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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 11 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

11-08-18

CAMP FIRE Revisited

A SPECIAL REPORT


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CN&R

NOVEMBER 7, 2019


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 11 • November 7, 2019

OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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HEALTHLINES

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GREENWAYS

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COVER STORY

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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ARTS & CULTURE

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Jennifer Jenkins, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, David Wyles

Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Allen Pierleoni, Thea Rood, Anne Stokes N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Julia Ballantyne, Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Art of Information Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN.

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CN&R

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Still in relief mode a year after Camp Fire A year after the deadliest and most destructive wild-

fire in state history, Butte County is still in crisis. Things certainly have changed over the past 12 months, and there are many signs of progress. The tent cities that sprung up overnight are long gone, the debris cleanup is nearly completed, and our hotels and motels have vacancies. Yet, thousands of people are still struggling with basic needs, including shelter and food. Over the past year, the CN&R has published more than 250 articles related to the Camp Fire. This week, in a wide-ranging issue, we delve back into the disaster on the eve of the anniversary. Among other things, we explore Enloe Medical Center’s strained operation, the county’s plans to improve disaster preparedness, the fire vulnerabilities related to a burned-out portion of the Miocene Canal, PG&E’s work to underground power lines on the Ridge, and District Attorney Mike Ramsey’s criminal investigation of the utility. But at the heart of this disaster are people who are hurting and need help. The trauma is real. It stems not only from the day they fled for their lives, but also all of the days

thereafter that they’ve spent attempting to adjust to a new life. For some, it’s meant dealing with the loss of the place they called home, all of their possessions, and, worst of all, a friend or loved one who perished in the firestorm. Perhaps what best illustrates where we are a year after the Camp Fire is our story on the tiny Ridge church that’s a sort of ground zero for ongoing relief efforts. Long after the parachute reporters and TV stations left town, and national charity groups like the Red Cross shuttered the shelter at Chico’s fairgrounds, the Magalia Community Church continues to care for those in need. Church officials believe they are doing God’s work, and in our minds what they are doing is essential to the region’s well-being. Thing is, they need help to keep this going. Volunteers and supplies are in demand. We don’t want to take away from the many other good works over the past year or the events to commemorate the anniversary. There will be beautiful, heartfelt remembrances and activities. But the reality is we have a long journey to recovery ahead. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Paper dolls Tready for it now than I was the first time. All week up here: remembrances, memorials,

omorrow the town burns down. And I’m no more

commemorations, tributes, groundbreakings, displays. But none of them really touches the fire. How could they? At the Optimo, trapped for hours. Finally, so desperate, unloading bottles from the Pepsi truck, setting them out as firebreak. When the fire comes, maybe it will explode the bottles—the Pepsi will douse the fire! Women there considering how best to kill their children. Before the fire takes them. by The bear is running, running with Kevin Jeys all that he has, but he doesn’t have The author stayed enough. He is coming out of the fire, in Paradise through but the fire is coming with him, the the fire to protect bear is on fire, the bear is running, the his pets. bear is burning, the bear is fire. The dog is in the house. His man in Chico. The fire is in the house, and the dog—good dog, smart dog—retreats to the bathtub; there, he ends. Months

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on, the people in the bar in the drink in the sports in the TV. But that is not what the man sees. He sees but his dog. In the bathtub. A woman recalls: “Today I passed the burned car on Skyway just up from Wagstaff. I couldn’t help but think about whomever had to climb out of that passenger door and leave it open as they fled the flames. I cried the rest of the way home.” A trio of people, who’d been homeless in Paradise, wondering if they have a claim. “I didn’t really lose anything,” says one. “Just my backpack with my clothes. And my dog.” I mention this to my fire compañera—old Paradise, family here 150 years—and her response is instantaneous: “Of course they have a claim. They lost the community. That’s what we all lost.” So maybe who touches it best is a guy who’s never been here. Except in heart, in soul. SF radio talk-show host. People calling in to carp about the power shutoffs. But he’s of another way. “I get it,” he says. “But it’s a small price to pay. Because we’re a community. We’re all paper dolls, standing in an oven, spraying water on each other.” Yes. It’s going to take something, from everybody, so that nobody has to be here. Again. Ω

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Milestone “Just get past Nov. 8.” That’s what I’ve been telling myself for the past month. Amid the buildup of the Camp Fire one-year mark—my anxiety growing with each day lacking rain—that refrain has kept me going. Our issue hits the stands on the eve of the anniversary of the great fire that wiped out a large swath of Butte County’s foothill communities. And to be honest, I’ve been stressed about the potential for another tragedy. It’s an emotional response stemming from an event that has left an indelible impression on so many. That includes the tens of thousands who drove down through hell to escape the firestorm, as well as a much smaller number of people who drove up into the smoke and the flames—the firefighters, police officers and other emergency personnel. Then, of course, there are the journalists. Our job was to bear witness to the devastation and chronicle it for the world while the region was cordoned off. I can’t speak for my CN&R colleagues, but for this scribe, those days don’t seem like a year ago. Not even close. I can still smell the smoke in the air, feel the heat coming from the twisted piles of metal and other smoldering detritus, and hear the sounds of propane tanks exploding. It’s an odd juxtaposition with my post-fire foggy memory of mundane things. I couldn’t tell you what I had for lunch yesterday, but I can tell you where I was and what I saw on the Ridge for about the first seven days after the blaze. Indeed, the images are seared into my mind. I see a tender-hoofed doe limping through the smoldering ashes of a Magalia neighborhood off South Park Drive, a fawn trailing behind with no fear of the human in their midst. I feel the soft fur and purring vibrations of the hungry orange tabby on Eureka Drive. I see the empty wheelchair in the parking lot of the still-burning Safeway shopping center. I see the gray husks of cars lining street after street. And still other vehicles—sometimes just feet away in the middle of the lanes—eerily untouched by the flames. I see a perfect motorcycle with a shiny blue tank dumped in a ditch. I think about the messages from strangers flooding my inbox. The man asking me to check on his home off of Sawmill Road. The woman asking me to give water to her cats on Country Oak Drive. I feel the punch to the gut as I search their neighborhoods only to find chimneys and a few blackened appliances. I remember sitting at my office in Chico, typing away with my breathing mask on, and weeping after hearing confirmation that a few of my colleagues lost their homes. But I steel myself for the work ahead. Here we are a year later with no end in sight. The anniversary is a milestone, but it won’t heal what ails our fractured community. I’ll spend the day reflecting on the past year—the highs and lows. Then I’ll take comfort from being surrounded by individuals who are dedicated to telling the stories that will help our community continue on its path to recovery—however long that might take.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

About that eco plan Re “Seizing the moment” (Newslines, by Andre Byik, Oct. 31): Chico is clearly situated to take climate change adaptability to a new level and provide pieces of a model for other cities to follow. I’m encouraged to see two City Council members embrace this responsibility. But this Chico Green New Deal, while it goes in the right direction, doesn’t call for any kind of fundamental shift away from the wasteful, oil-fueled development that got us here. As examples: Just like the Climate Action Plan, it takes no account of the production of commodities we habitually consume in Chico. It contains the idea of “climatefriendly housing solutions,” but nothing on the imminent expansion of Bruce Road and all further suburban sprawl based on private automobiles. The plan mentions upgrading

housing to be more climate-friendly, “saving on energy costs for property owners,” and “in economically feasible ways.” But for the majority of residences in Chico, tenants pay the power bill. So I wonder, who does it have to be economically feasible for? Someone may have called to “enhance” our bus system 30 years ago, but the reality is almost no one can entirely depend on it today. This isn’t a vision of walkable neighborhoods and city life where a private car is unnecessary. Addison Winslow Chico

Credit to Vice Mayor Alex Brown for caring, but their version of the Green New Deal is vague, lacks holistic thinking and parrots the false notion that we can “grow” our way out of an ecological crisis perpetuated by economic growth. Lots of talk about solar panels and “green” energy, but not efficiency, which could be placed on the landlords who pass the cost of inefficiency onto already burdened

renters. Talk of workforce development, but not of the fundamentally exploitative relationship between employer and employed, cooperative enterprise development, or eliminating profit- and rent-seeking. We need to democratize urban life. The best section is the one on food, yet there is no smart objective, like “produce 80 percent of fresh fruits and veggies consumed within the city limits,” a wholly realistic and transformative goal. There’s a section on water reuse, an expensive proposition. Nothing about our insane waste/stormwater systems. Nothing about outlawing turf, or even eliminating city-owned turf. How about save water, recharge the aquifer, help pollinators and grow food by providing a framework and mandates for gray water stub-outs and edible streetside rain gardens? That’s holistic thinking. Business as usual won’t do. We need visionaries willing to be bold. Steven Breedlove Chico

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Chico’s class divisions “Diversity on the dais” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, Oct. 31): Whether Chico can be improved by “district” elections, as opposed to an “at large” system, is anyone’s guess. What’s beyond doubt is that driving this change forward on the basis of ethnicity is just plain silly. Many cities exhibit geographic concentrations along racial and ethnic lines; Chico has no such concentrations. What we do have are distinctly different neighborhoods, with class being the operative factor. That is, geographic concentrations at well above the median income/wealth level and concentrations at well below the median—an obvious example being Canyon Oaks versus Chapmantown. What’s long been missing in Chico politics is representation of the 50 percent of our population falling at or below the median: the Walmart worker, the semi-employed construction worker, the elder caregiver, etc. Instead, we have a history of disproportionate representation by affluent professionals. To further complicate matters, we’ve had Latinx candidates running the spectrum from not qualified, Mercedes Macías, to well-qualified, Lupita Arim-Law— though Arim-Law is yet another professional! And let’s not let this irony go unnoticed: Our only selfidentifying Latinx council member, Mayor Randall Stone, voted for an ugly, not-at-all-progressive raft of homeless criminalization laws in 2015, while the lone dissenter was a white woman, Tami Ritter. Patrick Newman Chico

‘Love and respect’ Re “Awaiting rain” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Oct. 31): Journalists covering jarring local news stories are a testament not only to the constitutional rights of freedom of the press and freedom of speech, but also to sacrifices people make for the betterment of our community. Wendy, a principal in the Youth for Justice show I’m producing to air—on KZFR 90.1 FM at 6 p.m. Nov. 7—had this to say: “I Just wanted to thank you again for 6 

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n o v e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 9

being a part of our recovery. That was really good for Dolyn (age 6) today.” Every act of kindness has an impact. Documenting Camp Fire stories, a year later, of families who lost everything, on the sacred barren lots where their homes once stood, is the most personal healing endeavor of mine this year. Huge amounts of love and respect for my radio colleagues, print journalists and TV broadcast news for telling the stories that help all of us heal. Bill Mash Chico

Chiding the congressman Re “Stuntman LaMalfa insults constituents” (Editorial, Oct. 31): I know my Republican friends do not belong to a Trump cult, because if he shot a member of the Chico community in the middle of Main Street, they would not dispute a murder charge. However, I’m not sure about LaMalfa. Andy Hanson Chico

We knew from recent fires that climate crisis denier (akin to flatearther) Rep. LaMalfa is a “don’t let science get in the way” firebrand. But who knew he is also a red tie/ blue-suited anti-law-and-order firebrand? Beau Grosscup Cohasset

Anniversary thanks Last year on Nov. 8, we moved out of Paradise, after 40 years, 20 minutes. After almost a year, living in Chico, I just want to say thanks to all of you, for helping all of us. Thanks for caring and giving and helping. You are wonderful people and you know who you are. Pete Lipski Chico

Nov. 8 marks one year since the Camp Fire, the most devastating and destructive fire in the history of California. Within minutes of Gov. Jerry Brown being told of the Camp Fire, he ordered an all-out response. Thank you, Jerry. The rebuilding of towns on the Ridge and the lives of survivors will take years. But this is a time to once again thank all those in law enforcement, firefighters and private

contractors (with bulldozers, etc.), from all over California, who drove into the fire to rescue hundreds of people. And, of course, there are many government staff (including school officials), nongovernment organizations and businesses who have done so much for so many survivors since, and we are all grateful. The leadership of the Paradise Town Council has been extraordinary; they themselves were made homeless and yet they have persevered. A special thanks to the hundreds of families (including my wife, Linda, and I) who opened their homes, garages and driveways for people to stay, as they dealt with insurance companies, FEMA, etc. All of Butte County appreciates everything done by so many for the thousands of survivors. Karl Ory Chico

Editor’s note: The author is a member of the Chico City Council.

Wildfire, PG&E and Trump PG&E isn’t alone when it comes to wildfires destroying California. There is plenty of blame to spread around. Trump, who hates California and the idea of climate change, is at the top of the human-caused inferno. When he deregulated America and crippled the Environmental Protection Agency for greed and jobs, he turned up the heat and pollution. Then, threw it on our dry state. Now, he says, let it burn! Pollution from the south has dehydrated our forests. While trees clean air, they also poison themselves. All levels of government have permitted Sierra Pacific to clear-cut our forest, leaving a patch quilt of dead and dying trees. Piles of dead slash are ready to ignite the healthiest trees in the forest. Beetles invade the clear-cut, slash and dehydrated trees. Sunshine on snow-covered clear-cuts causes snow to evaporate quickly, instead of melting into Mother Earth. Pat Johnston Red Bluff

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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I’m actually really impressed. I was in Paradise last Tuesday and I was really blown away by how much recovery and work has been done. I’m so proud of this community. Everyone wants to see all those who lost their homes be embraced and healed.

Antoinette Vine food server

I feel as though it’s going pretty slow. They’re not getting much built, and the homeless population is just growing more and more.

Matthew Rivera student

I feel like the local area supported the victims a lot. They’ve helped each other out with housing, food, clothing, etc. I feel like we’re recovering from it very well.

Tom Witt after-school teacher

I feel like the community members have banded together really well. They brought people in and supported each other. Everyone both in and out of the area has been very supportive.

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NEWSLINES PG&E was the target of a group of environmental activists that honored victims of the Camp Fire last Friday (Nov. 1) at Children’s Playground in Chico.

Weighing charges Local prosecutors consider felony counts against PG&E

M bowed their heads in silence for 85 seconds last Friday (Nov. 1) at Children’s

ore than a dozen environmental activists

Playground in Chico, recognizing the people killed in the Camp Fire. story and The demonstrators also photo by Andre Byik criticized PG&E, whose equipment was found a nd reb @ responsible for starting newsrev i ew.c om the deadly blaze. Some carried signs reading, “People [over] profits,” “Let’s own PG&E,” and “No more profits on electricity.” One banner, facing traffic entering downtown from The Esplanade, read, “PG&E serial killers.” Sitting in a circle, one activist said she had friends on the Ridge, and PG&E “fucked those people over.” “If we don’t do something today,” she said, “we’re fucked tomorrow.” A year after the Camp Fire, the Butte County District Attorney’s Office’s criminal investigation into PG&E’s role in the fire remains active. District Attorney Mike

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Ramsey told the CN&R that investigators have collected a large body of evidence, and prosecutors are viewing that evidence with two felony charges in mind: unlawfully causing a fire with gross negligence, and involuntary manslaughter. Ramsey did not disclose whether or when charges may be brought against PG&E. There are several considerations he will take into account, including the interests of fire victims. The company, he said, could buckle under the weight of billions of dollars in potential civil liabilities and possible criminal restitution, leaving fire victims in the cold. In conversations with some survivors, Ramsey said, he has asked what they would prefer: “To be made whole or to kill PG&E?” “Both,” comes the reply. Last month, Ramsey rang in 32 years as Butte

County’s elected district attorney. Under those three-plus decades he’s served as the county’s chief law enforcement official, he said his office has not investigated a case of this magnitude. Billions of dollars in possible criminal res-

titution are on the line. Eighty-four counts of involuntary manslaughter are being weighed. (The Camp Fire death tolls stands at 85, but one person was found to have died by suicide.) One supervising deputy district attorney—an expert on arson—has been working the case full-time since shortly after the Camp Fire sparked. Two investigators also have been working nearly full-time on the probe. Clerical staff has contributed as well. Then there’s the assist from the state Attorney General’s Office, which has provided attorneys to help. “There has never been a case that … we’ve devoted that [many] resources to,” Ramsey told the CN&R. “We’ve never had billions of dollars on the table before, either.” DA investigators have seized critical evidence from the high-voltage PG&E transmission tower near Pulga—the utility’s equipment, according to Cal Fire, failed and sparked the Camp Fire. Specifically, Ramsey said, they collected a broken hook that caused an energized power line to swing into the tower structure, causing an arc flash estimated

at 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The result was molten aluminum and steel spewing to the ground and surrounding brush. Ramsey said that piece of broken equipment was sent to the FBI’s laboratory in Quantico, Va., to be analyzed, and investigators have been looking at the hook with some questions in mind. Should PG&E have known that the piece was worn and could fail? Or did it have undetectable—“secret”—cracks or fissures that no reasonable person or corporation could have known would cause a failure? The district attorney declined to divulge any possible answers to those questions, but he did say investigators collected hooks from other towers in the vicinity of the Camp Fire tower, and found them similarly worn. “We’re happy with the results thus far,” Ramsey said, adding that if investigators determined the hooks had undetectable cracks his office’s investigation would have been “dead in the water.” Details of the year-long investigation have been teased in the media and during hearings in PG&E’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy case. One detail, disclosed by a civil attorney, was that a grand jury has been impaneled. Ramsey said he could neither confirm nor deny the existence of such a body. PG&E has been cooperating with investigators, according to the DA. Prosecutors have met periodically with the utility’s “platoon” of attorneys, who have been responsive to requests for information. Multiple witnesses, including current and former PG&E employees, have been interviewed. And prosecutors have been poring over maintenance records and spreadsheets, decoding and interpreting the utility’s corporate language. Most records are digital, and there are a lot of them. “We used to say—on large murder cases—I would say, ‘Oh, my God, we’re going through reams of reports,’” Ramsey said. “Now it’s, ‘We’re going through terabytes of data.’ That’s our new reality of trying to get stuff done.” In a statement supplied to the CN&R by a spokesman, PG&E said it has been cooperating with the District Attorney’s Office but did not intend to discuss details of Ramsey’s investigation. “We have been open and transparent since the Camp Fire occurred and have been proactive in supplying information about our infrastructure to the [California Public Utilities Commission], Cal Fire, the Butte County District Attorney and the California Attorney General,” the statement reads. PG&E said its “most important responsibility” must be the safety of the public and its employees, adding that it is committed to


complying with all rules and regulations that apply to its work and developing “long-term safety solutions for the future.” The families affected by the Camp Fire are “our customers, our neighbors and our friends,” according to PG&E’s statement. “Our hearts go out to those who have lost so much, and we remain focused on supporting them through the recovery and rebuilding process.” Prosecutors are looking at individual play-

ers within PG&E, in addition to the corporation itself. The challenge, Ramsey said, with charging people instead of a company is responsibilities for decisions can be diffused to the point where it’s difficult to prove individual responsibility. The downside of prosecuting a corporation, he said, is that it can’t be hauled off to jail for misdeeds. Any punishment would come in the form of fines, fees and restitution. (PG&E already was convicted of six felony charges and placed on federal probation in connection with the 2010 San Bruno pipeline explosion.) Looking at the charges under consideration, a conviction of 84 counts of involuntary manslaughter could result in penalties reaching about $2.5 million, Ramsey estimated. “For PG&E, that’s not much,” he said. “Where they would be hurt in a sense—where the real penalty is—is the criminal restitution. The criminal restitution being that loss of all the property. That loss of all of the income. That loss of the businesses. Those, which right now is obviously estimated into the billions of dollars.” Criminal restitution, the district attorney said, could be ordered if PG&E were charged and convicted of unlawfully causing a fire with gross negligence. However, he said PG&E’s bankruptcy case could add wrinkles into any possible prosecution. There is a “strong line” of statutory interpretation that concludes corporations can have criminal restitution payments discharged in bankruptcy, meaning they would not have to pay. Ramsey said he disagrees with the interpretation but conceded that fighting it would be an “uphill push.” The considerations go back to the additional factors the DA’s Office has been taking into account. “Do you kill PG&E in the bankruptcy court?” Ramsey said. “They don’t come out of the bankruptcy court and then they can discharge their criminal restitution— even if we convict them. Those are some of the weighty, philosophical things that we’re weighing.” Ω

Bringing people home Camp Fire Zone Project forging community connections, helping residents rebuild For Kyla Awalt, Paradise has felt like a “small,

isolated, lonely town” for much of the past year. She’s experienced this firsthand—her family’s home in central Paradise survived the Camp Fire. Awalt felt compelled to help her burned-out neighbors and give them hope. So, early this year, she attended a conference in Santa Rosa and learned about a block captain system that has helped that city’s neighborhoods rebuild and stay connected in the wake of the 2017 Tubbs Fire. She was inspired by what she learned. She called her realtor, Jenna Murray, whom she described as “super tenacious,” and the duo launched the Camp Fire Zone Project in March. It has a fund set up at the North Valley Community Foundation to take donations. The pair created 33 zones encompassing the entire Get involved: Go to campfire burn scar, including Magalia, zoneproject.com for Concow, Yankee Hill, Butte more information. Creek Canyon, and so on. In each, there are multiple captains who serve as advocates and a “voice for the zones,” Awalt said. When a problem arises, these community leaders figure out how to solve it. They’re a triple-threat: an informational resource, a neighborhood event planner and a government liaison. Awalt and Murray—president and executive

director, respectively—manage the project and also are zone captains. It’s largely up to each zone’s members as to how active they’d like to be, Awalt said. Many meet regularly and several already have spearheaded projects in their neighborhoods. In one zone, members built a community shed for residents to store and share tools. In another, they designed a resource house—similar to a little free library. Inside is a binder full of information for survivors, a notepad for jotting down questions or messages to neighbors, and captain contact information. The zone project has provided cost savings as well. Murray rallied her neighbors in zone 3 (in eastern Paradise) and scheduled 12 parcel surveys at once. Instead of charging over $2,000 per household, each price tag came to $780, she said. In other zones, captains have scheduled tree removals and water

SIFT ER Recovery by the numbers In the year since the Camp Fire devastated eastern Butte County, the government-sponsored structural debris cleanup is nearing completion, the North Valley Community Foundation (NVCF) has raised tens of millions of dollars for recovery efforts, and survivors have begun to rebuild. Out of about 10,900 parcels identified for the largest debris cleanup effort in state history, about 10,200 have been cleared, with more than 3.6 million tons of debris hauled away, according to the county. The NVCF has

distributed or committed more than $20 million in relief funds through more than 500 grants, according to the organization. It’s raised more than $70 million total. And on the rebuilding front, the county has received 171 building permit applications for areas inside the burn scar. As of Monday (Nov. 4), 88 permits were issued. In the town of Paradise, 457 building permit applications were received. Eleven homes have been rebuilt in the town.

Jenna Murray (left) and Kyla Awalt launched the Camp Fire Zone Project in March to help the Ridge rebuild and stay connected. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

sampling in a similar fashion, saving their neighbors time and money. Local organizations and agencies have taken notice of the project. Murray and Awalt said the zone captains are working with the Paradise Adventist Church and Love Paradise to build sheds for survivors who need to store their belongings this winter. The Paradise Police Department also is partnering with the zone project, funded by a $10,000 grant from Farmers Insurance. Paradise Police Chief Eric Reinbold says he envisions the partnership providing opportunities to improve the safety and security of the town. Connections between the zone captains and officers can help the department respond more proactively, he said. This will be valuable as the town rebuilds and people move back, because there will be “more eyes out there” and more people “empowered to report” things that don’t look right in their neighborhoods. For example, the grant could fund installation of security cameras if a trail or area of town is having issues with trespassing or petty theft. But Reinbold is supportive of the grant potentially funding community outreach as well, such as zone barbecues to bring residents together. “It’s a good opportunity because you have a core of people that you can either get information transferred both ways or kind of learn what the concerns are out in the community,” he said. “The more we know about what’s going on out there before it becomes a big issue, the better we can head those potential problems off.” NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D N O V E M B E R 7, 2 0 1 9

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Paul Gosselin, director of the Butte County Department of Water and Resource Conservation, will instruct work to stop on a pipeline from Paradise to Chico.

Awalt and Murray told the CN&R they

want the project to continue to grow, and eventually become a model for other disaster-impacted communities. They see it as an important part of the rebuild and recovery of the region. “We want our community back,” Awalt said. “We really want the community members to feel like they’re cared about, they’re loved, there’s support.” Murray, who lost her home and temporarily relocated to Chico with her family, says there’s no place like Paradise. After the disaster, there was so much confusion and misinformation about what would come next that she wanted to do her part to help. “Paradise was not going to do it on its own,” Murray said. “We do have excellent community members, but it’s really important to note that a lot of the people that were part of our community were on the older side.” For Carrie Fritsch, a captain for zone 11 in southern Paradise, the Camp Fire Zone Project has already accomplished what Awalt and Murray intended. Fritsch, who was born and raised in Paradise, said five out of six of her family members lost their homes in the fire. Though she has been living in Chico with her husband and daughter, the zone project has helped her stay connected. In fact, she’s become close with Ridge neighbors she didn’t even know before the fire. “Everyone’s really watching out for each other and communicating more than they ever have been,” she said. “If there’s an issue that comes up, everyone’s really eager to help.” She recently organized a fundraiser to install a memorial for the four residents in her zone who perished in the fire and was “blown away” by the support she received. She’s also organized zone parties, which her neighbors have told her have been “really meaningful” because they have brought those living there together with those who are planning to move back. “[The Camp Fire Zone Project] really makes a strong foundation for the next chapter of our community, I think,” Fritsch said. “There’s just a really good feeling of ‘we’re all in this together, no matter what your situation is personally.’” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com 10

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PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

sioned in the future. A wide-ranging public meeting to discuss water issues, including the proposed pipeline and uses for the county’s “Table A” water allocation through the State Water Project, was scheduled for Dec. 17. During the lengthy public comment period Tuesday,

County sinks pipeline study Supervisors nix contract exploring PID-Cal Water connection Chairman Steve Lambert interrupted his col-

leagues at the Butte County Board of Supervisors meeting on Tuesday (Nov. 5), accusing Supervisors Tami Ritter and Debra Lucero of engaging in “political theater” before a crucial vote addressing the future of a study examining a proposed water pipeline from Paradise to Chico. Following nearly an hour of public comment on the matter, Ritter and Lucero had begun presenting their concerns about the scope and nature of the study when Lambert jumped in, saying there was other business to get to that day and asking his fellow supervisors why they would “go through this process” if their votes were already decided. “So, what you are doing is cutting off public discourse,” Lucero replied. “Because the public has a right to know,” Ritter told Lambert several minutes later during a similar exchange from the dais, eliciting applause from the gallery. The pointed exchanges came as the board once again considered funding a study that would determine the feasibility of a pipeline running down the Skyway and connecting the Paradise Irrigation District (PID) with California Water Service Co.’s Chico branch. Proponents say the project could help keep PID afloat as Paradise rebuilds and curb Cal Water’s reliance on groundwater moving forward. The board on Tuesday ultimately voted 3-2 in favor of funding the study, but because the item was a budgetary adjustment requiring a four-fifths majority, the motion failed. Ritter and Lucero cast the dissenting votes. The board had previously voted Sept. 10 to contract with Davis-based construction engineering company West Yost Associates to

conduct the pipeline study. Ritter cast the only nay vote at the time, and work on the study had since started. But Lucero, at a Board of Supervisors meeting Oct. 22, indicated she was considering changing her vote because Cal Water had not released groundwater study documents to the public, and the scope of the pipeline study had not been fully fleshed out (see “Tense negotiations,” Newslines, Oct. 24). Cal Water released more than 350 pages of study documents before Tuesday’s meeting, and Lucero said she had been reviewing them after only being able to print them the day before. Nevertheless, she switched her vote to nay, expressing further concerns over the scope of the study, the stakeholders consulted and questions surrounding the possible permanent nature of the intertie project. Paul Gosselin, director of the county’s Department of Water and Resource Conservation, told the board he would instruct West Yost to immediately cease work and send the firm a 30-day termination letter. Gosselin said the matter would have to come back to the board for a budget adjustment to cover the cost of work done thus far, which was estimated at about $25,000. The budget adjustment, according to Shari McCracken, the county’s chief administrative officer, would be required to cover those costs with grant money instead of general fund dollars. The original cost breakdown for the study involved $72,000 from the county through Proposition 1, the state’s Groundwater Grant Program, and $71,800 split between PID and Cal Water. The board left open the idea that a broader pipeline feasibility study could be commis-

proponents of the study urged the board to continue funding the work, which they said only would determine whether the proposed pipeline project is feasible or not. They said a pipeline could help keep PID solvent after its two years of “backfill” money from the state—about $14 million—runs dry. Mike Greer, president of the Paradise Unified School District board, told the supervisors that he supported the study. The school district, Greer said, is undergoing its five-year plan, and the study could help with budgeting. “Paradise Unified School District is the community,” he said. “If we can’t have our families up here—our students up here—and if there’s a question about the water and how expensive is it going to be, it’s going to really make a difference on how fast Paradise can re-establish itself.” Paradise Mayor Jody Jones said the issue at hand amounted to Paradise being in control “of its own destiny.” The state, Jones said, wants PID to explore consolidating with another entity, likely Cal Water. Without the study and possible pipeline project, she said, PID may be forced to. “We don’t want that,” the mayor said. “Deciding what is in the best interest of Paradise and [PID] is really not the job of the Board of Supervisors. It’s our job. My job, and the … irrigation district board’s job.” Some speakers, however, opposed the study, claiming it was a “water grab” by Cal Water. Others lamented not being consulted in the process. Chico Mayor Randall Stone told the board that he opposed the study in its current form. The city of Chico, he said, has not been consulted, which “should tell you something right off the bat.” Stone said the ratepayers most impacted by the study have not been included in the process, and they should be. “I’m very uncomfortable moving forward at this point,” he said. “I would feel much better if the feasibility study at least were incorporating what the impact would be to our community and to our ratepayers.” Ryann Newman, member of the Miocene Canal Coalition, criticized the scope of the study, citing its lack of inclusiveness. She requested that her group be included as participants. “Neither Cal Water or PID have advanced any solutions with respects to the Miocene,” she said. “To be brutally honest, from our perspective, any agency eyeing water rights and water conveyance systems off the Ridge should be able to do far more than sit silently and watch us fight with our hands tied behind our backs.” —ANDRE BYIK a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m


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HEALTHLINES Michelle Evans, Enloe’s director of case management (left), and Transitional Skilled Unit Nurse Manager Debbie Strukan stand in a room at the Enloe Rehabilitation Center reserved for patients needing skilled-nursing care.

Patient overflow

Enloe strained by demands, including nursing home patients with nowhere to go story and photos by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev iew. com

E

nloe Medical Center hadn’t planned on oper-

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Teeter standing outside the entrance to Feather River’s emergency room last month. He was there with several other speakers—including Sen. Jim Nielsen and Assemblyman James Gallagher—to commemorate the passage of Senate Bill 156, which allows Adventist Health to operate the facility as a standalone emergency room through 2027. The last time the county supervisor was on the hospital’s campus was Nov. 8, 2018. That day, survivors were stuck there for hours as the fire raged around them. “I watched those [medical offices] burn down as we were here trying to make the elderly and infirm comfortable,” he told the CN&R. Adventist Health CEO Rick Rawson couldn’t provide a timeline for the reopening, because the hospital has a lot figure out. The utility plant, which was damaged in the fire, has to be repaired, and the organization will need federal and state support to proceed, he said. It also has to draft a plan for staffing and transferring patients to other area hospitals should they need trauma care, for example. But the hospital intends to run a 24/7 emergency room, which Rawson said will be critical not only for Paradise residents but also for those living in Magalia and outlying Ridge communities. Michelle John, the superintendent

of Paradise Unified School District, already knows the ER will make a difference for students: “We’ve actually had a couple of broken bones on the football field, and kids have had to be transported, in pain, off of the Ridge,” she told those at the hospital’s campus that day. In Teeter’s view, the ER will help repopulate the Ridge, because of the economic, health and safety benefits it will offer. “To see Adventist Health willing to invest back into a community that has a lot of challenges,” he told the CN&R, “it’s going to make a huge difference for a lot of people.” Over the past year, Adventist Health has been working to restore its services in the region. It reopened its Paradise clinic, offering primary and specialty services, and opened a walk-in clinic in Paradise. In Chico, it launched a Cancer Care Center and expanded primary and specialty services. In addition to the emergency room, Adventist Health also plans to help re-establish a Butte County EMS base station in Paradise utilizing a $49,000 grant from the Butte Strong Fund. “That’s not lost on us, that what we do and how we invest can influence [the regrowth of the Ridge],” Rawson said. “So instead of just reacting, what we want to do is be a partner and really help Paradise and the Ridge as it grows and redevelops, and really serve all of Butte County.” Ω

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque

It was a “surreal” moment for Doug

Supervisor Doug Teeter offers his support of Adventist Health and its pursuit of a standalone emergency room. On Nov. 8, 2018, Teeter sought refuge at the campus with other fire survivors.

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

to 211 patients, from its current post-fire accommodation of 153 (see “Growth served,” Healthlines, March 7, 2019).

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GREENWAYS WAYS

Missing in action Water users making case in bankruptcy court; Cal Fire says dry canal poses fire hazards

story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com

Gorchard source of water for her Butte Valley and cattle pastures for nearly a

ail Tozier has been living without a steady

year. Her property had been fed by the Miocene Canal for more than a century, but that changed when the upper portion was destroyed in the Camp Fire. She’s always on edge now, Tozier told the CN&R—she’s terrified of fire risk because the valley is so dry. Last month, when she surveyed her olive orchard, she could see the devastation: branches of the parched trees filled with shriveled, brown leaves. “When there was water in the canal, we had the security of the fact that not only did we have green, [irrigated] grass … [but] if Cal Fire needed to tap into something to take care of a fire, the water was there.” The future of the canal, which has sustained thousands of acres of ranch and farmland for generations, remains uncertain— PG&E maintains it is not a worthwhile investment to repair, citing a price tag of $15 million. Miocene water users, under a collective of property owners called the Miocene Canal Coalition, have met with the utility several times over the past year, and grown increasingly frustrated. PG&E’s absence at the most recent meeting prompted the group to make its case in bankruptcy court. Tozier’s concerns about increasing fire hazards releated to the canal’s destruction are warranted. In May, Butte County Fire Chief David Hawks said as much in an email sent to Dan Blair, a senior government relations representative with PG&E, which the CN&R obtained through a public records request. The canal—a 25-mile, man-made system

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of ditches and wood-supported metal channels—runs from Magalia to Oroville, and when in full operation, fed not only Kunkle Reservoir off of Pentz Road but nearby ponds and streams. This created a contiguous wetland through Lime Saddle, Cherokee, Coal Canyon and into the valley that Hawks said was used as a fire break. He called the reservoir a “strategic” water source for firefighting primarily for helicopters, but also for fire engines and water tenders. Its location “shortens ‘turn around’ times, dropping and returning water for fires in the lower Paradise Ridge, Butte College, Cherokee and other surrounding areas,” he explained. Not only has Cal Fire used the canal itself to draft water to fight fires, Hawks wrote, but it also has drawn from ponds throughout the Ridge that are typically fed by the canal. This is “indicative of the direct impacts that the Miocene Canal has on fire protection as a resource.” Blair was unavailable for comment before deadline, but Paul Moreno, a spokesman for PG&E, said the Kunkle Reservoir has been “relatively full over summer and fall thanks to water runoff from a spring, so it has been available for Cal Fire’s use.” The utility company had sent several repre-

sentatives to meetings over the past year, where stakeholders brainstormed short- and long-term paths forward to restore water. The gatherings didn’t result in any concrete solutions, other than the temporary delivery of up to 5,000 gallons per week per household starting this July. But at least PG&E was participating, Tozier told the CN&R. When she arrived at the Sept. 27 meeting between Miocene Canal water users, Butte County staff and Ridge water purveyors, she

looked around the room and found no sign of PG&E. The company’s absence that day was telling, Tozier said. “It sent a clear message to everyone at the table,” she said. “[The company], they don’t care. They paid their bonuses out and to heck with the people that rely on the canal.” Tension regarding the matter has mounted to the point that the county has stopped being polite. Paul Gosselin, director of the Butte County Department of Water and Resource Conservation, facilitated the meetings between the utility and water users—as well as interested parties Del Oro Water Co. and Paradise Irrigation District—per the direction of the Butte County Board of Supervisors. The county’s goal was to help the parties solidify a plan and protect local water use and agricultural lands. Until last month, Gosselin had remained diplomatic. But at the September meeting, he told property owners to get legal counsel and file in the bankruptcy proceedings. He followed up by sending PG&E a letter chiding the company for its absence and lack of substantive participation. “We collectively kind of viewed that as PG&E’s unwillingness to participate in the process,” he told the CN&R, “and kind of really drag things out with any sort of answer to people.” In the letter, he wrote that “the good faith effort of the people along the Miocene Canal” was not reciprocated by the utility company, and, as a result, homes, farms and the environment along the canal corridor “experienced enormous damage this year that could have been avoided by meaningful PG&E involvement.” Mike Schonherr, PG&E director of strategic agreements, replied to Gosselin’s letter via email, stating that the county’s request for

Butte Valley neighbors (left to right) Danny Cuneo, Ryann Newman and Gail Tozier are property owners dependent on the Miocene Canal.

PG&E to “fund water delivery solutions” was presented to senior leadership. The county will be notified when PG&E makes a decision. Schonherr also presented the company’s perspective of its interactions. “PG&E believes that it participated in the [c]ounty’s process in good faith and is willing to continue discussions about potential longterm solutions for water delivery related to the Miocene Canal,” he wrote. Gosselin said the county is scheduling another meeting with water users for January. While “we cannot get in the middle and restore water to the Middle Miocene,” he said, it is exploring a project with Del Oro to extend water service on Pentz Road, which would help some of the folks who have been served by the canal. The UC Cooperative Extension is also close to completing an economic study related to the loss of the Miocene on water users, and Gosselin intends to seek grants and other funding for water supply reliability projects. Ed Cox, spokesman for the Miocene Canal Coalition, told the CN&R that, barring an “earth-shaking development,” there’s no reason to continue discussions with PG&E. The coalition and its individual members have filed claims and will be making a case for the Miocene in PG&E’s bankruptcy proceedings. “We have no reason now to be anything but aggressive,” he said. “We will litigate, we will file in bankruptcy court, we will try to press for criminal charges against PG&E. We will do everything we can possibly do in our power as constituents to compel them to do the right thing, and not just with the Miocene, but at every turn.” Ω


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS Photo by Josh CoziNe

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

rolling them bones

Anniversaries and new beginnings

Kurt Geiger was working as gallery supervisor and science educator at the Gateway Science Museum last year when it opened its doors free to the public for several months in the wake of the Camp Fire. Along with his son Carter, who was a volunteer at the museum, Geiger noticed the attention fossils were drawing from guests and started thinking about a career move. After some discussion, the father-son duo decided to go for it and start their own traveling fossil company. Since February, they’ve been visiting schools—starting with those displaced by the Camp Fire—bringing fossil specimens that students wouldn’t normally see outside of a museum. Next month, Fossil on Wheels will hold its first presentation in Paradise at Paradise Ridge Elementary. Find out more at facebook.com/fossilsonwheels.

We just had one up in Redding; we did eight classrooms and four presentations. It was really cool to get to travel and do this.

What do you enjoy most about this work? We see the kids drawing the dinosaurs as we’ve been talking about them, and that means a lot. We know we are giving these kids something that means something. You know, these kids may never have another opportunity to hold a T-Rex tooth or check out a Triceratops fossil or any of the other dinosaurs we have.

How many presentations have you done so far?

What’s your business model? Where do you get your fossils?

I think when we do [our presentation] at the new elementary school up in Paradise— the one built in Paradise to replace the others (that one will be Dec. 10)—that will be No. 40. That’s a really fun one for us. I did a lot of work with Camp Fire kids after the fire at the museum and so getting to go up there and work with the kids up at that school will be really special.

It’s very low overhead. We don’t have a lot of expenses. Gas, buying displays and such, but that’s not very expensive. The fossils come from a variety of places. Some of them are purchased, a few are self-collected and a lot of them have actually been given to us by other collectors and paleontologists that we’ve met through an internet forum called The Fossil Forum.

Do you have a favorite fossil? So this all started because [we’re] pretty much shark nuts. And we don’t live by the ocean, so you don’t often get to talk about sharks in Chico unless you go back in the fossil record. Everybody always wants to know about Megalodon, so we bring in some pretty good-sized Megalodon teeth—we have two that are both over five inches and we use them to explain the different adaptations of sharks and how the specific shape of teeth were related to what they ate.

How often do you do presentations? We’re starting to book a good number of programs for the spring. It’s pretty sporadic right now. It comes in bursts. We kind of figured with Thanksgiving break and then winter break right after that it would be kinda slow, but as it turns out we’re keeping pretty busy. It also depends on teachers’ lessons plans and what time they want us. —JosH CozINe

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The weeks leading up to this awful anniversary have been difficult, to say the least. Not nearly as rough as actually going through it, of course, but all the memories have been flooding back. Driving around Paradise, Magalia and the other communities affected by the fire these days is a much different experience than it was a year ago. From a business perspective, man, times are tough. I was impressed with the brave few owners who reopened their doors early on. If they didn’t cater to the cleanup crews, they struggled. But time marches on, and as people fill empty homes and move into RVs while they rebuild, there are more and more places opening up. A few weeks ago, I stopped by the Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce for a meeting of contractors. As it was during a blackout, we met in the dark. What an interesting concept—they all acknowledged that no one of them can handle the job of rebuilding the entire Ridge, so they all showed up to forge partnerships. Of particular note were a handful of folks who came down from Alberta, Canada, which endured that country’s largest wildfire back in 2016. Others are local and others still plan to open offices in Butte County soon—watch out for a huge surge of blue collars over the next couple months. Where they’re all gonna live is anybody’s guess, unless they can bunk up with the tree crews at Tuscan Ridge. A realtor mentioned to the group—and then reiterated to me—that there’s a huge need for skilled people who can do things like fix decks, replace damaged doors and windows, etc., on the homes that survived the fire. If you fit that bill, hit up the chamber and you’ll probably find some steady work.

New blood I came across a couple of new names during my regular research recently that bear mentioning. The first is close to my heart as it’s related to my chosen field: The DogTown Howler. The newspaper based in Magalia is focused on keeping people in the loop post-Camp Fire. Editor Tammy Waller Aviles has put out one issue so far—check it out at dogtownhowler.com. The second is a particularly cool-looking venture called Burnt Barn Distilling Co. Located on the grounds of the former Chapelle de l’Artiste, which burned in the fire, the future whiskey distillery is making use of part of the foundation that remains. The pics so far look rad! breAkiNg grouNd In non-Camp Fire-related news, I made it out to Rolling Hills

Casino for the first time this past weekend (Nov. 2) for the Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians’ 25th anniversary of becoming a federally recognized tribe. To honor the occasion, the casino unveiled its massive expansion plans, which include a Fatburger and Rock and Brews restaurant/brewery/distillery. Bonus: They served foods off those menus—the Fatburger was delish, and my fave from Rock and Brews was the melt-off-the-bone ribs. Yum.

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ONE YEAR LATER

Relief and recovery on the Camp Fire’s anniversary

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riage mode. That’s how Pastor Kevin Lindstrom describes the ongoing relief efforts taking place at Magalia Community Church. Each month, the tiny chapel draws thousands of people whose lives were upended one year ago this week by the Camp Fire. Some come for furniture and other supplies needed to restart their lives. Some come for basic necessities—food, clothing, diapers. For others, the church has become home. Run by volunteers and funded by donations and a recent grant, the operation is crucial to fire survivors and perfectly illustrates the challenges and complexities of natural disaster recovery, especially for those lacking economic resources. Indeed, the church’s relief work is a lifeline. For many, its resource and recovery center has taken the place of the long-closed tent city in the parking lot of Chico’s Walmart, the Red Cross shelter at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, and the disaster recovery center in the old Sears at the Chico Mall. On the eve of Nov. 8, in this wide-ranging special report, the CN&R highlights the church’s new calling, the trauma still surfacing, the efforts of county officials to prepare for future disasters, the local district attorney’s investigation into PG&E, and many other stories worth revisiting on the anniversary of the deadliest and most destructive fire in California history.

Ground zero Historic Magalia church the epicenter for ongoing, much-needed relief efforts

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he dragon chased Willie Snow out of Magalia. That’s the way he remembers the Camp Fire. A ferocious blaze that he said seemed to instinctively track and pursue the living. Snow and his longtime partner, by Andre Byik and Laurette Smith, both 60, snaked Ashiah Scharaga through Paradise in a Nissan Sentra to escape the flames—at times surrounded by fire and pitch black conditions. Vehicles lined either side of the road. Some had people in them. Others were abandoned. “When we left, I remember going through three, maybe four walls of fire, and the only reason we didn’t run off the road is because I knew it was a straight road, and I didn’t want to turn around,” said Snow, whose cadence mirrors that of Sam Elliott’s as the cowboy narrator in The Big Lebowski. The fire destroyed the couple’s home. A recycler paid $35 for their scorched car. In the months that followed, Snow and Smith lived out of a white Ford van—first at the Walmart parking lot in Chico, then at Lowe’s. About five months ago, the pair moved to the campus of the historic Magalia Community Church, a ground zero of sorts for survivor relief efforts on the Ridge. A year after the fire, the property surrounding the house of worship is filled with RVs, including the one donated to Snow and Smith. Since December, it’s also been the site of a recovery center offering clothes, furniture and food. The couple consider themselves lucky. Smith works as a security guard in Chico, clocking 40-plus hours a week. Snow is a former mechanic. He helps around the church, acting as a parking adviser and keeping watch on the grounds. But did they envision being nomads a year after the Camp Fire sparked? “No, man,” Snow said. “I thought we’d be Kevin and Sandy Lindstrom of Magalia Community Church jumped into fire-relief efforts as soon as they returned to the Ridge. PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

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back to normal by now. At least in a different place.” “At least have a permanent home,” Smith added. Pastor Kevin Lindstrom presides over the Magalia Community Church. He landed there eight years ago, after working in the film industry in Culver City as an editor and then earning his master’s degree in education and leadership from the Golden Gate Southern Baptist Seminary. A family friend who attended the historic nondenominational Ridge church had told him the former pastor was set to retire. Before the fire, the future of the church was in question. Its congregation was aging and shrinking, Lindstrom said. On Nov. 8, he and his wife, Sandy, fled their home in upper Magalia and traveled to Southern California, where they have another house. The Woolsey Fire was raging at the same time, and the couple’s Simi Valley residence was on evacuation watch. “We said, ‘All right. If the [Magalia] house burns and the church is OK, we’ll move back into the church,’” Lindstrom said. “‘If the church burns and the house is OK, then we’ll come back and rebuild the church.’ We said, ‘If they’re both gone, I guess we’ve got a lot of work to do.’ Our philosophy is that we will be here as long as the need is here.” About a month passed before the Lindstroms returned to the Ridge. They found their home intact and scorched buildings and burned-out sheds at the church property. But the historic chapel, whose construction traces back to the 1850s, had survived. The couple credit neighbors who fought the fire by throwing dirt on the flames and felling threatening trees. Nearly a year after the fire, the church is greatly needed. But it’s the practical necessities—more so than spiritual offerings—that the region has come to rely upon. Each month, the church serves thou-

sands of fire survivors. According to data collected for September, nearly 4,000 families—323 of which were new to the congregation—used the recovery center. Most reported they either live or had lived in Magalia or Paradise. Others had traveled from surrounding cities and hamlets, including

Chico, Oroville, Yankee Hill, Concow and Stirling City, though others had come from as far away as Redding. The church also saw a sharp increase in September of survivors living in a house, apartment or rental property. Nearly 600 families reported living in such accommodations, up from about 250 in August. “That is very concerning to me,” said Doreen Fogle, a recovery center volunteer who has been lending a hand since Christmas, “because it says people that have been in homes and haven’t needed help all of a sudden now need help.” More stats from that month: 400 families reported living in an RV, and about 200 were living with friends or family. Fewer reported living in FEMA-supported housing. Fewer still told the church they live in cars or tents. The cost to rebuild or find a new home is a common, significant barrier, Fogle said. That’s true for Ridge resident Michael White. Before the fire, he lived in an RV park in Magalia; when he returned after the evacuation was lifted, he discovered his RV had been vandalized and ransacked. It was moldy and uninhabitable. But because his home on wheels didn’t burn, he received no government assistance, he said. Homeless and jobless, White spent the majority of the past year living in a tent, he told the CN&R. He says he recently secured an RV in Berry Creek—he’s just had trouble finding a place to park it locally. A Butte County resident for more than 20 years, he’s determined to stay on the Ridge. “I love it up here; I love the people,” he said. White visits the church recovery center once a week and says volunteers have been “extremely helpful.” Life has been rough since the fire, so he takes it one day at a time. “It’s about all we can do,” he said. “When you are surrounded by it all day long every day, it’s hard to put it in the past. … It’s a lot more than just rebuilding ourselves. It’s rebuilding the entire infrastructure of our community.” Sandy Lindstrom recalled the early

weeks following the fire, when

the Red Cross asked if the church could serve as a distribution center for supplies, including nonperishable food and warm clothes. The Lindstroms agreed, and the relief organization dumped “tons” of supplies in the church’s hall, said, “Thank you,” and left, she said. “We looked at each other,” Sandy continued, “and said, ‘Um?’” The Red Cross was the primary relief organization immediately

“When you are surrounded by it all day long every day, it’s hard to put it in the past.” —Ridge resident Michael White

after the fire, but the last of its facilities closed at the end of January. The Lindstroms called in support in the form of friends and church members. Other outside relief—such as Operation Blessing, the relief arm of the Christian Broadcasting Network—began coming in as well. After the camp site set up for survivors at the Walmart parking lot in Chico was cleared, the church was asked if it could provide meals and a place for some people to stay. “Basically, our whole response to any question is … if God is leading us to do it, we do it,” said Kevin Lindstrom, adding that the church, which has a commercial kitchen, began serving three meals a day and started allowing church members who lost everything to live on the property. An electric company installed RV hookups on-site. The pastor estimates about two dozen people still live on the property, mostly in RVs. Folks living on the grounds say that number is higher. “Originally, when people asked us how long we’d be here, we thought about other disasters and we said, ‘Well, probably 18 months to two years,’” Sandy said.

Willie Snow and Laurette Smith have lived in an RV on the church grounds for about five months. PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

“Because that’s … pretty much what you hear before people are back on their feet.” But the unprecedented level of destruction wrought by the Camp Fire has upended those expectations. Church officials say the biggest need nowadays is food. People are forgoing groceries to pay for gas to get to work below the Ridge. Survivors can “shop” at the church’s hall once per week, walking away with bread, cereal and assorted canned foods. Toiletries also are available. Everything is free. On a recent Tuesday, a line snaked through the lobby of the food distribution center and spilled outside. Indoors, survivors checked in with Fogle, who was quick to offer a warm smile and help new visitors register. More of the church’s volunteers—many of whom lost their homes in the fire— were waiting in the wings, leading each household through rows of shelves with canned and boxed CAMP FIRE C O N T I N U E D

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goods, various toiletries and even some novelty items: small succulents and LEGO sets. Kaitlin Norton was there that day with her 18-month-old son, Josh. While her home in Magalia wasn’t destroyed, her family lost it all the same. They were renters, and the owner needed to move back in after losing his home in the fire. For now, they’ve been staying in an RV on a friend’s property—they are looking to buy, but the cost of living is steep, and fire insurance is tricky to secure. “We’re in this gray zone nobody thinks about [after disasters],” she said. It’s been a struggle “just trying to get back to everyday normal life.” Norton said she has felt financial pressure mounting after the fire, with more of her family’s expenses going to rising gas and food costs. “There’s just not enough to cover everything,” she said. The church has been a “lifesaver,” she told the CN&R. Without it, “there’d be months where we didn’t have diapers or wipes or food.” Carey Livingston can relate. Her husband, Tony, had to quit working because of the toll the fire had taken on his health, she said. That day, they were able to grab a case of water, fresh veggies and fruit, cereal, paper towels and other miscellaneous items. Livingston recalled the first time her family returned to Paradise following the evacuation. Seeing the devastation, each standing home here and business there stood out in her memory. As they cried together, Livingston told her children: “These are little heartbeats. We have a pulse up here that’s not going anywhere.” Until September, the family lived in an apartment in Chico. Recently, they moved into an RV on a friend’s property in Paradise. Their plan is to purchase a lot and build. Her family is so grateful that they were finally able to return, Livingston told the CN&R from the lobby of the Magalia church’s donation center. “We were renters, so we CAMP FIRE C O N T I N U E D 20

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Staying connected

Trauma surfacing a year later, as the struggle for basic needs continues story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga as hi ahs @ n ew sr ev iew. c o m

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erle Loomis gently placed her hand over her heart as tears welled in her eyes. After the Camp Fire destroyed her home in Magalia, there were days when she fell into a “terrible depression,” she said. She took a moment to collect herself in the lobby of the Magalia Community Church’s distribution center, where she had just checked in to grab a few household goods, including food to make for her visiting grandchildren. The past year has taken a toll on her. Since April, Loomis, 72, has lived in a solar-powered trailer on her property. Before that, she moved from hotel to hotel. Adjusting to life after the fire, including the exodus of her church group and friends, has been difficult. There have been times when she wished she didn’t make it out of the blaze alive, she said. It’s the kindness of the remaining community that has kept Loomis going—she’s made friends with the volunteers at the distribution center, who greet her with big smiles and light-hearted jokes. “I just remember coming in right after the fire—[it was] raining so hard—and getting a warm blanket and a nice coat,” she said. “Mentally, it’s been the very best for me, [coming here]. … I [get] a

lot of emotional support and love.” A year after the devastating blaze, Loomis is in good company. Experts say that many survivors are still struggling emotionally. The difficulty is compounded for those who aren’t able to meet their basic needs—such as water, food, clothing and shelter—which forestalls their ability to process the trauma and start healing. Crisis outreach workers with California HOPE, a Federal Emergency Management Agencyfunded program facilitated by Butte County Behavioral Health, have been working to address these issues since the wildfire, according to program manager Jake Fender. They’ve provided individual and group counseling and support at places like the Magalia Community Church. So far, they have logged 5,597 counseling visits, Fender told the CN&R, as well as 46,398 group counseling visits, primarily with children. The team of over 20 employees provides free, confidential services, focusing on listening to survivors and providing them with referrals and tips on how to cope, Fender said. They let people know “it’s OK to not be OK.” The program is set to expire in February, but Fender is hoping for an extension—the scope of this disaster is such that the outreach workers are still encountering

people nearly a year later who are struggling to meet their basic needs. Many were underinsured and already living in poverty, he said, and the fire just exacerbated those difficulties. “We want to move into a recovery phase, but we’re still in a relief mode,” Fender continued. “Those basic needs … are not necessarily as pressing as they were in the immediate aftermath, but there are people living in their cars, people living in their tents.” Many still have nowhere to go, no support system and no economic resources, Fender said. Some need mental health services but are hesitant to take that step. Behavioral Health released data late last month that show it has retained 97.6 percent of the 612 clients receiving outpatient services in Paradise before the fire. Across the county, the number of people visiting outpatient clinics, including the county’s youth contractors, increased by 6.4 percent when comparing the six-month period before and after the fire. At her private practice, Dr. Sésha Zinn has noticed more patients starting to process their trauma now, compared with the months immediately following the disaster. That’s Get help:

Go to buttecounty.net/behavioralhealth/ campfire for a list of mental health resources.

Merle Loomis finds some necessities at the Magalia Community Church distribution center.

typical, the psychologist said—right after a traumatic event, the fightor-flight response is triggered and people are focused primarily on making sure their families are safe, getting food and water and finding a place to stay. “It takes a while to come down from the traumatic event and decompress, and that’s when things really start to set in. We’re really starting to see a lot of that trauma turn into PTSD,” continued Zinn, who is also deputy director at Behavioral Health. “[But] some people are able to process it really well, especially depending on their support systems and their backgrounds.” In particular, the anniversary of a traumatic event is triggering, Zinn told the CN&R. The best thing people can do is find a way to honor the experience they had. This will depend on the person: Some may want to take a vacation or mental health day, or spend time with family and loved ones. Others might want to visit certain places on the Ridge, or won’t know how they want to spend Nov. 8 until the day arrives, Zinn said. She cautioned people against charging ahead and pretending that the fire didn’t happen. “We cannot control what happened to us, but we can control how we respond,” Zinn said. “It really is thinking about it and considering it, for you and your family, what is the healthiest [way] to kind of honor that experience.” Zinn added that it’s important to recognize that survivors may need a shoulder to lean on that day, whether it be a counselor, friend or family member. Everybody’s reaction will be different, and people should accept whatever feelings might arise within themselves and in others. This is something to remember for years to come. “This is an event and a trauma that this community will be processing for decades,” Zinn said. “Our entire community will need to be ready to give grace.” Back at the Magalia Community Church, as Loomis grabbed a few necessities like paper towels, she told the CN&R the supplies are helpful but that she mainly comes by to be connected to her community. It has been vital for her well-being. “I’m not sure I know where I’d be emotionally [without them],” she said. “They are my friends, and this is my home.” Ω


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Focus on the future

Cindi Dunsmoor, Butte County’s emergency services officer, encourages everyone to have a “go bag” filled with essentials in the case of a speedy evacuation.

County, town learn from mistakes, prepare for other potential disasters story and photo by

Meredith J. Cooper mere d i thc @ n ew sr ev i ew. com

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hen the Camp Fire ignited nearly a year ago, nobody knew how fast it would spread or how many lives it would imperil. In fact, by the time local officials recognized they needed to start evacuating the town of Paradise, people were already losing power and cell towers were burning down. “We relied on technology for notifications and it failed us miserably,” said Jody Jones, mayor of Paradise. Cindi Dunsmoor, the county’s emergency services officer, echoed that sentiment. “You have to look at the topography and the demographics of the area,” she said, referring to not only the Paradise Ridge, where the population was aging, but also to other foothills communities like Forest Ranch and Cohasset, where cellphone and internet coverage is spotty. “We need a system that doesn’t rely on cellphones [to alert people to emergencies].” Dunsmoor has held her position for three years but has worked in the Office of Emergency Management since 2004. She’s tasked with overseeing the hazard mitigation plan, which encompasses the entire county and aims to foresee potential disasters and prepare for them. “We look at fires, floods, these public safety power shut-offs,” she said, “and then we look at our critical facilities and projects like road-widening.” The county just finished updating its hazard mitigation

plan, with input from over a dozen agencies ranging from municipalities and fire safe councils to parks districts and public utilities. In it, they outline projects that could help save people or infrastructure in the event of a disaster. Dunsmoor submitted it to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) last month and it was approved, she said, so now it goes to each of those agencies for adoption. Thing is, not every project will be completed, nor are they required to be. So, while the county has set a priority for widening Cohasset Road, for example,

the only way in and out of that community, there’s no guarantee it’ll happen. “It’s a wishlist,” Dunsmoor said. Many of the projects laid out in the previous plan, completed every five years, were never realized, she explained. That’s because they tend to be costly—widening a road or executing large-scale tree and brush removal can run into the millions. But by including those projects in the hazard mitigation plan, they become eligible for annual grant funding, as well as for post-disaster FEMA assistance. “We had more districts join [the plan process] because of the flooding that hap-

PG&E expects to place 23 miles of power lines underground in Paradise by year’s end

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ince PG&E announced in May it would bury its electric distribution power lines and infrastructure in Paradise and parts of lower Magalia, work has begun in earnest, and the utility says it is on track to complete 23 miles of construction by the end of this year. In all, PG&E’s underground electric project will cover 199 miles in the town of

An albeit dull silver lining of any disas-

ter is the ability to rebuild with more insight. For Paradise, which lost 90 per-

Paradise—a move that could keep roads clear of power poles and lines in case of future evacuations, according to spokesman Paul Moreno. The project originally was expected to take about five years, but Moreno did not commit to that proPHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK jected timeline in a recent interview with the CN&R, saying construction could be affected by other infrastructure projects the town is pursuing. He said the company is working with the town so as not to conflict with planned engineering for future road and/or sewer projects. Temporary overhead lines will serve customers during construction. The cost is estimated in the millions of dollars, Moreno said, though he could not provide a more specific estimate. There could be some overlapping work in the form of “joint trenching” for gas and electric lines. (Moreno said PG&E is replacing 74 miles of gas lines in Paradise.) The cost of converting overhead electric lines to underground is estimated at $3 million per mile, according to PG&E’s website (go to tinyurl.com/PGEunderground). The utility has said the project will not come at an additional cost to the town or customers. Putting distribution lines underground could help prevent fires sparked by PG&E has begun trenching up the Skyway—part of the company’s long-term plan to underground 199 miles of local infrastructure.

Burying the lines

pened after the Oroville Dam [spillway disaster],” Dunsmoor said. The Feather River Recreation and Park District, for instance, sustained significant damage during that flood, as did facilities owned by the South Feather Water and Power Agency and Lake Oroville Public Utility District. When the water receded, however, and entities like the city of Oroville began applying for FEMA assistance, they weren’t eligible.


cent of its real estate, that opportunity is huge. While some say the town should not rebuild on its existing footprint because of the vulnerability against future fires, Mayor Jones says new codes and regulations will protect the community. “Are we better prepared? We’re getting ourselves there,” she told the CN&R. “The council adopted ordinances above and beyond wildland-urban interface standards set by the state. Couple that with our defensible space ordinance and I think the town will be a lot safer.” Jones pointed to the destruction of the Camp Fire as an indication they’re on the right path. Fifty percent of the homes built after 2008— when codes were updated to require sprinkler systems in every home, among other things—survived the fire. Only 9 percent of those built before then are still standing, she said. “If anybody’s saying that rebuilding on the same footprint might not be the right idea—they say it about rural areas, but not in big cities. Look at the Getty Fire. It’s hypocritical,” she said. “If you’re going to say people should not live where there’s risk, then there should be nobody living where there are tornadoes, nobody where there are hurricanes, nobody where there are earthquakes. What we do is we adopt new building standards so they stand up in an earthquake. We build in a smarter, more resilient way. But it doesn’t mean we can’t live here.” She, Dunsmoor and Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea all emphasized personal responsibility in preparing for future disasters. Have a communication plan that

doesn’t rely on technology, get to know multiple routes out should a hasty evacuation be necessary, and take the proper precautions to safeguard your home, whether it be from fire or flood or power outage. “I talked to a guy who lived in Paradise. As he was leaving [during the Camp Fire], the road was packed with traffic,” Honea said. “But he knew that the bike path used to be an old railroad bed that went from Paradise to Chico. So, he drove down the bike path and got to safety. You’ve got to be aware and know multiple ways to get out.” The county and the town of Paradise also are working on improving their emergency alert systems. On the day of the Camp Fire, the Butte County Sheriff’s Office had one person on duty who was experienced with how to send alerts. That person sent them via CodeRED, an opt-in service, but by the time those alerts reached residents, many of them already were evacuating or in harm’s way. The fire moved so swiftly, Honea said, that it knocked out cell towers and power before a lot of people were notified. The BCSO this past summer installed high-low sirens on its vehicles that are to be used only in the case of an evacuation, Honea said. In addition, Dunsmoor said she’s talked with, for instance, a group of people who do ham radio and could, with battery or generator backup, spread the word—assuming people know to tune in. “At least the siren would say, ‘Something is happening,’” she said. “We recognize we need to build out our ability to notify people with methods that aren’t overly reliant on technology.” Ω

trees falling into overhead power lines, Moreno said. This type of system also could improve egress in cases of emergency. The underground system, however, may not spare the town from future planned power shut-offs by the utility, the spokesman said. It could be the case that a future power shut-off would include high-voltage transmission lines—like the one that sparked the Camp Fire—that ultimately feed power into Paradise. Bill Johnson, CEO of PG&E Corp., told the California Public Utilities Commission last month that intentional power shut-offs could continue over the next 10 years while the utility improves its electric system. So far, Moreno said, underground work in Paradise and Magalia has been completed or slated for construction on Cliff, Erika, Ishi and Sunset drives, Almond Street and around Merrill Road. PG&E also installed underground power lines along the Skyway from Chico to the former Tuscan Ridge Golf Club, which has been used most recently as a base camp for fire recovery workers. Another project is underway to extend the underground system eastward into Paradise. —ANDRE BYIK an dr eb@ n ew srev i ew. c o m

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didn’t think we were going to get the option of coming back up here,” she said, her voice breaking and tears welling in her eyes. This past year has been exhausting, stressful and emotionally draining, Livingston said. There have been so many hoops to jump through to reestablish their lives post-fire. But she mostly feels overwhelmed with gratitude because of the kindness she has been shown by her community, like those at the church. “I have cried, I think, more over my blessings than my losses,” she said. Outside in the parking lot, Snow

guided cars in and out of a designated area for RVs on the church property. He also talked to motorists arriving at the church to donate items, as well as departing volunteers. “That’s what keeps this place going, bud,” he told one man who had dropped off clothing. “People donating.” There are misconceptions people have about fire survivors, Snow said. Some carry the dayto-day burden of not knowing where basic necessities will come from, as well as a barrage of “what ifs”. In terms of them getting back on their feet, people may ask, “Why don’t they just ...” he said. “Well, it ain’t just.” Securing long-term housing has been a challenge for Snow and Smith. They looked into Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) housing, but would have had to relocate farther from Chico than Magalia, which would mean more wear and tear on the van during Smith’s commute to work. Snow said he’d like to rebuild on the property where his home burned, but he’s been embroiled in an ownership dispute. If the couple are forced to leave the church grounds, it would mean living in the van again. “I do appreciate the volunteers that come in here and help run this place, because a lot of people need it,” Smith said. “And the ones that donate.” Shell Morley, the Magalia

Community Church’s office manager, said the facility’s PG&E bill is about $5,000 per month; the trash bill is about $2,000, water runs about $500. And food costs can total about $2,300 per week. The operation relies heavily on donations, though a $50,000 grant recently awarded through the North Valley Community Foundation will help keep it open for the winter months. Sandy Lindstrom said the church was told early on in community meetings that area churches likely would carry much of the load for ongoing relief. After the news trucks left, she said, many efforts by various other groups evaporated. The Lindstroms maintain they aren’t experts in this type of service, and, a year later, they say they’re still in triage mode. It feels at times like they are putting Band-Aids on survivors, trying to steer them in the right direction, they say.

Kaitlin Norton, pictured with her son, Josh, says the church is a “life-saver.” She’s one of the thousands of Ridge residents who has sought help for necessities in the wake of the fire. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

“We’re dealing with stuff that’s way over our heads,” Sandy said, noting a difficult experience she had with a survivor suffering from a mental health crisis. “They’re overwhelmed,” she said. “They don’t know what to do or where to turn.” The church offers counseling services on the property, but more is needed, Sandy said. The Lindstroms’ children ask them how they continue to operate the recovery center. “It’s where the Lord wants us to be,” Sandy said. “And He said, ‘OK, this is here, and I’ll help you if you do what I ask you to do.’” Her husband echoed her. “I basically can’t imagine not doing it,” the pastor said. Ω

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Arts &Culture

Jdestroyed the Camp Fire had the Norton

ust one month after

Variety show to bring community together for Camp Fire anniversary

Buffalo Hall—as well as the homes of most of the members of the Paradise Community Guilds organization that operated the facility—there was dancing. Despite initial worries that it might be too soon, President David Zink (whose Magalia home burned down) and the other guild members honored the by Dec. 12 booking of Jason Cassidy Greenland singer/songwriter Simon Lynge, j aso nc@ newsrev i ew.c om hosting the show at the Chico Guild Hall, where Preview: roughly 50 people Joy Will Find a Way Two shows: sunday, turned out. “Toward the end of nov. 10, 2 p.m. & 5:30 p.m. the show, [Lynge] was Link for tickets (by doing some tunes that donation) at norton buffalohall.com were just so up[beat]—it Call 762-1490 for info. got us up and dancing,” Zink said during a Paradise recent interview. “It was Performing Arts the first moment any of Center 777 nunneley road us had had a chance to feel a lightness after the Camp Fire. And it was beautiful, and it was joyous, and what a release and a relief to feel that things were going to be OK.” This Sunday, Nov. 10, there will be another chance for meaningful communal merriment as local performers fill the stage at the Paradise Performing Arts Center (PPAC) for Joy Will Find a Way, a variety show commemorating the one-year anniversary of the start of the Camp Fire. “What better indicator of life renewing itself, of our resilience, is there than creativity?” asked Zink. “As folks have been responding to their pain with creativity— even if it’s just a howl to say, ‘I hurt’— that creative expression itself is an expression of life rising, [of] that resilience. 24

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“That’s what hope is about, and that’s what this show is about. We want to put the spotlight on that dynamic in the community as it’s actually happening.” The show is part of a weekend of Camp Fire anniversary events overseen by an ad hoc committee made up of various community groups and arts organizations calling itself Camp Fire Anniversary Remembrance Events Committee (or CARE). (See Camp Fire calendar opposite page for listings of anniversary-related events.) Zink said that the plan for the PPAC event is for there to be a narrative arc to the performances (which will have two showings, 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.): from pre-Camp Fire, to the day of the fire and the immediate aftermath, to community resurgence, and finally an eye to the future. Highlights include many original compositions, with performances of songs written post-fire by two burned-out Ridge residents, Mark McKinnon and JohnMichael Sun, as well as a couple of works presented by the Paradise Symphony Orchestra—“Song for a Glorious Day” by Trevor Lloyd, and a tribute from conductor Lloyd Roby called “March of the First Responders.” There also will be performances by Theatre on the Ridge players, climate-action films by Nirvan

Mullick and Allen Myers, artworks curated by Paradise Art Center Museum and Museum of Northern California Art, and the culmination of a poetry project with area junior high and high school students. Bay Area poet Anna Sergeeva worked with Paradise students and their English teachers to write about their “wishes” for the future, and the 229 works were edited down and stitched together to form one piece, “86 Wishes for a New Dawn,” which will be recited with accompaniment by the symphony and a drone-footage film of Paradise. Zink will perform as well, debuting his hymn “Pines of Paradise,” playing the first half solo at the beginning of the program, and the other half with the orchestra and a chorus at the end. The show is a benefit for the PPAC and the Norton Buffalo Hall. Zink says that the long-range goal is to rebuild the hall (currently dubbed Norton Buffalo Hall West as it temporarily operates out of Chico Guild Hall), as well as to collaborate with other arts groups on the Ridge— such as Theatre on the Ridge, Paradise Art Center, Paradise Gem & Mineral Club and Gold Nugget Museum—“to brand Paradise as a destination for a cultural and arts experience.” He sees Sunday’s event as the first step. “This is when we begin to say to the world, ‘Paradise is a destination for arts and culture. We’ve got a vibrant thing happening here. It’s a worthwhile place to live, you ought to come. And if you can’t live here, you should visit here often because we’re going to be doing interesting things.’” Ω

THIS WEEK 7

THU

Special Events A PEACE TO END ALL PEACE? HOW THE FIRST WORLD WAR ENDED: Chico  State Department of History prsesents discussion on the  peace treaties that brought the Great War to an end.  Thu, 11/7, 7:30pm. Free. Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall, Chico State.  www.csuchico.edu

Theater BRIGHT STAR: Created by Steve Martin and Edie Brickell, this  original musical tells a tale of love and redemption set  against the backdrop of the American South in the 1920s and  ’40s.  Thu, 11/7, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735  Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

LET THE RIGHT ONE IN: Enchanting, brutal vampire myth and  coming-of-age love story adapted from the best-selling novel  and award-winning film.  Thu, 11/7, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room  Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

David Zink leading a group of players in the Norton  Buffalo Hall, which was destroyed in the Camp Fire. PHoTo by Ken Pordes

PHoenIX Key ProJeCT Friday, Nov. 8 6295 Skyway, Paradise

see CAMP FIRE CALENDAR (oPPosITe Page)


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

CAMP FIRE ANNIVERSARY EVENTS

7

THU

WE STAND TOGETHER Saturday, Nov. 9 Paradise Alliance Church

CALIFORNIA BANJO EXTRAVAGANZA: Benefit concert for Norton Buffalo Hall (which was destroyed in the Camp Fire) and the Paradise Performing Arts Center featuring some of the best bluegrass pickers in the world, including Bill Evans, Gina Furtado and Leroy Troy. Thu, 11/7, 7pm. $40. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. eventbrite.com

SEE CAMP FIRE CALENDAR (THIS PAGE)

COMIN’ ON STRONG: Free community cookout featuring live music, free Thanksgiving turkeys and “Tell Your Story” booths. Thu, 11/7, 2-6pm. Magalia Pines Baptist Church & Recovery Center, 14098 Skyway, Magalia. magaliapines.org

PARADISE ON ICE OPENS: The seasonal ice-skating rink is back, open daily noon-2:30pm & 3:30-6pm, through Jan. 20. Terry Ashe Recreation Center, 6626 Skyway Paradise, 872-6972, paradiseprpd.com

8

FRI

Special Events BEHIND THE CURTAIN: An inside look at how the North State Symphony prepares for a concert in a special rehearsal staged in the gallery. There will be a no-host bar and chance to mingle with the musicians. Fri, 11/8, 2pm. $20. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: Three-day, multi-venue comedy fest presented by Cause-Worthy Comics that benefits Safe Space Winter Shelter. See Nightlife, pages 30-31, for more details. Fri, 11/8. facebook.com/causecomics

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 11/8, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music ALEX VINCENT: Chill tunes throughout the day

with guitar and vocals by local favorite. Fri, 11/8. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

CAMERON FORD: Local singer/songwriter performs for happy hour. Fri, 11/8, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater BRIGHT STAR: See Thursday. Fri, 11/8, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

CARRIE: Musical adapted from the Stephen King classic that tells gory story of a high school outcast with telekinetic powers who gets revenge on prom night. Fri, 11/8, 7:30pm. $12$20. Butte College, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville. butte.edu/drama

LET THE RIGHT ONE IN: See Thursday. Fri, 11/8, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

9

SAT

Special Events ALL CHURCH BAZAAR: Holiday market featuring handcrafted items, baked goods and white elephant items. $5 lunch from 11am to 1:30pm. Sat 11/9, 9am. First Baptist Church, 903 First St., Orland.

AUTUMN IS HERE NATURE WALK: Adventure Quest takes you on a seasonal tour to learn about trees and the critters that rely on them. Sat 11/9, 10am. Hooker Oak Park, 1928 Manzanita Ave.

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: See Friday above and

Nightlife, pages 30-31, for more details. Sat, 11/9. facebook.com/causecomics

CHICO’S BIDWELL PARK: ITS PAST, PRESENT AND

FUTURE: Environmental educator and published author Paul Belz will provides preview

of his upcoming book on Bidwell Park. Sat 11/9, 10am. Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park, 525 Esplanade.

IMAGINE A WORLD BOOK SIGNING: Author Josh Shelton hosts book launch for inspiring new addition to his children’s I Am Adventures book series. Sat 11/9, 12pm. Yoga Center of Chico, 250 Vallombrosa Ave.

SILLY SOCK RUN-WALK: A 5K benefiting Girls on the Run Sat 11/9, 7:30am. One-Mile Recreational Area, Bidwell Park. gotrnorthstate.org/5k-Detail

TORRES SHELTER GRATITUDE GALA: Benefit for the Torres Community Shelter featuring dinner, drinks, live music and more. Sat 11/9,

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

8

FRI

ART AUCTION FUNDRAISER: Benefit for Paradise High School art program featuring silent auction of donated artworks by a variety of contributors, including Sen. Dianne Feinstein, artist Clay Vorhes and more. Fri, 11/8, 6pm. (Auction ends Sun, 11/10, 5pm.) Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

CAMP FIRE ART DISPLAY: View art celebrating remembrance, recovery and resurgence. Hosted by Paradise Art Center. Fri, 11/8, 3pm. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Road, Paradise.

CAMP FIRE REMEMBRANCE: Join the greater Butte County community in 85 seconds of silence in tribute to those lost in the Camp Fire. Fri, 11/8, 10:30am. Chico Downtown Plaza, 132 W. Fourth St.

FREE COMMUNITY MEAL: World Central

Kitchen provides a community meal. Fri, 11/8, 2:30pm. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Road, Paradise.

HOPE PLAZA GROUNDBREAKING: Ceremony to launch the Rebuild Paradise Foundation’s Camp Fire memorial project. Fri, 11/8, noon-12:30pm. 6148 Skyway. rebuildparadise.org

MAGALIA CAMP FIRE MEMORIAL: E Clampus Vitus Chapter 7-11 will unveil a memorial made from items donated by those who lost their homes in the fire. Fri, 11/8, 9:30am. Magalia Community Church, 13700 Old Skyway, Magalia, 877-7963.

PARADE OF FLAGS: Flags will be placed along the Skyway to honor the 85 Camp Fire fallen. Fri, 11/8, 8am. Skyway, Paradise.

PARADISE COMMEMORATION CEREMONY: Event

CAMP FIRE REMEMBRANCE Friday, Nov. 8 Chico City Plaza

SEE CAMP FIRE CALENDAR (THIS PAGE)

EARLY DEADLINES Due to holiday scheduling, submissions for the Nov. 27 print calendar are due by Monday, Nov. 18, 5 p.m.; and those for the Dec. 5 print calendar are due by Monday, Nov. 25, 9 a.m.

commemorating one-year anniversary of the Camp Fire. Fri, 11/8, 6pm. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Road, Paradise.

PHOENIX KEY PROJECT TRIBUTE REVEAL: Artist

REFLECTION AND HOPE: A YEAR REMEMBERED: Opening reception for group exhibit at MONCA featuring art that reflects the experiences of survivors and the community a year after the Camp Fire. Fri, 11/8, 6-8pm. Shows through Dec. 29. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

9

SAT

ADVENTIST HEALTH FEATHER RIVER CAMP FIRE REMEMBRANCE EVENT: Reunion and remembrance event to reflect and celebrate the heritage of the hospital, featuring food, displays and more. Sat 11/9, 11:30am. Adventist Health Feather River Hospital Campus, 5974 Pentz Road, Paradise.

MASTERWORKS 2: RISING ABOVE: The North State Symphony honors the anniversary of the Camp Fire with a program of resilience and hope, featuring works by Mendelssohn, Copland, Grenfell and Vaughan-Williams. Free pre-concert conductor talk one hour before the performance. Sat, 11/9, 7:30pm. $22-$40. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 8986333. northstatesymphony.org

THE RIDGE LIVES ON REMEMBRANCE & CELEBRATION FAIR: Celebrate resilience and strength after the Camp Fire at this community fair featuring live music by MixTape, children’s activities, food trucks and more. Sat 11/9, 10am. Pine Ridge School, 13835 W. Park Drive, Paradise.

WE STAND TOGETHER: Community event commemorating Camp Fire anniversary featuring keynote speaker and former NFL star Tim Tebow, magician Justin Flom, and artist Shane Grammer livepainting his “Hope Rising” mural. There will also be food, rides, a bounce house and more. Sat 11/9, 3:30pm. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark Road, Paradise. westandtogether.info

10

SUN

CAMP FIRE ART DISPLAY: Art exhibit celebrating remembrance, recovery and resurgence moves from Paradise Alliance Church to the performing arts center. Hosted by Paradise Art Center. Sun, 11/10, 3pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road.

JOY WILL FIND A WAY: A day of remembrance, recovery and resurgence post-Camp Fire, with music, poetry, visual arts, theater, film and dance presentations by many Ridge artists and friends from the rest of Butte County and beyond. Performers include Paradise Symphony Orchestra, Theatre on the Ridge, Butte County Scottish Bagpipers, Mark McKinnon & Friends, John-Michael Sun, David Leon Zink, Doin’ It Justice Chorus, Paradise Junior High and High School students, and many more. Two shows! Sun, 11/10, 2pm and 5:30pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. For more info call 762-1490. norton buffalohall.com

Jess Mercer unveils Camp Fire memorial project that used keys from survivors to create a phoenix sculpture. There will be music, a speech and 85-second moment of silence to honor the 85 lives lost during the fire. Fri, 11/8, 10:30am. 6295 Skyway, Paradise.

N O V E M B E R 7, 2 0 1 9

CN&R

25


THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

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REFLECTION AND HOPE: A YEAR REMEMBERED

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Music THE DALES: Five-piece Americana roots-rock band from L.A. perform for brunch. Sat, 11/9, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Shows through Dec. 30 Museum of Northern California Art

MASTERWORKS 2: RISING ABOVE: The North State

SEE ART

Symphony’s program of resilience and hope, featuring works by Mendelssohn, Copland, Grenfell and Vaughan-Williams. Free preconcert conductor talk one hour before the performance. Sat, 11/9, 7:30pm. $22-$40. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. northstatesymphony.org

Theater BRIGHT STAR: See Thursday. Sat, 11/9, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

CARRIE: See Friday. Sat, 11/9, 7:30pm. $12-$20. Butte College, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville. butte.edu/drama

LET THE RIGHT ONE IN: See Thursday. Sat, 11/9, 7:30pm. $15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

10

SUN

Special Events CALIFORNIA WATER STORIES FILM FESTIVAL: Films that explore the complexities of water in California from diverse perspectives— Indigenous groups of California, agricultural laborers, activists, fishermen, politicians, farmers, citizens and stakeholders. Sun, 11/10, 3pm. Free. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

CHICO LOL-A-PALOOZA: See Friday previous page and Nightlife, pages 30-31, for more details. Sun, 11/10. facebook.com/ causecomics

Music KYLE WILLIAMS: Brunch tunes with local singer/ songwriter. Sun, 11/10, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

RED, WHITE & BLUES FESTIVAL: All-day celebration of blues and craft beer with performances by Tab Benoit, Whiskey Bayou Revue, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s and Pamela Rose. Sun, 11/10, 1pm. $30. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

Theater BRIGHT STAR: See Thursday. Sun, 11/10, 2pm. $16-$22. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

13

WED

Music PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND: Chico Performances presents the legendary New Orleans jazz group plus Yusa and special guests celebrating Afro-Caribbean jazz with a program titles Tuba to Cuba. Wed, 11/13, 7:30pm. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 8986333. chicoperformances.com

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 30

26

CN&R

N O V E M B E R 7, 2 0 1 9

Art 1078 GALLERY: The World Evades Us: Surveying Composite Meanings of Place, inspired by Chico’s natural and built landscapes, artists Melanie Treuhaft, Tammy LePham and Shanna Sordahl bring together light, architecture, and sound to construct this immersive installation. Through 11/10. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

CHICO ART CENTER: Dia de los Muertos Art & Altar Exhibition, traditional and contemporary art pieces honoring the dead. Through 11/22. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Christine MacShane, paintings by local artist. The Enloe Cancer Center, Healing Art Gallery shows work by artists whose lives have been touched by cancer (survivors, caretakers and healthcare givers). Through 1/24. 265 Cohasset Road.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: To Freeze the Shifting Phantasmagoria, exhibit investigates diverse strategies emerging in contemporary painting, highlighting work by California artists. Through 12/14. Chico State, ARTS 121. headleygallerycsuchico. com

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Reflection and Hope, group exhibit featuring art that reflects the experiences of survivors and the community a year after the Camp Fire. Also, Bench Press, benches by 13 artists who work in diverse media. Opening reception Nov. 8, 6-8pm. Through 12/29. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Two Powerful Points of View, exhibit featuring work by artists Valerie Payne and Chuck Prudhomme. Through 11/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Courage, solo exhibition by Vanessa Wolfe at gallery inside Upper Park clothing store. Through 11/30. 122 W. Third St. provisionsgallery.com

RED TAVERN: Flora, Fauna and Fields, eclectic exhibit featuring paintings in oils and watercolor by Eva Farley, Candy Matthews and Dolores Mitchell. Through 1/1. Free. 1250 Esplanade.

THE TURNER: 3rd Story Prints with Prose, prints alongside Chico State students’ flash-fiction works inspired by the museum’s collection. Through 12/14. Free. Chico State. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Unbroken Traditions Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker Families in Northern California, exhibition represents the culmination of one year of research and collaboration between Mountain Maidu weavers, other tribal experts, museums studies students, faculty and curators. Through 5/15. Chico State, 400 W. First St.


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CN&R

N O V E M B E R 7, 2 0 1 9

‘Burnt offerings’ Paradise artist, fire survivor illustrates fundraising books

Ipitch-black endured a fiery escape down the Skyway on Nov. 8,

f you’re one of the thousands who

the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

TE A C I F I T R GIFT CE

SCENE

2018, it would be understandable if you chose not to watch footage of by Jason Cassidy the disaster that’s being rebroadj aso nc @ cast repeatedly to new srev i ew. c o m mark the Camp Fire’s one-year anniversary. Each person will process the trauma differently, and your timeline may or may not yet allow for such visceral reminders. Steve Ferchaud was a refugee that morning. The Paradise artist and his girlfriend, Jan Blair, went through a harrowing 2 1/2 hour evacuation and were among the thousands who lost their homes. But talking to Ferchaud now, it’s obvious he’s already ahead of the curve. When asked during a recent interview if the reminders of the fire are too much to bear, he says it’s actually kind of a point of pride for him that he made it out: “You almost look at it the other way, and [say to yourself], ‘I went through that and I’m still here. Those people driving through the flames … I went through that.’” It’s just the sort of outlook you’d want from someone working on a book called Finding Hope in Paradise. The illustrated children’s book is a fundraiser for Youth on the Ridge Community Foundation and a collaboration with writer (and longtime local television news anchor) Debbie Cobb, and without giving too much away, Ferchaud says it tells the story of the Camp Fire through the eyes of a young girl whose cat named Hope gets lost during the evacuation. (Debbie

LaPlant Moseley—director of Youth on the Ridge/Paradise Chocolate Fest—is credited with story’s concept.) The book is expected to debut at the Christmas Preview in downtown Chico (Nov. 24). Despite his losses—in addition to his home and all of its contents, nearly all the art he ever made was destroyed (“The only artwork that survived was artwork I gave away.”)—Ferchaud says he’s found peace largely due to the kind, selfless responses of his family and community. “To be honest, I think I have a good attitude because Chico was so great,” he said. “It was incredible how this town pulled together. I didn’t want [for] anything. People would just go, ‘You need this? Here. You need art supplies? Here.’” Immediately after the fire, a niece in Chico took him and his girlfriend in for five months until Steve Ferchaud in his studio. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

An evacuation scene from Finding Hope in Paradise ART BY STEVE FERCHAUD

they could find other housing. And friends and fellow Camp Fire refugees Les and Jessica Cummings opened up an office at their Digital Print and Design business in Chico for Ferchaud to use as a studio. “The story is not the fire itself, it’s how people were being at their best when things were at their worst,” he said. In an attempt to contribute what he called a “wave of human kindness,” Ferchaud immediately got to work trying to help the best way he knew how—by drawing. In fact, he’s already released one fundraising book. Burnt Offerings (available at ABC Books in Chico and on Amazon) is a collection of drawings Ferchaud did as part of Inktober, an online challenge that provides one-word art prompts every day in October to encourage artists to create 31 new pieces in one month. Ferchaud posted his daily drawings on social media during the 2017 and 2018 challenges, and it had been frequently suggested that he collect them in a book. The only problem: All of the drawings had burned. So Ferchaud just redrew them—all 62 of them—using his uploaded images as guides. He also included few extra pieces depicting treasured places lost to the fire, including the Honey Run Covered Bridge and Mendon’s Nursery. He then compiled them in a book with the help of Brian Curtis and his MC2 Design firm in Chico With Finding Hope in Paradise, Ferchaud was able to process some of his own experiences in telling the


Residential & Commercial story of a girl and her cat. Many people, objects and scenes are drawn from Ferchaud’s own experience, including one of his car driving by a burning Paradise sign. Ferchaud was born and raised in

Red Bluff. He came to Chico in 1981, and after a fortuitous meeting with a graphic designer at Chico State, he got started creating some of Chico’s most recognizable imagery. “I took all the artwork I had to Chris Ficken [at the university] … I showed him my artwork and he goes, ‘Steve, just go out there and get professional experience,’” Ferchaud said. “That was the best advice I was ever given.” His early work included doing caricature drawings for the local Merry Standish comedy show posters, as well as frequent illustrations for the Chico News & Review. Ferchaud’s celebrity-filled Woodstock’s Pizza ads were eagerly anticipated each week, and his works have likely graced more CN&R covers than any other artist’s. Ferchaud branched out to designing logos for businesses (including the iconic Roland’s Red image for the shuttered Butte Creek Brewing Co.) and illustrating children’s books—Rhyk Gilbar’s Shmerkli and the Booger Picker; Dan T. Davis’ award-winning A Carpenter’s Legacy: A Christmas Story; and an earlier collaboration with Cobb, Gracie’s Big Adventure: With Augustine the Beaver, to name a few. He’s currently working with Peter Gottesman, a writer in New York who was more than understanding when he heard Ferchaud had to restart his drawings for their project after the fire. “He found out I had this old Silver Age comic-book collection that got lost, so he started sending me all these really old comic books,” Ferchaud said. “And he just sent me an autographed picture of Linda Carter as Wonder Woman. My clients have been just incredible.” Standing in his temporary studio surrounded by various gifts of comics and toy figures and piles of drawings and paintings completed in just the past year, Ferchaud portrayed an image of an artist who wasn’t burned out. “It’s gone,” he said, remembering what the fire took. “[But] as somebody said, ‘The creator is still here.’” Ω

Carpet, Rugs & Upholstery Cleaning

Pictures of tragedy Two more Camp Fire art books raise money for relief Colorful shards in post-fire wreckage of a glass shop in The California Camp Fire: Reflections and Remnants. PHOTO BY RON SCHWAGER

G N I K N A E L C by D Inc.

By Michael DeHart • 530.345.9907

(Below) Melissa Schuster, owner of Chapelle de L’Artiste arts/events complex, one of the portraits in People Places and Pieces of Paradise. PHOTO BY DOUGLAS KEISTER

Dphoto-heavy a career of creating coffee table

ouglas Keister has made

books—dozens of them on architecture, cemeteries, travel trailers, etc. People, Places and Pieces of Paradise is closer to home for the Chico photographer as he documented the “inferno, aftermath and recovery of the most destructive wildfire in California history” with a collection of images of the town and portraits of the people impacted. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to arts organizations and the library in Paradise. Another photo book— The California Camp Fire: Reflections and Remnants—takes a more abstract approach, with Chico studio photographer Ron Buy the books: Burnt Offerings

$10, at ABC Books (950 Mangrove Ave.) and Amazon.com Finding Hope in Paradise Reserve a copy by emailing debbie@ chocolatefest.us or calling 342-4896 People, Places and Pieces of Paradise $35, paradisebook.org The California Camp Fire: Reflections and Remnants $45, thecampfirebook.com

Schwager joining forces with writer Phil Midling and graphic designer Connie Ballou to make “An Artful and Meaningful Documentation of the California Camp Fire,” according the to the book’s subtitle. The book is divided into two sections, with one part featuring monochromatic portraits of fire survivors alongside text of their stories, and the other a collection of full-color images featuring details from the fire’s aftermath. A portion of proceeds will be donated to the Butte Strong Fund. —JASON CASSIDY j aso nc @new srev i ew. c o m

N O V E M B E R 7, 2 0 1 9

CN&R

29


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 11/07—WEDNESDAY 11/13 WHITEY MORGAN: Salt-of-the-earth honkytonk artist from Flint, Mich., performs. Country singer/songwriter Alex Williams shares the bill. Thu, 11/7, 8pm. $20-$75. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

WHITEY MORGAN Tonight, Nov. 7 Senator Theatre

8FRIDAY

SEE THURSDAY

ALEX VINCENT: Chill tunes throughout the day with guitar and vocals by local favorite. Fri, 11/8. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

BIG BAD BOOGIE ROCK: High-energy

7THURSDAY

LAURIE DANA: Local vocalist and pianist Laurie Dana performs with John James and special guests. Thu, 11/7, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

CALIFORNIA BANJO EXTRAVAGANZA:

Benefit concert for Norton Buffalo Hall and the Paradise Performing Arts Center featuring some of the best bluegrass pickers around, with Bill Evans, Gina Furtado and Leroy Troy. Thu, 11/7, 7pm. $40. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. eventbrite.com

LIVING KARAOKE BAND PRESENTS JOHN LENNON: Live band plays backup to locals singing your favorite John Lennon hits. Thu, 11/7, 6pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

MARK MCKINNON AND FRIENDS: Local singer/songwriter performs with special guests. Thu, 11/7, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

CHICO ROAST LEAGUE: A combination of

standup and roast battles. Thu, 11/7, 8pm. $5-$7. The Lab, 250 Cohasset Road, Ste. 10.

JONATHAN RICHMAN: Local trouba-

THE SHIVAS: Awesome garage rock

dour /Modern Lovers founder. Plus, Sunday Iris. Thu, 11/7, 6:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

band from Portland performs, locals Viking Skate Country and Sex Hogs II share the bill. Thu, 11/7, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

retro funk and rock band performs hits from the ’70s and ’80s. Fri, 11/8, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

BRADLEY RELF: Local singer/guitarist

serenades. Fri, 11/8, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham. almendrawinery.com

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: BREW KETTLE: Comedy Showcase, part of threeday comedy fest that benefits Safe Space. Hosted by Dillon Collins and featuring Mark Leathers, Sydney Hupp, Phillip Corbin. Jerm Leather and many more. Fri, 11/8, 7pm. $10. Brew Kettle Taproom and Bottle Shop, 995 Nord Ave. Ste. 150. facebook.com/causecomics

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: NAKED LOUNGE: Comedy Night, part of three-day comedy fest that benefits Safe Space. Featuring Annie Fischer, Cassidy O’Brien. Robyn Engel, Eliza

Protecting Your Art from Clone to Cola!

Odegard, Elle LaFaye and Apryl Demetropoulos. Fri, 11/8, 8pm. $8. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St. facebook.com/causecomics

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: SPEED COMEDY: Rapid-fire comedy by every comedian taking part in the three-day comedy fest that benefits Safe Space. Fri, 11/8, 10pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. facebook. com/causecomics

CRANK IT UP

In the wake of their just released new album, Dark Thoughts, Portland veteran garage rockers The Shivas will be tearing through town with a stop at The Maltese tonight (Nov. 7). This band is legendary live, shredding the stage with an immersive sound that will blow your ears off in a good way. Locals Viking Skate Country and Sex Hogs II share the bill for one helluva night. Be there or be square.

DEFCATS: Cover band plays all your favorite classic rock and pop songs. Fri, 11/8, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave. unwinedchico.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, BOB LITTELL: Tasteful trio performs a wide variety of music during dinner. Fri, 11/8, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

LIL PETE: Rapper from the Bay

Area. Fri, 11/8, 8pm. $25-$50. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. jmaxproductions.net

NEIL DIAMOND NIGHT: Tribute to Neil

Diamond. Fri, 11/8, 7pm. $25. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville.

9SATURDAY

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: BOB’S COMEDY & MUSIC SHOW: Part of three-day comedy fest that benefits Safe Space. Headliner Erikka Innes from Los Angeles, and a lineup of local and out-of-town comedians. Music by

Legit Supreme. Sat, 11/9, 8pm. $5-$8. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. facebook. com/causecomics

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: DUFFY’S: Comedy Night, part of three-day comedy fest that benefits Safe Space. Featuring: Jesse Clark, John Ross, Travis Dowdy, Sam Mallett and more. Sat, 11/9, 8:30pm. $10. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St. facebook.com/causecomics

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: HANK DUKE’S GOOD TIMES VARIETY SHOW: Part of

tickets available at the door!

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Oroville State Theater • Fri, Nov. 8, 7-9PM • www.orovillestatetheatre.com State Theater, Red Bluff • Thurs, Nov. 14, 7- 9PM • www.brownpapertickets.com EL Rey Theater, Chico • Sat, Nov. 23, 7- 9PM • www.elreychico.com

three-day comedy fest that benefits Safe Space. Hank Duke hosts a night featuring Cassidy O’Brien, Don Ashby, Rich Morarre, Dean Waters, Thunder Lump, Legit Supreme and more. Sat, 11/9, 7:30pm. $7/advance; $12/day of. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. facebook.com/causecomics

EKALI: Canadian DJ and producer performs. Sat, 11/9, 8:30pm. $22-$25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 TEMPO REGGAE PARTY: Day and night party featuring reggae, dancehall, dub and roots from NorCal’s top DJs, bands and soundsystems, plus a delicious $20 buffet. Sat, 11/9, 5pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road.

10SUNDAY

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: CHICO IMPROV:

CALIFORNIA BANJO EXTRAVAGANZA JAZZ X-PRESS SOUL-CIOLOGY: A special night celebrating jazz with Chico State’s house band. Sat, 11/9, 7:30pm. $6-$18. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State. 898-6333. csuchico.edu/soa

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, BOB LITTELL: See Friday. Sat, 11/9,

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

JOURNEY’S EDGE: Don’t stop believin’! It’s a Journey cover band playing the songs you can’t get out of your head. Sat, 11/9, 9pm. $10. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

KATIE BARRETT & FRIEND: Live music, beer and food. Sat, 11/9, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

LONG TIME: The hits of Boston. Sat, 11/9, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

Tonight, Nov. 7 Paradise Performing Arts Center SEE THURSDAY

THE MANIMALS: Funk/reggae band plays for late-night happy hour. Sat, 11/9, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

NOCHE LATINA: Put on your nice clothes and head to El Rey for a night of dancing. All ages. Sat, 11/9, 7pm. $10. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

PAISANI: Local quartet plays instrumental Italian, Latin and Sicilian jazz. Sat, 11/9, 7pm. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive.

SAFETY ORANGE: Goofy San Diego trio

plays surf, rock and reggae. Sat, 11/9, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

Chico Live Improv Comedy takes part in three-day comedy fest that benefits Safe Space. Sun, 11/10, 7-9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. facebook.com/causecomics

CHICO LOL-APALOOZA: OPEN MIC & FINALE: Three-day comedy fest benefitting Safe Space comes to an end. Sun, 11/10, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

IN FLAMES: Sweden’s leading metal band. Red and Arrival Of Autumn share the bill. Sun, 11/10, 7:30pm. $25-$150. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

JOHN SEID AND LARRY PETERSON: Relaxing tunes by local favorites. Sun, 11/10, 6pm. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W 5th St.

RED, WHITE & BLUES FESTIVAL: Allday celebration of blues and craft beer with performances by Tab Benoit, Whiskey Bayou Revue, and more. Sun, 11/10, 1pm. $30. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

EARLY DEADLINES Due to holiday scheduling, submissions for the Nov. 27 print calendar are due by Monday, Nov. 18, 5 p.m.; and those for the Dec. 5 print calendar are due by Monday, Nov. 25, 9 a.m.

13WEDNESDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices with local duo. Wed, 11/13, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

SAFETY ORANGE: See Saturday. Sun, 11/10, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

11MONDAY

KEVIN BURKE: Irish fiddle master performs traditional Irish and Celtic tunes. Mon, 11/11, 6:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

SARCHASM: Bay Area pop punk band for Monday night rager. Sac’s Danger Inc. and locals Twitch and Cityslick share the bill. Mon, 11/11, 7pm. $5-$7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

12TUESDAY

HORRENDOUS 3D: Crusty punk rock

band from Portland performs, along with Fucking Lovers from Philly and locals Fall Children and Roaring Lion. All ages. Tue, 11/12, 8pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

QUEERS TO THE FRONT TALK, PLUS LIVE MUSIC: Trans talk by Maja and live music from SCOUT and Beth Munroe. Tue, 11/12, 6pm. $5-$10. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

THE FUNKY KNUCKLES: Atypical funk band of improvising musicians from Dallas. Wed, 11/13, 8pm. $10. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

JAZZ II AND CONCERT BAND BACH TO BASIE: Concert Band and Jazz II provide a wide array of concert music including Bach, Reed, Barnes, big band, fusion and more. Wed, 11/13,

7:30pm. Free. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State. csuchico.edu/soa

PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND: Chico Performances presents the legendary New Orleans jazz group plus Yusa, celebrating Afro-Caribbean jazz with a program titled Tuba to Cuba. Wed, 11/13, 7:30pm. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

SAMARIA AND PAUL: Local musi-

cians. Wed, 11/13, 6pm. The Allies Pub, 426 Broadway St., Ste. 130.

WEIRD AND WONDERFUL

If you don’t know Jonathan Richman, where have you been? The local legend and founder of The Modern Lovers performs tonight (Nov. 7) at the Chico Women’s Club. His last two albums weave a diversity of language, culture and musical genres with his signature emotive croon and lyrics pulled from your everyday life and strangest dreams. Expect some of that and much more. Local indie/folk/blues duo Sunday Iris opens.

N O V E M B E R 7, 2 0 1 9

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PFridaymovie. But the film of that name that opens in Chico (Nov. 8) has much more emotional appeal and ain & Glory may sound like an off-putting title for a

stylish beauty than even its original Spanish title—Dolor y gloria—might make you think. by But never mind the title (for Juan-Carlos now). The film becomes a more Selznick attractive proposition once you know some of the key details: it’s the latest from esteemed Spanish auteur Pablo Almodóvar; it features an exceptionally fine performance from Antonio Banderas in the central role; its mixPain & Glory tures of gloom and glory are given a Opens Friday, special poetic intensity by the characNov. 8. Pageant teristically spectacular color schemes Theatre. Rated R. devised by Almodóvar and company; its cast includes the stars Penélope Cruz and Cecelia Roth, and a wonderful child actor named Asier Flores. The film itself is a quasiThe Lighthouse autobiographical tale in which Cinemark 14. Rated R. Banderas plays Salvador Mallo, an aging Almodóvar-like filmmaker whose glory days have begun to fade amid medical problems and emotional crises, including a bout of drug addiction. The Banderas character tries to reconcile with an actor (played by a swaggering Asier Etxeandia) with whom he feuded in the past; has a brief and unexpected reunion with a former lover (the Argentine star Leonardo Sbaraglia) who is now a married man; embraces the estranged Zulema (Roth) as temporary but much-needed assistant and caregiver; visits his ailing mother (Julieta Serrano), and intermittently immerses himself in memories of his childhood (Cruz plays his mother in the flashbacks and Asier Flores plays Salvador as a very remarkable child). The characters played by Cruz, Roth and Serrano all have special meaning in the film, but the strong suit of Pain & Glory is in its offbeat, nuanced, and stereotypeaverse scenes of intimacy among men. The furiously mercurial relationship with Alberto Crespo (Etxeandia) looms especially large, and the brief reunion with the Sbaraglia character is rich in small emotional surprises. And the remembered childhood relationship of Salvador

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with an illiterate laborer (César Vicente) whom he taught to read and write has a delayed, restorative payoff for the aging Salvador in the final stages of the story. Filmmaker Robert Eggers (The Witch) has followed up

that remarkable debut effort with another venture into artfully haunted territory wherein deeply scary stuff seems to linger nearby but just out of view. The setting this time is a very isolated lighthouse on a mass of rock somewhere off the New England coast circa 1890. Two rather strange and sullen men are the sole occupants—Thomas Wake (Willem Dafoe), an old salt with a somewhat arcane and imperious sense of his duties and responsibilities, and Ephraim Winslow (Robert Pattinson), a new arrival who’s obliged to serve as a one-man maintenance crew within the steep and narrow confines of the eponymous light house. Furiously bad weather prevails all around them, but the main action of the film concerns the indoor storms and furies of this ill-matched pair who are stuck with each other’s volatile and increasingly brutal company. A spiraling descent into disparate signs of madness ensues. Jarin Blaschke’s brilliantly gloomy black-and-white cinematography prevails, to powerful effect, as does the monstrous electronic growl of Mark Korven’s musical score. Visual echoes of German Expressionism, film noir, and a few old-time documentaries from Britain exercise a certain cinematic fascination throughout the film. But the fast and loose play with mythology and madness in the two characters leaves everything in the film more or less stranded. Still, Eggers’ film scores points for sheer weirdness: Dafoe does some expressive farting and delivers a mud-spattered soliloquy while lying in an open grave; a terrifying mermaid (Valeriia Karaman) comes and goes; a demonic seagull poops on a sleeping man and then hangs around to see how he reacts when he wakes up; and Pattinson continues to seek acting adventures far, far away from the land of teenage heart throbs. Ω

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to guide more than 300 others to freedom from America’s slave states via the Underground Railroad. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Opening this week

2

Desolation Center

A documentary about the underground 1980s desert happenings—featuring the likes of econo-punks The Minutemen, rocket-firing performance artists Survival Research Lab, noise innovators Sonic Youth and Einstuerzende Neubauten, etc.—that were a precursor to counterculture fests like Burning Man and Lollapalooza. One showing: Sunday, Nov. 10, 7 p.m. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

Doctor Sleep

An adaptation of Stephen King’s 2013 followup to The Shining, staring Ewan McGregor as a grown up Danny Torrance, still messed up from the events at the Overlook Hotel. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Jojo Rabbit

A daring dark satire about a young German boy in Nazi Germany who finds out his mother has provided refuge to a Jewish girl. Oh, and the kid’s imaginary friend is Adolf Hitler. Starring Scarlett Johansson, Sam Rockwell and Rebel Wilson. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Last Christmas

Game of Thrones actress Emilia Clarke stars in this dramedy about an unlucky young woman who takes a job as a holiday elf at a department store where she meets a young man. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Midway

A historical drama about the pivotal Battle of Midway between U.S. and Japanese forces during World War II. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

4

Pain & Glory

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Parasite

This widely acclaimed South Korean dark comedy about an unemployed family’s efforts to insert themselves into—and profit from—a wealthy family won the Palme d’Or at Cannes. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Joker

Joker, the latest take on DC Comics’ Clown Prince of Crime, will go down as one of 2019’s big missed opportunities. Director/coscreenwriter Todd Phillips apparently had the green light to do whatever he wanted with the character’s story, and he also landed the perfect lead (Joaquin Phoenix) for the title role. This was a chance to tell a fresh, dark origin story from the Joker’s point of view. Phillips blew it. Phoenix, on the other hand, did not. He is otherworldly good as Arthur Fleck, a severely troubled clown and wannabe standup comic (and mama’s boy) with a condition that causes him to laugh uncontrollably at inappropriate moments. He physically and mentally disappears into the part—to the point where you may become concerned for the actor’s well-being. He accomplishes this in a film that has a major identity crisis. It’s trying to do something new (mostly via the use of extreme violence), while also riffing on something old (Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns, as well as various other comic book and cinematic influences). What’s delivered is a muddy, predictable and ultimately unoriginal film. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

3

The Lighthouse

See review this issue. Cinemark 14. Rated R —J.C.S.

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

In this sequel to Maleficent (2014), Angelina Jolie reprises her role as the evil fairy, and Elle Fanning is back as her goddaughter, Princess Aurora (aka Sleeping Beauty), and the two are at odds with one another thanks to outside forces intent on sowing discord between humans and fairies. Cinemark, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Motherless Brooklyn

Edward Norton directed and stars in this film set in 1950s New York City about a private investigator with Tourette Syndrom (Norton) who is trying to solve the murder of his mentor (Bruce Willis). Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Terminator: Dark Fate

John Cena, Keegan-Michael Key and John Leguizamo star as three firefighters who have their hands full rescuing/babysitting some kids and their dog. Hijinks! Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

The sixth film in the Terminator franchise is a sequel to the first two films (those directed by James Cameron, who returns to produce this latest installment), and stars Linda Hamilton as Sarah Connor, who teams up with a cyborg human hybrid to protect a girl from the Terminator hunting her. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing

3

Playing With Fire

The Addams Family

The creepy family made famous in the 1960s television series gets the CGI animation treatment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Arctic Dogs

A big-dog cast (Jeremy Renner, Alec Baldwin, Anjelica Huston, John Cleese, James Franco, and more) provide voices for this animated feature about a mail-delivering Arctic Fox who dreams of joining the huskies as a Top Dog. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Countdown

After downloading an app on her phone that supposedly can predict a person’s date of death, a nurse (Elizabeth Lail) learns she only has three days to live. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Harriet

Biography of famous abolitionist/activist Harriet Tubman (played by Cynthia Erivo) who, after escaping slavery in 1849, returned

Zombieland: Double Tap

For this sequel, director Ruben Fleischer returns with the whole zombie-killing crew—Emma Stone, Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson and Abigail Breslin—for a film that does little to reinvigorate the genre, but still delivers plenty of laughs and zombie gore. It’s 10 years later, and the rag-tag team has taken up residence in the abandoned White House. The basic story involves a zombiekilling road trip that leads to Graceland (sort of) and then a commune called Babylon, with a lot more zombie killing. Along the way, fun new characters are introduced, including Nevada (played by Rosario Dawson), owner of an Elvis-themed hotel, and Albuquerque (Luke Wilson) and Flagstaff (Thomas Middleditch), two zombie hunters who look and sound an awful lot like Harrelson and Eisenberg’s Tallahassee and Columbus. The best, though, is Madison, played by Zoey Deutch, a “valley girl” type who has survived all these years living inside the freezer of food-court yogurt shop in a decimated mall. Whenever the film threatens to go a bit stale, Madison will swoop in decked out in a pink leisure suit with fake fur (she’s also a vegan) to liven things up. Cinemark, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque

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N o v e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 9

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ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

A wish for love arts dEVo has watched the documentaries. If you’re a Camp Fire survivor,

Shop Local

Holiday Guides CN&R’s new holiday guides hit stands on November 14 and December 12. Don’t miss your chance to be included in these essential holiday shopping guides! Contact your advertising representative for more information today. (530) 894-2300

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N o v e m b e r 7, 2 0 1 9

don’t. I was not directly involved in the fire, nor did I live in any burned area, and it was still on the edge of being too much for me to watch. The excellent Frontline episode, “Fire in Paradise,” was doable. It was a balanced report that reenacted the events of Nov. 8 from many points of view—residents, first responders, dispatchers—and chased down the stories behind evacuation/notification and the causes of the fire (PG&E) and its severity (climate change). netflix’s Fire in Paradise, however, was rough. The interviews with the people who bravely relived the day for the camera were outstanding. But the after-fire portion was brutal, especially one particularly graphic scene that I wish I hadn’t seen. No one navigating trauma should get near it. I know there’s value in sharing stories in the processing of it all. And again, the people featured were impressively brave. I guess all I’m saying is, if you’re having a tough time, maybe hold off. And if you need help with your recovery, there are resources available. Here are two: Camp Fire Long Term Recovery Group (828-8011, campfirelongtermrecovery.org) and California HoPE of Butte County (966-7382, calhopebutte@gmail.com). Something that I can imagine being of comfort is art. I’m excited to see that Paradise art Center—closed since the fire—is reopening on the anniversary, this Friday (Nov. 8). I’m especially anticipating the unveiling of local artist Jess Mercer’s “Ridge Key Phoenix,” the Phoenix-shaped sculpture fashioned from the keys of those whose homes and cars and whatever else are no longer around to be locked up. In recent weeks, Mercer has put in place the keys she saved for last—those of the deceased, as well as the ones belonging to her family. The sculpture will be gifted to the Paradise community on Friday, and the Camp Fire memorial reveal will take place at 10:30 a.m., at 6295 Skyway. Local musician Erin Haley will perform a song with Ridgeview High school students (one written by them) at the ceremony, and afterward there will be an 85-second moment of silence in memory of those who died in the fire. You can watch a live feed of the event at makeitparadise.org. Another arts-related commemoration, the Joy Will Find a Way variety show, will take place a couple of days later (see “Art of hope,” page 24). Part of the program includes a reading of a poem written collectively by 229 Paradise junior high and high school students called “86 Wishes for a new dawn,” and I’ll hold off blathering any more and just let the kids take over. Here’s an excerpt:

I wish for love ... I wish to float through clouds, Jess Mercer fly through stars, Photo by DouglAs Keister run through fields with you, letting the colors flow through us, around us, as we glow in the arms of the moon and the sun and the sky. I wish you would hold me in your arms tonight, without you, I don’t feel quite right, I need you to tell me everything will be alright. In the dark I see you. In the light I look for you.

beer is love A quick shout out to local breweries doing good work for Camp Fire survivors. On Friday, secret Trail Brewing Co. is releasing Paradise strong ale, a bourbon-barrel-aged version of the Scotch ale that was originally brewed with the Brewers of Paradise homebrew club. A portion of its proceeds will be donated to Camp Fire relief. sierra nevada Brewing Co. just released an update on its Resilience ale campaign. The massive multi-brewery fundraising effort has pulled in $8.4 million for the Butte strong Fund! That calls for a beer and a toast to local breweries supporting the community that supports them. Cheers. Ω


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of October 21 - October 25, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

41 Crow Canyon Ct 12 Sega Dr 34 Sparrow Hawk Ln 3083 Rae Creek Dr 828 Dias Dr 15 Country Pride Ct 3255 Mystery Run 1914 Potter Rd 162 Picholine Way 717 San Antonio Dr 952 Karen Dr 1886 Bedford Dr 1707 Magnolia Ave 9 Dean Way 2950 Eaton Rd 1734 Broadway St 1610 Greenhaven Ln 46 Lacewing Ct 1 Mindy Ct 531 Reed Park Dr 1421 Locust St 1363 E Lindo Ave #8

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$895,000 $800,000 $650,000 $610,000 $565,000 $540,000 $417,000 $413,000 $392,000 $385,000 $375,000 $367,500 $362,500 $351,000 $330,000 $330,000 $330,000 $329,000 $300,000 $275,000 $260,000 $180,000

3/3 4/4 4/3 4/3 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/1 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/1 3/2 1/2

SQ. FT.

3429 2808 2476 2564 2142 1632 1759 1732 1837 1758 1885 1842 1504 1828 1314 1310 1385 1471 1418 1405 1274 1193

ADDRESS

9590 Lott Rd 9748 Lott Rd 2417 Campbell St 14185 Nimshew Rd 189 Big O Rd 2 Rosemel Ct 6309 Jack Hill Dr 31 La Mirada Ave 3885 Oro Bangor Hwy 87 Pine Oaks Rd 176 Apache Cir 11 Casa Loma Way 1608 Bridge St 2675 Oro Ave 38 Highlands Blvd 930 14th St 28 Janet Ln 2278 Oro Quincy Hwy 1784 Bille Rd 474 Castle Dr 2215 Stearns Rd 6237 Lind Ln

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Durham Durham Durham Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$750,000 $616,000 $326,000 $380,000 $650,000 $410,000 $405,000 $370,000 $335,500 $332,500 $310,000 $290,000 $269,000 $225,000 $210,000 $185,000 $175,000 $135,000 $400,000 $321,000 $294,000 $193,000

3/3 4/3 1/1 3/3 4/3 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 2/3 6/2 2/1 2/1 3/2 2/2 2/1 3/3 2/2 3/2 2/1

November 7, 2019

SQ. FT.

2683 2362 1056 1606 3068 2043 2142 2602 2029 2195 1757 1968 1672 1082 993 1620 1660 888 1713 1595 1685 884

CN&R

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REAL ESTATE TATE For more information about advertising in our Real estate section, call us at

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0001549 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BARRON PLASTERING at 5576 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. JAIME BARRON 5576 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: JAIME BARRON Dated: October 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001146 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DELICIOUS TWIST at 1940 Feather River Blvd Oroville, CA 95965. A J HAGGARD 1 Sevillano Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: A.J. HAGGARD Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001120 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitous business name DELICIOUS TWIST at 390 Purple Rocks Lane Oroville, CA 95966. LEANNA IRENE BROMLEY 390 Purple Rocks Lane Oroville, CA 95966. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LEANNA BROMLEY this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SILVERIZED TREE SERVICE at 1702 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. JEFF M SILVER II 1702 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. MANDY M SILVER 1702 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JEFF SILVER II Dated: September 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001084 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WIKIPOUCH at 1124 Almond Vista Ct Chico, CA 95926. INFECTION PREVENTION PRODUCTS, INC. 1124 Almond Vista Ct Chico, CA 95926. This busines is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KENT M. COLLINS, EVP Dated: October 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001151 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JUNK KING CHICO at 13242 Grass Valley Ave Ste 22 Grass Valley, CA 95945. PGE LYMATH LLC 6025 Happy Pines Dr Foresthill, CA 95631. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: PEGGY LYMATH, CO-PRESIDENT Dated: September 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001101 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PACIFIC NORTH CONSULTING at 1033 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. RODNEY W LACEY 1033 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. this Legal Notice continues

Signed: RODNEY LACEY Dated: October 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001163 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MI TAQUITO GRILL at 3005 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. JOVITO HERNANDEZ 27 Baltar Loop 1 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOVITO HERNANDEZ Dated: October 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001173 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOCALS CAFE at 6221 Clark Rd Paradise, CA 95926. RHONDA BERNDT DE PINEDA 944 Sheridan Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RHONDA L BERNDT DE PINEDA Dated: September 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001072 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as UNLEASHED PET HOTEL at 5260 Miocene Circle Oroville, CA 95965. RHONDA BERNDT DE PINEDA 944 Sheridan Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RHONDA L BERNDT DE PINEDA Dated: September 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001071 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE JOYMAKER at 2135 Nord Ave Spc 24 Chico, CA 95926. JOYMAKING PRODUCTIONS LLC 2135 Nord Ave Spc 24 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: TARA GROVER SMITH, PRESIDENT Dated: October 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001164 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SOLID VIBES at 2590 Mariposa Ave Chico, CA 95973. CHRISTINA ANN PETERSON 2590 Mariposa Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINA PETERSON Dated: October 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001133 this Legal Notice continues

Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MARLOW MOBILE BAR at 697 East 7th St Suite B Chico, CA 95928. JANAE CARRIGAN 697 East 7th St Suite B Chico, CA 95928. TUCKER SCHMIDT 697 East 7th St Suite B Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JANAE CARRIGAN Dated: October 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001170 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TDT CONCEPT DESIGN at 1080 East Lassen Avenue #65 Chico, CA 95973. TYLER TAPPIN 1080 East Lassen Avenue #65 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TYLER TAPPIN Dated: October 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001179 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HAGEN-SINCLAIR RESEARCH RECRUITING INC CHICO at 519 Reed Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. HAGEN-SINCLAIR RESEARCH RECRUITING INC CHICO 519 Reed Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CYNTHIA CROSS, PRESIDENT Dated: September 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001052 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as AZTECAS VIDEO AND GROC at 324 Walnut Street, Suite A Chico, CA 95928. FRANCISCO J REYES 18 Westminister Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FRANCISCO RAYES Dated: October 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001141 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RUSSELL’S SUNRISE CAFE at 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. PEACH TREE RESTAURANT INC 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: NAEEM REHMAN, VICE this Legal Notice continues


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PRESIDENT Dated: October 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001204 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PILLSBURY SQUARE APARTMENTS at 2781 Pillsbury Road Chico, CA 95973. LAPANT FARMS LLC 9032 Goodspeed St Durham, CA 959388. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ROGER JACK LAPANT Dated: September 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001109 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PYROCORP at 2515 Zanella Way #5 Chico, CA 95928. HAYDEN FIRE PROTECTION, INC. 2515 Zanella Way #5 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JEREMY HAYDEN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: October 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001113 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FAERIE HUMAN RELATIONS DEPARTMENT, IN OUR NATURE at 1844 Broadway Street Chico, CA 95928. JENNY RAE RICHMAN 1844 Broadway Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNY RAE RICHMAN Dated: October 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001112 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are 1oing business as LABELZ at 974 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. J. WITH ENTERPRISE 7749 Co Rd 61 Princeton, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: JAMIE WITHROW, MANAGING MEMBER Dated: October 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001199 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DARLING ROSE VINEYARD at 8995 Troxel Rd Chico, CA 95928. AMANDA WYLIE DARLING 8995 Troxel Rd Chico, CA 95928. GARY ANTHONY DARLING 8995 Troxel Rd Chico, CA this Legal Notice continues

95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: AMANDA W. DARLING Dated: October 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001217 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name LABELZ at 974 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. CYNTHIA E BROCHHEUSER 1941 Sycamore Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: CINDY BROCHHEUSER Dated: October 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000460 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name THE ACCOUNTING OFFICE at 1074 East Ave Ste K Chico, CA 95926. LAZARSKI ENTERPRISES, INC. 2166 Huntington Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KATHY LAZARSKI, PRESIDENT Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000876 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ACCOUNTING OFFICE at 1074 East Ave Ste K Chico, CA 95926. DEBBIE ALLEN EA INC 1074 East Ave Ste K. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARK ALLEN, SECRETARY Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001213 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ON YOUR MARK MOBILE NOTARY at 3550 Fotos Way Chico, CA 95973. ANGELA C. COOK 3550 Fotos Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANGELA C COOK Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001207 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PRANA ENDURA at 40 Constitution Dr Ste E Chico, CA 95973. CAITLIN LINSCHEID this Legal Notice continues

4 Spinnaker Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CAITLIN LINSCHEID Dated: October 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001233 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name WADE ARENA at 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. ELTA L TOWNE 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. CARYL WESTON 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ELTA L TOWNE Dated: October 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001174 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WADE ARENA at 1391 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. ROBERT J LEDOUX 1963 Air Strip Rd Redding, CA 96003. ELTA L TOWNE 1391 Clark Rd Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ELTA L TOWNE Dated: October 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001228 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO PODIATRY GROUP at 2103 Forest Avenue Chico, CA 95928. DANIEL D CAVINESS 3491 Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95928. MICHAEL L WILSON 9965 Lott Rd Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DANIEL D CAVINESS, DPM Dated: October 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001182 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 238SS JOSE ARTEAGA 6X10 (Couches, Furniture) 459CC MATHEW BOYD 6x15 (Bins, Boxes) 504CC DAVID DUNCAN 6x7 (Tool Box, Art, Boxes) 157CC SCOTT KNIGHT 6x7 (Boxes, Bins, Backpacks) 252SS TRISTIN NOBLE 5x10 (Bins, Boxes) 495CC TRISTIN NOBLE 5x7 (Books, Bins, Blankets) this Legal Notice continues

257SS SALIASI VANIQI 5x7 (Boxes, Bedding, Bags) 153CC ANDREA SMITH 5x7 (Bins, Boxes) 250SS WHITNEY WHEATON 5x5 (Camp Gear, Bikes, Boxes) 360CC1 SHERRI WHEATON 12x12 (Bags, Boxes, Bins) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday November 23, 2019 Beginning at 1:00PM Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: November 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KENNETH CHARLES REEVES II filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KENNETH CHARLES REEVES II Proposed name: KENNETH CHARLES DAGAMA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 17, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02730 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARY ANN SLYH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARY ANN SLYH Proposed name: MARY ANN DRENNAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition

this Legal Notice continues

without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 2, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02965 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MELANIE RENE REMMERT-BLEVINS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MELANIE RENE REMMERT-BLEVINS Proposed name: MELANIE RENE MCCARTHY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 8, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02964 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RICK DALLOUL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RICK DALLOUL Proposed name: REZKALLAH DALLOUL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition this Legal Notice continues

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For the week oF November 7, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Aries

psychologist James Hillman said we keep “our images and fantasies at arm’s length because they are so full of love.” They’re also quite flammable, he added. They are always on the verge of catching fire, metaphorically speaking. That’s why many people wrap their love-filled images and fantasies in metaphorical asbestos: to prevent them from igniting a blaze in their psyches. In my astrological opinion, you Aries folks always have a mandate to use less asbestos than all the other signs—even none at all. That’s even more true than usual right now. Keep your images and fantasies extra close and raw and wild.

by rob brezsNy It’ll be an excellent strategy for getting the healing you need.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran blogger

Ana-Sofia Cardelle was asked, “What is your signature perfume?” She said she hadn’t found one. But then she described how she would like to smell: “somewhere between fresh and earthy: cinnamon and honey, a rose garden, saltwater baked in the sun.” The coming days will be an excellent time to indulge in your own fantasies about the special fragrance you’d like to emanate. Moreover, I bet you’ll be energized by pinpointing a host of qualities you would like to serve as cornerstones of your identity: traits that embody and express your uniqueness.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Poet James SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Studies Merrill was ecstatic when he learned the Greek language. According to his biographer, he felt he could articulate his needs “with more force and clarity, with greater simplicity and less self-consciousness, than he ever could in his own language.” He concluded, “Freedom to be oneself is all very well; the greater freedom is not to be oneself.” Personally, I think that’s an exaggeration. I believe the freedom to be yourself is very, very important. But for you in the coming weeks, Taurus, the freedom to not be yourself could indeed be quite liberating. What might you do to stretch your capacities beyond what you’ve assumed is true about you? Are you willing to rebel against and transcend your previous self-conceptions?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Musician

Brian Eno made a deck of oracular cards called Oblique Strategies. Each card has a suggestion designed to trigger creative thinking about a project or process you’re working on. You might find it useful to call on Oblique Strategies right now, since you’re navigating your way through a phase of adjustment and rearrangement. The card I drew for you is “Honor thy error as hidden intention.” Here’s how I interpret it: An apparent lapse or misstep will actually be the result of your deeper mind guiding you to take a fruitful detour.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): We devote

a lot of energy to wishing and hoping about the meaningful joys we’d love to bring into our lives. And yet few of us have been trained in the best strategies for manifesting our wishes and hopes. That’s the bad news. The good news is that now is a favorable time for you to upgrade your skills at getting what you want. With that in mind, I present you with the simple but potent wisdom of author Maya Angelou: “Ask for what you want and be prepared to get it.” To flesh that out, I’ll add: Formulate a precise statement describing your heart’s yearning, and then work hard to make yourself ready for its fulfillment.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What are the key

parts of your life—the sources and influences that enable you to be your most soulful self? I urge you to nourish them intensely during the next three weeks. Next question: What are the marginally important parts of your life—the activities and proclivities that aren’t essential for your long-term success and happiness? I urge you to corral all the energy you give to those marginally important things, and instead pour it into what’s most important. Now is a crucial time in the evolution of your relationship with your primal fuels, your indispensable resources, your sustaining foundations.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “When she

spoke of beauty, he spoke of the fatty tissue supporting the epidermis,” wrote short story author Robert Musil. He was describing a conversation between a man and woman who were on different wavelengths. “When she mentioned love,” Musil continued, “he responded with the statistical curve that indicates the rise and fall in the annual birthrate.” Many of you have the flexibility to express yourself well on both of those wavelengths. But in the coming months, I hope you’ll emphasize the beauty and love wavelength rather than the fatty tissue and statistical curve wavelength.

suggest that on average each of us has a social network of about 250 people, of whom 120 we regard as a closer group of friendly acquaintances. But most of us have no more than 20 folks we trust, and only two or three whom we regard as confidants. I suspect that these numbers will be in flux for you during the next twelve months. I bet you’ll make more new friends than usual, and will also expand your inner circle. On the other hand, I expect that some people who are now in your sphere will depart. Net result: stronger alliances and more collaboration.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

I blame and thank the Sagittarian part of me when I get brave and brazen enough to follow my strongest emotions where they want to lead me. I also blame and thank the Sagittarian part of me when I strip off my defense mechanisms and invite the world to regard my vulnerabilities as interesting and beautiful. I furthermore blame and thank the Sagittarian side of me on those occasions when I run three miles down the beach at dawn, hoping to thereby jolt loose the secrets I’ve been concealing from myself. I suspect the coming weeks will be a favorable time to blame and thank the Sagittarian part of you for similar experiences.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Persian polymath Avicenna (980–1037) wrote 450 books on many topics, including medicine, philosophy, astronomy, geography, mathematics, theology, and poetry. While young, he tried to study the Metaphysics of Aristotle, but had difficulty grasping it. Forty times he read the text, even committing it to memory. But he made little progress toward fathoming it. Years later, he was browsing at an outdoor market and found a brief, cheap book about the Metaphysics by an author named al-Farabi. He read it quickly, and for the first time understood Aristotle’s great work. He was so delighted he went out to the streets and gave away gifts to poor people. I foresee a comparable milestone for you: something that has eluded your comprehension will become clear, at least in part due to a lucky accident.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In ad-

dition to being a key figure in Renaissance art, fifteenth-century Italian painter Filippo Lippi had a colorful life. According to legend, he was once held prisoner by Barbary pirates, but gained his freedom by drawing a riveting portrait of their leader. Inspired by the astrological factors affecting you right now, I’m fantasizing about the possibility of a liberating event arriving in your life. Maybe you’ll call on one of your skills in a dramatic way, thereby enhancing your leeway or generating a breakthrough or unleashing an opportunity. (Please also reread your horoscope from last week.)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Stand high

long enough and your lightning will come,” writes Piscean novelist William Gibson. He isn’t suggesting that we literally stand on top of a treeless hill in a thunderstorm and invite the lightning to shoot down through us. More realistically, I think he means that we should devotedly cultivate and discipline our highest forms of expression so that when inspiration finds us, we’ll be primed to receive and use its full power. That’s an excellent oracle for you.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. N o v e m b e r 7, 2019

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should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 10, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02999 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

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November 7, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ADRIANA YANETH GONZALEZ and JOSE DE JESUS GONZALEZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JESSEY JACOBO GONZALEZ Proposed name: JESSEY GONZALEZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 17, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03037 Published: November 7,14,21,27, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT NATHAN TYLER YOUNG You have been sued by petitioner: CATHRYN DENISE YOUNG You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), this Legal Notice continues

or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court Of California County of Butte Chico - North Butte County Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: CATHRYN DENISE YOUNG 1591 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: August 12, 2019 Case Number: 19FL01426 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: KENNETH R MEYER, AN INDIVIDUAL; AND DOES 1-100, INCLUSIVE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: CROWN ASSET MANAGEMENT, LLC NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico CA 95928. this Legal Notice continues

The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: RASHID SHAKIROV/SBN 318108 Persolve Legal Group, LLP (818) 534-3100 9301 Corbin Avenue, Suite 1600 Northridge, CA 91324. Dated: April 19, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV01224 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ANNA IRENE HASTINGS, aka ANNA I. HASTINGS, aka ANNA HASTINGS, AKA TONI HASTINGS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ANNA IRENE HASTINGS, aka ANNA I. HASTINGS, aka ANNA HASTINGS, aka TONI HASTINGS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JAMES KNAVER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JAMES KNAVER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your this Legal Notice continues

rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: October 8, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00458 Published: October 24,31, November 7, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RENATE RANFT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RENATE RANFT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CHRISTIANE H. RANFT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CHRISTIANE H. RANFT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-IV Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may this Legal Notice continues

want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: October 31, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00501 Published: November 7,14,21, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE TED MODESTO GIANNINI, aka TED M. GIANNINI, aka TED GIANNINI To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: TED MODESTO GIANNINI, aka TED M. GIANNINI, aka TED GIANNINI A Petition for Probate has been filed by: GINA GIANNINI in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GINA GIANNINI be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 3, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your this Legal Notice continues

rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: October 17, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00467 Published: November 7,14,21, 2019

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