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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 4 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

LASERS CAUSED

CAMP FIRE!

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CONSPIRACY ISSUE

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16 STRIKE ON FRIDAY

31 SEX HOGS, THE SEQUEL


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INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 4 • September 19, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY SERENE LUSANO

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Lisa Van Der Maelen, Jim Williams, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Publications Art Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

The fight of (and for) our lives A dozen years ago, the CN&R launched a weekly

section committed to covering environmentalism in the North State. Chico and the surrounding communities have given us a wealth of subjects from which to choose over the years. Name a local sustainability leader, organization or effort and chances are we’ve written about it in Greenways. As of this writing, 657 stories have been published in that section of the newspaper. Meanwhile, countless other environmental-themed topics have been featured in Newslines and as cover stories. Five years ago, our series on the drought was honored with a statewide award for best environmental coverage. All that is to say, this newspaper recognizes the media’s role in the climate crisis. We’ve long known that heat-trapping greenhouse gases were harming the planet and jeopardizing life as we know it. As journalists, we want to be part of the solution by underscoring the importance of curbing emissions and the consequences of ignoring scientists’ warnings about what might occur should the status quo continue. We’re talking about increasing extreme weather events, glacial melt, drought, famine, rising seas, species extinction, coral reefs dying, etc. Climate change was driven home for some people following the Camp Fire—a disaster worsened by years of drought and

extreme heat attributed to our warming planet. Climate change poses an existential threat to every life on Earth. This isn’t hyperbole. Scientists have spent decades studying its effects. So has our government. Fifteen years ago, a U.S. Pentagon report outlined the national security implications: climate-driven disasters causing the world’s populations to turn on each other while securing food, water and energy. Sadly, skepticism remains and inaction (and regression) is the result. Case in point: the Trump administration rolling back environmental regulations and pulling the United States from the Paris Agreement at a time when climate action is more significant than ever. Part of the problem is that the media have not covered climate change as the most significant and pressing issue of our lifetime. We hope that’s changing. This week and next the CN&R is participating in the Covering Climate Now project (look for the logo throughout the paper), a collaboration of hundreds of news organizations led by The Nation and Columbia Journalism Review to increase and improve coverage of the issue. It coincides with the United Nations Climate Action Summit in New York on Monday (Sept. 23). Joining the project is our way of recommitting to our longstanding coverage and also acknowledging that we must do more. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Americans deserve universal health care TNeedless by the likes of the USSR and Nazi Germany. to say, both versions have proven to be among he term “socialism” was usurped and bastardized

the most spectacular failures in modern history. Let’s not confuse it with the contemporary style of social democracy, which happens to be a significant component in a multiparty system that is practiced by many of our friends, partners and NATO allies, yet routinely is besmirched and vilified here, when it serves U.S. corporate/government interests. In the wake of World War II, parts of Europe embraced this by unique style of capitalism, which Joe Bahlke promotes the creation and mainteThe author, who was born in Germany, lives nance of a solid infrastructure by providing an array of citizen-friendly in Red Bluff. systems and entitlements intended to serve and balance the needs of its people with the pursuit of corporate profit. For instance: tax-funded universal health care for everyone regardless of pre-existing conditions, covering

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dental care, prescription drugs, cost of hospitalization and guaranteed continuation of wages for six months, extended paid maternity leave, four weeks paid vacation, automatic (not welfare) subsidies for families with children … and many more, too numerous to list here. Take Germany as an example. There, parameters similar to those noted above create stability and provide an even playing field, a decent standard of living, along with an environment in which the elite and corporations are held accountable. Though companies are taxed at a higher rate, they nevertheless are able to prosper and flourish as part of a stable economy. Meanwhile, in the States, our so-called benefits include routine denial of medical service. The American dream has become a nightmare for many of our citizens as a result. The chasm between rich and poor keeps expanding, while the standard of living and quality of life here, once No. 1 in the world, has now sunk to 17th, according to the 2019 Quality of Life rankings. (Canada is No. 1.) Isn’t it about time to follow the example set by so much of the civilized world by creating/providing a similar program for our citizens? We certainly deserve better. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Barely mayor Randall Stone is still the mayor of Chico. But those paying attention know he hung onto that role by the skin of his teeth. That became clear during the City Council’s regular meeting Tuesday evening (Sept. 17) as the panel considered Councilman Sean Morgan’s request to reconsider his appointment to that position. That is, Morgan, the previous mayor of Chico, was hoping the panel would dethrone Stone (see Ashiah Scharaga’s report on page 9). First, though, he needed to persuade the liberal-majority council to put his request on a future agenda. Alas, it wasn’t meant to be. Stone largely has Councilman Karl Ory to thank for that. Himself a former mayor, Ory trumped Morgan’s request with a strategic submotion to reject the proposal. He also changed the focus of the conversation from Stone’s purported failures of leadership to the divisiveness of Morgan’s request and what a waste of time it was considering the issues facing the city. Prior to that, the narrative centered on grievances from the dais—on both sides of the ideological divide. Though the embattled Stone wasn’t technically on the chopping block that night, it certainly seemed like it. In making his motion to agendize a mayoral reconsideration, Morgan read a long statement that, among other things, alleged Stone had attacked local police officers and business owners on social media. He offered no proof, but it wouldn’t surprise me. Stone has a penchant for poking the bear from behind a keyboard. Interestingly, in his comments, Morgan acknowledged that he hadn’t set a good example during his tenure as mayor. He also said the public should move beyond “incivility … recalls and other shenanigans. We need to set policy, respect those who carry it out— even when we disagree with them—and set an example for others.” Amen to those things. What I also found surprising were the comments by Councilwoman Ann Schwab and Councilman Scott Huber. Schwab seized the moment to gently—and indirectly—chide Stone. She explained how an unnamed person had informed her that she’d been accused of conspiring with a conservative activist and siding with the group attempting to recall Stone and Ory. “Power, sanctions, bullying and retaliations have no place at this dais or a backroom,” she said. Schwab should know—she was appointed to two consecutive terms as mayor, the second one in 2010 by unanimous vote of a panel that included conservatives Larry Wahl and Mark Sorensen. Councilman Scott Huber gave a more pointed assessment, including that numerous council members felt “disparaged, bullied and ignored” by the mayor. He offered up the best advice of the night: Learn from mistakes, be open to critique, avoid defensiveness, apologize when wrong, and practice humility. Stone’s response to the criticism was, well, strange. It included giving a rambling speech that mentioned the recent mass shooting in Gilroy, race (his maternal grandparents are from Mexico), and the collective trauma of the community following the Camp Fire. He acknowledged he has “the warmth of a dead fish,” but he didn’t offer an apology. He couched his comments about changing as an effort the entire body needed to take up. Will he change? Maybe so. Given what happened at the meeting, he definitely has an incentive.


LETTERS

DONATE YOUR CAR

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Speak up on climate Worried about the climate? This Friday (Sept. 20) is the Worldwide Climate Strike. Support climate action by showing up at 11 a.m.1 p.m. at the Chico City Plaza. Use your superpowers to support action. Most importantly: Stop the polite silence. We have to talk about this. As much as possible— with everyone. If you don’t do anything else, please do that! Be public. How? Take a selfie with a hand-held sign, then post it on Facebook, Instagram, etc. Use #ActOnClimate #ButteStrong to make searching easy and help us to show the faces of concerned people to our politicians. Phone your representative once a month. Sign up with ProjectGrandCanyon.com to be reminded by text or email. Go to EnvironmentalVoter.org to prove environmentalists can

vote. Pledge to vote and be a superhero. Julie Heath Chico

Protect the kids Re “Cannabis to council” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Cooper) and “More common sense, less emotion” (Editorial, Sept. 12): Who is the most “vulnerable” in our city? Is it the young children walking our streets or the homeless in our midst? Our Chico City Council has been listening to rooms full of kind-hearted, well-meaning Chico residents. This liberal-dominated council in just a few short months will bring pot shops for recreational marijuana use to a store near you. Oh, yes—they’ll be sure to require a 1,000-foot “buffer zone” around our schools (as though our schoolchildren don’t walk that distance—and more—to

and from schools). Next up for us living in Chico is the needle distribution proposal. Remember, it’s not exchange, it’s distribution! How is this endeavor going to reduce harm to our children who’ll be targeted as potential customers for IV abusers? Needles in our playgrounds, parks and streets. It’s not a family-first agenda for our current City Council! I ask again: Who is the most vulnerable population in Chico? This current council, save for two, should all be recalled. Keep Chico from becoming a drug mecca. Sign the recall petitions or email RecallStone&Ory@gmail.com. Loretta Ann Torres Chico

Editor’s note: The Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition’s efforts, including its naloxone distribution, are funded not locally but by the state of California. LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

Production of the Impossible Burger avoids most of the consumptive processes of beef production, which is notorious for using prodigious quantities of water and energy ... —don miller

Green angle missed Re “Across enemy lines” (Chow, by Jason Cassidy, Sept. 5): I appreciate the attention given to Burger King’s new Impossible Whopper, as part of a review of recent arrivals on the local fast-food scene, but it seems the article is missing an important point. The great value of products like the Impossible Whopper is offering alternatives to consumers who crave fast food such as burgers, but without the undesired impacts of raising animals for food. The reviewer admits the “beef” patty tastes fine on its own, much like a real fastfood burger. But the comparison truly stops there. Production of the Impossible Burger avoids most of the consumptive processes of beef production, which is notorious for using prodigious quantities of water and energy, not to mention the release of heat-trapping greenhouse gases responsible for a major portion of humancaused climate change. As I understand it, the mission of the developer of the Impossible Burger (Impossible Foods) was to offer a sustainable and humane alternative to meat for the average consumer. The Popeyes’ chicken sandwich does not provide that alternative.

down on the Bahamas and the eastern shore of the United States, Donald Trump did not fiddle; instead, he golfed. Displaying his own brand of ineffectual leadership, he helicoptered between his luxury golf resorts in New Jersey and Virginia, with cameo stopovers at Camp David. Meanwhile, tens of thousands lost their life’s identity and were left homeless and destitute, and the death toll in the Bahamas is rising. There are people who say those that tear down Trump hate America. Not so. We hate what he is doing to America: diminishing its status in the world; destroying policies that protect our environment; showing disregard for people who don’t fit the mold of what his tiny brain believes are true Americans. Trump cares not for the wellbeing of America, but only for the power it has given him, and how he can use it to enrich his family’s fortune. Roger S. Beadle Chico

More on POTUS It is time for us to properly address the current U.S. president in a more personal, meaningful way. Using the personal pronoun “he.” Let’s use this as follows: President Therump—thus the pronoun in his name. Lee Edwards Cherokee

Don Miller Chico

The Donald golfs In July of 64 A.D., a great fire ravaged Rome for six days, destroying 70 percent of the city and leaving half its population homeless. History recounts Nero fiddling while Rome burned; the actions of an ineffectual leader in a time of crisis. As Hurricane Dorian bore 6

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September 19, 2019

Write a letter tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. deadline for publication is noon on the tuesday prior to publication.


STREETALK

Any conspiracy theory seem plausible to you? Asked at Chico farmers’ market

Eric Johnson restaurant assistant manager

The one about JFK. I really don’t believe some random person just assassinated him. I feel it was set up as part of a higher plan. Oh, and O.J. [Simpson] did it. That’s a conspiracy as well.

Marilou Watson farmers’ market vendor

I’m honestly not convinced that the Camp Fire was an accident. Some things just don’t add up. Like the way a whole block of houses all burned, but the mailboxes all remain and the recycling containers were not touched. It feels like an attack.

Carl Schultz mechanic

I don’t think it’s merely a theory. It’s a conspiracy fact about the high-altitude aerosol spraying by forces unknown, or the militaryindustrial complex. It is changing and weaponizing our weather and exacerbating climate change.

Cecilia Pace nurse

I don’t really believe in the conspiracy theories I hear. I hear a lot about them, but they don’t resonate with me and they don’t have enough evidence. They’re just used to get people’s emotions worked up without a concrete solution.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE POWER TO THE PEOPLE

Chico and Butte County are that much closer to launching a program that will allow residents and businesses to choose alternative power providers. Last week, the Butte County Board of Supervisors adopted an ordinance to create a community choice aggregation, and on Tuesday (Sept. 17), the Chico City Council followed suit. Moving forward, the agencies will work together to create a joint powers authority, a collective governing body that will create program offerings and guidelines to get Butte Choice Energy off the ground. A launch date has been set for 2021. Such programs typically have tiers for people to choose from, with base rates matching PG&E’s grid mix of 33 percent energy from renewable sources, climbing to as much as 100 percent renewables.

ANOTHER DEATH ON THE STREET

Around 4:15 p.m. on Tuesday (Sept. 17), Chico police received a call of a deceased man outside the Chico Gospel Hall on Magnolia Avenue, according to a press release. The death likely was caused by a medical condition, they say, but an investigation is underway and identification is pending notification of next of kin. This is at least the fourth person to die on the streets of Chico this year. The CN&R previously reported that Wilson “Grant” Tyler and Jason Hicks both passed in June (see “Fatal conditions,” Newslines, June 27). Tyler technically died at the hospital, but had collapsed at the City Plaza from multiple organ failure and pneumonia; Hicks died of pneumonia. Robert Johnson’s body was found outside Chico Scrap Metal July 3; the Coroner’s Office confirmed he’d died of an alcohol and drug overdose.

CITY LAUNCHES WEB FORUM

The city of Chico launched a new online portal last week that makes it easier for the public to interact with the City Council. “Engaged Chico” allows people to submit public comments on council agendas electronically, as well as share civic ideas, take surveys and discuss upcoming city projects. It also gives residents the chance to sign up to speak at council meetings ahead of time. City Clerk Debbie Presson (pictured) said this program helps local residents get engaged even if they cannot attend meetings. “I truly believe that with these new tools, citizens will find it easier to have their voices be heard,” she said. Go to chico-ca.granicusideas.com to find out more or to sign up. 8

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

Reinvigorating recovery Author offers advice for communities struck by trauma, disaster

Rpeople, Conn., after a gunman fatally shot 26 including 20 children, at Sandy ich Harwood was called into Newtown,

Hook Elementary School. The town, struck with trauma, was story and confronting what to do photo by with the school buildAndre Byik ing. Raze it? Move it? Rebuild? and re b @ n ew srev i ew. c o m Harwood, who holds a master’s in public affairs from Princeton University and founded the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation—a Bethesda, Md.-based consulting firm—led the task force charged with bringing a recommendation forward. Ultimately, the town voted to destroy the building and rebuild on the same site. “The uncertainty about the future of Sandy Hook Elementary had little to do with bricks and mortar,” Harwood told The Washington Post in 2013. “On the surface, it appeared to be about a building. It’s really about a community coming to grips with the trauma and the despair it is feeling.” On Monday (Sept. 16), Harwood touched down in another region grappling

with trauma: Butte County. The author is on a speaking tour to support his new book, Stepping Forward: A Positive, Practical Path to Transform Our Communities and Our Lives, and he arrived at the invitation of county library officials. He toured firedevastated Paradise before leading a discussion at Chico State where educators, elected officials and those involved with Camp Fire response sought ways to reinvigorate enthusiasm for the recovery efforts and confront challenges that existed before the fire and may have been exacerbated because of it. Like in Newtown, Harwood told the CN&R, he got a sense that those affected by the Camp Fire, which claimed at least 86 lives and ravaged Paradise, Magalia, Concow and Butte Creek Canyon, are still coming to grips with the event nearly a year after the fact. “People have a desire—and really a need—to share their feelings,” he said. “To share their story, to share their sense of grief and to share their sense of hope that something positive can happen moving forward.” Harwood said his visit wasn’t meant as a way to commentate on the challenges in

Paradise and elsewhere in Butte County. He wasn’t familiar with the specifics, he said, and he wasn’t hired to consult the county or town. But his experience working in communities that have faced traumatic events—like the economic crisis that racked Flint, Mich., in the 1990s following auto plant closures—has given him some insight regarding how residents, organizations and government can work together toward longterm recovery. “Look, Butte County had a set of challenges before the Camp Fire,” Harwood said. “Those challenges probably still exist and maybe have been exacerbated—like housing. And so how is it that you can use this unspeakable event to make the community even stronger than before?” Seated in a conference room in Colusa Hall

at Chico State, Larry Olmstead, CEO of United Way of Northern California, had the same question. Olmstead said there are multiple issues wound up in the disaster, including socioeconomic status, rural vs. urban recovery efforts, and homelessness. What, Olmstead asked, has Harwood learned that


Rich Harwood, author and founder of the Harwood Institute of Public Innovation, stopped at the Paradise library before touring the firedevastated town.

could be helpful to Butte County? “To be honest, I’ve never worked in a community that’s faced a natural disaster of this size,” Harwood said. “I doubt there are very many communities that have faced natural disaster as concentrated as this.” Nevertheless, Harwood noted there likely is an overlap of issues that existed before the Camp Fire and after it. They could be issues related to health, education and poverty. Find those overlapping issues and begin to address them at the same time, he said. As an example, Harwood said efforts by school psychologists to provide mental health resources to students and staff could be used as a model to address mental health issues long-term (see “Stressing support in schools,” Healthlines, July 4). “At the heart of our work is the notion of intentionality,” he said. “We need to make intentional choices. I think in our work in communities, we make too many implicit choices—they’re not explicit enough—and we’re unwilling to make choices a lot of times. We want to be all things to all people. We don’t want to acknowledge we have limited resources. … I think our unwillingness to make intentional choices is one of the things that holds us back.” There was also the question of “compassion fatigue.” Immediately after the Camp Fire hit, one attendee told Harwood, it seemed as if the entire community banded together. Tears were shared between store clerks and patrons. Help was offered in abundance. Now, it seems some people are tired of hearing about the disaster, and tired of dealing with it. How can that feeling of compassion be reinvigorated? Harwood noted that part of the issue may be related to trauma. People affected by the disaster could be feeling a sense of hopelessness, and their personal recovery may be in a state that can exude negativity. There also could be a feeling of numbness permeating throughout the community, a feeling of, “Get over it.” It’s important, the author said, for those ready and willing to help with recovery efforts to find their allies. “As hard as it may be, and maybe as frustrating and enraging as it may be,” Harwood said, “I would urge you to try not to use as a measure [of enthusiasm] whether or not the whole community still can remain in the honeymoon stage, because it will only set us up for grave disappointment.” Ω

Hot seat Mayor keeps position after tense exchange; council comes together on housing, homeless initiatives

Ten months into Randall Stone’s tenure as Chico’s

mayor, members of the City Council found themselves weighing whether to consider revoking his leadership role on Tuesday (Sept. 17). The move was prompted by a proposal from conservative Councilman Sean Morgan, though it appeared a rift had been festering between council members, regardless of political views. After a lengthy discussion, a vote ultimately fell on ideological lines, with the progressives deciding to nix reconsideration of Stone’s appointment. For a meeting with several contentious subjects on the agenda, discourse was noticeably civil. The panel even passed a number of seemingly controversial agenda items with broad support. That included topics related to affordable housing on city land and a jobs program for those who are homeless. More than half of the public’s comments from the business from the floor portion of the meeting related to Stone, with about a dozen people offering criticism, including of his choice to silence a speaker at the last council meeting (see “Making changes,” Newslines, Sept. 5). Some called for him to step down, alleging hypocrisy and a lack of civility. A couple of people waved signs that read “give up the gavel.”

When it came time to discuss Stone’s position at the meeting’s end, Morgan said he wished to rescind the vote he’d cast in December because he no longer felt comfortable with Stone’s behavior in the chambers and on social media, or his “indiscriminate application of rules.” Councilman Scott Huber stated that “a number of councilors feel they’ve been disparaged, bullied and ignored by the mayor.” Councilwoman Ann Schwab shared similar sentiments. Huber asked Stone directly: “Can you tell us if you have any plans to change the way that you interact with your fellow councilors or the community, and what

SIFT ER

The Chico City Council contemplates whether to reconsider Mayor Randall Stone’s (right) appointment. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

would they be?” Though Stone said he was disappointed about how this discussion came up, he added that he understood why. He cited his disposition and the collective trauma the community is experiencing post-Camp Fire, among other things. “I’m committed to communicating more effectively and more routinely, and with more civility amongst us all,” he said. “Have mistakes been made? Absolutely. I can tick them off. I know the biggies. Can we do better? Absolutely. Will we? Absolutely. And that starts with me.” Though Schwab appeared torn when it came time to vote, she chose to side with her progressive colleagues, adding that “this evening gave us an opportunity to discuss and address ways we can move forward.” In other council news, the panel unanimously

Climate change’s economic cost Several experts recently addressed Congress regarding the economic impacts of climate change, and they had some surprising conclusions to report. First off, it’s already cost the U.S. government $1 trillion, a number that stands to grow to $5 trillion by 2050. That’s according to Marshall Burke, an economist and assistant professor of earth system science at Stanford. Among the highlights of the report, given by Burke and scientists, were some key foreseeable economic impacts: • Cognitive decline and lost productivity: “We have strong evidence that workers in all industries are less productive when it’s hot,” Burke said.

• Civil unrest and violent crime: “[V]iolent assault, sexual violence and homicide all increase on days or months where temperatures are above normal.” • Increased immigration and income inequality: “[E]conomic damages from climate change will be many times higher in poorer counties as compared to wealthier counties.” • Insurance collapse: The industry faces economic uncertainty—a phenomenon we’ve seen first-hand post-Camp Fire.

Source: Forbes

voted to seek ideas from the public on how best to use city land to create affordable housing. City staff specifically recommended considering four large, vacant parcels at the northwest corner of Bruce and Humboldt roads for new development. Council members also encouraged the community to think outside the box. Schwab suggested public-private partnerships to co-locate housing with parking lots, stores and even the Chico Transit Center. “I think this would be an exciting prospect, where we could help improve some of our facilities and that would be a way for NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

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c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 9

the city to be that partner,” she said. “When we’re looking for city property, we don’t have a lot of it available.” Morgan anticipated some people would be shocked by his aye vote, so he explained that this could drum up some interesting conversation, and “it’s irresponsible not to allow the discussion.” Another initiative that received support across ideological lines was Huber’s proposal to look into a homeless jobs program. In general, these programs provide work to the unhoused that include cleaning up blighted city areas. An ad hoc committee will review such programs elsewhere and discuss whether one could financially pencil-out for Chico. Some service providers in attendance were split on the topic. Angela McLaughlin, Safe Space Winter Shelter board president, said she was open to discussing the concept, but she was concerned about the efficacy without a comprehensive approach that included enough shelter beds or housing for the individuals who would participate. “It feels like it’s almost pandering to a group of the community that says, ‘Well, they should just get a job,’ without taking into account the whole spectrum of issues we’re encountering,” she said. In contrast, Patrick Newman, of Chico Friends on the Street, said that people have to give those on the streets opportunities to live a dignified life, and this provides a counter-narrative to the claim that homeless people are destroying the town. “What you’re trying to do then is to humanize, include and socialize people on the streets,” he said. “This is a matter of how people see this population, and that’s a very powerful thing.” Vice Mayor Alex Brown, the only dissenting vote, voiced concerns similar to McLaughlin’s. Just before casting her vote in support, Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds cited statistics from programs elsewhere that have helped house families and connected people to services. Morgan chimed in that he’d support it because he was “for progress.” —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m


believe global warming is just a natural cycle, you’re unlikely to support policies intended to reduce carbon pollution, like regulations and taxes,” said Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, which has made similar findings in its own, longrunning polling. “These results also again confirm a long-standing problem, which is that many Americans still believe scientists themselves are uncertain whether human-caused global warming is happening. “Our own and others’ research has repeatedly found that this is a critical misunderstanding, promoted by the fossil fuel industry for decades, in order to sow doubt, increase public uncertainty and thus keep people stuck in the status quo, in a ‘wait and see’ mode.” Similar to previous polls, the CBS

Americans are waking up Majority say climate crisis must be addressed, according to CBS News poll Two-thirds of Americans believe

climate change is either a crisis or a serious problem, with a majority wanting immediate action to address global heating and its damaging consequences, major new polling has found. Amid a Democratic primary shaped by unprecedented alarm over the climate crisis and an insurgent youth climate movement that is sweeping the world, the polling shows substantial if uneven support for tackling the issue. More than a quarter of Americans questioned in the new CBS News poll consider climate change a “crisis,” with a further 36 percent defining it as a “serious problem.” Two in 10 respondents said it was a minor problem, with just 16 percent considering it not worrisome at all. More than half of polled Americans said they wanted the

climate crisis to be confronted right away, with smaller groups happy to wait a few more years and 18 percent rejecting any need to act. “Americans are finally beginning waking up to the existential threat that the climate emergency poses to our society,” said Margaret Klein Salamon, a clinical psychologist and founder of the Climate Mobilization Project. “This is huge progress for our movement—and it’s young people that have been primarily responsible for that.” But while nearly all of those questioned accept that the climate is changing, there appears to be lingering confusion over why and scientists’ confidence over the causes. There is a consensus among climate scientists that the world is heating up due to human activities, such as burning fossil fuels for electricity generation and trans-

portation, as well as cutting down forests. However, just 44 percent of poll respondents said human activity was a major contributor to climate change. More than a quarter said our impact was minor or nonexistent. There is an even starker split on the findings of climate scientists. According to the CBS poll, 52 percent of Americans say “scientists agree that humans are a main cause” of the climate crisis, with 48 percent claiming there is disagreement among experts. “This remains a vitally important misunderstanding—if you

About this story: It originally appeared in The Guardian. It is republished here as part of the CN&R’s partnership with Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

research finds sharp ideological differences in attitudes to the climate crisis. While nearly 7 in 10 Democratic voters understand that humans significantly influence the climate and 80 percent want immediate action, just 20 percent of Republicans think humans are a primary cause and barely a quarter want rapid action. On the science, nearly threequarters of Democrats said almost all experts agree that humans are driving climate change, with just 29 percent of Republicans saying the same. Age is another key variable. While 70 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds think climate change is a serious problem or crisis, just 58 percent over 65 concur. Younger people are far more likely to consider it a personal responsibility to address the climate crisis and to believe that a transition to 100 percent renewable energy is viable. Young people have been galvanized by climate science being taught in schools, as well as a spreading global activist movement spearheaded by Greta Thunberg, the Swedish teenager who started a wave of school walkouts to demand action. Thunberg recently arrived in the U.S. on a solarpowered yacht, ahead of a major United Nations climate summit in

New York on Sept. 23. This generational divide even cuts across party affiliation, with two-thirds of Republican voters under 45 considering it their duty to address the climate crisis, according to the CBS poll. Just 38 percent of Republicans over 45 feel the same. “Younger Republicans are much more convinced climate change is a crisis and are supportive of action than older Republicans—which has big implications for the future of the party,” said Leiserowitz. Around three-quarters of all respondents said they understand that climate change is melting the Arctic, raising sea levels and causing warmer summers. A further two-thirds accept that hurricanes will be made more severe by global heating. Leiserowitz said that the relationship between extreme weather events and concern over climate change is a complex one, with people already worried the most likely to say that their alarm has increased when a major storm or flood hits. Regardless of concern over climate change, there appears to be skepticism among Americans about how much humans can do about it. Just 19 percent said humans can stop rising temperatures and the associated impacts, with nearly half thinking it possible to slow but not stop the changes and 23 percent refusing to believe humans can do anything at all. This may well influence the views of leading presidential contenders’ climate plans. Democratic hopeful Bernie Sanders, for example, has proposed a rapid remodeling of society where planet-warming emissions from transport and power generation are eradicated within just 11 years. “By saying we should merely slow and not reverse global warming, we are passively accepting the deaths of billions of people,” said Klein Salamon, of the Climate Mobilization Project. “The only thing that can protect us is an all-out, all-hands-on-deck mobilization, like we did during the second world war. Avoiding the collapse of civilization and restoring a safe climate should be every government’s top priority—at the national, state and local levels.” —OLIVER MILMAN

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HEALTHLINES An outbreak of vaping-related lung illnesses has killed six people and afflicted 380 others, prompting the CDC to launch an investigation.

California Cannabis Industry Association, said this is an important aspect of the crisis to acknowledge. “We really prioritize public safety and public health with all of our regulations in California,” Drayton told the CN&R via phone from his office in Sacramento. “When folks don’t have the opportunity to purchase from a regulated industry or delivery service, they’re going to turn to the unregulated market, which is a safety hazard at this point.” The trade association’s members are working closely with CDPH to provide data on their products and testing, he added. “Right now, it is still a situation where informationgathering is the No. 1 priority.”

mystery toxicity

At the same time this crisis is unfolding, the

federal government announced it is cracking down on e-cigarettes due to a spike in usage by youth. For years, vaping products were largely unregulated. As of August 2018, e-cigarette product manufacturers have been required to file applications with the U.S. Food and HEALTHLINES c o n t i n u e d

National vaping-related deaths have local health officials on alert

by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev iew. com

Bberations Health, officials are preparing for the reverof a national outbreak of vapingehind the scenes at Butte County Public

related lung illnesses. Six people have died—including one in California—and 380 cases have been confirmed, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which has launched a national investigation into the cause. Most patients have reported using cannabis products, though some used only tobacco e-cigarettes, the CDC says. No substance or product (i.e., device, liquid, pod or cartridge) has been identified as the clear culprit. So far, no cases have been reported in Butte County, but Dr. Andy Miller, the county’s public health officer, said this outbreak

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is “absolutely” concerning to the department. That’s why it has issued advisories to local health providers detailing what has been going on and asking for all potential cases to be reported to Public Health as soon as possible. Vaping-associated pulmonary injury is a condition that can mimic infections like pneumonia, but does not typically respond to antibiotics, Miller wrote in one advisory. Nationally, commonly reported symptoms include shortness of breath, coughing, fatigue, body aches, fever, vomiting and diarrhea. Part of why this outbreak has been so concerning to health officials, Miller added, is that the symptoms can progress quite rapidly. Media reports have detailed several cases in which young people have been rushed to the hospital and hooked up to ventilators to keep them alive. The CDC has taken a stance that consumers should refrain from vaping any products, even those sold legally, until it knows more.

Miller told the CN&R he’s inclined to agree with that approach. “We are at that early stage where we don’t know enough to give people even a false sense of security that there’s a safe product,” he said. “There’s kind of this general belief in our society … that if something is legal that someone has proven it’s safe. And that is definitely not always the case, especially in an industry that has evolved so rapidly, and really with little regulation.” Health officials aren’t the only ones concerned about the outbreak. Vapes make up the majority of cannabis sales in California, with consumers spending $283 million on such products from January to June of 2018, according to BDS Analytics, a data-analysis company that tracks the cannabis market. This represents 79 percent of all concentrate sales. Cannabis-industry advocates have argued that the devil’s in the details. Statewide, since late June, 67 potential cases of acute lung disease were found in those with a recent history of vaping. According to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), “most” patients reported purchasing from unregulated and unlicensed street vendors or popup shops, and “some” vaped unlicensed or unregulated cannabis products, specifically. Josh Drayton, a spokesman for the

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appointment Joining forces against cancer

Come together this weekend to honor cancer survivors, remember loved ones lost and fight back against this devastating disease at Relay for Life, Enloe Medical Center’s all-day annual fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. Festivities take place on Saturday (Sept. 21) from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. at DeGarmo Park. The opening ceremony starts promptly, followed by the Survivors Lap. The powerful Luminaria Ceremony takes place at 9 p.m., offering attendees the opportunity to grieve, and to receive comfort and hope. For more information contact Debbie O’Connor at 342-8365 or go to relay.acsevents.org.


! t n i o p Fiction 59

e h t o Get t

Can you tell a story in 59 words— no more, no fewer?

The Chico News & Review’s annual Fiction 59 flash-fiction contest is back. Submit your 59-word stories today for the chance to have your work published in the annual Fiction 59 issue of the CN&R, on stands Oct. 24. Winners will also be invited to share their works during a live reading at The Bookstore (118 Main St.). NEW THIS YEAR: Six-Word Stories Go really micro with your fiction and tell a story in only six words. Here’s a famous example (possibly by Ernest Hemingway): For sale: baby shoes, never worn. Please do not include a title with six-word story. Six-word stories will not be separated by age category. All other rules for Fiction 59 apply. For submission guidelines, visit newsreview.com/fiction59

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9, AT 11:59 P.M.

FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY September 19, 2019

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CR E ATING THE CO MF OR T OF CALM Will be presented in a series of 4 classes by Connie Massie, LCSW Connie is a Board Certified Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 35 years of experience in counseling for people facing chronic stress, anxiety, depression, trauma, and difficulty with many of life’s transitions. She is a certified Meditation teacher, as well as, in Hatha Yoga and Restorative Yoga, incorporating mindfulness techniques into her everyday practice.

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HEALTHLINES Drug Administration to stay on the market. Before this rule, which was adopted in 2016, the products could be sold without any review of their ingredients or how they were made. In the coming weeks, the FDA will unveil a compliance policy that will remove all flavored e-cigarette vaping products from the market, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told reporters last week in the Oval Office. The primary goal is “to reverse the deeply concerning epidemic of youth e-cigarette use,” Azar said in a press release. Legislative changes also are taking place in California. On Monday (Sept. 16), Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order that directs the state Department of Tax and Fee Administration to step up enforcement of illegal or counterfeit vaping products. CDPH also will spend $20 million on a public information campaign and create health risk signs that will be posted at stores and on advertisements. Approximately 21 percent of high-schoolers and 5 percent of middle-schoolers vape, according to data from the 2018 National Youth Tobacco Survey. This marks a 78 percent increase among highschoolers and 48 percent increase among middle-schoolers compared with 2017. Preliminary data for 2019 show that the problem only has gotten

c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 1 2

worse, with more than a quarter of high school students saying they currently vape. An overwhelming majority cited the use of fruit, menthol or mint flavors. Bruce Baldwin, tobacco treatment coordinator for the local chapter of the California Health Collaborative, said a flavored e-cigarette ban is long overdue. When he asks kids why they vape, they always offer the same reasons: “They like the flavor and they like the fact that it’s strong … they get a buzz.” Though vaping cartridges have been found to contain metal, volatile organic compounds and cancercausing agents, “there’s been this notion that somehow vaping is safer than smoking,” he said. “To me, it’s like saying it’s safer to get run over by a Volkswagen than by a pickup.” Ellen Michels, Butte County Public Health’s Tobacco Program project director, said her program has been urging local policy makers to adopt a ban or more stringent regulations for flavored e-cigarette products for years. So far, it has been discussed in Oroville and Chico, but not acted upon. “At this point in time, the message really is ‘don’t vape,’” Michels said. “Don’t use anything, because we don’t know yet what’s causing these serious illnesses and deaths.” Ω

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GREENWAYS Steven Marquardt, of the local Sunrise Movement group in Chico, leads a planning session at Chico State ahead of the local climate strike.

Striking for the planet

Activists organize rally, call on locals to join global day of climate action story and photo by

Andre Byik

andre b@ n ewsrev iew.c om

S1,000 people to a local “climate strike.” Sitting on a lawn at Chico State on a teven Marquardt has a goal: to attract

recent evening, he explained to a group of about 15 activists that the idea is to get people to leave their classrooms and workplaces to demand action and answers to address climate change. Marquardt, a co-founder of the local Sunrise Movement group, conceded that number may be lofty. The Chico Joins Global Climate Strike Rally is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday (Sept. 20) at City Plaza. As its name implies, the event coincides with demonstrations planned around the world. “Things are going to get crazy these next couple of months,” Marquardt told his peers, “and a lot of people are looking to Sunrise Chico at leading the way in terms of engaging young people.” The group, composed mostly of college students, got to work, breaking into groups to chalk sidewalks, hang fliers and produce a video addressing why they will strike. They needed to get the word out. The event and others like it around the

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world will precede the United Nations Climate Action Summit on Monday (Sept. 23) in New York. There, governments, private businesses and other international organizations will gather with the expectation of presenting ways to reach “net zero” greenhouse-gas emissions by 2050. Put on locally by 350 Butte County and the

Sunrise Movement, the strike will be youthled, with politicians and other speakers taking questions instead of delivering canned speeches, organizers said. “The whole thing for 9/20 is just to be upbeat with solutions,” Mary Kay Benson, steering council manager for 350 Butte County, told the CN&R. “We’re not here to scare people more. We’ve been doing that for the past 30 years and it only got us this far. So, now we’re trying to show them the positive solutions that are still possible to turn the ship around.” All local candidates for political office have been invited to participate in the event, Benson said, and the ones who accept will be required to answer questions by young people during their speaking time. The point

Join the cause:

Chico Joins Global Climate Strike Rally runs from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday (Sept. 20) at Chico City Plaza.

is to get local leaders on the record regarding their climate policies, and also to help inform voters. The strike, Benson said, comes at a time when climate-driven action has gained momentum locally. Following the Chico City Council’s climate emergency declaration earlier this year, the panel this month adopted an ordinance creating a Climate Action Commission (see “Making changes,” Newslines, Sept. 5). That commission will advise the council on how to best implement the city’s Climate Action Plan, with a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels over the next 10 years. The city and Butte County also are moving forward with the development of a community choice aggregation, which gives local governments the power to purchase and sell energy based on their residents’ needs. Such an arrangement, Benson said, means more “clean” energy options. Taking concrete steps to address climate change, she said, is needed to address the urgency of the crisis. “The climate crisis has accelerated exponentially, and we don’t have the time,” Benson said. “The [U.N.] said last year that we have 10 or 12 years, but that’s very conservative, and a lot of scientists are saying we probably have more like 18 months to change the direction. We’re already just

trying to mitigate the worst that’s going to be coming down the pike.” Locally, Benson said, the Camp Fire has contributed to the sense of urgency. The effects of a changing climate have arrived in Butte County in disastrous fashion, and the world is watching with interest in how the community recovers. Marquardt also has the sense that other disasters, such as the Oroville Dam spillway incident, have awakened people to the effects of climate change. “People have realized that the crisis is here,” he said. “We know that we’re living in it. It’s not coming—it is here. There is that sense of, we need to do something.” The Sunrise Movement organizer said his group is still trying to gain a stronger membership and leadership core, and events like the strike can embolden people to move from passive to active supporters in the fight against climate change. “It’s people power and political power,” Marquardt said. “If you get the right amount of that, you can get a new political alignment. If we don’t have a mass amount of people demanding bold solutions and quite literally taking to the streets to demand it, it does not matter who is in office. We’re not going to get those kind of changes.” Ω

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Get your hands dirty Earn some goodie points and help restore beautiful Bidwell Park and its waterways to clean and pristine this weekend at Butte Environmental Council’s 32nd annual Bidwell Park & Chico Creeks Cleanup. The event takes place on Saturday (Sept. 21) from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., beginning at the Hooker Oak Recreation Area then moving on throughout the park. There will be complimentary coffee and a breakfast snack in the morning, an appreciation barbecue provided by Madison Bear Garden when cleanup is complete, and registering online gets you a free T-shirt!


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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLARK FAMILY

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Meet the millers The Clark family history is one of hardworking folks skilled in various trades, like mechanics and carpentry, Karyl Clark told the CN&R. But last year marked a first, when her son, Trenton, asked if she and her husband, Kenneth, wanted to launch a mobile wood milling business. It was quite the head-scratcher for the DMV and insurance companies, she said. It took them from September 2018, when they purchased the mill, till March 2019 to get everything ready to roll. Since then, the Cohasset family has drummed up interest across the region. First, the father-son duo visit an interested client for a free consultation, then they bring the mill and complete the work on-site. Karyl, who spoke with the CN&R about the family venture, primarily takes care of the paperwork and financial side of things. Visit Clark Family Milling on Facebook, email clark familymilling@gmail.com or call 343-0794 or 774-7431 to find out more.

What services do you provide? Clark Family Milling offers onsite milling of clients’ downed trees. They have to be ready to mill, meaning they’ve had all the limbs removed, and they have to be in a site that the mill can get to. [We do] custom sizes, custom orders. And the wood is then stacked and stickered to dry for [clients’] personal projects. An

Moving around in downtown Chico

example is a wood shed. Another client wanted it for siding. Then [we’ve] had a client that had a large piece of Cohasset oak. This client is a cabinet builder and he wanted … specific sizes and [a] specific thickness for cabinet doors.

Why get into milling? Collectively, our foothill communities and our forests are seeing this increased amount of dead trees, and what do you do with them? It was an answer to a problem that presented itself. I think that a portable milling business emboldens people to the idea that there are more opportunities. Trent looks at a log and he sees a table, he sees cabinets, he sees framings, he sees children’s blocks painted. Someone else looks at a log and sees firewood. Someone else looks at that log and sees trash. Someone else looks at that log and sees a burden. My sister lost

her home in the [Camp] fire, and has gone through that [feeling of], “What do we do with this?” This is an outlet.

What do you enjoy about running a family business? We all get along really well. It’s that opportunity to spend time together in a productive way that we don’t get if we all just go our separate ways. Our grandson [Ryan], who is 8, looks forward to the day that he will be able to drive [the mill] down the road and use it, too. And he is a good little worker. He helps move the sawdust … which is a valuable product also, for gardens, for worm bins. And looking towards the future, the comments are always made when Ryan is with them [that], “Someday you could be doing this.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

I was walking down Third Street the other day and noticed a sign outside clothing boutique 3 Seas announcing an impending move. So, I popped in and perused the sales racks—everything is 20 percent off!—and to chat with owner Kim Colombo. Turns out, 3 Seas, which opened almost four years ago in a space adjoined to what used to be Crepeville (soon to be Woodstock’s Pizza’s new home), is taking over a space on Broadway recently vacated by Red Fly. The shop will be more spacious and offer a front door (versus a walk-up ramp to her current store). Colombo tells me the owner of Red Fly, Raine Eldridge (who also owns Ruby’s Boutique), had sold it—and its Oroville counterpart—to an employee, but some personal issues had come up and the sale fell through. Eldridge confirmed and said the Oroville Red Fly will be reopening by the Oroville Salmon Festival, which runs Sept. 27-28, after a short break for remodeling. Look for 3 Seas to open at 334 Broadway St. in the coming weeks and stop by its current spot—between Main and Broadway on Third—for some great deals.

MORE CHANGES After 11 years in business, Leon Bistro announced last week that it’s closing its doors. I certainly have some fond food memories from the popular upscale Main Street eatery—from a delicious sea bass birthday dinner to attending a couple of chef Ann Leon’s cooking classes. But do not fear! Leon isn’t skipping town or retiring; she’s simply shifting gears to take over head chef duties at Meriam Park’s new restaurant, Burban Kitchen. I understand Leon will continue her commitment to locally sourced ingredients, but with a bourbon-inspired twist. Can’t wait. Leon Bistro will be open till Sept. 28.

AND ANOTHER I got word over the weekend that the folks behind The Bank Club, scheduled to (re)open in the old Winchester Goose spot at Eighth and Broadway, suffered some setbacks when it came to the lease. “After 42 years in business, and a brief 40 year break, Bank Club will find a new home,” reads the Facebook announcement. “Let’s create new memories there.” I, for one, hope they find somewhere fast—the photos from their test kitchen look bomb. OPENING SOON Gabriela’s Eatery (at 6433 Skyway) is changing its name to Secrets of Paradise, which is set to open this fall. According to a Facebook post, it’ll feature a garden, a gift shop with locally made items and local beer, wine and cider. Plus a whole new menu. Sounds good to me! SELL YOUR WARES Tractor Supply Co. is taking signups for its annual fall farmers’ market. It’s open to all farmers, artisans and crafters. Best of all, it’s free for vendors. The market will take place next Saturday (Sept. 28), at both the Chico and Oroville locations. Interested vendors must sign up by Wednesday (Sept. 25), either at their local store or online at tractorsupply.com/farmersmarket.

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SPONSORED BY UNITED DOMESTIC WORKERS OF AMERICA/AFSCME LOCAL 3930

Open letter to the

Butte County Board of Supervisors W

as untold savings in added health care costs. Yet, home care providers through the state’s In-Home Supportive Services (IHHS) program are now facing the loss of our own health care coverage. Our union – the United Domestic Workers of America, AFSCME Local 3930 – has been without a contract with Butte County for nearly six years. During that time, UDW members have continued to do our jobs for the minimum wage of $12 an hour. This is hard, often physical work. Home care workers do all sorts of tasks – cleaning, bathing and feeding those who need assistance as well as making them as comfortable as possible. We are true day-to-day caregivers. Not many people are willing to do this work for $12 an hour. Because of this, thousands of care hours are unmet every year in Butte County. Some of us care for a family member, others care for members of the community. Our union represents those who have taken on the difficult job of providing 24-hour assistance to elderly relatives with dementia or other health issues. We also represent workers who care for children with disabilities or complex medical challenges. Whether we are looking after loved ones in our families, or caring for community members who need our assistance, we do this as professional caregivers. Many of us left paid, full-time jobs to do this work, and we frequently work many unpaid hours. Access to affordable health left: Carnella Marks provides in-home care for her father-in-law, Albert Smith. care coverage is one of the few right: Barbara Wilson serves as caregiver for her husband, Clyde.

e represent the front line of health care, the in-home care workers. We provide daily care to hundreds of local residents who otherwise would be forced to live in institutions or assisted care facilities. Our work helps these residents stay in their own homes, providing them better quality of life as well

United Domestic Workers of America AFSCME LOCAL 3930 Butte Office 2592 Notre Dame Blvd Suite 150 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 892-0206

SEPT

24

perks of this job. In the case of family members, that coverage allows us to keep working and helping those who need it most. Now the board of supervisors wants to take away our health coverage in exchange for a 25 cent an hour raise. We need a raise but, like everyone, we need health care, too. This issue truly hits home for us. For example, UDW member Carnella Marks cares for her father-inlaw, Albert Smith, who has dementia. Without health care coverage, she could no longer do this job. “It’s hard to focus on your client’s needs when you can’t pay your bills,” said UDW member Barbara Wilson, who provides in-home supportive services for her husband, Clyde. “We need a pay raise, so we can concentrate on providing the best care possible.” The irony is that county funding for in-home supportive services is matched by state and federal agencies. The county would pay only 16.5 % of any pay increase for our workers. That’s basically free money that will go right back into our local economy. Why would the county not take advantage of such a high return on their small investment? We’re part of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Workers, the nation’s largest trade union of public employees. Although we serve in homes, we are really public employees. We’re not asking for much. In our current negotiations, we’ve requested a 50-cent per hour raise whenever the minimum wage increases and additional funding towards the development of a more substantial health care plan. Supervisors, we ask you please: Don’t take away health care benefits from home care workers.

Show your support! Tell the Butte County Supervisors what you think when they meet at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24, at the county government offices, 25 County Center Drive, Oroville. Or call the Board of Supervisors today at 1-855-9127804 and tell them that caregivers deserve a raise!

September 19, 2019

  CN&R 

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Cult of misinformation

Camp Fire lasers and other beliefs rooted in disaster, vulnerability

THE

CONSPIRACY ISSUE

A

s the Camp Fire blazed last November, a startling conspiracy theory spread with the flames that added a sci-fi element to the real-life terror and chaos then reigning on the Ridge—that the blaze was intentionally started by blue laser beams fired from helicopters, specifically targeting homes and vehicles.

The masterminds behind this terrible act, depending on which YouTube video you watch or whom you talk to, could be anything from the Rothschilds to Big Cannabis corporations to Satan himself. But by far, the suspect most often named is the United States government. Fueled by doctored or improperly identified photos and pseudo-scientific “experts” sharing their “evidence,” the laser theory is still being propagated via far-right bloggers, conservative fringe talk radio and, most effectively, YouTube. In one video posted days after the fire started titled “Genocidal California Fire Operations”—which garnered tens of thousands of views before being taken down just last week—an unidentified female narrator shared aerial videos of Paradise after the town burned. “That’s not a wildfire, that looks like it was hit with a laser beam,” she said, her voice dripping with knowing authority and rage. “Common sense should at least beg questions in people’s minds when they see what I’m showing you right now.” However, cult expert and retired Chico State professor Janja Lalich believes it’s a breakdown in common sense that leads to fervent belief in someCult expert Janja Lalich says Americans tend to thing so implausible. “[Conspiracy theories] are look for a quick fix to complex problems, and extremely popular now, and it’s quite similar to conspiracy theories offer a convenient solution. the prevalence of cults in our country and around CN&R FILE PHOTO the world. “As the world has gotten more complex, people are looking for solutions, and America has a culture that looks for the quick fix. People will latch onto something that provides them a framework for understanding the world, even if it defies logic, science and critical thought.”

The CN&R and its sister papers in Reno and Sacramento explore three bizarre tales circulating in the Digital Age.

The idea that California’s recent deadly

and destructive wildfires were caused by malevolent forces wielding directedenergy weapons (DEW weren’t sparked

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

Ridge residents during the fire by the Camp Fire, but began to proliferate when saying they saw blue lasers. After the Tubbs Fire ravaged Santa Rosa in October spending 23 days on the scene of 2017. the Camp Fire, he concluded it’s Tracing the theory back to its original source “suspicious” and “very odd,” citis like trying to find the longest noodle in a ing burn patterns and the flames’ dumpster full of spaghetti. Online videos, some extreme temperatures. (The latter with hundreds of thousands of views, touch on detail is along the same lines as DEW technology some claim lasers also started 9/11 Truthers’ claim that fire can’t the Notre Dame Cathedral fire) and offer intermelt steel beams.) woven theories about why and by whom these Preston said he invited researchattacks were perpetrated. One theory circulating ers from “a very prestigious private by word-of-mouth in Butte County—largely in university” to the burn site and that pot-growing circles—is that large cannabis comthey found suspicious evidence. panies will benefit from the disaster by burning However, he declined to name the out small growers and acquiring cheap, fertile institution until they got back to him land for their operations. Another theory is that with “some official results.” property owners are being dislocated to allow Lalich, who has written books construction of the high-speed rail system. about cults, elaborated on why people The most widespread and popular theories of all education levels buy into such revolve around something called Agenda 21. outlandish ideas: “In a moment of In reality, Agenda 21 is a nonbinding vulnerability, even someone who’s United Nations action plan developed in 1992 intelligent and curious might see to encourage the development of sustainsomething that for some reason resoable environmental practices from local to nates with them. Then they go online international levels, but the plan has been the and find a community of other people subject of odd theories and conservative ire who believe this, too, which reinforces since its inception. The anti-Agenda 21 sentitheir beliefs,” she said. ment is particularly strong in rural Northern “In sociology we call it confirmaCalifornia, where some residents see efforts tion bias,” she continued. “Even with to limit mining, agriculture and logging—as proof or data that shows your thinking well as create unpopulated wildlands and is wrong-headed, you’re going to just protect endangered species—as an attack on dig in deeper and hold more firm to your their way of life. own belief.” “The idea of Agenda 21 isn’t a conThese beliefs can be hurtful to fire spiracy theory, it’s a real plan by the U.N. survivors, she said, and cause even for what is now known to be world dominamore damage by contributing to a rise in tion,” said Paul Preston, a Yuba City-based extremism. conservative talk radio host, whose Agenda “It creates this us-versus-them mental21 Radio show is broadcast on AM radio ity, where one group believes they have and online. “They’re using environmenall the answers and only they know what’s talism and the notion of sustainability to really going on. That leads to extremdestroy sovereign states and boundaries so ist viewpoints and, potentially, extremist you have one borderless world.” action. Most of these theories are formed Preston said he’s on the fence about around paranoia. Combined, that’s a perfect laser attacks during the Camp Fire, mix for violent action.” though that hasn’t prevented him from sharing the theory on air. He said he —KEN SMITH received at least a dozen calls from


SPACE invaders ▼

Let’s see them aliens at Area 51

B

efore Stanley Kubrick faked the moon landing, before the grassy knoll, before “Bush did 9/11,” there was Area 51. Perhaps the clearest indicator among believers that the United States military is hiding evidence of alien visitation, the top-secret Air Force base in the Nevada desert has been a subject of fascination and skepticism alike for decades.

In June of this year, Matty Roberts, a college student from Bakersfield, created the “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us” event on Facebook with the intended goal to “see them aliens.” The event took off, and more than 2 million Facebook users responded as “going,” prompting the Air Force to issue a formal warning to anyone seriously considering attempting to cross the hard border of Area 51, where signs authorizing “use of deadly force” have hung for years.

“As a matter of practice, we do not discuss specific security measures, but any attempt to illegally access military installations or military training areas is dangerous,”Air Force spokeswoman Laura McAndrews told ABC News in July. The base itself is part of the vast Nevada Test and Training Range in Lincoln County, about 100 miles north of Las Vegas. People referring to “Area 51” often colloquially include the Groom Lake facility, a dry lake bed used as an airfield for experimental aircraft, the officially sanctioned Homey Airport, and an even more secretive site called S-4. (More on that later.) In 2005, Jeffrey Richelson, a senior researcher at George Washington University, filed a Freedom of Information Act request about the CIA’s Lockheed U-2 spy plane program and the SR-71 “Blackbird,” which were developed at Groom Lake. Eight years later, his request was granted in the form of an unredacted report called The Central Intelligence Agency and Overhead Reconnaissance: The

U-2 and OXCART Programs, 1954-1974. “This is a history of the U-2,” Richelson, who died in 2017, told The New York Times in a 2013 interview. “The only overlap is the discussion of the U-2 flights and UFO sightings, the fact that you had these high-flying aircraft in the air being the cause of some of these sightings.” The report makes no mention of aliens or UFOs stored on-site, but for the first time ever, it referred to Area 51 by name, confirming—unwittingly or not on the CIA’s part—the base’s existence. “That was sort of a bonus,” Richelson told the Times. According to that same CIA report, “Area 51”—its map designation by the Atomic Energy Commission at the time— was commissioned in 1955 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and experimental aircraft have long been the government’s unofficially official explanation for UFO sightings in the area. The public’s attention waxed and waned over the decades, with various ufologists occasionally positing theories about alien visitation. It wasn’t until 1989 that someone came forward with knowledge of not only the workings of Area 51, but also the trove of extraterrestrial technology housed within. “There are several—actually nine— flying saucers, flying disks … the propulsion system is a gravity propulsion system, the power source is an anti-matter reactor. This technology does not exist at all,” said a man with his face obscured by shadow, identified only as “Dennis” to reporter George Knapp of KLAS-TV in Las Vegas in a May 15, 1989, broadcast. The report found international attention. In a follow-up interview months later, “Dennis” was revealed as Bob Lazar, a young scientist who claimed to have been tasked with reverse-engineering alien hardware in Area 51’s secret hangar at S-4, a few miles south of the base proper, for almost six months. Lazar himself says he can’t prove his claims with hard evidence, but in a 2018 documentary by Jeremy Corbell called Bob Lazar: Area 51 & Flying Saucers, Lazar

presents his case in greater detail, including home footage he claims to have filmed of flying saucer test flights above the facility. On June 20, 2019, Lazar and Corbell went on the popular The Joe Rogan Experience podcast and spoke at length about his purported knowledge. Rogan, himself a believer in aliens, is gracious to Lazar throughout the interview. As of this writing, the interview had close to 8 million views on YouTube. One of those views, however, belonged to Roberts, the student who then created the “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us” event on Facebook. Roberts later came forward to explain that it was a joke, and implored people not to take the invite seriously. Still, the Facebook page became a repository for memes and internet jokes, with mock battle plans and images of thousands of internet denizens “Naruto running”—look it up—through a hail of machine gun fire to free the captive aliens within. In place of the actual “raid,” set to take place on Friday (Sept. 20), Roberts and a few partners lent their name to an “Alienstock” festival planned in the tiny town of Rachel, Nev., near Area 51, promising live music, events and a place for believers to connect. Another event, “Storm Area 51 Basecamp,” is also scheduled for that weekend at the Alien Research Center in Hiko, Nev., with a panel by guest speakers, including Jeremy Corbell and Bob Lazar. However, on Sept. 9, Roberts announced Alienstock was canceled, citing a “potential humanitarian crisis” on the website, in that none of the infrastructure or events promised by his partner in Rachel had been delivered. The event will be replaced with a one-night concert in downtown Las Vegas tonight (Sept. 19). Still, despite the confusion on the ground, Facebook users are keeping their hopes up. While one event respondent answered a message about her plans to attend the event with “I feel like you’re the government, so why would I tell you all this?” another, Steven Davis from Pennsylvania, responded with, “Hell yeah, I’m going.” Davis said he plans to fly out “real soon” and potentially camp on the outskirts of Area 51. “In all honesty, if taxpayers fund the government, why can’t the taxpayers go see what’s up there? Why do they have such big secrets?” Davis said. Davis cites his own belief in—and personal experience with—UFOs for his interest, and as far as the government’s official explanation of top secret aircraft at the base: “You’d have to be dumb to believe that.” —MATT BIEKER mat tb @ newsr ev iew.c o m MORE

CONSPIRACY C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 2 4

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

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CONSPIRACY

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 2 1

Epstein, Trump and … SN&R?

An unbelievable news tip leads to a journey into the heart of modern politics

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SERENE LUSANO

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I

t didn’t start with a phone call, but I thought it ended with one. A 2 a.m. tremor on my nightstand. I reached for the phone already knowing who was on the other end and what they were going to say. Your mother’s dead and you weren’t there. I thumb-dragged the red cursor and tried to say, “Dad.” But it wasn’t him. The voice I recognized. Its master I never knew. “You still want to talk to Katie Johnson?” It had been months since I’d heard that name. “Katie Johnson” was the plaintiff in a federal lawsuit filed in April 2016 in Southern California. According to her claim, Johnson was an adolescent when she drifted into Jeffrey Epstein’s orbit. You may have heard of him. The devil sure has. Epstein was the obscenely wealthy, insidiously connected financier who allegedly procured and sexually assaulted dozens of girls, with little more than a legal wrist-slap. But his victims grew up and, eventually, made us listen. Epstein was in a New York jail cell on federal child sex trafficking charges when he died of a mysteriously broken neck last month, igniting conspiracy theories that one of high society’s most untouchable was killed to keep him from implicating members of a powerful inner circle of pedophiles. Which brings us back to Johnson, who claimed that she, too, had been lured to Epstein’s New York penthouse in 1994 when she was 13, only to be swallowed into an underworld of sexual enslavement. Her chief tormenter for the next three months, she alleged, was a real estate mogul named Donald Trump. Those allegations haven’t been substantiated. And no one has been able to prove that Katie Johnson exists. One week after Johnson’s lawsuit was filed, a judge for the U.S. Central District Court of California dismissed it for failing to cite an actionable civil rights claim. More troubling to those of us in the journalism field, the only identifying information available for Johnson proved inconclusive—mail to her supposed Twentynine Palms address returned, calls to her supposed phone number disconnected. But text messages sneaked through. At least mine did. I exchanged a few with a person claiming to be Johnson. I was told to answer a phone call from a blocked number. When I did, I heard a man’s voice, offering the improbable—an opportunity to stop Trump from becoming president. I hung up.

Six months later, in October 2016, he called again. “You still want to talk to Katie Johnson?” The voice more than the question burned through me. It was thick and duplicitous. It was sucking and sickeningly familiar. It was these things at this wrong hour to a son waiting for his mother to die. I hung up. We were just days from Trump’s inevitable defeat, and I’d had enough of frauds. Three years later, my mom is gone, Trump sits in the White House and Epstein’s corpse refuses to confess or atone. And I want to know who was behind it all, and whether—in this dark, unenlightened age—something can be both true and false at the same time.

Grill the messenger I restart my search not with Johnson, but with the person who began it: Elaine Halleck. She’s the one who sent a May 9, 2016, email under the subject line “Murky CA lawsuit against Trump.” This is how I fell down the rabbit hole. Halleck’s email said she was a former SN&R contributor working a news desk in Guadalajara, Mexico. It was unclear to me at the time why a border-adjacent reporter thought a hyper-local alternative weekly was positioned to blow open a story with national implications. The New York Times we were not. Before phoning Halleck for a trip down memory lane, I go through our email exchanges, both to refresh my memory and for any overlooked clues. I learn a few things that could be significant or meaningless. In May 2016, Halleck said she had written a couple of pieces for SN&R with Alex Landon, a San Diego attorney and law professor. While I’m able to find two op-eds credited to Landon in our online archives, I don’t find Halleck’s name anywhere. But interestingly, Landon’s commentaries, from 2003 and 2006, contended that California was crafting laws against sexual predators that went too far. This feels pertinent somehow. While I can’t find Halleck on our webpage, Amazon shows that she and Landon collaborated on a 2011 book it describes as an exploration of About the author:

Raheem Hosseini is news editor at the Sacramento News & Review. Read the unabridged version of this story at sacblog.newsreview.com


the “designer laws” that Landon condemned in his columns. The book does this, its synopsis says, by mixing fact and fiction. It’s titled A Parallel Universe. How fitting. I feel as if I’m in one. I ask myself: Could Landon and Halleck have fabricated a salacious lawsuit and/or pressed for media coverage to somehow call attention to sex crime laws they find problematic? I soon discover how preposterous the question is. Today, Halleck is still working for the Guadalajara Reporter, a community newspaper geared toward American and Canadian expatriates, and updating the book she coauthored with Landon. She says she ghostwrote Landon’s columns. She tells me two people at her church brought Johnson’s lawsuit to her attention. Halleck did a little online digging, finding speculative stories by “sleazy British newspapers” fixated on Epstein’s relationship with Prince Andrew, as well as the lawsuit, which had already been dismissed. She wasn’t sure what to make of it all, but hoped someone else could. “I just thought it was weird that no one really paid that much attention to it,” she tells me. I tell Halleck why I didn’t write about the lawsuit at the time, that it all felt too unverifiable. Other, stronger allegations against Trump were already competing for voters’ attention. How his casinos bled Atlantic City dry. How he groped women and peeped on his Miss Teen USA contestants. Inaccurately reporting one claim could heap discredit on those telling the truth about him. Not that any of it ultimately mattered. When my mom died, I remember thinking she was just going to miss America electing it first female president. Instead, Trump overcame all manner of boorish indiscretions, siphoning just enough electoral votes to defeat the popular will. “I guess society had changed a lot by the time Trump came along,” Halleck reflects. “All these outrageous things come out about him, and none of it affected his chance of being president.” And “Katie Johnson,” where did she fall into all of this? Was she a fraud, perpetrated by the left to smear Trump with Epstein’s heinous crimes—or a “deep fake” ploy of the right to discredit the media? And all this time later, why do I still care?

The Guterman tangent People other than me have supposedly communicated with Katie Johnson, including someone from the venerable (cough) Daily Mail and attorney Lisa Bloom, daughter of Gloria Allred, go-to lawyer of the #MeToo movement. But every video purporting to show Johnson telling a piece of her story—in a deposition, to a therapist—has been scraped from the internet.

I heard not the voice of a woman but a man. He refused to give his name and purported to speak for Johnson. For as little as I knew about him, I knew enough to distrust him. It’s one of those scrubbed videos, on a popup-cluttered website called DemocracyUnderground, that points me to Jeffrey Guterman. The video, posted July 10, is advertised thusly: “Katie Johnson video re: grooming by Epstein and rape by Trump …” When I click on the embedded box, I get a darkened screen with a white-lettered letdown: Sorry This video does not exist. Of course it doesn’t. The poster credits the video to Guterman, a Trump-bashing Florida personality with a rabid Twitter thread. We’re talking more than 200,000 tweets in less than two months. We’re talking archival photos, John F. Kennedy audio clips, retweeted Trump stories, shaky hand-held Periscope videos and racier material that’s attracted the eyes of both the Secret Service and Twitter’s code-of-conduct enforcers. I scroll through it all and find that Guterman’s Twitter account starts at July 14, four days after the Katie Johnson video was supposedly posted. I waste more time perusing Guterman’s extensive vlog, including one YouTube video that’s just him on his laptop listening to cable news for a half hour. Somewhere around minute 14, I conclude he’s not going to be my Deep Throat.

The conversation Feeling like I’m running out of ways to nip around the edges, I punch Johnson’s number into a new text and stumble across the old ones. They remind me how weird this whole thing was from the start—how, even then, I questioned whether the lawsuit’s author was who she appeared to be on paper: an unemployed model with $276 to her name, acting as her own attorney against one of this nation’s most litigious developers. Flashback to May 10, 2016. I text: “Is this the phone number for Katie Johnson?” I receive a green bubble before 8 the next morning: “Who are you Rahim? Friend or foe! Give me info on u please. Thank you, Katie.” I was surprised by the response, not just

because the tone seemed at odds with the seriousness of her claim—I reminded myself sexual assault survivors often are unfairly disbelieved because they don’t “behave” how someone thinks they should—but because I had never given her my name. On May 13, 2016, I got a call from a blocked number. I didn’t answer it. Johnson texted, telling me to answer the next call from that blocked number because “it’s me.” I did so the following morning just before 10. I heard not the voice of a woman but a man. He refused to give his name and purported to speak for Johnson. For as little as I knew about him, I knew enough to distrust him. I told him I would only speak with Johnson. “I’m trying to figure out if she’s a real person,” I said. “Oh, she’s real,” the voice said. I scolded him, but I don’t remember what I said. And then I hung up. The call lasted less than nine minutes. I then texted Johnson’s number: “Hey Katie, this is Raheem. It’s totally OK if you’re not ready to talk to me, but don’t have that weird guy call me and waste my time again. Good luck with everything.” “Katie” never responded. I waited 40 months to send a follow-up. Epstein’s death reopened the mystery for me—or was it a wound?

Finding ‘Katie Johnson’ On the same day I sent a Facebook friend request to a “Katie Johnson,” I reached out to a private investigator for help—three, in fact. Rob Hessee was the only one to volunteer his services. The retired Placer County sheriff’s sergeant and homicide detective is now a licensed private investigator. He comes through big time. Besides confirming that Facebook Katie Johnson is not lawsuit Katie Johnson, he runs the only two leads I have— the phone number and the supposed home address, which turns up a 2012 Google Maps image of a house in Twentynine Palms. Regarding the latter, Hessee gets 28 hits. But only five people were associated with the address at the time the lawsuit was filed. Of those five names, none links back to the phone number, which is my best lead, as I had actually corresponded with someone on the other end. When I personally ran the phone number through Google, I got two names. Tantalizingly, one possible owner worked as an administrative assistant for the Colorado Bureau of Investigation. Her job? To provide clerical support within the bureau’s forensic science laboratory. What were the odds that my would-be puppet master learned her subterfuge skills watching lab techs crack encrypted cellphones and analyze hard drives? But something tells me this Colorado secretary didn’t file a lawsuit in Southern California.

(Then again, what a good way to divert suspicion.) Which brings me to my second phone number hit and back to Hessee, who independently comes up with the same name. We’ll call her “Bethany.” Bethany is a 29-year-old esthetician living in Riverside County. According to PeopleFinder, she’s a Christian and a registered Republican. According to a criminal background check, she was convicted of possessing methamphetamine almost a decade ago, with a couple of traffic infractions on either side of that. Her husband is tall and rawboned, with heavy tattoo ink crawling up his neck. If someone hoaxed the lawsuit as a stunt to blow up in the media’s face and discredit all of Trump’s other accusers, could it have been them? Could Bethany’s husband be the nameless man who tried to get me to bite? Critically, Hessee is able to determine that the phone number was registered to Bethany between July 23, 2011, and June 6, 2019. That means the number belonged to her during the time I received texts from it. So now what? Place a call from a blocked number like they engineered? Maybe in the dead of night. Maybe during a listless sleep, while they’re waiting for word of a loved one’s demise. But that isn’t journalism. It’s vendetta. He called once more, the nameless man, in October 2016. He left a message. I no longer remember his exact words. But the same voice, husky and solicitous, left a brief rejoinder, a juvenile tease. My memory aborted the rest. I deleted the message. I waited for my mom to die, for the call I dreaded all my life: Come now. It’s happening. It arrived on Oct. 22, 2016. A couple weeks later, Trump was elected president. At the time, it felt like he broke the last promise I ever made to her. As she rasped and shook into the void, I squeezed her hand and told her we’d be all right. Maybe she would find this country unrecognizable today, its people worn down to the coarse edges of fear and suspicion, quick to blame and so afraid to look inward. Every clumsy expression an excuse for revenge, every stranger an enemy. Maybe she wouldn’t recognize this country, but had I changed, too? I return to Bethany’s Facebook page and weigh the value of a curated life. She’s married with two children. She and her husband look happy. They’ve been together a while. A 2012 photo shows them kissing a newborn girl. Three months later, they walk an aisle under an overcast sky. Four years later, a son is born. I don’t know them. And I may never know who called on that desolate October night. But I know who I am. I slide my phone away. Good luck, Katie Johnson. Whoever you are. —Raheem hosseini ra h e e mh @ newsr ev iew.c o m

September 19, 2019

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Arts& Arts &Culture Activist/ journalist Naomi Klein makes a case for the Green New Deal

Bist Orleans. The journalist, social activand best-selling author was there to

ack in 2005, Naomi Klein was in New

investigate the economic crisis unfolding in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. As she interviewed real estate developers who surveyed the surrounding devastation and spoke of opportunities to rebuild condominiums instead of public housing projects, Klein had a revelation. “I realized there was no way to understand climate change and the impact without looking at how our economic and political systems were driving pollution and making us so much more vulnerable, some more than others,” by Klein said in a recent Robin Bacior interview. Her latest book, Preview: On Fire: The Chico Performances (Burning) Case for presents Naomi Klein, a Green New Deal, The (Burning) New Case For A Green New Deal, released in April, Saturday, Sept. 28, does just that. The 6 p.m. collection of essays Tickets” $13-$15 (free features highlights for youths and Chico State students) from Klein’s past work that are bookHarlen Adams ended with clearly Theatre defined arguments Chico State 898-6333 for the potential chicoperformances.com impact and benefits of a Green New Deal. Inspired by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal in the wake of the Great Depression, the Green New Deal is legislation spearheaded by U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey that aims to tackle climate change, along with economic and social inequality. Its goals are wide-reaching, which has been its main criticism— primarily from conservatives—but Klein makes the argument that a multifaceted approach is what’s needed. 26

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“I think the mistake we [make] about the Green New Deal is we talk about it as a policy—it’s a governing framework,” Klein said. “FDR’s New Deal wasn’t a policy, it was dozens and dozens of social programs, laws, regulations—the overarching mission of attempted transformation. I talk in [On Fire] about the many failures and exclusions of [people of color] who [were] left out in that vision, but I think we’re still having trouble wrapping our minds around that. “We have [presidential] candidates talking about how they support the Green New Deal, but it’s literally one item on a checklist,” she continued. “You don’t just talk about it when you get asked about climate change; you talk about it when you get asked about the economy, immigration, agriculture. We’re not going to do anything of the scale we’re talking about unless it is the overarching mission of the entire administration; it’s too

Naomi Klein PHOTO BY KOUROSH KESHIRI

heavy a lift. I think we’re getting closer to it.” In support of the fact that corporations are the largest contributors to climate change, Klein’s book presents the startling statistic (one of many) that our world’s richest 20 percent are responsible for 70 percent of global emissions. Those kinds of numbers can make individuals feel hopeless, but the author argues the Green New Deal is an opportunity to mobilize our communities and make change. “What we’re seeing right now from the leading candidates vying to win, they’re listening to what people want and putting it in their platform,” Klein said. “I think we should be as organized as we can in every sector. We need teachers coming together and saying, ‘This is what a Green New Deal would look like for education,’ and health care workers coming together and doing the same. We need the women’s movement to come together and say, ‘Whoa, there isn’t nearly enough about women in the Green New Deal.’ There’s tons of work to be done that’ll make people feel empowered; the tricky thing is we don’t really have the infrastructure, so a lot of it has to be self-[organized].” Klein’s upcoming talk at Chico State (Sept. 28) comes a little more than a month before the anniversary of when the Camp Fire broke out and forever reshaped the lives and landscape of Butte County. “Chico is an extreme frontline because of the impact of the Camp Fire,” Klein said. “Even if you’re not at the center of the blaze. ... People are breathing it, they’re living it.” Klein offers no delusion of there being a smooth road toward solutions. “I’m not saying it’ll be easy, I’m just saying there’s a [way],” Klein said. “It’s incredibly hard and our chances are slim. What are we gonna do to improve our chances? That’s the only conversation I want to have.” Ω

THIS WEEK 19

THU

Special Events CLIMATE CRISES - WE ARE LIVING IT: 2019 fall speaker series with Don Hankins, professor of geography at Chico State, and Ali Meders-Knight, environmental educator for the Mechoopda Tribe. Thu, 9/19, 7pm. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade.

NOAH’S ARKIVE – UTOPIA, FAILURE AND CLIMATE CHANGE: Jeffrey Cohen, author of Stone: An Ecology of the Inhuman offers a re-examination of the planet from the perspectives of a planetary scientist and a literary humanist. Free and open to the public. Thu, 9/19, 7:30pm. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State.

LAMA TSERING EVEREST: Tibetan Buddhist speaks about happiness and suffering. $20 suggested donation. Thu, 9/19, 6pm. Center for Spiritual Living, 14 Hillary Lane.

PASTA ON THE PLAZA SPAGHETTI DINNER: Annual fundraiser supporting local youth. Thu, 9/19, 5pm. $10 - $35. Boys & Girls Club, 601 Wall St.

UNWINED COMEDY: Headliner Neel Nanda joins a lineup of local and out-of-towner comics, hosted by Dillon Collins. Thu, 9/19, 7pm. $17. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

BRAD WILLIAMS Wednesday, Sept. 25 El Rey Theater

SEE WEDNESDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON PAGE 29

FREE LISTINGS! Music KYLE WILLIAMS: Enjoy music under the stars by local singer/songwriter. Fri, 9/20, 4:30pm. Sierra Nevada Hop Yard, 1075 E. 20th St.

TYLER DEVOLL: Local singer/songwriter plays for happy hour. Fri, 9/20, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater DOES THIS SHOW MAKE MY BUTT LOOK FAT?: A comic romp through the trials and tribulations of womanhood. A celebration of women’s self-acceptance and a reminder of the things that really matter. Fri, 9/20, 7:30pm. $20. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. birdcagetheatre.org

LASSEN TRADITIONAL CIDER ANNIVERSARY

THE SUNSHINE BOYS: See Thursday. Fri, 9/20, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735

Saturday, Sept. 21 Lassen Traditional Cider

Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

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SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

WORK DAY FOR ALICE HECKER NATIVE PLANT GARDEN: Volunteer opportunity to spruce up the garden. Call Ann Elliott at 521-4402 or email annonfire@gmail.com for more info. Thu, 9/19, 8am. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.

Music TOMMY CASTRO & THE PAINKILLERS: Blues and hard-rocking soul from Bay Area guitar legend and his band. Thu, 9/19, 7:30pm. $30. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Theater THE SUNSHINE BOYS: Classic comedy written by Neil Simon and directed by Jerry Miller featuring a famous vaudeville duo who couldn’t stand each other yet get back together for one last performance. Thu, 9/19, 7:30pm. $12$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

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FRI

Special Events BLUE NIGHTS AT THE BLUE ROOM: A two-night theater fundraiser featuring a range of local

CLASSICAL GUITAR PROJECT

Saturday, Sept. 21 Museum of Northern California Art SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC

SAT talent. Friday (day one): a performance by Jonathan Richman, themed storytelling and late-night happy hour. Fri, 9/20, 7:30pm. $5-$30. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

CHICO MALL FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT: Summer movie series. This week: Pokemon Detective Pikachu. Bring low back chairs and blankets. Fri, 9/20, 7pm. Free. Dick’s Sporting Goods, Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St., Ste. 727.

FORK IN THE ROAD: Final event for the season featuring food trucks, activities for the whole family and live 1980s hits with Esplanade. Fri, 9/20, 6pm. DeGarmo Park, 199 Leora Court.

LAMA TSERING EVEREST: See Thursday. Fri, 9/20, 6pm. Center for Spiritual Living, 14 Hillary Lane.

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA AUTISM SYMPOSIUM: Speakers and trainers from across the country present on interventions, services and supports available for individuals with ASD and their families. Scheduling and info at ncas.csuchico. edu. Fri, 9/20, 7:30am. $50 - $195. Chico State.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 9/20, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Special Events ADULT PROM: Benefit for Catalyst Domestic Violence Services and Apollo Music programs for kids featuring live DJ. Sat 9/21, 7pm. $45. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

BIDWELL PARK AND CHICO CREEKS CLEANUP: Butte Environmental Council and the city of Chico host 32nd annual citywide cleanup with free appreciation barbecue at 1pm. Register individuals and groups at becnet.org. Sat 9/21, 9am. Hooker Oak Park, 1928 Manzanita Ave.

BLUE NIGHTS AT THE BLUE ROOM: A two-night theater fundraiser featuring a range of local talent. Saturday (day two): early happy hour, more themed storytelling and dance party with DJ Selekta Tali One. Sat, 9/21, 7:30pm. $5-$30. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.

CAMINO DE SANTIAGO PRESENTATION: Traveler Robyn North shares her “1,000-mile journey to healing” while walking the famous trail from Le Puy-en-Velay, France, to Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Sat 9/21, 10am. Bolt’s Antique Tool Museum, 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

LAMA TSERING EVEREST: See Thursday. Sat 9/21, 9am. Center for Spiritual Living, 14 Hillary Lane.

LASSEN TRADITIONAL CIDER ANNIVERSARY PARTY: A three-year anniversary party at the cidery

with music by Cat Depot, Garrett Gray and RJ the DJ, plus the Gnarly Deli food truck. Sat 9/21, 2pm. Lassen Traditional Cider, 26 Bellarmine Ct.

MASTERS 4-MILE RACE: Flat and fast course that begins and ends at Cedar Grove. Hosted by Chico Running Club. Visit chicorunningclub. org to register. Sat 9/21, 8am. Bidwell Park.

MUSEUM DAY: Families can visit two exhibits and enjoy make-and-take activities around the new Maidu basketry exhibit and the Remarkable Lives of Birds show. Sat 9/21, 11am. Free. Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology, Chico State.

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA AUTISM SYMPOSIUM: See Friday. Sat 9/21, 8am. $50-$195. Chico State. OBLIGATED TO THE TRUTH: Documentary chronicling the story of murdered student activist Marc Thompson. Fundraiser for the Marc Thompson Memorial Scholarship at Butte Community College to assist those students who, like Marc, seek to dedicate their lives to justice. Sat 9/21, 7pm. $10. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. 514-3415.

Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

perform. Sat, 9/21, 7:30pm. $5-$15. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

REESE WEILS: Singin’ and guitar slingin’ for brunch. Sat, 9/21, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater DOES THIS SHOW MAKE MY BUTT LOOK FAT?: See Friday. Sat, 9/21, 7:30pm. $20. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. birdcage theatre.org

THE SUNSHINE BOYS: See Thursday. Sat, 9/21, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

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RELAY FOR LIFE: A 12-hour event to celebrate survivors, honor caregivers, and help lead the fight for a world without cancer. Features a relay, entertainment and more. Sat 9/21, 10am. DeGarmo Park, 199 Leora Court.

ROCK AND GEM SHOW: More than 30 vendors, activities for kids and families including geode cutting, raffle prizes, treasure hunt and more. Sat 9/21, 9:30am. $4. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St. 321-6331.

TENDER LOVING ANNIVERSARY: Neighborhood cafe/coffee roaster celebrates its one-year anniversary with the first installment of its new monthly supper club. A menu of special dishes and unique beer pairings, plus live music. Sat, 9/21, 7pm. $40-$50. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. tender lovingcoffee.com

SUN

Special Events CHICO WOMEN’S CLUB BIRTHDAY OPEN HOUSE: The Women’s Club is 106 years old! Celebrate with live music from the Robert Seals Band, light refreshments, popcorn and cake. Sun, 9/22, 3pm. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

LAMA TSERING EVEREST: See Thursday. Sun, 9/22, 9am. Center for Spiritual Living, 14 Hillary Lane.

PUMPKIN SPICE COMEDY: Sunday funday with an evening of comedy from your favorite improvisers. BYOB Sun, 9/22, 7pm. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

Music CLASSICAL GUITAR PROJECT: Guitar masters Toby

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

Roye, Carlos Rivera and Warren Haskell

EDITOR’S PICK

PARTY DOWNTOWN! Enjoy the best in local food, drink, fine arts and tunes this Sunday (Sept. 22) at the 34th annual Taste of Chico. This popular event takes place downtown, where the streets will be closed to traffic and local restaurants will set up and offer samples of their menus. Live music will be spread around downtown and this year’s performers include six-piece jazzy funk ensemble Smokey the Groove, plus Kyle Williams, Max Minardi, The Damaged Goods, and The Retrotones. Come hungry, thirsty and ready to shake your tail feather. SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

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THIS WEEK continued from page 27

A R R I V I N G O C T . 10 , 2019

Chico’s favorites are revealed in CN&R’s most anticipated issue of the year. Advertisers: Contact your News & Review representative today to be a part of this event.

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ROCK AND GEM SHOW: See Saturday.  Sun, 9/22, 9:30am. $4. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357  Fair St. 321-6331.

SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF ITALY DINNER: Threecourse Italian dinner showcasing the  Abruzzo region of Italy.  Sun, 9/22, 4pm. $33. Christian Michaels, 192 E. Third  St.

TASTE OF CHICO: One-day food, beverage, music  and fine arts festival featuring tons of local  restaurants in downtown Chico. Smokey  and the Groove  and The Rockhounds perform.  Sun, 9/22, 12pm. Downtown Chico.  downtownchico.com

Music SHIGEMI MINETAKA’S MUSICAL CHAIRS: Brunch  tunes with local jazz artist who invites  players to rotate and change instruments  freely throughout the set.  Sun, 9/22, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

TELEGRAPH QUARTET: The San Francisco  Conservatory of Music’s resident orchestra puts a contemporary spin on the  classics  Sun, 9/22, 2pm. $15-$34. Zingg  Recital Hall, Chico State. 898-6333.

Theater DOES THIS SHOW MAKE MY BUTT LOOK FAT?: See  Friday.  Sun, 9/22, 2pm. $20. Birdcage  Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. birdcage  theatre.org

23

mon

Special Events FARM STAND: Fun farmers’ market featuring  local growers, plant starts, homemade  bakery goods and medicinal herbs.  Mon, 9/23, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

25

Wed

Special Events BRAD WILLIAMS: Standup with longtime touring comic who Robin Williams called 

“Prozac with a head.” JB Ball opens.  Wed, 9/25, 6:30pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W.  Second St. elreychico.com

DECEPTIONS: A MAGIC & MIND-READING SHOW: Chico Magical Arts presents Ron  Giesecke and Stephen Chollet for an  evening of cards, mentalism and mindreading.  Wed, 9/25, 7pm. $15. Unwined  Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

MODERN HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE FROM 1860 TO TODAY: Six-week MONCA lecture series  featuring survey of events, individuals  and the buildings that shaped modern  European and American architecture  from the late 19th century through the  present.  Wed, 9/25, 6:30pm. $50. Museum  of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade.  monca.org

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken  word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis  Rowdy.  Wed, 9/25, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431  Park Ave.

for more MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE on page 32

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September 19, 2019


FINE ARTS

Art

Both show through Sept. 27 Chico Art Center

1078 GALLERY: Field Notes, artists Rebecca  Shelly and Rebecca Wallace apply  different approaches of working  en  plein air. Through 9/29. 1710 Park Ave.  1078gallery.org

BSO GALLERY: Furniture Design, Interior  Architecture students’ new designs for  furniture exhibit. Through 9/20. Ayres  Hall, Chico State.

CHICO ART CENTER: On Track, exhibit (in  the gift shop and Great Northern  Coffee train car) of railroad art to celebrate and encourage participation in  California Railroad Safety month. Also,  in the main gallery,  Augmented, using  smart electronic devices to view artwork enhanced with video, animation  and sound. Through 9/27. Free. 450  Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Connie G. Adams, Enloe  Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery featuring Northern California artists whose  lives have been touched by cancer showcases series of watercolor paintings by  breast cancer survivor. Through 10/18.  Free. 265 Cohasset Road.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Bernie 

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Give  Voice, Empower Me Art presents  exhibition of Northern California and  international artists/survivors of sextrafficking. Through 9/29. Also, Walls We  Create, exhibition reflects the cultural  experience of “barriers.” Through 9/29.   $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Group Show, 29 artists  from all over California show their work.  Through 9/21. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

PROVISIONS GALLERY: The Art of Absolute  Ama, new works inside the downtown 

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Summer’s  End, featuring original paintings by local  artists Ray Eastman, Joan Smith and  Gary Baugh. Through 9/28. 493 East Ave.,  Ste. 1.

THE TURNER: Drawn In–By Hand Graphic  Prints, a collaboration with the  Department of Art and Art History’s  foundations faculty, exhibition reveals  how the act of drawing creates an acuity  of vision. Through 9/28. Free. Chico State,  Arts & Humanities Building. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of  cool stuff for kids to explore including a  miniature city, complete with a junior vet  clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market,  a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room,  imagination playground and much more.  Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325  Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and  Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human  and technological achievements needed  to reach the moon and envisions a  future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625  Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Unbroken Traditions  Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker  Families in Northern California, exhibition  represents the culmination of one year  of research and collaboration between  Mountain Maidu weavers, other tribal  experts, museums studies students, faculty and curators. Through 5/15. Meriam  Library building, Chico State. csuchico. edu/anthmuseum

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Lubell, San Francisco sculptor explores  the relationship between humans and  machines, and visitors are active participants. Gallery talk takes place Thursday,  Sept. 19, 5:30pm. Through 10/12. Chico  State, ARTS 121. cscuchico.edu/soa

Upper Park Clothing store. Through 10/31.  122 W. Third St. provisionsgallery.com

This guy saves you money.

AUGmeNteD & ON trACK: rAILrOAD eXHIbIt

September 19, 2019

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MUSIC Sex Hogs II (from left): guest saxophonist Kevin Killion, guitarist/singer Johnny Meehan, drummer Nate Daly and bassist Greg Hopkins.

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Greasin’ the hog The fun, mischievous rock of Chico’s Sex Hogs II Sex Hogs ‘Y No, I’d never even heard of it when Johnny Meehan asked me the question, and I didn’t find it when

And for Meehan, it was in the popular rockabilly-leaning trio The Shankers that he made a name for himself in Chico’s scene (literally, some locals still call him Johnny Shanker). After that he transitioned to a variety of punk Googling “Sex Hogs” either—but the internet did take crews and finally the recently defunct Michelin Embers, a me down some freaky alleys. If the film does exist, it’s self-described “Western skiffle” four-piece. either so obscure no one knows anystory and For its first three years, Sex Hogs II was a duo, thing about it, or it’s all in the minds photo by releasing a couple albums and random singles and playJason Cassidy of the band that took its name. “Our band is Sex Hogs II, which is ing a high-energy, snare-driven, often heavily distorted j aso nc@ a sequel to a movie, which is like this brand of good-time garage rock at shows that reveled newsrev i ew.c om ’70s slasher flick,” said drummer Nate in theatrics. Like the Duffy’s Tavern gig when—in a nod to Macho Man Randy Savage—they dressed up in Preview: Daly after a recent band rehearsal. wrestling singlets and challenged the audience to a Slim Sex Hogs II “It’s like a summer camp thing tape-release and with teens, and the teen counselors Jim-eating contest. And then there was the Sex Hogs 11 Beehive record(“eleven,” not “two”) show, where nine different bassists sneak out of camp to have sex with release party tonight, were added to the duo, with all of them on stage at the Sept. 19, 9 p.m. the townies,” Daly added, followed same time for the finale. Sunny Acres opens. by vocalist/guitarist and co-founder Cost: $5 Meehan as the two took turns sharing “If you got onstage and just played, that’s cool I guess,” Meehan said of the band’s performance philosotheir origin story. Duffy’s Tavern phy. “But it’s also really fun to be a goofball.” “And there’s like this mystical 337 Main St. Some of the best examples of the band’s shenanigans 343-7718 farm up on the hill ...” facebook.com/ are its wacky videos., from the homage to “as-seen-on“Hog farm.” duffschico “Yeah, there’s a pet cemetery kind TV” commercials for the song “Kick You in the Face,” to the holiday-themed “Merry HoggsMaxx” filmed at of thing.” the local Food Maxx (the chorus: “Food Maxx/Take it to “So they go and like have sex there.” the max/Maximize your shopping power!”). “There’s all this bad mojo blood dripping into the “We needed a Christmas song,” Daly said. teen camp … from this hog farm. And it makes the teen“That was another joke that kind of became a realagers go crazy, and they have crazy sex—to the point ity,” Meehan replied. where they kill each other.” As of 2018, the band is officially a three-piece, hav“Our band is the sequel to that movie.” Before their sequel was born, however, the two musi- ing added bassist Greg Hopkins (of West by Swan and Black Fong) after he joined them for a special one-off cians didn’t even know each other. In early 2015, a few months after moving to Chico from Albuquerque, N.M., party of Blues Brothers covers (naturally). In April, Hopkins joined the band at Sharkbite Studios Daly put out a Craigslist ad looking for other musicians in Oakland to record a new five-song cassette, Ride the to play with. Tusk. Tonight (Sept. 19) at Duffy’s Tavern, Sex Hogs II “His bands that he listed [in his ad], I was like, ‘Oh will celebrate during a double-release party with fellow shit,’” said Meehan. “And that’s one of those things local garage-rockers Beehive. While the band’s current where I kind of fell in love with Nate because he knew guest “Sax Hog”—Smokey the Groove’s Kevin Killion— about Radioactivity and Reigning Sound.” will be onstage for the party, all other antics are top secret. Daly came to town with his own garagey experiThough Daly did let slip an idea about a cannedence—from playing jittery mod-punk with Oakland’s Giant Haystacks to trashy fun-rock with The Scrams in peach-eating contest. You might want to bring moist towelettes just in case. Ω Albuquerque. ou never saw

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NIGHTLIFE ACHILLeS WHeeL

Friday, Sept. 20 Chico Women’s Club See FrIDAY

tHUrSDAY 9/19—WeDNeSDAY 9/25 roots-rock band with the infectious  high-energy live show.  Fri, 9/20, 7:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club,  592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

BLUE NIGHTS AT THE BLUE ROOM: A twonight theater fundraiser featuring a  range of local talent. Friday (day one):  a performance by Jonathan Richman,  themed storytelling and late-night  happy hour.  Fri, 9/20, 7:30pm. $5-$30.  Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.  blueroomtheatre.com

CHANNEL 66: Local folk/rock project 

19tHUrSDAY

BEEHIVE: Double-release show! 

Beehive will have a 10” EP hot off  the presses and Sex Hogs is slingin’  five new songs on tape. Sunny Acres  kicks it all off.  Thu, 9/19, 9pm. $5.  Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

THE BIDWELLS: Local duo sings songs  that will break, melt and mend your  heart.  Thu, 9/19, 7pm. Tender Loving  Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

REGGAE NIGHT: DJ Cootdog (of Stay  Positive Sound and the band  Mystic Roots) will be spinning  the reggae love on the patio.  Thu, 9/19, 7pm. The Commons Social  Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

TOMMY CASTRO & THE PAINKILLERS: Blues and hard-rocking soul from Bay Area guitar legend  and his band.  Thu, 9/19, 7:30pm. $30.  Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th  St. sierranevada.com 

TRIPLE TREE: Live reggae jams on the 

patio. Thu, 9/19, 6pm. La Salles, 229  Broadway St.

UNWINED COMEDY: Headliner Neel  Nanda joins a lineup of local and  out-of-towner comics, hosted by  Dillon Collins.  Thu, 9/19, 7pm. $17.  Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980  Mangrove Ave. 

20FrIDAY

THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat  with a rotating list of DJs spinning  all vinyl til late.  Thu, 9/19, 8pm. Bill’s  Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

ACHILLIES WHEEL: KZFR presents the  popular Nevada City genre-blending 

showcasing songs of the Beatles,  Stones, Dylan, Paul Simon and  more.  Fri, 9/20, 6pm. Almendra  Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway  Road, Durham.

COCO WONDERLAND BIRTHDAY DRAG SHOW: Live drag show performances  and six DJs including AZ Redsmoke,  Weezy, DUB Heezy, Bazz, Bionix,  Soliloquy and special host, MJ.  Fri, 9/20, 8pm. $15-$20. El Rey Theater,  230 W. Second St.

DYLAN’S DHARMA: Local reggae-rock  superstar crew returns.  Fri, 9/20, 7pm. The Commons Social  Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

EALDOR BEALU: Boise-based atmospheric heavy-psych quartet  performs in support of new album.  Local faves Shadow Limb, Soar  Estates and You Poor Devil share  the bill.  Fri, 9/20, 7pm. $7. The  Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

EMMA GARRAHY & WILL HARTMAN: Live  music by talented singer/songwriter 

tHe reAL DeAL

duo while you enjoy dinner and  drinks.  Fri, 9/20, 6pm. Copa de Oro,  1445 Meyers St., Oroville.

Clear your schedule this Sunday night (Sept. 22), because a true American original is coming to the 1078 Gallery to dazzle you with sound and story. Folksinger, songwriter and storyteller Tom Brousseau is touring his new album, In the Shadow of the Hill, a collection of deep cuts by the legendary Carter family. Expect to feel lots of feelings. Chico favorites Pat Hull and Donald Beaman share the bill.

JIM SCHMIDT AND LARRY PETERSON: Relaxing dinner tunes by 

local duo.  Fri, 9/20, 6:30pm. Diamond  Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

KALIMBA: Groove tonight with an  Earth, Wind and Fire tribute  band.  Fri, 9/20, 9:30pm. $5. Feather  Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda  Drive, Oroville.

KYLE WILLIAMS: Mellow tunes with  local singer songwriter.  Fri, 9/20, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975  Montgomery St., Oroville.

MOJO GREEN & THE GOLD SOULS: Heavy  horns, funk and soul with seven-piece 

dance band from Reno.  Fri, 9/20, 9pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

NED LEDOUX: National country sensation and son of legend Chris LeDoux  performs. The Box will be roasting a whole hog for the event.  Fri, 9/20, 8:30pm. $40. Tackle Box, 379 E.  Park Ave.

SOUL POSSE: Dance to hits from  yesterday and today with local  five-piece cover band.  Fri, 9/20, 6pm. Paradise Elks Lodge, 1100 Elk  Lane, Paradise.

SWING AWAY: Nor Cal punk band  on tour with genre-breakers  Underego.  Fri, 9/20, 8pm. $7. The  Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway,  Oroville.

TOM BLODGET AND THE KITES: Longtime 

locals playing originals and 1960s/ early 1970s pop rock b-sides and  favorites.  Fri, 9/20, 8pm. Unwined  Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

Mangrove Ave.

ALEX VINCENT: Chill tunes with guitar  and vocals by local favorite.  Sat, 9/21, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975  Montgomery St., Oroville. theex  changeoroville.com

21SAtUrDAY

AMAHJRA: Popular genre-bending band 

ADULT PROM: Benefit for Catalyst 

Domestic Violence Services  and Apollo Music programs for  kids featuring live DJ.  Sat, 9/21, 7pm. $45. Apollo School of Music, 936 

from Richvale plays a mashup of  blues, rock, alternative and hip-hop.  Special guest 3SD opens.  Sat, 9/21, 9pm. $10. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

BLACK CROSSES: Sac punk-rockers 

Preorder NoW! Sign up today for Butte County’s First Ever BYOC Cannabis-Friendly Art Classes www.ButteCounty CannabisArtClub.com

supp rt

real

TickeTs $25 Oroville State Theater • Fri, Nov. 8, 7-9PM • www.orovillestatetheatre.com State Theater, Red Bluff • Thurs, Nov. 14, 7- 9PM • www.brownpapertickets.com Cascade Theater, Redding • Sat, Nov. 16, 7:30- 9:30PM • www.cascadetheater.org EL Rey Theater, Chico • Sat, Nov. 23, 7- 9PM • www.elreychico.com 32

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September 19, 2019

news Donate to ’s InDepenDent JournalIsm FunD:

InDepenDentJournalIsmFunD.org


THIS WEEK: FIND mOre eNtertAINmeNt AND SpeCIAL eVeNtS ON pAGe 24 and Warren Haskell perform. Sat, 9/21, 7:30pm. $5-$15. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

CREAM OF CLAPTON: Homage to the great Slowhand himself, Eric Clapton. Sat, 9/21, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

CAmerON FOrD Saturday, Sept. 21 Naked Lounge See SAtUrDAY

are joined by Sonora punks False Freedom, Chico rock-and-rollers Locals The Primers and Stepdad Passport open. All-ages. Sat, 9/21, 7pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

BLUE NIGHTS AT THE BLUE ROOM: A twonight theater fundraiser featuring a range of local talent. Saturday (day two): early happy hour, more themed storytelling and dance party with DJ Selekta Tali One. Sat, 9/21, 7:30pm. $5-$30. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

CAMERON FORD: Longtime local musician celebrates release of his solo record with friends Webster Moore and Uni & Her Ukelele. Sat, 9/21, 8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

CLASSICAL GUITAR PROJECT: Guitar masters Toby Roye, Carlos Rivera

DRAG SHOW: Your favorite performers are back and ready to slay all day on red stage. Sat, 9/21, 10am. $8. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

EMMA GARRAHY & WILL HARTMAN: Local singer/songwriter duo performs pop covers and originals. Sat, 9/21, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

THE GNARLY PINTS: Married duo play guitar and fiddle for late-night happy hour. Sat, 9/21, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

JIM SCHMIDT AND LARRY PETERSON: See Friday. Sat, 9/21, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

THE KOOL SHIFTERS: Four seasoned musicians play ’60s vintage, country and blues. Sat, 9/21, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

RUN4SALMON CONCERT: Evening of music and speakers as the twoweek-long Run4salmon makes its way through Chico on its way to Lake Shasta. Performances by: Jesi Naomi, Desirae Harp, Stewie G and more will perform music inspired by

the journey. Sat, 9/21, 7pm. Riparia, 2300 Estes Road. run4salmon.org

RUNNING IN THE SHADOWS: Go your own way with Fleetwood Mac tribute band from Paradise. Sat, 9/21, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

STEELHEAD: Detroit-based cover band playing classic rock, blues and country on the patio. Sat, 9/21, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

TAINTED LOVE: Famed San Francisco ’80s cover band plays all the retro hits Sat, 9/21, 8:30pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

22SUNDAY

JOHN SEID AND LARRY PETERSON: An

eclectic mix of dinner tunes. Sun, 9/22, 6pm. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345

W. Fifth St. 5thstreetsteakhouse.com

PUMPKIN SPICE COMEDY: Sunday funday with an evening of comedy from your favorite improvisers. BYOB Sun, 9/22, 7pm. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

TOM BROSSEAU: Masterful folk-singer/ songwriter from North Dakota performs. Locals Pat Hull and Donald Beaman share the bill for a special night you would be a fool to miss. Sun, 9/22, 8pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.

23mONDAY

THE EMO NIGHT TOUR: DJs will be spinning all the angst of your teenage dirtbag heart desires, circa Warped Tour 2008. Mon, 9/23, 9pm. $10-$13. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

24tUeSDAY

BEST OF THE WEST SOUND CLASH: Dub sounds face-off with Bless Coast, Guerrilla Takeover, and Broken Silence “The West Coast Rule.” Tue, 9/24, 9pm. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

DANCING PLAGUE: Goth night with Portland-based band, local darkwavers Iver, and Orland’s Mercury’s Butterfly, Tue, 9/24, 7pm. $7. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

SMACKTALK: Five-piece jazz fusion collective from Seattle performs with local support from Chico State Alumni jazz/funk ensemble, Off The Clock. Tue, 9/24, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

25WeDNeSDAY THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 9/25, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

longtime touring comic known for his humorous and inspiring observations, JB Ball opens. Expects to sell out. Wed, 9/25, 6:30pm. $25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

LOUD LUXURY: LA-based dance-pop

DECEPTIONS A MAGIC & MIND-READING SHOW: Chico Magical Arts presents

word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 9/25, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Ron Giesecke and Stephen Chollet for an evening of cards, mentalism and mind-reading. Wed, 9/25, 7pm. $15. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

duo performs, joined by CID, and Midnight Kids. Wed, 9/25, 9pm. $18$20. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproductions.net

POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken

STEVE COOK, JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON: An eclectic mix of dinner music. Wed, 9/25, 6pm. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd.

FeeLING bLUe?

Head to the Blue Room Theatre this weekend for a twoday fundraiser full of surprises. Blue Nights at the Blue Room takes place on both Friday and Saturday evenings (Sept. 21-22) and features a range of local talent, including a special performance by the one and only Jonathan Richman (Friday), dance night with DJ Selekta Tali One (Saturday), themed storytelling and special happy hours (both nights). Get your tickets now.

BRAD WILLIAMS: Comedy night with

September 19, 2019

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33


REEL WORLD

NO.

It’ll do

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

Sequel wraps up Stephen King’s story, just not very well

Iyoustarted with It (2017). If you saw chapter one, have to watch this one to get the full story.

t Chapter Two provides a needed conclusion to a saga

Unfortunately, you also get a decline in quality. If you look at the two films as one long two-chapter adaptation of Stephen King’s 1986 novel, the overall experience is still cool. However, if you look at this sequel as a standalone, it’s a bit of a mess. Actually, it’s a big mess—an by editing room fatality. Bob Grimm The first movie focused on the bg ri m m @ Losers Club when they were chilnew srev i ew. c o m dren, concluding with the group of friends seemingly defeating Pennywise the clown. This one picks up 27 years later, with the adult Losers—played by Bill Hader It Chapter Two (Richie), Jessica Chastain (Beverly) Starring bill Hader, and James McAvoy (Bill), among Jessica Chastain others—called back to their homeand bill Skarsgard. town where the evil has returned Directed by Andy muschietti. Cinemark and a rematch with the morphing 14, Feather river clown is in order. That’s it for the Cinemas. rated r. plot. The adults split up, suffer some individual horrors at the hands of Pennywise (played again by the always frightening Bill Skarsgard), then wind up back together for the finale. After a solid start, the performers just run from set piece to set piece, setting the table for some CGI scares mixed with the occasional practical effects. (The old lady freezing during her tea chat with Beverly is perhaps the scariest/funniest moment in the movie and required no software.) A central problem in this movie is that the kid actors who starred in the first film, who also play a large part in this one, have grown significantly since

2

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September 19, 2019

filming of the first chapter wrapped. While there have been some nice advancements in digital effects, the kid scenes in this film (a mixture of newly filmed and flashbacks) are not a shining example of the technology. Often shown in the dark, the kids look very odd with their digitally altered, disproportionate faces. And, in some cases, their digitally de-aged voices make them sound like chipmunks. There’s also been a lot of whining about this film’s running time, as it clocks in at 2 hours and 48 minutes. However, I’d like to submit the notion that director Andy Muschietti should’ve taken three films to tell this story. Even at nearly three hours, this movie comes off as rushed and haphazard. Supposedly, the original cut for Chapter Two was four hours long. Perhaps an hour will be restored for a home-video release, which might fill in some gaps. Despite all this, in a strange way, I’m happy the film exists. Hader rules here as Richie in the same way Finn Wolfhard ruled the character in the first one. He’s funny, he’s aces at looking scared, and he can handle the heavy drama. He and Skarsgard make good chunks of this movie worth watching. Surprisingly, McAvoy seems a little lost in the role of grown-up Bill, while Chastain isn’t really given much to work with during her screen time. The film also closes out King’s story in much better fashion than the spider sequence at the end of the 1990 TV miniseries. It Chapter Two drags the overall grade for both movies together to somewhere around a B-minus. Ω

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent


Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week Ad Astra

James Gray (Little Odessa, The Lost City of Z) co-wrote and directed this space adventure about an astronaut (Brad Pitt) who travels to the edge of the solar system to find out what happened to his father (Tommy Lee Jones), whose own mission 30 years earlier had serious consequences for the universe. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Anthropocene: The Human Epoch

This 2018 documentary is a dramatically shot film about the impact of humans on planet Earth. Part of a nationwide screening to coincide with the U.N. Climate Action Summit. Shows Wednesday (Sept. 25), 7 p.m. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

Downton Abbey

The popular British television show comes to the big screen, with the familiar cast of characters being visited at their English country house by the king and queen. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Rambo: Last Blood

Sylvester Stallone returns as traumatized Vietnam vet John Rambo, who has to conjure up his superior fighting skills when he ventures into Mexican drug cartel territory on “one final mission.” Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Remember My Name

A candid documentary on the tumultuous life of 1960s musical icon David Crosby, from his days in Crosby, Stills and Nash to his recent musical renaissance. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

Now playing Angel Has Fallen

Gerard Butler and Morgan Freeman return for this third Fallen film (following Olympus Has Fallen and London Has Fallen), with the former as a Secret Service agent now on the run after being framed for an assassination attempt on the latter (now playing the U.S. president). Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Brittany Runs a Marathon

A dramedy starring Jillian Bell as a woman who sets out to lose weight and train for running the New York City Marathon. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

3

Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

Hobbs & Shaw is actually a spinoff from the series. In other words, rejoice! The leaden, dreary Vin Diesel is nowhere to be seen in this movie. Now we can have some real fun! Hobbs & Shaw is a bizarre hybrid of spy thriller, action flick, screwball comedy and science fiction. Here, Furious franchise regulars Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and Shaw

(Jason Statham) are tasked with protecting the latter’s sister, Hattie (Vanessa Kirby), after she injects herself with something that will have worldwide consequences if she’s captured. The main antagonist is Brixton (Idris Elba), a former Shaw ally who has turned into some sort of bionic badass dubbed, by himself, “Black Superman.” Stuntmanturned-director David Leitch, who gave us the first John Wick and Deadpool 2, knows his way around an action scene, and his edits create constant action and laughs—thanks in large part to Johnson and Statham’s great timing and onscreen chemistry. And while it’s expected that the tough-guy leads will kick ass in movies such as this, it’s Kirby who steals the show as the action hero of this installment. She is a total badass. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Good Boys

Three sixth-grade boys embark on an epic, R-rated coming-of-age odyssey. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Goldfinch

Film adaptation of Donna Tarrt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 2013 novel, a coming-of-age story about a man who’s taken in by a wealthy family as a young boy after his mother was killed in a bombing at a museum. Starring Nicole Kidman, Luke Wilson and Jeffrey Wright. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated. R.

Hustlers

Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez, Julia Stiles and Cardi B star as a crew of strippers who hustle money from Wall Street clients who frequent the club. Inspired by a true-life 2015 story that appeared in New York magazine. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

2

It Chapter Two

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —B.G.

The Lion King

Jon Favreau (Elf, Iron Man) directs this photorealistic CGI remake of the 1994 Disney animated classic that features an impressive cast of voice actors, including Chiwetel Ejiofor, Donald Glover, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen, John Oliver and, naturally, James Earl Jones as Mufasa. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

The Peanut Butter Falcon

The story of teen boy with Down syndrome (Zack Gottsagen) who runs away and sets off on a journey to a wrestling camp to realize his dream of becoming a pro wrestler. Also starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson and Bruce Dern. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

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FILM SHORTS

Alvin Schwartz’s 1980s series of children’s scary short stories gets the cinematic horror treatment. Cinemark 14. Rated PG

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Anthropocene: The Human Epoch SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

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35


CHOW

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Saturday 11aM-2PM

MENU HIGHLIGHTS Cinnamon pancakes with cream cheese frosting Prime Rib and eggs Assortment of different benedicts served on our very own cheddar cheese potato cakes Fresh berry Acai bowl Mimosa flights with over 10 different juice options 1/2 lb Burger made from our own blend of ground beef / brisket / short ribs Many more exciting dishes!!

229 BROADWAY CHICO 530.487.7207 LASALLESCHICO.COM

Open Tuesday-Friday 4PM, Saturday-Sunday 9aM Sat & Sun Brunch 9AM -2PM Daily Happy Hour 4PM-6PM Live Music Thur 6PM-9PM, Fri 4PM-6PM, Sat 11AM-2PM Check out our patio with fire pits & games to enjoy! 36

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2019

Four wines to keep on ice as summer invades fall

Tlikely autumn, but hot temperatures will linger in Chico until at he calendar is inching toward

least mid-October. So as long as it continues to feel by like summer, we’ll Rachel continue to drink Leibrock as if it’s summer. rac h e l l @ That means new srev i ew. c o m white wines and rosés, lots of them. Red wine seems too cloying, most beers are too heavy, and cocktails, with their complex array of ingredients, just feel like too much work. If like me, however, you sometimes feel intimidated when it comes to selecting drinkable, affordable wines—don’t. Whites and rosés are among the easiest to navigate, particularly if you know what flavor profile you prefer. I like the driest of blends—crisp with minimal-to-no sweetness. Following are four picks that fit my basic criteria: cheapish ($10 or less), dry and almost as refreshing as sparkling water. Domaine de Pellehaut Harmonie de Gascogne blanc This wine, which hails from the Côtes de Gascogne region in southern France, is a blend of white grapes that exudes a dry, oh-soslightly tangy taste. The maker describes it as “flinty,” but I’d say it’s just right for early evening sipping on those hot nights when a cooling breeze eludes us. Usually

on sale for about $10 at various local grocers. Kirkland Signature Marlborough sauvignon blanc Have a Costco card? Pick up this sauvignon blanc for just $6.99. Seriously. New Zealand whites are having a moment and this wine, named by Business Insider magazine as one of the discount store’s best options, exemplifies the trend. It’s got a clean, crisp taste ripe with lemongrass, grapefruit and apple notes. All that and the price is so good you won’t feel as bad about all the other impulse buys you throw into your cart. Hello, fancy $400 vacuum. La Ferme Julien rosé Trader Joe’s, not surprisingly, stocks a decent selection of whites and rosés—most less

than $10. One of my favorites is this super-affordable option. At only $5.99 a bottle, it’s as light as a summer morning breeze with a pleasing pale pink hue. Made from a blend of syrah, granache and cinsault grapes, it’s got a clean finish that makes it ideal for barbecues, pool parties or afternoons binge-watching Fleabag on Amazon Prime. Again. 2016 Dark Horse California rosé Another choice for the non-wine snobs among us. This mediumbodied wine is very crisp but balanced, with notes of juicy fruits and a slight floral-forward finish. Pick up a bottle (or two) for $9.99 and pair it with the “Rosé All Day” tank top you can probably snag from Tar-jay’s yoga wear section. Ω


september 19, 2019


ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

Goodbye, Sun Summer is for woodshedding, especially in a college town.

It’s when many artists practice, make plans and gear up to launch new projects during the fall semester. And judging by the pile of new releases dropping early in the school year, Chico’s musicians have been sweating hard the past few months. There are at least six local recordings that have come across arts dEVo’s computer recently. Tonight (Sept. 19, 9 p.m.), at duffy’s Tavern, two bands with new albums share the stage at a proper release show: sex Hogs ii (see “Greasing the hog,” page 31) will celebrate its five-song cassette, Ride the Tusk (available for digital download at sexhogs.bandcamp.com) alongside depressed and distressed, the debut 10-inch record by Beehive. The latter is being released on colored vinyl by Orange County’s Jester Records, and it is a gritty slice of distorted garage rock built on the ever-shifting foundation of an ancient Hammond drum machine. For the recording, bassist Brandon “Bud” armienti and vocalist/guitarist/drum programmer Jake sprecher followed the tempo live (all songs, back-to-back in one take, no overdubs!) as it wound up and down, not stopping between tracks. It’s an impressive feat of riff-ripping stamina that doesn’t take a breath until the last chord of hectic closer “Wasting Our Time.” Available for download at beehive1.bandcamp.com. A couple nights later, Saturday (Sept. 21, 8 p.m.), longtime local music dude Cameron Ford (of legendary noisemakers The secret stolen) will be at the naked Lounge to debut his solo album, Killer Bee Brownie. The just-released album (available at all the major digital/streaming sites) is an impressively recorded collection of tuneful rock songs—a little chamber pop, a little death Cab for Cutie, a lot of introspective lyrics—that features Ford on most every instrument, plus some special local guests, including Lorna such (Lo & Behold vocalist), Garrett Gray, Jen Benoit, Ben Ruttenburg, John Wold and Webster Moore, to name a few. Moore also will perform at the release show, along with uke badass Uni and Her Ukelele. donald Beaman doesn’t have an official party planned for his just-released open Field, but you can catch him live on Sunday (Sept. 22, 8 p.m.) at the 1078 Gallery when he and Gray both open for the Highplainsman Troubadour himself, Tom Brosseau. You can download the gorgeous album at donaldbeaman. bandcamp.com. It has everything you need to settle in with headphones for an immersive experience: sparkly and warm guitars, inventive vocal melodies, intriguing lyrical imagery (“You ran your fingertip/wet with wine/along the edge of the glass,” from opener “Night Now”) and subdued and inviting production (recorded by scott Barwick; mixed/mastered by Kirt Lind). Coming soon: sunday iris, the dave Elke/Lisa Langly duo, will headline a record-release show for their latest—anywhere (already available online at CD Baby and Amazon)—at The Maltese on Sept. 27, with openers Gray (the guy’s all over the place!) and The Exclusionaries. Burn scar, the new album by local prog-metalheads shadow Limb, doesn’t come out until Oct. 11, but you can get a taste with the brutal (and bonkers!) teaser track, “Asger Arisen,” at shadowlimb.bandcamp.com. And you can get a taste of the band live this Friday (Sept. 20) at The Maltese when it opens for Boise heavy-psyche crew Ealdor Bealu.

beSt of the WeSt Sound ClaSh Bless up, Chico, the clash of DJ crews

Guerrilla Takeover, Blessed Coast and Broken silence goes down Saturday, Sept. 21, at 9 p.m., at Lost on Main. The show is free (big ups to stay Positive sound!), so come out for a night of reggae, show much love to the performers and help choose the winner of the battle.

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September 19, 2019


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Homes Sold Last Week

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of September 2 - September 7, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

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ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

1975 Big Ridge Rd

Berry Creek

$249,000

5/2

SQ. FT.

1824

141 W Lassen Ave #4 Apt

Chico

$156,500

2/1

SQ. FT.

768

220 White Cedar Ln

Chico

$595,000

3/3

2307

10010 Jones Ave

Durham

$750,000

4/2

4582

1093 Corino Real Ct

Chico

$499,000

3/2

1926

9255 Goodspeed St

Durham

$222,000

2/1

864

1826 Roth St

Chico

$480,000

3/3

1472

633 Oregon St

Gridley

$225,000

2/2

1164

1454 Heather Cir

Chico

$420,000

2/3

1872

6225 Kilgord Ct

Magalia

$275,000

3/2

1655

651 Larch St

Chico

$417,000

3/2

1936

6302 Amherst Way

Magalia

$270,000

3/2

1654

223 W 1st Ave

Chico

$380,000

2/1

1841

14300 Culver Ct

Magalia

$246,000

3/2

1570

1602 Laburnum Ave

Chico

$365,000

3/2

1476

193 Sunnybrook Ln

Oroville

$425,000

3/2

2084

7 Shari Ln

Chico

$364,500

3/2

1730

149 Acacia Ave

Oroville

$359,000

3/2

2048

1658 Pendant Pl

Chico

$358,500

3/2

1234

59 Mayberry Rd

Oroville

$315,000

3/2

1712

1339 Yosemite Dr

Chico

$340,000

3/2

1718

771 Bird St

Oroville

$225,000

3/2

1622

38 Garden Park Dr

Chico

$305,000

3/3

1236

2274 Las Plumas Ave

Oroville

$175,000

3/2

1144

2763 Ceres Ave

Chico

$299,000

3/2

1170

2355 Via Canela

Oroville

$165,000

2/1

1269

1715 Laurel St

Chico

$285,000

3/1

1800

2527 C St

Oroville

$155,000

3/2

1008

2172 Mariposa Ave

Chico

$270,000

3/3

1144

1081 Robinson St

Oroville

$115,000

4/3

1846

1107 Sunset Ave

Chico

$265,000

2/1

927

1614 Gate Ln

Paradise

$345,000

3/2

1554

1714 Elm St

Chico

$250,000

2/1

810

6096 Maxwood Dr

Paradise

$237,500

2/2

1178

3959 Keefer Rd

Chico

$217,000

1/2

330

3605 Connie Cir A

Paradise

$230,000

2/2

1080

1125 Sheridan Ave #28

Chico

$175,000

1/1

642

522 Digger Pine Ln

Paradise

$229,000

2/1

1020

September 19, 2019

CN&R

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THOUSAND ACRE WOOD BOOKS at 2811 North Avenue Chico, CA 95973. TERESA TRAVER 2811 North Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERESA TRAVER Dated: August 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000948 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CB WOOD ARTS at 19 Franciscan Way Chico, CA 95973. CRAIG ARTHUR BONNER 19 Franciscan Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CRAIG A. BONNER RH Dated: August 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000979 this Legal Notice continues

FBN Number: 2019-0000980 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SECRETS OF PARADISE at 6433 Skyway 9 Paradise, CA 95969. GABRIELL HERNDON 5827 Wildwood Lane Suite 6 Paradise, CA 95969. ESTEFANIA MIRANDA 5827 Wildwood Lane Suite 6 Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: ESTEFANIA MIRANDA Dated: August 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000984 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KREMER DENTAL CARE PHILADEPHIA SQUARE at 140 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973. KEVIN KREMER, DDS, NORTH STATE, INC. 3 Glenbrook Ct. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KEVIN KREMER, PRESIDENT Dated: August 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000959 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CONNECTIONS COUNSELING at 15 Ilahee Lane Suite 100 Chico, CA 95973. HEATHER MARIE BOGGS 291 Cavalier Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HEATHER BOGGS Dated: August 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000986 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TREE CITY FILMS at 1729 Oakdale St Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. SHAWN DYER 1729 Oakdale St Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHAWN DYER Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000967 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEART BEAN COFFEE at 777 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. FAELIN KLEIN 777 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FAELIN KLEIN Dated: August 21, 2019 this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EDELWEISS at 1933 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. KRISTEN FRIETSCHE 8 Rockerfeller Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTEN FRIETSCHE Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000953 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADVENTURE QUEST at 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. DRUIN DANIEL HARVEY HEAL 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. ELIZABETH (HEAL) MARTIN 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DRUIN (DANIEL) HEAL Dated: August 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000982 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SANTINOS CATERING at 40 Quadra Ct Chico, CA 95928. KAELEN DAVIS 40 Quadra Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAELEN W. DAVIS Dated: August 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000994 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUILDING MARKET INTELLIGENCE, MISSING MIDDLE METRICS, PELOTON RESEARCH ECONOMICS at 125 W 3rd Street, Suite 250 Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD FRANKLIN HUNT 1040 Macy Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD F. HUNT Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001007 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CORVO JEWELRY at 1293 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. CORVO LLC 1293 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: LILY ANN RAVEN, CEO Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000938 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name F.E.W. PRODUCTS at 5050 Cohasset Rd. Unit 50 Chico, CA 95973. LANCE A WALDSMITH 14064 Limousin Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LANCE A WALDSMITH Dated: September 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000418 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PLANT MADNESS at 3856 Cosby Ave Chico, CA 95928. JOHN FENDLEY 3856 Cosby Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN FENDLEY Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001005 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STEPHANIE KAY FILMS at 3117 Bay Ave Chico, CA 95973. STEPHANIE KAY VALDES 3117 Bay Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHANIE VALDES Dated: September 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001023 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BENJAMIN’S INSURANCE SERVICES at 1661 Forest Avenue Unit 74 Chico, CA 95928. BENJAMIN HENRY 1661 Forest Avenue Unit 74 Chico, CA 95928. JODY HENRY 1661 Forest Avenue Unit 74 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: BENJAMIN HENRY Dated: August 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000929 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BABY’S BREADS at 2654 Fair Street Chico, CA 95928. MARY OLIVER 2654 Fair Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARY OLIVER Dated: September 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001032 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as 10-4 CONSTRUCTION at 15 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. SCOTT A MCCOLLUM 15 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT A MCCOLLUM Dated: July 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000825 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAMINA at 2560 Dominic Drive Ste A Chico, CA 95928. CAMINA BAKERY LLC 851 Netters Circle Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limitied Liability Company. Signed: TATTON WHITE, CFO Dated: September 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001018 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BRASS CONNECTION, SWING SHIFT at 702 Mangrove Ave Ste 165 Chico, CA 95926. TIMOTHY PAUL HOWEY 758 Cleveland Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TIM P. HOWEY Dated: September 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001043 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EXCLUSIVE TATTOO CO. at 2109 Esplanade Ste 110 Chico, CA 95926. JOE ANTHONY SANCHEZ 1542 1/2 Citrus Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOE SANCHEZ Dated: August 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000989 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE COUNTY LOCAL FOOD NETWORK at 2483 Streamside Court Chico, CA 95926. PAMELA MARIE LARRY 2483 Streamside Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: PAMELA LARRY Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001004 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as this Legal Notice continues

BEST ASIAN MASSAGE at 1360 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL L ARIZA 1145 W 2nd St Apt 9 Chico, CA 95928. BEST ASIAN MASAGE 1145 W 2nd St Apt 9 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: M. L. ARIZA Dated: September 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001051 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DAVE BOUL IT CONSULTING at 1312 Purcell Ln Chico, CA 95926. DAVID A BOUL 1312 Purcell Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAVID BOUL Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001048 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RIVER OAK GARDENS at 754 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. KRISTA KNECHT 754 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. MATTHEW MORRISSEY 754 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KRISTA KNECHT Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001046 Published: September 19,26, October 3,10, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARTHA MAYR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ELLA PHYLLIS BUNTING MILLIE BEATRICE BUNTING Proposed name: ELLA PHYLLIS MAYR MILLIE BEATRICE MAYR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 9, 2019

this Legal Notice continues

Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: August 16, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02426 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 30, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02631 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARINA DALIA CARINO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARINA DALIA CARINO Proposed name: MARINA DALIA ESQUIVEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02498 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: LANDES MEDICAL GROUP, A MEDICAL CORP.;, WILLIAM LANDES, MD, AN INDIVIDUAL; AND DOES 1-5 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: CARWOOD SKYPARK, LLC NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: JOSEPH L. SELBY 249546 FERRIS & SELBY 2607 Forest Avenue, Suite 130 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 343-0100 Dated: May 21, 2019 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 19CV01535 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOHN MARK KRAMER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JOHN MARK KRAMER Proposed name: JACK MARK KRAMER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 23, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is:

this Legal Notice continues

SUMMONS

SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT PAUL JOSEPH GHIMENTI You have been sued by petitioner: GRACE ANN GHIMENTI You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court Of California County of Glenn Willows Branch - Main Courthouse 526 West Sycamore St Willows, CA 95988 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: GRACE ANN GHIMENTI 425 E Walker St Orland, CA 95963 Signed: CINDIA MARTINEZ Dated: May 14, 2019 Case Number: 19FL06504 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

PETITION

CLaSSIfIEdS

CONTINUED ON 42

ARIES (March 21-April 19): We’re in the

equinoctial season. During this pregnant pause, the sun seems to hover directly over the equator; the lengths of night and day are equal. For all of us, but especially for you, it’s a favorable phase to conjure and cultivate more sweet symmetry, calming balance and healing harmony. In that spirit, I encourage you to temporarily suspend any rough, tough approaches you might have in regard to those themes. Resist the temptation to slam two opposites together simply to see what happens. Avoid engaging in the pseudo-fun of purging by day and binging by night. And don’t you dare get swept up in hating what you love or loving what you hate.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “I tell you

what freedom is to me: no fear.” So said singer and activist Nina Simone. But it’s doubtful there ever came a time when she reached the perfect embodiment of that idyllic state. How can any of us empty out our anxiety so completely as to be utterly emancipated? It’s not possible. That’s the bad news, Taurus. The good news is that in the coming weeks you will have the potential to be as unafraid as you have ever been. For best results, try to ensure that love is your primary motivation in everything you do and say and think.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Some

things don’t change much. The beautiful marine animal species known as the pearly nautilus, which lives in the South Pacific, is mostly the same as it was 150 million years ago. Then there’s Fuggerei, a walled enclave within the German city of Augsburg. The rent is cheap, about $1 per year, and that fee hasn’t increased in almost 500 years. While I am in awe of these bastions of stability, and wish we had more such symbolic anchors, I advise you to head in a different direction. During the coming weeks, you’ll be wise to be a maestro of mutability, a connoisseur of transformation, an adept of novelty.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Granny

Smith apples are widely available. But before 1868, the tart, crispy, juicy fruit never existed on planet Earth. Around that time, an Australian mother of eight named Maria Ann Smith threw the cores of French crab apples out her window while she was cooking. The seeds were fertilized by the pollen from a different, unknown variety of apple, and a new type was born: Granny Smith. I foresee the possibility of a metaphorically comparable event in your future: a lucky accident that enables you to weave together two interesting threads into a fascinating third thread.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Every masterpiece

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE NADINE I. REGAS, also known as NADINE IDA REGAS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NADINE I. REGAS, also known as NADINE IDA REGAS, NADINE REGAS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JUDITH K. TESSIEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUDITH K. TESSIEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

this Legal Notice continues

For the week oF September 19, 2019

is just dirt and ash put together in some perfect way,” writes storyteller Chuck Palahniuk, who has completed several novelistic masterpieces. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you have assembled much of the dirt and ash necessary to create your next masterpiece, and are now ready to move on to the next phase. And what is that phase? Identifying the help and support you’ll need for the rest of the process.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1959,

scandal erupted among Americans who loved to eat peanut butter. Studies revealed that manufacturers had added so much hydrogenated vegetable oil and glycerin to their product that only 75% of it could truly be called peanut butter. So began a long legal process to restore high standards. Finally there was a new law specifying that no company could sell a product called “peanut butter” unless it contained at least 90% peanuts. I hope this fight for purity inspires you to conduct a metaphorically comparable campaign. It’s time to ensure that all the important resources and influences in your life are at peak intensity and efficiency. Say “no” to dilution and adulteration.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1936, the

city of Cleveland staged the Great Lakes Exposition, a 135-acre fair with thrill rides, art galleries, gardens and sideshows. One

by rob brezSny of its fun features was The Golden Book of Cleveland, a 2.5-ton, 6,000-page text the size of a mattress. After the expo closed down, the “biggest book in the world” went missing. If it still exists today, no one knows where it is. I’m going to speculate that there’s a metaphorical version of The Golden Book of Cleveland in your life. You, too, have lost track of a major Something that would seem hard to misplace. Here’s the good news: If you intensify your search now, I bet you’ll find it before the end of 2019.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 1990,

the New Zealand government appointed educator, magician and comedian Ian Brackenbury Channell to be the official Wizard of New Zealand. His jobs include protecting the government, blessing new enterprises, casting out evil spirits, upsetting fanatics and cheering people up. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to find your personal equivalents of an inspirational force like that. There’s really no need to scrimp. According to my reading of the cosmic energies, you have license to be extravagant in getting what you need to thrive.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“Do silly things,” advised playwright Anton Chekhov. “Foolishness is a great deal more vital and healthy than our straining and striving after a meaningful life.” I think that’s a perspective worth adopting now and then. Most of us go through phases when we take things too seriously and too personally and too literally. Bouts of fun absurdity can be healing agents for that affliction. But now is not one of those times for you, in my opinion. Just the reverse is true, in fact. I encourage you to cultivate majestic moods and seek out awe-inspiring experiences and induce sublime perspectives. Your serious and noble quest for a meaningful life can be especially rewarding in the coming weeks.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Before comedian Jack Benny died in 1974, he arranged to have a florist deliver a single red rose to his wife every day for the rest of her life. She lived another nine years, and received more than 3,000 of these gifts. Even though you’ll be around on this earth for a long time, I think the coming weeks would be an excellent time to establish a comparable custom: a commitment to providing regular blessings to a person or persons for whom you care deeply. This bold decision would be in alignment with astrological omens, which suggest that you can generate substantial benefits for yourself by being creative with your generosity.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Actress

and author Ruby Dee formulated an unusual prayer. “God,” she wrote, “make me so uncomfortable that I will do the very thing I fear.” As you might imagine, she was a brave activist who risked her reputation and career working for the civil rights movement and other idealistic causes. I think her exceptional request to a higher power makes good sense for you right now. You’re in a phase when you can generate practical blessings by doing the very things that intimidate you or make you nervous. And maybe the best way to motivate and mobilize yourself is by getting at least a bit flustered or unsettled.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Syndicated

cartoon strip Calvin and Hobbes appeared for 10 years in 2,400 newspapers in 50 countries. It wielded a sizable cultural influence. For example, in 1992, 6-yearold Calvin decided “The Big Bang” was a boring term for how the universe began, and instead proposed we call it the “Horrendous Space Kablooie.” A number of real scientists subsequently adopted Calvin’s innovation, and it has been invoked playfully but seriously in university courses and textbooks. In that spirit, I encourage you to give fun new names to anything and everything you feel like spicing up. You now have substantial power to reshape and revamp the components of your world. It’s Identify-Shifting Time.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. September 19, 2019

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The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 24, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: August 28, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00384 Published: September 5,12,19, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE BETTY ANN VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY A. VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY VANDEGRIFT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BETTY ANN VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY A. VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY VANDEGRIFT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARK D. VANDEGRIFT this Legal Notice continues

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in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARK D. VANDEGRIFT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 24, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: August 28, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00385 Published: September 5,12,19, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHERI L. MEYERS, aka SHERI LYNN MEYERS To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the this Legal Notice continues

will or estate, or both, of: SHERI L. MEYERS, aka SHERI LYNN MEYERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JUSTIN MEYERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUSTIN MEYERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: JUSTIN MEYERS, IN PRO PER 6447 Hollywood Rd., #3 Magalia, CA 95954 Case Number: 19PR00399 Published: September 12,19,26, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JANET P. BECK, aka JANET PENNY BECK, aka JANET BECK, aka PENNY BECK To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JANET P. BECK, aka JANET PENNY BECK, aka JANET BECK, aka PENNY BECK A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DANIELLE LECLERC KLEIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DANIELLE LECLERC KLEIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration this Legal Notice continues

of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: September 12, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00413 Published: September 19,26, October 3, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ROBERT LEE BOYD aka BOBBY L. BOYD To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ROBERT LEE BOYD aka BOBBY L. BOYD A Petition for Probate has been filed by: BRIAN K. BOYD in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: BRIAN K. BOYD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under this Legal Notice continues

the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 8, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-IV Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC, ESQ. P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: September 12, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00414 Published: September 19,26, October 3, 2019

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