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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 13 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

FACING HUNGER in California

Why college students, seniors and immigrants miss out on food stamps BY JACKIE BOTTS AND FELICIA MELLO

8 DISASTER PROTECTIONS 12 SYRINGE SCRUTINY

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INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 13 • November 21, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultant Brian Corbit Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Jennifer Jenkins, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Allen Pierleoni, Thea Rood, Anne Stokes N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Julia Ballantyne, Greta Beekhuis, Chris Cohen, Joseph Engle, Laura Golino, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Art of Information Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN.

NOVEMBER 21, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Talk is cheap, councilwoman “Trust the experts.”

That’s our advice of the week, and it goes out to Chico City Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds. At issue is Reynolds’ criticism of the Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition (NVHRC), the local group helping opioid addicts who’ve fallen through the cracks. We’re not talking about the soccer moms who got hooked on Vicodin—after, say, a surgery—but have health insurance to pay for expensive treatment. We’re talking about poor folks who in many cases live on the streets and have little to no support to pull themselves out of the depths of dependence. NVHRC volunteers have been helping these people via state-approved giveaways of Narcan—a drug that reverses the effects of opioid overdose— and a new program in which injection-drug users are given clean syringes. Like this newspaper, they believe that all humans—irrespective of social status—deserve the opportunity to change their lives. Reynolds maintains the group’s syringe access program is “enabling.” That’s part of the missive she posted as a public official on social media, along with a photo of the pop-up tent NVHRC uses during its weekly outreach at a local greenway (see Healthlines, page 12). In an interview with the CN&R, the freshman

councilwoman said she’d like to see people get treatment. “Let’s deal with the root of the problem,” she said, positing that addicts have issues stemming from childhood trauma. We agree with Reynolds on the importance of addressing core needs, but talk is cheap. Frankly, what she posted online is ignorant and divisive. For one thing, NVHRC is working to accomplish the very things Reynolds says are needed. Reaching out to and earning the trust of addicts is a proven way to get them connected with resources to battle dependency. That was just one of the takeaways from the Butte County Public Health representatives, including the county’s public health officer, a medical doctor, who last month at the City Council’s regular meeting gave a presentation on the merits of such programs. Among other things, they cited data showing syringe programs do not increase drug use or crime. They unequivocally recommended one for our community. Reynolds was there—presumably listening, although it certainly doesn’t appear that way. So, what exactly is she accomplishing by spewing misinformation? Playing to her base, it seems, and riling up those who didn’t hear from the experts. What a disappointment. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Join the conversation on new election system Iby-district changes in Chico politics—the switch from at-large to City Council elections—occurred under the t’s unfortunate that one of the most momentous

duress of a threatened lawsuit. It didn’t have to be that way. Four years ago, Ken Fleming and I, on behalf of the group Districts for Chico, warned council members that the city was vulnerable to a lawsuit charging that it was out of compliance with the California Voting Rights Act. Cities up and down the state with at-large systems had been given a choice: either switch to district elecby tions or face a lawsuit. Several chose Robert Speer the latter option. All that did lost in The author, a former court and were forced to pay millions CN&R editor, is a founding member of of dollars in attorney fees. In October, the city received two Districts for Chico. “demand letters” from attorneys threatening to sue it for being out of compliance and giving it 30 days to decide whether it intended to switch

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election systems or fight the inevitable lawsuit if it chose not to switch. At a special meeting on Nov. 12, amid much grumbling and gnashing of teeth, council members wisely sucked it up and voted to make the switch. (See “About-face,” Newslines, Nov. 14.) They now have about 90 days to implement a new voting system. There’s a lot of work to do in those 90 days, a lot of questions to answer. How many districts will be created—five, seven (the current number) or nine? Will council members continue to select the mayor every two years, or will the mayor be elected separately on an at-large basis? The city has hired a demographer to help with drawing the new districts. He in turn will need the help of interested citizens in locating the natural boundaries and historic neighborhoods that will make the voting districts viable. Please join Ken and me in ushering in this new system. We believe it will encourage more people to run for council and take much of the money out of the process. It’s unfortunate that we have so little time, but in the long run it will be worth the effort. Ω

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Blind eyes Americans have the attention spans of gnats. Seems most can’t be bothered to tune into the impeachment hearings. More than 80 percent of the nation reportedly watched at least part of the Watergate hearings when Richard Nixon’s presidency was on the line. Today, in the reality-TV era, roughly 4 percent have that type of intellectual curiosity. That’s a shame given the stakes—you know, just America’s constitutional democracy. Based on the testimony I’ve watched thus far, it doesn’t take long for any rational person to see that Donald Trump abused his power for personal gain at the cost of national security. But that’s really not a surprise. It’s been clear for the bulk of his term that his work in the Oval Office is part of the long con. The Ukraine imbroglio is just one small part of it. Recall how quickly his sycophants went from saying there was no quid pro quo to saying that the president could basically do whatever he wants. That’s because they know he’s guilty. In fact, that’s probably why Trump’s base isn’t tuning in. I can’t believe I’m about to write a sports analogy, but, look, nobody wants to watch their home team get its ass kicked. The question ultimately is whether the GOP-controlled Senate is willing to determine that Trump is above the law. If so, they’ll set a dangerous precedent. Thing is, they’ve had their minds made up for weeks—prior to the start of the open hearings—hence the fingers in their ears. Case in point: Sen. Lindsey Graham publicly vowed not to watch them. Congressional Republicans’ defense strategy in the hearings thus far has largely involved either easily debunked conspiracy theories or character assassination of key witnesses. Problem is, we’re talking about people with exemplary records who have spent decades in service to their country under presidents of both parties. The exception came Wednesday morning (Nov. 20) during the testimony of Gordon Sondland, a Pacific Northwest hotelier serving as Trump’s ambassador to the EU. He’s not a career service member, but rather a rich guy who bought his post via GOP fundraising. He was expected to plead the Fifth Amendment. Unfortunately for the president, that didn’t happen: “Was there a ‘quid pro quo’?” Sondland read from his opening statement. “The answer is yes.” It’ll be interesting to see how Trump spins that testimony. For advice, we can be sure that he’ll turn to his favorite mouthpiece, Fox News. Hell, an anchor at that network, the Trump administration’s unofficial state TV, actually encouraged the president to ignore the entire proceedings. That is, a purported news source told the most powerful man in the world to turn away from the process outlined in the Constitution as the way to hold corrupt members of the executive branch to account. I’m sure that message wasn’t lost on viewers. Perhaps most baffling is how Trump is able to hold the support of low- and middle-income earners when he’s so clearly not working in their interests. Income inequality is at the highest point in five decades—the point at which the federal government began tracking it. But whatever. Move along. Nothing to see here. Just your basic banana republic.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Two on the cover Re “Weapons of mass deception” (Cover story, by Daniel Walters, Nov. 14): The story by Daniel Walters provided abundant material on reliable sources of information and fact-based news. However, its jumbled data was presented in such a convoluted mish-mash style that it was hard to follow. Somewhere along the line, from Spokane to Chico, Walter’s piece deserved a serious editor. Daniel could be encouraged to follow the wisdom of heavyweight boxing champ Joe Louis: “When a man’s got something to say, he don’t need to take all day to say it.” Charles Geshekter Chico

Given Trump’s achievements and wins for Americans/others—tax, regulatory, prison, immigration,

veterans reform; historical employment and stock market highs; funding for HBCU, technical/ vocational studies, opioid crisis; rebuilding our military while decimating ISIS, sanctioning bad players, and ending endless wars; securing U.S. energy independence while lowering CO2 emissions, accelerating Superfund cleanups, and investing more money for water infrastructure (per EPA); leveling the playing field through fair trade agreements; setting historical highs in the Economic Optimism index; and much more—and the media’s 92 percent to 96 percent negative coverage of Trump for the past three years, Daniel Walters’ article lacks credibility when he blatantly ignores the abject bias and propaganda spewed daily by the mainstream media as the main driver of distortion. If actions speak louder than words, isn’t it time for the

mainstream media to give fair coverage to all the good the Trump administration is doing? John Blenkush Forest Ranch

‘Crazy antics’ Re “An easy out” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, As a Camp Fire survivor, over the last several months I have heard from others who survived the Camp Fire and relocated to Chico, too, tell me how surprised they were to find such crazy antics being played out toward certain members of the Chico City Council. For instance, the recall attempts of Karl Ory and Randall Stone from a fringe element of local Trump supporters supposedly unhappy with the results from the last election. Now I just heard they needed to collect [7,600] signatures for Councilman Ory and another [7,600] signatures for Mayor Stone LETTERS C O N T I N U E D

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to be put on a special election ballot in order to be possibly recalled. However, these unhappy individuals weren’t able to collect enough, and with the deadline looming had to admit that very few cared for their political stunt. As one person told me, “Maybe this is what we can now expect in the era of Trump.” Jim Henson Chico

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Syringe program rebuke Free needles for junkies! How cool is that? Is it as cool as junkies defecating on the creek banks? Sure, it is! And needles are small and cheap, not like porta-potties to contain the human feces of the disenfranchised homeless that have impacted our creeks for so long. Good job, city! And if you think free needles are a bad idea, try providing any kind of housing for these Lou Reed wannabes. I mean, needles are cheap! Should the city also require a place for these junkies to shoot up? A place where free-needle customers can chase the dragon, away from the prying eyes of children? Probably too expensive! I should take this opportunity to thank the city for placing the Junkies Come Here sign a block from my home, in a public park, rather than in their, um, more affluent neighborhoods. But I won’t. Randy Abbott Chico

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Editor’s note: To learn more about the syringe access program, which was approved by the state of California, see Healthlines, page 12.

Lockups and ultimatums  Two solutions to the homeless crisis in Chico and other cities: 1) Short term: Cities should put them all together in a football stadium and lock the doors. Provide food, blankets, johns and drink. They are a danger to others, they drain all the city services—police, fire, etc. They

carry diseases, they use illegal drugs, they leave needles around, they leave trash around. They are violent, they are criminals (break into houses, hurt others). They need an ultimatum! 2) Long term: If they want out of the stadium, they have to agree to 21 days at a crisis house for counseling and medication, etc. If they are amenable and complete the 21-day program, then give them the housing. If not, they stay curtailed.

treatment of the struggling, embattled Ukrainians during their time of extreme need combined the two, and thereby, in Trump’s manner of kicking human venality to the next exponent, compounded each. And he did so not with the wealth of which he so often boasts, but ours—yours and mine. Whatever the outcome in Sen. Mitch McConnell’s jaundiced Senate, history and our grandchildren will deem that indefensible. Norman Beecher Chico

Mary Nordskog Paradise

Unintended consequences  A recent law passed in California was: High schools will not start class until 8:30 in the morning. Currently, most local schools start at around 8 a.m. with the exception of late-start days. People argue that high school students do not receive the amount of sleep they need. They say that, as a result of having a later start to their school day, students will be more rested. This, however, is false and will create conflicts. Once the law comes into effect, parents of high school students who need to drop their kids off early will be affected. Late school start times mean later school end times, which will conflict with after-school and extracurricular activities that students participate in. Late high school start may have its benefits, but it has more drawbacks that are not being taken into account and need to be factored in. Maddie Hoff Chico

Impeachment impressions Amazing to watch Republicans distort reason to defend a man known to lie about everything in the face of testimony from people—war heroes, lifelong civil servants, patriots—they’ve canonized in the very recent past. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s characterization of them as “beclowning” themselves is the best summation yet. But in legal and logic terms, no one has quite captured in English the full extent of Trump’s now-proven crimes—and they are, legally, crimes, no question. You hear terms like “bribery” and “extortion,” but our president’s

‘Commander-in-Thief’  When promoting his tax cut, Trump strongly touted that it “would not benefit the wealthy.” Neatly tucked away in the final bill is a federal tax break provision intended to draw investment to lower-income areas but that instead has become a conduit for the rich to avoid paying taxes, especially those who are real estate developers. Surprise! “Opportunity zones” are real estate development areas deemed investment deserts, aka high-risk geographical areas, and a way to transfer capital gains taxation to real estate development. In reality, the tax break is being exploited to juice the profit margins on projects, like the president’s son-in-law Jared Kushner’s investment in Pier Village, which promotes itself as a “jewel on the New Jersey coast”; where one-bedroom apartments fetch $2,765 monthly rents. Kushner is one of many developers buying into about 9,000 opportunity zones across the country. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has interceded to help his friend Michael Milken, a billionaire junk bond king and felon, who wants to develop an opportunity zone that includes, among other projects, a 700-acre industrial park. A hidden gift to billionaires courtesy of our Commander-inThief. I wonder how long his base will continue to look the other way. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Write a letter tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@newsreview.com. Holiday deadline for Nov. 27 issue is noon on Monday, Nov. 25.


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“Pony,” by Ginuine, because it reminds me of an encounter in Southside Oroville that I wish I could forget.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE SIX ARRESTED FOR ID THEFT, DRUGS

Butte County Sheriff’s deputies arrested six people last Wednesday (Nov. 13) on charges of mass identity theft and drug sales. While serving a search warrant on Grover Lane in Oroville, deputies discovered heroin, methamphetamine, marijuana, forged checks, computers used to forge the checks and personal information identifying at least 50 victims, according to a press release. A subsequent investigation indicated one of the suspects, Rodney Mills, allegedly had stolen large quantities of mail from Chico, as he was found to be in the possession of multiple community mailbox keys and stolen mailbox locks. U.S. Postal law enforcement is assisting with the investigation. Mills was arrested along with Andrew Roberts, Claire Davis, Shelby Thomas, Jamin Baxmeyer and Laura Barkowski. They are being charged with a range of crimes, from possession of drugs for sale to felony forgery.

Housing and cannabis

CHICO HIKES PARKING FEES

Parking will be more expensive in certain parts of downtown Chico starting midDecember. At Tuesday’s City Council meeting (Nov. 19), the panel approved a final reading of an ordinance changing the fees. Drivers will pay $1 per hour for spaces between First and Fourth streets and Normal Avenue and Wall Street. Enforcement hours will be reduced to 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday (as opposed to starting at 7:30 a.m.). The city also will install signage to help motorists find spaces and deploy a mobile license plate recognition unit for enforcement. To complete this work, outlined in the Downtown Access Action Plan, the city hired consultant Dixon Resources Unlimited for $80,000.

MAN CHANGES PLEA IN KILLING

A 42-year-old Oroville man accused of brutally murdering an elderly woman during a burglary changed his plea as a jury was being selected for his trial earlier this week. Brian Scott Madding pleaded no contest to first-degree murder, with a burglary enhancement. He is facing a life sentence without parole for the killing of Greta Jayne Putnam, 86, on Nov. 7, 2018, District Attorney Mike Ramsey said in a press release. Madding is scheduled to be sentenced Dec. 19. Madding (pictured) broke into Putnam’s home inside a senior mobile home park in Oroville to steal money and other items to trade for illegal drugs, Ramsey said. Her caretaker discovered her body the next morning. She’d been stabbed at least five times, and attempted to fight off her attacker. Ultimately, a deep stab wound to her neck killed her. 8

CN&R

NOVEMBER 21, 2019

Council approves extension of price-gouging ordinance, kicks can on cannabis legalization

Cthatrenters, especially given the housing was lost in the Camp Fire.

hico leaders must prioritize protecting

That was one of the main messages of the dozen-plus speakers who advocated story and for the city to extend photo by its anti-price-gouging Ashiah Scharaga ordinance at the ash i a h s @ Tuesday City Council n ew srev i ew. c o m meeting (Nov. 19). The law initially was adopted shortly after the disaster, and several residents, like Addison Winslow, argued that it should stay on the books longer than the Dec. 31, 2020, sunset proposed by city staff. “For a lot of us, it means the difference between remaining in our homes in Chico and either relocating completely from the area, commuting over an hour away or living on the street,” he said. Adopted as an emergency ordinance on Nov. 16, 2018, the law prohibits rent and hotel/motel rates from increasing more than 10 percent. City Manager Mark Orme explained Tuesday that it is a cumulative cap on price increases from the original adoption date. The fallout from this disaster is far

from over, community members argued. Several council members voiced their agreement, and the extension of the ordinance passed unanimously. Mayor Randall Stone called the decision a “nobrainer.” This is the second time the council extended the law. But Winslow, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America: Chico, still chided the council for its lack of further actions to protect renters and address the “extreme insecurity people have been facing since the fire.” Other speakers said extending the ordinance is the least the council can do. Vice Mayor Alex Brown agreed, adding that the city will continue to work toward finding affordable housing solutions in its Internal Affairs Committee (IAC) and ad hoc housing committee. Councilwoman Ann Schwab said she was struck by the outpouring of testimony on the reverberations of the Camp Fire, referencing several speakers who mentioned friends in Chico who were displaced as their rentals were sold. Schwab said she’d been alerted that some tenants already had received a notice of a rent increase starting Jan. 1, when the ordinance was set to expire.

Also that night, the panel spent a long time

debating commercial cannabis legalization only to wind up voting unanimously to defer the item to its next meeting. The proposal before the council, which was unanimously recommended by the IAC— composed of Brown, the chairwoman, and Councilmen Scott Huber and Karl Ory— would allow cannabis delivery businesses and storefronts, testing laboratories, and distribution and manufacturing services. No more than four stores would be allowed within the city, based on population. This topic was the most contentious. Jessica MacKenzie, head of the Inland Cannabis Farmers Association, served on the Cannabis Advisory Committee and reminded the panel that “this should not be an emotional issue, and yet it is.” “Cannabis is here in our community. It has been forever. We just need to decide. Instead of continuing to have this conversation about whether we like it or don’t …. It’s here. How are we going to manage it as a community?” Conversely, Teri DuBose, a local businesswoman who also served on the committee, said she was part of the minority and felt that the outcome had been “set in stone” from the get-go, that the committee was


Addison Winslow says renewing the city’s antiprice-gouging ordinance is the “first order of business” when it comes to addressing the “extreme insecurity people have been facing since the [Camp] Fire.”

“just for show.” “We did give our input, but it really didn’t make a difference,” she said. Brown asked her several questions, and the pair appeared to find common ground. DuBose suggested that a presentation on the health impacts of marijuana use from health officials might be helpful, and Brown later voiced support for that in conjunction with future discussions. Schwab said she wanted to make sure there was ample time for the council and community to have questions answered and process the information regarding this significant change for the city. While the council did not provide direction that night, it was clear there was a desire to discuss a potential THC potency cap for products (an issue on which the advisory committee could not come to a consensus), and invite Butte County Public Health to make a presentation on that issue, along with other health considerations. Stone encouraged his colleagues to come prepared with specific questions based on the proposed policy: “What is it that you are concerned about? Are there remedies to some of these concerns?” The city also held its first of many public meetings centered on the process of switching from at-large to districtbased elections, a change prompted by the threat of litigation from not one but two law firms (see “About-face, Newslines, Nov. 14). This first hearing was designed to explain the severalmonths-long process for the public. As with the last council meeting, several speakers advocated for ranked-choice voting and changing the number of council seats. Assistant City Attorney Andrew Jared clarified that such a move would require changing the city charter, which can happen only by a vote of the people. The council appeared to come to a consensus that could be discussed later—the task before them, getting the districts drawn, was most pressing. Schwab asked if any consideration was given to where current council members reside when districts are created. Demographer Michael Wagaman said that incumbency can be considered, but shouldn’t be the predominant factor. As part of the process, the public is invited to create maps proposing how district lines should be drawn. More information can be found at tinyurl.com/ ChicoDistricts or by emailing district elections@chicoca.gov. Ω

Water clearer Experts say most plumbing in Camp Fire burn scar is OK, but some contamination still present

For people living in Paradise, having safe

drinking water is a big deal. After all, many residents have been told since December to avoid their taps. While the Paradise Irrigation District (PID) has tested half of its distribution lines to standing structures—and cleared 38 percent of those— home and business owners have been left to test their faucets on their own. The looming question: Is home plumbing contaminated? The answer, delivered Monday night (Nov. 18) by Gina Solomon, a clinical professor in the division of occupational and environmental medicine at UC San Francisco: Not terribly. Solomon was speaking at a PID community meeting at the Paradise Alliance Church. She explained that she’d begun her research—funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences—in September and preliminary results showed minimal contamination within standing homes. “We found almost no benzene—that’s really reassuring overall,” she said. “We did find disinfection byproducts—that’s not a surprise, that’s OK. That’s what hap-

pens when you chlorinate drinking water. But there were a few that required followup.” Solomon and her team, comprising researchers from UC Davis and the Public Health Institute, set out last month to test the water in about 10 percent of standing buildings in the burn scar. That equaled about 100 structures in the PID service area and 24 in the Del Oro Water Co. area, which includes Magalia and Paradise Pines. They cast a wide net, testing for the largest number of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that commercial laboratories can handle.

SIFT ER

PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

“We’re looking for the worst-case scenarios,” Solomon said. While benzene was found in only two samples—and at levels well below the state-mandated maximum—other chemicals were found. They included acetone, chloroform and methylene chloride. Some of those reached levels considered unsafe for drinking. Methylene chloride was found in 28 percent of the homes tested, which is notable, Solomon said. She said she was hesitant to worry about the potability of water on the Ridge, as the chemicals found can occur naturally, but said “they’re not things to be taken lightly.” The homes where those chemicals were found will be retested, she said. Water authorities were first alerted to the

Dems eye electability With the 2020 presidential election less than one year away, Democrats are prioritizing strategy over ideology. The latest Gallup survey shows that 60 percent of Democrats and Democrat-leaning Independents favor the party nominating a candidate with the best chances of beating Donald Trump, versus 36 percent who would prefer a candidate that aligns with them on most issues. With that in mind, 50 percent of those surveyed would choose a moderate Democrat for the nomination, 33 percent a liberal, and 17 percent a conservative Democrat. Here’s a rundown of which candidates Democrat voters currently think have the best chance of winning the presidential election.

Kevin Phillips, general manager of Paradise Irrigation District, updated residents on the status of the water in town—half of the lines serving standing homes have been tested; the rest is estimated to be finished by spring.

Democrat

Percent chance of beating Trump

Joe Biden................................ 51 Bernie Sanders ..................... 16 Elizabeth Warren .................. 15 Pete Buttigieg ..........................3 Andrew Yang............................2

existence of benzene in the water supply in December, after testing was done based on findings of contamination following the Tubbs Fire in Santa Rosa a year prior. In that case, benzene—a known carcinogen— was determined to have leached into the water system after plastic pipes and meters melted. The same was true for the Camp Fire, only on a much larger scale. Since December, PID has been testing its system and either declaring portions clear of contamination or replacing the pipes. Once a service lateral—the pipe that

Amy Klobuchar........................ 1 Michael Bloomberg ................. 1

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goes from the main line to customers’ meters—is cleared, homeowners get a letter letting them know their water is safe to drink, explained Kevin Phillips, PID general manager. He expects to complete testing for areas serving standing structures by next spring. Most of the concerns voiced during Monday’s meeting were focused on the timeline for testing—when will my neighborhood be cleared? It’s being done on a priority basis, with occupied homes at the top of the list, said Sami Kader, representing Waterworks Engineers. But PID is responsible only for the plumbing leading up to the water meter, which has left some residents unsure about the safety of their water inside their home. That’s where Solomon’s team came in, with backing from an emergency grant for $275,000 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. “Our aim was to test drinking water at the tap,” Solomon explained. “We’re also trying to learn some lessons that might be helpful in the case of other fires in the future.” In addition to testing standing homes and businesses to determine the extent of indoor plumbing contamination, Solomon and her team are hoping to help pinpoint the source of the contamination. While it’s believed to be linked to plastic piping, the science is still new—is it the piping itself or is it the smoke and debris that flowed through the pipes? Is there some link to galvanized pipes that would increase the chances of contamination, because PID’s service area contains more galvanized piping than Del Oro’s, and PID’s system appears to have more contamination? Those questions remain to be answered, Solomon said. The first round of samples were taken last month, with a second round taken this week. Results from those tests are expected before Christmas, Solomon said. —MEREDITH J. COOPER me re d i thc @ n ewsrev iew. com

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Power provider Butte Choice Energy Authority board takes first steps toward offering PG&E alternative

It’s possible that by 2021, ratepayers in the city

of Chico and unincorporated areas of Butte County could be paying less for their electricity while using more renewable energy. The Butte Choice Energy Authority (BCEA)—a community choice aggregation (CCA) set up between the city and county to buy electricity for residents and businesses as an alternative to PG&E—began working out the details Monday (Nov. 18) at its inaugural board meeting. The BCEA must submit an implementation plan to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) by year’s end if it wants to hit its launch target of 2021, and the board— comprising county Supervisors Debra Lucero and Doug Teeter and City Council members Alex Brown and Scott Huber—will consider the types of rate packages it wants to include in that plan. A consultant advising the board, Gary Saleba of EES Consulting Inc., said Monday that CCAs typically offer two to three options for their customers, including an option that could result in potential bill savings of roughly 2 percent. Several CCAs in PG&E’s service area offer rates that include a higher percentage of renewable energy sources at competitive or discounted price points compared with PG&E’s rates. Speaking generally, Saleba told the board it could offer a low-end option that meets or exceeds current minimum state requirements of about 33 percent renewable energy but would provide customers with the aforementioned savings, at least. A feasibility study conducted last year found local residential customers could save about $29 per year through a CCA. Small businesses could see an average of $63 in yearly savings, and large businesses could receive $469 in savings. A medium option, Saleba said, could include 50 percent renewable energy sources and result in a slight discount compared with PG&E’s rates. And a high-end option, which could include 75 percent to 100 percent renewables, could come with no savings or even a premium. Customers would choose among them. “It’s all about choice,” Saleba told the board, adding that decisions made for the implementation plan, which needs to be submitted for certification to the CPUC by Dec. 31, will follow the board’s philosophies and goals. The document, he added, provides a general outline for regulators, and it can be

modified in the future. The BCEA, a joint powers authority between the city and county, will give the local governments authority to buy electricity for residents, businesses and other users routed via PG&E’s infrastructure. PG&E would still read meters, send out bills and charge for distribution. But the bills would include the BCEA’s generation costs as a line item. PG&E also would collect the money and transfer the necessary funds back to the BCEA. Customers would be able to opt out of the BCEA and stick with PG&E as their power provider if desired. The board will undergo a surge of activity before signing off on its implementation plan, with consecutive Monday meetings Dec. 9 and 16. The first is tentatively scheduled to be held at 5:30 p.m. at the Butte County Association of Governments, 326 Huss Lane, Chico. Several board members came into the meeting

Monday with questions for the consultant. Brown, Chico’s vice mayor and co-author of the Chico Green New Deal, asked whether the BCEA would be able to provide lower rates for qualifying residents and families akin to assistance received through the California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) and Family Electric Rate Assistance (FERA) programs offered through PG&E. She also questioned how the BCEA could reach those low-income customers for informational purposes—whether it be for renewable energy education or home weatherization options. Saleba told the board it could adopt the same plans PG&E offers for low-income residents, and any additional outreach to those residents—for home weatherization or renewable energy options—could be communicated

through bill inserts and social media, among other forms of marketing. Lucero, the chairwoman, asked whether the BCEA would be able to explore purchasing power from local energy suppliers, and whether hydroelectric sources would be feasible. Saleba said pursuing local sources of energy could be made a priority if desired, and that could be included in requests for proposals that are estimated to go out sometime next year. He added that other CCAs have included hydroelectric sources in their power supply portfolios, with most of that power originating in the Pacific Northwest. Transmission infrastructure exists to get the power to Butte County, he said. The particulars of accessing hydroelectric power at Oroville Dam, however, was unclear. Saleba said more information about local power sources would be explored and brought to the board. Shawn Marshall, executive director of LEAN Energy US, a nonprofit organization that helps local governments pursue CCAs, told the board that the BCEA’s 2021 launch is tentatively scheduled in two phases. The first is expected around March 2021 and would bring the community’s commercial customers online. August is the rough timeline for residential customers. Officials said bringing the two segments online at different times could ease the financial burdens on the CCA while beginning to bring in revenue. “You’re going to find a lot of our advice comes from—keep it simple initially,” Saleba said. “It’s going to be hard enough getting set up. It’s going to be new. You’re all new. [The customers are] all new. Let’s keep the moving parts to a minimum.” —ANDRE BYIK a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m


November 21, 2019

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HEALTHLINES Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition volunteers prep for their free Sunday services in the Humboldt Avenue park, including sterile syringe distribution.

‘In a healthier place’ Syringe-access program remains controversial, despite state approval and support from local health experts story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ newsrev iew. com

ACreek through the underbrush near Little Chico on a recent Sunday, they came s Richard Muenzer and Mia Kirk walked

across a homeless man with a small dog. Muenzer said good morning and explained that he and Kirk are volunteers with the Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition (NVHRC). They were prepping for the group’s weekly gathering in Humboldt Park, which

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begins and ends with a sweep for needles. The man handed Muenzer a sharps container for used syringes he’d received from NVHRC. Nearby, other volunteers set up a harm reduction station stocked with free condoms; sharps containers; first-aid supplies, including Narcan, which reverses the effects of opioid overdose; and sterile syringes. The needles are the newest edition to NVHRC’s offerings. They also are the most controversial. Though the harm reduction group has state approval and the support of local public health officials, it still is experiencing pushback, including from prominent Chico figures, such as Police Chief Mike O’Brien and City Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds, as well as nearby residents and other community members, several of whom have stopped by to criticize the group. Program Manager Angel Gomez says volunteers have responded by attempting to educate them about the program. “I know many people are concerned that it is going to encourage or increase drug use, but the drug use already exists. All it’s doing is giving people the tools to

do it in a way that is as safe as possible,” she said. “And some of the hopes are that, if and when people are ready to enter treatment or change their usage, they will be in a healthier place to do so, and they’ll already have a trusted resource that they can reach out to.” NVHRC formed in July 2018, and has since provided free trainings for opioidoverdose response and the use of Narcan, syringe disposal and litter cleanup, and street outreach (see “A vital exchange,” Cover story, March 7). Rather than requiring sobriety for services or support, the group focuses on meeting people where they are in their addiction, with the goal of reducing harm. People have been “extremely grateful” to be able to access the services in a safe, nonjudgmental environment, Gomez told the CN&R. Many have expressed appreciation for having a place to dispose of used syringes. “That has been a challenge for them in the past,” she said. NVHRC also provides free HIV/hepatitis C testing, food, hygiene products and referrals to a variety of services, including health care, addiction treatment and housing. Research has found syringe access programs to be effective in reducing transmission of these diseases among injection drug users, as well as promoting entry and reten-

tion into drug treatment programs. This was the driver behind the California Department of Public Health’s decision last month to allow NVHRC to offer syringes. The license is valid through Oct. 14, 2021, with opportunities to renew. Locally, representatives from Butte County Public Health recommended the program, based on supporting data and given Butte County’s sharp increase in hepatitis C cases in the past five to six years, particularly among those ages 18 to 29. During a City Council meeting in October, Public Health experts cited data showing such programs do not increase drug use or crime in the areas in which they are located, and actually decrease needle-stick injuries among first responders. Local detractors, however, remain unmollified. Councilwoman Reynolds recently criticized the effort on her public Facebook page, writing, “There’s nothing compassionate about handing out free needles to drug addicts in city parks. This is enabling, not compassionate.” She also posted a photo of the pop-up tent at the greenway. In a phone interview, Reynolds, who was present for Public Health’s presentation, told the CN&R that while she finds HEALTHLINES c o N t I N u e d

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Do you know what to do if someone is choking? What about in the event of a heart attack, or an injury on the playground? Prepare yourself, just in case, this Monday (Nov. 25), 6-10:30 p.m., at the Lifeline Training Center with a basic CPR/AED and first-aid training session. Experienced professionals will teach you what to do in an emergency for people of all ages. Learn how to use a defibrillator, how to provide proper CPR and Heimlick techniques, and how to maintain a crisis situation until medical personnel arrive. Call Lifeline at 893-5254 or email at lifelinechico@gmail.com with questions and to register.


November 21, 2019

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the data about HIV and hepatitis C transmission “compelling,” she still has overriding concerns related to syringe litter and addiction treatment, especially given the region’s shortage of physicians. “Ultimately, I’d like to see them get into help and get into sobriety,” she said. “Let’s deal with the root of the problem: What’s going on in that person that they are wanting to use drugs to cover up what happened to them as a child … ?” Chief O’Brien has expressed reservations as well. He sent a letter to the California Department of Public Health’s Office of AIDS outlining his concerns, including the boundaries of operation and the model—distribution rather than a one-to-one exchange. (Public Health officials at the aforementioned meeting pointed to studies showing that exchanges limit the number of clients who turn to treatment.) In response, NVHRC worked with the state to narrow its hours of operation and the areas of service. O’Brien told the CN&R he appreciated the changes, but that he’s still uncomfortable with the boundaries since technically the

go to nvhrc.com. Syringe litter hotline: 332-8065

group is allowed to operate adjacent to Community Park. (Thus far, the group has set up only at Humboldt Park). He commended NVHRC for its litter cleanup program, and “admirable objective” to reduce the spread of disease. “I would prefer it, quite frankly, in more of a medically supervised area, like in an actual storefront,” he said. “As police chief, I’ve got to look at the entire community… at our kids. There are parks where littering of these syringes causes me concerns.” Gomez said syringe litter has been a problem for years, and that’s why cleanup is an important part of their programming. Providing services in a health clinic would reduce NVHRC’s efficacy, she said. “A lot of the people we serve are mistrusting or feel fearful of entering a health clinic. And what we try to do is bridge that gap,” she said. “By having a communitybased organization do that, it really helps people wanting to reach the services.” □

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WEEKLY DOSE Cure your cold naturally You can hear it everywhere— the coughs, the sneezes, the sniffles. Don’t let it happen to you! And if it does, stop that cold or flu in its tracks the natural way. Vitamin C is still tried and true for boosting your immune system and shortening the lifespan of a cold. The best way to get your C is by eating it, and citrus fruits, leafy greens and bell peppers are great sources. Honey has natural antiviral and antimicrobial properties, and it suppresses coughs, so put that sweet sauce in your tea or just take a spoonful. And the benefits of chicken soup are real! Hot liquids reduce mucus buildup and keep you hydrated, and chicken soup has anti-inflammatory properties. Make sure to get your probiotics, too, as they keep your gut and immune system healthy and can reduce your chance of getting sick in the first place. Source: Dr. Suhyun An (drsuhyunan.com)

November 21, 2019

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GREEN GREENWAYS

DIY safety

Landscaping with California lilac is a good choice to help strategically resist the spread of fire to your home.

officials also recommend getting a pump if you have a pool.

5. Rakes Cost: $20 and up

President Donald Trump was razzed for suggesting that Finland has fewer wildfires because of all the “raking and cleaning” Finns purportedly do in their forests. Finns were flummoxed by the remark—their fire management apparently doesn’t hinge on raking—but fire officials highly recommend it for homeowners in fire-prone neighborhoods. Clearing all dead plants, leaves and pine needles from your yard will go a long way toward removing fuel for wildfires. It’s also a good idea to get up on a ladder and pull out any vegetation that may have collected in rain gutters. Guttercleaning services will do this for a couple hundred dollars for homeowners who don’t want to do it themselves.

Six inexpensive ways to protect your home from wildfires

6. Weather stripping Cost: $10 and up

by

Adria Watson

Cexperienced normal. In the last four years, the state has 10 of the most destructive wildalifornians have all but adapted to a new

fires in its history. The Camp Fire destroyed nearly 19,000 structures and killed 85 people—the deadliest on record. And though the 2019 fire season has not been as active, the Kincade Fire in Sonoma County triggered the evacuation of some 200,000 residents. State and fire officials are adapting by changing firefighting tactics, improving emergency response plans and adding high-tech cameras, radar and infrared equipment to their arsenal of firefighting tools. But for all that the government is doing, the public needs to pitch in, because 1 in 3 homes is located in the wildland-urban interface. With an estimated 11 million residents living in high-fire-threat areas, it’s no wonder Gov. Gavin Newsom and lawmakers are demanding property owners take responsibility for fireproofing their homes. This year, the Legislature passed several bills aimed at encouraging home hardening. Among them: Assembly Bill 38 by Democratic Assemblyman Jim Woods of Santa Rosa, requiring property sellers in high-fire-threat zones to disclose fire safety improvements. Senate Bill 190 directs the state fire marshal to develop a defensible space program. That bill by Democratic Sen. Bill Dodd of Napa gives local govern16

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ments the authority to impose an abatement lien if they fail to create and maintain defensible space around their homes. So how can homeowners now help themselves? First, find out whether your home is located in a high-fire-threat area. The California Public Utilities Commission recently developed a searchable fire map to help residents determine their fire risk. If you are in a high-risk zone, Cal Fire has recommendations for hardening a home for wildfire season. Some suggestions are high-cost, such as replacing wood or shingle roofs and single-pane windows, or using ignition-resistant materials for decks, patios and fences. But if spending tens of thousands of dollars isn’t in your budget, there are still many low-cost preventive measures worth trying. Here are a cheap and effective few.

1. Fire-resistant landscaping Cost: $20 and up

French lavender, red monkey flower, sage, California fuchsia and California lilac. These are just a few of the beautiful and affordable fire-resistant plants that can be used to strategically resist the spread of fire to your home. A gardener can relandscape your yard in an afternoon for a few hundred dollars, or a family can turn it into a fun weekend do-it-yourAbout this story:

It was produced by CalMatters.org, an independent public journalism venture covering California state politics and government.

self project. An added bonus? Fire-resistant plants are usually also drought-tolerant.

2. A good pair of pruners Cost: $30 and up

Cal Fire suggests trimming trees, branches and clearing bushes around defensible spaces—areas that are usually up to 5 feet from the home. Trees should be cut regularly so that branches are a minimum of 10 feet from other trees. Remove branches that hang over a roof and keep dead branches 10 feet away from a chimney. A gardening crew can do this for a few hundred dollars, but homeowners on a budget can also do it themselves.

Just as you want to stop embers from blowing into vents, you also should block them from slipping through doorways. Pro tip: Don’t forget to install weather stripping around and under the garage door. This can be DIY, or homeowners can spend a few hundred dollars on a service. As a bonus, weather stripping also helps keep down your heating and cooling bill. □

ECO EVENT

3. Ember-resistant vents Cost: About $50 per vent

Open vents act as back doors for embers. Hours after a blaze appears to be extinguished, a smoldering wildfire fragment can ignite a new fire from inside a home. Fire officials recommend covering vent openings with an eighth- or quarter-inch metal mesh. The wire mesh should be very small and stay away from material that can melt and burn, such as fiberglass or plastic—fireproof vents are also available at your local hardware store. Again, homeowners can pay a handyman or contractor a modest fee to do this, or do it themselves.

4. Garden hoses Cost: $10-$100

Keep multiple garden hoses on your property. Make sure they are long enough to reach around the house and other structures. Fire

A season of good deeds Get your volunteering in this week by helping to clean our area parks and waterways. Volunteer Fridays, hosted by the city of Chico’s Park Division, occur every Friday at 9 a.m. Participants meet at the Caper Acres parking lot and attend to various spots throughout Bidwell Park that need litter removal and trail clearing. Call Shane at 896-7831 for more info. Reclaim Old Humboldt Wagon Road is a monthly cleanup opportunity hosted by Respect the Walls—it takes place this Saturday (Nov. 23) at 8 a.m., with meet-up on Old Humboldt Road. Go out and get your hands dirty!


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS Photo by briaNNa miNtoN

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Peddling her wares

Giving thanks, expanding downtown

Leann Powell is a mother, adventurer and entrepreneur. The longtime Chicoan is an experienced business owner, but she recently decided to switch things up by operating a pop-up clothing boutique. The vibrantly colored designs she offers are distinctive of a technique known as “reverse tie-dye.” According to Powell, there is a special process her supplier has perfected that prevents the bright colors from fading, as many of the more common home-dyed fabrics do. She gives credit to her Cambodia-based supplier for most of the merchandise—including shirts, skirts, hoodies, pants, you name it—but says that she’s also been working to create her own designs. Powell currently sets up shop at her house and she’s working on a website. By appointment only, she transforms her home into a boutique for her customers— complete with a dressing room. For more info, call 518-8883 or send The Peddler’s Closet a message on Facebook, where you also can spy Powell’s latest offerings.

What inspired you to start selling tie-dye?

moviNG iN The downtown space formerly occupied by Zucchini & Vine, at the corner of Second and Main streets, is getting a rapid facelift. I’ve spied a crew there hard at work revamping the place over the past month or so and it’s already filled to the brim—Little Red Hen Home held its grand-opening Wednesday (Nov. 20). I’m fairly obsessed with the Vintage shop across the street—and I appreciate the organization’s motto of “retail with a purpose,” as it employs and empowers kids and adults with developmental disabilities.

How did you come up with the name of your boutique?

What were you doing before you started this venture?

I wanted to keep it affordable, so I start out at about $25 and my most expensive item is $75, which is my jacket (pictured). I was trying to keep everything between $25 and $65, but a jacket this large and intricate is bound to be a bit more pricey. I’ve had people come up to me and say I could be charging a lot more, but I want to keep the prices as low as possible.

Honestly, it just kind of came to me. I’ve always liked the term “peddler,” which is basically a person who travels from town to town selling random small items. A lot of people have a misconception about the term, thinking it means drug trafficker or dealer, when really I’m aiming for the more traditional meaning.

How do you price your items?

—BRiANNA MiNtoN

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It’s hard to believe that Thanksgiving is just around the corner, but that’s how this time of year tends to go—quickly. In the spirit of the holiday, Matthew Martin over at Pyramid Farms is once again—for the 12th year in a row—donating 100 percent of his sales at the Saturday Chico Certified Farmers’ Market to a good cause. This time around, that cause is Slow Food North Valley, a local nonprofit focused on increasing food education in the community and at schools. So, if you need another reason to stock up on organic veggies this weekend (Nov. 24), this is a good one: you’ll be supporting the creation and maintenance of school gardens. Insider tip: Pyramid Farms’ carrots are famously delicious.

I found my first piece of this clothing at a small boutique and purchased another piece a year later. I wanted more and was unable to find it locally. I sought after the original creator, and I told him that I wanted to bring these amazing dyes to Chico. He was elated! He only has clothing made twice a year and … I have been fortunate enough to be one of the few to work with him here in the U.S. My husband and I own two other businesses, so he’s able to support me in this. We own a janitorial company with about 25 employees that work for us, and then we have a granite business. Between the two of those, he stays very busy. He’s like, “You’re gonna do this?” and I’m like, “Yeah, why not?”

by

Meredith J. Cooper

60% off

New eats The hottest new eatery in town, Burban Kitchen, opened this month and I made my way over there for lunch one afternoon with my friend Joan. The ambiance is what I might call modern industrial chic, with tall, sheet-metal ceilings, lots of natural light, and what appeared to be a combination of individual and communal seating choices. The bar wraps around a large, open kitchen, so you can watch chef Ann Leon and her crew do their thing. The menu is eclectic, with an emphasis on local ingredients but inspiration from around the world. I had the meat patty—an open-face burger, basically— and the seasoning was killer, as was the sauce. Joan chose the lamb sausage and couldn’t stop raving about the hummus, which mellowed out the heat of the merguez mixed in. We didn’t see the cheese plate till after lunch—it’s on the dessert menu—otherwise we’d have ordered that as a pre-meal snack. Leon did sneak us a taste of the blue cheese, Kapiti Kikorangi from New Zealand, which she paired with pecans from Table Mountain. Pure bliss. but wait, there’s more Oroville is adding to its fast-food menu this month. First, on Wednesday (Nov. 20), Chipotle opened up at 325 Oro Dam Blvd. E., in the Feather River Crossings center, with what it calls a Chipotlane. The pickup lane allows customers to order on their phones and then pick up their food at the window—it’s only the second location in California with such a feature. And just up the road, at 680 Oro Dam Blvd. E., the long-awaited KFC is scheduled to open Sunday (Nov. 24). Who’s hungry?

Look for next week’s issue of Chico News & Review on Wednesday, Nov. 27

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November 21, 2019

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Faces of modern

hunger

Why college students, seniors and immigrants miss out on food stamps

by

Jackie Botts and Felicia Mello

A

college student in Fresno who struggles with hunger has applied for food stamps three times. Another student, who is homeless in Sacramento, has applied twice. Each time, they were denied. A 61-year-old in-home caretaker in Oakland was cut off from food stamps last year when her paperwork got lost. Out of work, she can’t afford groceries. While picking up a monthly box of free food, a 62-year-old woman in San Diego told outreach workers that she won’t apply for food stamps because she worries that it might prevent her from qualifying for U.S. citizenship.

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All told, roughly 1.6 million Californians are not getting help from the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, known as CalFresh here, even though they are eligible. That means 28 percent of people with povertylevel budgets didn’t receive the food assistance they needed, according to 2017 state data. At the bookends of adulthood, college students and seniors increasingly struggle to pay their bills yet they are among the groups most likely to miss out on the food stamps they qualify for, according to interviews with more than a dozen outreach workers and state and county officials. Obstacles also face immigrants, working families and homeless people, experts said. When these categories overlap, the hurdles to obtaining food stamps are often higher. At California State University campuses in 2016, just 5 percent of students were getting food stamps even though 1 in every 4 is eligible. For seniors in California, just 19 percent get the assistance, compared with 42 percent of seniors nationally, according to 2015 data. And citizens who are immigrants are less likely to sign up than those who were born in the United States. For those living on the edge, food stamps can make a big difference: The average CalFresh household each month earns $735 and gets $272 in food stamps, which amounts to $3 per meal. A family of two qualifies with income of $16,920 per year after paying expenses such as housing and childcare. “On a human level, what that means is that we continue to allow Californians to go without food,” said Jessica Bartholow, a policy advocate at the Western Center on Law and Poverty. California’s low enrollment is not inevitable. Nine states, including neighbors Oregon

and Washington, enrolled nearly every eligible person in 2016, according to federal data, while California had the fifth lowest rate in the nation. Nearly 4.4 million Californians lack reliable access to sufficient food, including 644,300 seniors and 1,638,430 children. In a statewide survey of college students, 35 percent were food insecure. Each story of someone who loses out on food stamps provides a lesson for how county officials and state lawmakers could clear the roadblocks that prevent people from getting help. Here are some of their stories.

‘It’s like a job itself to apply’ On an empty stomach, Beverly Callupe’s brain felt hazy and slow while her English instructor reviewed possible exam questions on the memoir The Glass Castle. “I just try to write down everything and try to make sense of it after—when I’ve gotten some food,” said Callupe, 20, a Sacramento City College student. “Doing something as simple as reading just becomes so exhausting. Paying attention is really difficult. It is not the best state to go to class.” Hunger has been a constant for Callupe since June, when she left what she describes as an abusive household and became homeless overnight. Now living in a shelter, she supplements free dinners there with the cheapest foods she can find: canned soup, pancake mix, granola bars, canned peaches. She often skips lunch, and said About the authors:

Jackie Botts and Felicia Mellow are CalMatters journalists. Botts is part of The California Divide, a collaboration among newsrooms examining income inequity and economic survival in California.


she goes to bed hungry “almost every single night.” The first time Sacramento County denied Callupe’s CalFresh application, several months ago, she wasn’t sure why. The second time, a county worker told her that she needed to work more hours to qualify. That’s because federal law bars full-time students from receiving CalFresh benefits unless they meet one of several exceptions or work at least 20 hours per week—an amount that can hurt their grades and delay graduation. “I was really sad and frustrated because I was really depending on that,” said Callupe. In late October, she dropped all of her courses to focus on finding a job. She is hesitant to apply for CalFresh again because she plans to enroll as a full-time student next semester. Many students also struggle to navigate the complex rules. Ruby Sultan first learned about CalFresh in a class for her major in food science and nutrition at Fresno State University. The instructor assigned the students to live for one week on just $21 worth of food—a typi-

cal food stamp budget. To Sultan, the assignment felt like an abstract exercise. “Now it’s like my real life,” said Sultan, 26, who has since moved out of her mother’s house, become financially independent and unsuccessfully applied for CalFresh three times. Between odd jobs and teaching classes at three fitness studios, Sultan said she hardly has enough money to cover food and rent. But the aspiring dietitian refuses to let her budget diminish the quality of her diet, so she meticulously plans meals with fresh veggies, seeds and grains. Meanwhile, she holds off on other expenses, like textbooks. Apart from the $25-$30 she spends on groceries each week, she relies on free rice, beans and oranges from a food pantry, and weekly hot meals at a local church. Sultan frequently works over 20 hours a week but has struggled to prove it to Fresno County. The first time she was denied CalFresh, she couldn’t get pay stubs for one job in time. The second time, she hadn’t worked enough hours to qualify. The last time, in September, she was working enough

hours but failed to get a boss to sign a form before time ran out. Student hunger and homelessness in California is widespread. In a 2018 survey at 23 CSU campuses, more than 40 percent of students reported food insecurity while 1 in 10 said they experienced homelessness in the past year. “It really has to do with this kind of mythology about students that comes from the history of education being reserved for elite and middle-class people,” said Bartholow of the Western Center on Law and Poverty. While previous generations might have been able to rely on their parents for help with food costs, she said, many of today’s students come from families already grappling with hunger. Students who have children or receive certain other forms of aid—such as Cal Grants and federal work-study jobs—are still eligible for food stamps. In recent years, California campuses have stepped up their efforts to help students like Callupe and Sultan negotiate the CalFresh bureaucracy. Some hold fairs in which hundreds sign up en masse.

Beverly Callupe, 20, prepares lunch in a homeless shelter after an English class at Sacramento City College. Some days, she skipped lunch to save money. She recently dropped all her classes so she could focus on finding work. PHOTO BY ANNE WERNIKOFF/CALMATTERS

Sacramento County sends county workers to fairs at two area colleges—though not to Callupe’s—several times a year to help students apply on the spot, said Media Officer Janna Haynes. Fresno County has trained staff at campuses to help students apply and has clarified letters to students, said Social Service Program Manager Angela Stillwell. “The support is there if [students] have the time to seek it,” said Stillwell. But she said there’s only so much Fresno County can do to simplify the process given federal regulations. Campus outreach workers say their biggest challenge is meeting the growing demand from students who want to apply but need support. When Fresno State added a CalFresh application link to its class registration system, interest among students skyrocketed, HUNGER C O N T I N U E D NOVEMBER 21, 2019

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HUNGER c o N t i N u e d

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said Jessica Medina, who runs the school’s food security project. Nearly 400 students have applied this quarter alone, she said, compared with a total of about 200 over the previous two years. Medina estimates she’d need two to three assistants to handle the volume of questions her office receives. Right now, she has one part-time helper. One new California law might make a dent by streamlining the student application for CalFresh. Two bills pending in Congress would expand student eligibility for food stamps. A few days after her third denial, Sultan said she was too discouraged to apply again. “It’s too much time. It’s like a job itself to apply.”

‘I don’t know why they cut me off’ It’s not only students who struggle to navigate CalFresh. A year ago, Ruth Aquino, 61, received a letter from Alameda County saying that her CalFresh benefits had ended because she failed to turn in a report verifying that she was still eligible. But Aquino says she did submit the report, and left a voicemail to confirm it. “I don’t know why they cut me off when I submitted the papers. I have the receipt,” said Aquino. She had come to count on the $91 per month. Now, between jobs as an in-home caretaker after a client died, she has no income. To save money, she stopped filling prescriptions to treat her high cholesterol. In September, she learned that she could sign up for CalFresh in the lobby of her low-income senior apartment building in West Oakland. She decided it was time to apply again, no matter how frustrating her last experience had been. “Sometimes I’m looking at food that I want to buy that I cannot afford,” Aquino said. With the extra grocery money, she’d be able to buy meat with less saturated fat. She daydreamed about making a big spaghetti dish with lots of vegetables. With the help of an outreach worker from the Alameda County People pick up produce, canned goods, meat,  dairy products and bread at the River City Food  Bank in Sacramento.  photo by Jackie botts/calmatters

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Community Food Bank, it took half an hour to upload Aquino’s documents—ID, rent receipt, utility bills—and answer the application’s many questions. Days later, a county worker called Aquino for a required interview. When her application was approved about a week later, she received $194, the maximum amount per month for a single person. To veteran CalFresh outreach workers, the phenomenon of people reapplying after they accidentally fall off is called “churn.” In the first quarter of 2019, 23 percent of all new CalFresh applications statewide came from people who had received the food aid within the last 90 days. Sometimes people churn because their income temporarily rises above the limit, but more often it’s due to paperwork problems. Often people miss the deadline for their six-month status report or annual recertification, or their paperwork is deemed incomplete. It’s not uncommon that documents get lost at the county, according to outreach workers. For Sharon Johnston-Corson, 50, of Sacramento, it took losing a job to have time to deal with CalFresh. Without a computer at home, she said she and her husband had struggled to find time outside of their full-time jobs to go to a library where they could upload required documents. A month ago their CalFresh was cut off. But now that Johnston-Corson’s temporary job has ended, their family—including teenage twins—is

Gaps in participation College students

1 in 5 eligible Cal State University students got CalFresh in 2018 seniors

1 in 5 eligible seniors got CalFresh in 2015 Working poor

3 in 5 eligible people in working families got CalFresh in 2016 Source: California State University’s “Study of Student Basic Needs January 2018; Food Research & Action Center; U.S. Department of   Agriculture’s “Reaching Those in Need: Estimates of State Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation Rates in 2016” 

living on the $11 per hour her husband makes. “One thing [about] being out of work is that I do have time to get to the food bank and get all of that [CalFresh] stuff done,” she said. In California, about 61 percent of eligible working poor people participated in CalFresh in 2016, compared with 75 percent across the country, according to federal data. Incomplete applications and churn are especially common among homeless people, who often lack an address and cellphone, said Amy Dierlam, CalFresh outreach director at the River City Food Bank, a lifeline for Sacramento’s growing homeless population. Some have trouble keeping track of papers

and appointments due to disability, mental illness or addiction. While waiting for Dierlam’s help on a recent afternoon, Antonio Chaquies, a middle-aged homeless man, railed off a list of things that have gone wrong: His CalFresh card was stolen, his benefits were cut because he didn’t turn in one of his interim reports, his backpack containing personal documents was stolen, he’d missed multiple county meetings. “They just don’t get through the hoops,” Dierlam said. Her job often feels like detective work, piecing together clients’ stories with letters from the county to figure out why their CalFresh was cut. “For some, it’s life or death.”

‘This program is not for me anymore’ Nearly two decades ago, when Evangelina Castaneda’s husband passed away, food stamps helped her family make ends meet. But now the 62-year-old San Diego resident doesn’t want to depend on governmental assistance. “I have fear that I will lose my papers,” said Castaneda, who is originally from Mexico but has been a permanent resident for decades, is eligible for food stamps. “Now it’s a little scary because of the president. ... I hear about what he says sometimes in the news.” Castaneda said she usually has enough to eat, and when she doesn’t, she picks up boxes from the food bank or attends meals at a local church. Of her four adult children, she said, “They don’t know I go to these places to eat food. ... I’m not going to tell them, because they have their own families.” Castaneda’s concern has become increasingly common among immigrant communities since early 2017, said food bank outreach workers. That’s when a version was first leaked of a Trump administration rule that would make it harder for immigrants to get a green card if they were likely to use safety net benefits like food stamps or Medicaid. California and other states sued the Trump administration and federal courts blocked the rule on Oct. 11, days before it would take effect.


Student volunteer Yong jie He restocks shelves with canned goods at the UC Berkeley campus food pantry. PHOTO BY ANNE WERNIKOFF/ CALMATTERS

The court battle hasn’t made a difference on the ground. Maria Lewis, a San Diego Food Bank CalFresh outreach coordinator, estimates that she talks to about 10 people each week who worry applying for CalFresh would harm their or a family member’s green card application. Across the state, social services providers have reported that even those, like Castaneda, who would be unaffected by the federal rule increasingly are avoiding safety net programs because of uncertainty and confusion. The fear has made it harder to get CalFresh to immigrants. But the puzzle of federal eligibility requirements for non-citizens has long been difficult for county workers to explain in English, let alone in other languages. Among U.S. citizens who fall below the income limit for the program, the rate of immigrants who reported participating in CalFresh is 70 percent of that of people born in the U.S., according to 2018 California Health Interview Survey data. Counties can fight the chilling effect by ensuring that all paperwork is well-translated into locally spoken languages, said Almas Sayeed, deputy director of the California Immigrant Policy Center. She said county offices dedicated to providing immigrants with a welcoming space in Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Clara provide a model. Castaneda also didn’t want to accept food stamps because she

thought it should go to needier people, a belief common among seniors. “These programs are good, but I feel that this program is not for me anymore because I’m healthy,” said Castaneda. “I don’t want to take advantage.” Limited knowledge of the program and the intimidating amount of paperwork also are significant barriers for seniors, said Lorena Carranza, CalFresh outreach manager at the Sacramento Food Bank. One recent policy change may help educate seniors and dispel myths. Until June of this year, lowincome seniors and disabled people receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) were barred from getting CalFresh. But California lawmakers voted last year to expand the program to SSI recipients, so counties and food banks mobilized a statewide enrollment campaign. As of Oct. 1, nearly 243,000 SSI recipients had enrolled.

Lessons learned There are common themes among these tales of Californians— college students, immigrants, seniors, people working long hours and those without homes—who are not getting the food they need. Misconceptions about who’s entitled to food stamps abound. Getting and staying on the program requires a lot of time, diligent record-keeping and comfort navigating bureaucracy. Many need the support of food banks and nonprofits to guide them through the program.

Alexis Fernandez, acting chief of the California Department of Social Services CalFresh branch, said increasing participation among students, working people and seniors is a priority for the state. Some progress already has been made: The state has dropped requirements for fingerprints, a test of financial assets and a lifetime ban on people with drug-related felonies. Allowing people to apply and be approved for the program all in the same day, as Washington state has done, would greatly reduce barriers, said policy advocate Bartholow. Some California counties have moved toward this model by checking state databases rather than requiring people to track down documents, offering applications entirely over the phone and letting people do the interview on-demand. But the roll-out hasn’t been uniform across the state’s 58 counties, which each run the program separately. State leaders have clashed over how much improvement can be gained by pressuring counties to be more efficient and how much depends on the state providing more funding for workers and outreach. The stakes are high as populations that are vulnerable to hunger swell. Seniors, who are increasingly poor and immigrant, are the fastest growing age group in the state. More low-income students are attending California colleges than in the past. And homelessness is rising rapidly amid a housing affordability crisis. But closing the gap between those who need food stamps and those who aren’t getting them is doable, Bartholow said. “It’s not as complicated as being hungry and trying to go to school, or being hungry and trying to find housing, or being hungry and trying to care for your kids, or being hungry and needing to take medication with your meals,” Bartholow said. “There’s a meal with their name on it.” Ω

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Arts &Culture Art walkin’ T and I’m addicted to it. It’s a straightforward coffee drink—just

he “J-Gold” is a work of art,

espresso, hot water and a little coconut oil—and a stop for one at the Naked Lounge (it’s named in honor of the friendliest tattooist in story and town, Jeremy Golden) photos by is part of my daily Jason Cassidy routine. The oil’s j aso nc @ presence enhances the newsrev iew.c om mouthfeel more than anything else, and the key to the velvety texture is the cafe’s finishing technique of emulsifying the mixture in a blender. Simple, sublime, and a perfect complement to a casual art stroll through downtown and university art spaces—beginning with the Naked Lounge itself. The current untitled show is a collaboration between Kayce Tynan, a barista at the cafe, and collage artist/ sculptor Zak Elstein. The latter has been busy over the past year constructing his trippy shadowboxes loaded with animal skeletons for a couple of prior solo exhibits. For the new one, he works in drawings by Tynan, whose dark, detailed pieces are a natural fit behind the glass and under moody lights. While there are more ornate/ grand examples in the show (such as “Twins,” featuring a drawing of conjoined ram heads with a sword plunged through the middle and a lace border), my favorite was the body-part series: “Rat Heart,” “Rat Brain” and just plain “Uterus.” The pieces don’t depict rat body parts, but rather rats interacting with human-looking body parts—gnawing on a giant heart or brain, sleeping inside a uterus. Creepy and cool. Reception happens Thursday (Nov. 21), 6:30 p.m.

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If fall gives you sunshine, grab a coffee and take a stroll

At University Art Gallery: “Marble Rounds” by Leah Rosenberg.

form and color—the most impressive Tucked in the way back of Upper of which was the wall-filling “Marble Park Clothing’s downtown boutique is Rounds” by Leah Rosenberg. It’s the cozy Provisions Gallery, Chico’s a 4-by-10 grid of 40 solid-colored newest art space. The handsome whitesquares, with a circle mounted to each wall gallery debuted last spring with and painted with marbled patterns of the goal of showcasing paintings and the premixed colors of its background illustrations and helping the artists square. On the floor in front of the sell their work via art prints. Exhibits installation is an audience of complechange each quarter, and the newest is mentary pedestals called “Paint Pour a collection of wildlife watercolors by Blocks.” Fun! (The exhibit’s title is To local artist Sterling Wolfe (real name Vanessa Wolfe). The animal images are Freeze the Shifting Phantasmagoria, and to my mind, it and the accompanymatched with one-word qualities for titles—“Vigilant” (rabbit), “Loneliness” ing artist’s statement take the long way to say “To make art.”) (wolf), “Courage” (lion) and my favorThose were just some of the highite, the shadowy “Trust” with a coyote lights of the afternoon. I also looked emerging from the blackness. in on 3rd Story: Prints With Prose at At Chico State, the small gallery The Turner Museum (featuring print“between the stairs and the office” in inspired fiction pieces by university Ayres Hall, aka B-So Space, is where creative-writing students accompanying student works are presented throughout the artworks), as well as the nature/ the school year. Sometimes it’s group wildlife watercolors of Carol Prebleshows, more often it’s week-long exhibits for bachelor of fine arts students. Last Miles at the Upper Crust Bakery & Cafe, my last stop, perfectly timed for a week, it was the culminating BFA show post-coffee sweet treat—which took all for Benjamin Echeverria and the sign my willpower to resist. on the open door read: “Caution Broken Ω Glass.” The floor inside was indeed covered in it as part of two smashed installation pieces featuring mys“Trust,” by terious scenes with impressive Sterling Wolfe, piles of colorful shards of glass at Provisions Gallery. and ceramics—one with a table covered in empty pill bottles and another with the artist’s tools among the rubble. Next up at B-So: culminating exhibit by ceramicist Shai Porath, now showing through Friday (Nov. 22). The most immediately engaging show of my art walk was at the Jacki Headley University Art Gallery in the Arts & Humanities Building. The colorful five-artist exhibit includes a handful of intriguing large-scale works—mostly abstract studies of

THIS WEEK 21

THU

Special Events CROCHET JAM: Free ongoing rag-rug making event where participants work together on a piece of art and focus on healing, relaxing and fostering positive human connection. Presented by San Francisco-based artist Ramekon O’Arwisters. Thu, 11/21, 6pm. Free. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade.

NANCY AU: The Chico State Writer’s Voice series presents Oakland author reading from newly released collection of short stories. Thu, 11/21, 7:30pm. Free. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS 279.

NICK COLLETTI: Popular SoCal comedian is here to crack you up. Thu, 11/21, 6:30pm. $15 - $20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

RETURN TO SENDER: Sierra Nevada Spotlight Film Series presents documentary showcasing the skills, backstories and mindsets of four elite freeskiers. Thu, 11/21, 7pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

RECUERDOS DE PARADISE

Sunday, Nov. 24 Paradise Performing Arts Center SEE SUNDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE RETURN TO SENDER Tonight, Nov. 21 Sierra Nevada Big Room

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SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. MischiefCabaret.com

SUN

RECUERDOS DE PARADISE: Benefit concert for

Special Events CHRISTMAS PREVIEW: Head downtown for annual evening of carols, live music, Christmas tree lighting, food, drinks, shopping and Santa. Sun, 11/24, 4pm. Downtown Chico and City Plaza. Downtownchico.net

CLOTHING-SWAP PARTY: Drink champagne while you swap out your gently used clothing, shoes, accessories for someone else’s gear. Sun, 11/24, 2pm. Strong Again Yoga and Movement Arts, 1916 Oleander Ave.

TWEED RIDE: Oil up your bike and dust off your old-timey tweed duds for this annual fall ride. Meet at Bidwell Mansion between 10:3010:55am, ride to Five-Mile for lunch then cruise to Blackbird for socializing. Sun, 11/24, 11am. Bidwell Mansion, 525 Esplanade.

Theater

Music

BRIGHT STAR: Created by Steve Martin and Edie

DARRELL SCOTT: Nashville-based roots rock/ Americana artist returns to Chico. Fri, 11/22, 7:30pm. $35. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E.

Brickell, this original musical tells a tale of love and redemption set against the backdrop of the American South in the 1920s and ’40s. Thu, 11/21, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

LET THE RIGHT ONE IN: Enchanting, brutal vampire myth and coming-of-age love story adapted from the best-selling novel and award-winning film. Thu, 11/21, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomthe atre.com

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FRI

Special Events VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds in the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 11/22, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Third St. kzfr.org

GREEN MOUNTAIN BLUEGRASS: Happy hour with local string band. Fri, 11/22, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

SYNERGISM FALL CHORAL CONCERT: Celebrate the season with choral concert “There and Back” featuring women singing songs of travel and return. Fri, 11/22, 7pm. Free. Chico First Baptist Church, 850 Palmetto Ave.

Theater BRIGHT STAR: See Thursday. Fri, 11/22, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

FROZEN JR.: California Regional Theatre kids fall show. Fri, 11/22, 7pm. $10. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtkids.com

LET THE RIGHT ONE IN: See Thursday. Fri, 11/22, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

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SAT

Special Events CBD YOGA AND SOUND HEALING: Destress for the holidays with a hot vinyasa session

enhanced by CBD oil and sound healing. Sat 11/23, 6:30pm. $25-$30. Hatha House, 707 Wall St.

RECLAIM OLD HUMBOLDT WAGON ROAD: Monthly

Music KYLE WILLIAMS: Celebrate Christmas Preview with festive tunes by local singer/songwriter. Sun, 11/24, 4:30pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

LEANN COOLEY: Local singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist playing blues, country, rock, bluegrass and swing during brunch. Sun, 11/24, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

MISCHIEF!: Cabaret concert starring Chico ex-pat Molly Mahoney singing classic and contemporary gems with G. Scott Lacy at the piano. Sun, 11/24, 6:30pm. $25-$50.

the Paradise Performing Arts Center and the rebuilding of Norton Buffalo Hall featuring the Los Angeles Classical Guitar Quartet. Sun, 11/24, 4pm. $40. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. paradiseperformingarts.com

SUNDAY SUPERJAM: Join Chico’s best musicians at this weekly jam. Rock, blues, country, funk—anything goes. Sign up early. Sun, 11/24, 2pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater BRIGHT STAR: See Thursday. Sun, 11/24, 2pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

FROZEN JR.: See Friday. Sun, 11/24, 1pm. $10. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtkids.com

25

MON

Special Events BASIC CPR/AED AND FIRST AID TRAINING: Community class for skills necessary to recognize and provide resuscitation for all ages. Call 893-5254 with questions. Mon, 11/25, 6pm. $65-$90. Lifeline Training Center, 1074 East Ave., Ste. E.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 26

cleanup hosted by Respect the Walls. Equipment will be provided. Sat 11/23, 8am. Old Humboldt Wagon Road.

STREGA STUDIOS OPEN HOUSE: Open house and pop-up shop featuring work from Sienna Orlando-Lalaguna, Claire Fong, Night Moves and Ama Posey. Sat 11/23, 12pm. Sienna Ceramics, 2163 Fair St., Ste. B.

EDITOR’S PICK

Music

NANCY AU

Tonight, Nov. 21 Zingg Recital Hall SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

38 SPECIAL: Hold on loosely with Southern rock band from the 1970s. Sat, 11/23, 8pm. $35$65. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

O.B.E.: Relaxing brunch tunes. Sat, 11/23, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater BRIGHT STAR: See Thursday. Sat, 11/23, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

FROZEN JR.: See Friday. Sat, 11/23, 2pm and 7pm. $10. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtkids.com

LET THE RIGHT ONE IN: See Thursday. Sat, 11/23, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

EARLY DEADLINES Due to holiday scheduling, submissions for the Dec. 5 print calendar are due by Monday, Nov. 25, 9 a.m.

FA-LA-LA-LA-LA Give into the season this Sunday (Nov. 24) at the annual Christmas Preview and Tree Lighting festivities taking place in downtown Chico. The cheery shindig has been a Yuletide stand-by since 1978! Starting at 4 p.m., enjoy the sounds of caroling in the streets while merchants debut their holiday wares and offer plenty of cider and sweets. Santa will fly in for a visit and pictures with the kiddos and there will be plenty of local entertainment for the whole family. Let the bike valet park your ride and watch the lighting of the big tree in the plaza signal the start of a season of giving.

NOVEMBER 21, 2019

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FINE ARTS

To FreeZe THe SHIFTING PHANTASmAGorIA Shows through Dec. 14 Jacki Headley University Art Gallery See ArT

Art BLACKBIRD: Prisoner Art Show, group show of works by the previously or currently incarcerated. Shows through Nov. 30. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Dia de los Muertos Art & Altar Exhibition, pieces honoring the dead. Through 11/22. 450 Orange St. chicoart center.com

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Christine MacShane, paintings by local artist. The Enloe Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery shows work by artists whose lives have been touched by cancer (survivors, caretakers and healthcare givers). Through 1/24. Free. 265 Cohasset Road.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: To Freeze the Shifting Phantasmagoria, exhibit investigates diverse strategies in contemporary painting, highlighting work by California artists. Through 12/14. Chico State, ARTS 121. headleygallerycsuchico.com/

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Reflection and Hope, group exhibit reflecting the experiences of survivors and the community a year after the Camp Fire. And, Bench Press, benches by 13 artists. 900 Esplanade, monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Two Powerful Points of View, work by artists Valerie Payne and Chuck Prudhomme. Through 11/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Courage, solo exhibition by Vanessa Wolfe. Through 11/30. 122 W. Third St. (in back of Upper Park Clothing).

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November 21, 2019

RED TAVERN: Flora, Fauna and Fields, eclectic exhibit featuring paintings in oils and watercolor by Eva Farley, Candy Matthews and Dolores Mitchell. Through 1/1. Free. 1250 Esplanade.

THE TURNER: 3rd Story Prints with Prose, prints alongside Chico State students’ flash-fiction works inspired by the museum’s collection. Through 12/14. Free. Chico State. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Unbroken Traditions Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker Families in Northern California, exhibition represents the culmination of one year of research and collaboration between Mountain Maidu weavers, other tribal experts, students, faculty and curators. Through 5/15. Chico State.


MUSIC

Nov 7 thru

Jan 20 Moira Scar lost in the shadows of 1078 Gallery.

Ice

Paradise

Rink

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Burning from the inside Drama, energy and great music at 1078 Gallery

TwasonanSaturday night (Nov. 16) excellent example of both

he four-act show at 1078 Gallery

Chico’s eclectic music scene (three of the acts were homegrown) and story and the willingness of photo by the Chico Area Carey Wilson Punks booking collective (not Review: to mention the Moira Scar, host gallery) to Mercury’s embrace creativity Butterfly, Shadow of all stripes. Figures and Desperate Hell A selfSaturday, Nov. 16 described “gothic/ 1078 Gallery underground” one-person band from Orland, Mercury’s Butterfly opened the show with a dirgey set of atmospheric synthesizer-based songs highlighted by singer/composer Feywer Folevado’s dramatic vocal delivery. Standing behind his keyboards and other electronics in a cloud of fog with hair teased and frizzed to fantastic heights, Folevado brought an undeniable goth spirit to the proceedings that drew enthusiastic support from the mostly young crowd, many of whom were similarly decked out. The fairly new quartet Shadow Figures is one of the more interesting examples of Chico’s constantly

recombinant musical DNA, featuring ace Hot Flash guitarist Tom Little on keyboard, Severance Package guitarist Josh Indar on drums, punk madman Cody Kay on somewhat melodic shouting and guitar, and Elliot Lang on bass and singing backup vocals. Pre-show publicity summed up the group as “spoopy punkers from beyond,” yet live it was less “spoopy” (i.e., spooky) than a high-octane jolt of garage-rock energy reminiscent of The Stooges, The Fleshtones or The Cramps. A 30-minute rush! Upping the ante of visual and sonic weirdness, Oakland’s “postpunk freak-deathrock trio” Moira Scar took over the stage in horned headdresses and face masks. Synth player/singer LuLu Gamma Ray sported a black latex cat suit, and guitarist/saxophonist/singer Roxy Monoxide was in what might be termed Klingon casual wear, with drummer Aimee S. choosing a more utilitarian sleeveless look well-suited to her energetic task. Musically, the trio blended tight, electronically enhanced instrumental arrangements with primeval rock beats and dramatic vocals. Despite the “deathrock” descriptor, Moira Scar delivers music that is very much alive. Monoxide

created all kinds of dark dramatics thanks to a wide range of guitar effects—from harsh noise to spooky reverb and chorus-drenched atmopherics—and Gamma Ray’s synthesizer takes over the role of bass while also adding ambient sound effects. I particularly enjoyed the climactic song of their set, “NightBite,” which ended in a chaotic swirl of synths over which Monoxide blew a saxophone solo that brought to mind some of Nik Turner’s free-form blasts on early records by seminal space-rockers Hawkwind. Up last was another new Chico act, Desperate Hell, playing its second show. The “new dark punk/ deathrock” crew features members of Iver and Rogue Squadron, and the music lived up to the description. To these ears, the tightly arranged and well-played songs came off as examples of excellent pastiche but lacked the experimental creativity evidenced by the preceding acts. Howls of approval from the audience belied my personal perspective, however, and the that’s part of the beauty of live music in Chico. The impressive range of personal tastes and artistic approaches is a big part of what makes the local scene so invigorating. Ω NOVEMBER 21, 2019

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 11/21—WEDNESDAY 11/27

SOLAR ESTATES & DONALD BEAMAN Tonight, Nov. 21 Argus Bar + Patio SEE THURSDAY

SOLAR ESTATES & DONALD BEAMAN: AN evening of local indie melodies with the synth-pop band, plus darkAmericana-tinged singer/ songwriter. Thu, 11/21, 8pm. $7. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

21THURSDAY

HOARDER: DIY hardcore band from Olympia performs, local face-melters Snuff and Lyfecoach share the bill. All ages. Thu, 11/21, 8pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.

6TH STREET CD RELEASE: Performances by Jonathan Richman, October Coalition and 6th Street Center for Youth artists to celebrate release of songs and poetry by local homeless youth. Thu, 11/21, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

CHARMING DISASTER: Brooklyn-based

JULIEN KOZAK: Singer/songwriter on tour from Milwaukee. Thu, 11/21, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

NICK COLLETTI: Popular SoCal come-

folk-noir duo sing about love and death, local goth-punks The Empty Gate and classic-country band Truck Stop share the bill. Thu, 11/21, 8pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

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NOVEMBER 21, 2019

dian is here to crack you up. Thu, 11/21, 6:30pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elrey chico.com

WIZZROBE: L.A. punk shredders joined by locals 5 Mile Myth, LDF and Dead Amanda. All ages. Thu, 11/21, 7pm. $5-$7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: Happy hour tunes that

you can relax to. Fri, 11/22, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument, acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign up at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 11/22, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St. winery. Fri, 11/22, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

WILD POWWERS & PRIZM TATS: Seattle invasion with a grungy riff-rock trio and moody art-rocker. Locals Panther Surprise and Satanic Mountain Witches share the bill for one wicked night. Fri, 11/22, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

23SATURDAY

AMANDA GREY: Live music, beer and

with Styx tribute band. Fri, 11/22, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

ANDRE THIERRY: Grammy-nominated

JAYSON ANGOVE: Singer/songwriter performs. Fri, 11/22, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

The 6th Street Center for Youth has been providing local homeless and at-risk youth basic needs like showers; hot meals and employment; educational and family support for more than 10 years. You can help their efforts at Blackbird tonight (Nov. 21) at a CD release party for the center’s third compilation featuring music and poetry by local homeless youth. Enjoy live performances by friends Jonathan Richman and October Coalition (pictured), plus 6th Street youth artists. All proceeds from CD sales will go toward the program.

RETROTONES: Classic rock at the

22FRIDAY

BLUE COLLAR MEN: Come sail away

CONCERT FOR A CAUSE

food. Sat, 11/23, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

accordion soul music artist performs for late night happy hour. Sat, 11/23, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

BREAKSGIVING 2019: EDM night with a solid lineup of DJs and the BellySutra dance crew. Sat, 11/23, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

CHUCK EPPERSON: Original tunes with longtime local musician. With Bobby D. and Eric Weber. Sat,

11/23, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

DYLAN’S DHARMA: Hometown reggae/ rock band jams at The Box. Sat, 11/23, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22 JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: See Friday. Sat,

11/23, 6:30pm. Diamond

Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

MA BARKER: Classic rock, blues, pop and a little bit of country from fourman group. Sat, 11/23, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. NEIL DIAMOND NIGHT: Tribute

concert. All ages. Sat, 11/23, 6:30pm. $25-$30. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

NORTH STATE SOUL CLUB: Dance all night with DJ Byrdie spinning vintage soul on vinyl from the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s. Sat, 11/23, 9:30pm. $2. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

MAKER RADIO LAUNCH Saturday, Nov. 23 Idea Fab Labs Chico SEE SATURDAY

HA’PENNY BRIDGE: Original Celtic music by longtime local band. Sat, 11/23, 7pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

RADIO STATION LAUNCH PARTY AND FUNDRAISER: The Idea Fab Lab hosts launch/benefit for new eclectic micro-radio station— 94.5FM—with DJs and drinks. Sat, 11/23, 9pm. $16. Idea Fab Labs Chico, 603 Orange St. chico.idea fablabs.com

THE ROCKHOUNDS: Local band plays everything from hard rock to easy listening for your dancing pleasure. Sat, 11/23, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

SMELLS LIKE NIRVANA: Nirvana cover

band performs; the end is nigh. Sat, 11/23, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SOUL POSSE: Sing-along with fun five-piece cover band playing decades worth of hits. Sat, 11/23, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

24SUNDAY

ATOMIC APE: Eclectic surf-rock band from L.A., plus locals Bogart the Monster and Cat Depot Sun, 11/24, 7pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.

JOHN SEID & LARRY PETERSON: An

eclectic mix of dinner tunes. Sun, 11/24, 6pm. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St.

MISCHIEF!: Cabaret concert starring Chico ex-pat Molly Mahoney singing classic and contemporary gems with G. Scott Lacy at the piano. Sun, 11/24, 6:30pm. $25-$50. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. MischiefCabaret.com

26TUESDAY

LAST TUESDAY TRIVIA: Five random categories consisting of seven questions each, first place gets a prize. Tue, 11/26, 6:30pm. The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114.

Due to holiday scheduling, submissions for the Dec. 5 print calendar are due by Monday, Nov. 25, 9 a.m.

tunes for dinnertime. Wed, 11/27, 6pm. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd.

OPEN MIC: Come on down strut your

band hosts. Wed, 11/27, 7pm. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken word hosted by Bob the

Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 11/27, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

stuff. Andan from the Channel 66

TRIVIA NIGHT: Harry Potter-themed

trivia night. Tue, 11/26, 5:30pm. The Lab Bar and Grill, 250 Cohasset Road, Ste. 10.

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

know and win prizes. Tue, 11/26, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

27WEDNESDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 11/27, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

DANCE NIGHT: Four lady DJs with large vinyl collections select a fresh slice of wax for your boogie-ing pleasure. Wed, 11/27, 10pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

JAM SESSION: Informal night of

EARLY DEADLINES

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: Soulful songs and tasty

improvised music. All musicians and genres are welcome. House band until 8, open jam after. Wed, 11/27, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

tickets available at the door!

UNSINKABLE MOLLY

Molly Mahoney did just about everything a singer could do in Chico when she lived here: Chico State choir; leads in the opera Carmen and with the North State Symphony; regular performances at community events and clubs around town with a variety of groups (including her dad’s big band, The Skyliners); and starring in many community theater musicals. She’s now based in the Bay Area, where she’s tearing it up on theater and opera stages, and she returns to Chico this Sunday (Nov. 24), at the Chico Women’s Club, with her touring cabaret program, Mischief!, featuring accompaniment by pianist G. Scott Lacy.

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CN&R

27


REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS

Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week 21 Bridges

Chadwick Boseman stars as a New York detective who puts the city on lockdown in an effort to capture a couple of cop killers. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

A biopic based on real-life events surrounding a cynical journalist (played by Matthew Rhys) whose worldview shifts after accepting an assignment for a feature on Mr. Rogers (Tom Hanks). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Frozen 2

Queen Elsa (voiced by Idina Menzel) and her sister Princess Anna (Kristen Bell) and the rest of the gang are back for a journey beyond Arendelle in this sequel to the massively popular animated musical. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

The Irishman

Martin Scorsese has all his heavy-hitters— Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Joe Pesci—lined up for this mobster epic about hitman Frank Sheeran (De Niro) and his connection to the life and death of Jimmy Hoffa (Pacino). Limited big-screen release. Drops on Netflix Nov. 27. Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Get behind the wheel

Knives Out

A thrilling ridealong with classic racing rivalry

FFordthe vformulaic The Fast and the Furious movies, Ferrari will be a welcome change.

or those who love car films but are perhaps tired of

It’s the sixties, and Henry Ford II (Tracy Letts) has had it with Enzo Ferrari (Remo Girone) and his fast, flashy by Bob Grimm cars. He and cronies such as Lee Iacocca (Jon Bernthal) and Leo bg r i mm Beebe (Josh Lucas) decide to send @newsrev iew.c om a message to the world that Ford isn’t just about family cars. The plan is to win races and appeal to a younger demographic by rolling out sporty Mustangs and the like. Enter Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon), a former race car driver Ford v Ferrari Starring matt Damon turned designer and salesman. Ford and Christian bale. hires Shelby to come up with a car Directed by James that can beat Ferrari, namely at the mangold. Cinemark 14, prestigious 24 Hours of Le Mans Feather river Cinemas. rated PG-13. in France. It’s a tall order, and it calls for a crazy guy behind the wheel. Ken Miles (Christian Bale) is a rule-breaking Brit who can drive as well as provide instant feedback on what alterations need to be made to make the damn thing go faster. His lack of convention causes Ford to bristle, Shelby gets in the middle, and we have ourselves a gripping tale about racing technology, volatile

4

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November 21, 2019

friendships and corporate clashes. If you are coming to this film for glorious depictions of high-stakes auto racing, you will not be disappointed. Director James Mangold (Walk the Line) films in a way that makes you feel every gear shift, every hairpin turn, and every skid toward potential destruction. Damon and Bale are very good as two longtime pals who have no problem expressing themselves— even if it’s via a punch in the face—and always have each other’s backs. There’s a lot of car talk, and credit goes to writers Jez and John-Henry Butterworth and Jason Keller for teaching without boring or overwhelming non-gearheads with with too much technical talk. (I walked out of this movie knowing about hot brakes and how they affect a driver’s chances to win a race.) The final sequence at the Le Mans endurance race is a superbly conducted balance of the technical and the dramatic. This is a movie that will please racing fans, as well as those who couldn’t care less about automobiles in any setting. It also makes Vin Diesel and company look like a total posers.  Ω

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent

A star-studded black comedy from writer/ director Rian Johnson about a detective (Daniel Craig) investigating the murder of a wealthy author who winds up dead in his remote mansion soon after his dysfunctional family arrives. Also starring Jamie Lee Curtis, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon, Don Johnson, Toni Collette and Christopher Plummer. “Early access” screening Friday and Saturday (Nov. 22-23) only. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Rock ’n’ Roll High School (1979)

The Pageant celebrates the 40th anniversary of Riff Randell (P. J. Soles) and The Ramones burning down the school with two late-night showings: Friday and Saturday (Nov. 22-23), at 10 p.m. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

Now playing Charlie’s Angels

The 1970s TV series gets another film reboot, this one directed by Elizabeth Banks (who also plays Bosley—there’s more than one now!) and starring Kristen Stewart, Naomi Scott and Ella Balinska as the trio of detective angels. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

4

Ford v Ferrari

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

The Good Liar

Ian McKellen stars as a lifelong conman whose plans to seduce a rich widow (Helen Mirren) and steal her fortune are complicated as he starts to fall in love with her. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Last Christmas

Game of Thrones actress Emilia Clarke stars in this dramedy about an unlucky young woman who takes a job as a holiday

elf at a department store where she meets a young man. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

3

The Lighthouse

The setting for the sophomore film for Robert Eggers (The Witch) is a very isolated lighthouse on a mass of rock somewhere off the New England coast circa 1890. Two rather strange and sullen men are the sole occupants—Thomas Wake (Willem Dafoe), an old salt with a somewhat arcane and imperious sense of his duties and responsibilities, and Ephraim Winslow (Robert Pattinson), a new arrival who’s obliged to serve as a one-man maintenance crew within the steep and narrow confines of the eponymous lighthouse. Furiously bad weather prevails all around them, but the main action of the film concerns the indoor storms and furies of this ill-matched pair who are stuck with each other’s volatile and increasingly brutal company. A spiraling descent into disparate signs of madness ensues. Jarin Blaschke’s brilliantly gloomy black-and-white cinematography prevails, to powerful effect, as does the monstrous electronic growl of Mark Korven’s musical score. But the fast and loose play with mythology and madness in the two characters leaves everything in the film more or less stranded. Still, Eggers’ film scores points for sheer weirdness. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

In this sequel to Maleficent (2014), Angelina Jolie reprises her role as the evil fairy, and Elle Fanning is back as her goddaughter, Princess Aurora (aka Sleeping Beauty), and the two are at odds with one another thanks to outside forces intent on sowing discord between humans and fairies. Cinemark. Rated PG.

Midway

A historical drama about the pivotal Battle of Midway between U.S. and Japanese forces during World War II. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

5

Parasite

The latest prize-winning film from South Korean auteur Bong Joon-ho is a savagely farcical comedy/drama with a whiplash streak of social commentary and a few stinging touches of horror film and theater of the absurd running through it. Its central story concerns the mutual misadventures of two families, one poor and the other wealthy. The down-at-theheels members of the Kim family live in a squalid basement apartment and are mostly unemployed. They’re indifferently educated, lacking in marketable skills, and not particularly attentive to ambition or any other bourgeois values. But they do have a certain roguish flair for forgery and the role-playing of con artists, and that’s what soon brings them all into the lives of the very well-heeled Park family. An air of rowdy comedy prevails through most of this, but the harsh contrasts between poverty and wealth bode ill right from the start, and the signs that all this probably won’t end well really start to kick in when we (and the Kims) discover that there’s yet another family and yet another basement dwelling in this story and in the palatial “modernistic” house that is its main setting. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Playing With Fire

John Cena, Keegan-Michael Key and John Leguizamo star as three firefighters who have their hands full rescuing/babysitting some kids and their dog. Hijinks! Cinemark 14. Rated PG.


CHOW

Slow and low Spirit-barrelaged beers don’t have to be high in alcohol

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Abrewed Pond Farm Brewing in San Rafael. The beer, with grapefruit, offers a peculiar flavor of

notable wheat beer is now flowing from taps at

oak and tequila—the signature marks of a beer aged in spirit barrels. In this case, tequila barrels did the job. “It’s reminiscent of a cocktail,” said Trevor Martens, co-founder and brewer at Pond Farm. The beer is named Palomarin—a play on the Point Reyes trailhead of the by Alastair same name and the Paloma cocktail. Bland What really makes it stand out is its alcohol level of just 5.5 percent by volume. That’s pretty much average for beer, but it’s very much below average for a boozebarrel-aged beer. “At 5.5 percent, it’s very drinkable; drinkable but still has that oaky flavor from the barrel,” Martens said. Until recently, anyone wishing for a hit of that particular flavor had little choice but to drink a strong—and expensive—beer. That’s because virtually all spirit-barrel-aged beers contain between 9 percent and 13 percent ABV with many as high as 15 percent. And they are often priced at a dollar or more per ounce. But lower-alcohol options are becoming more plentiful. The first one I ever noticed was Anderson Valley’s Bourbon Barrel Stout—the brewery’s classic oatmeal stout aged for three months in Wild Turkey barrels. The final product contains just 6.9 percent ABV. Firestone Walker also makes a relatively modest oatmeal stout aged in spirit barrels. While the trend is still undeveloped, there seems to be enough chatter about it online that I expect we’ll see more low-ABV spirit-barrel beers in the near future. In the early 1990s, Goose Island Brewing Co. in Chicago poured its high-alcohol stout into some empty Jim Beam barrels as an experiment. What came out of those casks—an oaky, coconutty, vanilla-flavored stout as strong as wine—was quite unlike anything ever brewed before, and it spawned a whole new way of making and aging beer. The brewery’s Bourbon

We make a living by what we get... but we make a life by what we gave. Chico.Salvationarmy.org County Stout ranges between 12 percent and 15 percent ABV, and it became a benchmark for the style and quality of spirit-barrel-aged beers. Since then, hundreds of breweries have aged countless beers in whiskey, rye, brandy, sherry, tequila and rum barrels, with the phenomenon going relatively mainstream about 15 years ago. Spirit-barrel-aged beers—as opposed to those aged in wine or unused oak barrels, such as sours, saisons and other traditional European styles—are aggressive and hard-hitting. You need not be an attuned taster or a cicerone to detect the effects of the barrel and the booze it once contained. Moreover, these beers tend to be big styles to begin with, like imperial stouts, barleywines and some Belgian-style ales—beers already high in alcohol that often end up even stronger with the barrel treatment, either by absorbing more alcohol from the liquor-soaked wood or because of continued fermentation during the aging process. Their high-alcohol level has brought these beers much acclaim and notoriety, but lately I feel there’s been some consumer fatigue. One challenge that Pond Farm faced as Martens and his crew kegged their new lower-alcohol rendition was how much to charge for it. Generally, high-alcohol barrel-aged beers are among the most expensive, and are also served in smaller glasses. The barrels for the lower ABV versions still take up space and add time to the process, but the base beer requires fewer ingredients. They settled in the middle: Palomarin is now pouring for 8 bucks per 13-ounce glass. It’s available only at the taproom, but you can get Anderson Valley’s Bourbon Barrel Stout at beer stores everywhere—for about $10 per 22 ounce bottle. Ω

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ARTS DEVO

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by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

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ChiCo, deep Cuts This week arts dEVo is drawn to the hidden corners of our local calendar of arts and fun. There are four unique choices on the schedule that have caught my eye—including one at a new arts venue and another featuring an exciting new local venture: • Maker radio launch party: Those busy creatives at the idea Fabrication Labs (IFL) have really done it now. They’ve built a new community radio station that’s currently broadcasting at 94.5 FM from the lab’s downtown spot on Orange Street. The call letters are KWQa, and IFL member sterling ogden says the low-power FM station is presenting an eclectic schedule of programming—from “dance beats to Louis Armstrong, Bernie Sanders to hip-hop”—and can be heard from Hegan Lane to East Avenue and from Highway 99 to the Sacramento River. It’s also streaming online at chico. ideafablabs.com/maker-radio-2. IFL is also recruiting DJs (contact them at info@ideafablabs.com to make your pitch) and raising money Sienna Orlando-Lalaguna for equipment upgrades. There’s a Fundly donation campaign set up at tinyurl.com/FabLabRadio and this Saturday (Nov. 23), at 9 p.m., there will be a launch party fundraiser at the lab. Tickets for the party are $15 in advance on the IFL website, $20 at the door, and performers include electronic DJs/ producers Eye-re-Eyes and simple science, fire dancer Kula Light and many others. • strega studios: Local sculptor/ceramicist sienna orlando-Lalaguna has moved her home ceramic studio into a semi-public space. Her new strega studios at 2163 Fair St., Ste. B, features a work space, a couple of artist studios and a shared exhibition space that will be open to the public once a month. This month’s open house is Saturday (Nov. 23), noon-6 p.m., and will feature works by OrlandoLalaguna, Claire Fong, night Moves and ama Posey art. There also will be blank ornaments available to purchase and glaze however you desire. • Prisoner art: Blackbird is hosting an art exhibit unlike anything Chico normally gets to experience with its Prisoner art group show composed of works contributed by the formerly Tweed Ride and currently incarcerated. On display through Nov. 30. • Tweed Ride: It’s fall. Time to bust out the penny-farthing, wrap some sandwiches in wax paper and put them and some Nesbitt’s Orange in your wicker basket and meet the gang of velocipedalers on the lawn in front of John and Annie Bidwell’s place Sunday (Nov. 24), at 10:30 a.m. Though it may be a little warm for wool (breathable fabrics in autumnal browns, oranges, etc., are probably acceptable tweed alternatives), the annual Tweed Ride is on. It will depart from the mansion at 11 a.m. and wind its way to Five-Mile in Bidwell Park for lunch before returning to town for after-ride drinks, and possibly some Christmas Previewing?


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of November 4 - 8, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

4172 Tiberon Way 5 Walnut Park Dr 387 Weymouth Way 37 Blackstone Ct 2857 Lucy Way 20 Westgrove Ct 12 Dana Point Rd 1520 Ridgebrook Way 1183 E 5th Ave 1191 Bonair Rd 8 Kevin Ct 11 Hidden Brooke Way 3006 Hudson Ave 25 Redeemers Loop 4 Phyllis Ct 332 W Shasta Ave 417 Mission Santa Fe Cir 4312 Caballo Way 2994 Eaton Rd 805 Penstemon Way 2890 Carlene Pl 6 Merle Ct

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$790,000 $675,000 $665,000 $640,000 $540,000 $525,000 $525,000 $459,000 $458,000 $449,000 $432,000 $430,000 $420,000 $416,000 $413,000 $410,000 $402,000 $389,000 $380,000 $350,000 $346,000 $345,000

3/3 3/3 4/3 4/2 4/3 4/3 3/3 4/3 4/3 3/3 3/2 4/4 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/1 3/2 3/3 4/3 4/2 3/1 3/2

SQ. FT.

2295 2254 2938 2428 2243 2123 2036 2165 1720 2039 1620 2240 1679 1761 1654 1669 1917 1505 1750 1580 1472 1498

ADDRESS

1045 Glenwood Ave 222 Mission Serra Ter 24 Forest Creek Cir 2556 North Ave 7 Tilden Ln 1128 Sunset Ave 11 New Dawn Cir 20 Glenshire Ln 810 Verbena Ave 2756 Ceres Ave 3044 Monticello Ln B 282 E 17th St 964 Wisconsin St 2829 Trimbelle Riv 110 Pinedale Ave 5277 Wilbur Rd 3706 Argonaut Ave 107 Inglewood Dr 27 Oak Park Way 47 Greenbank Ave 1380 Wagstaff Rd 6260 Sawmill Rd

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise

$330,000 $319,000 $315,000 $315,000 $315,000 $303,000 $300,000 $296,000 $295,000 $245,000 $215,000 $212,500 $135,000 $132,500 $540,000 $440,000 $385,000 $326,000 $261,000 $259,000 $429,500 $350,000

3/2 3/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 2/2 3/2 2/2 3/2 3/2 2/1 2/1 1/1 3/2 2/3 3/3 3/2 4/3 3/2 2/2 3/2 3/3

November 21, 2019

SQ. FT.

1376 1414 1418 1326 1346 1083 1396 999 1299 1039 1049 704 688 1543 2339 2810 1215 2645 1998 1256 1884 1765

CN&R

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at 324 Walnut Street, Suite A Chico, CA 95928. FRANCISCO J REYES 18 Westminister Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FRANCISCO RAYES Dated: October 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001141 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RUSSELL’S SUNRISE CAFE at 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. PEACH TREE RESTAURANT INC 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: NAEEM REHMAN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: October 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001204 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PILLSBURY SQUARE APARTMENTS at 2781 Pillsbury Road Chico, CA 95973. LAPANT FARMS LLC 9032 Goodspeed St Durham, CA 959388. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ROGER JACK LAPANT Dated: September 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001109 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PYROCORP at 2515 Zanella Way #5 Chico, CA 95928. HAYDEN FIRE PROTECTION, INC. 2515 Zanella Way #5 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JEREMY HAYDEN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: October 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001113 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AZTECAS VIDEO AND GROC

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FAERIE HUMAN RELATIONS DEPARTMENT, IN OUR

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

NATURE at 1844 Broadway Street Chico, CA 95928. JENNY RAE RICHMAN 1844 Broadway Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNY RAE RICHMAN Dated: October 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001112 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are 1oing business as LABELZ at 974 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. J. WITH ENTERPRISE 7749 Co Rd 61 Princeton, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: JAMIE WITHROW, MANAGING MEMBER Dated: October 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001199 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DARLING ROSE VINEYARD at 8995 Troxel Rd Chico, CA 95928. AMANDA WYLIE DARLING 8995 Troxel Rd Chico, CA 95928. GARY ANTHONY DARLING 8995 Troxel Rd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: AMANDA W. DARLING Dated: October 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001217 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name LABELZ at 974 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. CYNTHIA E BROCHHEUSER 1941 Sycamore Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: CINDY BROCHHEUSER Dated: October 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000460 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name THE ACCOUNTING OFFICE at 1074 East Ave Ste K Chico, CA 95926. LAZARSKI ENTERPRISES, INC. 2166 Huntington Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KATHY LAZARSKI, PRESIDENT Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000876 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ACCOUNTING OFFICE at 1074 East Ave Ste K Chico, CA 95926. this Legal Notice continues

DEBBIE ALLEN EA INC 1074 East Ave Ste K. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARK ALLEN, SECRETARY Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001213 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

9965 Lott Rd Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DANIEL D CAVINESS, DPM Dated: October 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001182 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ON YOUR MARK MOBILE NOTARY at 3550 Fotos Way Chico, CA 95973. ANGELA C. COOK 3550 Fotos Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANGELA C COOK Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001207 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as K-C NAILS AND SPA at 175 Cohasset Rd #3 Chico, CA 95926. THUY THANH HO 1170 E 9th Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: THANH T. HO Dated: November 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001258 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRANA ENDURA at 40 Constitution Dr Ste E Chico, CA 95973. CAITLIN LINSCHEID 4 Spinnaker Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAITLIN LINSCHEID Dated: October 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001233 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name WADE ARENA at 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. ELTA L TOWNE 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. CARYL WESTON 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ELTA L TOWNE Dated: October 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001174 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WADE ARENA at 1391 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. ROBERT J LEDOUX 1963 Air Strip Rd Redding, CA 96003. ELTA L TOWNE 1391 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ELTA L TOWNE Dated: October 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001228 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO PODIATRY GROUP at 2103 Forest Avenue Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL D CAVINESS 3491 Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL L WILSON this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ONCE UPON A CHILD at 801 East Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MELLON 537 Madrone Ave Chico, CA 95926. JESSICA PECK 14 Comstock Rd Chico, CA 95928. PAUL PECK 14 Comstock Rd Chico, CA 95928. ROBERT MELLON 537 Madrone Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JESSICA PECK, PRESIDENT Dated: September 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001099 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name PRANA ENDURA at 40 Constitution Drive Suite E Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER L MILLER CMT 2114 Kennedy Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER L MILLER Dated: October 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0001428 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as JENNY’S HELPERS at 1 Smith Brothers Court Chico, CA 95926. MARK ROGER HARSHMAN 1 Smith Brothers Court Chico, CA 95926. TINA MARIE HARSHMAN 1 Smith Brothers Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: TINA HARSHMAN Dated: November 5, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001254 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AWAY BUSINESS at 2990 Nord Ave Chico, CA this Legal Notice continues


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY 95973. ROBERT MATTHEW OW 2990 Nord Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT OW Dated: November 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001267 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FEGUSON TIMELESS TREASURES at 1280 E 9th St Ste C Chico, CA 95928. KATHLEEN ANN FERGUSON 1998 Potter Rd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KATHY FERGUSON Dated: October 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001240 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIBRENEW CHICO at 1651 Albion Ct Chico, CA 95973. REBEW INC 1651 Albion Ct Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOSEPH WEBER, PRESIDENT Dated: November 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001291 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BURRITO BARAJAS at 1013 W First St Chico, CA 95928. KRISTIAN JANET LOPEZ 1975 Bruce Rd #209 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTIAN LOPEZ Dated: November 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001284 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CORINTHIAN STERLING SILVER JEWELRY at 1235 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. JANE ANN JOHNSON 1235 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. NATALIE JOHNSON 1235 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JANE JOHNSON Dated: November 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001261 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PRESTA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 1900 Oro Dam Blvd E Ste 12-139 Oroville, CA 95966. PRESTA FINANCIAL LLC 1900 Oro Dam Blvd E Ste 12-139 Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Limitied Liability Company. this Legal Notice continues

Signed: EFREN ROBINSON, MEMBER Dated: October 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001234 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GREAT CLIPS at 738 Mangrove Ave. Chico, CA 95926. HOPPIN SHEARS, INC. 4650 Northgate Blvd Ste 100 Sacramento, CA 95834. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHAEL WAGNER, CFO Dated: October 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001139 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KAFTANESE, MAHARAJA ME at 892 Naomi Ave Chico, CA 95926. AARON SAUBERAN 892 Naomi Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AARON SAUBERAN Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001208 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SCRY SOLUTIONS at 1066 E 8th St Chico, CA 95928. MATTHEW KELLER 1068 E 8th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MATT KELLER Dated: November 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001303 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as K CUSTOM CLOTHIER at 1132 Arbutus Ave Chico, CA 95926. GEORGE KNOX 1132 Arbutus Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: GEORGE KNOX Dated: November 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001304 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADVANCED PIPE AND LEAK DETECTION at 325 Southbury Lane Chico, CA 95973. ROAN FAMILY COMPANIES INCORPORATED 325 Southbury Lane Chico, CA 95973 This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CASSIE ROAN, PRESIDENT Dated: October 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001198 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RICK DALLOUL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RICK DALLOUL Proposed name: REZKALLAH DALLOUL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 10, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02999 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ADRIANA YANETH GONZALEZ and JOSE DE JESUS GONZALEZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JESSEY JACOBO GONZALEZ Proposed name: JESSEY GONZALEZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 17, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03037 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LARRY THIEM STEVENS filed a petition with this this Legal Notice continues

court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LARRY THIEM STEVENS Proposed name: LARRY THIEM CLARK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: November 1, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03258 Published: November 14,21,27, December 5, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MA DE LA LUZ PADILLA CAMPOS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MA DE LA LUZ PADILLA CAMPOS Proposed name: MARIA DE LA LUZ GALLEGOS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: November 15, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03345 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner WILLIAM MORGAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: HUNTER LEE BELANGER Proposed name: HUNTER LEE BELANGER-MORGAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the this Legal Notice continues

hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01178 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KAREN R. TRAVERS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KAREN RENEE TRAVERS Proposed name: KAREN RENEE HALLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: November 6, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03278 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner THOMAS EDWIN HAMILTON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: THOMAS EDWIN HAMILTON Proposed name: THOMAS EDWIN VIERRA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described this Legal Notice continues

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For the week oF November 21, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Beware of

what disturbs the heart,” said Abdullah ibn Mas’ud, a companion of the Prophet Muhammad. “If something unsettles your heart, then abandon it.” My wise Aries friend Artemisia has a different perspective. She advises, “Pay close attention to what disturbs the heart. Whatever has the power to unsettle your heart will show you a key lesson you must learn, a crucial task you’d be smart to undertake.” Here’s my synthesis of Ibn Mas’ud and Artemisia: Do your very best to fix the problem revealed by your unsettled heart. Learn all you can in the process. Then, even if the fix isn’t totally perfect, move on. Graduate from the problem for good.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus

social critic Bertrand Russell won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1950. He’s regarded as the founder of analytic philosophy and one of the 20th century’s premier intellectuals. But he went through a rough patch in 1940. He was judged “morally unfit” to accept his appointment as a professor at the City College of New York. The lawsuit that banned him from the job described him as being “libidinous,” “lustful,” “aphrodisiac” and “irreverent.” Why? Simply because of his liberated opinions about sexuality, which he had conscientiously articulated in his book Marriage and Morals. In our modern era, we’re more likely to welcome libidinous, lustful, aphrodisiac and irreverent ideas if they’re expressed respectfully, as Russell did. With that as a subtext, I invite you to update and deepen your relationship with your own sexuality in the coming weeks.

by rob brezsNy mysteries that are usually beneath your conscious awareness. You have a mandate to reacquaint yourself with where you came from and how you got to where you are now.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): It’s natural

and healthy to feel both the longing to connect and the longing to be independent. Each of those urges deserves an honored place in your heart. But you may sometimes experience them as being contradictory; their opposing pulls may rouse tension. I bring this to your attention because I suspect that the coming weeks will be a test of your ability to not just abide in this tension, but to learn from and thrive on it. For inspiration, read these words by Jeanette Winterson: “What should I do about the wild heart that wants to be free and the tame heart that wants to come home? I want to be held. I don’t want you to come too close. I want you to scoop me up and bring me home at night. I don’t want to tell you where I am. I want to be with you.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Louvre Museum in Paris displays 38,000 objects throughout its 18 acres of floor space. Among its most treasured 13th century artworks is “The Madonna and Child in Majesty Surrounded by Angels,” a huge painting by Italian painter Cimabue. When a museum representative first acquired it in the 19th century, its price was five francs, or less than a dollar. I urge you to be on the lookout for bargains like that in the coming weeks. Something that could be valuable in the future may be undervalued now.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In her poem SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “What the Light Teaches,” Anne Michaels describes herself arriving at a lover’s house soaked with rain, “dripping with new memory.” She’s ready for “one past to grow out of another.” In other words, she’s eager to leave behind the story that she and her lover have lived together up until now—and begin a new story. A similar blessing will be available for you in the coming weeks: a chance for you and an intimate partner or close ally to launch a new chapter of your history together.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Some

scientists deride astrology despite being ignorant about it. For example, they complain, “The miniscule gravitational forces beaming from the planets can’t possibly have any effect on our personal lives.” But the truth is that most astrologers don’t believe the planets exert influence on us with gravity or any other invisible force. Instead, we analyze planetary movements as evidence of a hidden order in the universe. It’s comparable to the way weather forecasters use a barometer to read atmospheric pressure but know that barometers don’t cause changes in atmospheric pressure. I hope this inspires you as you develop constructive critiques of situations in your own sphere. Don’t rely on naive assumption and unwarranted biases. Make sure you have the correct facts before you proceed. If you do, you could generate remarkable transformations in the coming weeks.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): As you glide into the Season of Love, I’d love you to soak up wise counsel from the author bell hooks. (She doesn’t capitalize her name.) “Many people want love to function like a drug, giving them an immediate and sustained high,” she cautions. “They want to do nothing, just passively receive the good feeling.” I trust you won’t do that. Here’s more from hooks: “Dreaming that love will save us, solve all our problems or provide a steady state of bliss or security only keeps us stuck in wishful fantasy, undermining the real power of the love—which is to transform us.” Are you ready to be transformed by love?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Burrow down

as deep as you dare. Give yourself pep talks as you descend toward the gritty core of every matter. Feel your way into the underground, where the roots meet the foundations. It’s time for you to explore the

Sagittarian performance artist Marina Abramović observes that the Prophet Muhammad, Buddha, Jesus and Moses “all went to the desert as nobodies and came back as somebodies.” She herself spent a year in Australia’s Great Sandy Desert near Lake Disappointment, leading her to exclaim that the desert is “the most incredible place, because there is nothing there except yourself, and yourself is a big deal.” From what I can tell, Sagittarius, you’re just returning from your own metaphorical version of the desert, which is very good news. Welcome back! I can’t wait to see what marvels you spawn.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Up-

coming events may bedevil your mind. They may mess with your certainties and agitate your self-doubts. But if you want my view about those possibilities, they’re cause for celebration. According to my analysis of the astrological indicators, you will benefit from having your mind bedeviled and your certainties messed with and your selfdoubts agitated. You may ultimately even thrive and exult and glow like a miniature sun. Why? Because you need life to gently but firmly kick your ass in just the right way so you’ll become alert to opportunities you have been ignoring or blind to.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Every

writer I’ve ever known says that a key practice to becoming a good writer is to read a lot of books. So what are we to make of the fact that one of the 20th century’s most celebrated novelists didn’t hew to that principle? In 1936, three years before the publication of his last book, Aquarianborn James Joyce confessed that he had “not read a novel in any language for many years.” Here’s my take on the subject: More than any other sign of the zodiac, you have the potential to succeed despite not playing by conventional rules. And I suspect your power to do that is even greater than usual these days.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “If you are

lucky enough to find a way of life you love, you have to find the courage to live it,” wrote Piscean novelist John Irving. In the coming weeks, you will have the power to get clearer than ever before about knowing the way of life you love. As a bonus, I predict you will also have an expanded access to the courage necessary to actually live that way of life. Take full advantage!

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. November 21, 2019

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above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: January 8, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: November 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03279 Published: November 21,27, December 5,12, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RENATE RANFT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RENATE RANFT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CHRISTIANE H. RANFT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CHRISTIANE H. RANFT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-IV Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or

this Legal Notice continues

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personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: October 31, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00501 Published: November 7,14,21, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE TED MODESTO GIANNINI, aka TED M. GIANNINI, aka TED GIANNINI To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: TED MODESTO GIANNINI, aka TED M. GIANNINI, aka TED GIANNINI A Petition for Probate has been filed by: GINA GIANNINI in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GINA GIANNINI be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of this Legal Notice continues

November 21, 2019

either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: October 17, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00467 Published: November 7,14,21, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE KENI M. TITMUS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KENI M. TITMUS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BUTTE COUNTY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: BUTTE COUNTY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the

this Legal Notice continues

decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: BUTTE COUNTY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR PO Box 1649 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 538-3721 Dated: October 30, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00498 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE KAY F. HILL aka KAY FRANCES HILL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KAY F. HILL aka KAY FRANCES HILL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DEAN J. HILL, JR. in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DEAN J. HILL, JR. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written this Legal Notice continues

objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC PO Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: November 6, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00509 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE MARGARET L. KAISER, also known as MARGARET LUCY KAISER, MARGARET KAISER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARGARET L. KAISER, MARGARET LUCY KAISER, MARGARET KAISER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MATTHEW M. ESTRADA, CARISA R. ESTRADA in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MATTHEW M. ESTRADA, CARISA R. ESTRADA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California this Legal Notice continues

County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: November 5, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00506 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RONALD J. ZACH, also known as RONALD JOSEPH ZACH To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RONALD J. ZACH, also known as RONALD JOSEPH ZACH A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARILYN K. ZACH in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARILYN K. ZACH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California this Legal Notice continues

County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: November 5, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00507 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE HEIDI D. LEONE, also known as HEIDI DRAKE LEONE, HEIDI LEONE To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: HEIDI D. LEONE, also known as HEIDI DRAKE LEONE, HEIDI LEONE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: SAVARA H. ABOUZEID in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SAVARA H. ABOUZEID be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate this Legal Notice continues

Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: October 31, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00499 Published: November 14,21,27, 2019

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