the districts that have not passed any local bond funds in recent decades. The latest polling numbers are similar to

those from 2016, when a pre-election PPIC poll found that 46 percent of likely voters supported Prop. 51, a $9 billion proposal and the state’s most recent school bond. Prop. 51 ended up passing with 55 percent of the vote, but the circumstances surroundNEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D N O V E M B E R 2 7, 2 0 1 9

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NEWSLINES Leslie Johnson and Bob Trausch, co-founders of the Chico Housing Action Team, visit the potential future home of Simplicity Village as contractors grade the land.

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ing that state bond were different from the one being proposed for next year. Former Gov. Jerry Brown and some legislators criticized the structure of that state bond proposal because they said it favored wealthier school districts that had the means and resources to maximize local bond funds to get matching state funds. In a statement to CalMatters, Democratic Assemblyman Patrick O’Donnell, author of the state school bond measure legislation, noted that the PPIC poll “did not provide those surveyed with detailed information about the school bond.” “I am confident that voters will support Proposition 13 once they learn that funds will be provided to ensure our schools are safe, such as eliminating mold and asbestos in our classrooms,” O’Donnell said. Gov. Gavin Newsom expressed similar confidence in the ballot measure at an October signing ceremony for the bond legislation at a Sacramento elementary school. Describing the $15 billion bond proposal as “historic,” Newsom said he planned to throw his political weight behind Prop. 13. He touted the proposal for carrying “a disproportionate focus on equity” compared with previous bond measures. “Voters will approve this bond because voters historically approve school bonds. It transcends urban, rural, suburban, it transcends politics,” Newsom said in October. “You can’t look in the eyes of these kids and make an argument that the facilities that so many of them are being educated in are appropriate. We’ve got to meet our own expectations.” The PPIC survey also polled likely voters on two potential school funding tax measures that education groups are angling to put on the November 2020 ballot via citizens’ initiative. According to the poll, 46 percent of likely voters support the proposed property tax overhaul—a “split roll” property tax on commercial properties—while 56 percent of likely voters support a separate tax measure that would raise income taxes on the wealthiest Californians to raise funds for schools. —RICARDO CANO 10

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PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

nity’s significant number of homeless, which is documented by the State’s and City’s Shelter Crisis Declaration, and has more recently been exacerbated by a significant influx of Camp Fire survivors,” Vieg wrote in the OPDI. Going through a use-permit process could add hundreds of thousands of dollars to the project’s price tag, Chico principal planner Bruce Ambo told the CN&R, using accessory dwelling unit fees as an example. Johnson said the lease is for two years with options to extend up to 24. Based on the region’s tremendous need for housing, CHAT wanted to secure the land longer in the event of an extension of the emergency shelter crisis declaration. Solinsky told the CN&R he respects CHAT and the

Hanging in the balance Tiny home village’s future to be hashed out in court On a recent morning, Leslie Johnson, co-founder

of the Chico Housing Action Team, watched as bulldozers flattened the earth and piled up the leafy remains of bushes on an expanse of land on Notre Dame Boulevard, just south of Morrow Lane. CHAT was breaking ground on its latest project—a tiny home community for seniors dubbed Simplicity Village—amid a lawsuit that aims to bar its development. Earlier this month, Frank Solinsky, president of neighboring business Payless Building Supply, filed a lawsuit against the city of Chico and Brendan Vieg, its director of planning and housing, for approving the project. CHAT is listed as an interested party, along with the land’s owners, Ted and Justine Ball. In a nutshell, the dispute comes down to land use: The city maintains that Simplicity Village is allowed temporarily and without a permit, per the shelter crisis declaration made last year. Conversely, Solinsky argues that the project is permanent, and therefore is not allowed without a use permit and environmental review; that the city is bypassing laws in order to approve a favored project. CHAT members and Solinsky have met several times to hash things out, but have yet to see eye-to-eye. Johnson and her husband/fellow CHAT co-founder, Bob Trausch, told the CN&R the lawsuit could cost the nonprofit time and money, delaying the vital services it plans to provide to homeless seniors. CHAT has raised $350,000 for the project so far, enough to get it off the ground, the pair said. “We’d love to see him drop the lawsuit and give us a chance to show that we can be good

neighbors and that we can be super responsible and responsive to his needs and concerns,” Johnson said. “It would be very unfortunate to have to divert some of the funds that people have donated to help make this happen toward legal defense.” In the lawsuit, Solinsky maintains that Simplicity Village should be defined as a permanent emergency shelter, which means the project cannot be developed at that site in a light manufacturing zone without a use permit. Robert L. Berry, who is representing Solinsky as co-counsel on the case with land-use attorney Walter P. McNeill, of Redding, told the CN&R they believe that the project is “a permanent use being approved under a temporary ordinance.” Berry cited CHAT’s $700,000 investment that permanently alters the land (by putting in roads and utilities, for example), arguing that the project could remain for decades, making it “impossible” to categorize as temporary. Vieg found in his official planning director interpretation, or OPDI, that Simplicity Village’s use is temporary because it is intended to operate during the city’s declared shelter crisis, which is set to expire on June 30, 2021. This allowed it to be classified as an emergency facility, which addresses “emergency public health and safety needs.” State law allows for communities that have declared shelter crises to waive certain processes and permit requirements in order to speedily get people into housing. “The proposed use is further acceptable due to its temporary nature, the operational characteristics proposed by the applicant, and given the urgency of the need to provide emergency public health and safety needs to the commu-

work it has done to house homeless people. It has provided permanent housing to 130 people across 35 homes via its master lease Housing Now program, for example. But he is “absolutely” concerned the project could have impacts similar to those of the homeless encampment that sprung up next door a few years ago. At the time, Payless lost $30,000 worth of lumber that Solinsky alleges was stolen from the camp’s inhabitants. “It can be managed to the best of their ability, and I’m sure CHAT would try to do that. But then what happens down the road? Once you start something like this, it’s forever …” Berry added that the lawsuit is not about the merits of Simplicity Village or CHAT’s qualifications. “It’s about whether or not the interests of the people that are impacted by this on all sides of this development have been adequately provided for. And we argue that they haven’t been.” Those concerns could have been addressed during a use-permit and environmental-review process, Berry added. CHAT is confident in the city’s ruling, but the organization still has made changes to its plans to address some of Solinsky’s concerns, including writing into tenant contracts that they will not complain about the lumber yard’s early morning operations. The property will be fenced and well-managed, Johnson and Trausch told the CN&R. They’ll also have vans to transport people, and parking to prevent overflow onto nearby streets. “We’re really trying to think of everything that could help improve the situation,” Johnson said. She added that CHAT realizes a tiny home community “isn’t the ideal.” “As a community, we are doing what we can, and the most and the best we can to try to offer one solution,” she said. “And it’s a temporary solution … but it’s much better than having someone living on the street or dying on the street,” Trausch added. —ASHIAH SCHARAGA


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HEALTHLINES cater to younger people, and is designing ads for display in convenience stores and markets, Reyes said. Those who make up to 138 percent of the fed-

Expansion resistance Undocumented young people wary of Medi-Cal enrollment in the Trump era by

Ana B. Ibarra

Sregardless up for California’s Medicaid program of immigration status.

tarting in January, young adults can sign

But a fundamental question looms: Will they? Some young people already say they won’t enroll in public coverage because they fear federal immigration policies could later penalize them for participating—though that fear might be unfounded. Add to that their age. Young adults— both immigrants and nonimmigrants—are notoriously hard to convince of the necessity of health insurance. The insurance industry even has coined a special term for them: “young invincibles.” “Young adults, undocumented or not, tend to consider themselves healthy,” said Cathy Senderling-McDonald, deputy executive director of the County Welfare Directors

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Association of California, which represents county human services directors. “They’re not thinking ‘This is something I need to worry about.’” Medi-Cal is California’s version of the federal-state Medicaid program for lowincome residents. In May 2016, the state began offering undocumented immigrant children up to age 19 full Medi-Cal coverage, funded by state money. Nearly 129,000 were enrolled in the program in March 2019, according to the most recent data available. During budget negotiations this year, California lawmakers voted to use more state dollars to expand the program to all income-eligible adults ages 19 to 25, which will make California the first state to offer full Medicaid coverage to unauthorized immigrant adults. The state Department of Health Care Services expects to enroll about 90,000 young adults in the first year. Of those, nearly 75 percent are currently enrolled in limited Medi-Cal coverage, which includes emergency and pregnancy-

related care. The department plans to transition those individuals into comprehensive coverage, it said. That leaves health officials and immigrant rights advocates grappling with how to persuade everyone else who is eligible to apply. Undocumented immigrant adults make up the majority of California’s uninsured population, about 58 percent, according to the Insure the Uninsured Project. “The message we have to spread is to think about prevention and chronic conditions, which could start early in life,” said Jeffrey Reynoso, executive director of the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California. Advocates must meet young adults where they are, Reynoso said, which means social media is key. His group is creating a social media toolkit that includes Instagram posts and sample tweets tailored to young adults, which will be available to partner organizations. It also plans to use radio and ethnic media, in cooperation with other groups, to spread the message to families so parents and grandparents can encourage younger family members to sign up, he said. “We can’t use traditional media to reach this population,” said Sarah Reyes, managing director of communications at the California Endowment, a foundation that promotes health insurance coverage for all Californians, regardless of immigration status. The endowment also is planning social media posts and radio spots on stations that

eral poverty level are eligible for Medi-Cal. This year, that means individuals with annual incomes of up to about $17,200 qualify. Because Medi-Cal is free for most participants, most young people won’t have to worry about taking a financial hit, said Sarah Dar, senior manager of health and public benefits for the California Immigrant Policy Center. That makes them different from the so-called young invincibles—who generally fall into the 18-to-34 age group—looking for private health coverage, where cost is a major consideration. But age is not as great a barrier to enrollment as fear of federal immigration rhetoric and policies, Dar said. For example, since 2017 the Trump administration has been fighting to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which allows some undocumented people, whose parents brought them into the country illegally as children, to live and work in the U.S. temporarily. The fate of the program rests with the U.S. Supreme Court, which heard oral arguHEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT

Annual turkey day trot Burn a few calories and do a good deed, all in one fell swoop Thanksgiving morning (Nov. 28). The 14th annual Run for Food 5K takes place at One-Mile Recreation Area in beautiful Bidwell Park from 9-11 a.m. This is a benefit for the Jesus Center. You can register online at runforfood.com or in person at the Jesus Center or Fleet Feet downtown. This is a family-friendly event with space open for both children under 12 and adults. Work up that appetite together before you gobble all day!


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HEALTHLINES ments in the case Nov. 12. The Trump administration is also trying to expand its “public charge” rule, which would allow immigration officials to more easily deny permanent residency status to those who depend on certain public benefits, such as Medicaid. Federal judges temporarily blocked it from taking effect in mid-October. But the fears may be misguided, Dar said. Participants of the DACA program already are eligible for Medi-Cal if they meet the income guidelines. And applying for Medi-Cal wouldn’t count against undocumented young adults should they become eligible to apply for permanent residency later because their coverage will be paid for with state, not federal, money, she said. “We need to get out a clear message that public charge should not be a concern,” Dar said. Esmeralda, 20, of Santa Maria, works in the fields picking strawberries and attends community college when the fruit isn’t in season. She agreed to be interviewed on the condition that her last name not

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Mediterranean Market

Now opeN

About this article:

This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, which publishes California Healthline, an editorially independent service of the California Health Care Foundation.

be used. She needs glasses and has struggled with occasional but debilitating back pain since she was a child in Mexico. The pain sometimes forces her to stop working for the day. The last time she went to a doctor was almost five years ago, when she started school in the U.S. and had to get vaccinated, she said. Esmeralda said she would like to sign up for Medi-Cal but will wait to see how the process works for others. She wants to know whether they feel their personal information is being kept safe from federal immigration officials, she said. “I would wait to make sure there are no problems,” she said in Spanish. “Obviously, with being undocumented, there is fear.” □

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Christmas special for the Kids at the Esplanade House 1. Stop by the Chico News & Review office

Know your options It’s open enrollment season, when many people must select or switch their health benefits for the following year. Thankfully, there often are overlooked benefits and programs that can help you save money and boost your well-being at the same time. More health plans are offering telemedicine as an option for care—mobile apps can connect you to a doctor 24 hours a day via the camera on your cellphone, tablet or computer, and can cost as little as $5 a visit. Some dental plans also offer access to teledentistry, where consumers can avoid in-person costs and order direct-to-consumer products like teeth aligners. Vision plans can provide a second pair of prescription eyeware for a reduced co-pay and cover safety or extended computer-use glasses for free, too. And make sure to check with your employer—they may supply discounted gym memberships or financial incentives for taking part in healthy activities.

today and choose a child’s name. 2. Purchase age-appropriate gifts and wrap them. 3. Drop off the wrapped gifts at the CN&R office no later than Thursday, Dec. 12th. CN&R OFFICE HOURS: Mon.-Fri., 9am – 5pm 353 E. 2nd St., Chico (530) 894-2300

Be a Special Santa to benefit the children of the Esplanade House, a transitional shelter facility for homeless families.

Thank you from:

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GREENWAYS George Barber, district manager for Cal Water’s Chico and Oroville branches, said the water supplier will continue to conduct tests for contaminants under review by federal and state water officials.

Testing the water As Cal Water examines wells for contaminants, manager says water is safe to drink story and photo by

Andre Byik

an dreb@ n ewsrev iew. com

Bouttook two of its groundwater wells in Chico of service after tests showed they were ack in 2016, California Water Service Co.

contaminated with toxic flourinated chemicals known as PFAS—or per- and polyfluoralkyl substances—that have been linked to cancer and other adverse health effects. The move was done quietly. Under questioning by the Butte County Water Commission earlier this month, Loni Lind, water quality manager for Cal Water, told the board the public was not notified at the time. “We took them offline the second we had results,” Lind told the board. “So, it wasn’t like there was a period of time when we were running it knowingly with these results in hand.” The removal of the wells from Chico’s water supply came after a round of testing mandated for large public water systems by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). More examinations were ordered statewide by the California Water Resources Control Board earlier this year, finding hundreds of wells and other water sources containing traces of PFAS. State and federal water officials continue to explore regulation, mitigation and notification requirements for the substances. PFAS are a group of man-made substances—sometimes referred to as “forever chemicals”—that are resistant to heat, water and oil, according to the state water board. They can be found in a variety of sources, such as nonstick cookware, fast-food wrappers and firefighting foam, and can accumulate in the body over time. Two common PFAS substances—PFOS and PFOA—are no longer manufactured or

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imported into the U.S., though traces of PFAS have been found in nearly every person tested in several national surveys, according to the state. Elaine McSpadden, Butte County’s environmental health director, said the health effects of PFAS are not yet fully understood, but she added that the county is working in conjunction with state and federal agencies as regulations are being developed. The ultimate goal, she said, is the implementation of legislation that would require public water systems to monitor for the chemicals, provide proper notification and develop treatments. George Barber, district manager for Cal

Water’s Chico and Oroville branches, told the CN&R that regulation for PFAS has taken a different path than other contaminants. Essentially, he said, water systems are mitigating a chemical while state and federal requirements—known as maximum contaminant levels—are still being developed. When Cal Water found that the two wells in Chico had tested positive for PFOS in 2016—one at 76 parts per trillion (ppt), and the other around 58 ppt—it took action immediately to ensure it wasn’t delivering unsafe water, Barber said. As for keeping the public in the dark at the time, he said Cal Water follows the rules and makes notifications when required. “We didn’t know what the [maximum

contaminant] levels would be at that point, [and] whether it was going to need treatment or not,” he said. “So, we notify when we are required to. I don’t want that to sound harsh, but we don’t want to concern people. It’s not like we’re hiding anything.” Nevertheless, the district manager said it’s likely Cal Water will be more proactive in notifying the pubic about water supply decisions in the future, even when it’s not required, “to try and help our customers understand the reality of our certain districts.” Last month, the state released results for PFAS testing mandated for nearly 600 drinking water supply wells. More than 300 wells and other sources throughout the state tested positive for the chemicals. In Chico, Cal Water was required to test fewer than half of its wells, but the utility decided to test all 56 of them, Barber said. Eleven were found to have traces of PFAS above the state’s notification level of 6.5 ppt for PFOS or 5.1 ppt for PFOA, though none reached the response level of 70 ppt—the point at which officials recommend removing a well from service. A notification level requires further monitoring and notification to local governments. The state water board says the notification level has been set “conservatively” as it further assesses health effects. However, the Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit environmental health organization, has developed a health guideline of 1 ppt for PFAS in

drinking water. The two wells previously taken out of service remain offline. Barber didn’t disclose where they are located. He noted, however, that close proximity to a certain well doesn’t necessarily mean a customer is receiving water from it. “The water is safe,” he said. “The water in Chico is safe.” In Oroville, where Cal Water tested all four of its wells, one was found over the response level for PFAS. The water supplier worked with the state to remove that well from service. Almost all drinking water in Oroville comes from surface water, not groundwater, Barber said, and tests did not detect the chemicals in surface water there. Regular testing remains ongoing, he said, and treatment options—such as granular activated carbon and ion exchange—are being explored. Treatment can range from $1 million to $2 million per site. In January, new legislation will require water systems to either remove from service drinking water sources that exceed the response level or provide public notice. As the state continues to develop regulations for PFAS, Barber said Cal Water’s message is: Don’t be concerned. “We’re on it,” he said. “We’re testing. … We’re taking actions as appropriate.” □

ECO EVENT

Self-sustainable is attainable Food independence means having the freedom to grow and eat healthy, local food without depending upon large companies with questionable practices or environmentally unsound systems. But how does one achieve more self-sufficiency when it comes to the food on your plate? Join in the Creating Food Independence in Butte County conversation at Blackbird this Sunday (Dec. 1) from 1-3 p.m. Hosted by Butte County Local Food Network and Avenue Farms, this recurring community meeting will feature a guest speaker and a chance to network and share ideas with likeminded folks.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY JOSH COZINE

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Home full of heart

Turkey, cider and relocations

Gabrielle Green changed her entire career when she first joined the team at Little Red Hen, which she said also changed her life. She started as an instructor and now, nearly six years later, she’s the manager of a new, “higher end” home gift store on one of downtown Chico’s busiest corners with the opening of Little Red Hen Home. After more than 20 years in publishing, Green says the change was never about career advancement, but about Little Red Hen’s staff and mission. The nonprofit operates as an educational program that provides on-the-job work experience and skill training for over 175 people with developmental disabilities. The addition of the home store puts the organization at six retail locations across Chico, in addition to multiple other support programs. After the recent closing of Zucchini & Vine across the street from Little Red Hen Vintage, Green and other staff members jumped at the chance to lease the space at 204 Main St. The shop offers upscale versions of classic home items, like board games, spices and specialty oils, and décor. Stop by weekdays, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., and weekends, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone! It’s always been my favorite holiday, as it’s traditionally a time to be with family and stuff our faces. As the years go by, traditions change. This year will be my first not celebrating with family—but I’ll be with friends, and they know good food, so all’s well. The other thing I’ve always loved about Thanksgiving is the fact that it’s about gratitude, a time to reflect on all of the good people and things in our lives. What irks me is the newish trend of stores opening on Thanksgiving with outlandish sales, forcing employees to work so greedy consumers can flock to their doors instead of staying home and appreciating what they already have. As has become my annual tradition the past few years, then, I want to give a shout out to the national retailers that have bucked that trend and decided to keep their doors shut till Black Friday: Barnes & Noble, Costco, Guitar Center, Hobby Lobby, Home Depot, Joann Stores, Lowe’s, Petco, PetSmart, Pier 1 Imports, Staples, TJ Maxx and Trader Joe’s. These, at least, are the ones listed by USA Today. I’d bet the majority of mom-and-pop shops stay closed, too.

Why the decision for Little Red Hen to expand? It allows us to employ more people and we can continue to

grow our program. The population of adults with disabilities or developmental disabilities and those with autism is increasing, and many are going to be aging out of the high schools in the future, and it’s really important that they have a place where they can have a career, earn full wages, have dignity and potentially grow to advance to other areas. The need for employment for this diverse population is staggering, so we’re responding to the demand. We have the [plant] nursery, the kitchen store, a floral store, a gift shop, a vintage store, and so the home store seemed like a beautiful extension.

What were renovations like? I think this process has been about two weeks. We used our team from [Little Red Hen] Tools

& Trade. We all had a vision and came together. And this building is gorgeous; it was the perfect canvas to build on, so it wasn’t hard to make it look beautiful.

Where do you get your products? We operate five other stores, so we have some from them, and we purchase new product. Erika [Birkholm] is an extremely talented buyer of products and we all are involved in curating it.

Did the holiday season spur you to open the store so quickly? Yeah, absolutely. But we also wanted to bring beauty and vibrancy to this corner and keep it as gorgeous as our predecessors. It’s an important location and it’s important for there to be beauty and life in here as quickly as possible. —JOSH COZINE

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

STELLAR CIDER A relative newbie on the scene, Cellar Door Cider is already knocking it out of the park. Owner Bryan Shaw was recently awarded a gold medal at the U.S. Open Cider Competition for his Grasshopper hopped cider. It also got a judge’s award for most creative name. Congrats! The tasting room is open Saturdays 2-6 p.m. at 11 Commerce Court, Ste. 2. NEW DIGS Nor Cal Brewing Co. is making a move. I’d been wondering what was going

on over at the old Winchester Goose space at Eighth and Broadway ever since I got word that The Bank Club had changed course and was looking for a different location. Turns out, Nor Cal Brewing is moving its taproom there. I look forward to checking out the next incarnation.

NEW ’DO For those who’ve come to enjoy the ambiance and expertise of Cool Kidz Cuts, do not fear—the popular hair salon has not closed. Owner Tammie Harvey tells me she was planning on shuttering the place due to high overhead, but five days before her planned closing date she found a perfect spot to relocate. Look for her and her crew—they specialize in kids’ cuts, but also work with adults—at the newly named Taming Tangles at 1360 Longfellow. Call 897-0123 for an appointment. MORE STYLE I was walking downtown the other day and spied activity going on inside of the space underneath Crush. Curious, I popped in and came upon the lovely ladies from Envee Hair Studio & Spa cutting away. Turns out their salon on Second Street was damaged during the same storm that took out Woodstock’s Pizza (which has reopened, by the way, while their new space on Main Street is being fixed up). While it’s being repaired, they’re enjoying the picture windows looking out onto Broadway.

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LOCAL HEROES Giving thankТ to the helperТ

A

s is tradition during Thanksgiving week each year, the Chico News & Review shines a light on a handful of people who go above and beyond to make the North State a better place to live. We call them local heroes. That’s because they do so out of the goodness of their hearts. Butte County certainly has much to be thankful for in this first full year after the Camp Fire. We’ve watched a swell of volunteerism over that time—countless people stepping up to help a variety of worthy causes related to the disaster. We couldn’t possibly feature all of the wonderful people giving selflessly of their time. Take, for example, Kevin and Sandy Lindstrom and their helpers at the Magalia Community Church, who set up and continue to run a recovery center aiding Ridge survivors (see “Ground zero,” Cover story, Nov. 7). Or, recall Lynne Spencer and her crew operating the Gridley Camp Fire Distribution Center (see “Home, sweet temporary home,” Cover story, Sept. 5). In this special annual issue, we’ve chosen four individuals and a couple who deserve recognition. Some are new to volunteering, having felt the calling after the disaster. Others are longtime helpers. What they have in common is that they all were personally affected by the fire but have chosen to give freely of themselves to better their communities. Cheers to them, and happy Thanksgiving to all of our readers.

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Bridge builder

Robert Catalano Robert Catalano of the Honey Run Covered Bridge Association (HRCBA) became reflective on a recent morning at the site of the historic bridge over Butte Creek that’s no more. He and the association have been leading the effort to rebuild the county landmark after its destruction in the Camp Fire. A year after the disaster, progress is slow but steady. “I’m a man with a mission,” he said. “My life has always been about looking forward and helping others. ... We and the HRCBA believe that rebuilding this bridge is creating hope where there is little.” That mission has been twofold. Catalano, president of the HRCBA, has been working to rebuild his life as well as the bridge. His home in Butte Creek Canyon, where he’s lived with his girlfriend, Christine Jennings, since about 2010, also burned in the fire. Over the last 12 months, he’s moved more than 15 times, staying with friends, neighbors, in hotels and, most recently, in an RV on the burned-out lot

where they will rebuild. Catalano and Jennings expect to move into their new home by Christmas. Despite his transient circumstances, Catalano is committed to re-creating the bridge. He’s been the face of the rebuild effort, organizing pancake breakfasts, manning fundraising booths at community events and communicating with the county, which owned the structure. He described the grueling process of rebuilding his home and the bridge as taking two steps forward and one step back. The work has taken a toll. Catalano says he sometimes has trouble recalling words when speaking, something he was advised was related to stress. Nevertheless, he’s determined to move forward.

Built in 1886, the bridge connected the Paradise Ridge with the communities below. Even after its destruction, Catalano says the iconic structure is still connecting folks, albeit symbolically. The rebuild effort has garnered support from people near and far. “The whole purpose of the rebuild is to return to normalcy and give people hope that if we can rebuild the bridge, they can come back and rebuild their homes,” he said. So far, HRCBA has raised about $650,000 in cash, pledges and materials, Catalano said. That’s short of the estimated $3 million price tag, but fundraising continues and it’s hoped upcoming activity will spur more interest to donate.


Friend of the animals Sandy Doolittle

As an ominous glow rose in the sky above her Paradise home the morning of Nov. 8, 2018, Sandy Doolittle began to load her car with animals—her two big dogs and two cats, as well as three doves and two possums in cages. “I just started throwing them in, and … I called [my friend] Shelly [Rogers] and said, ‘I’m bringing possums and birds and can you please take them?’ When I got to Chico, she opened the door and she goes, ‘How did you get these in here?’ I said, ‘Adrenaline!’ We could hardly get them out of my car. “We made it. But I did think, ‘They’re going to find us dead in the car and they’re going to go, Why did she have possums in her car?’” For anyone who knows Doolittle, the only surprise is that there weren’t more wild animals crammed into her sports car. As president of Bidwell Wildlife Rehabilitation (BWR)—an organization that rehabs wild animals in Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Sutter and Yuba counties, and which she’s been with since 1974 (when it was known as Bidwell Nature

Robert Catalano, president of the Honey Run Covered Bridge Association, says foundation work on the bridge rebuild could begin next spring. PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

Work has started on a new caretaker’s cottage at the park nearby. Further, the association expects to begin work on the bridge’s foundation in April, an expense estimated at around $530,000. After that, the structure’s framework—which is being designed as a replica with modifications to adhere to modern building standards—could be up by the end of next summer. That’s if all goes according to plan. The association is working to take ownership rights to the bridge from the county, and Catalano said that process is showing progress. He added that

negotiations remain active with a private-property owner to expand the park to the east side of the creek. Once rebuilt, the bridge will reconnect the county to its history, Catalano said. “What happens so many times—America rolls on and it leaves its past behind,” he said. “So, we want to re-create the past so we never forget where this area came from, what its history is [and] what we’ve done as we go forward. It gives people a foothold into knowing where they are and who they are.”

Center)—Doolittle often has up to two dozen animals in her care during the nine-month-long breeding season. It had just started winding down for her and Rogers, another BWR volunteer and the group’s secretary. The fire, of course, disrupted everything. Doolittle, who has lived in Paradise since 1970, lost her home and everything in it. But before processing that and figuring out how to recover, she started helping more animals. In addition to work with BWR, Doolittle is a co-founder of North Valley Animal Disaster Group, which has been assisting with animal evacuations and sheltering during disasters since 2002. The morning of the fire, before she realized that Paradise would be evacuated, Doolittle was preparing to go join other NVADG volunteers. “When I looked up, I saw the glow. I thought, ‘Oh, Concow’s on fire.’ So I put on my uniform, getting ready to be activated.” With the only clothes she now owned being her volunteer gear, she figured, “I might as well go to work.” Doolittle volunteered for a few days on-site at the temporary animal shelter at Chico Municipal Airport, and another few on the phones securing donations of medi-

cine and other supplies for volunteer veterinarians to help with the influx of animal refugees. “And then after that, I was like, ‘I’m done. I’m empty. I gotta deal with where I’m gonna live. What am I gonna do?’” She eventually secured an RV and was invited to park in Butte Valley on the property of another volunteer, and despite the cramped quarters, resumed her BWR duties once the 2019 breeding season was underway, cramming cages of possums, squirrels and birds wherever she could fit them. “I would feel bad if I didn’t do wildlife [rehab] in the summer. Because that’s me,” she said. “I’m not going to let the fire take that, too.” Doolittle notes that she is one of many helpers, and that neither NVADG nor BWR could operate without an army of volunteers. And though she stepped down from the role of public information officer for NVADG (after 17 years), she’ll remain as a volunteer for that group while also staying on as BWR president. “I’ve just been a weird animal person all my life,” Doolittle admitted. “It’s not what I do, it’s who I am.” —JASON CASSIDY

HEROES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 2

Sandy Doolittle, president of Bidwell Wildlife Rehabilitation and co-founder of North Valley Animal Disaster Group, jumped immediatley into helping rescue animals rafter the fire. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

—ANDRE BYIK

N O V E M B E R 2 7, 2 0 1 9

CN&R

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HEROES C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 1 9

Leading by example Teri and John Rubiolo

John Rubiolo was hard at work constructing a deck a few weeks ago with a volunteer laborer from Germany. They were laying a foundation to stretch between the two RVs on Rubiolo’s Concow property—one of them he and his wife, Teri, live in; the other serves as a kitchen. Teri, meanwhile, was out delivering a freezer to a neighbor. It had been donated and she’d matched it with a woman in need. That’s what she does best— she connects the dots. The Rubiolos, like the majority of their neighbors, lost their home to the Camp Fire. But they’re Donate to I Am’s Garden: Find the garden on Facebook. Teri not letting that hold them back. Rubiolo says their single biggest They’ve lived in Concow since need is donations for men ages 2001—having moved down from 25-45, as they tend to be the Paradise—and had built a welcomones falling through the cracks, working but living in tents. They ing home there over those years. A accept everything from clothing shared love of Jesus sent them on to gift cards to RVs. a path of helping others—for Teri, “it’s not about religion, it’s about relationships. Jesus had compassion and wanted us to truly love one another and take care of one another.” About four years ago, the Rubiolos started opening their home to hungry neighbors. Teri said everything fell quickly into place. Their refrigerator had broken and she was offered one out of the blue. “We didn’t even have a dining room table,” she said. But that week, her daughter said she had a table she needed to get rid of. Then Teri’s brother called asking if she’d like half a pig. Obviously, they’d chosen the right path, she decided. They dubbed their home I Am’s Garden.

Teri and John Rubiolo in their large storage shed, where they keep food, toiletries and clothing to supplement the aid their neighbors receive at formal food pantries and donation centers. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

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“We started out making dinner for four people,” she said. “Then there were five. And then we were serving 35 to 50 people six days a week.” That was before the Camp Fire. Since then, most of the Rubiolos’ regular dinner guests have returned, Teri said. And now there are more. They still serve about 35 to 50 people at their home, these days just three times a week. The other three days, they make deliveries—to anywhere from 90 to 120 people. Needs go up later in the month, Teri explained, as paychecks and Social Security begin to dwindle. “A lot of older people lost their vehicles [in the fire] and can’t get out,” she said. So, deliveries became a necessity. Generous donors keep the Rubiolos’ storage shed full of everything from canned goods to shampoo to clothing. They also get larger donations of generators, propane and even cars and trailers. The couple know who in their community needs those things the most and connect those dots. When their neighbors come over for dinner, they’re welcome to their washer and dryer, and their shower. Many of them are sleeping in tents. “We’re working on building a shower house,” she said, pointing to one area of their property. On the other side are the horses, pot-bellied pigs, donkeys, chickens and a mule—they also take in animal rescues. Five of the horses came from slaughter yards and one from a racetrack, she said, and four, like the Rubiolos, were Camp Fire survivors. “I know we’re doing what we need to be doing because there’s always someone helping us to help others,” Teri said, gesturing toward their German visitor who was constructing the deck for people to eat on out of the elements. “It’s about leading by example. I’m basically homeless, but my life is good still and I want to share that.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER

Sweet on history Bill Hartley

Bill Hartley has a passion for local history. He’s made plenty, having been honored as the Paradise Police Department’s officer of the year in 1998 and cofounding the Paradise Chocolate Fest—a benefit for local youth programs—in 1995 with his wife, Pam, with whom he co-owned the renowned confectionery Joy Lyn’s Candies for 30 years. More than his own, though, Hartley loves sharing the stories of Ridge pioneers. Take Yellowstone Kelly. Around four years ago, while at a marine shop getting his boat serviced, Hartley noticed a small memorial to this Wild West figure he’d just seen an old movie about. He was surprised to discover not only that Kelly was “a real person,” but also that he had ties to town. Hartley learned more. Luther Sage Kelly, aka Yellowstone, fought in the Civil War, guided an Alaskan expedition and commanded in the PhilippineAmerican War. A friend of President Theodore Roosevelt, he died in Paradise in 1927. He’s entombed in Montana, though his wife, Alice Mae, is buried at Paradise Cemetery. Hartley inquired about Kelly at the Gold Nugget Museum, repository of things historical to the Paradise area. The museum had a few pieces (uniform buttons) but scant information. Officials there asked Hartley to join the board and chair a committee on Kelly. He obliged and, in 2016, set to work on what would become the Yellowstone Kelly Heritage Trail—a place to commemorate the people who shaped Ridge history. “I could go on and on about the number of roads in this town named after pioneers,” he said. “We know the names, but we don’t know the stories—and the stories are important. It’s important to know how the spirit of this town came about.” The museum unveiled 34 heavy metal markers along a 5-mile section of the town’s paved bike trail, heading up from the Depot Museum at Paradise Community Park, in September 2018. Two months later, the Camp Fire struck. It spared the markers and the Depot Museum, but not the Gold Nugget Museum; that property on Pearson Road—like the majority of Paradise,


Driven to help Stephen Murray

including Joy Lyn’s on Bille Road and the Hartleys’ home off Neal Road— burned to the ground. The Hartleys, who’d sold their business to their son and daughter-in-law shortly before the blaze, are helping rebuild Joy Lyn’s, which is set to open in phases starting next month. They’re also building a home on a new property in Paradise. Meanwhile, Hartley has plans for the museum. He’s vice president—working with Don Criswell, the president, and other board members to re-envision the facility as a collaborative space for multiple community groups. Prospects include Theatre on the Ridge, Paradise Grange, Norton Buffalo Concert Hall, Paradise Gem & Mineral Club and the Butte County Fire Safe Council. They took a major step two weeks ago by acquiring a new site: the former Ridge Transmissions auto shop situated “a stone’s throw from where our old museum was.” Along with including arts, culture and other educational offerings, Hartley said, the new Gold Nugget Museum will “start educating more on what grew our community, and how all these people contributed to our community. Gold brought people here, but they stayed because of the farming and the beauty of the land.” Now, more than ever, “that’s the story that needs to be told.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY

Bill Hartley sees promise in the Gold Nugget Museum’s newly acquired site, a former auto repair facility located “a stone’s throw” from the destroyed facility. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

On the morning of Nov. 8, 2018, Stephen Murray drove through Apple Tree Village Mobile Home Park, a community of 281 seniors in Paradise, honking his horn, calling out to residents and stopping to kick down doors whenever he saw a car parked in a driveway. The Camp Fire was fast approaching their neighborhood. He had to get everybody to safety. He helped two residents into his truck, and after he made the rounds, he plowed through the park’s back fence and led a convoy of tenants to safety down the bike trail into Chico, where he was reunited with his wife and two young children. Murray had lived in Paradise for 31 years, and worked at Apple Tree Village for the last five as a handyman/groundskeeper/jack of all trades. He called it his “dream job.” He found out later that every resident in that development survived. Murray lost everything that day, but it didn’t stop him from continuing to help his community. For more than a year now, he has simultaneously grappled with relocating and re-establishing his family, organized countless fundraisers and events, and founded a nonprofit, the Coral Apple Foundation, to help survivors rebuild. He’s taken in a lot of donations, but he’s also indebted himself in the process. Murray says he’s driven approximately 100,000 miles to help more than 80 survivors tow RVs to their new properties. He’s organized several events, too. On Easter, he held a massive celebration at Bille Park—3,000 people attended and some 900 Easter baskets were given to Ridge children.

He’s the kind of person who doesn’t get intimidated by a challenge. A prime example: He showed up at the Red Cross shelter at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds shortly after the fire with donations, and was told he would not be allowed in unless he had enough for every person. So he drove to Target and bought 431 pairs of jeans. “You’re not gonna stop me from helping my people,” he said. “I don’t like roadblocks, so I try to figure out how to get under and over and through.” Jeanette Bright, a former resident of Apple Tree Village, told the CN&R via phone from her new home in Washington that Murray saved her life the day of the Camp Fire. She sat in the passenger seat of his truck as he drove them to safety. Murray was good to her before the fire, she said. He knew she didn’t have a lot of money, so he would fix things Reach out: around her home, like a leaky sink, To volunteer, donate or without charging her. find out more about Coral Apple Foundation, go to Now, she considers him a coralapple.com. grandson. “He’s got such a kind, kind heart,” she said. “He’s just got that instinct of helping people and saving people and not taking care of himself.” Murray admitted that he’s emotionally exhausted. He just returned to work in September, and it’s become harder to balance everything in his life. But he can’t imagine halting his volunteer efforts. “I just care for people, y’know what I mean?” he said. “I’ve been down and out. I know what it’s like to have nothing. I know what it’s like to need help and not get it. … I’ve realized that things can get better, things can be better. You just gotta know who to ask.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Stephen Murray, president of the Coral Apple Foundation, has raised thousands of dollars and traveled more than 100,000 miles in the past year to help Camp Fire survivors get resettled. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

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Arts &Culture

love

PHOTO BY SIMON ERTLER

It rains

Ionesongswhofrom a legacy artist, let alone took a full decade off from t’s a rare thing to hear fresh new

performing to pursue another career. But Lee Fields is nothing if not a rare exception of talent, and 50 years after his first single, he has a new album, It Rains Love, recorded with his band The Expressions by and released this Robin Bacior past spring. Nicknamed Preview: “Little JB” for Lee Fields & The Expressions, Monday, his physical and Dec. 9, 8 p.m. vocal similarity to Astronaut Ice Cream James Brown, the opens. soul singer began Tickets: $20 recording music in 1969, working Sierra Nevada Big Room with legends such 1075 E. 20th St. as Kool and the 892-4647 Gang and B.B. sierranevada.com King. An upward trajectory seemed inevitable, but after experiencing a family tragedy, Fields decided to halt his music career and switch tracks. He and his family relocated to New Jersey, where he began working in real estate. “I was trying to find myself in the ’80s, things hadn’t panned out like I thought [they] would,” Fields said during a recent phone interview. “My sister-in-law was killed by her husband, and I was trying to make sense of it all, being a god-fearing man. I felt I needed to be with my family instead of being on the road so much. I spent years re-creating myself in

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real estate and being there with the kids. The family became more important to me, and still is really, but the family was the ultimate thing in my life.” It was family that led him back to his first calling. Fields was considering going into the restaurant business and had plans to open a small fish joint in one of his buildings, but his wife advised him to return to music instead. “[She] took a look at the place and she asked me, ‘What do you know about fish?’ And I said, ‘Well, it tastes good.’ And she said I should stick with what I know,” Fields said. “So we invested in musical equipment in the early ’90s and I’ve been on the road ever since.” It’s been another steady climb for the soul artist. He eventually signed with Desco Records, which evolved into the infamous Daptone Records, home to artists like Sharon Jones and her band The Dap-Kings (who also backed up Amy Winehouse) and Charles Bradley. Fields even linked up with French house DJ Martin Solveig and began singing on dance tracks, which took him all over France. In 2009, he switched to Big Crown Records and teamed up with backing band The Expressions, most recently for the beautiful It Rains Love, a collection of tightly stacked soul songs with tasteful arrangements and uplifting lyrics about coming together in divisive times. “It seems like what’s happening

For a full calendar of the season’s holiday-related events, see “Festivities” on page 28.

THIS WEEK Lee Fields on keeping people

united

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WED

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 11/27, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

28

THU in the world today, it’s not generated [from] love, it’s generated [from] self-satisfaction,” Fields said. “Everybody’s so about self today, which is good, but self to me is all of us. All of us are one. If we become so concerned about ourselves, so vain, that means we’re breaking away from others. The chemistry of mankind [will] disintegrate. We have to be about all in order to keep that bond where we’re all working as one system. Love is that bond. Anything other than love, it breaks down unity, and we must be united in order to endure whatever calamities the future brings. The album is all about love, it’s all about us, and us is the world.” At 68 years old, Fields is touring constantly (visiting the Sierra Nevada Big Room in Chico on Dec. 9), with shows booked into 2020, plans to make a new album, and no intention of slowing down anytime soon. “I really consider myself retired now—this is my hobby, but fortunately it makes money for me,” Fields said. “There’s a scientific thing that a body in motion tends to stay in motion, and a body at rest tends to stay at rest, so I’m trying to stay in motion.” □

Special Events RUN FOR FOOD: The 14th annual Thanksgiving 5K run benefiting the Jesus Center. Race begins and ends at One-Mile Recreation

Area. Register online or at Fleet Feet (241 Main St.). Thu, 11/28, 9am. One-Mile Recreation Area, Bidwell Park. runforfood.com

29

FRI

Special Events COFFEE WITH COMRADES: Enjoy a beverage and chat about the

state of the city and the planet with old and new friends. Fri,

11/29, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

ENLOE TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY

Tuesday, Dec. 3 Enloe Medical Center SEE TUESDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE NOVEMBEARD BASH Saturday, Nov. 30 Blue Room Theatre

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. SUNDAY SUPERJAM: Weekly pro jam. Rock, blues, country, funk—anything goes. Sign up early, music starts at 2. Sun, 12/1, 2pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway St. (408) 449-2179.

3

TUE

ENLOE TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY: Carolers, holiday treats and a special visit from Santa Claus on the front lawn of Enloe. Tue, 12/3, 5pm. Enloe Medical Center, 1531 Esplanade.

LIFE LINE SCREENING: A five-test package to

pulling weeds in the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 11/29, 9am. Bidwell Park.

CHICO INDIAN MARKET Saturday, Nov. 30 Chico Women’s Club

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Music TYLER DEVOLL: Snappy guitar tunes for happy hour. Fri, 11/29, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

30

SAT

Special Events CHICO INDIAN MARKET: The Mechoopda Indian Tribe hosts a celebration of culture, diversity and artistry with a market of jewelry,

basketry, apparel, Indian tacos and baked goods. Sat 11/30, 10am. Free. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. 924-2713. mechoopda-nsn. gov

dedicated to updates from local agencies such as PID and PUSD. Tue, 12/3, 6pm. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Road, Paradise.

WOMEN’S CLOTHING SWAP: Clothes and accessories swap with no host bar. Tue, 12/3, 6pm. $10. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade.

Special Events

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and

TOWN OF PARADISE COMMUNITY MEETING: Meeting

thoroughly check you for risk of stroke, cardiovascular disease and other chronic conditions. Register online at lifelinescreening.com/communitycircle. Tue, 12/3, 9am. $70-$149. Redeemer Evangelical Lutheran Church of Chico, 750 Moss Ave.

4

WED

Special Events FIBER ARTS NIGHT OUT: Bring your own knitting, crocheting, hand-sewing, cross-stitch, embroidery, or other fiber project and work on it in the company of other hand-crafters. Wed, 12/4, 4pm. Butte County Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 30

COMEDY SLICE III: Comedy series hosted by Dillon Collins featuring Morty the Mortician,

Jesse Clark, Hussein Ali and more. Sat, 11/30, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

EDITOR’S PICK

DOWNTOWN LANDMARK TALK: Dave Nopel presents the history of the Chico Presbyterian Church with projected pictures and stories. Sat 11/30, 10am. $5. Chico History Museum, 141 Salem St.

NOVEMBEARD BASH: Chico Beard Collective hosts 11th annual Novembeard competition finale featuring live music, a silent auction, raffle prizes, bearded pageantry and the crowning of the 2019 champion. Sat 11/30, 7pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.

Music WHO CAN SLEEP?: Relaxing brunch tunes. Sat, 11/30, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

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SUN

Special Events CREATING FOOD INDEPENDENCE IN BUTTE COUNTY: Short talk and connecting/networking about the various ways in which we all can contribute to feeding our community. Sun, 12/1, 1pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Music BOGG DOES A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS: Local band performs original and jazz classics and pays tribute to the soundtrack from A Charlie Brown Christmas during brunch. Sun, 12/1,

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

OLDEN TIMES AND ANCIENT RHYMES OF LOVE AND DREAMS TO SHARE What’s the perfect Christmas combo? Charlie Brown + jazz. The soundtrack to A Charlie Brown Christmas might be the best-known music by a jazz artist in America. Recorded in the mid-’60s by the Vince Guaraldi Trio, it’s one of the best holiday albums of all time. Local jazz/funk genre-benders Bogg will pay tribute this Sunday (Dec. 1) at Tender Loving Coffee and make everyone feel like “Christmastime is here … ”

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All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque 26

FINE ARTS

THE GIFT SHOW Art

Shows through Dec. 27 Chico Art Center SEE ART

BLACKBIRD: Prisoner Art Show, group exhibit featuring artwork by the currently and formerly incarcerated. Through 11/30. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: The Gift Show, artists sell handmade goods and artwork for the holiday season. Think global, buy local. Opening reception Saturday, Nov 30, 10am-1pm. Through 12/27. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Christine MacShane, paintings by local artist. The Enloe Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery shows work by artists whose lives have been touched by cancer (survivors, caretakers and healthcare givers). Through 1/24. Free. 265 Cohasset Road.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: To Freeze the Shifting Phantasmagoria, exhibit investigates diverse strategies emerging in contemporary painting, highlighting work by California artists. Through 12/14. Chico State, ARTS 121. headleygallerycsuchico. com

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Reflection and Hope, group exhibit reflecting the experiences of survivors and the community a year after the Camp Fire. And, Bench Press, benches by 13 artists. 900 Esplanade, monca.org

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Courage, solo exhibition by Vanessa Wolfe. Through 11/30. 122 W. Third St. (inside Upper Park Clothing).

RED TAVERN: Flora, Fauna and Fields, eclectic exhibit featuring paintings in oils and watercolor by Eva Farley, Candy Matthews and Dolores Mitchell. Free. 1250 Esplanade.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Home for the Holidays, original artwork by Gary Baugh. Through 12/31. 493 East Ave., Ste. 1.

THE TURNER: 3rd Story Prints with Prose, prints alongside Chico State students’ flash-fiction works inspired by the museum’s collection. Through 12/14. Free. 400 W. First St. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Unbroken Traditions Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker Families in Northern California, exhibition represents the culmination of one year of research and collaboration between Mountain Maidu weavers, other tribal experts, museums studies students, faculty and curators. Through 5/15. Chico State. www.csuchico.edu/anthmuseum


SCENE The man behind the curtain and keys, David Rothe and the Centennial organ.

Organ failure

PHOTO COURTESY OF JERRY SNODGRASS

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University seeks new home for magnificent Centennial organ

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Fhome. Centennial pipe organ has been without a permanent or nearly 30 years, Chico State’s magnificent

During this time it has “temporarily” resided backstage at the Harlen Adams Theatre, sequestered among the fly ropes and screens. It was consigned there when it was learned that its intended home, in Laxson Auditorium, posed asbestos safety issues. But the new location presented its own safety issue: The organ blocked the line of sight between the theater fly rail (the pulley system for raising and lowering equipment) and the by stage. The university has known of Robert Speer this problem for 25 years and, unable rober tspeer@ or unwilling to solve it, has used newsrev i ew.c om “great caution” to avoid any injuries. However, the National Catch it while Association of Schools of Theatre you can: now has indicated it will pull the The Centennial university’s Music and Theatre Organ will be featured as part of Department’s accreditation if there is the Glorious Sounds no plan to move the organ by of the Season Feb. 1, 2020. holiday program, Unfortunately, nobody knows Dec. 6-7, 7:30 p.m. where to put it. In a recent phone and Dec. 8, 2 p.m. Tickets: $20 interview, Tracy Butts, interim dean of the College of Humanities and Harlen Adams Fine Arts, said there was no site on Theatre Chico State campus suitable for an instrument that 898-6333 is 27 feet tall, 20 feet wide and 10 www.csuchico. feet deep. Unless a site off campus is edu/soa found, it will go into storage. To the many lovers of this worldclass, historically significant instrument, that would be sacrilege. The organ is the brainchild of David Rothe, a longtime Chico State professor of music (now emeritus) known for his prowess on the organ and love of J. S. Bach’s organ music. It was he who convinced the university administration that creation of such a magnificent instrument was a perfect way to celebrate the school’s centennial in 1987. And it was he who located the organ’s designer and builder, Munetaka Yokota, and convinced him, in 1984, to come to Chico.

Lacking a professional construction team, Yokota spent a great deal of time training the many volunteers—more than 100 altogether—who signed up to help. As a result, the organ took six years to build, but what emerged was the first major pipe organ built entirely on-site since the Middle Ages. It’s truly a product of Chico. For example, its 2,200 pipes were cast from lead reclaimed from spent bullets in the Bidwell Park gun range. Much of the woodwork came from the historic Hooker Oak. Construction took place in a barn at the University Farm, and cow shin bones were used for the organ keys. Despite being semi-hidden backstage, the organ has been played fairly often over the years. “We’ve done some wonderful concerts in the Harlen Adams Theatre,” Rothe said during a recent interview. “With careful lighting, people don’t see the ropes at all.” Rothe will be playing the organ as part of the annual Glorious Sounds of the Season concerts next month (Dec. 6-9). Still, it’s not a fitting architectural or acoustic home for such a magnificent instrument. Responding to criticism that the decision to move the organ was made without consulting people in the Music and Theatre Department, Butts said that it was an issue of safety, not academics. “We don’t need to have a vote on something that involves safety,” she added. “The university had no choice in the matter.” She shares with Rothe a hope that a suitable offcampus site can be found. The most likely would be one of the city’s many churches. After all, originally grand organs were built for churches, and locating the Centennial Organ in a local church would be an ideal solution. This magnificent instrument really is a creation of the entire community, and it deserves to find a home here. Ω

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Entertainment, charity & cheer

Paradise Ice Rink

The CN&R’s annual holiday-season Festivities Guide

Santa Pub Crawl

Frontier Christmas - Oroville

COMMUNITY EVENTS Paradise Ice Rink

Nov. 27-Jan. 20, Sun.-Thurs., noon8 p.m.; Fri., noon-8 p.m. (teen skate 9-11 p.m.); Sat., noon-10 p.m. An outdoor ice rink for the holiday season. $12 day pass; $5 for teen skate nights. Terry Ashe Recreation Center, 6626 Skyway, Paradise. 872-6393.

The Gift Show

Nov. 30-Dec. 27. Artists sell handmade goods and artwork for the holiday season. Think global, buy local. Opening reception Saturday, Nov. 30, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St. 895-8726.

Enloe Tree Lighting Ceremony

Dec. 3, 5:15 p.m. Carolers, holiday treats and a special visit from Santa Claus on the front lawn of Enloe. Free. Enloe Medical Center, 1531 Esplanade. 332-7300.

Oroville Tree Lighting

Dec. 6, 4 p.m. Tree-lighting and smallbusiness holiday event featuring caroling, carriage rides, and treats. Downtown Oroville, explorebuttecounty.com

Stansbury Home Victorian Christmas

Dec. 6-8, Fri., 5-8 p.m.; Sat., noon6 p.m.; Sun., 1-4 p.m. Santa, entertain-

ment, spiced cider, homemade cookies, holiday raffle and a Victorian decorations. Donation: $2-$6. Stansbury Home, 207 W. Fifth St. 895-3848.

Breakfast with Santa

Dec. 7, noon-4 p.m. Make a Christmas wreath to take home, enjoy live music, tasty snacks, a craft fair and a visit from Mr. and Mrs. Claus. Proceeds benefit the visitor center’s educational programs. Lake Oroville Visitor Center, 917 Kelly Ridge Road, above Oroville Dam. 538-2219.

Santa at the Ice Rink

Dec. 7, 2-6 p.m. Santa arrives at the rink at 2 p.m., followed by music and dancing. Visit Santa starting at 4 p.m. Terry Ashe Recreation Center, 6626 Skyway, Paradise. 872-6393.

Christmas Lighted Truck Parade

Dec. 7, 6:30 p.m. Parade of lights through Paradise, starting at Ace

Hardware and following Pearson up Skyway to the Holiday Shopping Center and back. Town of Paradise.

Santa Pub Crawl

Dec. 7, 2-6 p.m. A downtown pub crawl with discounted drinks and a commemorative shirt. Proceeds go to Active 20-30 Club of Chico, which supports underprivileged children in Butte County. Tickets are $25 and available at chicosantapubcrawl.bpt.me.

Holiday Open House at the Ehmann Home

Dec. 7, 8 a.m.-noon. Visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus, make crafts with the elves and enjoy pancakes and treats from Roots Catering. Pre-registration required. $14. CARD Community Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave. 895-4711.

Dec. 14. 3 p.m. Open house with decorations, quilt drawing and light refreshments. Coincides with Parade of Lights. Ehmann Home, 1480 Lincoln St., Oroville, 533-5316.

Breakfast with Santa - Oroville

Dec. 14, 6 p.m. A hometown Christmas in historic downtown Oroville with floats, vehicles, horses, music and Santa riding a fire truck. Free. Downtown Oroville.

Dec. 7, 8-11 a.m. Breakfast, crafts and a visit with Santa. Pre-registration required. $10. Feather River Recreation and Park District. 1875 Feather River Blvd., Oroville. 533-2011.

Parade of Lights - Oroville

Winter Bizarre Bazaar

Dec. 7, 8:30 a.m. Five-kilometer or 1-mile fun run/walk with proceeds benefiting Chico’s Salvation Army. Lower Bidwell Park. Register online at runsignup.com.

Dec. 14-15, Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m; Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Chikoko design/artist collective hosts its annual alternative holiday craft faire, featuring the handmade clothing, jewelry and utilitarian art of local artists. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

Butte County Toy Run

Community Hanukkah Party

Santa Shuffle

Dec. 7, 9:30 a.m-2:30 p.m. All motorcyclists welcome for annual Christmas toy drive/run. Call Barbi at 228-7838 with questions. Start location: 2357 Fair St. 893-1918.

Dec. 22, 5-7 p.m. Traditional dinner for the community, featuring music, menorah lighting, dancing, games and more. Call to RSVP. Congregation Beth Israel, 1336 Hemlock St. Tammy Brown’s Holiday Sparkle Tour

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Lights of the Season

Dec. 7, 7:30 p.m. The Oroville Community Concert Band and Chorus presents their annual Christmas Concert. $10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St. 538-2470.

The Yule Logs

Dec. 7-21. The hardest-working band in snow biz is back. Local shows include: Duffy’s Tavern (Dec. 7, 8:30 p.m.); Gateway Science Museum (Dec. 8, 3:30 p.m.); Argus Bar + Patio (Dec. 12, 8:30 p.m.); and El Rey Theater (Dec. 21, 7:30 p.m.). Go to yulelogsmusic.com for info on all the shows.

Nochebuena: Christmas Eve in Mexico

Dec. 21, 7:30 p.m. Two Los Angeles dance and music ensembles—Ballet Folklórico de Los Ángeles and Mariachi Garibaldi de Jaime Cuélla—celebrate the holiday traditions of Mexico. $15-$38. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 8986333, chicoerformances.com

North Valley Community Foundation is accepting donations for various Camp Fire relief efforts. Visit nvcf.org or call 891-1150 to donate and for more information. Safe Space Winter Shelter needs volunteers for providing shelter to the homeless community during the cold winter months. Go to safespacechico.org and follow on Facebook for donation needs and updates on volunteer signups.

Nochebuena: Christmas Eve in Mexico

The Santaland Diaries

Dec. 12-Dec. 22, Thurs.-Sat., 7:30 p.m. (through Dec. 21); plus, Sun., Dec. 22, 2 p.m. Delisa Freistadt plays Crumpet the Macy’s elf in this one-woman adaptation of David Sedaris’ classic short story. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre.com

Voom Voom Variety Show

Dec. 13, 7 p.m. The Chikoko design/artist collective hosts a variety show to kick off its annual holiday craft faire. $5. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

ENTERTAINMENT

Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333, chicoperformances.com

Funksgiving

Rockin’ Acapella 4: Doin’ It Justice

Nov. 29, 8 p.m. Annual benefit for Safe Space Winter Shelter featuring music by Smokey the Groove, Lo & Behold, Sounds Good, DJ Amburgers. $7-$10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

White Christmas

Nov. 29-Dec. 22, Thurs.-Sat., 7:30 p.m. & Sun. 2 p.m. A celebration of the classic songs of Irving Berlin. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. 894-3282, chicotheatercompany.com

Into the Wardrobe

Nov. 29-Dec. 1, Fri. & Sat., 6 p.m. & Sun. 3 p.m. North State Ballet’s holiday production, an adaptation of C.S. Lewis’ The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. $13.50$18. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road. 872-8454, paradiseperformingarts.com

A Very Chico Nutcracker

Dec. 5-8, Thurs., Fri. & Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun., 2 p.m. Traditional Nutcracker ballet with an infusion of rich Chico history presented by the Chico Community Ballet. $15-$22. Laxson

Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m., Dec. 8, 6:30 p.m. Doin’ It Justice Chorus presents an evening of a capella versions of classic hits. A benefit for Safe Space Winter Shelter. $20 suggested donation. First Christian Church, 295 E. Washington Ave.

Glorious Sounds of the Season

Dec. 6-9, Fri.-Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. Festive event featuring music and drama for the season with faculty and students performers in the Chico State Choral Ensembles, Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Jazz X-Press, theater ensembles and soloists. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State. $20. University Box Office: 899-6333.

Elf the Musical

Dec. 6-15, Fri.Sat., 7:30 p.m. & Sat.-Sun. 2 p.m. California Regional Theatre presents a stage adaptation of the film about the adventures of Buddy the elf. $18-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

North State Symphony: Holiday Concert

Dec. 13-14, Fri. (Chico) & Sat. (Red Bluff), 7:30 p.m. Celebrate the season with a festive performance of a variety of sacred and popular holiday music. $15$30. First Baptist Church, 850 Palmetto Ave. & Red Bluff State Theatre, 333 Oak St. 898-5984.

Christmas Jug Band

Dec. 14, 7 p.m. Norton Buffalo Hall West and Museum of Northern California Art present the “kings of 100 percent acoustic folk-skiffle-swing holiday hijinks.” $25 (tickets at eventbrite.com). Monca, 900 Esplanade.

Tammy Brown’s Holiday Sparkle Tour

Dec. 14, 8 p.m. RuPaul’s Drag Race allstar Tammie Brown brings her “holiday sparkle” to Chico. $22. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. justinbuckles.storenvy.com

Give My Regards to Christmas Dec. 14-22. Fri.-Sat., 7:30 p.m. & Sun., 2 p.m. Legacy Stage presents a Christmas cabaret with new arrangements of holiday classics by a live band and cast. $25. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave. legacystage.org

Pink Martini: Joy to the World

Dec. 19, 7:30 p.m. The so-called “United Nations house band” puts on a holiday-themed concert. $15-$64. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333, chicoerformances.com

CHARITY Chico Housing Action Team needs donations and volunteers for its efforts to meet the needs of the unhoused. Donation checks can be made out to CHAT and mailed to P.O. Box 4868 Chico, Calif., 95927. Call 518-9992 or visit chicohousingactionteam.org for more info. Far Northern Regional Center is accepting donations for its efforts to provide services and support for persons with developmental disabilities. Also, contributions can be made to the Holidays Are for Caring Fund to provide gifts for those who may not otherwise receive any during the holiday season. 222-4791, farnorthernrc.org. Jesus Center needs food and clothing donations along with volunteers. Call 3452640 or visit jesuscenter.org for info.

Salvation Army’s red donation kettles are popping up around Chico. Donate to support programs online at chico.salva tionarmy.org. Salvation Army community center, 567 E. 16th St. Info: 342-2199. 6th Street Center for Youth needs donations of personal-care items, first-aid supplies, undergarments, coats, backpacks, sleeping bags, blankets and more. Donations accepted Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 130 W. Sixth St. 894-8008. 6thstreetcenter.org. Torres Shelter needs donations and volunteers. Torres Community Shelter, 101 Silver Dollar Way. Info: 891-9048, torresshelter.org. Youth for Change is accepting donations and volunteers for its community collaborations supporting the healing of children and families (including assisting those displaced by the Camp Fire). 877-1965, youth4change.org.

Glorious Sounds of the Season

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NIGHTLIFE

WEDNESDAY 11/27—WEDNESDAY 12/4 tunes for dinnertime. Wed, 11/27, 6pm. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd.

OPEN MIC: Come on down and strut your stuff. Andan from the

Channel 66 band hosts. Wed, 11/27, 7pm. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

TOM & SHAWN: Local duo performs originals and classic rock hits of

the ’60s and early ’70s. Wed, 11/27, 6pm. The Allies Pub, 426 Broadway, Ste. 130.

29FRIDAY

LE WOLVES

CHOPPING MALL: A late-show cult clas-

Saturday, Nov. 30 1078 Gallery

sic and anti-Black Friday benefit for Blackbird with a screening of this rad 1980s sci-fi horror flick featuring killer robots vs. teens in a “chopping mall” rampage. Fri, 11/29, 10pm. $5-$10. Pageant Theatre, 351 E. Sixth St.

SEE SATURDAY

FUNKSGIVING: Annual benefit for Safe

27WEDNESDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 11/27, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

11/27, 10pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

JAM SESSION: Informal night of improvised music. All musicians and genres are welcome. House band until 8, open jam after. Wed, 11/27, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

DANCE NIGHT: Four lady DJs with large vinyl collections select a fresh slice of wax every Wednesday for your boogie-ing pleasure. Wed,

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: Soulful songs and tasty

Space Winter Shelter featuring music by Smokey the Groove, Lo & Behold and Sounds Good and tunes by DJ Amburgers. Fri, 11/29, 8pm. $7-$10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

JEFF KING: Live music at the

winery. Fri, 11/29, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: Eclectic mix of tunes by local favorites. Fri, 11/29, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. diamondsteakhousechico.com

TEEN SCREAM

A story about a group of teenagers partying in a mall after hours versus three killer robots on a mission to murder that will make you second-guess your Black Friday plans. Chopping Mall (1986) is a must-see cult-classic slasher flick and its screening at the Pageant Theatre this Friday (Nov. 29).

LOSE YOUR ILLUSION: Ride the night train with Guns N’ Roses tribute. Fri, 11/29, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

MAX MINARDI: Local folk singer-

songwriter performs. Fri, 11/29, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theex changeoroville.com

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Signups at 7:30pm, all ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 11/29, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

30SATURDAY

COMEDY SLICE III: Comedy series

hosted by Dillon Collins featuring Morty the Mortician, Jesse Clark, Hussein Ali and more. Sat, 11/30, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

DECADES: Music from Chuck Berry to

Katy Perry with fun local band. Sat, 11/30, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Tackle Box, 379 E Park Avenue, 379 E. Park Ave.

THE DIRTY 30 SHOW: Benefit for the Butte Humane Society hosted by Cherry Blossom and featuring music, magic and burlesque. Sat, 11/30, 8pm. $10-$18. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

DRIVER: Classic rock, rhythm and

blues band performs. Sat, 11/30, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

HAIR METAL COVER NIGHT: Chico bands cover your favorite power ballads, stadium anthems and ’80s strip-club jams. Benefit for the Chico Housing Action Team. Sat, 11/30, 8pm. $5. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

HARVEST BALL: The 11th annual musical celebration featuring performances by the Tim Bluhm Band, Swamp Zen, Dylan’s Dharma and XDS. Sat,

M-F 9am-5pm Sat 10am-5pm Sun 10am-4pm

Equipment

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 ROD STEWART TRIBUTE: Rob Caudill

HARVEST BALL Saturday, Nov. 30 Lost On Main SEE SATURDAY

sings “Maggie May” and more. Sat, 11/30, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SAMANTHA FRANCIS: Live music, plus

beer and food. Sat, 11/30, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

VIRGINIA MARLO: Piano and heartfelt

vocals. Sat, 11/30, 6pm. Almendra Winery, 9275 Midway, Durham.

1SUNDAY

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 12/1, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

SMASHED SPELLING BEE: Monthly adult 11/30, 8pm. $12-$15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: See Friday. Sat, 11/30,

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

LE WOLVES: Rock four-piece from Fresno performs. Local faves Similar Alien and Culture Tourist share the

bill. Sat, 11/30, 8pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.

NOVEMBEARD BASH: Chico Beard Collective hosts 11th annual Novembeard competition finale featuring live music, a silent auction, raffle prizes, bearded pageantry and the crowning of the 2019 champion. Sat 11/30, 7pm. $10. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First S

spelling bee drinking game with cash prize and a medal. Sun, 12/1, 7pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

3TUESDAY

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

know and win prizes. Tue, 12/3, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

4WEDNESDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 12/4, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

DANCE NIGHT: Four lady DJs with large vinyl collections select a fresh slice of wax every Wednesday for your boogie pleasure. Wed, 12/4, 10pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

EMMA GARRAHY & WILL HARTMAN: Local duo performs covers of popular songs and a few originals from a wide range of genres. Wed, 12/4, 6pm. The Allies Pub, 426 Broadway, Ste. 130.

JAM SESSION: Informal night of improvised music. All musicians and genres are welcome. House band until 8, open jam after. Wed, 12/4, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

MONTHLY OPEN MIC: Blackbird’s firstWednesday open mic. All welcome. Signups start at 5:30pm. Wed, 12/4, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

OPEN MIC: Come on down and strut your stuff. Andan from the Channel 66 band hosts. Wed, 12/4, 7pm. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

STEVE JOHNSON: Dinnertime guitar and vocals. Wed, 12/4, 6pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

FUNK FOR THE CAUSE

Safe Space Winter Shelter provides a warm place to sleep and a hot meal for people living on the street during the coldest and wettest months of the year, and this Friday (Nov. 29), the Chico Women’s Club hosts the fifth annual Funksgiving party to raise dough for their efforts. Smokey the Groove, Lo & Behold and Sounds Good all perform; DJ Amburgers will spin and prizes will be raffled.

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REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week Chopping Mall (1986)

It’s robots versus horny teens in a shopping mall. A late-night showing of the cult slasher flick at 10 p.m. on Black Friday (Nov. 29). Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Fungi

Can you say … beautiful? A sweet and complex story of the impact of Mr. Rogers

Awarmth, film. Whimsical, sweet, complicated and full of just like that polite guy who used to put on Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood is a beautiful

his cardigan and sneakers for his long-running children’s show on PBS. Tom Hanks plays Mr. Rogers by in this movie, and you don’t get Bob Grimm more perfect casting than the world’s most likable actor playing bg r i mm@ newsrev i ew.c om one of history’s most likable guys. (The recent reveal that Hanks is an actual sixth cousin of Rogers comes as no surprise.) Hanks plays Rogers in an honorable way. He doesn’t fully A Beautiful Day in impersonate the man so much as the Neighborhood adapt some of his mannerisms, his Starring Tom Hanks winning smile, and that slow, conand matthew rhys. cerned cadence in his voice. The marielle Heller. Cinemark 14, Feather performance stands as a terrific river Cinemas. homage. rated PG. But Fred Rogers is a supporting player (albeit a mighty important and present one) in director Marielle Heller’s heartfelt movie (based on a real-life friendship between Rogers and journalist Tom Junod). The main protagonist is Lloyd Vogel (Matthew Rhys of The Americans), a troubled journalist who grumbles upon getting an assignment to do a profile on the PBS icon—the guy with a “hokey” TV show—for Esquire magazine. Lloyd journeys to the show’s home station, WQED in Pittsburgh, Penn., to see the man in action, and Rogers instantly starts interviewing the journalist as he is being interviewed. Lloyd bristles at first, but

5

over the course of the film, the two become friends, and Rogers helps him in his dealings with his wife, Andrea (Susan Kelechi Watson), his newborn son and his dying father (a mightily good Chris Cooper). Heller brilliantly frames the film as an episode of the TV show, starting with Hanks delivering the infamous welcoming song, and then introducing Lloyd as a friend who needs help. The characters travel between different cities that are depicted like the train sets that had a presence throughout the TV show. The father-son aspect of the film wasn’t part of Junod’s 1998 article—“Can You Say … Hero?” But fictional or not, that relationship is handled heartwrenchingly well. For his part, Junod has acknowledged that the friendship on display in the film is much like the one he had with Rogers. As an adult, I have a new appreciation for Fred Rogers. He always weirded me out when I was a kid—I was more interested in being entertained by The Electric Company and Sesame Street than by the guy with the sweater. Still, I watched a lot of his shows before and after my favorites and, in retrospect, I realize that Mr. Rogers taught me more about life and my fellow human beings than any of those other children’s programs. There was a warmth to the show, a warmth that made a bullied, antisocial kid such as me a little uncomfortable. Like Llyod in the film, I eventually lightened up. I think this film will open doors in heads and hearts. It’s going to make Tom Hanks fans love him even more, even if that doesn’t seem possible. And it’s going to fortify precious memories of the sweet man who talked right to you from the TV screen, be it with his haggard puppets or through an everpresent smile. Ω

Documentary on the fungus kingdom that uses breathtaking time-lapse macro photography to illustrate a world underneath our feet that offers possible solutions to many of our most pressing environmental, therapeutic and medical issues. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

Knives Out

A star-studded black comedy from writer/ director Rian Johnson about a detective (Daniel Craig) investigating the murder of a wealthy author who winds up dead in his remote mansion soon after his dysfunctional family arrives. Also starring Jamie Lee Curtis, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon, Don Johnson, Toni Collette and Christopher Plummer. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Queen & Slim

A black couple on a date are pulled over for a minor infraction, and after the overzealous white cop escalates the situation to deadly consequences, the couple (played by Daniel Kaluuya and Jodie Turner-Smith) are forced to go on the run from authorities as their plight becomes a “symbol of trauma, terror, grief and pain for people across the country.” Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Now playing 21 Bridges

Chadwick Boseman stars as a New York detective who puts the city on lockdown in an effort to capture a couple of cop killers. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

5

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG —B.G.

Charlie’s Angels

4

CN&R

N o v e m b e r 2 7, 2 0 1 9

Queen Elsa (voiced by Idina Menzel) and her sister Princess Anna (Kristen Bell) and the rest of the gang are back on a journey beyond Arendelle in this sequel to the massively popular animated musical animated flick. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

The Good Liar

Ian McKellen stars as a lifelong conman whose plans to seduce a rich widow (Helen Mirren) and steal her fortune are complicated as he starts to fall in love with her. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Irishman

Martin Scorsese has all his heavyhitters—Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Joe Pesci—lined up for this mobster epic about hitman Frank Sheeran (De Niro) and his connection to the life and death of Jimmy Hoffa (Pacino). Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

In this sequel to Maleficent (2014), Angelina Jolie reprises her role as the evil fairy, and Elle Fanning is back as her goddaughter, Princess Aurora (aka Sleeping Beauty), and the two are at odds with one another thanks to outside forces intent on sowing discord between humans and fairies. Cinemark 14. Rated PG. A historical drama about the pivotal Battle of Midway between U.S. and Japanese forces during World War II. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Playing With Fire

It’s the ’60s, and Henry Ford II (Tracy Letts) has had it with Enzo Ferrari (Remo

John Cena, Keegan-Michael Key and John Leguizamo star as three firefighters who have their hands full rescuing/babysitting some kids and their dog. Hijinks! Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

32

Frozen 2

Midway

The 1970s TV series gets another film reboot, this one directed by Elizabeth Banks (who also plays Bosley—there’s more than one now!) and starring Kristen Stewart, Naomi Scott and Ella Balinska as the trio of detective angels. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Ford v Ferrari

Girone) and his fast, flashy cars. He and cronies such as Lee Iacocca (Jon Bernthal) and Leo Beebe (Josh Lucas) decide to send a message to the world that Ford isn’t just about family cars. The plan is to win races and appeal to a younger demographic by rolling out sporty Mustangs and the like. Enter Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon), a former race car driver turned designer and salesman. Ford hires Shelby to come up with a car that can beat Ferrari, namely at the prestigious 24 Hours of Le Mans in France. It’s a tall order, and it calls for a crazy guy behind the wheel. Ken Miles (Christian Bale) is a rule-breaking Brit who can drive, as well as provide instant feedback on what alterations need to be made to make the damn thing go faster. His lack of convention causes Ford to bristle, Shelby gets in the middle, and we have ourselves a gripping tale about racing technology, volatile friendships and corporate clashes. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent


CHOW Sign up today for Butte County’s First Ever BYOC Cannabis-Friendly Art Classes www.ButteCounty CannabisArtClub.com

Use your gourds For tasty squash varieties, think beyond butternut

Tthatsquash season. It’s the time when outdoor fruit stands previously were piled high with melons and stone he height of autumn is also the height of winter

fruits become dedicated to heaps of rock-hard orbs and saucers of all sizes, shapes and colors. by Chances are you’re most familiar with Alastair the butternut, and perhaps the acorn and Bland the spaghetti types. But these winter squashes represent just the tip of the pile, and there are dozens more that many people know little to nothing about. Many of them trump even the acclaimed butternut squash with flesh that is starchier, sweeter and sappier. But butternut squash produces bigger yields than many other types and lasts longer in storage, making it a good choice for farmers, according to Thaddeus Barsotti, squash savant and co-owner of Capay Organic, a northern California farm. Barsotti says this is a main reason the butternut has come to dominate the market, leaving other winter squashes—such as the delicata, the buttercup and the sweet dumpling—on the fringe. In fact, all winter squashes, which fall into the genus Cucurbita and once were a key dietary staple in Mesoamerica, have mostly vanished from Americans’ cultural pantry. For a prospective shopper, the tough rind on many squashes can be an immediate deterrent to bringing one of the big, clunky things home. The relatively long cook time can also be a turnoff. The irony is, few kitchen tasks could be easier than putting a squash into a hot oven. What’s more, baked winter squash is awesome. While more ambitious chefs may blend butternut or kabocha squash into soup, simmer it in coconut milk curries, or puree and drizzle it like sauce over pasta, the simplest prep method is hard to beat. “Baking them is just the best way,” says Barsotti, whose favorite winter squash is the delicata. “You get the real taste of the squash. I like a good butternut squash soup, but what you’re really tasting is the cream and the salt and that other stuff.” Whatever kind of winter squash you’re cooking, Barsotti suggests slicing it in two, scooping out the seeds, and baking the halves for about 40 minutes at 400 to 425 degrees. It doesn’t hurt to oil and salt them first, but it’s by no

means necessary. With that in mind, the following are seven of the best winter squashes likely appearing at markets near you. Look closely—they’re likely hiding just behind the butternut heap. Kabocha: A tried and true champion among squash, it has green mottled skin and sweet flesh that, when cooked, is usually thick and a bit sticky, with a texture like chestnut and a faint essence of pumpkin. Sunshine Kabocha (aka Japanese Orange Pumpkin): If you thought kabochas were good, then you’ll love this close cousin cultivar. Saucer shaped like its counterpart but fiery orange on the outside, the sunshine kabocha has silky orange flesh that is softer than the green kabocha’s. Delicata: This beauty looks like some sort of heirloom cucumber, with its lengthy shape and the yellow lateral ribs that run its length. Baked whole, it can be served much like a baked potato. The flesh is yellowish with a sweet flavor lingering somewhere between that of zucchini and sweet potatoes. Buttercup: The distinguishing mark of this froggreen squash is a peculiar bulge on its rump. Other than that, the buttercup can easily fool one into thinking they’re buying a kabocha. It doesn’t matter. As a close relative, it cooks up much the same, the thick walls of golden meat melting in the oven as sappy juice oozes over the baking pan. Jarrahdale: The bluish-gray skin of this Australianborn cultivar is deceptive. For inside the dull colored rind is gleaming orange flesh that comes out of the oven exceptionally soft and creamy with a grainy tasting finish. The remarkable smoothness of the meat makes the Jarrahdale a suitable, and probably more flavorful, stand-in for mashed potatoes. Red Kuri (aka Red Hokkaido): Brilliant red and festively shaped like a joker’s hat. The meat is rich, syrupy and soft, with some of the fibrous texture and juicy consistency of a pumpkin. Sweet Dumpling: The apple-size sweet dumpling is one of the smallest of the winter squashes. The meat is moist and tender, light in color, and with an exceptional flavor of creamed corn. Its size and shape make it an ideal vessel to stuff with savory goodies and plate as an individual portion. □ N o v e m b e r 2 7, 2 0 1 9

CN&R

33


ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

GUITAR ROCK IS NOT DEAD Black Midi is a genre of electronic music that features computer-assisted compositions made up of so many notes—millions, literally—that when the songs are expressed as notation, the entire sheet of music is blacked out. You have to look it up on YouTube to understand; without visuals, you’ll never get a sense of it. The fact that English rock group Black Midi took its name from something that is a challenge to wrap your head around is fitting. As with its namesake, the band has to be experienced to be understood. Arts DEVO bore witness to the much-hyped four-piece last Thursday (Nov. 21), during an exhilarating performance at the Rickshaw Stop in San Francisco, and though it’s tempting to say, “You had to be there,” I’ll try and do better than that. The four dudes in Black Midi have been out of high school for only a couple of years. Yet even before the band’s debut album, Schlagenheim, was released this past summer, they’d earned breathless praise from the English press on the intensity of their live shows and a handful of internet videos—especially a weird and intriguing set that Seattle radio station KEXP posted to YouTube. The incongruous footage features what appears to be four teenagers cooly melting the Black Midi at Rickshaw Stop faces off an audience at an Icelandic PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY hostel with mathy, noisy art rock. That was my introduction, and I was hooked on the impressive blending of elements from many genres—experimental noise, jazz, math rock, prog, worldbeat, Kraut rock, metal, funk, punk—into something uniquely driving and complex, yet not overstuffed or showy. Last week’s show was the band’s first in San Francisco on what is its first U.S. tour, and tickets that originally sold for $15 were posted on resale sites for $70-plus. Black Midi immediately lived up to the hype as it kicked down the doors with the album opener, “953,” a hard-charging rocker that presented the band’s bona fides. It started with a dizzying and distorted odd-timed guitar progression that immediately whipped the crowd into a frenzy and showed off drummer Morgan Simpson’s otherworldly chops with his ability to thicken/intensify an already impressive noise to the point that it felt like the building might come down. Damn impressive. Mid-set jam “Ducter” was the most memorable. Built at first on two insistent riffs from guitarists Geordie Greep and Matt Kwasniewski-Kelvin, before being joined by bassist Cameron Picton’s own loop, the song wound up the tension thanks to a frenetic groove that appeared to trip over itself as Simpson purposefully dropped and added beats. After a sudden quiet release, the room was overwhelmed by impressive guitar noise in many shifting forms—fuzzed-out marches, storms of feedback, and overdriven treatments of the core riffs. No matter the level of chaos or the abrupt shifts in dynamics, the band— especially Picton and the intense-looking Greep—appeared unfazed. The contrast was striking, and it brought to mind a line regarding Hannibal Lecter in the movie Silence of the Lambs: “His pulse never got above 85, even when he ate her tongue.” Despite the fact that the band members aren’t old enough to drink in the U.S., they seem to already have full confidence in their vision. Or maybe they’ve been coached on their presentation and on how making a memorable first impression can transform hype into mystique. If the latter, it worked. The only bummer of the night was that Black Midi wasn’t able to finish its full set. A blown amplifier put a halt to the proceedings. After which the band just simply walked off the stage. It was the perfect move. 34

CN&R

N O V E M B E R 2 7, 2 0 1 9


REAL ESTATE

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Homes Sold Last Week

5 acres with a home and studio $299,000 Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of November 11 - November 15, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

155 Spanish Garden Dr 3513 Shadowtree Ln 3273 Tinker Creek Way 1350 Salem St 1060 Gateway Ln 1046 Sir William Ct 1278 Whitewood Way 43 Forest Creek Cir 8 Trinity Ln 2134 Kennedy Ave 2 Springbrook Ct 133 Delaney Dr 2890 Carlene Pl 60 Artesia Dr 27 Lawnwood Dr 21 Forest Creek Cir 60 Casa Del Rey Ct 710 W Lindo Ave 45 Garden Park Dr 1076 Viceroy Dr 1874 Bedford Dr 2395 Alba Ave

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$750,000 $520,000 $501,000 $450,000 $425,000 $415,000 $409,000 $405,000 $385,000 $382,000 $380,000 $379,000 $366,000 $350,000 $340,000 $337,000 $335,000 $333,500 $319,000 $310,000 $305,000 $302,500

4/2 2/2 4/2 4/3 4/2 4/3 4/3 3/3 4/2 3/2 4/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 4/1 3/2 3/1 3/2 3/1 3/1 3/1

SQ. FT.

2642 2894 2056 1663 2329 1950 1606 1460 1598 1904 1424 1506 1472 1358 1200 1813 1760 1652 1236 1126 1320 1292

ADDRESS

3 Coolwater Cmns 1268 Ravenshoe Way 1520 Laurel St 1513 Warner St 1826 Laurel St 106 W 11th Ave 5555 Market St 1372 Filbert Ave 1192 Stanley Ave 790 Eastwood Ave 4680 Foothill Blvd 36 Executive Ave 123 Casey Ct 6 Rockridge Rd 33 Highlands Blvd 2910 Foothill Blvd 189 Skyline Blvd 46 Skyline Blvd 42 Linda Dr 1372 14th St 3461 Ashley Ave 5318 Treasure Hill Dr

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville

$300,000 $295,000 $286,000 $280,000 $255,000 $235,500 $225,000 $175,000 $153,000 $146,500 $515,000 $310,000 $289,000 $286,000 $270,000 $265,000 $260,000 $256,500 $250,000 $240,000 $225,000 $196,000

2/2 3/2 2/2 2/1 2/3 2/2 2/2 3/1 3/2 3/1 4/2 2/2 6/2 3/2 3/1 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/1 3/2 3/3 2/2

November 27, 2019

SQ. FT.

1300 1285 1192 784 825 840 812 1439 1630 1464 2160 1398 1872 1523 1560 2291 1622 1618 1223 1150 1199 1440

CN&R

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRANA ENDURA at 40 Constitution Dr Ste E Chico, CA 95973. CAITLIN LINSCHEID 4 Spinnaker Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAITLIN LINSCHEID Dated: October 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001233 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name WADE ARENA at 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. ELTA L TOWNE 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. CARYL WESTON 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ELTA L TOWNE Dated: October 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001174 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WADE ARENA at 1391 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. ROBERT J LEDOUX 1963 Air Strip Rd Redding, CA 96003. ELTA L TOWNE 1391 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ELTA L TOWNE Dated: October 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001228 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO PODIATRY GROUP at 2103 Forest Avenue Chico, CA 95928. this Legal Notice continues

DANIEL D CAVINESS 3491 Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL L WILSON 9965 Lott Rd Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DANIEL D CAVINESS, DPM Dated: October 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001182 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as K-C NAILS AND SPA at 175 Cohasset Rd #3 Chico, CA 95926. THUY THANH HO 1170 E 9th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THANH T. HO Dated: November 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001258 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ONCE UPON A CHILD at 801 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MELLON 537 Madrone Ave Chico, CA 95926. JESSICA PECK 14 Comstock Rd Chico, CA 95928. PAUL PECK 14 Comstock Rd Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MELLON 537 Madrone Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JESSICA PECK, PRESIDENT Dated: September 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001099 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name PRANA ENDURA at 40 Constitution Drive Suite E Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER L MILLER CMT 2114 Kennedy Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER L MILLER Dated: October 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0001428 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as JENNY’S HELPERS at 1 Smith Brothers Court Chico, CA 95926. MARK ROGER HARSHMAN 1 Smith Brothers Court Chico, CA 95926. TINA MARIE HARSHMAN 1 Smith Brothers Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: TINA HARSHMAN Dated: November 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001254 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AWAY BUSINESS at 2990 Nord Ave Chico, CA 95973. ROBERT MATTHEW OW 2990 Nord Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT OW Dated: November 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001267 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FEGUSON TIMELESS TREASURES at 1280 E 9th St Ste C Chico, CA 95928. KATHLEEN ANN FERGUSON 1998 Potter Rd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHY FERGUSON Dated: October 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001240 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIBRENEW CHICO at 1651 Albion Ct Chico, CA 95973. REBEW INC 1651 Albion Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOSEPH WEBER, PRESIDENT Dated: November 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001291 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BURRITO BARAJAS at 1013 W First St Chico, CA 95928. KRISTIAN JANET LOPEZ 1975 Bruce Rd #209 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTIAN LOPEZ Dated: November 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001284 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CORINTHIAN STERLING SILVER JEWELRY at 1235 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. JANE ANN JOHNSON 1235 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. NATALIE JOHNSON 1235 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JANE JOHNSON Dated: November 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001261 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PRESTA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 1900 Oro Dam Blvd E Ste this Legal Notice continues

12-139 Oroville, CA 95966. PRESTA FINANCIAL LLC 1900 Oro Dam Blvd E Ste 12-139 Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Limitied Liability Company. Signed: EFREN ROBINSON, MEMBER Dated: October 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001234 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GREAT CLIPS at 738 Mangrove Ave. Chico, CA 95926. HOPPIN SHEARS, INC. 4650 Northgate Blvd Ste 100 Sacramento, CA 95834. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHAEL WAGNER, CFO Dated: October 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001139 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KAFTANESE, MAHARAJA ME at 892 Naomi Ave Chico, CA 95926. AARON SAUBERAN 892 Naomi Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AARON SAUBERAN Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001208 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SCRY SOLUTIONS at 1066 E 8th St Chico, CA 95928. MATTHEW KELLER 1068 E 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATT KELLER Dated: November 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001303 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as K CUSTOM CLOTHIER at 1132 Arbutus Ave Chico, CA 95926. GEORGE KNOX 1132 Arbutus Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GEORGE KNOX Dated: November 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001304 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADVANCED PIPE AND LEAK DETECTION at 325 Southbury Lane Chico, CA 95973. ROAN FAMILY COMPANIES INCORPORATED 325 Southbury Lane Chico, CA 95973 This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CASSIE ROAN, PRESIDENT Dated: October 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001198 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TINAS MINI MART #2 at 1631 Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. TEIG CHICO OIL INC 1248 Franklin Ave Yuba City, CA 95991. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: FARIA ALI, MANAGER Dated: October 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001218 Published: November 27, December 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE HUMAN BEAN - CHICO at 2805 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. EDWARD BOOTH 2558 White Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EDWARD BOOTH Dated: November 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001277 Published: November 27, December 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LONGFELLOW EXPRESS LAUNDRY at 1383 Longfellow Ave Chico, CAL 95926. KIEFER NELSON 1053 Palmetto Ave Chico, CA 95926. ROBERT ZAVALA 1053 Palmetto Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ROBERT ZAVALA Dated: September 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001085 Published: November 27, December 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PHOENIX PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 1385 Ridgewood Dr Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. THOMAS K LEDGERWOOD 1385 Ridgewood Dr Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THOMAS LEDGERWOOD Dated: September 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001104 Published: November 27, December 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COTTONPARTY at 337 Broadway St Chico, CA 95928. ANGELA REBEKAH YOUNGBLOOD 1835 Broadway St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANGELA REBEKAH YOUNGBLOOD Dated: November 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001312 Published: November 27, December 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A TRANQUIL NEST at this Legal Notice continues


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY 1470 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN K ROBINSON 1470 Vallombrosa Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHLEEN K. ROBINSON Dated: November 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001297 Published: November 27, December 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name COTTONPARTY at 337 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. KAREN DENISE LANGEN 476 East 1st Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAREN LANGEN Dated: November 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000195 Published: November 27, December 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PROTECH, PROTECTION CONSULTANTS at 3199 Plummers Drive #4 Chico, CA 95973. SCOTT CRAGER 3199 Plummers Drive #4 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT CRAGER Dated: November 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001327 Published: November 27, December 5,12,19, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ADRIANA YANETH GONZALEZ and JOSE DE JESUS GONZALEZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JESSEY JACOBO GONZALEZ Proposed name: JESSEY GONZALEZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 17, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03037

this Legal Notice continues

Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LARRY THIEM STEVENS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LARRY THIEM STEVENS Proposed name: LARRY THIEM CLARK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: November 1, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03258 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MA DE LA LUZ PADILLA CAMPOS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MA DE LA LUZ PADILLA CAMPOS Proposed name: MARIA DE LA LUZ GALLEGOS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: November 15, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03345 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner WILLIAM MORGAN filed a petition with this this Legal Notice continues

court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: HUNTER LEE BELANGER Proposed name: HUNTER LEE BELANGER-MORGAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01178 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KAREN R. TRAVERS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KAREN RENEE TRAVERS Proposed name: KAREN RENEE HALLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: November 6, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03278 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner THOMAS EDWIN HAMILTON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: THOMAS EDWIN HAMILTON Proposed name: THOMAS EDWIN VIERRA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to this Legal Notice continues

show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: November 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03279 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LAUREL SAMSON CLARK filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LAUREL SAMSON CLARK ILIA SIDHE CLARK DOMINIC HOWARD CLARK Proposed name: LAUREL SUZANNE SAMSON ILIA SIDHE MARGARET SAMPSON DOMINIC BAY EARL SAMSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 15, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: November 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03384 Published: November 27, December 5,12,19, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE KENI M. TITMUS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KENI M. TITMUS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BUTTE COUNTY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate

requests that: BUTTE COUNTY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: BUTTE COUNTY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR PO Box 1649 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 538-3721 Dated: October 30, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00498 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE KAY F. HILL aka KAY FRANCES HILL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: this Legal Notice continues

CLaSSIfIEdS this Legal Notice continues

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For the week oF November 27, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Humans

invented the plow in 4,500 B.C., the wheel in 4,000 B.C. and writing in 3,400 B.C. But long before that, by 6,000 B.C., they had learned how to brew beer and make psychoactive drugs from plants. Psychopharmacologist Ronald Siegel points to this evidence to support his hypothesis that the yearning to transform our normal waking consciousness is a basic drive akin to our need to eat and drink. Of course, there are many ways to accomplish this shift besides alcohol and drugs. They include dancing, singing, praying, drumming, meditating and having sex. What are your favorite modes? According to my astrological analysis, it’ll be extra important for you to alter your habitual perceptions and thinking patterns during the coming weeks.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What’s

something you’re afraid of, but pretty confident you could become unafraid of? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to dismantle or dissolve that fear. Your levels of courage will be higher than usual, and your imagination will be unusually ingenious in devising methods and actions to free you of the unnecessary burden. Step one: Formulate an image or scene that symbolizes the dread, and visualize yourself blowing it up with a “bomb” made of a hundred roses.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The word

“enantiodromia” refers to a phenomenon that occurs when a vivid form of expression turns into its opposite, often in dramatic fashion. Yang becomes yin; resistance transforms into welcome; loss morphs into gain. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you are the sign of the zodiac that’s most likely to experience enantiodromia in the coming weeks. Will it be a good thing or a bad thing? You can have a lot of influence over how that question resolves. For best results, don’t fear or demonize contradictions and paradoxes. Love and embrace them.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): There are

Americans who speak only one language, English, and yet imagine they are smarter than bilingual immigrants. That fact amazes me, and inspires me to advise me and all my fellow Cancerians to engage in humble reflection about how we judge our fellow humans. Now is a favorable time for us to take inventory of any inclinations we might have to regard ourselves as superior to others; to question why we might imagine others aren’t as worthy of love and respect as we are; or to be skeptical of any tendency we might have to dismiss and devalue those who don’t act and think as we do. I’m not saying we Cancerians are more guilty of these sins than everyone else; I’m merely letting you know that the coming weeks are our special time to make corrections.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Erotic love is one of

the highest forms of contemplation,” wrote the sensually wise poet Kenneth Rexroth. That’s a provocative and profitable inspiration for you to tap into. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’re in the Season of Lucky Plucky Delight, when brave love can save you from wrong turns and irrelevant ideas and when the grandeur of amour can be your teacher and catalyst. If you have a partner with whom you can conduct these educational experiments, wonderful. If you don’t, be extra sweet and intimate with yourself.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the follow-up story to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, our heroine uses a magic mirror as a portal into a fantastical land. There she encounters the Red Queen, and soon the two of them are holding hands as they run as fast as they can. Alice notices that despite their great effort, they don’t seem to be moving forward. What’s happening? The Queen clears up the mystery: In her realm, you must run as hard as possible just to remain in the same spot. Sound familiar? I’m wondering whether you’ve had a similar experience lately. If so, here’s my advice: Stop running. Sit back, relax and allow the world to zoom by you. Yes, you might temporarily

by rob brezsNy fall behind. But in the meantime, you’ll get fully recharged. No more than three weeks from now, you’ll be so energized that you’ll make up for all the lost time—and more.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Most sane

people wish there could be less animosity between groups that have different beliefs and interests. How much better the world would be if everyone felt a generous acceptance toward those who are unlike them. But the problem goes even deeper: Most of us are at odds with ourselves. Here’s how author Rebecca West described it: Even the different parts of the same person do not often converse among themselves, do not succeed in learning from each other. That’s the bad news. The good news is that the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to promote unity and harmony among all the various parts of yourself. I urge you to entice them to enter into earnest conversations with each other!

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Poet Cecilia

Woloch asks, “How to un-want what the body has wanted, explain how the flesh in its wisdom was wrong?” Did the apparent error occur because of some “some ghost in the mind?” she adds. Was it due to “some blue chemical rushing the blood” or “some demon or god?” I’m sure that you, like most of us, have experienced this mystery. But the good news is that in the coming weeks you will have the power to un-want inappropriate or unhealthy experiences that your body has wanted. Step one: Have a talk with yourself about why the thing your body has wanted isn’t in alignment with your highest good.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Sagittarian composer Ludwig van Beethoven was inclined to get deeply absorbed in his work. Even when he took time to attend to the details of daily necessity, he allowed himself to be spontaneously responsive to compelling musical inspirations that suddenly welled up in him. On more than a few occasions, he lathered his face with the 19th century equivalent of shaving cream, then got waylaid by a burst of brilliance and forgot to actually shave. His servants found that amusing. I suspect that the coming weeks may be Beethoven-like for you. I bet you’ll be surprised by worthy fascinations and subject to impromptu illuminations.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

During the next 11 months, you could initiate fundamental improvements in the way you live from day to day. It’s conceivable you’ll discover or generate innovations that permanently raise your life’s possibilities to a higher octave. At the risk of sounding grandiose, I’m tempted to predict that you’ll celebrate at least one improvement that is your personal equivalent of the invention of the wheel or the compass or the calendar.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The only

thing we learn from history is that we never learn anything from history. Philosopher Georg Hegel said that. But I think you will have an excellent chance to disprove this theory in the coming months. I suspect you will be inclined and motivated to study your own past in detail; you’ll be skilled at drawing useful lessons from it; and you will apply those lessons with wise panache as you reroute your destiny.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In his own

time, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) was acclaimed and beloved. At the height of his fame, he earned $3,000 per poem. But modern literary critics think that most of what he created is derivative, sentimental and unworthy of serious appreciation. In dramatic contrast is poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886). Her writing was virtually unknown in her lifetime, but is now regarded as among the best ever. In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to sort through your own past so as to determine which of your work, like Longfellow’s, should be archived as unimportant or irrelevant, and which, like Dickinson’s, deserves to be a continuing inspiration as you glide into the future.

➡ www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. November 27, 2019

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KAY F. HILL aka KAY FRANCES HILL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DEAN J. HILL, JR. in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DEAN J. HILL, JR. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC PO Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: November 6, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00509 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE MARGARET L. KAISER, also known as MARGARET LUCY KAISER, MARGARET KAISER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARGARET L. KAISER, MARGARET LUCY KAISER, this Legal Notice continues

MARGARET KAISER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MATTHEW M. ESTRADA, CARISA R. ESTRADA in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MATTHEW M. ESTRADA, CARISA R. ESTRADA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: November 5, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00506 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RONALD J. ZACH, also known as RONALD JOSEPH ZACH To all heirs, beneficiaries, this Legal Notice continues

creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RONALD J. ZACH, also known as RONALD JOSEPH ZACH A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARILYN K. ZACH in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARILYN K. ZACH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: November 5, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00507 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE HEIDI D. LEONE, also known as HEIDI DRAKE LEONE, HEIDI LEONE To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: HEIDI D. LEONE, also known as HEIDI DRAKE LEONE, HEIDI LEONE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SAVARA H. ABOUZEID in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SAVARA H. ABOUZEID be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: October 31, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00499 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SALLY LEE GAMBOA, aka, SALLY L. GAMBOA, aka SALLY GAMBOA To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SALLY LEE GAMBOA, aka SALLY L. GAMBOA, aka SALLY GAMBOA A Petition for Probate has been filed by: ANTHONY GAMBOA in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: ANTHONY GAMBOA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 17, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 877-4961 Dated: November 19, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00525 Published: November 27, December 5,12, 2019


November 27, 2019

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