__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 5 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Eight ways to prepare in the climate change era

4

LISTEN UP, CSUC PREZ

8

IMMIGRATION REAL TALK

27

ART OF THE MAIDU

DISASTER READY PAGE

18


Accident? injured?

law oFFiCes oF

Lawrence a. Puritz F o r m e r I n s u r a n c e D e F e n s e at t o r n e y

eae Fr ion sult t

Con

2

CN&R

september 26, 2019

343-0500 northvalleylawyer.com


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 5 • September 26, 2019 OPINION

11

4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

8

12

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

12

Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

GREENWAYS

16

Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

17

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

33

COVER STORY

18

ARTS & CULTURE

22

Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

REAL ESTATE

35

CLASSIFIEDS

36

ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Jennifer Jenkins, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Publications Art Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

3


OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

planet, national security at risk The president of the United States, arguably the

most powerful man on the planet, didn’t plan to attend the U.N. Climate Summit on Monday (Sept. 23), despite a desperate call to action by U.N. Secretary General António Guterres. If drastic measures aren’t taken to curb greenhouse gases, Guterres said, we’re headed for a climate breakdown. The fact that Donald Trump “dropped by” the summit, for all of 15 minutes, is shameful but a clear representation of his environmental record. He’s already vowed to pull the United States out of the 2015 Paris agreement and has done seemingly everything in his power since his election to dismantle environmental measures across the country, including in California. Trump’s actions Monday are yet another embarrassment for the United States on the world stage. Meanwhile, the hero of the day, 16-year-old Greta Thunburg from Sweden, gave an impassioned speech imploring the world’s leaders to look past money and greed and take

steps to ensure the health of the planet for generations to come. “We are in the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth,” Thunberg said. Like a schoolyard bully, Trump responded via Twitter: “She seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. So nice to see!” This is the leader of the free world, folks. Had enough? We hope so. On Tuesday (Sept. 24), Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi finally launched an impeachment inquiry. The subject: a phone conversation with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, a former sitcom star, in which Trump allegedly urged him to investigate former VP and current presidential candidate Joe Biden. Russian meddling déjà vu, anyone? Newsflash, Mr. President: Life is not a reality show. It’s time for you to go. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

A call to republicans: support LGbt rights Bbelieve George W. Bush said these famous words: “I marriage is between a man and a woman,

ack in 2003, ahead of his re-election, President

and I think we ought to codify that one way or another.” The Bush administration even attempted to put marriage equality measures on as many state ballots as possible. Thing is, Donald Trump is a thousand times worse than Bush, and if you support him, you should hang your head in shame. You should be ashamed not because you’re a Republican, by but because you support those Mark Segal who roll back our rights. It would be fine to be a the author, publisher of the philadelphia Gay Republican and stand with News, is the author of pride as a conservative and try the memoir And then to get Republicans to appreciate I Danced. LGBT rights. But LGBT people who support Trump are like what the black community once

4

CN&R

September 26, 2019

called black individuals who supported the status quo: Uncle Toms. Also of note: One of the architects of Bush’s anti-LGBT campaign was a gay man named Ken Mehlman, who, at the time, I wrote, “had blood on his hands.” I wrote that knowing that LGBT youth would see all of the homophobia proffered by their president and many would face bullying, or worse. Mehlman eventually owned up to his “errors.” But the damage to those coming out had already been done. Supporting anti-LGBT campaigns hurts those who are attempting to appreciate who they are. It also denies people in many states employment, housing and public accommodations protections. What would provide those protections? The Equality Act, and one man is standing in the way of its passage: Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell. But even if he allowed a vote, Trump wouldn’t sign it. My mantra this year: I don’t care which Democratic candidate you currently support, but once someone is nominated at the National Convention, you need to not only support that person, but also get out and vote for them. Ω

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Interference Working for Chico State’s student newspaper was an invaluable experience for this fledgling journalist in the early aughts. I first spent a semester as the copy editor for The Orion’s features section. Then came two consecutive semesters as a reporter primarily covering public safety. One of my first assignments was the Labor Day flotilla back when that event was at its peak—you know, 20,000 drunken college-age folks tubing down the frigid waters of the Sacramento River bound for some orgiastic celebration on a slice of land dubbed Beer Can Beach. That was it for me—I loved everything about reporting. The art of writing a lede to pull readers into the story, the deadline pressure, the thrill of getting a scoop, the sense of accomplishment when it all came together. Back then, the campus culture provided a fertile training ground for me and my newspapering peers. More often than not, folks in academia and the community—be it then-Chico State President Manuel Esteban, faculty, staff, City Council members, firefighters or cops—took us seriously by responding to our queries as though we were professionals. Unfortunately, that’s not the case these days, according to the current staff of The Orion. As the editor of the student-operated publication has opined in recent weeks, the university has obstructed the paper’s efforts to gather information essential to its reporting. During a visit to campus last week, my CN&R colleagues and I got a rundown of the roadblocks coming mainly out of University Communications—the public relations department that’s had three executive directors in as many years (the last one left on Sept. 6 to care for aging relatives, according to remaining PR folks). We were there to critique The Orion—to give our input on that week’s issue. Being a nosy editor, I asked about the aforementioned editorial. I was especially curious because the same department had given the CN&R the runaround recently (see “Bad PR” and “Crickets,” Second & Flume, Aug. 15 and 22). But what we encountered was minor compared with what the students say they are experiencing—multiple examples of far-reaching interference. Cases in point: withholding enrollment data and attempting to route all interviews— including with student athletes—through the PR chain. This isn’t normal. I speak not only from firsthand experience, but also from the view of CN&R reporters Andre Byik and Ashiah Scharaga, who worked at The Orion and graduated in 2012 and 2015, respectively. So, who’s to blame? Where the buck stops: President Gayle Hutchinson, who was hired in 2016 following the retirement of longtime President Paul Zingg. Ultimately, she gives the marching orders. What Hutchinson’s administration is doing is an affront to free speech. If she’s not getting the message from the historical record being curated in The Orion’s op-ed page on the subject—or from these very words—someone higher up the California State University chain ought to intervene. Indeed, by continuing on this path, Hutchinson threatens not only her reputation but also that of a campus and university system that over the majority of the past 20 years have underscored the importance of the First Amendment by valuing its award-winning campus paper and journalism in general. I had a blast talking to the students, and I’m really proud of them for pushing back. My team gave our input on how to effectively step it up a notch. Afterward, I fumed over what they’re encountering. To me, this is personal. Supporting the Fourth Estate has never been as important in my lifetime than it is today, as a demagogue in the Oval Office attacks the media. As is the case with many of the good rank-and-file folks in President Trump’s administration, faculty and staff at Chico State must resist this effort to control the narrative. Everyone must demand that Hutchinson put an end to this nonsense. Full stop.


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

The truth is out there Re “Space invaders” (The Conspiracy Issue, by Matt Bieker, Sept. 19): Kudos to the CN&R for publishing an article about recent activity around Area 51 in Nevada. Matt Bieker has written for the paper on many diverse topics, but I could find no others on ufology in his author archive. He has done a good job with the limitations of this article, delving into the history of Area 51 and its secrecy. The 2018 documentary he mentions, Bob Lazar: Area 51 and Flying Saucers, is certainly revealing about Lazar’s work on an antigravity propulsion system at the base in 1989. There are two recent films, also by Jeremy Corbell, that expose details of Lazar’s examination of a basketball-sized anti-gravity device taken out of a crashed saucer. One is called Anatomy of a Flying Saucer and the other is Behind the Scenes. Everything Lazar has said about

his work at Area 51 has come across as a sincere effort to explain the advanced technology he witnessed and its implications for all earthlings. Efforts to debunk his story have fallen away as the consistency of Lazar’s testimony has held up over 30 years. Thomas Carey and Donald Schmitt’s 2013 book, Inside the Real Area 51, offers the history of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. This is where extraterrestrial beings are being kept. Benjamin Hills Chico

Way to go, CN&R, on depicting us conspiracy theorists as sci-fi wackjobs and Area 51 groupies! A conspiracy is a “confederacy between two or more persons formed for the purpose of committing by their joint efforts, some unlawful or criminal act.” Does

this sound familiar in the wake of the media storm surrounding POTUS and his disregard for constitutional law and common sense? A more obvious government conspiracy came to light in 2013 when Edward Snowden revealed the National Security Agency had been collecting everybody’s digital data from computers and cellphones. His whistle-blowing efforts resulted in a Supreme Court decision denying this meta-data collection by U.S. spy agencies. The gorilla-in-the-room of all conspiracies currently altering the entire biosphere is climate engineering. Many of you have looked up to see our once deep-blue skies to see only a silvery blue haze and often crisscrossed with jet trails. The origins of this activity above our heads is the U.S. military, as outlined in its mission statement in the early 1960s to control the weather by 2025. LETTERS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 6

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI “We help YOU through the System” We assist with paperwork! Attorney at Law

LAw OffIC ES Of BETSY H. A LBERTS Over 35 years of experience.

976 Mangrove, Chico • 530.893.8387

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

5


Your plumbing

Fixed Right, Right Now!

LETTERS

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

Without including the effects of climate engineering into the conversation and protests over climate change world leaders may continue to ignore the scientific facts laid down around the Paris Climate Accord. Carl Schultz Chico

Editor’s note: Conspiracies absolutely exist. However, many of today’s popular conspiracy theories aren’t based on science or in reality for that matter.

Youth unite on climate

NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

Re “Striking for the planet” (Greenways, by Andre Byik, Sept. 19): Last Friday morning (Sept. 20), tears came to my eyes as our young people came pouring into Chico’s City Plaza for the Global Climate Strike. So many kids—the youth of our city, our daughters, our sons, our future. How have we failed them that they must take on the burden to fix the world we brought them into? How can we hide behind our fears and ambiguities, while they speak truth to what must be done? And how can our leaders—who must be parents, have grandchildren and love their families—not act to protect what older generations have so carelessly endangered? Yes, we must start this long road toward healing; these are our children. There is no longer a question of the reality of climate change, only the question of honesty … and don’t we at least owe them that? Marvey Mueller Chico

Editor’s note: For a snapshot of Chico’s Global Climate Strike event, check out page 11. Also, be sure to read our Covering Climate Now stories in this issue.

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Three on mayoral drama Re “Hot seat” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga) and “Barely mayor” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Sept. 19): We humans tend to be distracted with one drama after another. This penchant for drama is being exploited by the right wing, especially via social media, 6 

CN&R 

September 26, 2019

where they successfully inflame hysteria over “safety” (at its core, a temper-tantrum-type reaction to the presence of visible poverty— homelessness—40 years in the making and the direct result of federal and state policies promulgated by “conservatives”). A dedicated contingent continues to undermine public confidence in the Chico City Council with well-targeted activism. This we see in outraged-mommy safety protests, recall antics and Rob Berry’s marshaling of 15 or 20 wannabe vigilantes during business from the floor. Whatever was its pedigree, the Sept. 17 toppling-of-Mayor-Stone-drama was a theatrical grand slam for the authoritarians. Our best hope lies in the current council, with its “liberal majority,” finding its way to solid progressive values and action—with our citizenry showing up to lend support. Right now, we have a “middle of the road” council. And, as Ambrose Bierce said, “We know what happens to people who stay in the middle of the road. They get run over.” Mr. Berry will be happy to bring the steamroller. Patrick Newman Chico

I commend Councilman Karl Ory for rebuking Councilman Sean Morgan’s charade, and Councilmembers Ann Schwab and Scott Huber for stepping outside the herd with honesty about Mayor Randall Stone, a self-proclaimed grenade thrower. It’s not that Stone has the “warmth of a dead fish,” it’s that he often treats people the same way and it stinks. I also commend Morgan for admitting to his poor example of leadership while mayor and welcome his call for civility and ending shenanigans like the ruse Stone/Ory recall effort. It sure seems like the civil thing for Stone to have done was to have offered a sincere apology as well, or at least a level-headed acknowledgment to his shortcomings as mayor. Flippantly stating the whole council needs to change was a deflection from reflection and a poor way to address the healthiness of the council understanding the only person you can change is oneself. Bill Mash Chico

Regarding Melissa Daugherty’s column (“Barely mayor”), I’d also point out that in the CN&R’s May 24, 2018, primary endorsements article, the newspaper said this about Stone on his run for county assessor: “To put it bluntly, Stone lacks the maturity this management post requires.” Clearly, you were prescient in not endorsing him then. Now we are reaping the whirlwind. Anthony Watts Chico

‘We are not criminals’ Re “Protect the kids” (Letters, by Loretta Ann Torres, Sept. 19): Ms. Torres, please don’t be afraid. I like marijuana. I have used it for nearly 60 years. In that time I was married for 50 years, bought four homes and held mostly union jobs, so am comfortably retired. I will patronize the marijuana stores that open in Chico and the taxes paid by us patrons will help Chico and Butte County’s budgets. In an excellent March 30, 2017, article in the CN&R, “Fact vs. Fiction,” Meredith Cooper writes about the $860,000 added to Shasta Lake’s budget in 2015, with the added plus of 30 good jobs in the local economy. Hopefully Chico won’t have to foolishly spend $150,000 of those proceeds on a special election. We are not the other. We are not criminals. We are not the scary, wild-eyed kids of Reefer Madness you would like to paint us as. We are your neighbors. I have no interest in your children, though I have heard that if fed gingerbread, cooked in a wood oven, and seasoned just right they can be yummy. Rich Meyers Oroville

Highlight the veggies! Still no vegetarian, much less vegan, section or icon-notes by restaurant entries in the annual 2019-2020 CN&R Savor dining and nightlife guide. How out of touch can you be? Ironically, there is an article, “Vegetarian delights.” But still no veg(etari)an section or icon-notes by restaurant entries. Maybe in 2025? Bill Donnelly Chico

Corruption, part I It’s bad enough having to pay taxes for Trump to fly around the country on Air Force One with his crew of bandits. On a weekly basis, Trump is at a MAGA hat campaign rally, or a casino magnate billionaire fundraiser, all at the expense of Joe taxpayer. However, when Trump admitted to colluding with former stand-up comedian and current Ukranian President Volodymyr Zelensky, Trump reached an all-time low. They dare not call it treason for an American so-called president to coerce a foreign leader into finding dirt on his political opponent—aka Joe Biden—by withholding $250 million in military aid to said foreign leader’s country (i.e., Zelensky). I guess the only thing Trump has ever said that rings with the slightest bit of truth is that he “could shoot someone on Fifth Avenue and get away with it.” Attorney General William Barr bailed Trump out on obstruction of justice over Russian collusion, and judging from the feckless Democrat-controlled Congress, he’ll get away with it again with Ukraine, even after admitting to doing it. Why do I as a taxpayer have to pick up Trump’s tab for such corruption? Ray Estes Redding

Corruption, part II The corruption in Washington, D.C., extends beyond Trump. There are old-time Democrats like Speaker Nancy Pelosi who are blocking impeachment. Why? Abe Sanchez Berry Creek

Editor’s note: The two letters above were submitted before Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi opened an official impeachment inquiry.

Write a letter  tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. deadline for publication is noon on the tuesday prior to publication.


STREETALK

Are you ready for autumn?

SAle!

Buy any regular priced shoe & get a Fashion Clearance Sale shoe FRee! Expires 10.31.19 @heelnsoleshoes

Rain Boots $19.99 or 2 for $30 Chengs

Women’s Boots

Asked at Saturday farmers’ market

Curtis Lemure

Starting at $19.99

furniture salesman

I really like fall. You get crisp mornings and crisp evenings, with just a little bit of heat during the day. And that, to me, is the perfect formula for comfort.

Jill Pedrozo Kindergarten teacher

I’m getting ready for fall, but [I’m] not quite ready yet. I like some of the vegetables [and fruits] that come ripe in the fall, like pumpkins, and apples for apple pies.

Anton Dotson physician

Ready for fall, and looking forward to cooler days. Windows open at night and the start of the rainy season. And, of course, here comes football.

Men’s Fashion Dress

Heel & Sole SHoeS

Open 7 Days • 708 Mangrove Ave • 899-0780

Let’s Plant! Fall Vegetables Onions and broccoli and kale OH MY! It’s planting time for your winter garden. Feast on succulent lettuce, spinach, cabbage and chard. The warm soil of fall is the perfect

Linda Kerch retired realtor

I am so ready. I’m tired of the heat. I want some cool air. I love the fall leaves, the beautiful colors along The Esplanade. I love Chico.

time to transplant cauliflower, brussells sprouts and all the cool season crops.

Make a

difference. California MENTOR is seeking individuals and families who have an extra bedroom and want to make a difference in the life of an adult with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Special Needs Adult(s) live with you in your home and you Mentor them toward a brighter future. Receive ongoing support and a generous monthly payment (Approx. $1100/ mo - $4400/mo). Requirements: *Valid drivers license *Vehicle *Must be at least 21 years of age *A spare bedroom *Clean criminal record

as a Mentor, you become a teacher, an advocate and a friend.

Mon-Fri 8aM-4pM • Sat 8:30aM - 5pM 2270 Fair Street | 343-7615

Information Sessions are held weekly. Please call now to R.S.V.P. Sarah Lucas (530) 221-9911 September 26, 2019

CN&R

7


NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE ROAD REPAIR COMPLETE

The upper portion of Centerville Road, which had been washed out during February’s heavy storms, has reopened to all traffic, Butte County announced Tuesday (Sept. 24). Repair work included removing and replacing failed embankment and drainage structures. The roughly $378,000 contract was completed by Knife River Construction, and the project was funded through the Federal Emergency Management Agency, according to the county. Safety concerns had mounted regarding the washed out portion of the road—and another section that was damaged in January 2017 (see “Road repairs coming,” Downstroke, Sept. 12). The repaired section of Upper Centerville Road provides general roadway access and an evacuation route north for Butte Creek Canyon residents.

Taking on immigration

SUPES BACK EVACUATION BILL

On Tuesday (Sept. 24), the Butte County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a letter of support for a bill that would establish a grant program to strengthen or construct evacuation routes. The federal bill, H.R. 2838, or the Enhanc-

ing the Strength and Capacity of America’s Primary Evacuation Routes (ESCAPE) Act, was introduced by Rep. John Garamendi and

would authorize $1 billion to help communities improve evacuation routes in the wake of disasters across the country, including the Oroville Dam spillway crisis in 2017 and last year’s Camp Fire. “The lack of adequate evacuation routes in our nation—particularly for small rural communities—is costing us lives every year,” Garamendi said in a press release.

GREAT DEBATE FEES

The Chico City Council voted on Tuesday (Sept. 24), to reconsider the fees charged to rent city facilities for a specific event: the Chico State Great Debate. It voted 6-0 (Councilman Sean Morgan was absent) to have city staff bring forward a report with a cost estimate for the use of the council chambers and its conference rooms. Several council members spoke to the public benefit of such an event, which is intended to foster civic engagement between college students and the community. City Manager Mark Orme (pictured) said the estimate will take that, and the university’s $1,000 budget, into account. City Clerk Debbie Presson said she’d prepare the report for the next meeting’s consent agenda, as the event is slated for Oct. 25. 8

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

Pastor begins discussion series with focus on the plight of foreign-born residents, common ground

A birth defects, Griselda Hernandez could find neither proper medical care for fter giving birth to a baby with several

her daughter nor help from neighbors in her home country of Mexico. story and The community in photo by the state of Michoacán Andre Byik shunned the new mother, an d re b @ and she subsequently n ew sr ev i ew. c o m sought help by seeking asylum at the United States border. “[Hernandez’s family] Join the conversation: thought they couldn’t get Saturday (Sept. 28) at ... medical care for the Faith Lutheran Church, situation because the doc667 E. First Ave. tors treated them badly,” 12:30-2:30 p.m. said Andrew Holley, a Chico-based immigration attorney who took on Hernandez’s asylum case. “They felt like they couldn’t get a fair shake in their neighborhood and they couldn’t raise their daughter the way that they hoped to.” Several years later, in 2017, Hernandez was granted asylum in San Francisco Immigration Court. It was “one of those cases where you walk out a courtroom and you go to your car and you just cry when you [get] in,” Holley told the CN&R. He added: “This … is a real honest-to-goodness person

who was living in Mexico, who came to the border and said, ‘I need to come into the United States. I need to flee my country because of the persecution I’m suffering.’ And now we can hear her … rather than some video that flashes on the TV that you know is great for the eyeballs and great for clicks and great for the passions but doesn’t really give you a three-dimensional portrait.” Hernandez is one of several panelists scheduled to speak at a discussion on immigration at 12:30 p.m. Saturday (Sept. 28) at Faith Lutheran Church in Chico. Pastor Benjamin Colahan, who arrived at Faith Lutheran about three years ago, told the CN&R that the event— the first of a new series called Sacred Conversations—is intended to give people a better understanding of complex issues, a forum to hear a range of opinions and the tools to take action. The discussion is free and open to the public. “I have noticed in my own congregation and [among] friends ... that, in our climate of such stark political division, people are afraid to talk about the issues that matter most to them,” Colahan said. “But when people talk to me one-on-one, what I hear from them—across the political spectrum— are common concerns and values.”

Panelists include the Rev. Robin Denny, rector of Saint Mary’s Episcopal Church in Napa; Chico State geography and planning professor Naomi Lazarus; Holley; and Hernandez. Immigration, Colahan said, is one of those incendiary topics that elicits passionate feelings in private conversations but is avoided in group settings. Part of the reason for that, he said, is the fear of offending someone. But it’s also a topic in which, perhaps, common ground can be found. Each panelist, Colahan said, will be asked to state several values that shape their understanding of immigration. The idea is to base the conversation around those shared values, to which he said he believes attendees will relate. Colahan’s mother and grandmother emigrated from Mexico under a context “very different” from what’s been reported in the news over the last several years, he said, adding that today’s inflammatory immigration rhetoric is “unhelpful.” “The values for me around immigration: Each and every person is a beloved child of God,” he said. “The scriptures are clear— we are called to love and serve the orphan, the widow and the stranger. … It is good to have an organized and legal system by which people enter into our community.”


Chico-based immigration attorney Andrew Holley is one of several panelists scheduled to talk about immigration Saturday (Sept. 28) at Faith

Moving forward

There are two questions Holley regularly

Council denies appeal, paving way for Chico’s first tiny home community

fields: Why can’t undocumented immigrants “get in line” and enter the country legally, and why should taxpayer dollars go toward immigration services instead of something such as veterans affairs? “There’s very little tax dollars [that] go toward funding an immigrant or detention processing center and letting them in,” Holley said. “It’s marginally nominal for every additional immigrant we let in.” Further, according to the nonprofit American Immigration Council, there is no “line” available to most undocumented immigrants. Immigration to the U.S. is generally limited to employment, family reunification or humanitarian protection. “Most unauthorized immigrants do not have the necessary family or employment relationships and often cannot access humanitarian protection, such as refugee or asylum status,” according to the organization. “A lot of people come from Mexico seeking asylum in the United States, and they come from rural areas and they’ve been mistreated, persecuted, harmed, hurt,” Holley said. “And they’ve come to the United States [to] seek a better life.” Holley’s caseload largely consists of asylum cases, though a significant portion of his work also includes immigration status cases, deportation defense, and marriage and finance visa litigation. The attorney takes cases from Red Bluff to Sacramento, a region comprising a rich agricultural community that relies on migrant workers. In 2017, 27 percent of California’s population was foreign-born, accounting for about 11 million immigrants, according to the Public Policy Institute of California, a nonprofit think tank. Estimates peg about 2 million immigrants as residing in the state without legal status. The immigration discussion Saturday, Holley said, will be a place where folks can engage with each other and share facts about the country’s immigration system. Attendees also will hear firsthand accounts about navigating that system. The attorney described the event as a place where people can bring forward questions they have been afraid to ask. “So many people are just afraid of opening themselves up and looking dumb or learning something, and they’re afraid to ask questions,” he said. “This is a church. … It’s a safe place.” Ω

Chico Housing Action Team’s Simplicity Village

got the green light from the Chico City Council, but the proposed tiny home community could face more obstacles. On Tuesday evening (Sept. 24), the project’s proponents came out in force, with 42 out of 45 speakers urging the council to deny an appeal of the project, which would create 33 tiny homes for about 45 seniors on Notre Dame Boulevard. Most spoke to the heart of the matter: housing homeless seniors. At one point, many of those in the chambers even broke into song. The council ultimately voted 5-1 to deny the appeal, with Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds the only nay (Councilman Sean Morgan was absent.) Reynolds, a conservative, reminded people that she previously voted in favor of the location for Simplicity Village, but had reservations about whether the city was following the letter of the law. Frank Solinsky, co-owner of Payless Building Supply, has filed two appeals on the project. First, on Community Development Director of Planning & Housing Brendan Vieg’s decision to allow for such use on the property, which is across the street from the business. When that appeal was heard by the Planning Commission back in August, its members voted 6-0 to deny it (one commissioner was absent). Then, Solinsky, represented by attorney Rob Berry, appealed that panel’s ruling—

bringing the issue before the City Council. City staff has classified the project as a temporary emergency facility under the Chico Municipal Code, which hinges on the shelter crisis declaration the council made last October. The declaration expires June 30, 2021, unless the council votes to extend it. During the meeting, Berry argued that such a designation is inappropriate. For a shelter crisis declaration to apply, and standard building codes to be waived by the state, the project must be a public facility or on public land, he told the council, and this project is on private land. The city has argued that there is no such requirement. “Approving this project … means you are willing to break the law to get the outcome you want,” Berry said. Councilwoman Ann Schwab said she

SIFT ER

Product

Trouble at the checkout After the Trump administration launched a trade war with China, Mexico and Canada, NPR began tracking how that (and China’s retaliatory tariffs) might impact consumers. The news organization just reported its findings after price-checking 80 products each month at a Walmart in Liberty County, Ga., from August 2018-19. The news isn’t good: There was an average price increase of 3 percent, almost double the current inflation rate. Here are some of the top price increases and decreases, broken down by product.

Price, Aug. 2018

Price, Aug. 2019

Price change

Cod fillets (skinless, 32 oz.)

$8.76

$14.54

Cabbage head

48 cents

78 cents +62.5 percent

+66 percent

Fresh garlic (3 bulbs) $1.48

$2.26

+52.7 percent

Toilet paper (ultra strong, 12 rolls)

$9.47

$12.97

+37 percent

Dog leash (retractable, 16 ft.)

$9.88

$13.37

+35.3 percent

Shrimp (super colossal, frozen, raw) $10.98

$8.84

-19.5 percent

Lobster claws and arms (frozen, cooked 16 oz.) $20.94

$16.98

-18.9 percent

Microwave oven

$49.84

-16.8 percent

$59.88

Chico Housing Action Team board members and supporters gather in front of a tiny home parked outside the council chambers. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

found the planning director’s decision reasonable and supported by law. Emergency facilities are permitted in that zoning district, the project is temporary and its operational characteristics, given the urgency of the need, provide for public health and safety, she said. Mayor Randall Stone, who said the decision is “well within our police power authority,” got choked up when he cast his vote in support, mentioning that “some people die every single year out on the streets,” and they are often 55 or older. “This is an important step, and it is within our responsibility and our right as a community, as a council and as community leaders,” he said. In an unexpected twist during public comment, Anna Meehan, who is performing at an upcoming CHAT benefit, began singing her own rendition of “Put a Little Love in Your Heart” in support of Simplicity Village. Many of those sitting in the chambers joined her during the chorus. Local attorney Richard Harriman also offered his support, calling it “an appropriate exercise of discretion … under these land use and zoning requirements.” Other proponents included two Camp Fire survivors, who said that they are intimately aware of the dire need for affordable housing post-disaster. “If it was not for a very dear friend that happened to have a temporary facility I could stay in, I would have been out on the streets,” said Ronald White. “[Simplicity Village] would have suited me and many people impacted by Camp Fire.” NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

O N PA G E 1 0

CN&R

9


Try a Week Free!

$5 OFF

any purchase of $20 or more

GOOd at all arC StOreS!

www.thearcstore.org

Chico 2020 Park Ave. • 530.343.3666 Oroville 2745 Oro Dam Blvd E • 530.532.1272

CNR coupon expires 10.26.19 Excludes ARCoffee & consignments. Not valid with other specials. One coupon per visit.

NEWSLINES c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 9

Includes:

Cross-Training • TRX Yoga • Barre Nutrition Guidance Cookbook • Assessments Support • Child Care

JoiN TodAY! 530.521.7800 FiTNe SS • NuTRi TioN • ReSulTS • CommuNi TY

A similar community in Marysville

has had success since it opened just over three years ago. Originally approved after a shelter crisis declaration, 14 Forward is made up of 20 tiny homes on county-owned land near the Feather River. Participants share community facilities and receive supportive services and case management, as CHAT has planned for Simplicity Village. Chaya Galicia, Yuba County’s homeless and housing project manager, said 300 people have stayed there so far, and one-third have gone on to find permanent housing. There are plans to expand, and neighboring Sutter County is embarking on a similar development. That CHAT intends to establish a program in Chico is exciting, Galicia said. “It’s always exciting for housing and shelter to be prioritized and completed,” she added. This may not be the last time the project faces detractors, however. Berry posted in a public Facebook group later that night that, “fortunately for the appellants and you all who believe in the rule of law, this is not over. The ball is back in our court.” Irrespective of a potential lawsuit, CHAT co-founder Robert Trausch said the organization plans to move forward and get Simplicity Village operating as soon as possible. Before the meeting, Trausch told the CN&R that the nonprofit has worked with city staff for the past two years on this project, and the city has “done a heck of a job … ensuring that something like this can go forward legally.” While CHAT’s volunteers have worked on this project, they also have expanded their Housing Now program, for which they hold the master lease. They now have 120 people living in 36 houses across Chico. In Trausch’s view, either homelessness will no longer exist come June 2021, or “it’s up to the City Council to extend” the shelter crisis declaration. “We see this land as a solution for seniors,” he said. “That’s 45 people who won’t be living on the street, who won’t be in crisis. That’s really important to us.” —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

10

CN&R

September 26, 2019


‘You are failing us’ Greta Thunberg condemns world leaders in emotional speech at U.N. Climate Summit Greta Thunberg has excoriated world leaders

for their “betrayal” of young people through their inertia over the climate crisis at a United Nations summit that failed to deliver ambitious new commitments to address dangerous global heating. In a stinging speech on Monday (Sept. 23), the teenage Swedish climate activist told governments that “you are still not mature enough to tell it like it is. You are failing us. But the young people are starting to understand your betrayal.” Days after millions of young people joined protests worldwide to demand emergency action on climate change, leaders gathered for the annual United Nations general assembly aiming to inject fresh momentum into efforts to curb carbon emissions. About this story: It originally appeared in The But Thunberg Guardian. It is republished predicted the sumhere as part of the CN&R’s mit would not delivpartnership with Covering er any new plans in Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news line with the radical outlets to strengthen coverage cuts in greenhouse of the climate story. gas emissions that scientists say are needed to avoid catastrophic breakdown. “You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words,” a visibly emotional Thunberg said. “The eyes of all future generations are upon you. ... We will not let you get away with this. Right here, right now is where we draw the line.” As the summit spooled through about 60 speeches from national representatives, it became clear that Thunberg’s forecast was prescient. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi told delegates that “the time for talking is over” in announcing a plan to ramp up renewable energy but announced no phase-out of coal—a key goal set by António Guterres, the U.N. secretary general who convened the summit. Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, did

set out the end of coal-mining in her country but only by 2038—a lengthy timeframe that disappointed environmentalists. Meanwhile, China declined to put forward any new measures to tackle the climate crisis. Emmanuel Macron, the French president, called for the European Union to deepen its emissions cuts and said that France would not make trade deals with countries not signed up tor the landmark Paris climate agreement. “We cannot allow our youth to strike every Friday without action,” Macron said. Despite Guterres’ efforts, the summit was somewhat overshadowed by its absentees— most notably the U.S., and Jair Bolsonaro’s Brazil, whose representatives were reportedly not selected to make a presentation there because of Brazil’s failure to outline plans to strengthen its efforts to counter climate change. Donald Trump did visit the U.N. on Monday but only briefly dipped into the climate summit to see Modi’s speech before attending a meeting that he had called on religious freedom. As he arrived at the U.N., Trump crossed paths with Thunberg, who fixed the president with a hard stare. The summit was designed to accelerate countries’ ambition to address the climate crisis amid increasingly urgent warnings by scientists. A new U.N. analysis has found that commitments to cut planet-warming gases must be at least tripled and increased by up to fivefold if the world is to meet the goals of the 2015 Paris agreement of holding the temperature rise to at least 2 degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial era. The world is currently on track to warm by as much as 3.4 degrees by the end of the century, the U.N. warned, a situation that would escalate disastrous heatwaves, flooding, droughts and societal unrest. Major coral reefs and many other species face extinction. “There’s a big dissonance between every leader saying to Greta ‘we hear you’ and the commitments they are putting on to the table,”

said Isabel Cavelier, a former climate negotiator for Colombia who is now senior adviser at the Mission 2020 climate group. “China said absolutely nothing new, India mentioned commitments made in the past, the U.S., Canada and Australia aren’t here.” There were a few signs of progress. A group of nearly 90 large companies promised to reach net zero emissions by 2050, while a handful of countries said they will be winding down coal use. But it became apparent that most of the ambition was coming from developing countries, rather than the major polluters. Trump has vowed to pull the U.S. out of the Paris agreement, while other major powers are wary of making further commitments ahead of key U.N. climate talks in Glasgow next year. “Other countries must follow our lead,” said Hilda Heine, president of the Marshall Islands, a country situated on coral atolls in the Pacific that is extremely vulnerable to sea level rise. “Falling short will represent the greatest failure humanity has ever seen. The summit must be the moment we choose survival over selfishness.” But delegates at the summit warned that

City Council candidate Rich Ober speaks to hundreds at the Chico City Plaza Friday (Sept. 20). He pledged to support Green New Deal legislation. It was all part of a global climate strike in advance of the U.N. Climate Summit Monday (Sept. 23). PHOTO BY CHARLES FINLAY

the international effort to stave off dangerous global heating was being undermined by a wave of nationalism. “If you look at the U.S. and Brazil, it’s a result of populist politics that is turning its back on the climate,” said Cavelier. “That needs to be made explicit and isolated from the world.” Thunberg, who arrived in the U.S. last month on a solar-powered yacht, has directly castigated Congress and leaders at the U.N., as well as spearhead the largest ever climate protest last week. On Monday she joined 14 other children to lodge a formal complaint under the U.N. convention on the rights of the child. Thunberg said that world leaders were endangering children by ignoring climate breakdown. “They promised to protect the rights of the child and they have not done this,” she said at a media conference. “The message is that we have had enough.” —OLIVER MILMAN

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

11


HEALTHLINES Allergies

Broad implications Every specialty of medicine is seeing the effects of climate change by

Emily Holden

Tallergies worsening illnesses ranging from seasonal to heart and lung disease. he climate crisis is making people sicker—

Children, pregnant women and the elderly are the most at risk from extreme weather and rising heat. But the impact of the climate crisis—for patients, doctors and researchers—is already being felt across every specialty of medicine, with worse feared to come. “There’s research suggesting that our prescription medications may be causing harm because of changing heat patterns,” said Aaron Bernstein, a pediatric hospitalist who is the co-director of the Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment at Harvard University. “There’s evidence that extreme weather 12

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

events are affecting critical medical supplies so we can’t do things as we normally would do because IV fluids aren’t available. “And there’s evidence that extreme weather events are knocking out power more and more, and that is a huge issue for providing care in health care facilities.” In a recent example, a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that lung cancer patients undergoing radiation were less likely to survive when hurricane disasters disrupted their treatments. An August article in the New England Journal of Medicine lays out dozens of similar studies to show how the climate crisis affects each practice of medicine. Renee Salas, a co-author of the report who teaches emergency medicine at Harvard Medical School, said: “The climate crisis is impacting not only health for our patients but the way we deliver care and our ability to do our jobs. And that’s happening today.”

Climate change makes allergies worse. As temperatures increase, plants produce more pollen for longer periods of time, intensifying the allergy seasons. Increased concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can make plants grow more and cause more grass pollen, which causes allergies in about 20 percent of people. Carbon dioxide also can increase the allergy-causing effects of pollen. Neelu Tummala, an ear, nose and throat specialist at the George Washington Medical Faculty Associates in Washington, D.C., said she sees many patients with allergic rhinitis, or inflammation of the nasal cavity, congestion and post-nasal drip. “It used to be that tree pollens were only in spring, grasses were just in summer, ragweed was just in fall,” Tummala said. “But the timing of those is starting to overlap more.” One of Tummala’s patients, Kelly Kenney, had minor seasonal allergies as a child but now suffers year-round from sinus pains, ear pressure and congestion. “The last four years, my symptoms have gotten increasingly worse,” Kenney said.

Pregnancy and newborn complications Pregnant women are more vulnerable to heat and the air pollution that is being made worse by climate change. Bruce Bekkar, a San Diego-based obstetrician gynecologist who stopped practicing six years ago to spend more time as a climate activist, has compiled 68 studies from the continental U.S. on the association between heat, smog and the tiny particles of pollution that come from fossil fuels and how they are connected with premature birth, low birth weight and stillbirth. More smog forms when it is hot, and some research suggests particulate matter also increases with the climate crisis, although the data is less robust. Bekkar said he and his co-authors found a significant association in 58 of the 68 studies. The body of research covers 30 million births in the U.S. Bekkar said doctors should talk to their patients about how heat waves could lead to premature births and how staying away from air pollution can help them keep their children healthy. “We’re finding that we have increasing

numbers of children born already in a weakened state from heat and air pollution. That’s a totally different story than thinking about climate change as the cause of hurricanes over Florida … . It’s a much more pervasive and ongoing impact.” In the developing world, pregnant women also can suffer from food and water scarcity. Insect-borne illnesses—such as the Zika virus, which was spread by mosquitoes—are also a hazard to developing fetuses.

Heart and lung disease Air pollution gets worse as temperatures rise, stressing both the heart and lungs. The fossil fuel pollution that causes the climate crisis also is linked with increased hospitalizations and deaths from cardiovascular disease, and it is connected with more asthma attacks and other breathing problems. More intense wildfires spew dangerous smoke into the air, as documented in the western U.S. this year. And hotter days make more smog, which the American Lung Association describes as acting “like a sunburn on your lungs which may trigger an asthma attack.”

HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 1 5

APPOINTMENT

Be prepared The Lifeline Training Center will be hosting a fun and informative CPR Saturday Country Cookout this Saturday (Sept. 28) from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. This fourth annual community fair will feature a wide range of activities for the whole family, plus “hands only” CPR training. Activities include interacting with critters from Two by Two Ranch & Petting Zoo, a chance to use a bow and arrow, a cow-milking contest with “Bessie,” music provided by 95.7 The Wolf, barbecued chili dogs, lemonade and much more. Meet some new friends and learn how to save a life!


september 26, 2019

CN&R

13


14

CN&R

september 26, 2019


HEALTHLINES Risks for children Children under the age of 5 experience the majority of the health burden from climate change, according to Salas’ report. Samantha Ahdoot, a pediatrician in Alexandria, Va., treated an 11-year-old and a 13-year-old who moved from Florida after a hurricane destroyed their community and their medical records at their doctor’s office. One needed surgery for a heart condition and had to start from scratch with a new cardiologist. Both had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that was harder to treat amid the major life disruption and without records on adjustments to medication dosages. Ahdoot, who also founded the group Virginia Clinicians for Climate Action, said she has seen an influx of families moving because of weather disasters.

Dehydration and kidney problems

Digestive illnesses Heat is linked with higher risks for salmonella and campylobacter outbreaks. Extreme rains can contaminate drinking water. Harmful algae blooms that thrive in higher temperatures can cause gastrointestinal problems, too.

Infectious disease Changing temperature and rainfall patterns allow some insects spread farther and transmit malaria, dengue, Lyme disease and West Nile virus. Waterborne cholera and cryptosporidiosis increase with drought and flooding.

Mental health conditions The American Psychological Association created a 69-page

guide on how climate change can induce stress, depression and anxiety. The group says “the connections with mental health are often not part” of the climate-health discussion. People exposed to or displaced by extreme weather or violent conflict are at higher risk for mental health challenges. Extreme heat can also make some mental illnesses worse. The University of Maryland’s Howard Center for Investigative Journalism found emergency calls relating to psychiatric conditions increased about 40 percent in Baltimore in summer 2018, when the heat index surged above 103 degrees, as reported on NPR. And some psychotropic medications interfere with the body’s ability to regulate temperature— increasing vulnerability to heat.

We reprogram water’s energy structure to emit strong electromagnetic pulses, creating permanently charged ultrapure VEW Water that’s bursting with benefits for your wellbeing.

ASk your LocAL grocer!

“My personal therapy includes Starchamber water. I have a higher vibrancy in my whole self!” —J.L., Scottsbluff, Nebraska

“Today I’m awake, in balance … I’m feeling good!” —J.G., Chico, California

Office/24 HR Messages/TexT 530-570-5291 • sTaRcHaMbeRpROducTs.cOM

AdvocAtes Needed Become a state certified Long-Term Care Ombudsman and make a difference in the lives of the residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. We need people in Oroville, Paradise, Glenn and Tehama Counties. If you have time and wish to make a difference, please call!

530.898.5927

Neurological disease Fossil fuel pollution can increase the risk of stroke. Coal combustion also produces mercury—a neurotoxin for fetuses. Diseases spread by mosquitoes and ticks increase the chance of neurological problems. Extreme heat is also linked with cerebrovascular disease, a disorder that affects blood supply to the brain.

26 t. c o

Higher temperatures and the depletion of the ozone layer increase the risk of skin cancer. The same refrigerants and gases that damage the ozone layer contribute to climate change.

It originally appeared in The Guardian. It is republished here as part of the CN&R’s partnership with Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

Restore your connection to Earth’s Natural Energy Forces with voRtically ENhaNcEd watER!

t SA

Skin disease

About this story:

S d EN

Much hotter days make it harder to stay hydrated. They are linked with electrolyte imbalances, kidney stones and kidney failure. Patients who need dialysis as their kidneys fail can have trouble getting treatment during extreme weather events.

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

Nutrition Carbon dioxide emissions are lowering the nutritional density of food crops, reducing plant levels of protein, zinc and iron and leading to more nutritional deficiencies. Food supplies are also disrupted by drought, societal instability and inequity linked with climate change.

Trauma Extreme weather events, including hurricanes, floods and wildfires, often cause physical injuries. Doctors see minor fractures, crush injuries and smoke inhalation. Extreme heat is also linked with aggression and violence, and the climate crisis globally is connected with violent conflict and forced migration. □

ANNUAL FALL SALE 50% off Many IteMs!

15% oFF EvErythiNg!

sutherlandscape.com

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

15


GREEN GREENWAYS

‘See you in court’

California and other states take on the Trump administration’s rollback of air-pollution regulations by

Julie Cart

Ttailpipe California’s unique authority to combat pollution on its own terms, setting the he Trump administration has revoked

stage for protracted litigation, jeopardizing public health and hindering the state’s ability to battle climate change. The announcement was tweeted by President Trump last Wednesday, Sept. 18, while he was in California on a two-day fundraising swing. The long-promised action was sure to be greeted with enthusiasm by his supporters here, as it features a trio of Trump trademarks: deregulation, dismantling of Obama-era environmental regulations and irritating California’s mostly Democratic policymakers. The state’s response was swift. “See you in court,” Gov. Gavin Newsom tweeted, calling the decision “a continuation of a political vendetta.” Trump’s move, he said at a news conference, was more about asserting “power and dominance” than a well-reasoned policy change. “It’s an aggressive move against the state,” Newsom said. “Pure politics. It’s about the oil industry, full stop.” State Attorney General Xavier Becerra confirmed that the state would sue to block

16

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

the rollback. On Friday, two days after Trump’s announcement, California and 22 other states challenged the president’s move by suing the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. They argue that the administration exceeded its authority, that the decision was made without adequate justification and that it violates federal law. California has had the authority to set its own standards to reduce planet-warming greenhouse gases in vehicle exhaust since 1970, granted by an exception written into the federal Clean Air Act in recognition of the state’s difficult history with choking smog. California’s clean-air authorities say the state’s stringent rules are essential to protect public health and a critical tool to ensure the state achieves its goal of cutting greenhouse gases by 40 percent in the next 10 years. Transportation is the top greenhouse-gas producer in California and a major contributor to air pollutants such as ozone—a component of smog that can aggravate asthma. Climate change is expected to make air quality even worse. Air Board Chair Mary Nichols said last week that she had a “heavy heart” considering

About this story:

This is an edited version of the original, published by CalMatters and available at calmatters.org.

the health implications of the rule. Echoing the defiant tone of other California officials, Nichols asked Becerra if she could sign onto the state’s lawsuit. “This is the fight of a lifetime for us; we have to win this,” Nichols said. State officials said the federal EPA has issued

more than 100 waivers, an authority that successive governors have relied on to address California’s persistent air-quality problems. Former Gov. Jerry Brown, who also went toe-to-toe with Trump, took to Twitter to respond to the president’s announcement, saying: “Your toxic tweets are insufferable, but your pillaging of our clean air is criminal.” Julia Stein, supervising attorney at UCLA’s Frank G. Wells Environmental Law Clinic, estimates the lawsuit could take up to 18 months. In the meantime, California may ask the court to keep its waiver in place until any litigation is resolved, Stein said. California’s air board is confident of its legal standing, in part, state officials say, because the federal agency has failed to make a scientific or technical case for the waiver decision. “Their work’s been bad. Their facts are bad,” said Craig Segall, assistant chief counsel for the California Air Resources Board, referring to the EPA’s analysis, which has been widely criticized. Anything can happen in litigation, he acknowledged, but “we’ve got the better of the argument, and it helps to have facts on your side.” The administration has been vocal about its plans to roll back Obama-era efforts to clean up cars and light-duty trucks, an overhaul that 13 major automakers initially sup-

ported and California helped craft. Those standards set targets to reduce greenhouse gases from tailpipes and increase gas-mileage requirements to roughly 50 miles per gallon by model year 2025. More than a year ago, Trump’s EPA proposed freezing the standards at 2020 levels through model year 2026, maintaining an average of about 37 miles per gallon. According to calculations from the federal Department of Transportation, the new rules would have the effect of adding millions of cars to the roads. Anticipating the rollbacks and the regulatory uncertainty of a lengthy court battle, California and four major automakers cut their own deal in July. California agreed to give car makers more time and flexibility to meet the Obama-era targets, and the four manufacturers agreed to voluntarily comply with California’s standards. That deal is still an unsigned, unfinalized framework. But on Sept. 6, the Trump administration launched an effort to derail it, saying the pact appeared to be “inconsistent with federal law.” The Wall Street Journal reported that the U.S. Department of Justice was investigating whether the four car companies—Honda, Ford, BMW and Volkswagen—had violated antitrust law by forging the agreement with California. But the state has remained defiant. This week, lawmakers confirmed that they have drafted a plan to enlist even more car makers by limiting the consumer rebate for electricvehicle purchases to manufacturers who have joined the agreement. □

ECO EVENT

One small step for man ... Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that first landed humans on the moon—the year was 1969, and it was during the height of summer, July 20. The U.S. would soon complete six more missions to the moon, landing a total of 12 astronauts. If you are a fan of space travel, head to the Gateway Science Museum this Wednesday (Oct. 2) for Beyond the Earth: 50 Years Since Apollo 11. Dr. Scott Perry will discuss the Apollo 11 mission, the moon, and humanity’s prospects, plans and hopes for traveling to much more distant places. The talk is free and runs from 7:30-8:30 p.m.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

‘Tattoo ministry’

Growing season, eats and startups

Joe Anthony Sanchez, or “Mr. Sanchez,” as he’s known at his shop, Exclusive Tattoo Co., has been in the ink business for 15 years. Before he started, he said he hated his job picking fruit in Orland and Durham. He got his first tattoo when he was 15 years old (his last name, which is now covered up by a flower on his right arm). He chuckled while reminiscing: He was drawn to tattooing because of “what I thought was the lifestyle of a tattoo artist.” It developed into a passion that extended beyond the art and into the spiritual realm. Sanchez, who is a nondenominational Christian, says his vision for the shop is one that includes “spreading the word” and giving back to the community. Sanchez opened the shop 3 1/2 years ago with two business partners, but after buying them out, he’s the sole owner and part of a team of five artists. Most recently, he downsized and has some aesthetic touchups in store. He’s also considering opening another location in Sacramento. To make an appointment, call 715-7286, or visit the shop on Facebook or at 2109 Esplanade, Ste. 100.

How do you like running your own shop? It’s good. I like the freedom of setting my own schedule. I didn’t want to be a business owner, but it kind of happened. I was tired of working at another shop where the owner was never there. I didn’t want to float somebody else’s shop. [At first,] I only had enough money to open up the doors … to pay the rent and the deposit and that was it.

What makes Exclusive Tattoo Co. stand out? [It’s] custom. We don’t have flash up on the wall. You can’t just walk in and pick something off the wall; we’ve got to draw it for you. When [customers] come in, if they haven’t heard about us, we tell them, “Look, the design you have, it’s an awesome design. We’d like to take that design and make it our own, just for you, so no one else has it, you know what I mean?” The hardest canvas is the

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

As we head into fall (RIP summer), it’s hard not think about harvest season. I happen to live nearly across the street from acres of orchards, so I’m anticipating the sound of the shakers (shaking the “L” out the almonds) starting up soon. What’s surprising is, with the release of the latest crop report this week, nuts are no longer Butte County’s biggest cash cow. That honor for 2018 goes to rice ($161 million), followed by almonds ($155.5 million) and, finally, walnuts ($154.5 million). Put into context, in 2017, walnuts raked in $254 million. Among the reasons for the steep drop: Chinese tariffs in response to President Trump’s trade war. But he’s still “making America great again,” right? When the trickle-down effects are taken into account, this news is a pretty big deal, as agriculture is Butte County’s biggest industry. In fact, 1 in 5 jobs is ag-related, according to Louie Mendoza, the county ag commissioner. The drop in walnut earnings is being attributed to a drop in cost. And while the majority of sales are exports, it’s a good reminder to shop at farmers’ markets—let’s keep our money local and support our neighbors.

SPEAKING OF FOODSTUFF I had the occasion to check out the annual Taste of Chico

skin. You have to know how to tattoo on a range of skin tones, colors, body shapes.

Do you have some favorite pieces you’ve done? Jesus tattoos. God-related stuff is awesome. I say, “Cool, it’s Jesus. Let me tell you about Jesus.” Preach the gospel a little bit.

What is your vision for the shop? What’s left after bills, I want to take that money and build the tattoo ministry: We go with Bibles and pray for people and feed the unfortunate. It starts here: I have [Christian rap] videos playing on my TV … and [customers are] like, “Oh, who’s this?” and I tell them and I just start talking about God. [And] I want people to feel welcome here. I want people to know that they’re not going to get attitude from anyone here. That we’re not hard-headed, we’re not disrespectful to people. —ASHIAH SCHARAGA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

street festival this past Sunday (Sept. 22) and, as always, it was a blast. Perhaps my favorite discovery was Momona’s pork belly onigiri, a menu item I’ve somehow never tried but will definitely add to my repertoire, as it was crunchy, soft, savory and came with a delicious aioli. Second fave: The Lab Bar & Grill’s falafel wrap. I’m a little picky, ever since staying above arguably the best falafel shop in Cairo while traveling some 13 years ago. Lab owner Kevin Jaradah tells me the ingredients came straight from his family’s home country of Syria; well, they’re doing something right. Pro tip: They’ll be part of a rotating menu on the restaurant’s new Arabian Nights authentic Middle Eastern events every other Wednesday. Check Facebook for details. All in all, Taste of Chico was super fun. I was a bit disappointed, however, to find at least half a dozen vendors had sold out more than an hour before the event was scheduled to end. Either the event planners need to communicate about ticket sales better or the vendors aren’t adequately preparing—but for $35 a ticket, a significant number of food stalls shouldn’t be shutting down so early.

GET YOUR LEARN ON Local nonprofit Chicostart and the Northern Rural Training and Employment Consortium (NorTEC) are sponsoring growTECH Fest Oct. 8-10, billed as “the biggest event for startups, investors, entrepreneurs, techies, students, educators, business owners and community leaders.” Speakers will include many of the area’s usual suspects: Ken Grossman (Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.), Dan Gonzales (Fifth Sun and Meriam Park), Jeff Cresswell (Klean Kanteen) and Colleen Winter (Lulus). Plus, the keynote speaker is Paul Singh, “chief hustler” for Results Junkies, a traveling consulting firm for startups. Go to growtechfest.10web.site to sign up. (Students can attend for free!)

got mosquitoes? Need to make a service request? Need Mosquitofish? Got Yellowjackets/Ticks?

Contact 530.533.6038 or www.ButteMosquito.com SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

17


Prepping for disaster BY TESS TOWNSEND

One snapshot of Paradise on Nov. 9, the day after the Camp Fire ravaged the town.

C

PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

limate change is here. On average, temperatures are already 1 degree Celsius warmer than pre-industrial levels. It’s important to understand we are not helpless. We can pressure government officials to take the bold actions necessary to curb carbon emissions and to prepare our infrastructure. California is the seventh-largest producer of crude oil in the United States, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. A major oil spill in Kern County and The Desert Sun’s revelations that fracking permits have doubled in recent months are a reminder that fossil fuel production still plays a big role in the state. “If people really want to protect themselves in the long term, they need to get involved in climate action, and push local, state and county governments to make the difficult decision to stop oil and gas development in California,” said Leah Stokes, an assistant professor of political science at UC Santa Barbara who studies energy and climate politics. In the meantime, we all have to start thinking about whether we are prepared for the impacts of warming that has already happened or that is inevitable. Global warming makes extreme weather such as fire, floods, blizzards and heat waves more intense and, in some cases, more frequent. Being prepared is not “an achieved state,” said Samantha Montano, an assistant professor of emergency management at North Dakota State University. That’s the wrong approach because “at an individual level, our preparedness is changing literally minute to minute.” Butte County has been through two federal disasters in as many years—the Camp Fire in 2018 and the Oroville Dam spillway crisis the year before—and thus many in the region understand the importance of emergency planning. How prepared you are depends on where you are when disaster strikes, your relationships with other people and your information sources, among other factors. This guide offers tips and resources for how you can be more ready.

18

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

1

What to worry about and when

Here’s a timeline of what types of extreme weather are more likely in California, as well as when and how climate change may shift or alter what to expect. July-September: Dry, hot and definitely fire season. Areas downwind of fires may be choked with smoke, as was the case in Butte County and the rest of the northern Sacramento Valley last November during the Camp Fire. Heat-related illness is another risk. More greenhouse gases trap heat in the atmosphere. That means nights cool off less, and heat builds more during the day. October-November: Normally the start of rainy season. The period between October and April accounts for 90 percent of annual precipitation in California, says climatologist Michael Anderson with the state

Department of Water Resources. However, a delayed wet season means fire risk extends longer. Heavy rains after extended dry periods, and especially after fires, can cause mudslides. December-February: Half of California’s yearly rainfall typically happens during these months, says Anderson. Storm drains clogged with debris from the dry season can lead to urban flooding, as it did last winter in certain areas of Chico. March-April: Usually, the wet season tends to taper off, but with climate change April might be unseasonably hot or abnormally stormy, as in 2018. Rising average global temperatures mean more evaporation, resulting in storm systems retaining more water, says Anderson. May-June: Normally when the landscape starts drying out. A warm winter with more rain and less snow can mean the dry season starts even earlier, Anderson says. While snow sticks around, rain flows directly into waterways, leaving land to dry out sooner.


3 Eight ways to be ready in the climate change era

2

Throw a block party

Preparing for disasters, we often think about having enough food and water to hold out. But a significant factor is a lot less tangible: social connections. How involved are you in your community? How far does your social network extend? During the March 2011 tsunami that killed more than 20,000 people in Japan, those living in communities with high levels of trust and social interaction had higher survival rates, one study found. In another study by Daniel Aldrich, director of Northeastern University’s security and resilience program, researchers found that Facebook users were more likely to evacuate during Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria if their friends-of-friends network on the social media site included more people in different geographic areas. “Broader, more diverse networks give you more diverse information,” says Aldrich. Community trust and social networks are examples of social capital. “The nice thing about social capital, like other forms of capital, is it can be built,” he says. Cities can invest in parks, libraries and other public spaces. Individuals can take even simpler steps: Introduce yourself to your closest neighbors. Organize block parties and other neighborhood events. Attend public meetings. And join social media groups directed to your community.

Defend your space

Defensible space can make a property more resistant to wildfire, especially important for residents of eastern Butte County and other foothills communities at high risk. Cal Fire recommendations include removing dead plants, pruning and creating space between flammable plants and moving flammable objects such as firewood away from the home. These steps are one line of defense against the spread of wildfire, along with strong planning and building codes. Among local resources to mine: the Butte County Fire Safe Council (buttefiresafe.net). The nonprofit operates a wood chipper program—an alternative to burning and hauling off brush and limbs—that is available for residents in the Camp Fire footprint. Fire Safe Council members also can borrow a special tool called a “weed wrench” to help remove broom, an invasive and highly flammable shrub. Defensible space does not guarantee a property will not burn, and Cal Fire recommendations appear to be written with homeowners in mind. Renters may not be able to make changes without a landlord’s permission. Laurie Shoemann, who oversees the resiliency and disaster recovery program at Enterprise Community Partners, an affordable housing nonprofit, says tenants should organize themselves and work with property owners to ensure a property has defensible space and other safety precautions in place. “Residents are the eyes and ears for the building and the community,” she says. Enterprise offers a “Ready to Respond” kit for property owners and renters on its website, enterprisecommunity.org. Renters also should purchase renters insurance.

4

Be ready for floods

With climate change, “extremely heavy precipitation events”—a lot of rain all at once—are more likely, according to a paper published last year in Nature Climate Change, a scientific journal. That means the risk for large floods is greater. As with fires and other climateinfluenced disasters, the most important thing to do in the case of flooding is to follow safety or evacuation directions from government officials. You can also work to prevent localized flooding near your home, and you can secure your property in the case of more severe flooding that may require evacuation. Sacramento emergency manager Daniel Bowers recommends clearing leaves from storm drains and tying down lawn furniture, among other measures. More tips are available at stormready.org. Renters and homeowners should have flood insurance; standard renters insurance policies may not cover flooding, so you may need to buy a separate policy. Floodwater is often contaminated and you should avoid contact with it, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Flooding also can contaminate drinking water, so it’s important to store containers of clean water at your home and workplace in case of emergency. The best method for making water safe from bacterial contamination is boiling it. First, filter the water through clean fabric, a coffee filter or a paper towel and let any contents settle.

PREP C O N T I N U E D

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

O N PA G E 2 0

CN&R

19


PREP C O N T I N U E D

5

F R O M PA G E 1 9

Evacuate!

Climate change increases the likelihood and intensity of wildfires in California, and these fires can move fast. When officials issue evacuation orders, “you have to take and heed the directions,” said Brian Marshall, fire chief at the California Office of Emergency Services. “Time is of the essence.” Evacuation can mean leaving town, and routes may not be predetermined. Public safety officials may choose to reverse traffic flow on highways or roadways—so-called “one-way evacuation operations”—should primary evacuation routes get clogged with traffic. They also might usher people to a location in town that is comparatively safe, as was the case for many Ridge residents during the Camp Fire. For more info, visit buttecounty.net/oem and click on the “evacuation plan and map” link. Many places in California at high risk of wildfire lack evacuation plans. The ease or difficulty of evacuating will vary, depending on the community and conditions of the fire. Whatever your situation, you should have your own plan. “Without a plan, you don’t know what to do in an emergency,” said Marshall. For example, if power goes out, automatic garage doors may not open. If you can, install a backup battery, which new garage doors must have. Be ready to open the door yourself; if you’re not sure you can, park your car outside, pointed forward for easy maneuvering, with windows closed. Follow local news outlets and Cal Fire on Twitter or Facebook, and sign up for local emergency alert systems such as CodeRED (tinyurl.com/ ButteCountyCodeRED). But be aware that sometimes evacuation orders don’t come in time. If you can, invest in a battery-powered or hand-crank radio that operates when the electricity is out, so you can get weather and news updates. If your community is on fire or flooding, even if you don’t feel threatened, the safest move is to leave. Don’t just think about yourself, but also about others trying to get out and first responders coming in, all of whom can benefit if you get out early, said Cal Fire public information officer Scott McLean. “This time of year, we just have to all keep our heads on a swivel,” he said.

20

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

6

Staying in a shelter

After a disaster, you might not be able to return home for some time. If you are unable to stay with friends and family, you can check into a shelter. Often these shelters are run by the American Red Cross, which coordinates in advance with community facilities willing to host disaster victims. You can look up open shelter locations at redcross. org. Local police and fire departments also will be aware of sites. The Red Cross does not require ID from people seeking shelter and does not ask about immigration status, said national headquarters spokesman Don Lauritzen. The organization also has said it will not allow immigration agents into a shelter without a court order. Shelter guests are free to come and go, but must check in and out, said Heath Wakelee, a Northeastern California Red Cross public information volunteer. While there is no curfew, 10 p.m. is “quiet time,” he said. Service and comfort animals are allowed into many shelters, but some cannot accommodate pets. Sometimes, veterinarians will take pets in for free. People who choose to stay with their pets outside a shelter may still use shelter facilities. Shelters, however, can be hectic, and might not operate as expected. Wakelee said the Red Cross does not turn people away, but may refer them to other shelters when they are full. He said case workers ensure shelter guests have plans to stay elsewhere before the shelter closes. Fair warning: As the CN&R reported a few months after the Camp Fire, the Red Cross started preparing to shut down its facility at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds in Chico with a few weeks’ notice to displaced individuals, many of whom ended up on the streets. The organization had previously assured this newspaper that the shelter would remain open as long as it was needed. Shortly before the closure, on Feb. 1, representatives told the CN&R that people asked to leave either had plans to stay elsewhere, had declined help from Red Cross case workers or were homeless before the Camp Fire.

7

Doctor’s orders

In their 2017 book

Enviromedics, Drs. Jay Lemery

and Paul Auerbach write that environmental change “has been proclaimed the biggest global health threat of the twenty-first century.” The book looks at a long list of health impacts of climate change, including increases in heat illness, greater spread of diseases, poor air quality and declining access to clean water. If you have any health problems, climate change could make them worse. Talk to your doctor about whether you should change your asthma or allergy care during pollen season or heavy wildfire smoke. Be aware of any medications, including for psychiatric conditions, that make you more sensitive to heat. One thing to watch for, especially during the North State’s already sweltering summers, is heat illness. By the end of the century, average daily maximum temperatures could increase by 10 degrees, according to UC Davis researchers. Be alert for symptoms of heat exhaustion and more severe heat stroke. Get to a

cooler location, ideally somewhere with air conditioning. Drink water, and if symptoms don’t subside in 15 minutes, go to the hospital. Heat stress can be deadly, leading to problems such as kidney failure. The National Kidney Foundation recommends against using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen when you know you’re going to be exposed to heat. Exposure to heat is a major health risk for people who work outside and in high-heat indoors, such as farm workers, landscapers and factory workers. If you pack an emergency “go-bag,” include extra supplies of your prescription medications. If you have insurance, see if you can move up your refill date to have extra pills on hand. You can also ask your doctor to prescribe an additional one-time supply. Some insurance providers may have special programs to help disaster victims get prescription medications. For more on this topic, see Healthlines, page 12.


Under supervision of a veterinarian, NVADG volunteer Janice Rosene treats a dog injured during the Camp Fire. PHOTO COURTESY OF NVADG

8

A R R I V I N G O C T . 10 , 2019

Get trained

For those looking for volunteer opportunities, NVADG is hosting a two-day training session on Jan. 18-19. ARES (Amateur Radio Look for free and low-cost Emergency Service): Ham radios disaster preparation and response training, as well as opportunities to and other alternative communication methods become indispensparticipate in coordinated disaster response. Joining these groups can able when cell networks get interrupted, as was the case during help better prepare yourself, your the Camp Fire. Locally, there’s family and your community. CERT (Community Emergency the Golden Empire Amateur Radio Society (GEARS), a nonResponse Team): This federally profit whose roots trace back to recognized program trains volunthe 1930s. For information about teers for a range of disasters, from basic individual response to coordi- its meetings and membership, visit nated response by teams after large- gearsw6rhc.com. Because the rural North State scale disasters. You likely will have to travel out of the region for lacks many of the emergency preparedness training opportunities training. The Sacramento area has a number of CERT teams offering found in major metros, it is especlasses and volunteer opportunities cially important to be self-reliant. Butte County Public Health recthroughout the year. More info at ommends residents put together a saccountyares.org/links/cert. disaster supply kit and offers an Disaster preparation and online checklist. Suggested items response training helped save countless pets and livestock during include important documents, complete changes of clothing for the Camp Fire. Among the groups each family member, and keeping that rescued and cared for animals a full tank of gas at all times. after the evacuation is the North Residents also should create Valley Animal Disaster Group a family emergency plan that, (NVADG). among other things, identifies an In addition to those efforts, individual in a safe zone out of the the nonprofit educates the public area that everyone should contact on disaster preparedness geared if separated. Learn more at tinyurl. toward pet owners by giving preΩ sentations and attending safety fairs com/EvacList. and other community events. Learn Melissa Daugherty contributed to more at nvadg.org. this story.

Chico’s favorites are revealed in CN&R’s most anticipated issue of the year. Advertisers: Contact your News & Review representative today to be a part of this event. CN&R • 353 E. Second St. • Chico • 530-894-2300

www.chicobestof.com SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

21


Arts &Culture Psartners • in

ong

The soulful musical relationship of Sunday Iris

Tof band Sunday Iris in the first verse the first song on the duo’s new CD,

here is a lot to be gleaned about the

Anywhere. To start with, the opening line is a wonderby fully vivid, mysteriJason Cassidy ous way to begin an album: “Down jason c @ a dark road/in the new srev iew.c om blinding rain/I would Preview: go with you/I’d go Sunday Iris performs insane.” Friday, Sept. 27, 8:30 p.m. The song’s Garrett Gray and The stripped-down Exclusionaries open. Cost: $7 arrangement—with Dave Elke’s pristine The Maltese finger-picked acous1600 Park Ave. tic guitar creating a 343-4915 facebook.com/ breezy counterpoint themaltese to Lisa Langley’s rich and soulful vocals and his own quiet harmonizing—is the perfect introduction to what is the foundation for the band’s sound. And the words, co-written by the duo, capture the themes of playing music together and being romantic partners as well. “[The song] felt like a metaphor for us going into something—our journey—as partners and musicians without knowing what will happen, but that we are just crazy enough to go for it,” said Langley. Anywhere is the third record from Sunday Iris—following a self-titled debut and the Cross the Line EP, both released in 2017. This Friday (Sept. 27), the duo celebrates its latest with a CD-release party at the Maltese. Last week, over appetizers and drinks at downtown’s Bill’s Towne Lounge, the two talked with the CN&R about 22

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

THIS WEEK

the album, songwriting and how the band came about. “I was missing writing with just the guitar without a bunch of instruments, [and wanted to] focus on stories and stuff, instead of trying to wail all the time,” Langley explained. Before this project, Langley made a name for herself in Chico’s music scene as Lisa Valentine—playing solo, as part of jazz combos and with her own R&B/soul crew, Lisa Valentine and the Unlovables. Her impressive pipes and bluesy, expressive style are right in line with her big influences (everything from Patsy Cline to oldschool Motown singers) and make Langley suited to a wide range of genres. She’s won a Chico Area Music Award (CAMMIE) for Best Female Vocalist, and even tried out for The Voice and American Idol—she won a Chico competition that sent her to auditions for the latter. Elke has been involved in local music since the early 1990s, when the Texas native (Langley was born in Texas as well, but grew up in Corning) moved to town for school. He’s since become one of the better-known music personalities in Chico. “I came here in ’93 and joined a band that year, and I’ve been in probably 25 or 30 bands since then. One year at the CAMMIES I was in four or five showcases in all different styles,” said Elke (his Dave Elke Trio also won a CAMMIE for Best Jazz Artist). Some of the highlights on his résumé include playing with ’90s alt-rockers Jensing, acid-jazz crew Potluck, Latin dance band Los Papi Chulos and many jazz combos. He’s also a guitar instruc-

Sunday Iris: Lisa Langley and Dave Elke. PHOTO BY ALICIA HAYES HERNANDEZ

tor, plus teaches recording arts and music appreciation at Butte College. Langley and Elke met as fellow local players—working together on various projects, including a couple of Langley’s solo albums, which Elke recorded—before they started dating and eventually created Sunday Iris. “We just started writing songs, just sitting down together writing songs on the acoustic. Because we wanted to explore deeper songwriting,” Elke said. After they had a few numbers in the can, they were inspired to keep going, which led to recording, playing shows and the rest. “I don’t think we ever went, ‘We’re going to start a duo,’” Elke said. “I feel like my voice has developed more since doing this,” Langley said. “You can’t hide behind anything, so you’re hearing yourself and you’re being more intimate.” “This is my favorite project I’ve ever done,” Elke added. “It’s real.” Elke recorded Anywhere himself, at the couple’s home, and the album finds them adding more extra elements to the sound than usual. Pianist Kara Gorr (a music student of Elke’s) plays on one song, and local jazz ringer Robert Delgardo adds drums to a few tracks. But at it’s core, Sunday Iris is still a bluesy folk duo that seems to have provided an ideal venue for both of their skillsets, a notion that Elke chalks up to not having preconceived ideas going in. “I think it’s all luck,” he said. “Two people get together and everything just works.” □

26

THU

Special Events BUFFALO FIELD CAMPAIGN ROAD SHOW: Join Buffalo Field Campaign’s co-founder Mike Mease for an evening of music, stories and videos, and learn how to save and protect Yellowstone National Park’s wild buffalo. He will be joined by flutist Mignon Geli. Thu, 9/26, 7pm. Suggested donation: $5-$10. Pageant Theatre, 351 E. Sixth St.

FEATHER FALLS OKTOBERFEST: Celebration featuring German food specials, raffle prizes, contests, photobooth and live music by Big Lou’s Polka Casserole. Wear traditional garb for Bavarian costume contest. Thu, 9/26, 6pm. $10. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

NEAR & DEAR BREAKFAST POP-UP: Chico’s favorite organic, vegan bakery will be cooking up some morning treats, and Stoble Coffee will provide the caffeine. Thu, 9/26, 8am. Alex Marshal Studios, 1095 Nelson St.

NORTH STATE SYMPHONY Sunday, Sept. 29 Laxson Auditorium SEE SUNDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

CHULAS FRONTERAS Saturday-Sunday, Sept. 28-29 Pageant Theatre

SEE SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

12:30pm. Free. Faith Lutheran Church, 667 E. First Ave. chicofaithlutheran.org to save a life at this annual community fair featuring food, petting zoo, archery and more. Sat 9/28, 11am. Lifeline Training Center, 1074 East Ave., Ste. E.

EARLY CAMERAS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS OF CHICO: Lee Laney and Randy Taylor provide a glimpse into the numerous early photographers and studios in Chico and show examples of early local photographs. Sat 9/28. Chico History Museum, 141 Salem St.

NAOMI KLEIN: Author and social activist Klein is set to discuss her latest release On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal which gathers more than a decade of her impassioned writing about the climate crisis. Sat 9/28, 6pm. $15. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State. chicoperformances.com

OKTOBERFEST: See Friday. Sat 9/28, 5pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

RECLAIM OLD HUMBOLDT WAGON ROAD: Monthly

WRITER’S VOICE: A fiction reading with PeruvianAmerican writer Juan Alvarado Valdivia. Free and open to the public. Thu, 9/26, 7:30pm. Chico State, Ayres 120.

Music JIM MESSINA: Former member of Buffalo Springfield, Poco and Loggins & Messina performs music from the past and present. Thu, 9/26, 7pm. $34 - $49. State Theatre, 333 Oak St., Red Bluff.

VINCE NEIL & QUEENSRYCHE: Rock out with the lead screamer of Motley Crue and the band that brought you “Silent Lucidity.” Thu, 9/26, 8pm. $25. Rolling Hills Casino & Resort, 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning.

27

Sunday, Sept. 29 Chico Guild Hall

SEE SUNDAY, MUSIC

pulling weeds in the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 9/27, 9am. Bidwell Park.

WHISKY & WINE - TASTE FOR A CAUSE: A night of fine spirits and local wines provided by New Clairvaux Vineyards. All proceeds from this event benefit the Work Training Center’s programs. Fri, 9/27, 6pm. $30 - $50. Lakeside Pavilion, 2255 Fair St. 343-7994. wtcinc.org

FRI

Special Events OKTOBERFEST: Two-weekend extravaganza fea-

HONKY TONK MATINEE

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and

turing craft beer, food, costumes, dancing, raucous music and more. Sold out. Fri, 9/27, 5pm. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

The Easy Leaves

cleanup hosted by Respect the Walls. Gear will be provided. Sat 9/28, 8am. Old Humboldt Wagon Road.

SACRED CONVERSATIONS: IMMIGRATION: Forum exploring complex issues in an effort to understand diverse perspectives and find common values for action. Event will feature panel that includes an episcopal priest, an immigration attorney, a professor, and a successful asylum seeker. Sat 9/28,

TIG NOTARO: Groundbreaking stand-up comedian, actor, writer, producer, and director recently named “one of the 50 best standup comics of all time” by Rolling Stone magazine performs. Sat 9/28, 7:30pm. $15$48. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. chicoperformances.com

Music DIEGO’S UMBRELLA: San Francisco band puts on a high-energy show combining traditional gypsy rhythms, Spanish flamenco, polka, ska and pop hooks. Sat, 9/28, 9pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

STEVE JOHNSON: Acoustic guitar and vocals for brunch. Sat, 9/28, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

TYLER DEVOLL: Local singer/songwriter plays for happy hour. Sat, 9/28, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Friday. Sat, 9/28, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: Offbeat musical comedy

EDITOR’S PICK

based on the beloved 1960s television series. Fri, 9/27, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

28

SAT

Special Events BETA SIGMA PHI VENDOR BAZAAR: The Chico chapter of Xi Pi Nu is hosting a huge sale with proceeds going to charity. Vendors include Lula Roe, Scentsy, Mary Kay, Origami Owl and much more. Sat 9/28, 10am. Trinity United Methodist Church Hall, 285 E. Fifth St.

CHICO ZINE FEST: A fun day full of zine vendors, guest speakers and workshops from local and out of town artists. Sat 9/28, 10am. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

CHULAS FRONTERAS: Restored 1976 film chronicling the life, music and culture found on the Mexico/Texas border. Sat 9/28, 1pm. Pageant Theatre, 351 E. 6th St.

CPR SATURDAY COUNTRY COOKOUT: Learn how

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

SQUIRM, LAUGH, CRY You may have heard her hilarious Taylor Dayne bit on This American Life. You may have watched her silently push a chair for three minutes on Conan O’Brien’s show. Or maybe you heard Live Album, the recording of her legendary set at Largo in Los Angeles performed hours after being diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer. Tig Notaro is an accomplished actor, writer, producer and director, a comedian for the ages and a human worth looking up to. She will bless the Laxson Auditorium stage with her presence this Saturday (Sept. 28). Do you like to laugh until you cry? You need to drop everything and be there.

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

23


THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

FINE ARTS

29

SUN

Special Events CHULAS FRONTERAS: See Saturday. Sun, 9/29, 7pm. Pageant Theatre, 351 E. 6th St. TOUCH OF CHICO: 18th annual holistic festival that brings local massage therapists together with the community to share their skills and help raise money for KZFR. There will be live music, sound healing, food, artisans, vendors, educational booths and more. Sun, 9/29, 12pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St. kzfr.org

Music HONKY TONK MATINEE BENEFIT: Come on down and shake a leg to Nor-Cal country band The Easy Leaves and West Coast troubadour Trevor McSpadden. There will be kids activities, food, beer, and wine, a chili cook-out and a bake sale. This is a fundraiser to rebuild Norton Buffalo Hall in Paradise. Sun, 9/29, 2pm. $20 (tickets at theeasyleaves.com). Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

NORTH STATE SYMPHONY: The symphony season kicks off with Masterworks 1: Beethoven Triple, a celebration of the conductor’s 250th birthday with his Triple Concerto. Plus, works by Schubert and Michael Torke. Pre-concert talk 1-2pm. Sun, 9/29, 2pm. $18-$40. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. northstatesymphony.org

THE ART OF ABSOLUTE AMA Shows through Oct. 31 Provisions Gallery SEE ART

SKIP CULTON: Vegan brunch accompanied

Benefit Concert for the Friends of the Chico Animal Shelter! Saturday, SepteMber 28

apollo SCHool oF MuSiC and artS 936 Mangrove Avenue Doors 6pm • Show 7-9pm Headliner

Heavy Mello with openers

Melli Farias and Jacob Mcdonald All profits go towards caring for the animals of the Chico animal Shelter

$10 advance tickets available at the apollo School of Music $12 at door

by the soul grooves of local vocalist and guitarist. Sun, 9/29, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Friday. Sun, 9/29, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

2

WED

Special Events BEYOND THE EARTH: 50 YEARS SINCE APOLLO 11: For this installment of October lecture series, Dr. Scott Perry will discuss the Apollo 11 mission and humanity’s prospects, plans, and hopes for traveling to much more distant places in our solar system and beyond. Wed, 10/2, 7:30pm. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade.

MODERN HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE: FROM 1860 TO TODAY: Six-week MONCA lecture series featuring a survey of events, individuals and the buildings that shaped modern European and American architecture from the late 19th century through the present. Wed, 10/2, 6:30pm. $50. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

Art 1078 GALLERY: Field Notes, artists Rebecca Shelly and Rebecca Wallace apply different approaches of working en plein air to create the work presented in this exhibition. Through 9/29. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

CHICO ART CENTER: On Track, exhibit of railroad art to celebrate and encourage participation in California Railroad Safety month. Also, Augmented, visitors use personal mobile devices to view artwork that has been virtually enhanced with video, animation, and (sometimes) sound. Through 9/27. Free. 450 Orange St. chico artcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Connie G. Adams, Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery featuring Northern California artists whose lives have been touched by cancer showcases series of watercolor paintings by breast cancer survivor. Through 10/18. Free. 265 Cohasset Road.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Bernie Lubell, artist’s sculptures explore the relationship between humans and machines, and visitors to the exhibit get to be active participants. Through 10/12. Arts & Humanities Building, Chico State. headleygallerycsuchico.com

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Give Voice, Empower Me Art presents exhibition of Northern California and international artists/survivors of sex-trafficking. Also, Walls We Create, exhibition reflecting the cultural experience of “barriers.” Through 9/29. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 28

PROVISIONS GALLERY: The Art of Absolute Ama, exhibit in the gallery inside the

24

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

Upper Park Clothing store. Through 10/31. 122 W. Third St.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Summer’s End, featuring original paintings by local artists Ray Eastman, Joan Smith and Gary Baugh. Through 9/28. 493 East Ave., Ste. 1.

THE TURNER: Drawn In–By Hand Graphic Prints, a collaboration with the Department of Art and Art History’s foundations faculty, exhibition reveals how the act of drawing creates an acuity of vision. Through 9/28. Free. 400 W. First St. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Unbroken Traditions Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker Families in Northern California, exhibition represents the culmination of one year of research and collaboration between Mountain Maidu weavers, other tribal experts, museums studies students, faculty and curators. Through 5/15. Meriam Library, Chico State.


September 26, 2019

CN&R

25


26

CN&R

September 26, 2019


SCENE

Woven through history Museum shares four generations of Maidu basketry

TValene new exhibit at Chico State’s L. Smith Museum

he excellent and often moving

of Anthropology, Unbroken Traditions, offers viewers the immeby Robert Speer diate pleasure of appreciating just rober tspeer@ how beautiful newsrev i ew.c om Native American basketry is. Review: It goes much Unbroken Traditions: further, however, Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker by demonstrating Families in Northern that these painsCalifornia shows takingly crafted through May 15. baskets are not Valene L. Smith only extraordiAnthropology nary examples of Museum Native ceremonial Chico State artistry, but also 898-5397 csuchico.edu/ highly practical anthmuseum utensils used in multiple ways— for storage, cooking, winnowing, fishing, carrying infants (in cradleboards), acorn processing and as water bottles and even women’s hats! More than anything, though, this exhibit is a celebration of the resilience that has enabled the Native people of Northern California to preserve their long-unbroken traditions despite the genocidal attempts to eradicate them and their culture. As is pointed out in the exhibit’s accompanying texts, the Indians of Northern California suffered profound “intergenerational trauma” in the form of “forced relocation, separation, violence and enslave-

ment” resulting in “loss of life, land, resources, culture and languages.” The current generation of basket weavers carries with it the “accumulated emotional harm linked to traumatic experiences.” (It’s beyond ironic that Chico State is located on land once occupied by—and subsequently taken from—the Mechoopda Maidu tribe.) The baskets on display were made by Mountain Maidu members of the Meadows-Baker family of Northern California (primarily Lassen and Plumas counties). The exhibit was put together by two master’s degree candidates, Coral Willard and Meegan Sims, both from Sacramento. Heather McCafferty, the museum’s assistant curator, oversaw the project. Together they did a fine job of putting the baskets in context and portraying them as a valuable tradition that has helped the Meadows-Baker family maintain its culture. At the heart of the exhibit is a woman who embodied Mountain Maidu traditions. Her name is Lilly Baker, and when she died, in 2006 at the age of 94, she was widely known not only as a masterful basket weaver, but also as a teacher who for many years shared her craft and its history with fourth- and fifth-graders in local schools. Baker, who learned basket weaving from her mother, is featured in a short film, Dancing With the Bear: Lilly Baker and the Maidu Legacy, made by Adam Horowitz and Daniel Voll in 1996. In it she demonstrates

Master basket weaver Lilly Baker. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE KURTZ FAMILY

how baskets are made (each takes a month to weave), discusses the importance of ecological knowledge of the landscape and the materials used in weaving, and laments the nearly total disappearance of the Maidu people, who once numbered 10,000 strong, and their language. Fortunately, the Mountain Maidu, in conjunction with members of the dominant culture, are memorializing and utilizing the contributions of Native basket weavers. Baker, for example, often was called upon to assist the U.S. Forest Service in identifying plants so the agency could make land management decisions that protected valuable gathering areas. In 1991, Indians from many California tribes came together to form the California Indian Basketweavers Association, whose mission, according to a statement, is “to preserve, promote and perpetuate California Indian basketweaving traditions while providing a healthy physical, social, spiritual and economic environment for basketweavers.” This revitalization, the statement reads, is “especially vital to our young people who will be responsible for sustaining the cultural practices of California Indians for the next generation.” It’s a daunting challenge, but Baker and her fellow weavers have shown the way. □ SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 9/26—WEDNESDAY 10/2 LO & BEHOLD: Local funk ensemble

plays the patio. Thu, 9/26, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

VINCE NEIL & QUEENSRYCHE

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive

Tonight, Sept. 26 Rolling Hills Casino & Resort

Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 9/26, 8pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

SEE THURSDAY

THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat with a rotating list of DJs spinning all vinyl until late. Thu, 9/26, 8pm. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

VINCE NEIL & QUEENSRYCHE: Rock out

26THURSDAY

BOB MARLEY TRIBUTE: Popular San

Francisco-based roots and reggae soul band Sol Horizon performs your favorite Marley hits. Chico’s own DJ Cootdog will spin. Thu, 9/26, 8:30pm. $10-$12. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

CONJURER: Post-metal band from the UK performs. Local death-metal crews Aberrance, Dead Amanda and Aitherios share the bill. Thu, 9/26, 6:30pm. $10. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

28

CN&R

with the lead screamer of Motley Crue and the band that brought you “Silent Lucidity.” Thu, 9/26, 8pm. $25. Rolling Hills Casino & Resort, 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning.

EDM DANCE NIGHT: Dubstep, trap and EDM for monthly dance night on the patio. Thu, 9/26, 9pm. The Beach, 191 E. Second St.

JIM MESSINA: Former member of Buffalo Springfield, Poco and Loggins & Messina performs music from the past and present. Thu, 9/26, 7pm. $34-$49. State Theatre, 333 Oak St., Red Bluff.

KYLE WILLIAMS: Talented local singer/ songwriter brings his soulful acoustic music to Farm Star. Thu, 9/26, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

YURKOVIC: Local soul and blues trio on the patio. Thu, 9/26, 8pm. $5. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

27FRIDAY

BLACKOUT BETTY: High-energy

tribute band playing your favorite 1980s arena jams. Fri, 9/27, 9:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

CAJUN PARTY WITH THE ALAN RIGG BAND: Come get swampy with

local band playing dixieland and zydeco. Fri, 9/27, 8pm. $5. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

CROATION DANCE PARTY

HANNAH JANE KILE & THE REAL SARAHS: Local singer, multi-instrumentalist and composer performs with rising Americana stars out of Mendocino, The Real Sarahs. Expect harmonies, folk, jazz, blues and country. Fri, 9/27, 7:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

JAYSON ANGOVE: Singer/songwriter performs. Fri, 9/27, 12pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

LARRY PETERSON AND STEVE COOK: Eclectic mix of tunes

by local favorites. Fri, 9/27, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign-ups at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 9/27, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

“Gypsy punk” is a term that might be best defined not by describing the musical style—a mix of Eastern European Romani folk music and high-energy rock—but rather by pointing to the bands that make it. One look at the carny-meets-sideshow-performer aesthetic of bands like Gogol Bordello and Diego’s Umbrella tells you that you’re in for a wild night when they hit the stage. The latter will be whipping up the crowd at Lost on Main this Saturday, Sept. 28. Drink plenty of fluids and get ready for a long night of sweaty fun.

THE SHIGEMI TRIO: Piano-led jazz

trio. Fri, 9/27, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

SUNDAY IRIS RECORD RELEASE: Celebrate the release

of Anywhere with Chico folk duo. Locals The Exclusionaries and Garrett Gray share the bill. Fri,

9/27, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

TANNER RICHARDSON: Local singer/ songwriter plays for happy hour. Fri, 9/27, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

28SATURDAY

BEE GEES GOLD: Tribute to the disco

band in its prime. Sat, 9/28, 9pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22

THE REAL SARAHS Friday, Sept. 27 Chico Women’s Club

NO LIGHTS: Punk band from SF featur-

SEE FRIDAY

ing members of Kowloon Walled City. Locals Black Magnet and West by Swan share the bill. Sat, 9/28, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

THE ONLY CASH TRIBUTE BAND: Popular band recreates the style, mystery and music of the legendary Johnny Cash. Sat, 9/28, 7pm. $20-$30. State Theatre, 333 Oak St., Red Bluff.

ROCK MOSAIC: Classic rock and country hits with a modern twist. Sat, 9/28, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

ROCKHOUNDS: Groovy classic rock DIEGO’S UMBRELLA: San Francisco band puts on a high-energy show combining traditional Gypsy rhythms, Spanish flamenco, polka, ska and pop hooks. Sat, 9/28, 9pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

DRIVER: Local classic rock, rhythm

and blues band performs. Sat, 9/28, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

EMMA GARRAHY & WILL HARTMAN: Local duo performs hit songs from a variety of decades and genres with a bluesy twist. Sat, 9/28, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

LARRY PETERSON AND STEVE COOK: See

Friday. Sat, 9/28, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

LEANN COOLEY: Chico-based singer/ songwriter and multi-instrumentalist plays blues, country, rock, bluegrass and swing. Sat, 9/28, 5pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

LOVE ETERNAL: Hawaiian roots and reggae soul duo performs. Local keyboardist and songwriter Caloy opens. Sat, 9/28, 7pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

LUKE SWEENEY: Once local poet, composer and guitarist returns to Chico and is joined by Similar Alien and Dorothy Valens. Sat, 9/28,

29SUNDAY

8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED: CCR’s founding rhythm sections performs the band’s classic hits with a couple of ringers. Sun, 9/29, 7pm. $25. Rolling Hills Casino & Resort, 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Sign-ups start at 8pm. Sun, 9/29, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

SMASHED SPELLING BEE: Monthly adult spelling bee drinking game with cash prize and a medal. Sun, 9/29, 7pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

from longtime local act. Sat, 9/28, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

TICKET TO RIDE ELECTRIC/ ACOUSTIC: Beatles tribute concert to raise money for Beyond the Horizon Coaching. Sat, 9/28, 6pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

1TUESDAY

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

know and win prizes. Tue, 10/1, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

2WEDNESDAY

TIG NOTARO: Groundbreaking stand-up comedian, actor, writer, producer and director recently named “one of the 50 best stand-up comics of all time” by Rolling Stone magazine. Sat, 9/28, 7:30pm. $15-$48. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. chicoperformances.com

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 10/2, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

DANCE NIGHT: Four lady DJs with large

wax every Wednesday for your boogying pleasure. Wed, 10/2, 10pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

HOT AUGUST NIGHT: Relive the excitement of Neil Diamond’s 1972 Greek Theater concert with tribute artist Dean Colley. Wed, 10/2, 6:30pm. $10$40. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

LISHA AND FRIENDS: Jazz, blues, oldies, big band, country, folk, and

contemporary with female vocalist and full band. Wed, 10/2, 6pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

MONTHLY OPEN MIC: Blackbird’s firstWednesday open mic. All welcome. Sign-ups start at 5:30pm. Wed, 10/2, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

NIANTIC: LA-based indie rockers play loud. Joined by locals Kairomone and Jamm. Wed, 10/2, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

HOMECOMING

Chico-born artist Luke Sweeney (pictured) is an all-around talented guy—a poet, composer, guitarist, singer/songwriter—and he just released his third album, Peace Meal. Now based in San Francisco, he returns to his birthplace this Saturday (Sept. 28) to play The Maltese. Sweeney’s music has been compared to Stephen Malkmus, Al Green and classic garagepsych rock, with songs that will make you happy and want to dance. Locals Similar Alien and Dorothy Vallens share the bill.

vinyl collections select a fresh slice of

Preorder NoW!

TickeTs $25 Oroville State Theater • Fri, Nov. 8, 7-9PM • www.orovillestatetheatre.com State Theater, Red Bluff • Thurs, Nov. 14, 7- 9PM • www.brownpapertickets.com Cascade Theater, Redding • Sat, Nov. 16, 7:30- 9:30PM • www.cascadetheater.org EL Rey Theater, Chico • Sat, Nov. 23, 7- 9PM • www.elreychico.com SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

29


REEL WORLD

Lotus FLower 20% Off Imports All Jewelry w/ coupon

Outer/inner space

Sept 26 - Oct 5 839 Main Street • Chico • (530) 345-6783

Locally Grown carving & baking pumpkins & gourds. Baked goods & beverages Kids activities & games on the weekends

Sept. 27th – Oct. 27th Fridays 3pm to Sunset Sat & Sun 10am to Sunset

pspumpkinpatch.com l On the corner of Jones Ave and Bell Rd

Ad Astra

Mysteries of the universe and the human condition in two new films Ad Astra Jmixture ture wrapped around a sketchy but serious-minded of psychological drama and cosmic allegory. ames Gray’s

is a spectacular sci-fi adven-

That mixture is sometimes rather labored, but the overall result is fascinating and vivid in ways that are never merely by Juan-Carlos generic. Selznick The basic storyline has a veteran astronaut, Major Roy McBride (Brad Pitt), sent on a top secret mission to the far side of Neptune. He’s sent to find what remains of something called the Lima Project and to determine any connection it has to Ad Astra the massive cosmic rays currently Starring Brad Pitt and wreaking havoc on the solar system. Tommy Lee Jones. Directed by James The mission is doubly fraught for Gray. Cinemark 14 and McBride since the head of the “lost” Feather River Cinema. Lima Project was, and perhaps still Rated PG-13. is, a legendary astronaut (Tommy Lee Jones) who is also McBride’s chronically distant father. Plus, the entangled duplicities and manipulations of the ruling space agency incite multiple treacheries for what is Luce Opens Sept. 27. an increasingly desperate mission. Pageant Theatre. The aging astronauts played by Rated R. Jones and Donald Sutherland have a haunted, near ghostly look to them, in keeping with the film’s sidelong mysticism. Pitt’s character learns a thing or two from those ghostly savants, and also from the small crowd of semi-robotic colleagues with whom he is involved. The father-son encounter in the allegorical climax seems contrived, but the gravity of Jones and Pitt, as

4 4

30

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

well as the authority of the physical action, give it some heft all the same. And Pitt is excellent throughout as a dedicatedly robotic hero and human being who seems to find himself by losing his way. In Luce, “mixed signals” lead to increasingly perilous

misunderstandings, even among well-meaning people who believe they’re acting with the best of intentions. The key players, in this case, a school teacher/activist (Octavia Spencer); the orphaned teenage African refugee called Luce (Kelvin Harrison Jr.), who is the school’s star pupil; and the childless suburban couple (Naomi Watts and Tim Roth) who have adopted him. The crisis of misunderstandings comes when the teacher finds what she takes to be evidence of violent and destructive tendencies in the young man. Adapted by director Julius Onah and writer J. C. Lee from a play by the latter, Luce is a sharply written roundelay in which the characters take action on personal impressions that are mistaken or incomplete. The film lets us see the nuances of such things, moral and otherwise, with all four of the chief characters, each of whom also makes early impressions on us viewers that we’re obliged to reconsider later on. Harrison Jr. is especially fine as the mercurial Luce. Andrea Bang, Norbert Leo Butz, Marsha Stephanie Blake, and actor/rapper Astro all make apt contributions in secondary roles. Ω

1 2

3 4

Poor

Good

Fair

Very Good

5 Excellent


FILM SHORTS

Opening this week Abominable

A computer-animated feature about a teen girl who finds a Yeti on her roof and helps her new friend find his way back to his home at Mr. Everest. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Chulas Fronteras

A 4k restoration of “Beautiful Borders,” Les Blank’s 1976 documentary on the music and culture on both sides of the U.S./Mexico border. Two showings: Saturday (Sept 28, 1 p.m.) and Sunday (Sept 29, 7 p.m.). Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

4

Luce

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Now playing

4

Ad Astra

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Brittany Runs a Marathon

A dramedy starring Jillian Bell as a woman who sets out to lose weight and train for running the New York City Marathon. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Downton Abbey

The popular British television show comes to the big screen, with the familiar cast of characters being visited at their English country house by the king and queen. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Good Boys

Three sixth-grade boys embark on an epic, R-rated coming-of-age odyssey. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Hustlers

Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez, Julia Stiles and Cardi B star as a crew of strippers who hustle money from Wall Street clients who frequent the club. Inspired by a true-life 2015 story that appeared in New York magazine. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

2

It Chapter Two

If you look at this sequel as a stand-

alone, it’s a big mess. The movie picks up 27 years after the first part, with the grownup Losers Club—played by Bill Hader (Richie), Jessica Chastain (Beverly) and James McAvoy (Bill), among others—being called back to their hometown where a rematch with the morphing Pennywise the clown is in order. That’s it for the plot. The adults split up, suffer some individual horrors at the hands of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgard), then wind up back together for the finale. After a solid start, the performers just run from set piece to set piece, setting the table for some CGI scares mixed with the occasional practical effects. Even at nearly three hours, this movie comes off as rushed and haphazard. Despite this, Hader rules as Richie in the same way Finn Wolfhard ruled the character in the first one. He’s funny, he’s aces at looking scared, and he can handle the heavy drama. He and Skarsgard make chunks of this movie worth watching. It Chapter Two drags the overall grade for both movies together to somewhere around a B-minus. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

The Lion King Jon Favreau (Elf, Iron Man) directs this photorealistic CGI remake of the 1994 Disney animated classic that features an impressive cast of voice actors, including Chiwetel Ejiofor, Donald Glover, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen, John Oliver and, naturally, James Earl Jones as Mufasa. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Overcomer

A Christian-based film about a high-school basketball coach who faces a crisis of faith and a new challenge as a mentor for an unlikely cross-country athlete. Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

This guy saves you money.

Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

The Peanut Butter Falcon

The story of teen boy with Down syndrome (Zack Gottsagen) who runs away and sets off on a journey to a wrestling camp to realize his dream of becoming a pro wrestler. Also starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson and Bruce Dern. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Rambo: Last Blood

Sylvester Stallone returns as traumatized Vietnam vet John Rambo, who has to conjure up his superior fighting skills when he ventures into Mexican drug cartel territory on “one final mission.” Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

Alvin Schwartz’s 1980s series of children’s scary short stories gets the cinematic horror treatment. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Luce

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com September 26, 2019

CN&R

31


32  

CN&R 

S ep t em b er 26 , 20 1 9


CHOW

STOP THE CYCLE

START THE HEALING Bubbles and buzz Taste-testing a new line of cannabis-infused sodas

Coften, satisfying way to consume the versatile plant. Too weed drinks are pungent in taste and putrid in

annabis-infused beverages are not always the most

scent, creating an off-putting drink that provides only a moderate high. Colorado-based Keef Brands has by attempted to overcome this dubious Jeremy reputation with its line of fizzy sodas, Winslow sparkling waters and low-calorie fruity mixers. Keef has been creating cannabis-infused products—edibles, concentrates, beverages and more—for more than a decade, and this summer, its Keef Cola portfolio of sodas finally made its way to dispensaries in Northern California. Naturally, I had to try them. Currently, there are only five Keef beverage varieties available in the Golden State: Blue Razz, Bubba Kush Root Beer, Keef Cola Original, Orange Kush and Purple Passion. Other flavors, not available in the state yet, include a Keef Cherry Cola and a tropicalflavored FLO Energy Soda. Keef also has a line of zero-calorie sparkling waters in lemon, raspberry, blackberry and blood orange flavors. I tasted three of the five sodas available—the root beer, the cola and Orange Kush. The Bubba Kush Root Beer is a smooth and creamy root beer, with sweet vanilla notes and a decadent molasses flavor that make it bold and rich, but not overbearing. It’s no wonder the drink won the High Times Cannabis Cup award for Best Edible in 2015. Keef Cola Original is the company’s OG soda, and it presents an in-your-face cola mouthfeel without much persistent tingling from carbonation, giving a

slightly sweet, subtly bubbly experience. And the Orange Kush is a tart, tangy drink with citrus notes that mirror Sunkist minus any overt sourness. Each is infused with 10 mg of THC (Keef also offers 100 mg versions of some flavors for medical use), and the sodas also contain added vitamins such as C, B3, B6 and B12 (a bit of nutrition never hurt). Not only does each flavor taste great, its effects are also immediate and all-encompassing. Though not explicitly stated, each Keef Cola flavor uses extracts from hybrid strains. They hit in the head first. The high is thick and dense like an indica, but not heavy enough to impose a “stuck” feeling. It then travels through the body, massaging and relaxing the muscles while keeping the psychological effects intact. The amount of THC in each beverage may not sound like much to canna-veterans, but 10 mg could be intimidating for the simply curious. Because of the evenness between its sweetness and the THC, plus the addition of a couple of milligrams of CBD, Keef sodas don’t feel like “too much,” a fate often associated with unbalanced cannabis drinks. Best of all, the company has mastered the process of infusing cannabis in a liquid without the residual aromatics. The THC extracts used in Keef sodas are tasteless and orderless and to my delight, there wasn’t an overpowering weed punch from any of the sodas. The overall result is a refreshing, thirst-quenching drink that’s tasty and provides an impactful but not overwhelming high. Keef has managed to live up to its hype, delivering excellent taste and satisfying effects. I’ll drink to that. Ω

SEXUAL VIOLENCE IS NOT A GENDER ISSUE, BUT A HUMAN ISSUE FACT: 9-10% of all rape survivors outside of a criminal institutions are male 16 years of age FACT: Many men experienced sexual abuse by the age of 18 FACT: The greatest age risk for males being sexual violated is age 4

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 Tehama: 530-529-3980 24hr CRISIS LINE: 530-342-RAPE (7273) Collect Calls Accepted SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

CN&R

33


IMPORTANT MESSAGE TO ALL AREA BUSINESSES: CN&R will never contact a person or business with intentions to sell a Best of Chico winner’s plaque. Any company attempting to do so is NOT associated with the Chico News & Review or the Best of Chico contest.

CN&R • 353 E. Second St. • Chico • 530-894-2300

ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

www.chicobestof.com

proSt! to Autumn Chico’s party season (aka the fall semester) ramps

A R R I V I N G O C T . 10 , 2019

sold out, so most of you will have to find something else to do. Here are a few much more low-key options for the week where at least you won’t have to stuff the girls into a dirndl or the boys into lederhosen.

• Pop-up breakfast: If you’re reading this early enough Thursday morning (Sept. 26), you might be able to make it down to alex Marshall studios in time for some amazing treats. Fresh-baked goodies from near and dear Baked Goods and locally roasted coffee from stoble Coffee are on the menu at the

! t n i o p

e h t o Get t

Can you tell a story in 59 (or six!) words?

up this week as sierra nevada Brewing Co. kicks off its two-weekend run of oktoberfest celebrations under the big tent by the hop yard. All four days are

Chapmantown ceramic studio at 1095 Nelson St.

• Writer’s Voice: The organizers of the Chico state literary arts reading series

Fiction 59 The Chico News & Review’s annual Fiction 59 flash-fiction contest is back. Submit your 59-word stories today for the chance to have your work published in the Fiction 59 issue of the CN&R, on stands Oct. 24. Winners also will be invited to share their works during a live reading at The Bookstore (118 Main St.) on Oct. 25. NEW THIS YEAR: Six-Word Stories Go really micro with your fiction and tell a story in only six words. Here’s a famous example (possibly by Ernest Hemingway): For sale: baby shoes, never worn. • Online and email entries preferred: Visit newsreview.com/fiction59 to submit, or email stories to fiction59@newsreview.com. You can also drop off or mail your entries to the CN&R office at 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA, 95928. • Stories can be on any topic, but must be exactly 59 words or six words. Count carefully. Every year we disqualify at least one amazing entry that has come in over or under by as little as one word. • Six-word stories will not be separated by age category. All other rules for Fiction 59 apply.

bring a different contemporary writer to Chico every month, and tonight (Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m.), Peruvian-American writer Juan alvarado Valvidia will speak on campus (Ayres Hall, room 120). In 2016, Valvidia’s first book, ¡Cancerlandia!: a Memoir, won the International Latino Book Award for Best Biography, and earlier this year, University of new Mexico Press published his short story collection, Ballad of slopsucker, which offers a “new perspective on the experiences of Latinos and Latinas in the United States and complicated ideas of nationhood, identity and the definition of home.”

• at the art house: The Pageant Theatre has had a steady lineup of special events alongside its regular film schedule lately, and this week there are two rad ones: tonight (Sept. 26, 7 p.m.), the Buffalo Field Campaign—champions of yellowstone’s wild buffalo—returns to town for a night of music, stories and videos with campaign founder Mike Mease and the “indigenous soul” music of Mignon Geli. And this weekend—Saturday (Sept. 28, 1 p.m.) and Sunday (Sept. 29, 7 p.m.)—the Pageant will feature two música norteña documentaries, Chulas Fronteras and del Mero Corazón.

Contest rules: newsreview.com/fiction59 34

CN&R

September 26, 2019

Buffalo Field Campaign

• Chico Zine Fest: It’s finally going down, a four-hour zine party with vendors, DIY workshops, speakers and all the zines. Saturday, Sept. 28, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at Blackbird. • Touch of Chico: Dude, chill. Seriously, you

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9: IN THE CN&R OFFICE AT 4:59 P.M. OR ONLINE AT 11:59 P.M.

Juan Alvarado Valvidia

Diane Suzuki at Touch of Chico

need to take your overworked, overstressed, over-it-all meatsack over to the Chico Creek nature Center this Sunday (Sept. 29, noon-6 p.m.) and have one of the many massage therapists at KZFR’s holistic festival put things right. This is the 18th year of the community radio station’s health-conscious fundraiser, and in addition to massage, there will be many other bodywork options available—reiki, acupressure, vibrational healing, etc.—plus, skill-shares and live music. Visit kzfr.org for more info.


REAL ESTATE

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the professionals at Century 21 Select 530.345.6618 www.C21SelectGroup.com 2354 Tiffany Way 3 bd 2 ba, Pool $419,000 2625 Lakewest Dr 3 bd 2 ba $459,900 2308 Ritchie Circle IN G $499,000 E N DSolar 5 bd 3.5 ba,PPool, 880 Whispering Winds S o lD $1,489,000

Steve Ka SprzyK (Kas-per-ziK) You don’t have to spell it for me to sell it! 28 years representing clients in our area Century 21 Select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com (530) 518–4850 License#01145231

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

UpdaTed HoMe in the Avenues located on a tree lined cul de sac. Home features 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. $310,000 adorable bUngaloW ngaloW located near downtown Chico. has a garage D IN G P E NHome and very large backyard. $275,000 Me across from Lindo ClassiC CHiCo HoMe Channel! HomePhas immaculate D IN G wood flooring EN and a park like back yard. $285,000

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

Large cuStom Home, 3 bed/3.5 bath, 3,528 sq feet on 5.95 acres, living rooms, music, play room, 30 X 50 shop, horse barn, creek, pond, gazebo ................................................................................................................................$849,000 Senior manufactured Home in gated park. 2 bed/2 bth, 1404 sq ft with 2-car garage, fenced yard, and lovely home! ................................................................................................................................................ $188,900 oWned SoLar! Wonderful Pebblewood Pines condo offering 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 1889 square feet with 2-car garage and more! ...........................................................................................................................................................$339,000

DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

PEN outdoor kitchen, fruit trees! ......................................................................................................................... $389,000 amazing monte Betty custom built home that offers 4 IN bedG 3 bath, 3,600 + sq ft with tile roof, RV parking, and PEND in-ground pool! .............................................................................................................................. ..............................................................................................................................................................$699,000

JoYcE TurnEr

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

Location, Location, Location 3/2 in California Park $315,000 3/2 close to Meriam Park $315,000

as a local realtor, i am here to help. call me!

trees and in-ground pool! ..............................................................................................................................................$779,900

eaSy maintenance toWnHouSe near shopping & Little Chico Creek Elementary, 3 bdr, 2 bth, 1375 sq ft......$245,000 neWer Home near ParK!, 3 bed/2 bth, 1,348 sq ft,D open G plan, gorgeous home! Vinyl pool, garden area, IN floor

Lic# 01506350

SMILES ALWAYS!

SearcHing for a Home?

WonderfuL 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 3,014 square feet on 1.71 acres. Features large rooms, shop/outbuilding, fruit

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925

Curious about your home’s value in today’s marketplace? Call me, I can help!

CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l (530) 520-3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Homes Sold Last Week

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc.

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of September 9 - September 13, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

3130 Shady Grove Ct 4267 Tuliyani Dr Foxfield Ct 136 W Frances Willard Ave 3260 Rogue River Dr 2708 Ceanothus Ave 3153 Rogue River Dr 353 Saint Augustine Dr 2050 Parkway Village Dr 1564 East Ave 226 Mission Serra Ter 1374 Lucy Way 610 Olive St 5 La Bella Ct 13011 Carmen Ln 1987 Belgium Ave 1169 Deschutes Dr 654 Victorian Park Dr 58 Roseanna Ct 1136 Sheridan Ave 1088 E 9th St 263 Cavalier Way

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

PRICE

$885,000 $839,000 $726,000 $625,000 $485,000 $470,000 $458,000 $430,000 $420,000 $398,500 $379,000 $354,091 $350,000 $350,000 $350,000 $330,000 $325,500 $325,000 $325,000 $305,000 $300,000 $300,000

BR/BA

4/3 4/3 4/3 3/2 4/2 5/4 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 2/1 4/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 4/2 2/1 3/2

SQ. FT.

3160 2726 2758 2005 2216 2287 1867 1782 1634 1125 1317 1402 673 1497 1461 1406 1407 1131 1416 1500 1202 1127

ADDRESS

1257 Locust St 922 Karen Dr 511 Cliffwood Ct 1300 Chestnut St 682 E 19th St 257 Connors Ave 1125 Sheridan Ave #29 Apt 384 W Lassen Ave 75 Galaxy Ave 459 Central House Rd 4 Coventry Dr 4587 Olive Hwy 2535 Oro Ave 5279 Parkdale Ave 5301 Harrison Rd 405 Sharon Ln 970 Wagstaff Rd 3903 Pentz Rd 3619 Connie Cir D Apt 3606 Connie Cir A Apt 3622 Connie Cir C Apt 3549 Connie Cir B

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$299,000 $295,000 $273,000 $270,000 $270,000 $262,000 $188,500 $180,500 $340,000 $330,000 $325,000 $306,500 $285,000 $250,000 $600,000 $300,000 $283,000 $250,000 $230,000 $230,000 $230,000 $230,000

3/1 3/1 2/2 3/1 2/1 3/3 2/2 2/1 3/3 3/3 3/2 4/2 3/2 4/2 3/3 2/2 2/2 1/1 2/2 2/2 2/2 2/2

September 26, 2019

SQ. FT.

1188 1143 1357 1280 960 1051 1148 1013 1710 1537 1764 984 1512 1179 2743 2084 1487 544 1224 1080 1284 1140

CN&R

35


CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE E

Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

For more information about advertising in our Real estate section,

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

call us at

(530) 894-2300

some upgrades.

Need a hand with your home purchase?

bidwell TiTle & esCrOw

With locations in:

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

saves you money! Inday’s

$10 Value You pay $3.50

65%

Need IRS Relief $10K = $125K+ Get Fresh Start or Forgiveness. Call 1-855-399-2890 Monday through Friday 7AM-5PM PST (AAN CAN) Struggling With Your Private Student Loan Payment? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888-670-5631 (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN) A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1-855-993-2495 (AAN CAN) COMPUTER ISSUES? FREE DIAGNOSIS by GEEKS ON SITE! Virus Removal, Data Recovery! 24/7 EMERGENCY $20 OFF ANY SERVICE with coupon 42522! Restrictions apply. 1-866-966-1581 (AAN CAN)

Livelinks - Chat Lines. Flirt, chat, and date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! 1-844-359-5773 (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled - it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-5359689 (AAN CAN) PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP. Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guaranteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN) Give Baby Up For Adoption? Living Expenses Paid. You Choose Family. Nationwide Agency. Talk With Us 24/7. 866-459-3369. Online Chat. Online Application. www.onetruegift.com. Text 515-778-2341. (AAN CAN) DISH TV - Over 190 Channels Now ONLY $69.99/mo! 2yr price guarantee, FREE Installation! Save HUNDREDS over Cable and DIRECTV. Add Internet as low as $14.95/mo! Call Now 1-800-373-6508 (AAN CAN)

Rant Restau 0.2593 Inday’s | 530.52 st 8th st Not redeemable for credit. 1043-B We g to California Civil Code Sections 1749.45-will1749.6. be given as store

accordin gratuity. Change e and does not expire Cannot be used for This is a gift certificat with other discounts and offers. cash. Can be used

Country Morning Bakery $5 Value You pay $3

GIFT CERTIF ICATE COUNTRY MORNING BAKERY ST. A,

CHICO 959 This is a gift certificat 28 | 530-899 e and does not expire Can be used with -0527 according to California other discounts and Civil Code Sections offers. Cannot be 1749.45-1749.6. used for gratuity. Not redeemable for Change will be given cash. as store credit.

5

SEpTEmbER 26, 2019

Claudia’s Relaxing Massage 10am-7pm in cool studio 530-893-0263 by appt. only. You can Google me!

off

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

CN&R

A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session. Ask 4 special rates 4 fire victims (530) 321-0664

40%

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

36

Denied Social Security Disability? Appeal! If you’re 50+, files for SSD and denied, our attorneys can help get you approved! No money out of pockets! Call 1-844-218-7289 (AAN CAN)

10

off

2625 AZTEC DR.

chat

Due to Retirement, very well established Tailoring Business in the middle of Downtown Chico is for sale. 126 W 3rd St., Chico, CA 95928 Call 530-895-3850

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EDELWEISS at 1933 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. KRISTEN FRIETSCHE 8 Rockerfeller Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTEN FRIETSCHE Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000953 this Legal Notice continues

Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADVENTURE QUEST at 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. DRUIN DANIEL HARVEY HEAL 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. ELIZABETH (HEAL) MARTIN 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DRUIN (DANIEL) HEAL Dated: August 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000982 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PLANT MADNESS at 3856 Cosby Ave Chico, CA 95928. JOHN FENDLEY 3856 Cosby Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN FENDLEY Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001005 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SANTINOS CATERING at 40 Quadra Ct Chico, CA 95928. KAELEN DAVIS 40 Quadra Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAELEN W. DAVIS Dated: August 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000994 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STEPHANIE KAY FILMS at 3117 Bay Ave Chico, CA 95973. STEPHANIE KAY VALDES 3117 Bay Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHANIE VALDES Dated: September 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001023 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUILDING MARKET INTELLIGENCE, MISSING MIDDLE METRICS, PELOTON RESEARCH ECONOMICS at 125 W 3rd Street, Suite 250 Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD FRANKLIN HUNT 1040 Macy Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD F. HUNT Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001007 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BENJAMIN’S INSURANCE SERVICES at 1661 Forest Avenue Unit 74 Chico, CA 95928. BENJAMIN HENRY 1661 Forest Avenue Unit 74 Chico, CA 95928. JODY HENRY 1661 Forest Avenue Unit 74 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: BENJAMIN HENRY Dated: August 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000929 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CORVO JEWELRY at 1293 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. CORVO LLC 1293 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: LILY ANN RAVEN, CEO Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000938 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BABY’S BREADS at 2654 Fair Street Chico, CA 95928. MARY OLIVER 2654 Fair Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARY OLIVER Dated: September 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001032 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name F.E.W. PRODUCTS at 5050 Cohasset Rd. Unit 50 Chico, CA 95973. LANCE A WALDSMITH 14064 Limousin Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LANCE A WALDSMITH Dated: September 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000418

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as 10-4 CONSTRUCTION at 15 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. SCOTT A MCCOLLUM 15 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT A MCCOLLUM Dated: July 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000825 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAMINA at 2560 Dominic Drive Ste A Chico, CA 95928. CAMINA BAKERY LLC 851 Netters Circle Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limitied Liability Company. Signed: TATTON WHITE, CFO Dated: September 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001018 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DAVE BOUL IT CONSULTING at 1312 Purcell Ln Chico, CA 95926. DAVID A BOUL 1312 Purcell Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID BOUL Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001048 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BRASS CONNECTION, SWING SHIFT at 702 Mangrove Ave Ste 165 Chico, CA 95926. TIMOTHY PAUL HOWEY 758 Cleveland Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIM P. HOWEY Dated: September 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001043 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RIVER OAK GARDENS at 754 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. KRISTA KNECHT 754 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. MATTHEW MORRISSEY 754 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KRISTA KNECHT Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001046 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EXCLUSIVE TATTOO CO. at 2109 Esplanade Ste 110 Chico, CA 95926. JOE ANTHONY SANCHEZ 1542 1/2 Citrus Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOE SANCHEZ Dated: August 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000989 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE COUNTY LOCAL FOOD NETWORK at 2483 Streamside Court Chico, CA 95926. PAMELA MARIE LARRY 2483 Streamside Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PAMELA LARRY Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001004 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BEST ASIAN MASSAGE at 1360 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL L ARIZA 1145 W 2nd St Apt 9 Chico, CA 95928. BEST ASIAN MASAGE 1145 W 2nd St Apt 9 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: M. L. ARIZA Dated: September 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001051 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE DARLING BEE at 8995 Troxel Road Chico, CA 95928. AMANDA WYLIE DARLING 8995 Troxel Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMANDA DARLING Dated: September 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001068 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BBMP WEALTH MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE SERVICES at 1074 East Ave Ste. K3 Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL BELLOTTI 26 Striped Moss Ct Roseville, CA 95678. CHRISTOPHER BODNEY 9 Hidden Grove Ct Chico, CA 95926. SCOTT MARCUS 11000 E Woodbridge Rd Acamp, CA 95220. MATTHEW PATTERSON 9488 Skye Court Granite Bay, CA 95746. This business is conducted by Copartners. Signed: CHRISTOPHER BODNEY Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001002 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO ECSTATIC DANCE COLLECTIVE at 1988 Wild Oak Lane Chico, CA 95928. MARY EWING this Legal Notice continues


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY 222 W. Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95973. EVELYN LAWSON 2107 Shoshone Chico, CA 95926. GLEN ORCUTT 1988 Wild Oak Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: GLEN ORCUTT Dated: September 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001038 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MATA CLOTHING at 617 Hayfork Creek Terrace Chico, CA 95973. EDUARDO MATA 617 Hayfork Creek Terrace Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EDUARDO MATA Dated: September 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001076 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DELPHINE at 180 Pauletah Place Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER CRANE 180 Pauletah Place Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER CRANE Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001045 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HALEY MUSIC THERAPY, THE MUSIC INITIATIVE at 138 West 22nd Street Chico, CA 95928. HALEY MUSIC THERAPY 138 West 22nd Street Chico, CA 95928. ERIN HALEY 2 Aldrin Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ERIN HALEY, PRESIDENT Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001047 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOHN MARK KRAMER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JOHN MARK KRAMER Proposed name: JACK MARK KRAMER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. this Legal Notice continues

Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 23, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 30, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02631 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LONNIE JERAMIAH JUNGERS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LONNIE JERAMIAH JUNGERS Proposed name: LONNIE KENNETH HOWLAND THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 17, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02738 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ROSEMARY AMANDA BELAK filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ROSEMARY AMANDA BELAK Proposed name: ROSEMARY OCHOA MEDELLIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written this Legal Notice continues

objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: September 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02708 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VANESSA MARIE PULLEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VANESSA MARIE PULLEY Proposed name: VANNESSA MARIE GRAMPS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: September 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02724 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT PAUL JOSEPH GHIMENTI You have been sued by petitioner: GRACE ANN GHIMENTI You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. this Legal Notice continues

For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court Of California County of Glenn Willows Branch - Main Courthouse 526 West Sycamore St Willows, CA 95988 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: GRACE ANN GHIMENTI 425 E Walker St Orland, CA 95963 Signed: CINDIA MARTINEZ Dated: May 14, 2019 Case Number: 19FL06504 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHERI L. MEYERS, aka SHERI LYNN MEYERS To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHERI L. MEYERS, aka SHERI LYNN MEYERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JUSTIN MEYERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUSTIN MEYERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a this Legal Notice continues

notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: JUSTIN MEYERS, IN PRO PER 6447 Hollywood Rd., #3 Magalia, CA 95954 Case Number: 19PR00399 Published: September 12,19,26, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JANET P. BECK, aka JANET PENNY BECK, aka JANET BECK, aka PENNY BECK To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JANET P. BECK, aka JANET PENNY BECK, aka JANET BECK, aka PENNY BECK A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DANIELLE LECLERC KLEIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DANIELLE LECLERC KLEIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or this Legal Notice continues

CLaSSIfIEdS

CONTINUED ON 38

For the week oF September 26, 2019

by rob brezSny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Comedian

John Cleese speaks of two different modes toward which we humans gravitate. The closed style is tight, guarded, rigid, controlling, hierarchical and tunnel-visioned. The open is more relaxed, receptive, exploratory, democratic, playful and humorous. I’m pleased to inform you that you’re in a phase when spending luxurious amounts of time in the open mode would be dramatically healing to your mental health. Luckily, you’re more predisposed than usual to operate in that mode. I encourage you to experiment with the possibilities.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You could

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Upcoming

adventures could test your poise and wit. They may activate your uncertainties and stir you to ask provocative questions. That’s cause for celebration, in my opinion. I think you’ll benefit from having your poise and wit tested. You’ll generate good fortune for yourself by exploring your uncertainties and asking provocative questions. You may even thrive and exult and glow like a miniature sun. Why? Because you need life to kick your ass in just the right gentle way so you will become alert to possibilities you have ignored or been blind to.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Novelist

John Irving asked, “Who can distinguish between falling in love and imagining falling in love? Even genuinely falling in love is an act of the imagination.” That will be a helpful idea for you to contemplate in the coming weeks. Why? Because you’re more likely than usual to fall in love or imagine falling in love—or both. And even if you don’t literally develop a crush on an attractive person or deepen your intimacy with a person you already care for, I suspect you will be inflamed with an elevated lust for life that will enhance the attractiveness of everything and everyone you behold.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You know

your body is made of atoms, but you may not realize that every one of your atoms is mostly empty space. Each nucleus contains more than 99% of the atom’s mass, but is as small in comparison to the rest of the atom as a pea is to a cathedral. The tiny electrons, which comprise the rest of the basic unit, fly around in a vast, deserted area. So we can rightfully conclude that you are mostly made of nothing. That’s a good meditation right now. The coming weeks will be a fine time to enjoy the refreshing pleasures of emptiness. The less frenzy you stir up, the healthier you’ll be. The more spacious you allow your mind to be, the smarter you’ll become. “Roomy” and “capacious” will be your words of power.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “We don’t always

have a choice about how we get to know one another,” wrote novelist John Irving. “Sometimes, people fall into our lives cleanly—as if out of the sky, or as if there were a direct flight from Heaven to Earth.” This principle could be in full play for you during the coming weeks. For best results, be alert for the arrival of new allies, future colleagues, unlikely matches and surprise helpers.

call the assignment I have for you as “taking a moral inventory” or you could refer to it as “going to confession.” I think of it as “flushing out your worn-out problems so as to clear a space for better, bigger, more interesting problems.” Ready? Take a pen and piece of paper or open a file on your computer and write about your raw remorse, festering secrets, unspeakable apologies, inconsolable guilt and desperate mortifications. Deliver the mess to me at Truthrooster@gmail.com. I’ll print out your testimony and conduct a ritual of purgation. As I burn your confessions in my bonfire at the beach, I’ll call on the Goddess to purify your heart and release you from your angst. (P.S.: I’ll keep everything confidential.)

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Two hundred years ago, Sagittarian genius Ludwig Beethoven created stirring music that’s often played today. He’s regarded as one of history’s greatest classical composers. And yet he couldn’t multiply or divide numbers. That inability made it hard for him to organize his finances. He once wrote about himself that he was “an incompetent business man who is bad at arithmetic.” Personally, I’m willing to forgive those flaws and focus on praising him for his soul-inspiring music. I encourage you to practice a similar approach with yourself in the next two weeks. Be extra lenient and merciful and magnanimous as you evaluate the current state of your life. In this phase of your cycle, you need to concentrate on what works instead of on what doesn’t.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

“When you hit a wall—of your own imagined limitations—just kick it in,” wrote playwright Sam Shepard. That seems like a faulty metaphor to me. Have you ever tried to literally kick in a wall? I just tried it, and it didn’t work. I put on a steel-toe work boot and launched it at a closet door in my basement, and it didn’t make a dent. Plus now my foot hurts. So what might be a better symbol for breaking through your imagined limitations? How about this: Use a metaphorical sledgehammer or medieval battering ram or backhoe. (P.S. Now is a great time to attend to this matter.)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In North

America, people call the phone number 911 to report an emergency. In much of the European Union, the equivalent is 112. As you might imagine, worry-warts sometimes use these numbers even though they’re not experiencing a legitimate crisis. For example, a Florida woman sought urgent aid when her local McDonald’s ran out of Chicken McNuggets. In another case, a man walking outdoors just after dawn spied a blaze of dry vegetation in the distance and notified authorities. But it turned out to be the rising sun. I’m wondering if you and yours might be prone to false alarms like these in the coming days. Be aware of that possibility. You’ll have substantial power if you marshal your energy for real dilemmas and worthy riddles, which will probably be subtle.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I just cut my

cLipstick. “An hour ago I shocked myself by making an impulse buy of a perfect cashmere trench coat from a stranger loitering in a parking lot,” testifies another Libran blogger who refers to himself as MaybeMaybeNot. “Today I had the sudden realization that I needed to become a watercolor painter, then signed up for a watercolor class that starts tomorrow,” writes a Libran blogger named UsuallyPrettyCareful. In normal times, I wouldn’t recommend that you engage in actions that are so heedlessly and delightfully spontaneous. But I do now.

bangs in a gas station bathroom,” confesses a Libran blogger who calls herself Magi-

1965, Chinese archaeologists found an untarnished 2,400-year-old royal bronze sword that was still sharp and shiny. It was intricately accessorized with turquoise and blue crystals, precision designs and a silk-wrapped grip. I propose we make the Sword of Goujian one of your symbolic power objects for the coming months. May it inspire you to build your power and authority by calling on the spirits of your ancestors and your best memories. May it remind you that the past has gifts to offer your future. May it mobilize you to invoke beauty and grace as you fight for what’s good and true and just.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “All human

beings have three lives: public, private and secret,” wrote Piscean novelist Gabriel García Márquez. I will add that during different phases of our lives, one or the other of these three lives might take precedence; may need more care than usual. According to my analysis, your life in the coming weeks will offer an abundance of vitality and blessings in the third area: your secret life. For best results, give devoted attention to your hidden depths. Be a brave explorer of your mysterious riddles.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. September 26, 2019

CN&R

37


the Cn&r Artbox Proje ProjeCt is looking for creative minds to to transform our newsracks into functional works of art.

Contact mattd@newsreview.com to find out more!

cn&r is Looking for • advertising consuLtant • distribution driver Do you love Chico? Do youwant to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

for more information, visit www.newsreview.com/chico/jobs

equal OppORTuNiTy emplOyeR

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

artists!

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque

We Need

contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: September 12, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00413 Published: September 19,26, October 3, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ROBERT LEE BOYD aka BOBBY L. BOYD To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ROBERT LEE BOYD aka BOBBY L. BOYD A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BRIAN K. BOYD in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: BRIAN K. BOYD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-IV Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written this Legal Notice continues

38

CN&R

September 26, 2019

objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC, ESQ. P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: September 12, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00414 Published: September 19,26, October 3, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ISABEL A. WEBB To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ISABEL A. WEBB A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARK MAXEMIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARK MAXEMIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting this Legal Notice continues

of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Avenue Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: September 16, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00423 Published: September,26, October 3,10, 2019

Save up to

50% s on restaurant ! ts en and ev

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com


September 26, 2019

CN&R

39


KNOW YOUR RIGHTS ANY sexual activity that is UNWANTED, UNWILLING OR UNINVITED

It is a complete sentence

...is NON-CONSENSUAL & AGAINST THE LAW!

ALL VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT WILL RECEIVE A FREE FORENSIC MEDICAL EXAMINATION, regardless of whether or not they choose to participate in the criminal justice process.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS ABOUT SEXUAL ASSAULT.

If you or someone you know has been sexually violated, Contact Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention.

IF CONFIDENTIALITY IS IMPORTANT TO YOU...

WE ARE HERE TO LISTEN

24hr CRISIS LINE: 530-342-RAPE (7273) Collect Calls Accepted

Butte/Glenn: 530-891-1331 or 877-452-9588 Tehama: 530-529-3980 Calling from Corning: 530-824-3980 2889 Cohasset Rd., Ste 2, Chico • 725 Pine St., Red Bluff Business office: Monday-Friday 10am-6pm, excluding holidays

Profile for News & Review

20190926 104006  

CNR SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

20190926 104006  

CNR SEPTEMBER 26, 2019