__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 10 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

PAGE

18

Fall Movie Guide 4 LAMALFA’S STUNT

What’s hot in the cool season’s big-screen lineup BY BOB GRIMM

9 CHICO’S GREEN NEW DEAL? 26 HALLOWEEN WEEKEND


2

CN&R

O C T O B ER 3 1 , 20 1 9


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 10 • October 31, 2019 OPINION 

28

4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES 

8 

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES 

12

Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS 

16

Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

17 

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

17

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Jennifer Jenkins, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, David Wyles

COVER STORY  

18

ARTS & CULTURE 

22 

Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

REAL ESTATE  

35

CLASSIFIEDS  

36

ON tHe cOVer: ANgeliNA JOlie As MAleficeNt: Mistress Of eVil

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Allen Pierleoni, Thea Rood, Anne Stokes N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Julia Ballantyne, Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Art of Information Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN.

OctOber 31, 2019

CN&R

3


OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., chico, cA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Stuntman Doug LaMalfa insults constituents Rep. Doug LaMalfa thinks his constituents are idiots.

That’s our takeaway from the Richvale congressman’s decision to join a couple of dozen House Republicans and barge into a closed-door hearing in the basement of the U.S. Capitol last Wednesday (Oct. 23), where members of his party and Democrats were gathered for a deposition related to the ongoing presidential impeachment inquiry. Their complaint: that Democrats should allow the American people to hear witness testimony, not hold “secret impeachment depositions.” Joining that dog and pony show meant LaMalfa stood in solidarity with many fringe Republicans— including Iowa Rep. Steve King, a white supremacist sympathizer. To the embarrassment of California’s 1st Congressional District, his sycophantic display made national television and newspapers. Thing is, LaMalfa isn’t on any of the congressional committees involved in this fact-finding phase of the impeachment inquiry. Butte County’s welfare-king rice farmer serves on the agriculture committee (conflict of interest much?), as well as the transportation and infrastructure committee. This was nothing more than a shameful stunt designed to distract the public from the question at hand—whether the president of the United States abused his position for personal gain and threatened national security in the process. To wit, Trump is

accused of leaning on Ukraine’s president to dig up dirt on his chief election rival, Joe Biden, in exchange for weapons that would allow that developing democracy to protect itself from Russia’s continuing incursion. Speaking of compromising national security, the tantrum by the House Republicans included them taking cellphones into the Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (aka SCIF), an environment in which sensitive information can be safely discussed. LaMalfa’s performance was the second in as many weeks. On Oct. 17, he posted on Twitter a photo of himself walking through the door of a restricted area of the Capitol. “The American people deserve transparency,” he said. He’ll soon get his wish. A vote on the House floor on the rules for public hearings is expected as soon as today (Oct. 31). Interestingly, while LaMalfa’s gang chided Democrats only on procedure, Trump humiliated them by saying the process was fine. The president maintains the substance of the impeachment inquiry is off base, denying he delivered a quid pro quo. Considering the increasing cast of American patriots testifying to the contrary, and the fact that evidence thus far is quite damning, LaMalfa looks like a clown. This is serious business. Not a joke. Our advice to LaMalfa: Pull your lips off the president’s backside and stop insulting our intelligence. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Friends don’t let friends debate trumpies ATrump. closest friends in Chico staunchly supports Donald That’s probably not a shock to folks who recall s anyone who knows me well knows, one of my

my editorship of the CN&R: I aimed for open discussion in the op-ed section—and even endorsed a few conservative/ Republican candidates when deemed the right call. That editorial philosophy is not radically different from today’s. Back to my friend: He’s got Texas roots, but our common piece of ground is Arkansas. We both love sports and talk baseball. Through by the 2016 election and well past Evan Tuchinsky the 2018 midterms, we’d debate the author, a chico politics on Facebook. Mutual friends resident, was the would lurk, savoring the spectacle, cN&r’s editor from confessing in conspiratorial whispers 2006-09. how much they enjoyed me—or him—delivering verbal haymakers. They wouldn’t always realize no bad blood spilled, that at the core the dialogue is always cordial. I typically don’t engage in political discussions online. It’s a low-reward proposition. How often does a

4

CN&R

OctOber 31, 2019

reply comment change someone’s mind? Rarely, in my experience. I’ve mostly challenged my friend on his “shares” and sources. Now, I don’t even do that. I’ve reached the conclusion that there’s no point in launching rational arguments into an irrational environment. That’s not to demean my friend; he’s well-read, just comes to starkly different conclusions and chooses memes accordingly. No, it’s come from the window he and others open for me into the mindset of Trump backers. Simply put, we don’t live in the same country—or the same state. Based on the overlap in groups such as Chico First and One Chico, we don’t live in the same city, either. The divide goes beyond tribalism, affiliation with a team; Americans—Californians, Chicoans—can’t even find agreement on what’s fact and who’s reliably delivering facts. Pick an issue: homelessness, the economy, climate change, the president’s words and actions. It’s impossible to find bases of consensus in the “fake news” era. Diehards are entrenched. Appealing to logic won’t work. Save your breath; don’t get carpal tunnel syndrome. Politically engaged citizens—and candidates—should focus on independent-minded allies. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Awaiting rain With nary a raindrop in the week’s forecast and wildfires igniting all around California, I spent the weekend glued to Twitter. By Saturday afternoon, I knew my journalism colleagues and friends would be dispatched to Sonoma County to cover the Kincade Fire. The blaze had grown to 25,000 acres. So I wished them well. Journalism is one of the few professions that sends its workers to danger. People forget that. It’s a weird thing to race toward a fire. Back in the summer of 2004, as a young reporter, I was sent off to report on a wildfire in Cherokee. I was alone and had no familiarity with that Butte County hamlet. My instructions: go there and come back with a story. So, with a paper map in hand, I jumped into my white Honda Accord and drove into the smoke of what was dubbed the Oregon Fire. As I got closer, watching flames lick either side of the rural winding backroad, thus began an internal conversation. My body told me it was a bad idea to keep going, but my head said the incident command center ahead would keep me safe. I eventually came upon a couple of firefighters dousing the hillsides of the little two-way road—the only route in and out of the area. I rolled down the window, explained that I was a reporter, and jokingly—but actually kind of seriously—asked whether I was driving into certain doom. Their calm assurances that I was going in the right direction pushed me forward a few more miles. Once I made it to my destination, I spent the rest of the day tagging along with fire personnel and residents who hadn’t heeded evacuation orders. Of course, that 2,000-acre blaze 15 years ago pales in comparison to the Kincade Fire—an inferno that doubled to more than 50,000 acres by Sunday due to high winds. I’ve been keeping tabs on it fairly obsessively. Compounding my anxiety: the upcoming Camp Fire anniversary and reports of several other conflagrations around the Bay Area and beyond—Lafayette, Livermore (where I grew up) and near the Carquinez Bridge on Interstate 80 in Vallejo. Northward, in eastern Mendocino County, evacuation orders were issued for yet another fire. Closer to home, more than 600 acres in Corning were torched. Then, on Monday, a new scary blaze started in So Cal near the Getty Center. As of Wednesday morning, the Kincade Fire had grown to more than 75,000 acres. It seems cruel that some of the Sonoma County evacuation areas include portions of the region still recovering from the 2017 Tubbs Fire. One of the reports I read mentioned a woman who’d moved into her newly rebuilt home only two months ago. Another wince-worthy element, especially for those of us in Butte County, are early reports that the Kincade Fire likely was started by PG&E equipment despite blackouts to prevent this very scenario. A transmission line not de-energized is the suspected ignition point. I can’t help but relive the Camp Fire and hold my breath. That’s precisely what I’ll be doing not only until we get past Nov. 8, but also until we get our first decent downpour. I suspect I’m far from alone. Life during fire season will never be the same.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

County’s right call  Re “County forgoes bridge rebuild” (Downstroke, Oct. 24): I was happy to see the article noting that the Board of Supervisors declined the rebuild of the Honey Run Bridge with county funds in favor of more pressing issues in support of Paradise. From my point of view, as sad as the utter destruction of the bridge was, it cannot be rebuilt as a historic bridge. It is, unfortunately, gone. The money that I understand has been raised to rebuild it would be better spent on Paradise institutions in need of support. The library, the museums, schools and park structures all need help. Perhaps a modest monument in memory of Honey Run Bridge, in the small park supported by the Honey Run Covered Bridge Association—and perhaps dedicated to the victims of the Camp Fire—would also be good. Every person and community grieves in their own way for loss,

but let’s not try to create “old.” William Monroe Chico

Don’t apologize Re “Sorry, Mitt Romney” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Oct. 24): Are we now in the place where we should apologize to Mitt Romney, who made his money picking the bones of companies he raided, because he can admit to misgivings about the most corrupt president in our history? The policies toward women’s reproductive rights that Romney could have only quietly wished for are now quickly being enacted by Trump’s pick for vice president. (Soon to be president?!) Republicans are saying the new normal is our president blackmailing the president of Ukraine, withholding congressional-allocated taxpayer money until he manufactures “dirt” on a Trump political opponent.

If Mitt Romney is the Republican with integrity, we are in big trouble. If you want integrity, look no further than Elijah Cummings, and please don’t apologize to any Republican for impugning theirs. Rich Meyers Oroville

Not exactly free passes Re “Law enforcement’s deadly free pass must end” (Guest comment, by Ronald Angle, Oct. 24): Mr. Angle believes that like surgeons, cops need more training. Wikipedia reports cops have killed 118 people so far this year. Medical error kills over 200,000 per year. His examples of cops killing with a “free pass” are Texas officers Amber Guyger and Aaron Dean. Officer Guyger was found guilty of murder and sentenced to 10 years in prison. Officer Dean has been fired and awaits trial for murder. No “free pass.” LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

Try a Week Free! Includes:

Cross-Training • TRX Yoga • Barre Nutrition Guidance Cookbook • Assessments Support • Child Care

o n pa g e 6

JoiN TodAY! 530.521.7800 FiTNe S S • NuTRiTioN • ReSulTS • CommuNiTY

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI “We help YOU through the System” We assist with paperwork! Attorney at Law

LAw OffIC ES Of BETSY H. A LBERTS Over 35 years of experience.

976 Mangrove, Chico • 530.893.8387

DONATE YOUR CAR Cars For A Cause

helps support Arc’s Family Support Programs for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families when you donate your car. * 100% Tax Dexuctible * We accept Vehicles Running or Not

* Free Vehicle Pickup * We take care of all paperwork and DMV

Make a difference in your community, call TODAY!

Call 343-3666 october 31, 2019

  CN&R 

5


LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 He scoffs at how “dangerous” a cop’s job is. Perhaps he should tell that to the widow of El Dorado County Sheriff’s Deputy Brian Ishmael, who, the day before Angle’s comments were published, responded to theft at a private marijuana garden and was gunned down before he got out of his patrol car. Mr. Angle states that all one must do is “peruse the daily headlines” for the facts. Well, before national backlash, the The Washington Post’s headline on the killing of the leader of the terrorist group ISIS read: “Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, austere religious scholar at helm of Islamic State, dies at 48.” Mr. Angle is entitled to a biased opinion. But news is supposed to be neutral and factual. Trouble is, we can’t tell the difference anymore. And neither can journalists. Peter Bridge Glenn

982 East Avenue Chico Ca. 95926 530-343-6178 Store hours ; Monday - Friday 10am -6pm Saturday 10am - 5 pm. Sunday 12pm - 5pm

Make a

difference. California MENTOR is seeking individuals and families who have an extra bedroom and want to make a difference in the life of an adult with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Special Needs Adult(s) live with you in your home and you Mentor them toward a brighter future. Receive ongoing support and a generous monthly payment (Approx. $1100/ mo - $4400/mo). Requirements: *Valid drivers license *Vehicle *Must be at least 21 years of age *A spare bedroom *Clean criminal record

as a Mentor, you become a teacher, an advocate and a friend. Information Sessions are held weekly. Please call now to R.S.V.P. Sarah Lucas (530) 221-9911 6 

CN&R 

october 31, 2019

Editor’s note: The Washington Post and other organizations track the number of people shot and killed by American law enforcement. The count thus far for 2019: 753 deaths. In 2018, 992 people were shot and killed by law enforcement.

worthless, Trump has tried mightily to stand up to the foreign policy establishment and the military industrial complex. Obama caved. Libya, too, was Obama’s disaster. Congratulations to Trump for trying to “bring the troops home.” Democrats live in la-la land if they refuse to acknowledge the very militarized foreign policy supported by most Democrats. Lucy Cooke Butte County

Talking taxes  Re “Where are the tax haters?” (Editorial, Oct. 17): Speaking of tax increases: “The dollar’s buying power is less than what it was 20 years ago, meaning what you earn doesn’t stretch as far as it once did. Government statistics show that while household income has been steadily increasing, it has failed to keep up with the pace of inflation.” —Investopedia For the hours we work, we are rewarded less buying power, and yet politicians of all parties never slow in their efforts to take more of your earnings. Do they know better than you how to spend what you’ve earned? Steve Jorth Chico

‘Congratulations to Trump’ Stunned by LaMalfa Re “Trump’s risky decisions” (Letters, by Robert Woods, Oct. 17): President Obama most definitely did not stabilize the Middle East. He made it worse. Hillary Clinton, as secretary of state, was Obama’s Dick Cheney. Only 2,000 Syrians had died when Obama carelessly said Bashar al-Assad must go. And then, egged on by Hillary, National Security Adviser Susan Rice and U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power, Obama proceeded to attempt a regime change by funding/arming dissidents and instigating a civil war that left 500,000 dead, many more maimed, cities in rubble and created 6 million refugees, many of whom flooded to other countries, including Europe, which probably was the tipping point for Brexit. John Kerry, Obama’s secondterm secretary of state, was recorded in a leaked audio saying the administration was watching ISIS grow, and that it might be useful against Assad. Useful?! While using not knowledge but his gut instinct that forever war is

Imagine how stunned my wife and I were to see our own congressman, Doug LaMalfa, among the band of Republican congressmen (yes, men and all white) storming a secure room in the Capitol basement. And then to learn those same congressmen had met with Trump some hours earlier. This disgusting, and potentially illegal, act—have you read Trey Gowdey’s comments about closeddoor hearings in the Bengazi testimony?—was obviously masterminded to distract attention away from the testimony of valued and lifelong civil servants. Lynn Elliott Chico

upon the evidence. Vulnerable Republican senators—like Colorado’s Cory Gardner, Arizona’s Martha McSally, Maine’s Susan Collins, and North Carolina’s Thom Tillis—could be taking on this dreadful task in the election year coming in 2020. They all have to be squirming in their seats wondering how they can absolve their dear leader Trump of fault for allegedly trying to trade $391 million worth of javelin missiles to Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky in return for dirt on Joe Biden—military equipment bought and paid for by the American taxpayer and authorized by Congress. These same Republican senators swore to support and defend the Constitution of the USA against all enemies, foreign and domestic. Gardner is already trailing by 15 percent in the polls. Imagine trying to defend your seat under circumstances so unfavorable. The fans at the Washington Nationals World Series game gave Trump a firsthand look at how the vast majority of the American people really feel about him, with boos and chants of “lock him up.” Good luck, aforementioned so-called senators. Ray Estes Redding

Torch for democracy What happens in Hong Kong now could be a big factor in what life is like 50 years from now. One example is coal. China is the largest producer and burner of coal. Huge amounts of coal stretch across northern China. Just the unstoppable coal mine fires alone burn 400 million pounds a year. The current Chinese government doesn’t care about pollution nearly as much as military and economic growth. The people of Hong Kong are carrying an Olympic Torch for democracy and perhaps all our futures. We should love and support them. Marvin Wiseley Chico

Editor’s note: For more on this subject, see Editorial, page 4.

Senators squirming It’s the responsibility of the jurors in Donald Trump’s almost certain impeachment trial to determine the facts from the evidence, to follow the law and to reach a verdict based

Write a letter  tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. deadline for publication is noon on the tuesday prior to publication.


STREETALK

Buy one get one 1/2 off any Breakfast!

Seen a good movie lately?

19 2002 –2019

Asked at Cinemark 14

Offer good Monday-Friday 6am-11am. One coupon per guest. Expires 11/15/19. “A Chico Tradition Since 1965” Come find out why we’re Chico’s best 19 spot for breakfast and home of great sandwiches, pizzas and pasta!”

2234 Esplanade • 343-7000 • 6am to 10pm 7 days a week 2525 Dominic Drive • 342-7771 • 6am to 9pm Tuesday thru Saturday. Sunday Brunch 6am to 1pm. Monday closed.

Sarah Holtz real time analyst

Midsommar. I loved the cinematography, and I thought it was done really creatively to bring a good message across.

Michael Garcia retail manager

We just enjoyed Gemini Man. I really liked how it poses the question: “What would you tell your younger self?” That’s something I’ve contemplated a few times. The storyline was really good. It’s a morality-based plot that makes you think.

Cassidy Blair student

I just saw Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, which is the best movie I’ve seen recently. I liked the CGI, and especially the wings on the Maleficent character.

Jordan Calo

show l❤ ve thrift Mon/Sat Tues Wed Thurs Fri Sun

Buy 1 get 1 free (clothing) 50% off 30% off everything 30% off for seniors & students 50% off 30% off everything

Veterans 20% off open 7 days a week | donations appreciated 1405 Park Ave. Chico, (530) 892-9198 www.facebook.com/ShowLoveThrift

CN&R will

NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt

to PuRChase

a Best

of Plaque

system administrator

My favorite movie of the last three months is Once Upon A Time In … Hollywood. I’ve seen it three times. I like the cast of characters in the movie and the twist on reality. You’re expecting one thing, but things don’t quite go that way.

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

OctOber 31, 2019

CN&R

7


NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE MAN VISITS COPS IN STOLEN CAR

Last Thursday (Oct. 24), around 12:30 p.m., a man walked into the Chico Police Department for personal business and ended up arrested instead. According to a Chico Police Department press release, Curtis Lang, 58, had driven to the department in a stolen vehicle and parked in the lot just outside the station. After Lang arrived, an officer recognized him “from previous contacts” and spoke with him outside, the release states. That officer checked the vehicle’s license plate, which dispatch confirmed as stolen from Chico. Lang was arrested for possession of a stolen vehicle and transported to the Butte County Jail. Chico PD stored the vehicle and reported that it would be returned to its owner.

Diversity on the dais

PEDESTRIAN KILLED NEAR DOWNTOWN

A driver struck and killed a pedestrian in downtown Chico on Saturday (Oct. 26). The crash occurred at about about 7:15 a.m. near the corner of East Ninth and Main streets. The pedestrian, 35-year-old Link Colvard of Chico, was taken to Enloe Medical Center, where he died from his injuries, according to a press release issued by the Chico Police Department. Colvard was crossing East Ninth Street against a red light when he was struck by an SUV driven by John Porter, 66, of Chico. Porter did not break any laws, police said, and no charges will be filed.

DISTRICT 5 CHALLENGER FILES

Magalia resident Henry Schleiger (pictured) has filed paperwork with the Butte County Elections Office indicating his intention to run against Supervisor Doug Teeter next year. Teeter has represented District 5, which encompasses Paradise, Magalia and Butte Creek Canyon, since 2013. Schleiger, who currently sits on the Butte County Planning Commission, is a U.S. Navy veteran and has spent a career in “wildfire mapping,” according to his Facebook campaign page. He was appointed to the commission by District 3 Supervisor Tami Ritter. Schleiger wrote on his campaign page that “it’s time for new leadership,” and county voters have a chance to “flip Butte County politics for the first time in known history.” 8

CN&R

OCTOBER 31, 2019

Attorneys warn city of Chico: Switch to district elections or prepare to be sued

ICouncil ing across the dais that the Chico City does not adequately represent its

t’s clear to Mercedes Macías just by look-

community. “They’re all white people or people benefiting from light-skinned privilege,” she said. “What we need are different shades of story and photo by our human family being Ashiah Scharaga represented in our government.” as h i a h s @ n ew sr ev i ew. c o m Macías, who selfidentifies as an “indigenous person of color” and ran for council in 2016, said the city’s current at-large election system is “functioning perfectly well … to serve the upper classes, which have historically been light-skinned people.” She is one of several former City Council candidates mentioned in two demand letters sent to the City Council this month, each warning the city to switch to district elections or prepare for expensive lawsuits. The issue at hand: voter representation. The California Voting Rights Act of 2001 (CVRA) prohibits the use of at-large elections if they impair the ability of minority populations to elect candidates or influence election outcomes. Since its adoption nearly 20 years ago, more than 80 cities have started using districts—many did so

after receiving demand letters. Two attorneys, Matt Rexroad (a former Yolo County supervisor) and Malibu-based Kevin Shenkman, allege that Chico is in violation of the CVRA because election data show that voting in Chico is racially polarized, and its at-large elections dilute minority votes. They cited election history: Macías was included in a list of candidates who lost “despite significant support from the Latino community,” Shenkman wrote. “You end up with a city that doesn’t have adequate representation because of its demographics,” Shenkman told the CN&R by phone. “I wouldn’t suggest that anyone in the city of Chico intends that to be the result. I think more often than not, in California at large, this has just kind of been the default.” Shenkman sent the letter on behalf of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project (SVREP), a nonpartisan Latino voter participation organization founded in the 1970s. Since 2012, Shenkman has been challenging at-large elections across the state, and estimates he has sued about a dozen jurisdictions—mostly cities, some school districts and one community college district. In his first case, against Palmdale, the city spent millions fighting the suit only to lose and have to pay Shenkman’s fees (a

stipulation of the CVRA). Earlier this year, the same story played out in Santa Monica. So far, Shenkman has not lost a case. These are “taxpayer dollars which could have been more appropriately spent on indispensable municipal services and critical infrastructure improvements,” Shenkman wrote. Chico Mayor Randall Stone says he’s familiar with the impact these lawsuits have had elsewhere and the city is “absolutely taking it seriously.” Whether the council decides to move to districts, put the issue before the voters or fight it remains to be seen. Stone, whose maternal grandparents came to the U.S. from Mexico, selfidentifies as the first Latino mayor of Chico. He said both letters were inaccurate: Each claim that the council is made up of seven non-Hispanic whites, and the city has a historical lack of representation of Latinos. U.S. Census data from 2010 show that 15.4 percent of Chico’s population is Hispanic or Latino. More recent data, from the Census’ American Community Survey, pegs the number at 17.7 percent. “Their statistics and their citations do not match the reality in this community, period,” Stone said. “It’s not unknown that there’s a Latino council member.”


The Chico City Council is being challenged to change to district elections under the allegation that its current system oppresses minority votes.

Shenkman acknowledged that’s where the issue gets tricky and sensitive—council members are “entitled to identify however they want, but that doesn’t necessarily change the way that the electorate views them or understands them to be,” he told the CN&R. And his firm has found that in Chico elections “there is a significant difference in the levels of support for candidates who the electorate would almost certainly understand to be Latino.” This isn’t the first time the city of Chico

has been asked to consider districts. In 2015, Ken Fleming and Robert Speer, co-directors of nonpartisan organization Districts for Chico, advocated for the switch. Their argument: Districts will create a more representative government that will improve efficiency and increase the chances of minority members and political independents getting elected. “We have a situation where if you’re running for City Council, there are a number of barriers,” Fleming said. They include campaign costs—with districts, Fleming argues, it’s more about knowing your neighbors rather than “how many big-buck contributors you can put together.” Fleming said Districts for Chico easily gathered support from the community—it was the elected officials who proved hard to sway. Their campaign was stonewalled by the City Council in 2015—it wasn’t even agendized for discussion. When the topic resurfaced in 2018, it again went nowhere. Stone, who voted against considering districts in both instances, said he still isn’t sold on the concept. He makes the same argument, but from the other side of the coin: Districts, not at-large elections, dilute groups and make it harder to elect minority candidates. “We’re perfectly heterogeneous; we have no specific ethnic enclaves in the city of Chico,” he said. “If we don’t have that dispersion of voters, what are districts going to help with?” Fleming and Speer (who is a former editor-in-chief of the CN&R) both expected Chico would end up in this predicament. “The city is out of compliance, and even if they weren’t, it’s just not worth the money and the hassle to fight it,” Fleming said. “They just need to get on with this and not drag their feet.” Ω

Seizing the moment Chico council members introduce sweeping local plan to address climate change Chico Vice Mayor Alex Brown and City Councilman

Karl Ory believe they are seizing a moment to cement the city as a regional model for tackling climate change, which they called a life-threatening crisis that could manifest locally in increasing flood and wildfire danger. On Tuesday (Oct. 29), the pair spoke with the CN&R days ahead of unveiling their proposed Chico Green New Deal, a sweeping plan meant to guide city policies addressing climate change, housing, economic development and the local food supply. (A press conference is planned for 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 31, at the Our Hands sculpture outside City Hall.) The document lays out three main goals: powering the city’s grid with 100 percent “clean electricity” by 2030, getting the city to climate neutrality by 2045, and instituting policies and actions for reaching those marks by 2026. Following the Camp Fire, which Brown said was exacerbated by a changing climate, people are watching how Chico responds to the disaster. “We have the opportunity in this moment to model for the North State,” Brown told the CN&R. “Model for semi-rural communities—or for rural communities—what participating on a local level in a global movement actually looks like.” The 14-page document authored by Brown, a first-term councilwoman, and Ory, who served as Chico’s mayor in the 1980s, outlines seven policy areas of focus. Among them are creating local

“green” jobs, developing affordable housing, rethinking water and waste management, and transitioning to a more sustainable transportation system. For example, the plan proposes moving the city’s vehicle fleet to 100 percent electric where possible by 2030, treating wastewater to be recirculated into the city for use in greenways and other areas, and continuing to commit to the city’s 2030 general plan by promoting accessory dwelling units and other infill development, including denser and taller housing, and mixed-use development downtown. Additionally, the plan calls for leveraging existing public-private partnerships—such as Team Chico—and the city’s relationship with local colleges to build a “green workforce” that can bolster the local economy while

SIFT ER The meth coast Fentanyl is justifiably getting a lot of press for the alarming rise in number of deaths as a result of overdoses of the drug—27,299 in the U.S. in 2017 (the most recent year reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). But a report released last week by the National Center for Health Statistics showed that the vast majority of those deaths are actually back East. In that same year, 24,813 of those fentanyl-overdose deaths happened east of the Mississippi. Out West, the No. 1 overdose killer is methamphetamine. Here are the top 10 drugs by overdose death in California’s four-state region (with Nevada, Arizona and Hawaii).

DRUG

DEATHS

Methamphetamine

2,741

Heroin

1,178

Fentanyl

744

Cocaine

672

Oxycodone

651

Morphine

572

Alprazolam (aka Xanex)

531

Methadone

396

Hydrocodone

389

Diphenhydramine (antihistamine)

258

Chico Vice Mayor Alex Brown, pictured, and Councilman Karl Ory have authored the Chico Green New Deal, a policy framework meant to guide the city in the coming decades. PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

addressing climate action through the lens of business and economic development. It’s also important, Brown said, to serve low-income households through information outreach efforts and cost-saving initiatives. Much like the Green New Deal proposed by

leaders at the nation’s capital, the Chico Green New Deal is ambitious. “This is not a wish list,” the plan reads. “It is a policy direction that is both bold and feasible. The Chico Green New Deal will help lay a path forward—for a better, brighter and greener future for all of us.” It includes long-term goals, Brown said, that won’t be realized while she and Ory are in office. “But the commitment that we have made is that by the end of the year 2026 there will at least be a plan for each of these items in place so that the next generation of leaders in our community can carry that legacy forward,” she said. “But many of these things are achievable in the time frame that we’ll be in office, so we’re going to be hard at work to bring some of those proposals forward.” The Chico Green New Deal, which shares its name and tenets with legislation proposed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey, is among several climate-related policies the city has taken on in the past year. In April, the City Council approved a proclamation of a climate emergency. Last month, the panel voted to create a Climate Action Commission. The council has begun the recruitment and appointment process for that commission, Ory said. The local Green New NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D OCTOBER 31, 2019

O N PA G E 1 0

CN&R

9


Let’s Plant! Maple Trees Renowned for their brilliant fall foliage. Vibrant hues of fiery red, electric orange and calming yellow deepen with warm sunny days and cool nights. Planting a Maple such as Autumn Blaze or October Glory will make you the envy of the neighborhood.

Mon- Fri 8aM-4pM SaTurday 8:30aM-5pM 2270 Fair STreeT | 343-7615

FirSt ChriStiAN ChurCh 58th ANNuAL

BAZAAR & Luncheon

Saturday Nov. 2 • 9a-2p 295 E. Washington Ave., Chico

BAKED GOODS JEWELRY CHRISTMAS ITEMS & MORE Lunch 11:30a-1:30p Proceeds to Benefit local Non-Profits & Church Scholarships For More Information: 530.343.3727 www.fccchico.com 10

CN&R

OctOber 31, 2019

NEWSLINES c O n t i n u e d f r O m pa g e 9

Deal document, he added, could also serve to inform various city commissions of the council’s priorities and spur community discussion. “This adds to the ammunition we have—to the resources we have to go forward,” Ory told the CN&R. “What happens often is the disconnect between [commissioners] and the council after they’re appointed. You don’t have joint meetings. There’s … little opportunity to engage the Airport Commission or the Planning Commission.” Ory said he believes a majority of the council will support the goals outlined and provide feedback to institute specific policy prescriptions. “Part of the strength is its comprehensiveness,” he said. “And I think that it will get strengthened over time so that we’re not doing a piecemeal operation.” There are aspects of the Chico Green New Deal that Brown says will not be easy to accomplish, nor will they be inexpensive. The vice mayor noted as an example the proposed additional treatment of the city’s wastewater to pump it back into the community for re-use. But the city can begin to take financial steps and identify infrastructure placement in the short term. Some proposals may be unpopular with city residents, the vice mayor acknowledged. As an example, she noted the city’s partnership with the county to develop a community choice aggregation (CCA), which gives local governments the power to purchase and sell energy based on their residents’ needs. As part of that effort, the Chico Green New Deal proposes automatically enrolling customers into a “higher clean energy portfolio,” with the option to opt out rather than hoping residents opt in. “You make it easier for people to do the right thing that is going to help you achieve your goals,” Brown said, adding, “I ran for office because I believe in culture change, and I think that the city of Chico has a unique opportunity right now to take this value of sustainability and climate action and really allow it to be embedded into our existing infrastructure—in our communications with the city of Chico and its residents.” —Andre Byik a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m


Compare and contrast Is San Diego’s power utility light-years ahead of PG&E in terms of safety?

As Pacific Gas & Electric Co. continues power

shut-downs in Northern California due to high winds and fire danger, its management of the crisis has been widely criticized. Earlier this month, PG&E cut power to more than 700,000 customers. At the time, politicians and pundits pointed to San Diego Gas & Electric, which shut off electricity to about 500 customers, as a better example of wildfire preparedness. But local critics argue SDG&E should not be put on a pedestal so quickly and the comparison is not equal. “Are they better than the utilities in the north? Yeah, probably,” said Dianne Jacob, a San Diego County supervisor and longtime critic of SDG&E. “But does that mean that they are the gold standard? Absolutely not.” Jacob said the utility made changes too late—only after power lines started catastrophic fires in 2007 that burned About this story: It’s part of the California hundreds of homes Dream series—a statewide and killed two media collaboration of people. That same CalMatters, KPBS, KPCC, year, SDG&E began KQED and Capital Public using “public safety Radio with support from the Corporation for Public power shut-offs” as Broadcasting and the James one mitigation tool. Irvine Foundation. Now shut-offs have become the new normal across California with increased wind and wildfire danger. At a recent hearing of the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), PG&E CEO Bill Johnson said planned power outages could occur for the next 10 years to mitigate wind and fire dangers. Since 2013, 52,000 SDG&E customers have lost power, a fraction of the more than 700,000 PG&E customers impacted in one shut-off earlier this month. That difference in the size of the shut-offs led the CPUC to blast PG&E, asking why it couldn’t be more

like its sister utility to the south. In a letter, the CPUC demanded substantial changes from PG&E, including that the utility enhance efforts to minimize the size of future events. That is a priority for SDG&E’s meteorologists working in the utility’s operations center. Ahead of a recent weekend of increased fire risk, Brian D’Agostino, SDG&E’s director of fire science and climate adaptation, was preparing to lead a team of meteorologists who would monitor the hot and dry air with strong Santa Ana winds. D’Agostino stood in front of five giant monitors showing live mountaintop cameras and yellow, blue and red lines representing the utility’s power lines. “A major change from 10 years ago is we can see those days coming,” he said. “All of these tools analyze all of the historical data and tell us when we’re going to have that type of day that can result in a catastrophic fire.” A SDG&E spokesperson said the utility has spent more than $1.5 billion in the past decade on wildfire preparedness. According

PG&E monitors conditions for potential wildfires in Northern California from a command center in San Francisco. PHOTO COURTESY OF PG&E

to D’Agostino, that includes an overhaul of its grid to minimize large-scale power shut-offs. Now if they shut down one line, they can still get power to areas through another route. The design of PG&E’s transmission and distribution network makes that much more difficult, said Michael Wara, the director of the Climate and Energy Policy Program at Stanford University. SDG&E is rolling out new technology all the time, including moving power lines underground and creating smaller grids so they can turn off power in neighborhoods or even individual households with the highest fire risk, D’Agostino said. All of this requires data, which SDG&E collects from 190 weather stations spread across the region. PG&E also utilizes weather stations—according to spokeswoman Tracy Lopez, they added 200 in 2018, and 200 more so far in 2019. The plan is to have 600 total

Residential & Commercial Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Carpet, Rugs & Upholstery Cleaning

G N I K N A E L C by D Inc.

By Michael DeHart • 530.345.9907

weather stations by the end of this year. But because most of these stations have been set up so recently, Wara said the utility doesn’t yet have all the data it needs. But is it fair to compare SDG&E and PG&E? Yes and no, said Wara. It’s unfair for a few reasons: San Diego’s utility serves a quarter of the number of PG&E customers over a far smaller area and its terrain is less challenging to manage. SDG&E covers 4,100 square miles in San Diego and southern Orange counties. PG&E, meanwhile, covers about 70,000 square miles in northern and central California. Also, PG&E’s territory involves far more trees that need to be managed, Wara said. And the fire-prone areas where the northern utility might want to cut power are far more densely populated than San Diego’s eastern county. But in other ways, the comparison is fair, he said. After SDG&E began making major changes in the wake of the 2007 fires, PG&E should have better followed their example, he said. “Twelve years ago SDG&E said utilitycaused wildfire is not acceptable, and we need to do something about it. So they developed a whole program of activities to really reduce the risk,” Wara said. “They’re not done, but they have a process where they’re always trying to improve, where there’s no end to their efforts for risk reduction.” He said PG&E also could have acted at that time, but didn’t. PG&E spokeswoman Lopez counters that the utility has acted to mitigate fire risk, and points to the current public safety power shutoff event as an example of how they are doing that. But, according to Wara, PG&E “didn’t say we should be doing the things San Diego is doing, because that could happen to us.” Now, PG&E is playing catch-up, and will not be able to improve its grid to minimize power shut-offs anytime soon, he said. “It’s a seven- to 10-year problem,” Wara said. “In the meantime, PG&E can improve how it communicates with its customers about the shut-offs.” —CLAIRE TRAGESER

$10 Off Purchase of $59 or more Exp. 11/30/19

Under new ownership, come try us out!

2365 Esplanade, Chico / 530-895-9607 OCTOBER 31, 2019

CN&R

11


HEALTHLINES Compression stockings help Britta Vander Linden stand and  walk. If she didn’t have them, her lymphedema would lead  to extreme swelling of her legs. phOtO by Lynne ShaLLcrOSS/Khn

Under pressure

by

Carmen Heredia Rodriguez

Eprocess compression stockings, a cumbersome she calls “putting on my legs.” very morning, Britta Vander Linden dons

She relies on the garments to stand and walk without intense leg pain and swelling. That’s because Vander Linden, 44, was born with lymphedema. The condition affects the lymphatic system, a network of lymph nodes and vessels that move infection-fighting liquid through the body. When that network is damaged, fluid can build up and cause limbs to swell well beyond their normal size and make them susceptible to harmful infections. Lymphedema is incurable, but specialized compression stockings, sleeves and gloves help prevent complications such as tissue damage, more swelling and infection. They’re also expensive. Vander Linden’s insurance coverage, which she gets through her job as a senior director of communications at a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization, covers about half the annual cost of her stockings, she said. For the rest of the year, she added, she pays out of pocket―between $2,500 and $3,500 annually. “I guess they’re thinking I don’t have to stand up” for half the year, she said.

12  

CN&R 

OctOber 31, 2019

Lymphedema patients, including those on Medicare, stressed by costs associated with compression garments

Many lymphedema patients struggle to get health insurers to pay for compression garments. Coverage varies among private insurance plans, and for many patients it is limited. Although Medicaid programs cover some of these expenses, Medicare does not. Advocates have been pushing for legislation to change that. “Right now there is a patch quilt across the country to navigate to get the care that you need,” said William Repicci, CEO of the Lymphatic Education & Research Network, a patient advocacy group. Lymphedema affects as many as 5 million

people in the United States. The majority develop the condition after undergoing cancer treatment, especially if they had surgery that required removing lymph nodes to stop the spread of disease. Breast cancer patients are particularly affected by the condition. People generally wear the garments daily, said Dr. Stanley Rockson, a professor of lymphatic research and medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Depending on the severity of the disease, some people also require them at night. Prices for garments vary considerably. A standard-fit arm sleeve costs $81, but a custom-made equivalent can run $202, according to the Lymphedema Advocacy Group, a patient volunteer organization seeking a federal mandate for insurance coverage. One pair of waist-high stockings costs $159

off the shelf. When made to order, the price can jump to $960. Some patients need custom garments because the standard size cannot adequately accommodate the affected area. Garments should be replaced two to four times a year, Rockson said. The 1998 federal Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act has helped some patients get insurers to cover their compression garments. The law requires insurers that provide coverage for mastectomies to also cover complications related to the procedure, including these socks and sleeves. It applies to employerbased plans, as well as those that people buy on the individual market. A handful of states, including Maryland and Virginia, have laws requiring health plans subject to state regulation to cover lymphedema treatment, including supplies such as compression garments. Virginia’s law, from 2004, was the nation’s first. Maryland’s took effect this year. At least three other states―California, Massachusetts and North Carolina―require health insurers to pay some of the costs, according to an analysis from the Maryland Department of Legislative Services. But many people aren’t covered by these laws because large-employer health plans are generally regulated by the federal government. In Maryland, approximately 25 percent of residents have plans that may

be affected, state officials estimated. “I know that it’s not a panacea. It’s not going to address every problem that patients are running into when it comes to lymphedema treatment,” said Al Carr Jr., the Maryland General Assembly member who sponsored the law after a constituent brought the issue to his attention. “But hopefully it makes things easier and better.” Even if compression garments are covered, plan restrictions―such as limits on how many stockings or sleeves are allowed―can leave enrollees’ needs unmet. That happened to Cindy Cronick. In 2007, the Wisconsin pharmacist found a lump under her arm, and doctors diagnosed her with breast cancer. She underwent chemotherapy, radiation and a mastectomy and remains cancer-free. But in 2012, she said, lymphedema dramatically caused her left arm and hand to swell. (The condition can crop up years after an operation.) Her employer-provided health plan, according to Cronick, 53, covered only four compression garments a year. This became a problem when she needed another compression glove because the old one was causing an abrasion, which can increase the risk of developing an infection. Cronick, who is a board member of the Lymphedema Advocacy Group, ultimately HEALTHLINES c O n t i n U e d

O n pa g e 1 5

appOintMent Managing trauma

As we near the anniversary of the Camp Fire, many in our community may still be experiencing symptoms of depression, anxiety and hopelessness. Trauma takes time to process, and we all have a different timeline. If you are looking for help, the Neighborhood Church of Chico is offering a free Managing Trauma with Resilience workshop this Saturday (Nov. 2) from 9 a.m. to noon. Speakers Leonard Matheson and Emma Sakai—both psychologiests—will discuss behavioral therapy, developing resilience, and children struggling with trauma. This workshop is for adults only. Register at info.ncchico.org/managing-trauma.


O C T O B E R 31, 2019

CN&R

13


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY 14

CN&R

O C T O B ER 31 , 20 1 9


c O n t i n u e d f r O m pa g e 1 2

About this story:

it was produced by Kaiser Health news, which publishes california Healthline, an editorially independent service of the california Health care foundation.

in Congress since 2002. But it has gone nowhere. Advocates said they think adding the government benefit would prompt more private insurers to pay for the stockings as well. The federal program’s reputation for being a benchmark of insurance coverage “makes this super valuable to get Medicare” to cover the garments, said Jeffrey Clemens, an associate professor of economics at UC San Diego who focuses on health issues. But other health care experts say it may not be the cure-all advocates hope for. “It’s probably not a simple matter of ‘if you succeed in getting Medicare coverage, then all the private insurers are going to fall in line really rapidly,’” said Jack Hoadley, a former member of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission. “I would say that’s probably not realistic.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

Another reason to nix trans fats We all know that trans fats are bad for us, but a new study published in the journal Neurology has now linked trans fats to Alzheimer’s disease—the resulting data suggests a 50 percent to 75 percent increase in the risk of dementia for those with a diet heavy in trans fats. Researchers followed 1,600 Japanese men and women without dementia over a 10-year period. People with the highest levels of trans fats in their blood were found to be more likely to develop dementia than those with the lowest levels, as both the brain and the cardiovascular system are affected dramatically by trans fats. So, what are these dangerous fats and where do they come from? They are a type of unsaturated fat that naturally occurs in small amounts in meat and milk products and in alarmingly high amounts in processed foods containing partially hydrogenated oils.

Source: Neurology

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

appealed to the insurer, and then an outside reviewer in New York, for more coverage. The case ended in 2013 with the insurer doubling the number of garments it covered. The insurer changed its policy the following year to allow patients with post-mastectomy garments to go beyond their limit. After Cronick switched to her husband’s health plan, she received other denials that she was forced to appeal, she said. She filed a complaint against the insurer with the Department of Labor, according to documents Cronick provided. As of Sept. 5, the investigation was still pending. “It shouldn’t be a certain number,” Cronick said, referring to the number of garments covered under health plans. “It should be what that patient and their doctor determine is required.” That option is not available to Medicare beneficiaries. Compression garments do not meet the definition for any category of covered services. Legislation to provide Medicare coverage for lymphedema diagnosis and treatment has been repeatedly introduced

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque

HEALTHLINES

OctOber 31, 2019

CN&R

15


GREENWAYS Los Angeles fire official Michael Flynn demonstrates advanced information equipment in a command vehicle, part of a California pilot program.

high-tech holy grail

PhOtO by NaNcy PastOr fOr calMatters

California pursues new and better ways to predict how wildfire will spread by

Julie Cart

Oofficials Guard airfield in Los Alamitos, local fire put on display what $4.5 million can n a recent day at an expansive National

buy: planes crammed with high-definition cameras, radar and infrared equipment that peers through smoke. This eye in the sky can provide commanders on the ground with a broad picture of a wildfire in its infancy, the most critical time for decision-making. The plane—operating at 10,000 feet, out of signal range—beams the information to a smaller aircraft below, which relays it to a UC San Diego research team running a lab known as WIFIRE. The lab’s supercomputer spits out mapping and heat-detection data within minutes, and it generates a model of how the fire might spread based on a number of factors— the holy grail for fire bosses. Eventually, such information will go to a wildfire warning center created under a new state law. The planes are part of a pilot program, an aspect of California’s emphasis on technology to respond to wildfire. In the state’s new landscape of more frequent and more ferocious fires, it takes a village to combat the menace: private technology, state and local fire agencies and computing know-how at California’s universities. The push to better anticipate wildfire danger is intended, in part, to provide early warning to residents about conditions so they can evacuate safely, before any flames get near. But the information bounty, welcome to many state officials and agencies, has potential downsides: It could regularly scare the heck out of Californians with a never-ending barrage of red-flag warnings, ever more disruptive power shutdowns and ever more warnings to flee. More frequent alerts could eventually cause residents to disregard them, acknowl-

16

CN&R

OctOber 31, 2019

edged state Sen. Bill Dodd, who proposed the warning center. “Yes, we do risk that the pendulum swings the other way,” said the Napa Democrat. “But it’s probably better to err on the side of giving folks too much information. We have to do this surgically so that only the people in the high-threat areas get these notices.” Eventually the warning center will be operated by the state firefighting arm, known as Cal Fire, and by the Public Utilities Commission and California’s Department of Emergency Services, Dodd said. The information collected—from multiple sources under various auspices—will be shared with federal, state and local authorities, utility companies and the public. Gov. Gavin Newsom budgeted about $1 billion in

new funding for fire preparedness and response and said he intends to tap into the hive mind of California’s innovative businesses to create better tools for predicting and attacking fire. In January, on his first full day in office, Newsom signed an executive order establishing the Wildfire Innovation Sprint, a program to foster that innovation. The state already has signed the program’s first two contracts. One project will use advanced computing to predict a fire’s path; the other will fund a network of “sky sensors” to detect fires as soon as they ignite and send alerts to emergency officials. Part of the state’s plan is to knit together what exists already: copious weather data, cameras operated by utility companies and federal partners. The new approach emphasizes information sharing, a potentially difficult concept for utilities and other businesses About this story:

It is an abridged version of an article produced by calMatters, an independent public journalism venture covering california state politics and government. learn more at calmatters.org.

typically more comfortable keeping their data to themselves. In addition to its involvement in the plane pilot program, UC San Diego operates the ALERT Wildfire system with the University of Nevada and the University of Oregon, a network of almost 300 high-definition cameras trained on high-fire-threat areas. The remotely operated cameras can see up to 70 miles in daylight and 100 miles with infrared at night. Each camera pans and tilts every two minutes, said Neal Driscoll, who runs the program. The resulting information feeds into a computer that “learns” what constitutes normal conditions in a specific place. When the cameras detect an anomaly such as a smoke plume, an alarm goes off, alerting myriad local and state agencies that monitor the system. In the case of a fire, authorities can manipulate the camera network to identify the fire site with fine resolution and quickly create a map. Computer programmers are using artificial intelligence to teach the network to distinguish between clouds and smoke, Driscoll said, and over time the cameras will act as remote 911 sensors. Such sensors send alarms to computers in dozens of emergency centers and other offices around the state where Cal Fire or another agency can take control of the cameras and determine whether to dispatch a crew or whether it’s a false alarm. “Having real-time data and being able to move these cameras from command centers has changed the way we fight fire,” Driscoll said. “They allow us to make a quick confirmation of a fire and make critical decisions in the critical moment—at the incipient point.” Officials hope to expand the system eventually to 1,000 cameras around the state. Much of the interaction with new technology falls to Cal Fire and local fire agencies, where handed-down traditions are strong. The fire service has in the past been slow to adapt to change—longtime wildland firefighters

laugh about how old timers resisted the adoption of chainsaws, arguing that axes didn’t need gasoline to operate. “It used to be that you’d drop the tailgate on a commander’s pickup and put a map on it,” said Cal Fire Deputy Director Mike Mohler. “Now you drop the tailgate and the truck bed is full of computers.” Still, some fire veterans keep one boot in the future and one in the past, cautioning that technology is only helpful until it fails. There’s no substitute for experience—what Dave Winnacker, chief of the Bay Area Moraga-Orinda fire district, calls “the hair-onthe-back-of-the-neck factor.” “This is a human business; we need people doing things, not staring at a tablet,” Winnacker said. “The computer just remorselessly runs the scenario and does the math. When the model runs, I want my battalion chief up on the hill to look at the model, and then look at the fire, and say, ‘Hmm, I don’t think that’s right.’ The machine does not have the authority to make decisions.” Winnacker was a crew leader fighting a 2017 blaze in Napa Valley, where cell service went down for seven days. “The need for an analog option is always there. We are always going to need people who can operate without the information scaffolding support. “We can’t just say, ‘The Wi-Fi is down; we can’t fight a fire today.’” □

ECO EVENT

Searching for answers The PBS NOVA episode “Inside the Megafire” will be screened at the Paradise Alliance Church (6491 Clark Road) at 6 p.m. Monday (Nov. 4) for free. This powerful documentary will examine the devastation of the Camp Fire and investigate how forestry practices, climate change and the nature of fire itself play a role in the drastic increase in wildfires across the American West. Follow scientists from the front lines into the lab for answers. Leading a discussion after the showing will be filmmaker Miles O’Brien. Additional speakers include forest adviser Yana Valachovic, Cal Fire representative John Messina, and Butte County Supervisor Doug Teeter.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PhOtO by JOsh cOzine

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

retail roundup

ready, set … throw Arianna Mathiopoulos moved to Chico from San Diego last December, looking for a slower pace. She quickly noticed a lack of evening entertainment outside of going to the bars. Having experience in the business realm, including working in the insurance and restaurant industries, Mathiopoulos started brainstorming ideas for the Chico market, and eventually landed on the idea of axthrowing. She taught herself the basics of opening a business and got her first business license last month to open The Hatchet House. After an Oct. 19 grand opening to chop out the kinks, the business is now open Wednesday-Sundays. Check it out at 845 Cherry St. or call 7157547 or visit hatchethousechico. com for more information.

Are you a big ax-thrower yourself, or is it just about the business? I think it’s a little bit of both. It’s more of a business, and I just wanted to create something new in Chico. But once I started to throw axes, I got why people enjoyed it. It’s actually fun. It’s an odd stress relief.

How did you find this location? I was out to sushi one night with a buddy, and I was venting about how difficult it had

Leaving the statiOn At its last regular meeting Oct. 15, the Chico City Council approved amending the lease agreement for the train depot to allow other uses for the railcar out front. Apparently Great Northern Coffee Co. isn’t making enough money for the Chico Art Center, which runs the space. It’s a shame—the ambiance was quirky and fun. I look forward to seeing how they reimagine it.

—JOSH COzINE

$

50% off

ssori

1 530.343.310Can S e. 140 | e,, St 07 ue nu mable for7cash. en ve Av 45-1749.6. Not redee Valid for 4 hours. Wall St. . 01 Godman according to California Civil Code Sectionse1749. credit Chico 280 store as CA 95 Chang will be given expire used for gratuity. cate and does not 926 offers. Cannot be This is a gift certifi be used with other

discounts and

50%

Amy Waltz Designs

$40 Value

$25 Value

$25 Value

You pay $12.50

25 HA

530.8 THA Not redeem 84.41 This able for cas 30 | ha HOUSE h. Can be use is a gift certificate and doe d with other tha-ho discounts and s not expire according use.co to California offers. Can m not be use d for gratuit Civil Code Sections 174 y. Change will be give 9.45-1749.6. n as store credit.

off

Hatha House You pay $12.50

40

den Monte

Sunny Gar

Sunny Garden Montessori You pay $20

ings this year, and many of them have locations in Chico. Here’s the quick and the dirty, according to Moneywise. We all know Kmart has been struggling for a while now. Chico may get a reprieve because the Paradise store is still shuttered, but for how long is anyone’s guess. Women’s clothing store Chico’s will be closing at least 250 stores over the next three years. CVS and Walgreen’s are both closing stores—46 and 200, respectively. GameStop will be closing 200 stores, as it struggles to compete with downloadable games. Pier 1 Imports announced it’ll close 140 stores, and Bed, Bath & Beyond 60. Other struggling stores to keep an eye on: Office Depot, Lowe’s and Victoria’s Secret. These are all big companies, but at least they employ local folks. So, when it comes to holiday shopping, remember that—and that sales tax dollars stay in our community—and when you’re not shopping mom-n-pops, at the very least keep your money in town.

I put a 5-foot barrier between the first bar to divide the audience, and you need to make sure you step in front of the line to throw. You have to make sure that nobody is throwing in the other lanes when you go to retrieve your axe. I put hay bales at the bottom to stop bounce back. Make sure your eyes are forward. Be alert, be aware, and no visibly intoxicated people.

My 70-year-old dad ... actually built all of this himself. I was still working full time in insurance and would come help after work.

saves you money!

MOre Musings Turns out a number of big retailers have announced store clos-

What do you do to make sure it stays safe?

What were renovations like?

meredithc@newsreview.com

As we head into the holiday season (yes, I know, it’s too soon!), retail businesses start to ramp up their sales and advertising to pull up their bottom lines. There’s always a bit of action around this time, with openings and closings, and since I haven’t taken the pulse of the retail market lately, I took this week to get caught up. I got word that H&M is moving into the Chico Mall. Of course, with Forever 21 leaving, there will be a niche to fill there—Sweden-based H&M specializes in clothing, and also features men’s styles. The new store will only be about 15,000 square feet, much smaller than the current Forever 21 footprint, so my guess is the mall is going forward with dividing that anchor space into multiple stores. (Spokeswoman Lynette Myers said she couldn’t divulge the plan for H&M.) I came to that conclusion after perusing a map of the mall on the website of its parent company, Ethan Conrad. It shows the Forever 21 space divided into three spots and, curiously, Planet Fitness in the back quarter or so of the food court. Some other indicators as to what the mall’s up to came up at the city Architectural Review and Historic Preservation Board meeting earlier this month. It’s hoping to erect a big, lighted sign visible from Highway 99, and on the sample marquee: H&M, Planet Fitness, HomeGoods and Petco (which would presumably move from its spot by Barnes & Noble). No love for any of the current tenants, I guess!

And on the weekends my brother and my mom, my nephew and sister-in-law would come here and paint and be other hands for my dad. It probably took three weeks to get everything up and standing, but I primarily have to give my dad the credit.

been [to find a place], and he said, “Let’s go drive around.” So we were driving and there’s a location like four blocks down the street ... and there was a hole at the top, so we backed up his truck to see what was in it and the owner came up and thought we were trying to break in. He was like, “What are you doing? Get down from there! Explain yourself!” He was super hot about it, but we started talking and I told him what I was looking for and he said he had a property down the street and to go check it out. I did, and to me this is the perfect space.

by

Meredith J. Cooper

|

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

k 290 AirPAr ChiCo, CA

Blvd

z.com AmyWAlt & oPen Wed

Pm Thu 1Pm –5

does not a gift certificate & on back. This is be used e use Promo Code 49.6. Not redeemable for cash. Can To redeem onlin 45-17 value for this to CA CC Sec. 1749. as store credit. Cash given be expire according will e used. amount & offers. Chang consumer minus any the with other discounts by paid t to the amoun certificate is equal

50% off

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

OctOber 31, 2019

CN&R

17


Fall movie guide What’s hot in the cool season’s big-screen lineup by

Bob Grimm bobg@ n ew sr ev i ew. com

T

he final quarter of 2019 is loaded up with Martin Scorsese, Robert Eggers, Star Wars, Terminator, Breaking Bad, a happy Hitler and a deranged Joker. Let’s hope at least some of them deliver the goods. I would hate to think Rambo: Last Blood is a harbinger of things to come. What follows is a list Now playing of many, though not all, Parasite: This already award-winning effort from director Joon-ho Bong (The of the movies playing out Host, Snowpiercer) looks to be social satire at its darkest and finest. the rest of the year. Keep Gemini Man: Here’s one of the seain mind that some of the son’s big attempts at de-aging a movie star. In this case, it’s Will Smith. The twist release dates represent here is that a younger Will Smith is hunting the older Will Smith. The big question limited theatrical runs here is will the movie provide Will Smith his ultimate film fantasy, that being the for awards consideration. opportunity to make out with himself? The Addams Family: This is an aniSome of them won’t get a mated take on the infamously morose wide release, especially in family that looks like it’s visually faithful to the look of the original Charles Addams Chico, until January. comic.

18

CN&R

OctOber 31, 2019

The Addams Family

El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie: Do I want a Breaking Bad continuation without Walter White (Bryan Cranston)? I love Better Call Saul, but that’s a prequel where Walter still walks the Earth teaching chemistry class (albeit off screen), unaware of his cancer-ridden, blue meth future. This movie follows Jesse (Aaron Paul) from the moment he escapes captivity after Walter (apparently … most likely) died, and it is a very worthy addition to the franchise. Jay and Silent Bob Reboot: I saw a cou-

ple of scenes for Kevin Smith’s latest View Askewniverse foray at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con, and it looks to be a blast. Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back is my favorite of his comedies, so this is in my wheelhouse.

Jojo Rabbit: Talk about risk taking. This film, set in World War II and directed by Taika Waititi (Thor: Ragnarok), features a boy being mentored by his imaginary friend, an amiable and good spirited Adolf Hitler (also Waititi).

admit, she looks kind of hot with fangs. Her evil fairy kind of looks like a vampire. Do I have a thing for vampires? Now that I think of it, I thought Kate Beckinsale was hot as a vampire, too. I think I have a vampire problem. They probably carry every blood-borne disease in the book. Oh, this isn’t good. I’m deleting my Vampire Tinder account profile right now.

November Harriet (Nov. 1): Hopefully, with this release, Harriet Tubman (played by Cynthia Erivo) will get the sort of tribute she deserves. Say, whatever happened to the Harriet Tubman $20 bill? Let’s get those into circulation. Motherless Brooklyn (Nov. 1): Edward Norton directs himself as a private inves-

Zombieland: Double Tap: The gang— including Woody Harrelson, Emma Stone, Jesse Eisenberg and Abigail Breslin—all return for more zombie shenanigans, with Bill Murray doing another cameo. The Lighthouse: Robert Eggers, director of The Witch—a film I loved so very, very much—returns with a black-and-white thriller starring Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson as two men having big trouble in a lighthouse. Sorry to be presumptuous, but I have a space reserved on my “best of” list for this movie, and I haven’t seen it yet. “Why’d you spill your beans?” Maleficent: Mistress of Evil: I just watched the video of Angelina Jolie getting made up for this movie and, I have to Doctor Sleep


Terminator: Dark Fate

tigator with Tourette Syndrome trying to solve the murder of his buddy Frank (Bruce Willis). Norton hasn’t really done anything of note since Birdman (2015), so hopefully this is the return of a great actor.

Terminator: Dark Fate (Nov. 1): While James Cameron is living in Avatar Land— no, seriously, he lives in that Avatar amusement park in Disney World, feasting on the feral Disney cats for sustenance and speaking Navi to perplexed tourists—he produced this . Allegedly, he never showed up for a day of shooting, but it does have his name on it, and that’s marketing for ya! Tim Miller (Deadpool) directs and Arnold Schwarzenegger plays an aged Terminator with an enlarged prostate who doesn’t eat enough fiber and hates all this newfangled smartphone technology. Linda Hamilton has returned after her royalties for Dante’s Peak ran out.

Doctor Sleep (Nov. 8): This sequel (starring Ewan McGregor) to Stephen King’s The Shining actually references the Stanley Kubrick film a lot, a movie King hates. So, if you’re watching this movie somewhere, and you notice a cascade of Sprite and Dots hitting the movie screen when they recreate Danny Torrance riding his trike in the Overlook Hotel, King just might be the culprit. Honey Boy (Nov. 8): This year is looking like a bit of a resurgence for Shia LaBeouf, whose odd behavior, which got him ostracized a few years ago, is nothing compared to today’s dummies getting ensnared in the #MeToo movement. Shia wrote the screenplay, too, about his childhood relationship with his own father. Last Christmas (Nov. 8): Game of Thrones’ Emilia Clarke plays a woman

working as a Santa’s elf in a department store. While it does feature the music of George Michael, the movie does not feature Clarke riding atop a dragon as it blasts yuletide commercialism with a stream of vengeful fire. Opportunity missed.

Midway (Nov. 8): There was a 1976

movie called Midway, based on the infamous Pacific theater battle during World War II, and I saw it with my Uncle Mike when I was a mere pup. It starred Charlton Heston, and it was kind of shitty. At one point, a character—I think it was the one played by Edward Albert—gets shot down during a plane fight, and there’s this quick shot of him all charred and screaming as his plane plummets toward Earth. That moment is still one of the most jarring, unintentionally funny movie moments I’ve experienced in my decades of film viewing. Anyway, they’ve made another

Midway, it’s full of stars (Patrick Wilson, Luke Evans, Aaron Eckhart, Mandy Moore, Dennis Quaid, Woody Harrelson, etc.), and Charlton Heston is long dead, so maybe it will be better.

Charlie’s Angels (Nov. 15): Look, Kristen Stewart has been making some fine indie films these past few years, but a girl has to get paid sometimes, so here we go. Ford v Ferrari (Nov. 15): Matt Damon plays legendary car designer Carroll Shelby, and Christian Bale is on hand as driver Ken Miles in this vroom-vroom movie from director James Mangold. Word has it that Bale had four ribs, 10 feet of intestine and the sunny side of his personality removed to look the part. Damon FILM c O n t i n u e d

O n pa g e 2 0

The Irishman OctOber 31, 2019

CN&R

19


FILM c O n t i n u e d

f r O m pa g e 1 9

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

simply put on 15 pounds eating melted Häagen-Dazs, because melted HäagenDazs is the fattener of choice among movie stars. That, and lots of pancakes.

The Report (Nov. 15): Good lord, does Adam Driver ever stop to take a breath? He’s in five movies released in the U.S. this year, including that indie movie where he plays the guy with the mask who likes to take his shirt off during randy, telekinetic phone calls. This one costars Annette Bening and is based on real events during a post-9/11 investigation. A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

(Nov. 22): Tom Hanks playing Fred Rogers is about as surprising as Tom Hanks playing Walt Disney.

Dark Waters (Nov. 22): Mark Ruffalo plays a lawyer who defends a city against the DuPont chemical company, which has been poisoning their waters for years. I swear to god, I feel like I’ve already seen 10 different versions of this movie, but this is the first one starring the Hulk. Frozen II (Nov. 22): Will they come up

with a track catchier than “Let it Go” for the sequel? I don’t know, but I’m sure my ears will bleed as they make their attempt. Writer’s honest aside: The previous sentence is a lie to make me look masculine and cool. I am a Disney junkie, and I sing “Let it Go” in the shower and on nature hikes.

21 Bridges (Nov. 22): It’s an NYPD detective story starring Chadwick Boseman, aka Black Panther. The Irishman (Nov. 27): In a movie that is allegedly 2,056 hours long, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci are de-aged in a Martin Scorsese picture that has the master playing in his most vital gangster sandbox. A Netflix film—I’ll say “Netflix” a lot in this article—vying

Jumanji: The Next Level

20

CN&R

OctOber 31, 2019

Frozen II

for Oscars, it will have a limited theatrical release starting in early November and move to streaming three weeks later. This epic story of Irish hitman Frank Sheeran (De Niro) and his involvement with labor union leader Jimmy Hoffa (Pacino) looks to be an event that would be best viewed on a big screen, with you perched in a chair right next to somebody who is filling the air with the latest, rancid strain of influenza. On second thought, streaming sounds pretty good.

Knives Out (Nov. 27): After pissing off legions of Star Wars fans with his sub-par The Last Jedi (that ill-timed Finn and Rose kiss during the climactic AT-AT showdown still ticks me off), director Rian Johnson returns to a less expensive narrative (before fronting his very own Star Wars trilogy—not excited about that). This Agatha Christie-like mystery/dark comedy starring Daniel Craig and tons more stars is getting good buzz. Queen & Slim (Nov. 27): A black couple on their first date (Daniel Kaluuya and

Jodie Turner-Smith) become fugitives after an unfortunate encounter with an overzealous white cop.

December Marriage Story (Dec. 6): Netflix strikes again with another high-profile dramatic film effort, this one written/directed by Noah Baumbach (The Squid and the Whale) and starring Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver as a deteriorating married couple. Driver is in everything. He’s like the male Kristen Bell! The Aeronauts (Dec. 6): In 1862, two hot air balloon pilots (Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones) on a scientific expedition are accidentally sucked into a time traveling tunnel. A Hidden Life (Dec. 13): Terrence Malick, one of the greatest movie directors to ever walk the planet, offers up his latest—a World War II biographical drama about Franz Jägerstätter, an Austrian who

Cats

refused to fight alongside the Nazis. All indications are that this is a return to form for the auteur (The Tree of Life, The Thin Red Line), and ends a late career slump that has included the massive missteps: Song to Song, Knight of Cups and To the Wonder. Next up for the director? He’s currently filming a Jesus movie. Oh, my.

Jumanji: The Next Level (Dec. 13): Not going to lie—this looks really, really funny. Kevin Hart’s avatar is Danny Glover, while Dwayne Johnson’s is Danny DeVito. This all strikes me as a hundred different kinds of brilliant. The trailer has already made me laugh more than most full comedies this year. Uncut Gems (Dec. 13): Adam Sandler gets serious in this heist film based on a true story. If you are irked that you didn’t hear about this sooner, I fully admit that I SHOULD HAVE TOLD YOU ABOUT IT YESTERDAY!!! (That’s a The Wedding Singer reference right there.) Bombshell (Dec. 20): We’ve already


★ ★

★ HEROES! ★ We’re looking for

learned plenty from this movie about sexual harassment in the early days at Fox News, mainly that it doesn’t take much to make Charlize Theron look exactly like Megyn Kelly. Also starring Nicole Kidman and Margot Robbie.

Cats (Dec. 20): Yeah, um, this looks seriously messed up. I don’t know how they’ve achieved those cat costumes (digital, body paint, invasive surgery). I just know that I don’t like them. Cuddly and cute has been traded for twisted and demonic. Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

(Dec. 20): After The Last Jedi, a divisive chapter for sure, Disney plays it safe and hands control of Star Wars back to J.J. Abrams, who made the far superior The Force Awakens. I think Rey (Daisy Ridley) has an evil clone, and that’s who we are seeing with the impractical double light saber thing in the preview. Let’s see if I’m right, or if I’m just a loser geek who spends way too much time thinking about shit like this. As a Star Wars fan, I’m more

jazzed about the TV shows (including The Mandalorian, premiering on the Disney+ streaming channel on Nov. 12) than the films beyond this year.

The Two Popes (Dec. 20): Anthony Hopkins and Jonathan Pryce play the title characters in a comedy/drama chronicling that religiously historical tennis match where two Popes played for the title of “Jesus’ Favorite.” The match went on so long that the two pontiffs wound up spitting up blood, losing toes and, most notably, taking their boss’ name in vain. This not only resulted in Jesus canceling the employee Christmas party, but also the Son of God deeming both of the Popes wimps and not worthy of wearing the funny hats. (Limited theatrical release in late-November; streaming on Netflix from Dec. 20 on.) Just Mercy (Dec. 25): Michael B. Jordan, Jamie Foxx and Brie Larson star in a film about famed civil rights attorney Bryan Stevenson and the appeal case of Walter McMillian, an Alabama man wrongfully convicted of murder. This has the makings of something special. Little Women (Dec. 25): Director Greta Gerwig follows up her fantastic Lady Bird with the latest adaptation of the classic Louisa May Alcott novel, and it stars the great Saoirse Ronan and new sensation Florence Pugh (one of the year’s best performances in Midsommar). Next up for Gerwig: possibly directing a Barbie movie starring Margot Robbie and co-written by her husband, Noah Baumbach. That’s not a joke … it’s a real project. While I’m enjoying her directorial efforts, I’m hoping Gerwig hasn’t given up on acting. She’s an onscreen presence that is totally unique—and needed.

Know a LOCAL HERO? Someone who volunteers his or her time to make the community a better place? Send us an email with the name of your nominee for local hero and the reasons why. He or she could be included in our annual LOCAL HEROES issue coming out the day before Thanksgiving.

SEND TO: cnrletters@newsreview.com with “LOCAL HERO” in the subject line. Please include your contact info.

Submission DEADLINE: FRIDAY, NOV. 1

1917 (Dec. 25): Sam Mendes (American Beauty) directs a World War I movie that might just be an awards season, under-theradar surprise, judging by the stellar trailer. Ω

OctOber 31, 2019

CN&R

21


Arts &Culture Th ir d ti m e’ s a ch ar m

Lreleased garage-rock four-piece The Shivas their newest album, Dark ast week, Portland-based psych

Thoughts. It’s the band’s third one. Not its third album ever— by it’s actually the band’s Robin Bacior fifth release—rather the Preview: third version of Dark The Shivas play Thoughts. The Shivas Thursday, Nov. 7, recorded the same 8 p.m. Sex Hogs II album three times, and Viking Skate Country open throwing out the first Tickets: $7 two in favor of what was eventually released The Maltese on Tender Loving 1600 Park Ave. 343-4915 Empire on Oct. 25. “We had this thing facebook.com/ themaltese in mind and we didn’t want to stop until we got it to a point where we felt like it needed to be,” guitarist/vocalist Jared Molyneux said during a recent interview. The record marked a pivotal time for the band, which formed as a trio back in 2006, when Molyneux was around 15 years old. The next decade was spent touring constantly. At times that meant the underage players had to sit outside of bars and be escorted onto stage to play, then promptly taken out after their set. The band went through lineup changes, released music on K and Burger and other indie labels and toured the world. Molyneux even mar-

ried a fellow bandmate, drummer/vocalist Kristin Leonard. By 2016, The Shivas were ready to work on a fifth studio album (sixth, unofficially). The group began recording, but due to time constraints/scheduling issues, it just wasn’t coming together. The band members didn’t feel like they’d done the songs justice, so they decided to re-record it and “in a weird way the same thing happened again,” Molyneux said. “[We] ran out of time with touring schedules and people moving from here to there. We never got a chance to get it to a point where it really needed to be and it wasn’t possible to pick it back up.” By 2018, the band found itself with two failed attempts. It would’ve been easy to toss the project out of frustration, but Molyneux said they wanted to get it right. “If you think about the songs like a photograph—‘My mouth was open in that picture, let’s take one more’— it really did feel like that, because each time we cut the record it was a totally different view of these songs,” Molyneux said. “Everything sounds kinda different because it’s a slightly different angle, different lighting. [We] just wanted to get one where everyone’s eyes are all the way open and mouths are closed, know what I mean?” For the third go at it, the band

The Shivas grind out garage-rock perfection on new album

teamed up with longtime friend and engineer Cameron Spies. Instead of pushing against the clock, they took their time, stretching the process out to 50 days in the studio. “Usually we’re paying for studio time, or even if we’re not, there’s only so much you can do on stuff, but it gave it a lot more time to experiment with overdubs and mixing,” Molyneux said. “We were able to feel it out a lot more, and make something that has more character.” The result was The Shivas’ most ambitious, polished work yet. The single “Gloria” kicks off Dark Thoughts with a well-rounded, hip-shaking garage-rocker—surf-rock drums, grimy guitars, spooky sing-along vocals—that shows off the group’s work in the studio, as well as on the stage during its famously energetic live shows. “It’s really through performing [the songs] live a lot that we got what we have on the album,” Molyneux said. “It’ll probably still change to some degree. I’m not really sure, but I’m curious to see.” Whatever new versions might arise will have to be experienced live, since the album is finally done … probably. “Everyone [was] constantly making jokes about getting done so we could start on it the fourth time,” Molyneux said. “It was a real test of our commitment. The fact that we came out of it feeling like it was worth it I think is something.” □

THIS WEEK 31

THU

Special Events TREAT STREET: Dress up the kids and stroll through downtown Chico. Businesses will be offering treats and crossing guards will be present. Thu, 10/31, 2pm. Downtown Chico.

Theater MACBETH: New local theater group Legacy Stage presents classic Shakespeare play in a nontraditional format. Performances take place at night in Lower Bidwell Park, beginning in Cedar Grove and then traveling to several different locations. Runs through Nov. 2. Thu, 10/31, 7:30pm. Sold out. Visit site to sign up for cancellations list. Cedar Grove, Bidwell Park. legacystage.org

1

FRI

Special Events ANDREW SCHULZ: Brash and blunt New York-based actor/ comedian performs. Support from Mark Gagnon. Fri, 11/1, 6:30pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds in the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 11/1, 9am. Bidwell Park.

The Shivas (from left): Jeff Schultz, Jared Molyneux, Kristin Leonard and Eric Shanafelt. PHOTO BY ADRIA IVANITSKY

TREAT STREET Today, Oct. 31 Downtown Chico

SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

22

CN&R

OCTOBER 31, 2019


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

OUR NEW WORLD

Sunday, Nov. 3 Paradise Performing Arts Center SEE SUNDAY, MUSIC

post-Camp Fire. Visit chiphousing.org for tickets. Sat 11/2, 5:30pm. $75. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

SCIENCE ROCKS GALA: Benefit gala to support the museum with interactive stations, dinner and live and silent auctions. Sat 11/2, 6pm. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade.

VOLUNTEER SATURDAYS: Volunteers meet at the Woodland entrance parking lot for litter pick-up and removal of invasive vegetation. Call Shane at 624-1102 for more info. Sat 11/2, 12pm. Bidwell Park.

YAHI SHUTTLE HIKE AND LITTER LOOKOUT: Guided 6.7-mile mostly downhill hike. Plan to pick up litter along the way. Visit chicohiking.org for more info. Sat 11/2, 1pm. Bidwell Park, 965 Fir St.

3

SUN

Special Events ALMOND BOWL RUN: Support local student athletes by signing up for 45th annual fun 5k or 10k run/walk. Visit fleetfeetchico.com to register. Sun, 11/3, 8am. One-Mile Recreational Area, Bidwell Park.

ANNIE’S STAR QUILT GUILD QUILTING SHOW: See Saturday. Sun, 11/3, 10am. $7. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St.

BUILDING FOOD INDEPENDENCE IN BUTTE COUNTY: Join The Butte County Local Food Network for a meeting on food independence. Sun, 11/3, 1pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

SONIC NATURE WALK: Community activity associ-

Theater CARRIE: Musical adapted from the Stephen

BILLY SKY & TAYLOR CRAFTED POP-UP: Shop for the holidays from a variety of locally made jewelry and hand-crafted woodwork. Sat 11/2, 10am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

King classic that tells the gory story of a high school outcast with telekinetic powers who gets revenge on prom night. Fri, 11/1, 7:30pm. $12-$20. Butte College, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville. butte.edu/drama

BLACK CAT BAZAAR: Music, handmade goods, food and fun for the whole family. Sat 11/2, 12pm. Mim’s Bakery, 890 Humboldt Ave.

MACBETH: See Thursday. Fri, 11/1, 7:30pm. Visit

COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Local artisans

site to sign up for cancellations list. . Cedar Grove, Bidwell Park. legacystage.org

2

SAT

Special Events ALOHA ADVENTURE: Arc fundraising dinner/silent auction: food/drinks and tropical theme. Sat 11/2, 6pm. $60. Arc Pavilion, 2040 Park Ave. ANNIE’S STAR QUILT GUILD QUILTING SHOW: See beautiful quilts made locally. Sat 11/2, 10am. $7. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St.

and Salvation Army crafters to help you get a jump start on your Christmas shopping. Sat 11/2, 10am. Salvation Army Community Center and Fellowship Hall, 567 E. 16th St.

ENLOE’S COMMUNITY WELLNESS EXPO: Free flu shots and health screenings, a safe drop-off station for unused and unwanted medications and more. Sat 11/2, 10am. Enloe Medical Center, 1531 Esplanade.

BOGG’S TRIBUTE TO BEYONCE Sunday, Nov. 3 Tender Loving Coffee SEE SUNDAY, MUSIC

FARM CITY HARVEST FESTIVAL: Free familyfriendly event featuring arts and crafts, interactive animal displays, antique and modern farm equipment, butter churning, plant sale and much more. Sat 11/2, 10am. Bidwell Mansion, 525 Esplanade.

FCC CHICO ANNUAL BAZAAR: Annual benefit for local charitable organizations featuring food, Christmas crafts, fresh market produce, rummage sale, jewelry, and handmade items. Sat 11/2, 9am. First Christian Church, 295 E. Washington Ave.

HOLIDAY CRAFT & GIFT FAIRE: Veterans of Foreign Wars fundraiser featuring local crafts, baked goods and more. Sat 11/2, 10am. Veterans Memorial Hall, 2374 Montgomery St., Oroville.

Music SYMPHONIC WINDS ENSEMBLE: CLASSICALLY BANDS: Concert features music from the 20th century to modern day. Sat, 11/2, 7:30pm. $6-$18. Harlen Adams Theatre, 400 W. First St. www.csuchico.edu/soa

ated with current exhibit The World Evades Us. Join the artists and explore the possibilities of discovery that purposeful listening can offer in Bidwell Park. Meet at the gallery. Sun, 11/3, 10am. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

TENANT RIGHTS WORKSHOP: Learn about your

Theater CARRIE: See Friday. Sat, 11/2, 7:30pm. $12-$20. Butte College, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville. butte.edu/drama/

MACBETH: See Thursday. Sat, 11/2, 7:30pm. Visit site to sign up for cancellations list. . Cedar Grove, Bidwell Park, 1890 E. Eighth St. legacystage.org

rights as a tenant with a facilitator from Sacramento Tenants Union. Sun, 11/3, 5pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

Music BOGG’S TRIBUTE TO BEYONCE: Local modern jazz/ hip-hop quintet plays the hits of Queen B for brunch. Sun, 11/3, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

HOWL & GROWL: Benefit for the Butte Humane Society featuring music by the Rockhounds, costume contest, drinks, dancing, and food by local vegan pizzeria Pizza Riot. Sat 11/2, 7pm. $20-$25. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

EDITOR’S PICK

ISHI AND THE ANTHROPOLOGISTS TREASURES THROUGH TIME: Working anthropologists and historians will share viewpoints of the anthropologists who worked with Ishi. Sat 11/2, 9am. Ehmann Home, 1480 Lincoln, Oroville.

JOHN BIDWELL AND CALIFORNIA: Discussion featuring three distinguished Bidwell authors: Nancy Leek, Michael Magliari, and Michele Shover. Sat 11/2, 10am. $5. Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park, 525 Esplanade.

MANAGING TRAUMA WITH RESILIENCE: Free workshop to assist in processing trauma and how to move forward into a place of health and hope. Call 343-6006 for more info. Sat 11/2, 9am. Free. Neighborhood Church of Chico, 2801 Notre Dame Blvd.

MONSTER BASH: Halloween-themed, solid-axle monster truck racing and freestyle event at the AMain RC Tracks. Sat 11/2, 10am. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St.

ROCK THE HOUSE: The Community Housing Improvement Program (CHIP) hosts benefit featuring music, dancing, food and drinks. Proceeds support housing and rebuilding

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

DOWN ON THE FARM If you are in the mood for a wholesome outing for the whole family, check out the 15th annual Farm City Harvest Festival celebration at Bidwell Mansion this Saturday (Nov. 2) from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The joys of farm life will be on colorful display with a petting zoo, roping demonstrations, carriage rides, butter-churning, cowmilking and a bee exhibition. The Mount Lassen chapter of the California Native Plant Society will be selling easyto-grow perennials and the Madison Bear Garden will be serving food. Plus, a bounce house and more for the kiddos. And guess what … the event is free!

OCTOBER 31, 2019

CN&R

23


THIS WEEK cONtINued FrOM PAGe 23

FINE ARTS

DUO SERAPHIM: Sundays at Two presents  sopranos Dara Scholz and Shauna Fallihee  performing ethereal music including pieces  by Pergolesi, Mozart and Delibes.  Sun, 11/3, 2pm. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State, ARTS  279.

OUR NEW WORLD: Paradise Symphony  Orchestra’s first performance since the  Camp Fire. Set will explore themes of  home, growth and recovery.  Sun, 11/3, 7pm. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777  Nunneley Road, Paradise. paradiseperform  ingarts.com

SUNDAY SUPERJAM: Weekly pro jam. Rock, blues,  country, funk—anything goes. Sign up early.  Music starts at 2.  Sun, 11/3, 2pm. LaSalles,  229 Broadway St. 

Theater CARRIE: See Friday.  Sun, 11/3, 2pm. $12-$20.  Butte College, 3536 Butte Campus Drive,  Oroville. butte.edu/drama

4

MON

tO FreeZe tHe SHIFtING PHANtASMAGOrIA

Special Events INSIDE THE MEGAFIRE: Screening of powerful film 

Shows through Dec. 14 Jacki Headley University Art Gallery

exploring the science of fire and our changing climate. Filmmaker Miles O’Brien will  be on hand.  Mon, 11/4, 6pm. Free. Paradise  Community Church, 6491 Clark Road,  Paradise. (415) 857-2456.

5

tue

Special Events FACULTY COLLOQUIUM SUICIDE PREVENTION: Nationally recognized scholar and Chico  State child development associate professor  Shelley Hart will discuss suicide prevention  and building relational capacities. The event  is free and open to the public.  Tue, 11/5, 5:30pm. Bell Memorial Union, Chico State.  898-6171. www.csuchico.edu

NEIL’S SHPEAL ABOUT ISRAEL: Middle East  expert Neil Lazarus presents an overview  of Israel. Event is free, RSVP to Chelsea  at israel4chico@gmail.com or (949) 7352266.  Tue, 11/5, 6:30pm. Bell Memorial Union  Auditorium, Chico State.

TOWN OF PARADISE COMMUNITY MEETING: Meeting  will be dedicated to updates from local  agencies such as PID and PUSD.  Tue, 11/5, 6pm. Paradise Alliance Church, 6491 Clark  Road, Paradise.

6

Wed

Special Events A PHOTOGRAPHIC GUIDE TO THE WILDFLOWERS OF THE KLAMATH MOUNTAINS: Author Ken DeKamp  will showcase rare and common wildflowers  from the area.  Wed, 11/6, 7pm. Chico Branch  Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

See Art

Art 1078 GALLERY: The World Evades Us Surveying  Composite Meanings of Place, inspired  by Chico’s natural and built landscapes,  artists Melanie Treuhaft, Tammy LePham  and Shanna Sordahl bring together light,  architecture and sound to construct this  immersive installation. Panel discussion  on Saturday, Nov. 2, 5pm. Through 11/10.  1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

CHICO ART CENTER: Dia de los Muertos Art  & Altar Exhibition, traditional and contemporary art pieces honoring the dead.  Reception Friday, Nov. 1, 5-7pm. Through  11/22. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

DOWNTOWN CHICO: Art & Wine Walk, monthlong art event featuring work produced  by local artists in downtown businesses.  Through 10/31.

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Christine MacShane, paintings by local artist. The Enloe Cancer  Center, Healing Art Gallery shows work  by artists whose lives have been touched  by cancer (survivors, caretakers and  healthcare givers). Through 1/24. Free.  265 Cohasset Road. 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: To Freeze the Shifting  Phantasmagoria, exhibit investigates  diverse strategies emerging in contemporary painting, highlighting work by  California artists. Through 12/14. Chico  State, ARTS 121. headleygallerycsuchico. com

MONCA: Points of Departure and fiber/ DIMENSIONS, an exhibition of 18 artists  who have used fiber and mixed media to  create forms that transcend definition.  Through 11/3. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca. org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Two Powerful Points  of View, fine art exhibit featuring work  by artists Valerie Payne and Chuck  Prudhomme. Through 11/23. 732 Fourth  St., Orland.

FOr MOre MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE ON PAGe 28

24

CN&R

OctOber 31, 2019

PROVISIONS GALLERY: The Art of Absolute  Ama, artist exhibition at gallery located  inside the downtown Upper Park clothing  store. Through 10/31. 122 W. Third St.

RED TAVERN: Flora, Fauna and Fields, eclectic exhibit featuring paintings in oils  and watercolor by Eva Farley, Candy  Matthews and Dolores Mitchell. Reception  Wednesday, Nov. 6, 4:30-5:30pm. Through  1/1. Free. 1250 Esplanade.

THE TURNER: 3rd Story Prints with Prose,  prints alongside Chico State students’  flash-fiction works inspired by the museum’s collection. Through 12/14. Free. Chico  State. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff  for kids to explore including a miniature  city, complete with a junior vet clinic,  dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant  fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check  the website for hours and admission  information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main  St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and  Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human  and technological achievements needed  to reach the moon and envisions a  future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625  Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Unbroken Traditions  Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker  Families in Northern California, exhibition  represents the culmination of one year  of research and collaboration between  Mountain Maidu weavers, other tribal  experts, museums studies students,  faculty and curators. Through 5/15. Chico  State, Meriam Library.


Shop Local

Holiday Guides CN&R’s new holiday guides hit stands on November 14 and December 12. Don’t miss your chance to be included in these essential holiday shopping guides! Contact your advertising representative for more information today. (530) 894-2300

O C T O B E R 31, 2019

  CN&R 

25


SaveS you Money!cate ifi Gift Cert

Yoga Center of Chico $20 Value

co r of Chi

You pay $10

50%

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

SCENE

off

te 0100 Yoga Cen 530.342. mable for cash. #150 | . Not redee t. mbrosa ding to CA CC Sec. 1749.45-1749.6 as store credi llo Va ge will be given 250 expire accor be used for gratuity. Chan mer minus any amount used. & does not ot s. Cann certificate by the consu unts & offer This is a gift amount paid with other disco is equal to the Can be used this certificate Cash value for

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

There will be (pig’s) blood Halloween weekend dress-up, dancing and gore

9

Downtown Fantasyland

Tonight (Oct. 31) is the night for the big parties in Chico as local fun-makers have booked all the grooviest local dance bands and DJs for living out one’s fantasies while shaking booties on the dance by floor. At Lost on Main, Chico-ween Jason Cassidy is back for the fourth year in a row, featuring performances by three local j aso nc @ new srev i ew. c o m bands—Lo & Behold, Sounds Good and Up to 11—plus DJ Byrdie and King Tommy spinning filthy funk and dirty rock all night. La Salles is having an early evening party on the patio with reggae/rock supergroup Dylan’s Dharma. Chico’s favorite jammers Swamp Zen team up with reggae crew Triple Tree for a Freak Out Halloween Party at Unwined. The Patio at Panama Bar Cafe hosts the Freakers Ball EDM night, while the El Rey Theater has the Zombie Silent Disco, with three channels to choose from—EDM, top 40 and throwbacks. And those music-crazy folks at KZFR will be jamming all night at the Chico Women’s Club with local Grateful Dead tribute crew The Ascenders.

Rocky Horror Picture Show Party Rocky Horror is a tradition the world over, and in Chico, the Maltese is the default home for the freak show. The bar’s traditional Halloween party features the classic film, plus dancing, singing and drink specials. Break out the spandex and fishnets and get to the party starting at 9:30 tonight (Oct. 31). No cover! Carrie

The Butte College Drama Department brings Carrie White’s ill-fated prom night to the stage for a musical adaptation of Stephen King’s story of high-school kids who mess with the wrong telekinetic loner. The original 1988 Broadway production was a flop, but a revamped 2012 revival version became an off-Broadway and community-theater hit. To make up for shows canceled due to power outages last weekend, an extra weekend was added to the run. If the winds cooperate, the pig blood will flow the next two weekends: Friday-

26

CN&R

OCTOBER 31, 2019

Derek Anderson with Sarah Merrill (as the title character) in Carrie at Butte College. PHOTO BY DAVIN SCHREINDL

Saturday, 7:30 p.m., through Nov. 9, plus a matinee Sunday, Nov. 3, 2 p.m. Tickets: $20 (students $12). Visit butte.edu/drama for tickets and more info. Scary movies

Two seminal horror films are about to be projected onto your Halloween weekend. Tonight (Oct. 31), Blackbird kicks off the retro frights with an outdoor showing of the OG zombie flick, Night of the Living Dead. Free popcorn; $5 cover. And at 10 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday (Nov. 1-2), the Pageant Theatre will host late-night screenings of the “final director’s cut” of the 1973 thriller The Wicker Man. Director Robert Hardy’s 2013 update uses a long-lost 35mm print of the film to restore his story of a Christian police officer’s ill-fated missing-person investigation on a remote Scottish island that’s home to a pagan cult.

Asylum of the Dead

What’s more frightening than a haunted house? How about a haunted barn where an insane-asylum escapee’s medical experiments have come to life? The annual Asylum of the Dead Haunted House finishes out its season this weekend with tours 7 to 10 p.m. from Halloween (tonight, Oct. 31) through Saturday (Nov. 2) at 3163 Esplanade. Tix: $5/adults; $3/kids.

Zombie Wrecking Crew

Get on the bus! There’s a zombie infestation in Oroville, and the Zombie Wrecking Crew invites you to the Combat Zone Paintball Park (4444 Pacific Heights Road) to get on the bus outfitted with a paintball gun at every window and drive through the woods and help eradicate the brain-eating hordes. Gates open at 6:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday (Nov. 1-2). Visit the site or call for prices and other info: 517-9026, zombiewreckingcrew.com Black Cat Bazaar

The bazaar is back! A craft faire that mixes a carnival, live music, food and drink with handcrafted works of art. Put on your witch’s hat, leash up the cat and cruise down to the parking lot of Mim’s Bakery (890 Humboldt Ave.) noon-5 p.m. this Saturday (Nov. 2). Ω


O C T O B E R 31, 2019

  CN&R 

27


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 10/31—WEDNESDAY 11/6 JAM OF THE UNDEAD

P-LO

Saturday, Nov. 2 Senator Theatre

POOR MANS WHISKEY: Nor Cal jamgrass band performs originals and a twangy version of Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon (aka Dark Side of the Moonshine). Dress as your favorite Wizard of Oz character. Thu, 10/31, 8pm. $22. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

SEE SATURDAY

ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW PARTY: Dress up and get down to the cult classic with a fun night of singing, dancing, costumes, drink specials and a DJ. Thu, 10/31, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

31THURSDAY

SINGER/SONGWRITER/PERFORMER SHOWCASE: A lineup of local artists, DYLAN’S DHARMA: Reggae, Latin grooves and more on the patio for a special Halloween get-down. Thu, 10/31, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

THE ASCENDERS: Hippie Halloween with local jam band and special guests. Event is family friendly, costumes encouraged. Thu, 10/31, 7:30pm. $10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

THE FREAKERS BALL: EDM night with DJ lineup playing bass, dub and house. Costumes encouraged. Thu, 10/31, 8pm. $5. Panama Bar Café, 177 E. Second St.

CHICO-WEEN: Halloween dance party with live local music by Up to 11 and more. DJ Byrdie and King Tommy on the decks, get in for cheap with a costume. Thu, 10/31, 8pm. $8-$10. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

28

CN&R

HALLOWEEN AT THE BOX: Celebrate the

OCTOBER 31, 2019

holiday with a blues jam from 5-9pm followed by karaoke. Thu, 10/31, 5pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

each performing 1/2 hour sets. Thu, 10/31, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

1FRIDAY

’90S DANCE PARTY: Dance to your favorite, pop, hip-hop and R&B favorites with DJ Barndoor. Fri, 11/1, 10pm. $3. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

THE LACS: Hick-hop duo from Georgia does their thing. Black Stone Cherry and the Josephines open the show. Fri, 11/1, 9pm. $40. Tackle Box, 379 E Park Avenue.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Signup at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 11/1, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

SWAMP ZEN: Halloween bash with local

RECKLESS ENVY: Trio plays everything

jam-funk band. Free Beer shares the bill. Plus, costume contest. Thu, 10/31, 9pm. $10. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

from Journey to Prince to Merle Haggard. Fri, 11/1, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

ZOMBIE SILENT DISCO: Celebrate Halloween silent-disco-style with Power 102.1. Costume contest and prizes. Thu, 10/31, 8pm. $10. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

SOUL POSSE: Cut a rug with fun fivepiece band playing decades of hits from a variety of genres. Fri, 11/1, 7pm. Southside Community Resource Center, 2959 Lower Wyandotte Road, Oroville.

Outside of Elvis impersonators, there are probably more Grateful Dead cover bands than any other tribute act in America. (Chico has two!) Terrapin Flyer, out of Chicago, is one of the longestrunning Dead-icated acts in the country, and Wednesday (Nov. 6) the band will make a stop at Lost on Main as part of its 20th anniversary tour. It’s an early show—doors open at 7:30 p.m.

STRAIT COUNTRY: Tribute band showcases George Strait’s mix of swing and honky-tonk. Fri, 11/1, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

2SATURDAY

CARAVANSERAI: Full-band tribute to

the music of Santana. Sat, 11/2, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

THE FRITZ: Celebrate Day of the Dead with a costume contest and tunes by fun local dance band. Sat, 11/2, 9pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

GUITAR GODS REVIEW: Tribute show celebrating the music of Hendrix, Clapton, Jimmy Page, Prince and more. Sat, 11/2, 9pm. $10. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

HOT BUTTERED RUM: Appalachian string band music from popular Bay Area bluegrass band. Locals Low


THIS WEEK: FIND MOre eNtertAINMeNt AND SPecIAL eVeNtS ON PAGe 22 JOe MAZZAFerrO QUINtet Saturday, Nov. 2 Tender Loving Coffee See SAtUrDAY

your favorite heavy metal hits from Ozzy, AC/DC and more. Costumes encouraged. Sat, 11/2, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

Flying Birds share the bill. Sat, 11/2, 9pm. $15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

JOE MAZZAFERRO QUINTET: Sacramento-based trumpeter and composer performs. Local support from pianist Thornsteinn Gunter. Sat, 11/2, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

and G5. Sat, 11/2, 9pm. $20-$25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

RECKLESS ENVY: See Friday. Sat, 11/2, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

RON MATHEWS: Late night Halloween

funk party with local tunes. Sat, 11/2, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

MALTEAZERS ANNIVERSARY BURLESQUE: Put on your fancy duds and celebrate Lucky No. 7 at this anniversary show for your fave dance troupe. Sat, 11/2, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

P-LO: Bay Area rapper and producer performs. Local Support from Aye-B

SUNDAY IRIS: Enjoy the sweet folk/

soul stylings of local duo. Sat, 11/2, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

UP TO 11: Local cover band playing

11/5, 8:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

know and win prizes. Tue, 11/5, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 11/6, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 11/3, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

DANCE NIGHT: Four lady DJs with large

spelling bee drinking game with cash prize and a medal. Sun, 11/3, 7pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

5tUeSDAY

SUSAN: Celebrate Trash Rock Tuesday with rad all-women rock trio visiting from L.A. Local bands Susurrus and Similar Alien share the bill. Tue,

SINGLE SIX RECORD RELEASE: Countryrock band release show. Local support from Black Fong and Sons

of Jefferson. Wed, 11/6, 8pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

TERRAPIN FLYER: Chicago-based Grateful Dead tribute band slathers on the jam for special 20th anniversary show. Wed, 11/6, 7:30pm. $15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

6WeDNeSDAY

3SUNDAY

SMASHED SPELLING BEE: Monthly adult

stuff. Andan from the Channel 66 band hosts. Wed, 11/6, 7pm. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

THE CONCERT THAT NEVER WAS: Tribute

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a

OPEN MIC: Come on down strut your

to Striesand and Sinatra. Wed, 11/6, 6:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

vinyl collections select a fresh slice of wax every Wednesday for your boogie-ing pleasure. Wed, 11/6, 10pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

JAM SESSION: Informal night of improvised music. All musicians and genres are welcome. House band until 8, open jam after. Wed, 11/6, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

MONTHLY OPEN MIC: Blackbird’s firstWednesday open mic. All welcome. Sign-ups start at 5:30pm. Wed, 11/6, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

trASH rOcK tUeSDAY

Pep up the doldrums of your work week with a killer lineup of solid local and out-oftown bands at Duffy’s Tavern on, you guessed it, Tuesday (Nov. 5). Susan, a melody-heavy, all-female rock trio from L.A., will be in town, joined by Chico’s Susurrus, self-described “mom rock with folk-punk assets.” Susan (pictured) has a strong ’90s vibe and boasts rad lyrics— they are a don’t-miss. The grungy lo-fi sounds of Similar Alien round out the night.

Preorder NoW! Sign up today for Butte County’s First Ever BYOC Cannabis-Friendly Art Classes www.ButteCounty CannabisArtClub.com

supp rt

real

news

TickeTs $25 Oroville State Theater • Fri, Nov. 8, 7-9PM • www.orovillestatetheatre.com

Donate to ’s InDepenDent JournalIsm FunD:

State Theater, Red Bluff • Thurs, Nov. 14, 7- 9PM • www.brownpapertickets.com

InDepenDentJournalIsmFunD.org

EL Rey Theater, Chico • Sat, Nov. 23, 7- 9PM • www.elreychico.com OctOber 31, 2019

CN&R

29


REEL WORLD

NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

ChiCo’S LoCaL MeaL Kit MarKet! Pre-Portioned ingredients, ready to Cook Meals*

how DoeS it worK? 1. We prepare your kits. 2. You pick your meal. 3. Take home and cook in 30 mins!

See our full menu at www.freshcove.com or stop by today! 14 West Eaton Road • 530.715.7205 *Call ahead for Keto, Whole 30, Paleo Customizations

Fierce fantasia Mostly unknowns fill cast of trippy child-soldier drama

Tspooky group of blindfolded young people playing a version of soccer on a mountain somewhere

his spectacular fever dream of a film begins with a

in Colombia. Soon enough it becomes evident that the game is a training exercise and by its players are teenage commandos Juan-Carlos hiding out while awaiting orders Selznick from the commanders in something known only as The Organization. There’s a story in all that, of course, with echoes (though not the political specifics) of recent history in Latin America, Africa and Monos Southeast Asia. And the dramatic Opens Nov. 1. action that does unfold in Monos Starring Julianne has provoked apt comparisons with Nicholson, Moisés Arias and Sofia the likes of Lord of the Flies and Buenaventura. Apocalypse Now. But it’s the sensuDirected by Alejandro ously stylized presentation and the Landes. Pageant sustained aura of fever dream that Theatre. Rated R. prevails and also impresses most. These child soldiers are known collectively as Monos and individually as Bigfoot, Rambo, Smurf, Lady, Swede, Wolf, Dog and Boom Boom. The names sound farcical, but the Monos have serious (and potentially deadly) responsibilities. On the farcical side, they are charged with protecting a milk cow named Shakira; on the increasingly serious side, they’re holding a hostage, an American engineer named Sara Watson (but called only “Dotora” by the

3

30

CN&R

OCTOBER 31, 2019

Monos). Absurdities abound with both tasks, and fatal consequences are suddenly all around them. Most of the cast are first-time actors, with the main exceptions being Julianne Nicholson as Sara Watson and Moisés Arias as Bigfoot. Both are American-born performers with lengthy résumés. The only other professional in the cast is Jorge Román, who plays a kindly gold prospector in one of the film’s more memorable sequences. I think Arias delivers the film’s most striking performance, with the other acting standouts being Nicholson, Sofia Buenaventura (as the curiously androgynous Rambo), and diminutive Wilson Salazar (as “The Messenger,” the tiny but fierce and authoritative emissary who periodically brings the Monos orders from The Organization). Writer-director Alejandro Landes brings it all back to a powerful political and moral point in the film’s final remarkable moments. But for the most part, Monos is a lush, stylish combination of trippy fantasia and violent outdoor (and sometimes underwater) action movie, all of it in settings that are harsh, perilous and weirdly seductive. □

1 2

3 4

Poor

Good

Fair

Very Good

5 Excellent


SaveS you Money!

50%

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

death, a nurse (Elizabeth Lail) learns she only has three days to live. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Opening this week

The Current War

Arctic Dogs

A big-dog cast (Jeremy Renner, Alec Baldwin, Anjelica Huston, John Cleese, James Franco, and more) provides voices for this animated feature about a mail-delivering Arctic Fox who dreams of joining the huskies as a Top Dog. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Harriet

Biography of famous abolitionist/activist Harriet Tubman (played by Cynthia Erivo) who, after escaping slavery in 1849, returned to guide more than 300 others to freedom from America’s slave states via the Underground Railroad. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

The Lighthouse

Writer/director Robert Eggers follows up The Witch with a black-and-white psychological horror about a couple of lighthouse keepers (Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson) who start to lose their minds during a storm on a remote island. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

3

Monos

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Motherless Brooklyn

Edward Norton directed and stars in this film set in 1950s New York City about a private investigator with Tourette Syndrom (Norton) who is trying to solve the murder of his mentor (Bruce Willis). Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Terminator: Dark Fate

The sixth film in the Terminator franchise is a sequel to the first two films (those directed by James Cameron, who returns to produce this latest installment), and stars Linda Hamilton as Sarah Connor, who teams up with a cyborg human hybrid to protect a girl from the Terminator hunting her. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Wicker Man – Final Cut (1973)

Director Robin Hardy’s re-cut and restored update to his classic horror flick about a cop who, during the course of investigating a missing person on an isolated Scottish island, uncovers disturbing local rituals. Two showings: Nov. 1-2, 10 p.m. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Now playing The Addams Family

The creepy family made famous in the 1960s television series gets the CGI animation treatment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Black and Blue

An action thriller about a rookie New Orleans cop (Naomie Harris) who, after realizing some of her fellow cops are part of a criminal enterprise, partners with a stranger (Tyrese Gibson) outside the force to try to expose their crimes. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Countdown

After downloading an app on her phone that supposedly can predict a person’s date of

The story of the war of the currents in the late-19th century that pitted Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse against one another in competition for the electric-power transmission systems that would be used in America. Originally distributed by the Weinstein Co. in 2017, the film was shelved at the time in the wake of the sexual assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

off

Ice RInk

2

Joker

Joker, the latest take on DC Comics’ Clown Prince of Crime, will go down as one of 2019’s big missed opportunities. Director/coscreenwriter Todd Phillips apparently had the green light to do whatever he wanted with the character’s story, and he also landed the perfect lead (Joaquin Phoenix) for the title role. This was a chance to tell a fresh, dark origin story from the Joker’s point of view. Phillips blew it. Phoenix, on the other hand, did not. He is otherworldly good as Arthur Fleck, a severely troubled clown and wannabe standup comic (and mama’s boy) with a condition that causes him to laugh uncontrollably at inappropriate moments. He physically and mentally disappears into the part—to the point where you may become concerned for the actor’s well-being. He accomplishes this in a film that has a major identity crisis. It’s trying to do something new (mostly via the use of extreme violence), while also riffing on something old (Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns, as well as various other comic book and cinematic influences). What’s delivered is a muddy, predictable and ultimately unoriginal film. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

r A F

Paradise Ice Rink Unlimited Day Pass $12 Value You pay $6.00

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Ty CeleBrA i C T m 2019

Harvest Festival

io

n

saturday, nov. 2, 10:00am–2:00pm Free daytime event for the Whole Family! Bidwell mansion state historic park, 525 esplanade, chico

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

In this sequel to Maleficent (2014), Angelina Jolie reprises her role as the evil fairy, and Elle Fanning is back as her goddaughter, Princess Aurora (aka Sleeping Beauty), and the two are at odds with one another thanks to outside forces intent on sowing discord between humans and fairies. Cinemark, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

3

Zombieland: Double Tap

For this sequel, director Ruben Fleischer returns with the whole zombie-killing crew—Emma Stone, Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson and Abigail Breslin—for a film that does little to reinvigorate the genre, but still delivers plenty of laughs and zombie gore. It’s 10 years later, and the rag-tag team has taken up residence in the abandoned White House. The basic story involves a zombie-killing road trip that leads to Graceland (sort of) and then a commune called Babylon, with a lot more zombie killing. Along the way, fun new characters are introduced, including Nevada (played by Rosario Dawson), owner of an Elvisthemed hotel, and Albuquerque (Luke Wilson) and Flagstaff (Thomas Middleditch), two zombie hunters who look and sound an awful lot like Harrelson and Eisenberg’s Tallahassee and Columbus. The best, though, is Madison, played by Zoey Deutch, a “valley girl” type who has survived all these years living inside the freezer of food-court yogurt shop in a decimated mall. Whenever the film threatens to go a bit stale, Madison will swoop in decked out in a pink leisure suit with fake fur (she’s also a vegan) to liven things up. Cinemark, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

Agri-Business Bus Tour Wednesday, nov. 6th

tickets:(530) 533-1473online www.farmcity.com

Farm City restaurant Program

The Farm City Celebration thanks our many Sponsors, including:

throuGh novemBer Local eateries cooking with locally-sourced ingredients. For more information see the special Farm City program inside the Oct. 25th issue of Chico News & Review.

Golden State Farm Credit, Avrit Insurance Agency, Inc., Butte County Rice Growers Association, North Valley Ag Services, A&J Family Farms, Inc.

OCTOBER 31, 2019

CN&R

31


CHOW

PHOTO BY BUBBY (VIA FLICKR)

Farmhouse brew The subtle pleasures of the saison

Shavemonth, but now temperatures climbed back into the 70s and ummer may have ended last

on sweet meals! ATE C I F I T R E GIFT C

5

40%

Y 27 BAKER 0-899-05 cash. RNING emable for 8 | 53 TRY MO A, CHICO 9592 Sections 1749.45-1749.6.eNotcredrede it. COUN stor DR. ST. be given as ornia Civil Code TEC Change will rding to Calif expire acco be used for gratuity. 2625 AZ ot and does not certificate ounts and offers. Cann This is a gift disc with other Can be used

Country Morning Bakery & Cafe $5 Value

You pay $3

off

65%

Inday’s

off

$10 Value

You pay $3.50 1043 Inday ’s -B

10

West R gift certific 8th s estau cash. Can ate and does not be used with expire t | 5 Ran other disc according to Cali 30.5 ounts and forn 20.2 t offers. Can ia Civil Code Sec tion not be use 593 d for gra s 1749.45-1749.6. tuity. Cha nge will be Not redeemable for given as store cre dit.

This is a

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

32

CN&R

OCTOBER 31, 2019

80s, and it hasn’t felt like fall. Thankfully, saisons are by Alastair still flowing. Bland Traditionally a light summer beer in the balmy countryside of Belgium and France, this style has survived through the ages and into the craft beer era with the persistence and class of a brew that has few haters. Yet at the same time, saisons don’t get a whole lot of love. “They’ve very undervalued,” says Jonathan Massman, the brewer at San Rafael’s Pond Farm Brewing Co. “If they were exposed to more people, they would really catch on.” Saisons are often termed “farmhouse” ales and were traditionally brewed in barns during the winter/ spring to be ready to quench the thirst of the working class during the summer. Made using locally sourced strains of yeast, saisons embody the fragrant summertime terroir of rural northern Europe more poignantly than many other styles. The distinguishing characteristics include spicy, fruity and mildly earthy flavors that are produced largely by the yeast. Massman says many saisons taste of allspice, pepper and “maybe some bubblegum.” The beers sometimes carry scents of hay, barn, horse and goat—the marks of the Brettanomyces yeast sometimes used in fermentation and aging. Saisons also tend to fall lower on the alcohol spectrum, which can make them suitable as lunchtime or session beers.

Pond Farm is currently pouring two saisons—Saison Automne, made in the traditional Belgian mold, and Sgt. Peppercorn’s Strawberry Saison, made with strawberry puree, pink peppercorns and hibiscus. In Berkeley, Gilman Brewing Co. makes roughly a dozen saisons. These include French and Belgian styles, fermented with and without Brettanomyces, some with added fruits such as plum, peach, blackberry and cranberry, others aged in oak barrels. Sean Wells, Gilman’s owner and brewmaster, regards saisons as one of his favorite styles. “The versatility of the style is amazing,” he says. “Lots of people use these as gimmick beers and throw in a bunch of crap, but the breadth of flavors you can get from just water, barley, hops and yeast is amazing. Simply tweaking the temperature of fermentation for a given beer can result in a whole new flavor profile.” Wells suggests that newcomers to the style watch for various markers of a good saison—dry, fully fermented beer with a crisp finish and a range of flavors, including rich grains, pepper and stone fruit. While traditional boundaries are important, Massman says he does enjoy the flexibility and diversity of the style. For example, he recently traveled in Hawaii where he came

across (and tasted) a dragonfruitlime saison. “It still had all the Belgian phenolics and was basically a Hawaiian take on the style,” he says. Massman believes the common link between all saisons is the small family of yeast strains used for primary fermentation. Beyond that, he says, virtually anything goes. Locally, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. paid respect to the style’s roots by open-fermenting its Estate Farmhouse in a local peach orchard and allowing the valley yeasts to spontaneously do their thing before aging the beer in wine barrels. The result is a complex blend of subdued flavors—sweet, tart and funky. To Massman, “the benchmark standard” is the Saison Dupont, brewed in Belgium but widely available in California. It’s brewed in a traditional style and often is noted for its fruity, spicy character. Some beer styles, like the IPA, conquer the world; others, like pumpkin beers, teeter on the verge of commercial extinction. It’s all but certain that saisons will never approach the level of popularity enjoyed by the IPA, for such is the power and appeal of the almighty hop. But appreciated for its subtleties, the saison will always have a place at the table. □


cn&r is Looking for • advertising consuLtant • distribution driver Do you love Chico? Do youwant to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

for more information, visit www.newsreview.com/chico/jobs

equal OppORTuNiTy emplOyeR

O C T O B E R 31, 2019

  CN&R 

33


ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

! S l a e M t e e w S n O 35%

Ginger’s

off

t Restauran

$5 Value

You pay $3.25

Fresh Cove $20 Value

You pay $10

Momona Noodle + Bao

cate used for any amount used. This is a gift certifi offers. Cannot be by the consumer minus other discounts & to the amount paid Can be used with certificate is equal Cash value for this

,

OPEN Thanksgiving Christmas & New Year

$

20

This is a gift cer 1749.45-1749 tificate and does not exp .6. Not red offers. Can eemable for ire according to Cali not be use fornia Civi d for gratuit cash. Can be used with other l Code Sections y. Change discounts and will be give n as store credit.

50% off

FRESH

COVE 14 WES T CHICO EATON RD , CA 95 9 530-77 4-5826 73

40%

Cate Gift CertifiC

off

20

MoMona noodle & Bao 230 W 3rd St 530.487.7488

$20 Value

You pay $12

Ginger’s 0.345.8862 0 | 53 redeemable for cash. ry Rd Ste 10 1749.45-1749.6. Not . 2201 Pillsbu & does not expire according to CA CC Sec.gratu given as store credit ity. Change will be

749.6. Not redeemable for expire according to CA CC Sec. 1749.45-1 This is a gift certificate & does not Change will be given as store & offers. Cannot be used for gratuity. cash. Can be used with other discounts consumer minus any amount used. is equal to the amount paid by the credit. Cash value for this certificate

Pita Pit

10

$10 Value

$

You pay $7.50 25% off

240 Broa dwa y St

regulat As a Californ ions. ia with oth Gift certificatecorporation, Ch er disco ico s unts an do not expir Community e d offer s, but cain accordancePublishing db a Ne nnot be wit used for h California ws & Review is gratuity Civil Code Se required . Any ch ange re ctions 1749.45to abide by all maining -17 Ca from pu 49.6. This lifornia Civil ce Co rchase will be rtificate may des and given as be store cr used edit.

Pit

a Pi | 530 t .899 .284 7

TAO OF BELL One of Arts DEVO’s standby

sayings is, “We all have our shit.” It’s very comforting to me. I’ll often say it to remind myself that I’m not alone in dealing with whatever I’m dealing with, as well as when I’m trying to empathize with others as they go through problems. It’s an especially helpful mantra when someone is being a jerk (often via social media, as is the way of the world today). If you can imagine that there must be some shit the jerk has in his or her life that’s at the root of things, sometimes an empathetic response can defuse a situation so that no one has to add any more shit Taca-taca-Taco Bell to their lives. We’re all made up of the same stuff, just in different combos. Kind of like the menu at Taco Bell. (Please, let me think outside the bun for a minute.) It’s not only that I was super hungry as I started writing this column, I really think there might be some value to be found at the Bell beyond just the Cravings Menu. There are 39 Taco Bell foods (not counting drinks) that are all basically the same. The same meats, beans, cheeses, tomatoes, onions and sauces appear in the tacos, burritos, nachos, tostadas, Mexican pizzas and Crunchwraps. The differences are mainly matters of architecture—or how things look. Inside, they all bleed the same red sauce. Sure, some items might seem like deep-fried abominations that exist only to cause us harm. But realize that their natural state has been mutated by extreme circumstances, and even with a monster like the double Chalupa, if you peel back the hardened layer of skin, you’re left with the gooey, unspoiled insides of a harmless soft taco supreme. We are Taco Bell?

DAMN! BURGER! OK, maybe I am just hungry. A trip to my hometown of

Redding for a doctor’s appointment this week and a brain that was still fixated on fast food meant I’d be stopping for lunch at a treasure from my childhood—Damburger. The place has been in the same hole in the wall since 1962, and has been in existence since 1938. The original owner, Bud Pennington, got his start— and the name for his restaurant—when, at the age of 18, he set up a grill in a tent next to the building where men were hired to work on the Shasta Dam. He sold a damburger, plus a piece of pie and cup of coffee, for 25 cents. Nostalgia aside, the real appeal of Damburger is the way they prepare the meat—flat and crispy. These are not like the trendy smashburgers of cooking shows; these patties are flattened super-thin with a tortilla press and fried until almost crunchy. (Where my Maillard-reaction people at?!) The “original” rendition adds just mustard, lettuce and onion to the bun and meat, and the perfect burger Damburger also includes a second patty with a slice of cheese in between. Add mayo and pickle if you have to, but not tomato, because it’s not allowed. (But why not try going OG for your first visit?) Take a Redding day trip this fall and plan a lunch at the downtown icon.

NO-SHAVE NOVEMBER Attention, beardslies, beardmeisters and all other Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico. 34

CN&R

OCTOBER 31, 2019

fuzzy-faces. The Novembeard beard-growing contest kicks off at 6 p.m. Friday (Nov. 1) with Clean-Shaven Day at Secret Trail Brewing Co. Contestants show up with all facial hair removed (even sideburns!) and then let it grow while collecting pledges for the rest of the month (funds go to the Paradise High School music and arts programs). Visit facebook.com/chico beardcollective for more details.


REAL ESTATE

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the professionals at Century 21 Select 530.345.6618 www.C21SelectGroup.com Two homes on one lot for $409K. Adorable vintage 2/1 and a 2005 built 3/2 in the West Aves near Enloe & CSUC. Great income property! Text Agent for address.

Garrett French • 530.228.1305 GarrettFrenchHomes.com • DRE# 01402010 Specializing in residential & agriculture properties in Chico, Orland, Willows.

6207 Clark Road e n d in g PParadise 470 Nottingham Drive e n d in g PParadise 1537 4thdAvenue e n in g PParadise CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Happy Halloween!

Perfect Student Parent InveStment!

New ListiNg! 200 Crater Lake Drive Amber Grove neighborhood! $485,000

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336 BRE# 01269667

Newer 3/2 North Chico $339,000 3.4 acres, well, septic & power in place $98,500 Duplex! 1 bed / 1 bath each $289,900

Get your tricks and treats tonight, but don’t let the home buying process spook you out of your next home. I am here to help you every step of the way.

Brad Smith | 530.894.4533

Mark Reaman l 530.228.2229

DRE #02032624

Mark.Reaman@c21selectgroup.com

Building trust one home at a time!

Lic# 01265853

Wonderful custom home located on 5.95, with 30 X 50 shop, horse barn, pond, creek, 3-car attached garage and lovely 3 bed/ 3.5 bath home with granite kitchen counters! ..............................................................................................$849,000

Location, Location, Location

3,600 sq foot home with 4 bed/3 bath, open floor plan, large rooms, RV parking, 3-car attached garage, in ground pool with beautiful grounds! Really nice! ......................................................................................................$699,000

3/2 in California Park $315,000 3/2 close to Meriam Park $315,000

stunning Teresa Larson (530) 514-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

Well maintained condo located in the highly desirable Pebblewood

Pines complex! 3 bed/2.5 bath, 1,889 sq ft, formal living/dining area with fireplace, family room with wet bar, cozy nook area! Priced well and a huge plus is the OWNED SOLAR! .............................................................................................$339,000

Homes Sold Last Week

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc.

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of October 14 - October 18, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

184 Tonea Way 11845 Ridge Rim Rd 605 Earl Ave 3404 Peerless Ln 1210 Dayton Rd #1212 2649 Lakewest Dr 362 Picholine Way 1930 Oak Way 2402 Mcgie St 136 Delaney Dr 1667 Carol Ave 2764 Beachcomber Cv 1422 Ridgebrook Way 1588 E 8th St 423 Madrone Ave 937 Karen Dr 737 Skyway Ave 2650 Fairfield Cmn 2239 Hutchinson St 1258 Calla Ln 669 E 6th St 990 E 8th St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$750,000 $691,000 $591,000 $535,000 $500,000 $479,000 $469,500 $469,000 $450,000 $425,000 $415,000 $400,000 $379,000 $364,000 $359,000 $350,000 $349,000 $349,000 $345,000 $340,000 $310,000 $295,000

4/3 3/2 3/3 3/2 3/2 4/3 3/2 3/3 3/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 3/2 3/3 3/2 4/1 3/2

SQ. FT.

2614 2499 2552 1970 1144 2163 1673 2177 1472 1653 1572 1348 1544 2699 1593 1189 1730 1143 1920 1350 1215 1194

ADDRESS

1332 Laurel St 2197 Huntington Dr 340 W 20th St 110 Macdonald Ave 1267 E 10th St 2099 Hartford Dr #17 2055 Amanda Way #31 1193 Parque Dr 2076 Parkway Village Dr 32 Santos Way 3075 Whistler Way 2681 Pinecrest Rd 155 Lemon Hill Dr 1850 Mountain Vista Dr 3 Sutters Mill Rd 10390 Red Eye Rd 54 La Cresenta Dr 330 Pinewood Dr 192 Valley View Dr 6324 Berkshire Ave 1424 Wagstaff Rd 549 Digger Pine Ln

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$278,500 $267,500 $267,000 $255,000 $250,000 $240,500 $188,000 $158,000 $141,000 $132,500 $108,000 $375,000 $325,000 $260,000 $247,000 $240,000 $230,000 $584,000 $419,000 $320,000 $300,000 $285,000

3/1 3/2 2/1 3/1 2/1 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 2/1 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 1/2 3/1 3/3 3/3 3/2 2/2 3/3

O c t O ber 31, 2019

SQ. FT.

948 1102 738 888 882 1375 1008 1240 1215 1862 1358 1470 1387 1270 1252 2090 1322 2509 2040 1455 1444 1863

CN&R

35


CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE E

Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

For more information about advertising in our Real estate section,

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

call us at

(530) 894-2300

some upgrades.

Need a hand with your home purchase?

bidwell TiTle & esCrOw

With locations in:

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

saves you money! Inday’s

$10 Value You pay $3.50

65%

Your Grandmother’s CRAFT FAIR Saturday November 9th from 9am to 3pm Chico Mobile Country Club / 1901 Dayton Rd.Beautiful handmade and homemade gifts

AFFORDABLE TRUSTS & WILLS Trust Amendments, Powers of Attorney & Deeds also. 10% discount for Nov. & Dec. 775-357-4472 Need Help with Family Law? Can’t Afford a $5000 Retainer?Low Cost Legal Services Pay As you go As low as $750-$1500 Get Legal Help Now! Call 1-844-821-8249 Mon-Fri 7am to 4pm PCT https:// www.familycourtdirect. com/?network=1 (AAN CAN) Struggling With Your Private Student Loan Payment? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888-670-5631 (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN) A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, localadvisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1-855-993-2495 (AAN CAN) COMPUTER ISSUES? FREE DIAGNOSIS by GEEKS ON SITE! Virus Removal, Data Recovery! 24/7 EMERGENCY $20 OFF ANY SERVICE with coupon 42522! Restrictions apply. 1-866-966-1581 (AAN CAN)

10

off

according to California used for gratuity. Change will be given e and does not expire Cannot be This is a gift certificat with other discounts and offers. cash. Can be used

$10 Value You pay $8.50

$

10

As a California corporati

TENDER COFFEE LOVING

365 E 6TH ST. TENDERLOV INGCOFFEE.C OM

on, Chico Communi all California Civil ty Publishing Civil Code SectionsCodes and regulations. Gift certificate dba News & Review is required cannot be used for 1749.45-1749.6. This certificate s do not expire in accordance withto abide by may be used with gratuity. Any change other discounts California remaining from purchase will be given as storeand offers, but credit.

off

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

36

CN&R

OcTObER 31, 2019

A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session. Ask 4 special rates 4 fire victims (530) 321-0664

15%

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP. Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guaranteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN) CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled - it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1-866-535-9689 (AAN CAN) One-Stop-Shop For All Your Catheter Needs. We Accept Medicaid, Medicare, & Insurance. Try Before You Buy. Quick and Easy. Give Us A Call 866-282-2506 (AAN CAN) VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60 pills for $99. 100 pills for $150. FREE shipping. Money back guaranteed! Call Today 1-844-879-5238 (AAN CAN) Looking for self storage units? We have them! Self Storage offers clean and affordable storage to fit any need. Reserve today! 1-855-617-0876 (AAN CAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

Rant Restau 0.2593 Inday’s | 530.52 st 8th st Not redeemable for 1749.45-1749.6. 1043-B We Civil Code Sections as store credit.

Tender Loving Coffee

Get Rid of your timeshare today! Safely, ethically and legal. Don’t delay call today. 1-844-757-4717 (AAN CAN)

FOR SALE: (1) 1986 F150 (Parts Only) (1) 42in. Cut Riding Mower (1) Push Mower (1) Recirculating Water Pump (1) Slant Leg 10x10 canopy (never taken out of box) (1) Older AC Unit / Contact Will: 530-624-6862

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CLEAR REFLECTIONS OF CHICO at 1612 Sherman Ave Chico, CA 95926. RICHARD J. WEMETTE 1612 Sherman Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD J WEMETTE Dated: August 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000957 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as OAK RIDGE CONSTRUCTION this Legal Notice continues

at 11128 Midway Suite A Chico, CA 95928. OAK RIDGE ENTERPRISE, INC. 11128 Midway Suite A Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SHAWN MACNEILL, PRESIDENT Dated: September 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001075 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EYE OF JADE at 1238 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. BENJAMIN LUCAS 11576 Dairy Rd Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BEN LUCAS Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001121 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AGRA MARKETING GROUP, AGRA SERVICES at 60 Declaration Drive, Suite A Chico, CA 95973. AGRA TRADING, LLC 60 Declaration Drive, Suite A Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: NICHOLAS B. CARTWRIGHT Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001116 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUNNY DAY FARMS at 8010 Reservoir Road Oroville, CA 95966. MARY ANN BARR 8010 Reservoir Road Oroville, CA 95966. LORRAINE M DAY 8010 Reservoir Road Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: LORRAINE M. DAY Dated: September 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001095 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO AQUAJETS, CHICO AREA SWIM ASSOCIATION, CHICO MASTERS at 3156 Canyon Oaks Ter Chico, CA 95928. CHICO AREA SWIM ASSOCIATION 1675 Park View Lane Chico, CA 95926. This busines is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: VERONICA COATES, TREASURER Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001118 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DELICIOUS TWIST at 1940 Feather River Blvd Oroville, CA 95965. this Legal Notice continues

A J HAGGARD 1 Sevillano Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: A.J. HAGGARD Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001120 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitous business name DELICIOUS TWIST at 390 Purple Rocks Lane Oroville, CA 95966. LEANNA IRENE BROMLEY 390 Purple Rocks Lane Oroville, CA 95966. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LEANNA BROMLEY Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0001549 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BARRON PLASTERING at 5576 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. JAIME BARRON 5576 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: JAIME BARRON Dated: October 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001146 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SILVERIZED TREE SERVICE at 1702 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. JEFF M SILVER II 1702 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. MANDY M SILVER 1702 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JEFF SILVER II Dated: September 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001084 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WIKIPOUCH at 1124 Almond Vista Ct Chico, CA 95926. INFECTION PREVENTION PRODUCTS, INC. 1124 Almond Vista Ct Chico, CA 95926. This busines is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KENT M. COLLINS, EVP Dated: October 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001151 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JUNK KING CHICO at 13242 Grass Valley Ave Ste 22 Grass Valley, CA 95945. PGE LYMATH LLC 6025 Happy Pines Dr Foresthill, CA 95631. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: PEGGY LYMATH, this Legal Notice continues

CO-PRESIDENT Dated: September 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001101 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PACIFIC NORTH CONSULTING at 1033 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. RODNEY W LACEY 1033 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RODNEY LACEY Dated: October 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001163 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MI TAQUITO GRILL at 3005 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. JOVITO HERNANDEZ 27 Baltar Loop 1 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOVITO HERNANDEZ Dated: October 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001173 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOCALS CAFE at 6221 Clark Rd Paradise, CA 95926. RHONDA BERNDT DE PINEDA 944 Sheridan Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RHONDA L BERNDT DE PINEDA Dated: September 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001072 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as UNLEASHED PET HOTEL at 5260 Miocene Circle Oroville, CA 95965. RHONDA BERNDT DE PINEDA 944 Sheridan Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RHONDA L BERNDT DE PINEDA Dated: September 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001071 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE JOYMAKER at 2135 Nord Ave Spc 24 Chico, CA 95926. JOYMAKING PRODUCTIONS LLC 2135 Nord Ave Spc 24 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: TARA GROVER SMITH, PRESIDENT Dated: October 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001164 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SOLID VIBES at 2590 Mariposa Ave Chico, CA 95973. CHRISTINA ANN PETERSON 2590 Mariposa Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINA PETERSON Dated: October 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001133 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MARLOW MOBILE BAR at 697 East 7th St Suite B Chico, CA 95928. JANAE CARRIGAN 697 East 7th St Suite B Chico, CA 95928. TUCKER SCHMIDT 697 East 7th St Suite B Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: JANAE CARRIGAN Dated: October 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001170 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TDT CONCEPT DESIGN at 1080 East Lassen Avenue #65 Chico, CA 95973. TYLER TAPPIN 1080 East Lassen Avenue #65 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TYLER TAPPIN Dated: October 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001179 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WADE ARENA at 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. ELTA L TOWNE 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. CARYL WESTON 1391 Clark Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: ELTA L TOWNE Dated: October 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001174 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HAGEN-SINCLAIR RESEARCH RECRUITING INC CHICO at 519 Reed Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. HAGEN-SINCLAIR RESEARCH RECRUITING INC CHICO 519 Reed Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CYNTHIA CROSS, PRESIDENT Dated: September 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001052 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as this Legal Notice continues


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY AZTECAS VIDEO AND GROC at 324 Walnut Street, Suite A Chico, CA 95928. FRANCISCO J REYES 18 Westminister Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FRANCISCO RAYES Dated: October 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001141 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RUSSELL’S SUNRISE CAFE at 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. PEACH TREE RESTAURANT INC 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: NAEEM REHMAN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: October 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001204 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PILLSBURY SQUARE APARTMENTS at 2781 Pillsbury Road Chico, CA 95973. LAPANT FARMS LLC 9032 Goodspeed St Durham, CA 959388. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ROGER JACK LAPANT Dated: September 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001109 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as PYROCORP at 2515 Zanella Way #5 Chico, CA 95928. HAYDEN FIRE PROTECTION, INC. 2515 Zanella Way #5 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JEREMY HAYDEN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: October 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001113 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FAERIE HUMAN RELATIONS DEPARTMENT, IN OUR NATURE at 1844 Broadway Street Chico, CA 95928. JENNY RAE RICHMAN 1844 Broadway Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNY RAE RICHMAN Dated: October 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001112 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are 1oing business as LABELZ at 974 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. J. WITH ENTERPRISE this Legal Notice continues

7749 Co Rd 61 Princeton, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: JAMIE WITHROW, MANAGING MEMBER Dated: October 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001199 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

an Individual. Signed: ANGELA C COOK Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001207 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DARLING ROSE VINEYARD at 8995 Troxel Rd Chico, CA 95928. AMANDA WYLIE DARLING 8995 Troxel Rd Chico, CA 95928. GARY ANTHONY DARLING 8995 Troxel Rd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: AMANDA W. DARLING Dated: October 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001217 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DEBORAH RENEE BENNETT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DEBORAH RENEE BENNETT Proposed name: JESSI LEE RAMONE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02654 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name LABELZ at 974 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. CYNTHIA E BROCHHEUSER 1941 Sycamore Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: CINDY BROCHHEUSER Dated: October 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000460 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name THE ACCOUNTING OFFICE at 1074 East Ave Ste K Chico, CA 95926. LAZARSKI ENTERPRISES, INC. 2166 Huntington Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KATHY LAZARSKI, PRESIDENT Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000876 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ACCOUNTING OFFICE at 1074 East Ave Ste K Chico, CA 95926. DEBBIE ALLEN EA INC 1074 East Ave Ste K. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARK ALLEN, SECRETARY Dated: October 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001213 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ON YOUR MARK MOBILE NOTARY at 3550 Fotos Way Chico, CA 95973. ANGELA C. COOK 3550 Fotos Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by this Legal Notice continues

NOTICES

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner WENDY JO MORROW filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WENDY JO MORROW Proposed name: WENDY JO GEBICKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: September 27, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02906 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUDITH ANNE BEDBURY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JUDITH ANNE BEDBURY Proposed name: JUDITH ANNE JOHNSTON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: October 3, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02877 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner KENNETH CHARLES REEVES II filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KENNETH CHARLES REEVES II Proposed name: KENNETH CHARLES DAGAMA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 17, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02730 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARY ANN SLYH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARY ANN SLYH Proposed name: MARY ANN DRENNAN this Legal Notice continues

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 2, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02965 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MELANIE RENE REMMERT-BLEVINS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MELANIE RENE REMMERT-BLEVINS Proposed name: MELANIE RENE MCCARTHY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 27, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 8, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02964 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RICK DALLOUL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RICK DALLOUL Proposed name: REZKALLAH DALLOUL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to this Legal Notice continues

CLaSSIfIEdS

CONTINUED ON 38

For the week oF october 31, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do you have

any skill in fulfilling the wishes and answering the prayers of your allies? Have you developed a capacity to tune in to what people want even when they themselves aren’t sure of what they want? Do you sometimes have a knack for offering just the right gesture at the right time to help people do what they haven’t been able to do under their own power? If you possess any of those aptitudes, now is an excellent time to put them in play. More than usual, you are needed as a catalyst, a transformer, an inspirational influence. Halloween costume suggestion: angel, fairy godmother, genie, benefactor.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Author

Amy Tan describes the magic moment when her muse appears and takes command: “I sense a subtle shift, a nudge to move over, and everything cracks open, the writing is freed, the language is full, resources are plentiful, ideas pour forth, and to be frank, some of these ideas surprise me. It seems as though the universe is my friend and is helping me write, its hand over mine.” Even if you’re not a creative artist, I suspect you’ll be offered intense visitations from a muse in the coming days. If you make yourself alert for and receptive to these potential blessings, you’ll feel like you’re being guided and fueled by a higher power. Halloween costume suggestion: your muse.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): More than

a century ago, author Anton Chekhov wrote, “If many remedies are prescribed for an illness, you may be certain that the illness has no cure.” Decades later, I wrote, “If you’re frantically trying to heal yourself with a random flurry of half-assed remedies, you’ll never cure what ails you. But if you sit still in a safe place and ask your inner genius to identify the one or two things you need to do to heal, you will find the cure.” Halloween costume suggestion: physician, nurse, shaman, healer.

by rob brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “One language is never enough,” says a Pashto proverb. How could it be, right? Each language has a specific structure and a finite vocabulary that limit its power to describe and understand the world. I think the same is true for religion: One is never enough. Why confine yourself to a single set of theories about spiritual matters when more will enable you to enlarge and deepen your perspective? With this in mind, I invite you to regard November as “One Is Never Enough Month” for you. Assume you need more of everything. Halloween costume suggestion: a bilingual Jewish Santa Claus; a pagan Sufi Buddha who intones prayers in three different languages.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In his novel

Zone One, Scorpio author Colson Whitehead writes, “A monster is a person who has stopped pretending.” He means it in the worst sense possible: the emergence of the ugly beast who had been hiding behind social niceties. But I’m going to twist his meme for my own purposes. I propose that when you stop pretending and shed fake politeness, you may indeed resemble an ugly monster—but only temporarily. After the suppressed stuff gets free rein to yammer, it will relax and recede—and you will feel so cleansed and relieved that you’ll naturally be able to express more of your monumental beauty. Halloween costume suggestion: your beautiful, fully exorcised monster.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“I am glad that I paid so little attention to good advice,” testified poet Edna St. Vincent Millay. “Had I abided by it, I might have been saved from some of my most valuable mistakes.” This is excellent advice for you. I suspect you’re in the midst of either committing or learning from a valuable mistake. It’s best if you don’t interrupt yourself! Halloween costume suggestion: the personification or embodiment of your valuable mistake.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cancerian

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The Dead Sea, on

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Around

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “We have

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Author

artist Marc Chagall (1887–1985) was a playful visionary and a pioneer of modernism. He appealed to sophisticates despite being described as a dreamy, eccentric outsider who invented his own visual language. In the 1950s, Picasso observed that Chagall was one of the only painters who “understood what color really is.” In 2017, one of Chagall’s paintings sold for $28.5 million. What was the secret to his success? “If I create from the heart, nearly everything works,” he testified. “If from the head, almost nothing.” Your current assignment is to authorize your heart to rule everything you do. Halloween costume suggestion: a heart. the border of Jordan and Israel, is far saltier than the ocean. No fish or frogs live in it. But here and there on the lake’s bottom are springs that exude fresh water. They support large, diverse communities of microbes. It’s hard for divers to get down there and study the life forms, though. The water’s so saline, they tend to float. So they carry 90 pounds of ballast that enables them to sink to the sea floor. I urge you to get inspired by all this. What would be the metaphorical equivalent for you of descending into the lower depths so as to research unexplored sources of vitality and excitement? Halloween costume suggestions: diver, spelunker, archaeologist.

stripped all things of their mystery and luminosity,” lamented psychologist Carl Jung. “Nothing is holy any longer.” In accordance with current astrological omens, your assignment is to rebel against that mournful state of affairs. I hope you will devote some of your fine intelligence to restoring mystery and luminosity to the world in which you dwell. I hope you will find and create holiness that’s worthy of your reverence and awe. Halloween costume suggestion: mage, priestess, poet, enchantrix, witch, alchemist, sacramentalist.

Cleopatra was an ancient Egyptian queen who ruled for 21 years. She was probably a Capricorn. All you need to know about her modern reputation is that Kim Kardashian portrayed her as a sultry seductress in a photo spread in a fashion magazine. But the facts are that Cleopatra was a welleducated, multilingual political leader with strategic cunning. Among her many skills were poetry, philosophy and mathematics. I propose we make the real Cleopatra your role model. Now is an excellent time to correct people’s misunderstandings about you—and show people who you truly are. Halloween costume suggestion: your actual authentic self. the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, the 11th sign of the zodiac will be capable of strenuous feats; will have the power to achieve a success that surpasses past successes; will be authorized to attempt a brave act of transcendence that renders a long-standing limitation irrelevant. As for the 11 days and 11 hours before that magic hour, the 11th sign of the zodiac will be smart to engage in fierce meditation and thorough preparation for the magic hour. And as for the 11 days and 11 hours afterward, the 11th sign should expend all possible effort to capitalize on the semi-miraculous breakthrough. Halloween costume suggestion: 11. Robert Musil made a surprising declaration: “A number of flawed individuals can often add up to a brilliant social unit.” I propose we make that one of your mottos for the coming months. I think you have the potential to be a flawed but inspiring individual who’ll serve as a dynamic force in assembling and nurturing a brilliant social unit. So let me ask you: What would be your dream-come-true of a brilliant social unit that is a fertile influence on you and everyone else in the unit? Halloween costume suggestion: ringleader, mastermind, orchestrator or general.

➡ www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

october 31, 2019

CN&R

37


show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 10, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02999 Published: October 31, November 7,14,21, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT NATHAN TYLER YOUNG You have been sued by petitioner: CATHRYN DENISE YOUNG You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court Of California County of Butte Chico - North Butte County Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: CATHRYN DENISE YOUNG 1591 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: August 12, 2019 Case Number: 19FL01426 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: KENNETH R MEYER, AN INDIVIDUAL; AND DOES 1-100, INCLUSIVE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: CROWN ASSET MANAGEMENT, LLC NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 this Legal Notice continues

38

CN&R

days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Chico Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico CA 95928. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: RASHID SHAKIROV/SBN 318108 Persolve Legal Group, LLP (818) 534-3100 9301 Corbin Avenue, Suite 1600 Northridge, CA 91324. Dated: April 19, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV01224 Published: October 24,31, November 7,14, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ARVEL RUSSELL ROGERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ARVEL RUSSELL ROGERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: GLEN EATON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GLEN EATON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested this Legal Notice continues

OctOber 31, 2019

persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: MARK JOHNSON 2531 Forest Ave Ste 100 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 345-6801 Dated: October 3, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00451 Published: October 17,24,31, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE FRED E. TRASK, JR. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: FRED E. TRASK, JR. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DANIELLE L. KLEIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DANIELLE L. KLEIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required this Legal Notice continues

to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: October 8, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00457 Published: October 17,24,31, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE VIVIENNE MARGARET RICH, also know as VIVIENNE M. RICH To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: VIVIENNE MARGARET RICH, also known as VIVIENNE M. RICH A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DENNIS LEE RICH in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DENNIS LEE RICH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many this Legal Notice continues

actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: YVONNE A. ASCHER 444 Pearl Street, Suite A1 Monterey, CA 93940 (831) 641-9019 Dated: October 9, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00456 Published: October 17,24,31, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ANNA IRENE HASTINGS, aka ANNA I. HASTINGS, aka ANNA HASTINGS, AKA TONI HASTINGS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ANNA IRENE HASTINGS, aka ANNA I. HASTINGS, aka ANNA HASTINGS, aka TONI HASTINGS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JAMES KNAVER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JAMES KNAVER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal this Legal Notice continues

representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: October 8, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00458 Published: October 24,31, November 7, 2019

more services online www.newsreview.com

our readers will love your business. Call us today to find out more about advertising, distribution and free design services

CN&R

530-894-2300


O c t O ber 31, 2019

CN&R

39


EVERY SURVIVOR’S JOURNEY IS UNIQUE Healing from INCEST seems impossible, but the guilt and shame one may feel was never theirs to carry.

Insightful Nurturing Self Courageous Empowering Self-Acceptance Triumphant STOP THE CYCLE & START THE HEALING

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN: 530.342.RAPE (7273) COLLECT CALLS ACCEPTED BUTTE/GLENN: 530.891.1331 · TEHAMA: 530.529.3980

ALL VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT WILL RECEIVE A FREE FORENSIC MEDICAL EXAMINATION, regardless of whether or not they choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS ABOUT SEXUAL ASSAULT. If you or someone you know has been sexually violated, contact Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention.

Profile for News & Review

20191031 103917  

CNR OCTOBER 31, 2019

20191031 103917  

CNR OCTOBER 31, 2019