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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 3 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

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MARC THOMPSON REMEMBERED

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POT SHOPS COMETH?

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Beer ISSUE

GOODBYE, ZUCCHINI & VINE

• Allied invasion

TM

• Label art • Curator of suds

WEEK See EVENTS CALENDAR, page 22


Accident? injured?

law oFFiCes oF

Lawrence a. Puritz F o r m e r I n s u r a n c e D e F e n s e at t o r n e y

eae Fr ion sult t

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S ep t em b er 1 2, 20 1 9

343-0500 northvalleylawyer.com


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 3 • September 12, 2019 OPINION 

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES 

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES 

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Lisa Van Der Maelen, Jim Williams, David Wyles

R E BE e issu

COVER STORY

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Beer Week Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

ARTS & CULTURE 

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

REAL ESTATE  

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CLASSIFIEDS  

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ON tHe COVer: pHOtO Of mOtHer aNd daugHter, alisON Kay aNd emma martiN Of allies pub by WeNdy steWart

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Publications Art Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

september 12, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 e. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

more common sense, less emotion One of the indicators that a local advisory committee

put together solid recommendations on codifying commercial cannabis operations in the city of Chico is that nobody who participated in the effort walked away entirely happy. Considering the group was composed of stakeholders from a wide cross-section of the city—including representatives from the Chico Chamber of Commerce, Butte County Public Health, the cannabis industry, Chico Unified School District, the Downtown Chico Business Association, the City Council and local laypeople—coming up with the final recommendations required concessions from all involved. We view that as a good thing. Some of the main questions for the group included how many retail outlets to allow and where to allow them. The recommendation: one per 25,000 people. That means no more than four dispensaries. In addition, with the zoning restrictions they agreed upon, there will be no dispensaries downtown or

near the mall, both places frequented by families with children. Chico is actually playing catch-up when it comes to commercial cannabis. Such activities have been legal for years in California, especially for medicinal products, and there are plenty of successful examples to draw from. Local governments are allowed to create stricter rules than the state allows, of course, including banning businesses altogether. The cannabis committee took that tack with regard to cultivation, something that we agree belongs more in the county than within city limits. We’re impressed with Vice Mayor Alex Brown’s execution of a plan to bring a diverse group of stakeholders together to discuss commercial cannabis, a subject that in the past has been highly contentious. We realize there’s still a long way to go, but hope that the courteous and thoughtful discussions that have dominated the past few months are indicative of a more common-sense, less emotional path forward. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Face recognition over stopping threats Tusedningontoalltestdomestic a face-recognition system that could be U.S. fliers, according to a docu-

he Transportation Security Administration is plan-

ment the agency recently released. That would represent a significant expansion of face recognition in daily life. In the test, which will occur at McCarran airport in Las Vegas, passengers entering the TSA security area will be photographed and a face-recognition algorithm applied in an attempt to tell whether they match the photograph on their IDs. The system adds face recognition to a technology that the TSA has been working on for years that scans by Jay Stanley a passenger’s driver’s license or the author is a senior other ID document and attempts to policy analyst with the automatically determine whether it ACLU Speech, privacy, is authentic. and technology If the TSA decides that the project. system works well, we can assume the agency will use it to replace human document checkers throughout the domestic aviation system. If widely deployed, the TSA’s program would normalize the technology, inevitably be subject to mission creep, and expose people to the judgments of unreliable and biased algorithms. For purposes of this test, the TSA says it will run the

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September 12, 2019

system only on passengers who volunteer to participate. Names and identification numbers will be obfuscated before the data is transferred for analysis, the agency says, and the data will be deleted within 180 days. But the real question is what data will be collected and how will it be handled if this technology moves beyond tests? Will passengers be able to opt out? Will the agency want to collect and store passengers’ photographs to improve the training of their face recognition algorithms? Will passengers’ photos be run against photographic watch lists, exposing them to the risk of being misidentified as a terrorist or other criminal? And what are the implications of introducing a technology for the automated checking of IDs? Like many airport security measures, such technology may expand beyond the airport and into daily life. When ID checks become cheap and easily scalable they will inevitably be overused, as we have seen happen with other surveillance technologies. Finally, one of the biggest problems with this use of face recognition is that it represents an ever-growing investment by the TSA in identity-based security—security based on knowing more and more information about people and trying to use that information to assess their “risk to aviation.” The TSA should instead focus on making sure that nobody—no matter who they are—can bring guns or explosives onto aircraft. Face recognition is an investment that is bad for security and is likely to have bad side effects on our society to boot. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

A telling vote This week, I’m hopping into the DeLorean and setting the dial to spring 2014. The city of Chico was climbing its way out of a financial hole triggered by the Great Recession. Morale at City Hall was still in the dumps following then-City Manager Brian Nakamura’s efforts to “rightsize” the budget. That’s code for layoffs—the year before, dozens of employees lost their jobs. But that wasn’t the only trend of the time. Another one: turning to the private sector to perform services traditionally conducted by staff. Many departments or portions thereof—animal control, street sweeping, tree work, etc.—were on the table. Then there was the biggie: the City Attorney’s Office. The city had always operated with in-house counsel, supplemented by various outside firms depending on the litigation at hand, but saving funds was the order of the day. The question before the City Council: Should it contract out that essential department? In an editorial, the CN&R came out against such an arrangement. That’s because yours truly had covered local government for years and had watched City Attorney Lori Barker—originally hired as assistant city attorney in 1990—present information and advice that shielded the municipality from potential lawsuits. She was accessible and held vast historical knowledge. That changed in 2014 when a liberal-majority council hired City of Industry-based Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin following an announcement that Barker was retiring. She was among the last of the senior-level managers from the pre-recession era that hadn’t quit, suddenly “retired” or been sacked. Back then, roughly seven months before an election, the lefties were on the ropes politically. The conservatives had spun the narrative that the city’s financial woes were due to the liberals’ mismanagement—to hell with the fact that the main culprits were the largest recession since the Great Depression and the overly generous compensation packages awarded to certain employee groups over the years by both left- and right-leaning councils. One of the biggest backers of privatization was Mark Sorensen, vice mayor at the time. In the CN&R’s election coverage months later—the year the council flipped—Sorensen charged that switching to contracted attorneys would save “hundreds of thousands of dollars per year.” But has it? I’m not so sure. I’m especially skeptical considering how the city now appears to be on the hook for a slew of attorney’s fees related to the ongoing Chico Scrap Metal saga in which Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin represented the city. Recall how Sorensen and the rest of the conservatives 1) sued Councilman Karl Ory over his participation in Move the Junkyard’s referendum to force the recycler to move, 2) entered into an agreement with that private business wherein they believed it would pay attorney’s fees, and 3) cost the city (aka taxpayers) what likely totals hundreds of thousands of dollars since a superior court judge ultimately ruled in the referendum’s favor. Who benefited from the litigiousness? Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin. Last week we reported that the council—the new liberal-majority panel—was cutting ties with the So Cal-based firm. One might assume that move is politically motivated. But that’s clearly not the case. My evidence: conservative Kasey Reynolds broke with Sean Morgan to vote with the liberals. That’s telling.


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Remember this recall? Re “Seeking offers” (Newslines, by Andre Byik, Sept. 5): In 2000, Cal Fire tried to take over the Oroville Fire Department. The effort led to a recall election in which Mayor Dennis Diver and two council members were recalled from office. A main issue in the campaign was state control over a significant portion of the Oroville city budget. Do Oroville residents care anymore? Don Blake Oroville

‘Missed the mark’ Re “2nd Amendment blues” (Letters, by Mona Uruburu, Sept. 5): Ms. Uruburu’s letter missed the mark on every point. The AR/AK-platform rifle is ineffective against government? Yet, it’s the capable personal-arms choice for freedom fighters all

over the globe. Governments don’t have a death-ray, Ms. Uruburu. Reporters … keep us free? The press supports freedom only if it’s neutral. A one-party press, in a two-party government, is statist propaganda antithetical to freedom. If the press were 95 percent conservative and only supported Republican ideals, would you believe they protected your freedom then? The Dayton shooter was a “loony conservative”? Wrong. He was a liberal, anti-gun socialist, who stated he’d vote for Elizabeth Warren. The Constitution ignored slavery? Stone tools are 2.5 million years old, and prehistoric man surely used one to bash the skull of another, take his mate, and enslave his offspring. The history of humankind is war and slavery. The framers of the Constitution knew that the idea of being born in freedom and slavery were incompatible, one would will out, and they had faith in their document.

Guided by that Constitution, America abolished the eons-old practice of slavery in a scant 90 years. Conservatives should listen to liberals? Well, Ms. Uruburu, we did read your letter. Peter Bridge Glenn

Survival gear snatched Across from Chico High School on Magnolia Street is a T-bird parked the wrong way in a twohour spot that has been there for more than a month. The registration is 20 months overdue but there are no tickets. There is a notice from the police to move within a week. A Suburban with no tags is parked on Cedar Street near the old Gold’s Gym that’s been sitting all summer. It has a 30-day notice taped to the windshield. My van parked near downtown LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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was seven months overdue. It was towed the Thursday before Labor Day weekend without any warning. The police department offices are closed on Fridays. The officer noted that, because of clothing and bedding material within, it appeared the vehicle was being lived out of. Thanks, Chico PD. All my possessions—in fact, everything that I needed to survive—simply vanished. The tow charge was $230. Storage was $60 per day. The “convenience fee” from the police department to allow the tow company to release my vehicle was $180. My friend Dave paid these criminally high fees to get my car back the next day. Isn’t the law supposed to be fair and even? Tedra Thomsen Chico

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Donald Trump had to cancel his secret meeting at Camp David with the leaders of the Taliban terrorist group after learning that they were responsible for the car bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, that killed an American soldier. The anniversary of 9/11 exacerbated the foolishness in timing of yet another meeting with vicious rulers that our illustrious so-called president has an affinity for. Kim Jong Un and Putin are others that come to mind. Trump pirated Ronald Reagan’s MAGA slogan for his 2016 presidential campaign and has many times tried comparing himself to Reagan. In reality, the failed reality-TV host is the antithesis of Reagan, and he proved it with the secret planned rendezvous with the Taliban. Reagan made it very clear that he would not “negotiate with barbarians.” Donald Trump, you’re no Ronald Reagan. Ray Estes  Redding

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CN&R 

September 12, 2019

The bad news is that there are humans on this planet who do not have enough food or access to clean water. The really bad news is that many of those with a full belly do not care. The good news is that soon we will have packages delivered by

drones. The really good news is that soon the wealthy will be able to vacation on flights into space. Wolfgang Straub Chico

out, angry, alienated and disappointed, and he makes them feel empowered. Zolby concludes their real issues need to be addressed, rather than disparaging this base. Gayle Kimball Chico

Likin’ the lovin’ Re “More makeouts, please” (Letters, by Bill Mash, Sept. 5): Please, I agree! Chico isn’t what it used to be and everyone could use a little lovin’—along with their root beer floats. The summertime is slowly fading and there are plenty of places in Chico to warm up to someone special. Except Tom Tomorrow—that man is a colossal farce to everything sacred in what’s left of physical journalism. To see him throw out opinions over drawings with no foresight on how to deliver adequate, relevant political jokes is nothing but a crude rouse, and he is undeserving of love or hair. Rest easy, Chico. Hot cocoa is around the corner. Timothy Sandaele Paradise

Address the issues Why does Trump’s base continue to believe someone who: has lied over 12,000 times since taking office; scorns reading; gets his news from TV while disregarding his intelligence agencies; reveals classified information with harmful results; falsified the Hurricane Dorian weather map with a Sharpie pen and insisted NOAA lie to back him up; attacks women (23 have spoken up publicly); had unprotected sex while cheating on his third wife with a porn star; denies and accelerates climate change; blames brown and black people; separates babies from parents; makes fun of disabled people; says he loves dictators like Putin and Kim Jong Un and is rude to our allies; hurts farmers and others with his trade/tariff wars; costs taxpayers millions of dollars golfing 215 days at his golf clubs; is inarticulate and a narcissist sociopath? James Zogby explains some Republicans see his character but are willing to make a deal with him to advance their social agenda. His mostly white, less-educated base of around 30 percent [of the population] turns to Trump because they feel left

Unifying the people French film crew Navajo France recently filmed on location in Paradise. Filmmakers Lorenza Garcia and Vienne Bruno are making a documentary for public television in France that will focus on healing our Mother Earth during this time of world climate crisis. Garcia saw Paradise as an ideal location to show how deadly and destructive wildfires have become across the globe. Like California, France is experiencing wildfires due to extreme heat. This August, fire destroyed over 2,000 acres of pine forest in southern France. Garcia’s documentary examines traditional ecological management and the ways indigenous people heal the land through song, drum and ceremony. Oscar C. Pérez, Ph.D, who is Apache/Mexican, was interviewed for the film on private land once owned by this author. Pérez is a motivational speaker, writer and martial artist. Pérez has worked across the globe sharing cross-cultural healing traditions and wilderness immersions in an effort to transform our ideas about how we live with the land. Pérez offered a healing ceremony that included traditional songs he sang with Garcia. The French filmmakers were moved by what they saw in Paradise. It is their hope that their film will help unify all people to stop the exploitation of resources and find ways to restore the land. Kandi Maxwell Brownsville

Write a letter  tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. deadline for publication is noon on the tuesday prior to publication.


STREETALK

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Ryan Nelson beer bartender

For the most part, I’d have to say IPA, but it definitely depends on the mood that I’m in. It does vary a little bit. I love big hop profiles, I love bitterness. I think it’s also one of the most versatile styles out there.

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heating/airconditioning

Single IPAs. [I like] the hops, the aromas and the flavor. [Tonight] I’m drinking Secret Trail’s ’Bout It ’Bout It [double IPA].

Cindy Vierra heating/airconditioning

Pilsners, I think. They’re lighter beers—not the heavy beers and dark beers. They’re smooth. Here I always get [Revision blonde ale]. We come here at least once a week.

If you can’t recycle, repurpose. Feel good Recycling.

Robert Smith carpenter/ musician

Hazy IPAs, because I was hungover the first time I tried one, and it immediately started to cure my hangover at a show I was playing. There’s something about it—I don’t know what it was. Chico: 2300 Fair St. • (530) 343-4394 • www.fairstreetsolutions.com Hours: Monday-Friday 8am–5:45pm & Saturday 9am-5:30pm September 12, 2019

CN&R

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE MORE CAMP FIRE VICTIMS ID’D

The Butte County Sheriff’s Office has identified three more people who died in the Camp Fire, bringing the total number of identified victims to 84. Herbert Alderman, 79, Evelyn Cline, 81, and Isabel Webb, 68, were all Paradise residents. The identities of two people who died in the fire remain unknown, and investigators have released more information about one of them in hopes of generating leads. The remains of an “older,” “larger” man who had dental work with crowns were recovered at 4220 Schwyhart Lane in Concow, BCSO said. The remains were found commingled with those of 72-year-old Ellen Walker, who was named previously. Anyone with information about the unidentified man is asked to call 538-7671.

Waiting for justice

NORTH STATE ON FIRE

Several wildfires scorched Northern California this past week, prompting evacuation orders for some communities. No deaths have been reported, and only four structures have been damaged. The Walker Fire in Plumas National Forest ignited on Sept. 4 and has scorched 48,321 acres. Containment is at just 20 percent. Three other area fires had slowed. Lightning ignited the Red Bank Fire west of Red Bluff on Sept. 5, and it burned 8,838 acres at 80 percent containment. The Forbestown and Swedes fires, which started east of Oroville, both torched areas in the burn scar of 2017’s Wall Fire. The former burned less than 100 acres and is 95 percent contained; the latter is 70 percent contained and has burned nearly 500 acres. All numbers were current as of press time Wednesday (Sept. 11).

ROAD REPAIRS COMING

This week, Butte County started rebuilding Upper Centerville Road, a portion of which washed out during February’s heavy storms. The contract was awarded to Knife River Construction for approximately $378,000, and should be completed by Oct. 4. In addition to general roadway access, it’ll provide an evacuation route north for those living in Butte Creek Canyon. Concerned about safety, resident Laura George (pictured) circulated a petition to urge the county to act this summer (see “No way out,” Newslines, Aug. 1) on that and another portion of the road, damaged in January 2017. “We can’t predict where a fire or flood is going to happen,” she told the CN&R then. “You’d think after the Camp Fire … there’d be some priority of evacuation routes.” 8

CN&R

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Marc Thompson, as seen in Obligated to the Truth.

Local filmmaker explores life of slain student activist

TThompson, Gold Country Casino, the last place Marc a 25-year-old Chico State stuhey rendezvoused in the parking lot of

dent and skilled poker player, was seen alive. Trudy Duisenberg was directing a story and photo by documentary about Andre Byik Marc’s life. His father, an d re b @ Lawrence Thompson, n ew sr ev i ew. c o m started his car and drove east as she followed. They were headed Screening: Saturday (Sept. 21) at toward the clearing El Rey Theater, 230 W. where his son had been Second St. Doors open found killed, his car set at 6:30 p.m., $10 ablaze in the remote foothills just off OroQuincy Highway about 28 miles east of Oroville. Then they hit a roadblock. Both lanes of the highway had been washed out about two miles from their destination. Dead end. “The road [was] gone,” Duisenberg told the CN&R. “Literally gone.” Thompson jumped out of his car, struck with emotion. Duisenberg’s cameraman followed suit. Roll film. “If you live up here and you murdered my son, good luck getting home,”

Thompson says in the opening scenes of Duisenberg’s Obligated to the Truth: The Story of Murdered Student Activist Marc Thompson. “There’s a big ol’ hole in this ground right here. It’s the most craziest thing I’ve ever seen .... They killed my son two miles from up here for no reason. There was no reason to kill that kid. He was going to Chico State. His whole life was ahead of him.” The film, which will be screened next Saturday in Chico (see infobox), has been 2 1/2 years in the making. The 73-year-old filmmaker said she didn’t set out to solve the murder case, which has gone cold with no identified suspects five years after Marc’s Sept. 3, 2014, death. Instead, she aimed to paint a portrait of his life as an equal justice advocate, exploring the traumatic toll his unresolved killing has taken on his friends, peers and family. “I’m just motivated by us all becoming so numb to these … violent, unexplainable deaths that just rain down on us,” said Duisenberg, noting that Marc, a black man, was killed at a time when the country was gripped by demonstrations following the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a Ferguson, Mo., police officer. “Each

of those stats is a precious life, and they just flutter away. I thought, I don’t think it’s right. I thought, If we knew some of these stories, it would bring some awareness.” The 72-minute documentary focuses less on the investigatory details of Marc’s killing than on how his life affected others. Duisenberg does, however, reveal one previously unreported fact: He suffered multiple gunshot wounds to his head and torso. Duisenberg said she believes Marc was playing poker at Gold Country Casino and someone took offense to his presence. She said he was “unapologetically” black, witting, and likely winning. “I think Marc was taken away to the woods because he was playing poker while he was black,” she told the CN&R. Duisenberg told the CN&R that the Butte County Sheriff’s Office, which is investigating the death, neither participated in the documentary nor provided an update on the case. The lack of cooperation, she said, was surprising. Family members in the film express their frustration with investigators, questioning whether leads provided to them were followed up on in a timely manner and whether the case would be handled differently had Marc not been black.


Trudy Duisenberg’s new documentary exploring the life of Chico State student Marc Thompson comes five years after he was found slain.

“Being born and raised in Butte County, I had no confidence that they were going to do anything,” Thompson says in the film. “Zero confidence.” Sheriff Kory Honea told the CN&R he had considered providing a statement for the documentary expressing his desire to solve the case and acknowledging the family’s frustrations with the investigation. Ultimately, Honea said, he decided against it, feeling any statement that did not specifically address concerns or frustrations would only exacerbate them. The murder case remains open, he said, and detectives have continually evaluated evidence to determine whether new or different technologies could be used to find the killer or killers. “I have been assured that the detectives assigned to the case have done their best to follow up on the leads provided by family, friends and other sources,” the sheriff said. Marc is remembered in the film by way of

somber and tearful testimonies. He was a well-liked and -respected student activist who was passionate about social justice issues. He was studying sociology and psychology at the time of his death and served as an Associated Students commissioner of multicultural affairs. In the documentary, Duisenberg interviews former Chico State President Paul Zingg, who recalled his first meeting with Marc. He was a new student at the school, Zingg said, and he walked into the president’s office with a question. “People tell me I should meet you. Why do you think that’s the case?” Marc reportedly asked. “Maybe because they think you can help me and I can help you,” Zingg replied. That was the beginning of a three-year relationship, which Zingg described in the documentary as intense in a positive way. “I always felt that Marc was aware of not only the necessity of truth telling,” Zingg says, “but the obligation to tell the truth.” There is power in telling Marc’s story, and power in witnessing it, Duisenberg told the CN&R. Viewers, she said, may walk away from the film feeling inspired by how he lived his life. They also may gain an appreciation of how the effects of violence ripple from person to person, community to community. “We have to just face it,” she said. “It was just such a horrible act that people needed to be reminded.” Ω

Cannabis to council Discussion on commercial businesses in Chico clears first big hurdle The discussion Monday (Sept. 9) at the Chico

Internal Affairs Committee meeting was unusually cordial, considering the often-contentious topic of conversation: commercial cannabis. It was more or less the culmination of 10 weeks of discussing the matter in a larger group, made up of people from varying sectors of the community. The outcome: The committee, Vice Mayor Alex Brown and City Councilmen Scott Huber and Karl Ory, voted unanimously to direct staff to draft an ordinance allowing dispensaries, deliveries, and manufacturing and testing facilities. The issue came before Internal Affairs as a result of Brown’s request to council to develop the framework for allowing commercial cannabis, which was supported by local voters via Proposition 64, passed in 2016. She then chaired a newly formed Commercial Cannabis Committee, made up of nine other people, representing everything from education to public health to the Downtown Chico Business Association to the cannabis industry. They met 10 times over the past several months. “The cannabis committee was a really wellformed group,” Brown told the CN&R by phone. “Even though there was some disagreement amongst members, it was incredibly professional and productive. I knew we couldn’t make everyone happy, but my goal was to build consensus around everything, [or at least] almost everything.” Brown offered the group assembled Monday— which nearly reached the capacity of the confer-

SIFT ER

ence room at the Fred Davis Municipal Center—an outline of the cannabis committee’s discussions and recommendations to Internal Affairs. The most discussed topic, unsurprisingly, was dispensaries, she said. The group settled on a cap of one retail shop per 25,000 population, to be allowed only in a special overlay zone prepared by the Planning Department, away from schools and excluding downtown and the Chico Mall areas. Applications will be merit-based, with priority going to Butte County applicants, as well as those with a commitment to giving back to the community and/or hiring locally. In addition, stores must provide educational material about their products and employees must attend a standardized “budtender” training. Artificially flavored vape products will not be allowed, while smokeable concentrates, like dabs, shatter and wax,

R E E B e issu

State of beer This week, Sept. 11-14, the California Craft Brewers Association is holding its annual summit and beer fest in Long Beach. Three days of talks, demos and a trade show will be followed by a festival of beer tastings from more than 170 member breweries. As part of its advocacy, the organization keeps track of stats, and these are a few of the current numbers related to craft-brewing in California: • There are 980 craft breweries in the state. • Ninety-five percent of Californians live within 10 miles of a brewery. • Craft beer employs 54,028 full-time workers. • More than 3 million barrels of beer are brewed in the state annually.

Dr. Andy Miller, Butte County’s public health officer, addresses the Internal Affairs Committee to discuss potency caps on cannabis products sold in dispensaries. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

must be kept behind the counter, available only by request. There was only one real item of contention—a suggestion by Butte County Public Health Officer Andy Miller to limit the potency of products sold. “I’m still concerned about the concentration of cannabis,” he told the panel, referring to levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive compound in cannabis. “I’m concerned if we think the risk from those products is low. I think our belief of the risk of high concentrations of THC is changing rather quickly. … Please be open to hearing evolving research.” Jessica MacKenzie, as head of the Inland Cannabis Farmers Association, represented the industry on the cannabis committee. She addressed the Internal Affairs Committee and expressed her reservations about setting potency limits. She elaborated by phone afterward that she sees Miller’s point of view, but thinks the state already has addressed the potency issue when it comes to edibles, and that flower— buds to be smoked—should not be limited, as there’s little risk of smoking too much. “There is a reason to care about dosage and potency of anything that you consume, whether it be THC, alcohol, calories or saturated fat,” she said. “The state of California is hyper aware of the fact that some forms of cannabis tend to come with more risk. That’s why there are regulations on labeling what the dose is of edibles. Where it doesn’t make sense is with flower—capping flower potency solves a problem we don’t have. The problem is the excess consumption of edibles.” Internal Affairs voted to further that disNEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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NEWSLINES c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 9

cussion at the City Council level, but not to include a cap on potency in the draft ordinance. As far as other cannabis-related

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businesses, the only major omission from the recommendations is cultivation—no commercial gardens or greenhouses allowed in city limits. Others, however, like delivery services, will have a place—and with no cap on how many. In fact, aside from retail operations, none of the other businesses will be capped; all will be handled through a permitting process. Manufacturing facilities larger than 5,000 square feet will require more extensive review. About a dozen members of the public, several of them from the cannabis committee, spoke during the public comment period. They expressed concerns ranging from ensuring only people 21 and older are allowed to purchase cannabis products to the ability of code enforcement to monitor businesses’ compliance with local regulations like keeping concentrates behind the counter. The state handles sting operations on alcohol and tobacco businesses, explained Brendan Vieg, Chico’s community development director of planning and housing, and it’s his understanding cannabis is handled similarly. Internal Affairs directed staff to look at various fee structures, including a sales tax, to ensure funding for code enforcement. Karli Olsen, who represented the Chico Chamber of Commerce on the cannabis committee, expressed frustration at Brown’s presentation, calling it “disingenuous.” She felt it didn’t accurately depict the group’s desires and said the process “lacked transparency.” Others, however, including speakers from the anticannabis contingent, praised the process and the progress made. MacKenzie concurred: “People disagreed, but you don’t have to be contentious to disagree,” she told the CN&R. “If anyone walked away thinking they got everything, it wouldn’t have been successful. Since nobody’s completely happy, I think we did a good job.” The draft ordinance will go before the City Council likely in the next couple of months, Brown said. Then it will go to the Planning Commission to discuss zoning. —Meredith J. Cooper me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m


Dan Gonzales, Meriam Park developer, says the Camp Fire has exacerbated the need for workforce housing. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

On a recent afternoon at Meriam

Park, bulldozers turned the earth as about a dozen workers labored over the foundations of what soon will become Bungalow Commons, a neighborhood of just over 40 singlefamily homes. Nearby completed apartments offered them shade. Just up the street, people stopped by Daycamp Coffee for a pick-me-up, and a woman rushed into Da Capo Style House. As developer Dan Gonzales led the CN&R on a brief tour of the burgeoning community in east Chico, he expressed anticipation for what’s to come. Its first residents move into apartments next month, which also will mark the opening of a neighborhood restaurant. “It’s really exciting it’s starting to take [shape],” he said. But it hasn’t come without challenges. Construction costs have been higher than he’d hoped—local laborers are in high demand, split between rebuilding the Ridge and working on typical housing projects. “The supply of available subcontractors is a challenge,” Gonzales continued. “Everybody’s busy, and most companies have experienced some loss of employees.”

Those are just a few of the obstacles Gonzales has faced while attempting to provide muchneeded housing amid the statewide shortage—a project that has taken on more urgency since the Camp Fire destroyed 14,000 dwellings overnight. The further contraction in the housing supply is part of the reason the city of Chico is diving into the issue via an ad hoc Housing Committee, made up of Mayor Randall Stone and Councilmen Karl Ory and Scott Huber. The municipality started hosting meetings last month (the next is Sept. 24), inviting developers, nonprofits and others in the housing industry to talk about barriers and solutions. During the second meeting in the

series, on Tuesday (Sept. 10), Community Development Director of Planning and Housing Brendan Vieg set the stage by giving a rundown of projects in the works. The city isn’t just seeing activity in Meriam Park. In 2019, 198 singlefamily and 589 multifamily units already have been built and an additional 194 single-family and 547 multifamily units are under con-

struction. This is a marked increase from last year, and the highest volume the city has seen since 2005, Vieg reported. “You can see a response, how the market [has changed] due to our housing demand, in essence postCamp Fire,” he said. Following that, Gonzales provided an update on Meriam Park— located at Bruce Road and East 20th Street—during which he told attendees the city needed the kind of workforce housing he’s building before the fire and “now we need that even more.” Gonzales told the CN&R his vision for Meriam Park hasn’t changed since the fire. The development still is being designed as a higher-density, walkable community with a variety of entry-level housing, for the workforce, as well as retirees looking to downsize. However, the blaze certainly intensified the demand and labor shortage. “I know we’re losing our workforce,” he said. “Any builder knows it … we’re all losing our people right now. If we don’t find a place for them to live, we’re really jeopardizing our future.” Several developers encouraged the city to prioritize installing infrastructure, which would help get their projects off the ground faster. But Tom DiGiovanni, a developer and the founder of New Urban Builders, said there’s “enough good urban fabric in this community” that developers can work on infill, and don’t necessarily have to rely on new infrastructure. They can build up instead of out to increase density and efficiency. Development impact fees, which the city recently updated, also were briefly discussed. While the city established fees varying by the number of bedrooms, some attendees suggested a breakdown based on square footage, which

—ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque

City, industry leaders talk housing demand, inclusionary zoning

could encourage the development of smaller units. Inclusionary zoning, the most controversial topic of the meeting, which Ory referred to as the elephant in the room, came up toward the end of the two-hour meeting. This isn’t the first time the city has considered adopting that type of policy. In fact, it’s included in the city’s housing element and general plan as a topic of consideration. The city actually put out a bid for an inclusionary housing analysis in 2013, Vieg said, but it happened at a time when the City Council was in transition. Staff “pulled the plug” because it didn’t have time to work on a project that wouldn’t have succeeded, he said. Most developers expressed hesitation or concerns or were outright against policies that would require them to offer a percentage of housing units at prices affordable to lowincome households. Kate Leyden, of the Chico Builders Association, argued that the solution to the affordable housing shortage is to increase the existing housing stock. She argued that mandating affordable units would force builders to pass on costs to other homeowners. “That’s where it just doesn’t seem fair,” she said. Stone replied that isn’t necessarily the case, because inclusionary zoning policies can include subsidies. Leydon said she’d need to have more specifics on where such a subsidy could come from. Vieg said the city could implement such things as flexible building standards and density bonuses, and Stone mentioned state funding. Later, Stone told the CN&R that all income groups are having trouble finding housing, and many have had no choice but to leave the area. It’s the city’s responsibility to look out for all of its residents—not just the ones that can afford large single-family homes. “I know inclusionary zoning is a viable tool. I want staff to research that and review its possible implementation for Chico given our economic constraints,” he said. “If we don’t get this housing thing right, we’re talking about economic devastation that’s remarkable.”

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

Driving development

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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HEALTHLINES Chicoan Shelly Baxter-Wetmore started Amputee Outreach to support others living with limb loss.

Help after limb loss New organization aims to support North State amputees story and photo by

Andre Byik

andre b@ n ewsrev iew. com

S The unexpectedly two years ago. retired businesswoman developed helly Baxter-Wetmore’s life changed

pneumonia while suffering a bout of the flu. She was sick for several several weeks, she said, and matters were complicated when she stubbed her toe. It wasn’t a hard hit, but it caused her foot to go numb. Her toes, she said, felt like stones.

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During an emergency visit to a hospital, a nurse attempted to place a blanket over Baxter-Wetmore’s lower body before she was to undergo an MRI-type scan, she said. The pain caused by the blanket touching her foot became excruciating. “I mean, it was stratospheric,” BaxterWetmore told the CN&R. “You know how they say, ‘Pain, one through 10?’ There is no number for this. It was worse than anything I’ve ever been through.” The bottom of her right foot was black, she said. The foot was dying. Physicians were beckoned, and Baxter-Wetmore spent the next

several foggy days in intensive care. After regaining her faculties, she began to come to terms with what had happened. Surgeons amputated her right leg below the knee. “I experienced an amputation for what they call idiopathic reasons,” she said. “They’re really not sure what prompted it, because I’m not the usual candidate that has diabetes or heart problems or other types of health issues.” Baxter-Wetmore spent the next few days managing the pain and trying to wrap her mind around her new life. So much of what she knew now took extraordinary effort. Getting in and our of bed. Going to the restroom. Putting on clothes. Making it to the kitchen. All harder. But something clicked over the first several months after undergoing the amputation. Baxter-Wetmore realized she wanted to offer help and knowledge to other people who’ve lost limbs. Help that could mean emotional and practical support. Help that she said was lacking in the North State. For the past year and a half she has worked as a certified peer support counselor through an Enloe Medical Center volunteer program. She’s also organized monthly amputee support group meetings in Chico. Now, Baxter-Wetmore is establishing Amputee Outreach, which she said recently obtained nonprofit status. The organization, she said, will build upon the activities of which she’s already been a part. “I want to reach as many amputees, their families, their caregivers and their situations, [which] I might be able to find solutions for,” Baxter-Wetmore told the CN&R. “Especially depression, isolation and not having peers, because I didn’t know anybody with an amputation before [I had mine]. Not a soul.” About 2 million people are living with the loss

of a limb in the U.S., with that number projected to rise to 3.6 million by 2050, according to an aggregation of studies compiled by the Amputee Coalition, an advocacy organization. Yearly amputations total about 185,000 nationwide, and the main causes are vascular disease—including diabetes—and trauma. According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, produced periodically by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 9.4 percent of the country’s population—or 30.3 million people—had diabetes in 2015, the most recent data available. New cases total 1.5 million every year. The prevalence of diabetes has become a national crisis, Baxter-Wetmore said, adding, “More and more of the population is going

to have diabetes.” Amputee Outreach will attempt to connect with and support those living with limb loss in the North State, which she said is underserved in terms of support services for amputees. The efforts could take the shape of the continuation and bolstering of peer counseling services, monthly support meetings and the lending of equipment, such as bathroom grab bars and portable ramps, to name a few. To be clear, Amputee Outreach is starting from scratch. Currently, it comprises a staff of one—Baxter-Wetmore. She said she is seeking three volunteers—preferably community leaders—to serve on the organization’s board. She’s also seeking fundraising, legal and accounting advice, and she’s put out a call for donations. “If this community can help me with gas cards, gift certificates—everything from a haircut to lunch somewhere—because I want to take people … and get them out, you HEALTHLINES c o n t i n u e d

o n pa g e 1 5

appointment

Our bodies, ourselves The Slow Theatre Company, in conjunction with local activist group Women on Reproductive Defense, hosts Chico Speaks:

Reproductive Healthcare—Local Perspectives. The event takes place tonight (Thursday, Sept. 12) at the Chico Branch Library from 7 to 8:30 p.m. This free public discussion features an all-female panel of health care specialists discussing the availability, accessibility and affordability of reproductive health care for women. Is reproductive health care readily available to all North State residents? To what extent do income, cultural bias, rural location, provider shortages and language barriers affect the care received? Join the dialogue and hear from the experts. Child care will be provided.


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HEALTHLINES

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Amputee outreach:

know? A coffee.” Brenda Logan, manager of inpatient rehabilitation services at Enloe Medical Center, said Baxter-Wetmore has a passion for supporting people who undergo amputations. The hospital, Logan said, has worked with her to set up support group services, offering meeting space and guest speakers for four months out of the year. There is a strong need in Butte County for peer support counseling for not only amputees, but also people who have suffered strokes or other life-altering events, Logan said. The shared experience between counselor and patient can help to foster a comfortable space to ask questions and confront challenges. Clinical experts are trained to help patients overcome physical and societal barriers but may not be as well versed in addressing psychological and emotional ones. “It takes a village,” Logan said. “We keep abreast of new techniques and things available to our patients, but that heart to heart is vital, and having somebody in your corner is really important.” The needs of those living with limb loss are myriad, BaxterWetmore said. Some patients isolate themselves in their homes and

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may benefit from speaking with someone who also is living with limb loss. Others may not have insurance policies that will cover certain equipment, such as prosthetic limbs. Baxter-Wetmore’s prosthetic leg, she said, cost $38,000, and she had to convince her insurance company to get it covered. The Camp Fire has also complicated matters. One fire survivor she knows recently underwent a leg amputation and is living in a motorhome in Paradise. Making such homes accessible, she said, could prove challenging for lowerincome residents. Baxter-Wetmore said she is aiming to serve as an advocate for her fellow amputees, offering help or pointing them toward the appropriate resources. “It’s a little bit of a different life, but I want people to know it’s a good life,” she said. “You can have a good life.” □

WEEKLY DOSE Sayonara, soda! Those sugary sodas may be as bad as you suspected. A study published last week in JAMA Internal Medicine found that those who drank two or more glasses a day of sugar-sweetened soft drinks had a higher risk of dying from digestive disorders, while those who drank the same amount of diet drinks had higher risks of dying from cardiovascular disease. The study followed more than 450,000 people from 10 European countries for up to 19 years, and none of the people had cancer, diabetes, heart disease or stroke before their participation. The heart of the matter seems to be something called “leaky gut.” High blood sugar and high sugar intake impair your gut’s immune system, altering the healthy microbes that prevent infection and intestinal inflammation. Researchers’ advice: switch to healthier drinks—you know, like plain-old water.

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GREENWAYS Marvey Mueller, active with both OLLI and the League of Women Voters, chairs the committee organizing the climate change speaker series.

Hitting home Speaker series focuses on local effects of climate change

We represent the league, so we have credibility that we must maintain. We are not partisan on any of this. I also happen to be on the League of Women Voters’ state task force on climate change—I can tell you, the league is doing so much work on this [topic]. They have supported us and encouraged us. It is amazing the resources we have available. What is your goal for the series?

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

Fested wilderness” spots in Los Angeles and forexpanses in the High Sierra, Marvey

or 30 years, guiding people through “urban

Mueller taught Californians how to connect with the environment. “I know about the water. I know about the geology. I know about the weather,” she said. “I know this state.” She relocated from Independence in 2001, after marrying a Chicoan, and retired as an educational tour operator eight years later. Mueller didn’t stop educating, however: Through OLLI—the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, locally based at Chico State—she put together a string of speaker series, mostly on eco-oriented topics. She’s at it again with a joint venture between OLLI and the League of Women Voters of Butte County, titled Climate Change–Butte County Issues. The groups are co-sponsoring a four-part lecture series starting next Thursday (Sept. 19) at the Gateway Science Museum (see infobox). The monthly talks—which culminate on Dec. 5—feature Butte County experts addressing local circumstances. The first session, explaining climate change and its effect on the North State, includes presentations by Chico State professor Don Hankins, an expert in fire science, and Mechoopda Indian Tribe environmental educator Ali Meders-Knight.

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Just a few of the many speakers at future presentations: Chico City Councilwoman Ann Schwab; Susan Dobra, of the Camp Fire Long-Term Recovery Group; and Cynthia Daley, director of Chico State’s Center for Regenerative Agriculture and Resilient Systems. For the breadth and depth of the speakers, Mueller is quick to credit her committee: local League of Women Voters President Debra Barger, Chico 350’s Mary Kay Benson, and retired Chico State ag professor Dick Baldy. But she clearly was the catalyst. Mueller, who turns 75 next month, spoke to the CN&R about the series—the impetus, the aims, and the league’s involvement. What was the kernel that yielded this series?

For 30 years, I have put together stories of history and geology to create a sense of place. When I moved here, I started to do that about Chico and the North State, and when I retired I still had that bug to educate, and I started some lecture series through OLLI. I have been deeply involved with the Snow Goose Festival for 16 years, so I know many of the players in this field. I was really moved to do a series about agriculture and climate change at the end of the drought. [In 2017] there was a group of musicians who came here from North Africa, so I tied Series specifics:

Climate Change—Butte County Issues starts next Thursday (Sept. 19), 7 p.m., at the Gateway Science Museum; the speaker series continues Oct. 17, Nov. 14 and Dec. 5. Visit tinyurl.com/lwvbc-cc for more info and to access videos from each session.

the two together—learned about the huge problem of drought in Africa and the Middle East, and compared it to what was happening here, especially in the southern San Joaquin Valley…. I have to be honest, learning about the effects of climate change around the world, and what it means in terms of refugees, was so overwhelmingly sad to me that I said, “I have to step back.” And, so, for two years, I did not pursue another speaker series on the environment. What changed your mind?

My daughter gave me this book [holds up In Search of the Canary Tree, by ecologist Lauren E. Oakes, detailing climate change impacts on forests]. It happens to be the book in common [in Chico] this year. I read it, and in essence, once you know the truth, what do you do? I said, “I do what I always do: I bring it to life.” How did the League of Women Voters get involved?

I was working with Debra Barger during the election last year doing voter registration, so Debra and I started talking about this…. We set a schedule for this fall. I was able to pull together an incredible team that’s perfect for what we’re doing. We came together and thought, “What are the most important things we need to talk about in Butte County to educate our community? Especially after the [Camp] Fire.” There are so many distractions—the big issue is climate change. We felt all our speakers needed to be local, all our topics needed to be local, because it’s too easy for people to dismiss the problem when it’s too big….

My daughter came home [from Portland] and was really worried. Her daughter is 9—is the world going to hell? … We need to have a hopeful approach, because there is a lot of hope. But unless you have the conversation, all kinds of fears will come. We have very heartfelt speakers. This is a story that affects all of us—when we think about it. By the end of this, we hope that people will bring these conversations into their homes, into their lives, and make some changes. The local league and the state league believe that it’s not going to happen and come down quickly from the federal government; it’s going to happen right here, in our hometown. □

ECO EVENT

Don’t fear the dark A full moon is on it’s way and so is another exciting Moonlit Stroll with Certified Naturalist Druin Heal of Adventure Quest. If you missed the last one, this is your chance learn about the creatures that roam Bidwell Park in the dark. And it’s too hot to hike during the day anyhow. This free event takes place Saturday (Sept. 14) from 8 to 10 p.m. Heal will cover lots of ground, from adaptations of nocturnal critters to constellations to the moon’s effects on our planet, and he will be bringing a black light along to look for scorpions! Meet up at the Cedar Grove Recreation Area, next to the Nature Center.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS photo by AShiAh SchArAGA

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

fresh spin

Giving back, plus ice cream

There’s a flurry of activity going on at 240 Main St., the future home of Woodstock’s Pizza. For the past several months, coowners Jeff and Laura Ambrose have been traveling back and forth from their home in San Diego to Chico to meet with designers, city staff and construction companies to get the new location up and running. After a flood damaged the pizzeria’s longtime location at 166 E. Second St. in April, the restaurant closed briefly and then started selling slices and pies curbside. In July, it announced it would be taking over the lease vacated by Crepeville. The Ambroses, who also co-own the six other Woodstock’s Pizza locations in California, have redesigned and expanded the kitchen at the new space, and anticipate increasing pizza production by 50 percent. They’re adding table service, too. And don’t fret: They’re keeping trivia and pint nights, and will continue hosting live music. On a recent morning, the couple sat down with the CN&R to talk about why they’re excited for what’s in store. Follow Woodstock’s on Facebook and Instagram for updates on the opening date (this fall), or grab a slice or pick up a pie to tide you over until then, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the old location.

bar … in the center island. We’re going to have 24 taps. In the front is all bar-height seating. We’re going to have some of our standard booths. There are four different areas that can be reserved in this space for groups … [and] there’s this inside, what we call the interior patio, that’s going to be lounge seating, and then there’s the patio outside. Jeff: The patio is a real highlight, too—we’re going to have two different heater/fire tables. We’re going to have misters, so during the hottest parts of the year people can feel comfortable sitting out there. Laura: We’re also planning to put [out] some games, the kind of standard things, like Jenga, cornhole. The plan will be to make it an all-year venue.

What are some highlights for the new spot? Laura: I call it a refresh. We’re

Do you think the new spot will encourage more business? Jeff: We believe we’ll do better

putting a big, new [three-sided]

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

Back in February, when we put out the annual Business Issue of the CN&R, I interviewed Brian Von Tress, owner of Collision Pros, which lost its Paradise shop to the Camp Fire. I’d been touched by the radio ads I’d heard, in which he related his employees’ losses and reached out to survivors to offer relief by way of auto repairs. Von Tress and his company, which includes stores in Chico, Red Bluff and Woodland, started a GoFundMe account for employees affected by the fire—and raised over $50,000. That in itself is impressive. Now, in celebration of the reopening of the Paradise Collision Pros shop, the team is going a step further. It’s partnered with CSAA Insurance, Enterprise Rent-A-Car and Maita Cars to donate a 2015 Subaru Forester to a Camp Fire survivor. Northern Valley Catholic Social Service helped cull the many worthy recipients, and the Collision Pros Paradise-based staff settled on a single mother who suffered burns over half her body. She received her new wheels on Tuesday (Sept. 13).

here … being on the corner and

having this great visibility coming down Main Street or [East] Third Street. We want to maximize the potential for it.

What has made Chico a good place for Woodstock’s? Jeff: It’s the quintessential college town. That’s kind of where we thrive. I think we’ve evolved over time to being focused on … creating what we like to call the ultimate pizza experience. Places where people can gather, have fun with events like trivia and pint night. That really, I think, sets us apart. Laura: My hope is that not only will our longtime loyal customers be excited by the new refresh and the new expanded space, but that we get back people who may not have been here for years. Our goal is to be a place that the entire town embraces, that they feel has everything. —AShIAh SChARAgA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

Another fArewell After 42 years in business, Zucchini & Vine announced last week that it’s closing its doors. I swung by on Monday (Sept. 9) to check on the sale and was shocked to see the inventory already seriously depleted. (My favorite cheese somehow was still in stock and I purchased the last 2 pounds.) Owner Nancy Lindahl has said she’s retiring, so I wish her well. The family is keeping Magna Carta, next door, open—so check in with them there. And go pick through what’s left of the cookbooks, dishware and décor at Z&V by the end of the month (30 percent off). This, sadly, will leave every corner at Second and Main streets vacant (save for Bill’s Towne Lounge, which occupies half of one spot). I hope someone snatches it up quick. turnover There’s some good news in the downtown business world: The space

vacated by Cold Stone Creamery a few weeks ago already has been claimed. A sign went up recently advertising Doc Burnstein’s Ice Cream Lab. A little internet sleuthing tells me there are just three other Doc’s, all in California—in Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo and Santa Maria—but the brand plans to explode across the state in the next several years, with up to 100 new shops in the works. The Yelp reviews are promising, and the photos show a vibrant, if not a little hokey, atmosphere. I’m curious to try some of Doc’s more eclectic flavors, like Jack & Coke and Motor Oil (dark chocolate and Kahlua with fudge swirls). Sign says opening this month, so we won’t have to wait long!

movin’ Mark Cooper Landscaping & Storage in Oroville is now offering U-Haul trucks, trailers and moving supplies. The store, at 1245 Oro Dam Blvd. E., Ste. 11, is a 24/7 location, meaning you can reserve your vehicle online and pick it up whenever it’s most convenient for you. Good stuff. ShAkin’ Midnite Munchies has opened its doors in the Nord Avenue Safeway parking lot. You can still order delivery, of course, but if you’d prefer to stop by, you’ll find an expanded menu—the caramel brownie milkshake looks delicious!

got mosquitoes? Need to make a service request? Need Mosquitofish? Got Yellowjackets/Ticks?

Contact 530.533.6038 or www.ButteMosquito.com September 12, 2019

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TAPPED IN Chico is slowly starting to resemble a craft-beer town

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ince 1980, when the tanks at a certain local pioneering brewery started flowing with pale ale, Chicoans have had no shortage of amazing beer. But as great as we’ve had it, when the craft-beer revolution that Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. helped spark took over the country, and “craft-beer towns”—San Diego; Asheville, N.C.; Bend, Ore.; etc.—started taking hold, Chico was slow to catch on. Thankfully, that’s changed. In recent years, Chico has welcomed four new breweries—Secret Trail Brewing Co., Nor Cal Brewing Co., Eckert Malting & Brewing, and British Bulldog Brewery—as well as a couple of cideries (Lassen Traditional and Cellar Door). There are at least two more breweries with plans to open in the next year, and there are rumors of at least a couple more taprooms coming to Chico to join what’s become an embarrassment of beer-bar riches. In this seventh annual edition of the Chico News & Review’s Beer Issue, we tap into Chico’s beer scene—from a beer label artist responsible for some of the most iconic craft-beer designs to an influential beer-buyer who’s helped bring great brews to Chico. We’ve also visited the cozy just-opened Allies Pub serving British Bulldog brews in downtown Chico. And, of course, we are celebrating the arrival of Chico Beer Week 2019. Turn to pages 22-24 for this year’s guide to beer fun.

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ARTIST FOR THE REVOLUT Jason Roberson has created some of the most recognizable craft-beer labels in the world

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hile on a business trip in Sonoma County, Jason Roberson walked into a liquor store and was taken aback. There he found an entire cooler stocked head-to-toe with craft beers from a variety of companies all carrying a personal touch: his design work. Roberson said he got a little emotional, and he snapped a photo to memorialize the moment. “There’s something just amazing about having your work on a beer label that somebody is having a great time drinking and having the party of their life, and I’m a part of that, in a way,” he said. “My goal is to make it hard for people to throw that beer bottle away at the end of the night, like: ‘God, I should keep this. It’s so cool!’ That’s what I strive for.” Roberson, a homegrown Chicoan, has been a full-time professional designer since 2004. He

got his start at one of the highest profile craft beer companies in the world, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., before branching out in 2015 and starting his own design company, Craft Beer Branding. He’s since enjoyed wide success designing labels and marketing materials for breweries all over the country, winning graphic and/or package design awards for eight of the last nine years from industry magazine Graphic Design USA. The married father of two sons often juggles a dozen projects at any given time. In the past


In the past 4 1/2 years, Chicoan Jason Roberson has created craft beer designs for more than 40 breweries. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

ION

4 1/2 years, he has worked with over 40 breweries. His design work for Sierra Nevada includes what remains some of the brewery’s most iconic labels, and often posters and tap handles as well, including the intricate golden tree of the Trip in the Woods barrel-aged series and the hooded, pensive monk on Ovila Abbey ales. Some of Roberson’s other notable clients include Bear Republic Brewing Co. in Cloverdale, Deschutes Brewery in Oregon, Russian River Brewing Co. in Santa Rosa and Windsor, and Highland Brewing Co. in North Carolina. Russian River Brewing Co. owner and brewer Vinnie Cilurzo first worked with Roberson when his brewery partnered with Sierra Nevada on Brux, a domesticated wild ale. His most recent project with him is one of the North Bay brewery’s more complex designs, Cilurzo said, and will be unveiled in about two weeks. For the new Robert and Jannemie saisons, Roberson created a scene of the Belgian port city Antwerp, featuring its iconic cathedral and the Scheldt River. When the two beers are placed alongside one another, it creates a full landscape. “He’s just super, super talented,” Cilurzo said. “Almost every time he comes back with almost exactly what I had in mind. He just has a really good way of listening and hearing what I want … to really capture the spirit of what I’m going for.” Stylistically, Roberson’s work is diverse. Take, for instance, Mad River Brewing Co.’s Everyone Gose Mad, with the vivid visage of a

bearded brewmaster bringing the ale to life, à la Dr. Frankenstein. Compare that with Russian River’s Tempo Change, a sparse metronome with interwoven hop vines providing a pop of color. Then there’s Bear Republic’s Thru the Haze: The design is a trippy, dizzying kaleidoscopic swirl. Roberson said the variation is intentional. He doesn’t have a signature look, and prefers to focus on versatility, with a caveat: “I really try to push color and make things vibrant and pop off the shelf.” “I try to work in every possible style,” he said. “That, for me, is what keeps the creative inspiration going.” Part of that inspiration is drawn from flavor: When Roberson is working with a client, that’s when it’s time to crack open the ales they offer and “just see what they’re all about.” It’s a part of his creative process. “It makes it a really fun, positive [connection] when I’m enjoying their product, as well as doing the work with them day in, day out,” he said. Roberson was the kind of kid who

often got called out in class for doodling. He studied design at Butte College before earning a bachelor’s in communication design at Chico State. For much of his life, he considered his passion for art a hobby. He worked in the recording arts industry for several years before moving back to Chico and working at Herreid Music.

That’s where he met Bob Littell (the former longtime manager of the Sierra Nevada Big Room), who hired him to create the logo for the Big Room’s live-music PBS series, Sierra Center Stage. Shortly after, he was brought on as a fulltime designer at Sierra Nevada. Roberson went from being a department of one in 2004 to managing a department of seven as the art director for the growing company when he left in 2015, he said. “I was there during literally the explosion of the craft beer industry,” he said. “It was, like, the most amazing and challenging experience … just pedal to the metal, go, go, go, crank out national branding basically by myself [for a while].” Roberson said beer lovers often are baffled to find he chose to strike out on his own. He made the call after visiting the World of Beer bar in Atlanta (which has since closed). Out of the thousand beer bottles they had displayed, only three featured his work. “I wanted to be a bigger part of the industry … and have a wider range of work out there.” It’s been a fulfilling and fun ride, Roberson said, and he’s in it for the long haul. “It’s not like a lot of industries where it’s cutthroat and people are stabbing each other in the back. It’s very cordial and friendly,” he said. “To me, they’re so similar in so many ways, all these companies: Their passion and their dedication to quality.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

Jason Roberson with a sampling of his bottle and can label designs. PHOTOS COURTESY OF CRAFT BEER BRANDING

PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Thirsty for art?

Check out Jason Roberson’s portfolio on his website, craftbeerbranding.com, or pick up a cold one featuring one his labels at a liquor store near you.

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R E BE Hand-pulled brews e issu

The Allies Pub adds a taste of England to downtown Chico

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hen one thinks of a British pub, what might come to mind are pints of beer—proper pints—rowdy conversation, a cozy atmosphere and comfort food. I’m happy to report that I found all that and more at The Allies Pub, smack in the middle of downtown Chico. First, the space: It’s a converted office building that shares a parking lot with Bank of America but feels quite separate once you enter the expansive patio. The night I went was during the soft opening, so the place was full and everyone was excited. But even empty, there is a relaxed ambiance. The décor is lively and welcoming, from the homey arm chairs surrounding a faux fireplace to the historical posters that line the walls. In one corner is a large, wrap-around bench with the words Pints up on a Saturday afternoon at the pub. PHOTOS BY WENDY STEWART

“The Snug” prominently displayed above it. That, explained co-owner Alison Kay, is a nod to the private rooms of yesteryear where women could drink out of the public eye. There are two walk-up windows—one for food orders, the other for drinks. The food menu is simple: apps, pies, pasties, salads, bangers and mash, and desserts (aka “puds”). The drink window is understandably larger, and more formal. As The Allies is the official brewpub of the British Bulldog Brewery—owned by English expats Alison and her husband, Stephen, and their daughter and son-in-law, Emma and Justin

Martin—one can guess what’s on tap. What’s particularly cool about the taps, however, is that they’re traditional British hand pulls that draw the beer up from the cellar below, allowing the brews to be cellar-aged and kept at a warmer temperature than Americans are used to—no frosty glasses here. As Stephen explained, the cellar-aging also makes for less carbonation, as the bubbles are all natural. In addition to British ales, Allies also serves up house-brewed American-style beers. They’re all named after British and American military terms—Battle of Britain, Trafalgar, Black Hops, Sapper, etc.—lending credence to the pub’s name. As for the food, it’s truly unique to Chico. My friend Kelly and I settled on three items: the Scotch egg off the “lighter fare” menu, The Cock pastie (pronounced pass-

Brews and The Fisherman pie.

tee, it’s a “traditional pastry filled with meat and vegetables”) and The Fisherman pie. First off, it was the first time either of us had tried a Scotch egg, and we both gravitated toward it as soon as we saw the menu. It’s a hard-boiled egg wrapped in sausage and breadcrumbs. (Fun fact: The “Scotch” does not refer to Scotland, but rather to the sausage, which is “scotched,” aka minced.) It was crunchy on the outside, soft on the inside, and the drizzled HP Sauce—a brown sauce similar to Worchestershire, but thicker and sweeter—kicks the flavor up a notch. On to The Cock. This bad boy is essentially a hand pie filled with chicken breast, onion, ginger and coriander in curry sauce. I must’ve overlooked the curry on the menu, because I wasn’t expecting it. The flavors are very Indian, but not at all spicy. Also on the pasties menu: The Bull (ground beef), The Hog (pulled pork) and The Garden (veg). The Fisherman pie stole the show for me. I simply could not stop digging my spoon in. Akin to a pot pie or shepherd’s pie, this was filled with shrimp, salmon,

The Allies Pub

434 Broadway St., Ste. 130, 809-1650, britishbulldogbrewery.com Open Tuesday-Saturday, 2-10 p.m.

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white fish, peas and carrots in a cream sauce. The menu says it’s topped with mashed potatoes, but it tasted like a pastry top to me, only broiled to a crunchy, almost crouton-like perfection. There were chunks of fish, though the dish wasn’t overpoweringly seafood-y. Creamy, well-balanced, and that crunchy crust just set it over the top. Of course, we had to try the beer—I had the Signalman (English special bitter ale); Kelly, the Queen Bea (blonde ale)—and we remarked at the smoothness of each. The lower carbonation, combined with the not-so-frigid temperature, make for excellent drinkability. And the slightly warmer temp opens up the beers’ flavors. As we finished our meals, an employee clicked a button to turn on the “street lamps” mounted to the walls. It was a nice touch that added a little more warmth to the place. The room was loud, but we noted that it just felt full of energy—we didn’t have to yell, but we also couldn’t hear the conversation next to us. I’m excited to see the patio in action—it’s expansive, well-shaded and dog-friendly—and to check the pub out when there’s live music (the first show is scheduled for Oct. 16). What a fun new addition to Chico’s beer, food and bar scenes. —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m


THE BEERMEISTER

Miyagi Pocock in his domain, the keg fridge at Burgers & Brew in Chico. PHOTO BY JASON CASSIDY

A conversation with beer buyer Miyagi Pocock efore Miyagi Pocock can sit down B to talk, he has to pour me a beer he just tapped. The Burgers and Brew beer

buyer is all smiles and excited energy as he offers a taste of Juicy Melons, an IPA he helped make at the restaurant’s house brewery, Sacrament Brewing Co., in Sacramento. In addition to his beer duties at the popular downtown Chico restaurant, the jovial married father of five is an assistant brewer at Sacrament (commuting and working seven days a week between the two jobs). He’s proud of the balanced, mildly fruity rendition of the style, and it’s hard to tell what he’s more excited about: having helped make Juicy Melon, or sharing something new with a fellow beer lover. Brewing is a relatively new development for Pocock, who has worked at the Chico Burgers and Brew (which also has locations in Davis, Sacramento and West Sacramento) for nearly 10 years, and during that time has become one of the more recognizable tastemakers on the Chico

craft-beer scene. He worked his way from the kitchen to the front of the house, learning the ropes from co-workers who’ve gone on to some of the most respected breweries in craft beer—e.g., Firestone Walker Brewing Co., Stone Brewing Co. “He’s a hard-working person who’s always kind to talk to and will help guide anyone to beers they like,” said friend and fellow local craft-beer purveyor Kevin Jaradah (Spike’s Bottle Shop, The Lab Bar and Grill, Brew Kettle Taproom & Bottle Shop). “He pushes reps to get great beers, so we can enjoy the rare beers that wouldn’t normally hit Chico.” The CN&R recently caught up with Pocock at Burgers and Brew during a break between rushes. What does a beer buyer do? Most of it is keeping up with the new stuff that’s coming out. You never want to be playing from behind. My wife jokes, “You get paid to be on social media.” Which is true. You go on and you’re like, “Oh, shit. So-and-so [brewer] is going to this brewery.” That can have a huge impact not only on the brewery that they’re going to, but [also] the brewery that they’re leaving. On top of that is promoting it to the staff to help sell. Because they need to be able to tell the customers exactly what is so cool about our beer. And then, also, making sure it’s on in a timely fashion. I’ll use Pliny [the Elder double IPA, from Russian River Brewing Co.], for example, because everybody knows what Pliny is. So, say Pocock and fellow assistant brewer Mitch Keener (lying down) at Sacrament Brewing in Sacramento. PHOTO BY GARY KIRBY

Pliny only came out every three months. You don’t want to be that guy who puts Pliny on seven weeks after that initial release. You want to get that excitement, you want to get it when it’s relevant and people are talking about it. Do you buy for all Burgers and Brew locations? Yeah, exactly. Every place is different. In Sacramento, for example, there are so many microbreweries around. I try to support as much local as [I] can get. And then there are breweries that aren’t necessarily local but we gotta have them, like Revision [Brewing Co., in Sparks, Nev.]. We have that on everywhere. [Brewmaster] Jeremy Warren does a great job at Revision. We want to support them as an awesome brewery, and he repays us by making fantastic beer. [But] we try to stay as local as we can. Ultimately, what I’m hoping the craft-beer industry will turn into is, like, [something] super-Euro, where everybody’s just making their own beer [in the] back of [the] house. How has the beer scene evolved in Chico over the last decade? Before, it was basically us, the Handle Bar, the Winchester Goose, and then Lost Dutchman opened up. And now there’s more and more places with just a badass beer list. What was at first super exciting and new [now] is the norm. Has Burgers and Brew’s beer portfolio changed since you started? Oh, yeah. Before, we had a large amount of Belgian beers. Belgian beers aren’t as in demand as they used to be. I

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mean, Chimay’s been the same beer for 150 years, so the beer hasn’t changed, but people’s palates have and people’s approach to craft beer has changed. Personally, I’ve gone on what I call “the beer lover’s cycle.” You go from [thinking] Corona was classy beer to discovering IPAs. And then doubleIPAs, then stouts and imperial stouts, and barleywines, and grand cru, and then sours, and then saisons, and all this. And then, what I go home and drink right now is a nice clear pilsner. It’s just a good beer. That’s what I call a complete cycle. That being said, we are super-blessed to have 64 handles. We have something for everybody. If we don’t have something that you like, then we didn’t do a good enough job explaining to you what we have, and sampling you on beers. I keep trying to keep our menu and our rotating beers relevant, and never stop listening to what the public wants. Is there beer on all the lines at all times? Oh, yeah. Empty lines give me panic attacks. What are the hard-to-get beers you’re most proud of having poured? I think the last really big “we are the champions” moment was [when] I got a couple of cases of Cantillon [brewery in Brussels, Belgium]. It’s not something that you just go to the store and buy anywhere. About five years ago I just started writing them; they’re really cool guys. I’m like, “I do the beer-buying at a little place in Chico,” and they’re like, “Sure, yeah, it’s not ever going to happen, but thanks for reaching out. We’re glad you like our beer.” [Then] slowly but surely they’re like, “Actually, this is how you have to do it.” And they kind of gave me some tips. Lo and behold, I managed to get a couple cases. Are there beers/styles that just haven’t worked for you? I think the best example of that for me was pumpkin beers. I thought pumpkin beers were going to be awesome, so I bought a few around October and Thanksgiving, and here comes February and they’re still there! Is this a fun job? I feel like I won the lotto. I get paid to drink beer. —JASON CASSIDY jaso nc @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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7TH ANNUAL TM

EVENTS GUIDE

WEEK

harvest-style cupcake and beer pairing. Also, brewery tours weekdays throughout Beer Week. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120. secrettrailbrewing.com

FRIDAY, SEPT. 13 FLAMINGO FRIDAY

Noon-close In celebration of the end of the work week, Chico Taproom selects certain beers to pour at $4 all day, and for Beer Week, it will be offering a large selection. Special bonus for wearing flamingo swag. Flamingo swag! The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

KOMBUCHA PARTY

4-7pm A tasting featuring BevMo’s unique selection of kombucha. BevMo, 1937 E. 20th St., Ste. A-1. bevmo.com

THROUGHOUT BEER WEEK BREWERY TOURS

times vary In addition to the traditional free 45-minute brewery tours (with tasting!), Sierra Nevada offers a host of other themed visits for a fee—including sustainability, heritage and beer-geek tours. All tours require reservations. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St., 899-4776. sierranevada.com

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THURSDAY, SEPT. 12 MODERN TIMES TAP TAKEOVER

11am-close San Diego’s Modern Times takes over the taps for the day. The Handle Bar, 2070 E. 20th St., Ste. 160. handlebarchico.com

BOOZY SPARKLING WATER TASTING

4-7pm In-store tasting of Oskar Blues’ Wild Basin boozy sparkling water. BevMo, 1937 E. 20th St., Ste. A-1. bevmo.com

ALVARADO ST. TAKEOVER

5pm-close A tap takeover featuring a selection of fresh releases from Alvarado Street Brewery out of Monterey. The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

BEER CAN DEBUT

5pm The neighborhood cafe debuts its new can menu starting at 5pm, with live music by Webster Moore starting at 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. tenderlovingcoffee.com

CUPCAKES & BEER PAIRING 5-9pm Lovely Layers Cakery and Secret Trail Brewing Co. come together to offer a

WORT GIVEAWAY & BEER COMPETITION

4-6pm Homebrewers! Visit the brewery before the 13th and sign up for a chance be one of 25 people to get five gallons of Secret Trail wort to make your own version of the brew. Also, brewery tours weekdays throughout Beer Week. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120. secrettrailbrewing.com

SECRET TRAIL SPECIAL RELEASE & TAP TAKEOVER

5pm-close Secret Trail is in the house for the release of its Peach Zephyr Weisse. The Lost Dutchman Taproom, 25 Lost Dutchman Drive. lostdutchmantaproom.com

SATURDAY, SEPT. 14 CIGAR CITY & FIRESTONE WALKER COLLABORATION

11am-close Tampa’s Cigar City Brewing and Firestone Walker Brewing Co. out of Paso Robles take over the taps with their respective beers, as well as a collaborative brew, the Los Lenadores barrel-aged brown ale. The Handle Bar, 2070 E. 20th St., Ste. 160. handlebarchico.com


presented by:

Sept. 12-21, 2019 FEST-HUND RELEASE AT SECRET TRAIL

11am-close Secret Trail’s seasonal Fest-Hund Oktoberfest is tapped. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120. secrettrailbrewing.com

SOUR SATURDAY

Noon-close The Chico Taproom unveils several specialty kegs of sour beers, plus shares its collection of bottles from The Rare Barrel out of Berkeley with one-day sale prices.

The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

HOP-INFUSED CIDER TASTING

2-6pm Taste the Grasshopper, plus six other types of hop-infused dry craft ciders (9 percent alcohol). Cellar Door Cider, 11 Commerce Court, Ste. 2. facebook.com/cellardoorcider

LASSEN TRADITIONAL CIDER HEIRLOOM RELEASE

2-7pm Tasting of Valley View Orchard special release, a small-batch cider made from heirloom apples from a 100-year-old lost orchard. Lassen Traditional Cider, 26 Bellarmine Court. lassencider.com

NEW GLORY TAP TAKEOVER

5pm-close Sacramento’s New Glory Craft Brewery takes over the taps. The Lost Dutchman Taproom, 25 Lost Dutchman Drive. lostdutchmantaproom.com

SUNDAY, SEPT. 15 CRAFT BEER GIRLS NATIONAL MEET-UP

11am Craft Beer Girls host a day for women who love beer. Meet starting at 11am, with brewery tour at 11:45am. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120. secrettrailbrewing.com

BOTTLE CAP EARRINGS PARTY

Noon-close Bring your own caps or find some of ours that strike your fancy and make your own “beer-rings.” One pair per person; while

co-presented by:

On-site tasting room open most Saturdays 2-6pm, and by appointment.

earring supplies last. The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

11 CommerCe Ct, Suite #2 ChiCo, CA 95928 facebook.com/cellardoorcider

T

CORNHOLE & WET HOP IPA RELEASE

2-5pm Secret Trail releases its Hydraulic Oats Wet Hop IPA and La Salles holds a cornhole tourney. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico. com

MONDAY, SEPT. 16 BREWERY GLASSWARE SALE

2pm-close An assortment of glassware from multiple breweries for sale, including Alvarado Street, Heretic, Lead Dog, Secret Trail and Modern Times. The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

TRUMER POURS + GLASS

2pm-close Get $3 pours of the legendary pils and take home the glass! The Lost Dutchman Taproom, 25 Lost Dutchman Drive. lostdutchmantaproom.com

FLIGHT FIGHT: THE COASTAL CLASH

5pm-close A double-brewery tap takeover with Pizza Port Brewing vs. Santa Maria Brewing. Round Table Pizza, 964 Mangrove Ave. facebook.com/RoundTablePizza MangroveAveChicoCA

SECRET TRAIL CORNHOLE TOURNEY

6-9pm Cornhole tournament at the brewery. Also,

BEER WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

C e l e b r at e

C hiCo beer w eek at

Sunday, Sept 15th Secret trail releaSe

Hydraulic Oats - Wet Hop IPA …and Cornhole Tourney from 2-5! Also pouring on

thurSday, Sept 19th during LIVE music 6-9 featuring local reggae band, Triple Tree!

Saturday, Sept 21St

Gnarly Pints are performing 10pm-12 for late happy hour • $10 Beer Flights 229 Broadway ChiCo (530) 487-7207 lasallesChiCo.Com

Open Tuesday-Friday 4PM, Saturday-Sunday 9AM SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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BEER WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23 brewery tours weekdays throughout Beer Week. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120. secrettrailbrewing.com

LocaL • SeaSonaL • organic Where the

Farmer iS the Star

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a week • 2359 espLanaDe, chico • 530.343.2056

TUESDAY, SEPT. 17 TASTING TUESDAY

2pm-close Multiple pre-set beer flight options available for Beer Week. The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

SECRET TRAIL AT FARM STAR

4-9 p.m. Have pie and support local brewers during the Secret Trail Brewing Co. tap takeover. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade. farmstarpizza.com

BEER TRIVIA & HAPPY HOUR

5pm Beer happy hour starts at 5pm, and beerthemed triva competition kicks off at 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. tenderlovingcoffee.com

3 Year anniversarY PartY Saturday, September 21 • 2pm - 7pm

At the Cidery at 26 Bellarmine Ct.-off Park & Meyers in Chico’s beverage district

Music: cat Depot, Garrett Gray, RJ the DJ Gnarly Deli Food Truck Raffle & Games Full Lineup of Delicious Dry cider

Lassen TRADITIONAL CIDERY

www.lassencider.com

26 Bellarmine Ct., Chico • 530.593.0555

FLIGHT FIGHT: THE SAN DIEGO SHOWDOWN

5pm-close A double-brewery tap takeover: Belching Beaver Brewery vs. Modern Times Beer. Round Table Clubhouse, 2201 Pillsbury Road. roundtablepizza.com

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 18 HALF-OFF HAZY

11am-close Sierra Nevada’s Hazy Little Thing on halfoff special all day! Riley’s Bar & Grill, 702 W. Fifth St.

FALL RIVER AT FARM STAR

4-9 p.m. Have pie and support Redding brewers during the Fall River Brewing Co. tap takeover. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade. farmstarpizza.com

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SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

MODERN TIMES TAKEOVER & COLORING CONTEST

6pm-close A tap takeover with the Portland, Ore., brewery, plus coloring contest judged by the Modern Times Party Wizard. The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

THURSDAY, SEPT. 19 PIZZA PORT & TIE-DYE

11am-close So Cal’s Pizza Port Brewing Co., makers of the Tie-Dye IPA, will take over the taps all day. Starting at 5pm, make tie-dye shirts with brewery rep. The Handle Bar, 2070 E. 20th St., Ste. 160. handlebarchico.com

FRIDAY, SEPT. 20 SIERRA NEVADA BARRELAGED TASTING + Q&A

2pm Some truly special barrel-aged Sierra Nevada beers on tap, plus an informal Q&A with someone from the brewery’s barrelroom staff. The Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

OKTOBERFEST TASTING

4-7pm ’Tis the season for an Oktoberfest tasting. BevMo, 1937 E. 20th St., Ste. A-1. bevmo.com

STONE TAP TAKEOVER

5pm-close The San Diego County brewery is on tap all night. The Lost Dutchman Taproom, 25 Lost Dutchman Drive. lostdutchmantaproom.com

SATURDAY, SEPT. 21 LASSEN TRADITIONAL CIDER ANNIVERSARY PARTY

2-7pm A three-year anniversary party at the cidery with music by Cat Depot, Garrett Gray and RJ the DJ, plus sandwiches from the Gnarly Deli food truck. Lassen Traditional Cider, 26 Bellarmine Court. lassencider.com

BEER-PAIRING SUPPER CLUB & TENDER LOVING ANNIVERSARY

7pm The neighborhood cafe/coffee roaster celebrates its one-year anniversary with the first installment of its new monthly supper club. A menu of special dishes and unique beer pairings, plus live music. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. tenderlovingcoffee.com

BEER FLIGHTS & LATENIGHT HAPPY HOUR

10pm Beer flights are $10, and Gnarly Pints plays live during late-night happy hour. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com


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Arts &Culture Still

killin’ it

pHoto by JaySon Carpenter

Three decades on the road with Bay Area bluesman

Tommy Castro

THIS WEEK

NthingThetoBaylureArea bluesman has someyou out to the club, his ever seen Tommy Castro perform?

new album, Killin’ It Live. “It’s a little bit by of a calling card in L. Kent a way: ‘Hey this Wolgamott is the show, if you want to come and see Preview: it,’” Castro said in a tommy Castro & the recent interview. It’s painkillers perform thursday, Sept. 19, a compact collection, 7:30 p.m. 10 tracks from across tickets: $30/advance the guitarist/vocal($35/day of show) ist’s nearly 30-year solo career that were Sierra Nevada recorded at a handful Big Room 1075 e. 20th St. of venues across the 892-4647 country—including sierranevada.com/ Biscuits and Blues events in San Francisco; the legendary Antone’s in Austin; Texas, and Daryl Hall’s popular Daryl’s House in rural New York. “I’ve been through so many different phases with this career of mine—different groups, different lineups, different directions. I think people don’t know what to expect if they haven’t been to one of my shows in a while. I thought it’d be great to put out a record that shows what we’re doing now.” The “we” is Castro and his band The Painkillers, featuring longtime collaborator/bassist Randy McDonald, plus keyboardist Mike Emerson and drummer Bowen Brown. The album covers the gamut of Castro’s compositions, from roadhouse rock (“Make It Back to Memphis”) to slow blues (“Lose Lose”) and sweet soul (“Anytime Soon”). There are also a pair of well-chosen covers: Sleepy John Estes’ “Leaving Trunk” (à la Taj Mahal’s groovy rendition) and a hot version of Buddy Miles’ “Them 26

CN&R

September 12, 2019

Changes” that closes out the album. “We can do just about everything I’ve ever written with this band,” Castro said. “We’ve been together about four years. … There’s a point where everybody knows where we are all the time instinctively.” Each year, the hard-working outfit tours the United States twice and Europe once. “It isn’t getting any easier, but I’m up for it,” Castro said of the grind. “I still love climbing on the bus and going across the country. We always turn up some new gigs along the way and we love seeing places and people we’ve seen over the years.” A San Jose native, Castro started playing guitar when he was 10 years old, but he didn’t start playing music for a living for a couple of decades. “I grew up in a working-class neighborhood where people did jobs they hated just to put food on the table,” Castro said. “I just played because I loved to play. It was my sport. One day a light bulb went off in my head: ‘Wouldn’t it be great if I did something I cared about and loved?’ I didn’t come up with that idea until I was about 30.” He honed his chops at blues clubs and in cover bands around the Bay Area, and eventually joined forces with McDonald in the soul band The Dynatones in the 1980s. Then, in 1991,

the two met up again in the first incarnation of the Tommy Castro Band. “We knew what we wanted to do: It’s blues, soul and rock ’n’ roll,” he said. “That’s who we are.” Within a couple years of playing, the band had become a hit in the Bay Area. “We got a record deal, booking agent, management. It started happening really fast.” Castro’s been putting out his own music since his 1996 debut on Blind Pig Records, and in 2009, he moved over to Alligator Records and released Hard Believer. The following year, he won four Blues Music Awards: Male Artist of the Year, Contemporary Blues Album of the Year, Band of the Year, and the B.B. King Entertainer of the Year. The latter award had special meaning for Castro, who had previously opened for King on multiple tours, often joining him on stage for the final song of the night. And King, he said, was one of his guitar inspirations. “I really connected with guys like B.B. King—the simple stuff,” he said. “Sometimes it calls for a little shredding. Even though that’s not necessarily my strong suit, I’ll go there if that’s what the song calls for. That sums me up as a player. I play what the songs call for, not the flashiest solos, but what fits the tunes.” □

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tHU

Special Events ABILITIES & POSSIBILITIES FAIR: A celebration of all of the possibilities our area has to offer people with disabilities, with live music by Soul Posse. Thu, 9/12, 5:30pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

CHICO SPEAKS REPRODUCTIVE HEALTHCARE: Free public discussion with an all-female panel of health care specialists. Childcare provided. Thu, 9/12, 7pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

CIRCUS VARGAS: 50th anniversary animal-free extravaganza featuring death-defying acrobats, daredevils, aerialists, jugglers, contortionists, clowns, motorcycles and more. Multiple performances 9/12-9/16. For times and to purchase tickets, visit circusvargas.com. Thu, 9/12. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St.

banFF FILm FeStIVaL Sunday, Sept. 15 Sierra Nevada Big Room

See SUnDay, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON pAGe 29

mArY pOppINS Jr. Friday, Sept. 13 Laxson Auditorium

See FrIDAY, THEATER

the details.  Sat 9/14, 8am. Mangrove Bridge,  northeast side by Ramada Plaza.

MOONLIT STROLL: Join Certified Naturalist Druin  Heal for a summer evening stroll. This is part  of Adventure Quest’s free monthly adult  program but children are welcome. Meet  in the Cedar Grove parking lot.  Sat 9/14, 8pm. Bidwell Park.

SLICE OF COMEDY: Comedy showcase featuring  a fine line-up of local Chico comedians.  Sat 9/14, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359  Esplanade.

Theater

Music

THE SUNSHINE BOYS: Classic comedy written by 

ORGAN RECITAL SERIES: A ROTHE CELEBRATION: In 

Neil Simon and directed by Jerry Miller featuring famous vaudeville duo who couldn’t  stand each other yet get back together for  one last performance.  Thu, 9/12, 7:30pm. $12$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road,  Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

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FrI

Special Events CIRCUS VARGAS: See Thursday. Multiple performances 9/12-9/16. For times and to  purchase tickets, visit circusvargas. com.  Fri, 9/13. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and  pulling weeds in the park. For more info call  Shane at 896-7831.  Fri, 9/13, 9am. Bidwell  Park.

WISH UPON A PAR: More than 100 golfers will tee  off for this second annual golf tournament  to raise money and awareness for the Make  a Wish Foundation local chapter.  Fri, 9/13, 8:30am. Rolling Hills Casino & Resort, 2655  Everett Freeman Way, Corning.

honor of David Rothe, University organist and music professor emeritus, the  Department of Music and Theatre hosts  this concert featuring Rothe, his students,  colleagues and the University Centennial  pipe organ.  Fri, 9/13, 7:30pm. $6-$15. Harlen  Adams Theatre, 400 W. First St. 898-5152.  csuchico.edu

Theater DOES THIS SHOW MAKE MY BUTT LOOK FAT?:  A  preview of Birdcage’s next show, a comic  romp through the trials and tribulations of  womanhood.  Fri, 9/13, 7:30pm. $20. Birdcage  Theatre, 1740 Bird St., Oroville. 282-5603.  birdcagetheatre.net

MARY POPPINS JR.: Blue Room Young Company  presents classic story of magical nanny and  the Banks family.  Fri, 9/13, 7:30pm. $10-$16.  Laxson Auditorium, Chico State.

THE SUNSHINE BOYS: See Thursday.  Fri, 9/13, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735  Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

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SAt

Special Events BIRDING PUTAH CREEK IN YOLO COUNTY: Visit an  amazing location that produces great warbler and other passerine rarities. Meet up is  at Butte County Park and Ride first parking  lot, 7:30 am. Contact Matt Forster at findforster@yahoo.com for more info.  Sat 9/14, 7am. Free. 519-4724.

BUTTE HUMANE SOCIETY 108TH ANNIVERSARY GALA: Huge fundraiser for the animals with  a “Fantastic Voyage” theme.  Sat 9/14, 5:30pm. $125. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 

WINE AMONG THE VINES: A beer, wine, and live  music event benefiting Chico Community  Ballet.  Sat 9/14, 4:30pm. $30. Goat’s Block  Vineyard, 4152 Keefer Road.

Music SOUL POSSE TRIO: Brunch tunes with local  cover band.  Sat, 9/14, 11am. La Salles, 229  Broadway St.

Theater THE SUNSHINE BOYS: See Thursday.  Sat, 9/14, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735  Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

20th St. 343-7917. buttehumane.org

CIRCUS VARGAS: See Thursday. Multiple performances 9/12-9/16. For times and to purchase  tickets, visit circusvargas.com.  Sat 9/14. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St.

LINDO CHANNEL CLEAN UP: Litter pickup along  the channel. Contact Dan at 518-6628 for 

tIm bLUHm

Sunday, Sept. 15 Chico Women’s Club See SUNDAY, MUSIC

post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&r calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

15

SUN

Special Events BANFF FILM FESTIVAL: A collection of stories  featuring remote journeys, groundbreaking  expeditions and cutting-edge adventures  told through the eyes of adventurers,  authors, photographers and filmmakers  from around the globe.  Sun, 9/15, 6pm. $15.  Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.   sierranevada.com

CIRCUS VARGAS: See Thursday. Multiple performances 9/12-9/16. For times and to  purchase tickets, visit circusvargas. com.  Sun, 9/15. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St.

CLIC MAIN STAGE SHOW: Two hours of both  short- and long-form improvised comedy.  BYOB.  Sun, 9/15, 7pm. $10. Chico Live Improv  Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

OAK TREE SEEDLING WATERING: Water young oak  trees planted by the Butte Environmental  Council. Call 891-6424 for more info. Meet at  parking lot B (Easter Cross/North Rim).  Sun, 9/15, 9am. Bidwell Park.

THIS WEEK CONtINUeD ON pAGe 28

CASA SUPERHERO RUN: Seventh annual race fundraiser to raise awareness for local children  needing a superhero. Wear your best superhero duds and run/walk a 5k for a good  cause.  Sat 9/14, 7am. $10. Bidwell Park.

Free LIStINGS!

EDITOR’S PICK

bIG tOp bONANzA Circus Vargas’ 50th anniversary tour comes to the Chico Mall this week, Thursday-Monday (Sept. 12-16). The show has been animal-free since 2010, and still pays homage to the olden days of the circus with a lineup of death-defying acrobats, daredevils, aerialists, jugglers, contortionists, clowns, motorcycles and much more. Arrive 30 minutes early for an entertaining, interactive preshow celebration where kids can create their own magic and learn circus skills such as juggling and balancing. And stay after to meet and mingle with the cast. Visit circusvargas.com for more info.

September 12, 2019

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THIS WEEK continued from page 27

Music JAZZ AT SCOTTY’S: The Miami Rogue Roosters  jazz up the patio at Scotty’s.  Sun, 9/15, 12pm. Scotty›s Landing, 12609 River Road. THE MODERN CLARINET: Sundays at Two recital  series features faculty clarinetist Ryan  Heimlich and other guest musicians performing modern clarinet works.  Sun, 9/15, 2pm. Zingg Recital Hall, Arts & Humanities  279, Chico State. csuchico.edu/soa

ROBERT KARCH: Brunch time jazz guitar by  local songwriter/musician.  Sun, 9/15, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. SUNDAY SUPERJAM: Jam with some of Chico’s  best musicians at this weekly pro jam. Rock,  blues, country, funk—anything goes.  Sun, 9/15, 2pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway.

TIM BLUHM: Mother Hips frontman performs  solo.  Sun, 9/15, 7pm. $25. Chico Women’s  Club, 592 E. Third St.

16

mon

Special Events BIRDING ECUADOR: Retired high school biology teacher and avid birder John “Mac”  McCormick describes his recent adventure  in Ecuador, home to more than 1,640 species of birds.  Mon, 9/16, 6:30pm. Free. Chico  Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.  519-4724.

CIRCUS VARGAS: See Thursday. Multiple performances 9/12-9/16. For times and to  purchase tickets, visit circusvargas. com.  Mon, 9/16. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St.

FARM STAND: Fun farmers’ market featuring  local growers, plant starts, homemade  bakery goods and medicinal herbs.  Mon, 9/16, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Music THIRD MONDAY JAZZ JAM: Tribute to Thad  Jones, followed by open jam.  Mon, 9/16, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

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tue

Special Events SAN FRANCISCO COMEDY COMPETITION: Legendary  touring comedy competition challenges the  best stand-up comedians in the world to  come out on top.  Tue, 9/17, 6:30pm. $15. El  Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico. com

18

Wed

Special Events COMANCHE CREEK GREENWAY CLEANUP: Trash  pickup, weeding, pruning and planting. For  more info call Liz at 513-2206. Volunteers  will meet at the East Park Ave. and Midway  parking lot.  Wed, 9/18, 8:30am. Comanche  Creek Greenway.

for more MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE on page 32

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September 12, 2019


FINE ARTS

UNbrOKeN trADItIONS Art 1078 GALLERY: Field Notes, artists Rebecca  Shelly and Rebecca Wallace apply different approaches of working en plein  air to create the work presented in this  exhibition. Through 9/29. 1710 Park Ave.  1078gallery.org

BSO GALLERY: Furniture Design, Interior  Architecture students new designs for  furniture exhibit, focusing on compositional principles of design to analyze and  generate spacial organization. Through  9/20. Chico State, Ayres Hall.

CHICO ART CENTER: Augmented, use personal  mobile devices to view art enhanced  with video, animation and sound. Also, On  Track, exhibit of railroad art to celebrate  and encourage participation in California  Railroad Safety month. Through 9/27. 450  Orange St., 895-8726. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Connie G. Adams, Enloe  Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery featuring Northern California artists whose  lives have been touched by cancer showcases series of watercolor paintings by  breast cancer survivor. Through 10/18.  Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Bernie  Lubell, sculptures that explore the relationship between humans and machines.  Exhibition and gallery talk Sept. 19,  5:30pm. Through 10/12. Chico State, Arts  121. headleygallerycsuchico.com

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Give  Voice, Empower Me Art presents exhibit  of Northern California and international  artists/survivors of sex-trafficking.  Through 9/29. Silent auction Sept. 15, 5pm,  in support of artist/survivors featuring  panel of special guests and professionals.  Also, Walls We Create, exhibit reflecting  the cultural experience of “barriers.”  Through 9/29.  $5. 900 Esplanade. monca. org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Group Show, 29 artists  from all over California show their work.  Through 9/21. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

Shows through May 15 Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology See mUSeUmS

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Summer’s End, featuring original paintings by local artists  Ray Eastman, Joan Smith and Gary Baugh.  Through 9/28. 493 East Ave., Ste. 1.

THE TURNER: Drawn In–By Hand Graphic  Prints, exhibition reveals how the act  of drawing creates an acuity of vision.  Exhibition talk at the Zingg Recital Hall  Thursday, Sept. 12, 5:30pm; reception to  follow at The Turner. Through 9/28. 400 W.  First St., 898-4476. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of  cool stuff for kids to explore including a  miniature city, complete with a junior vet  clinic, dentist, cafe and farmers’ market,  a giant fish tank, multisensory room,  imagination playground and much more.  Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325  Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and  Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human  and technological achievements needed  to reach the moon and envisions a  future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625  Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Unbroken Traditions –   Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker  Families in Northern California, exhibit  represents the culmination of one year  of research and collaboration between  Mountain Maidu weavers, other tribal  experts, museums studies students,  faculty and curators. Reception Sept. 18,  5:30-7pm. Through 5/15. Meriam Library,  room 180, Chico State. csuchico.edu/ anthmuseum

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S ep t em b er 1 2, 20 1 9


SCENE

New art worlds

25% Off * 648 W. 5th St, Chico (530) 924-3171 ILikeIkesPlace.com *Present this coupon at time of order. Cannot be used with any other offer. Expires 09.26.19

friday

sept 20th @ 5:30pm

Enter the digital universe at augmented-reality exhibit

deGarmo park 199 Leora ct.

Using the EyeJack app to  unlock Neon Mystic’s   kaleidoscopic vision.

A

s nearly every aspect of our lives

and interactions with our fellow Earthlings become infused with or dependent upon computer-based “devices,” it’s not surprising that by artists are explorCarey Wilson ing the seemingly endless possibiliReview: ties of the digital Augmented, on display world. through Sept. 27 With Augmented, Chico Chico Art Center 450 Orange St. Art Center’s 895-8726 gallery director, chicoartcenter.com Cameron Kelly— with the aid of Butte College art teacher/department chair and CAC board member Daniel Donnelly—has curated a beautiful and fascinating exhibition of works by artists on the cutting edge of melding art and virtual reality. By fusing two-dimensional visual art with computer-generated augmentations such as overlayed animations and audio soundtracks, the artists explore formerly flat and static imagery from varying perspectives and bring the viewer along for an interactive ride. Happily, my visit to the gallery on Sunday (Sept. 8) coincided with Kelly being on-site, and I enjoyed the exhibition with her as my enthusiastic and articulate guide. Being a smartphone novice and virtual-reality virgin, I felt a bit apprehensive about whether I would

even be savvy enough to properly manipulate the technology that the show depends on, but the gallery is set up to accommodate just such amateurs. Each section has its own iPad tablet anchored to cables that allow the viewer to examine most of the works in the show without having to download any apps to a personal device. The exhibit’s entry point is faced by excerpts from artist/ animator Rob Shields’ aptly titled sci-fi comic book Neon Wasteland. The brightly colorful prints depict—according to the artist’s statement—“a psychedelic, postapocalyptic cyberpunk future where most humans have abandoned their bodies in exchange for digital immortality inside the ‘Omniverse,’ a massive computer system that continues to spread across the galaxy.” Translated through the eye of the iPad, the beautifully drafted and colored drawings come alive with animation that complements their narrative impact. A completely different approach to placing art in the virtual world is taken by Los Angeles-based artist Nancy Baker Cahill’s virtual studio tour. Using the 4th Wall augmented-reality app, Cahill created a 360-degree photographic, holographic-looking representation of her actual studio that one can virtually walk around to look at objects from all angles. Along with the tour,

phOtO by JASON CASSidy

the artist supplied four drawings that, when viewed on the screen, can be manipulated in size and perspective to overlay whatever else is within the camera’s field of vision as you move the tablet. Representing the commercial art category are the “Living Wine” labels. Viewed on the screen, the zombie character from a bottle of The Walking Dead breaks out of his label and marches across the display pedestal to attack and be gorily vanquished by the axewielding cowboy who steps out of the bottle on the opposite side of the pedestal. Dominating the gallery’s back wall is a large mandala-like blackand-white drawing by New Zealand artist Neon Mystic. The piece is eerily gorgeous in its own right, but when viewed through the EyeJack app it becomes kaleidoscopic, a mesmerizing multicolored animation of wheels within wheels, spinning globes and shifting constellations of stars with an accompanying soundtrack of contemplative New Age music. For an exhibit that features so many applications, Chico Art Center has delivered a very cohesive, and immersive, experience. It’s both aesthetically marvelous and educationally enlightening. Well worth the visit. □

over a dozen food trucks Live music

the espLanade

Free to Attend!

September 12, 2019

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 9/12—WEDNESDAY 9/18 WEBSTER MOORE: Chico singer/song-

HED PE

Tuesday, Sept. 17 Lost on Main SEE TUESDAY

writer and keyboard wiz plays funk, R&B, jazz and hip-hop. Thu, 9/12, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

13FRIDAY

AMANDA GRAY: Talented and pro-

lific singer/songwriter performs country, Americana and more. Fri, 9/13, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

BUBBA SPARXXX AND ALEXANDER KING: Hallelujah tour with country-

rap stars. Fri, 9/13, 9pm. $15. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

COLTON CUTLER: Americana sounds

12THURSDAY

FEATHER RIVER GYPSIES: Local band

plays Gypsy swing, bluegrass, Latin and jazz. Thu, 9/12, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 343-2056.

HOWLIN’ RAIN: Popular Oakland-based psych-rock band returns to Chico. Trox and the Terribles and Horse the Hunter open. Thu, 9/12, 8pm. $10. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

RETROTONES: Classic rock and country

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with traveling musician for happy hour. Fri, 9/13, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. tunes on the patio. Thu, 9/12, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 9/12, 8pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (408) 449-2179.

THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat with a rotating list of DJs spinning all vinyl til late. Thu, 9/12, 8pm. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

CRIPPLE CREEK BAND: Unique blend of country/southern-rock favorites and originals. Fri, 9/13, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

DUELING PIANOS: Chico’s own Kelly Twins take your requests in the lounge. Fri, 9/13, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

THE JIMMY GRANT TRIO: Chico native turned world-renowned Gypsy jazz guitarist returns home for two shows in one night. Fri, 9/13, 7pm

and 9pm. $10-$15. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: Great tunes with local

favorites. Fri, 9/13, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. diamondsteakhousechico.com

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Signups at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10:00pm. Fri, 9/13, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 966-8342.

THE ’90S CALLED ...

Hot off a sweaty summer tour the moistest nooks and crannies of Northern California comes Radio Relapse, Chico’s favorite funny guys playing the songs of your youth. The Maltese will host the last show of the aptly named Summer Sucks, and Then You Die tour this Saturday (Sept. 14). Expect to hear the expected and the unexpected—from Nirvana to Rage to Blink-182 and beyond. Rad tunes, rad dudes, rad fun. Don’t forget your headband.

SOUL POSSE: Mix of ballroom, country and line dance with fun local cover band. Coffee and treats provided. Fri, 9/13, 7pm. $8. Southside Community Center, 2959 Lower Wyandotte Road, Oroville.

TROPA MAGICA: Sierra Nevada Full Moon Series presents psychedelic/ cumbia/punk band from LA. Catch them outside with new local group Chico Latin Orquesta. Fri, 9/13, 7pm. $12. Sierra Nevada Hop Yard, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

TYLER DEVOLL: Local singer/songwriter plays. Fri, 9/13, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

UNCLE KRACKER: Easygoing slinger of

pop radio hits performs. Fri, 9/13, 8pm. $30-$55. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

14SATURDAY

THE DAMAGED GOODS: Alternative rock

hip-hop group returns to town with the sweet melodies that made them famous. Sat, 9/14, 9pm. $30. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmax productions.net

ESPLANADE BAND: Local band performs

BONE THUGS-N-HARMONY: Popular

trio blending genres of rock, funk, country, bluegrass and jazz. Sat, 9/14, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.


THIS WEEK: FIND mOre eNtertAINmeNt AND SpeCIAL eVeNtS ON pAGe 26 PAISANI: Band from Paradise plays a variety of Italian, Latin, French, jazz and more. Sat, 9/14, 7pm. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive.

SAMARIA GRACE: Local blues/funk singer performs for late-night happy hour. Sat, 9/14, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

SLICE OF COMEDY: Comedy show-

tHe HeArtLIGHtS Saturday, Sept. 14 Naked Lounge

SUMMER SUCKS, AND THEN YOU DIE: Fun local cover band Radio Relapse plays your favorite ’90s hits at final show of summer tour. Sat, 9/14, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

See SAtUrDAY

your favorite ’80s hits to get you on the dance floor. Sat, 9/14, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

FOREIGNER UNAUTHORIZED: It will feel like the first time, again, with this Foreigner tribute band. Sat, 9/14, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

THE GET DOWN: Dance night hosted by local crew Boom Boom Room EDM. Sat, 9/14, 9pm. Taps Bar And Grill, 407 Walnut St., Ste. A.

THE HEARTLIGHTS: Garage/power pop rockers from Oakland perform, supported by Chico favorites Severance Package and Mr.

case featuring a fine line-up of local Chico comedians. Sat, 9/14, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

Bang. Sat, 9/14, 8pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, CHRIS WENGER: See Friday. Sat, 9/14,

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. diamondsteakhousechico. com

MIXTAPE: Local cover band playing hits

from yesterday and today. Sat, 9/14, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

NEW ORLEANS SUSPECTS: New Orleans funk band will get you on your feet, supported by Erica Falls (of Galactic) and locals Rigmarole. Sat, 9/14, 9pm. $20-$25. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

TEMPO REGGAE PARTY: Day and night party featuring reggae, dancehall, dub and roots from Nor Cal’s top DJs, bands and soundsystems, plus a delicious $20 buffet. Sat, 9/14, 5pm. Sipho’s, 1228 Dayton Road, (805) 801-3844.

15SUNDAY

CLIC MAIN STAGE SHOW: Two hours

of both short- and long-form improvised comedy, BYOB. Sun, 9/15, 7pm. $10. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

join our

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 9/15, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

18WeDNeSDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 9/18, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

SUMMER RURAL CONCERTS: American

OPEN MIC: Come on down strut your

TIM BLUHM: Mother Hips frontman

OPEN MIC: Presenters share

roots music with The Crawlers. Sun, 9/15, 6:30pm. Feather Falls Grange, 9 Lumpkin Road, Feather Falls. performs solo. Sun, 9/15, 7pm. $25. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

HED PE: Popular ’90s band known

for fusing rock, reggae and rap performs with special guests the Bloody Roots, Esoteric Chico, and Death Rattle. Tue, 9/17, 7pm. $15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

SAN FRANCISCO COMEDY COMPETITION: Legendary touring comedy contest challenges the best stand-up comedians in the world to come out on top. Tue, 9/17, 6:30pm. $15. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com know and win prizes. Tue, 9/17, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

TOTENWALD: Dark punk/new wave band from Berlin performs, Redding’s Lucid Apparition, local synth duo Astronaut Ice Cream and Matta Clark round out the show. Wed, 9/18, 7pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

prAYer FOr rAIN

17tUeSDAY

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

stuff. Andan from the Channel 66 band hosts. Wed, 9/18, 7pm. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

everything from poetry and memoir to folk songs and instrumental guitar pieces. Call Katy at 4343794 with questions. Wed, 9/18, 7pm. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave.

Dude, Howlin’ Rain has returned. Catch the psychwave of this Bay Area band and immerse yourself in sweet, fuzzy guitar riffs and soul-tugging vocal stylings that hark back to a much cooler time. On tour with a fresh live album titled Under the Wheels, the first volume in a limited edition live series, the show will probably sell out. Get with the cool kids and hit Argus Bar + Patio tonight (Sept. 12). Trox and the Terribles and Horse the Hunter open.

Preorder NoW!

team

Cn&r is Looking For • advertising ConsuLtant • distribution driver

the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

TickeTs $25 Oroville State Theater • Fri, Nov. 8, 7-9PM • www.orovillestatetheatre.com

For more inFormation, visit www.newsreview.Com/ChiCo/jobs

State Theater, Red Bluff • Thurs, Nov. 14, 7- 9PM • www.brownpapertickets.com equal opportunity employer

Cascade Theater, Redding • Sat, Nov. 16, 7:30- 9:30PM • www.cascadetheater.org EL Rey Theater, Chico • Sat, Nov. 23, 7- 9PM • www.elreychico.com September 12, 2019

CN&R

33


REEL WORLD

Lotus FLower Imports 839 Main Street • Chico • (530) 345-6783

Bittersweet reunion ‘Small marvels’ abound in well-acted dramedy

Texudes comedy/drama, is so full of small marvels that it a spell of enchantment that is by no means he Farewell, the prize-winning Chinese-American

small. It’s a multigenerational tale that’s thoroughly and seriously charming throughout. by It’s that rare bird, a PG-rated enterJuan-Carlos tainment that addresses adult issues, Selznick a “feel-good” movie that clearly prefers honest emotion to cheap sentiment. The story premise has a quirky young Chinese-American adult (Billi, memorably played by Awkwafina) and her Chinese-born The Farewell parents making a return visit to their Opens Friday, Sept. 13. Starring Awkwafina, hometown. The occasion is ostensiDiana Lin and Zhao bly the wedding of a young relative, Shuzhen. Directed by but the nuptials are above all a conLulu Wang. Pageant venient excuse for a family reunion, Theatre. Rated PG. and that reunion in turn comes about because of the not-so-public news that Billi’s beloved grandmother may be near death. But the diagnosis, stage-4 cancer, has been kept from grandma Nai Nai (Zhao Shuzhen) and family tradition dictates that no one should tell her the truth during what is presumably their final visit with her. What ensues from that is a witty and bittersweet comedy of culture clash, generation gaps, international by-play, and cycles of tradition and modernity.

4

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SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

In its sprightly intelligence and free-spiritedness, the relationship of Billi and Nai Nai is the emotional and spiritual centerpiece of the entire film, and the performances of Awkwafina and Shuzhen in those two roles are chief among those “small marvels.” But writer-director Lulu Wang has peopled her film with a whole range of illuminating pairings—Billi and her mother (Diana Lin), Nai Nai and her slightly younger sister (Lu Hong), Billi and her father (Tzi Ma), Billi’s father and her Uncle Haibin (Jiang Yongbo), cousin Hao Hao (Chen Han) and his Japanese fiancee (Aoi Mizuhara), etc. Wang’s directorial skills extend into the visual design of the film, presumably in collaboration with cinematographer Anna Franquesa Solano and production designer Yong Ok Lee. The Farewell is deftly scripted as both comedy and drama, but it also packs a wealth of expressiveness into the composition of its widescreen images. Intriguingly ornate settings, including streetside locations and rectangular interiors, recur, as well as quietly complex shots in which separate parts of the composition act as counterpoint or contrast to the conversation that proceeds in yet another portion of that same image. Ω

1 2

3 4

Poor

Good

Fair

Very Good

5 Excellent


Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week Brittany Runs a Marathon

A dramedy starring Jillian Bell as a woman who sets out to lose weight and train for running the New York City Marathon. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

4

The Farewell

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG —J.C.S.

The Goldfinch

Film adaptation of Donna Tarrt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 2013 novel, a coming-of-age story about a man who’s taken in by a wealthy family as a young boy after his mother was killed in a bombing at a museum. Starring Nicole Kidman, Luke Wilson and Jeffrey Wright. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated. R.

Hustlers

Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez, Julia Stiles and Cardi B star as a crew of strippers who hustle money from Wall Street clients who frequent the club. Inspired by a true-life 2015 story that appeared in New York magazine. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing Angel Has Fallen

Gerard Butler and Morgan Freeman return for this third Fallen film (following Olympus Has Fallen and London Has Fallen), with the former as a Secret Service agent now on the run after being framed for an assassination attempt on the latter (now playing the U.S. president). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

Three sixth-grade boys embark on an epic, R-rated coming-of-age odyssey. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

It Chapter Two

It’s been 27 years since the kids of the Losers Club defeated the evil clown Pennywise, but children have started to disappear in Derry once again, and the now-grown crew must reconvene to try and destroy It once and for all. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Lion King

Jon Favreau (Elf, Iron Man) directs this photorealistic CGI remake of the 1994 Disney animated classic that features an impressive cast of voice actors, including Chiwetel Ejiofor, Donald Glover, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen, John Oliver and, naturally, James Earl Jones as Mufasa. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Overcomer

A Christian-based film about a high-school basketball coach who faces a crisis of faith and a new challenge as a mentor for an unlikely cross-country athlete. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

The Peanut Butter Falcon

The story of a teen boy with Down syndrome (Zack Gottsagen) who runs away and sets off on a journey to a wrestling camp to realize his dream of becoming a pro wrestler. Also starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson and Bruce Dern. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

Alvin Schwartz’s 1980s series of children’s scary short stories gets the cinematic horror treatment. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

The Goldfinch

rs on Tap

e Cider & Win

Outside Food We Check out our lineup of Chico Beer Week events in the CN&R calendar and online

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Show your support at www.independentjournalismfund.org

Hobbs & Shaw is actually a spinoff from the series. In other words, rejoice! The leaden, dreary Vin Diesel is nowhere to be seen in this movie. Now we can have some real fun! Hobbs & Shaw is a bizarre hybrid of spy thriller, action flick, screwball comedy and science fiction. Here, Furious franchise regulars Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and Shaw (Jason Statham) are tasked with protecting the latter’s sister, Hattie (Vanessa Kirby), after she injects herself with something

Good Boys

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that will have worldwide consequences if she’s captured. The main antagonist is Brixton (Idris Elba), a former Shaw ally who has turned into some sort of bionic badass dubbed, by himself, “Black Superman.” Stuntman-turned-director David Leitch, who gave us the first John Wick and Deadpool 2, knows his way around an action scene, and his edits create constant action and laughs—thanks in large part to Johnson and Statham’s great timing and onscreen chemistry. And while it’s expected that the tough-guy leads will kick ass in movies such as this, it’s Kirby who steals the show as the action hero of this installment. She is a total badass. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Community Supported

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CHOW

BEER e issu

Enjoy it now! Fresh is best when it comes to hoppy beers

W for a date indicating when it was made, or when it will be past its prime? If not, you probably should.

hen you shop for beer, do you check each can or bottle

According to many beer aficionados, freshness is so important to many beers that undated bottles—especially dusty by ones—or those with best-by dates Alastair that have expired, should be left on Bland the shelf. If a bottle or can is undated, how can you tell? You really can’t. It’s an issue that has been gaining attention for a few years, and today, in fact, most breweries print a date on their packaged beer. It’s the breweries that still don’t that irk some in the industry. “Undated and outdated beer is the undiagnosed high blood pressure of craft beer,” says Marty Jones, a publicist for the equipment lender Brewery Finance. While many beer styles, especially those higher in alcohol, can get better with time, freshness is especially important for beers characterized primarily by their hops. The aromas of hops fade and, eventually, disappear relatively quickly. An IPA, for instance, that has spent a year or more unopened is liable to taste like a malty brown ale, with the IPA’s signature fruit and flower notes lost. Off-flavors can even develop from the deteriorated hop compounds—most notoriously the flavor of dank cardboard. (Funny, isn’t it, how we compare flavors to things that few sane people have ever eaten?) “A hoppy beer loses its wow factor when it gets older,” says Novato homebrewer Kevin McMahon. “A fresh, hoppy brew—there’s not much like it.” He says that a reliable rule of thumb calls for drinking high-alcohol beers after a few months or more, and consuming hoppy beers fresh. But it isn’t necessarily that simple. Aromatics are the first component to fade from an aging beer, and among IPAs, McMahon explains, some can tolerate the passage of time more gracefully. New Englandstyle, or hazy, IPAs—which contain less bitterness but more potent aromas—are more susceptible to the wear and tear of time. West Coast-style IPAs—famed for their bold hop flavors—are hardier. McMahon says he will drink West Coast IPAs as old as six months. Still, the younger the better, and the call for

fresh IPAs prompted Stone Brewing Co., in 2012, to launch an IPA series called Enjoy By. These recurring releases are packaged and stamped with a drink-by deadline (the date is actually part of the beer’s name) of just a few weeks, and they are shipped within about a day of being brewed. “We feel that it respects the consumer, and our beers, for people to be fully informed,” says Greg Koch, the founder of Stone. When the date is clearly printed on the bottle, it allows the consumer “to select the freshness level that they want.” Brewers are hardly required to date their beer— probably because there are no significant health risks associated with consuming “expired” beer. Still, the Brewers Association, the Colorado trade group representing United States breweries, recommended in February that they do it. “[I]t is in the best interest of craft brewers, distributors, importers, and consumers that all beer from small and independent craft brewers be identifiable by some form of a date or lot code,” the BA says on its website. This has the added benefit of helping distributors identify beer that, for example, has been recalled for safety reasons, like the time in 2008 when the Boston Beer Co. recalled thousands of 12-ounce bottles of Samuel Adams that the brewery determined to be at risk of shattering. For the most part, drinking beer is a relatively risk-free activity, and batch dates are most useful for making sure we don’t pay money for a fresh IPA and wind up with a malt bomb. □

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! t n poi Fiction 59

e h t o Get t

Can you tell a story in 59 words— no more, no fewer?

The Chico News & Review’s annual Fiction 59 flash-fiction contest is back. Submit your 59-word stories today for the chance to have your work published in the annual Fiction 59 issue of the CN&R, on stands Oct. 24. Winners will also be invited to share their works during a live reading at The Bookstore (118 Main St.). NEW THIS YEAR: Six-Word Stories Go really micro with your fiction and tell a story in only six words. Here’s a famous example (possibly by Ernest Hemingway): For sale: baby shoes, never worn. Please do not include a title with six-word story. Six-word stories will not be separated by age category. All other rules for Fiction 59 apply. For submission guidelines, visit newsreview.com/fiction59

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9, AT 11:59 P.M. 38

CN&R

September 12, 2019

ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

30 for 30 arts dEVo moved to Chico in 1989, a 20-year-old puppy dog with

a pillowcase filled with band shirts, a cardboard tube of rock posters and a couple crates of records and cassettes. No bed. No furniture. No car. No checking account. Just a fist full of student-loan money ready to be thrown at the essentials: beers, burritos and whatever band was playing that week at the Burro Room. That legendary downtown institution (located where aonami sushi is today) was a magnet that attracted young versions of the Flaming Lips, Green day, Fugazi and Mudhoney, and it’s where my crew and all the local bands we dug gravitated on weekend nights. I’ve lived here for 30 years now and in that time I’ve witnessed a lot of rad touring bands put on energetic shows as they experience Chico’s ready-toparty hospitality, and I’ve just as often watched as local bands have shown visitors how it’s done by setting fire to the stage. In fact, I’d take the Pepsi Challenge with Chico’s history of homegrown rock versus that of just about any other city. So, for my Chico birthday, I’ll start that list, a chronological roster of 30 locals chosen from across my 30 years in town. This is one man’s Chico timeline (arranged by decade) as told through the local music that’s defined his experience here. Decade one: 28th day: The original. Mid-’80s jangly dark-pop trio—with Barbara Manning and Cole Marquis singing/songwriting—that was my introduction to Chico’s music and the Paisley Underground. The downsiders: Marquis makes the hectic jump for Chico’s stoney answer to Sonic Youth that was the real impetus for me coming to town (and tuning my guitar weird). Vomit Launch: One of the seminal American indie-pop crews and one of the best bands from here or anywhere. The Vertels: Redding homeys who tutored me with their guitar-driven nerd rock. Trench: Brutal end-of-the-world noise/punk/ metal that literally threw up in its own mouth. death star: 1990s indie noise-rock perfection, especially live. The Downsiders (Objectively Chico’s best band ever?) Fat Chick From Wilson Phillips: Young, dumb, fun ska-punk for young, dumb, fun boys. Mid-Fi: Man-boys write the best snotty rock anthem, “Eugene.” Uncle Rosco: Fierce, complex, beautiful noise way before its time. Land of the Wee Beasties: See Uncle Rosco. The imps: Slacker pop-rock for the Duffy’s generation. The Verves: Cover band gets a pass by playing only The Velvet Underground. The Mother Hips: Not my jam, but my Chico history is not complete without their song “Superwinner,” written because I was a jerk to them. Decade two: stars Upon Thars: Multivocal post-punk with scary live energy. Meyow: Noisy-circus version of current Chico crew XDS. Royal Crown: Bandleader Becky Brown’s lyrics remain the best I’ve heard out of Chico. Botchii: The sound of everything being destroyed. danny Cohen: Butte County’s answer to Tom Waits and/or Captain Beefheart. West by swan: The kings atop Chico’s formidable noise-rock mountain. The americas: Constantly looping complex, loud, beautiful noise. (And Casey Deitz is the “Best F’n drummer in the world”—seriously, Google it.) The Makai: Metal not just for metal dudes. Whoa! Decade three: surrogate: Perfect pop-rock that would rule any town it lived in. French Reform: If they were around for more than a minute, this keyboard-informed guitar-rock quintet might’ve been the best Chico ever heard. Close to perfect. Michelin Embers: Western skiffle is the best music and only Chico knows it. Bunnymilk: Lyrics—beautiful, haunting lyrics—return to Chico. Bran Crown: More lyrics! Don Parrish is my Chico Dylan. Hallelujah Junction: Add up the previous three bands and invite ’em to your front porch. donald Beaman: Sad, quiet, soulful, weird music for Chico nights. Xds: Disco punks turn down the noise and turn up the fun. scout: Is the future.


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Homes Sold Last Week

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of August 26 - August 30, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

20 Dana Point Rd 2269 Bloomington Ave 1453 Lazy Trail Dr 3131 Vicksburg Ct 309 Denali Dr 3299 Carlsbad Ct 3012 Calistoga Dr 188 E Lincoln Ave 824 Penstemon Way 1751 Forty Niner Ct 3168 Sawyers Bar Ln 1285 Banning Park Dr 1090 Sierra Vista Way 2151 Robailey Dr 27 River Wood Loop 7 Heartwood Ct 2335 Floral Ave 2169 Ceres Ave 1265 Ravenshoe Way 1633 Citrus Ave 1174 Palm Ave 1134 W 5th St

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$585,000 $535,000 $530,000 $499,000 $499,000 $489,000 $488,000 $479,000 $475,000 $460,000 $450,000 $437,000 $416,500 $405,000 $395,000 $353,000 $350,000 $346,000 $333,000 $330,000 $330,000 $325,000

3/2 3/2 3/2 4/3 4/3 3/2 4/3 3/2 4/2 4/3 4/3 4/2 3/2 5/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 2/2 2/2 4/2

SQ. FT.

2121 2024 2061 2481 2151 1862 2172 1465 1580 1917 3165 1748 1468 2074 1704 1316 1608 1779 1285 1115 1267 1108

ADDRESS

1465 Hobart St 1292 Howard Dr 2171 Mulberry St 3069 Snowbird Dr 925 Sheridan Ave 915 W 4th Ave 2 Christopher Alan Ln 2309 Ceanothus Ave 1049 Blue Ridge Ave 6 Casa Del Lago 2289 Bar Triangle St 805 Macy Ave 1512 Sheridan Ave 1536 Bidwell Dr 254 E 15th St 1443 Heather Cir 3650 Circle Four Ct 6283 Jack Hill Dr 90 Ridgeview Ln 4523 Sunset Oaks Dr 1811 Paynes Way 240 Pinewood Dr

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise

$318,000 $315,000 $310,000 $309,000 $308,000 $303,000 $300,000 $290,000 $287,500 $285,000 $270,000 $267,500 $240,000 $225,000 $199,000 $108,000 $750,000 $437,000 $380,000 $610,000 $549,000 $530,000

3/2 3/1 2/1 3/2 3/2 4/2 3/2 2/1 3/2 2/2 4/2 2/1 2/1 3/3 2/1 3/1 4/4 3/3 2/1 4/3 3/4 3/3

September 12, 2019

SQ. FT.

1178 1050 1395 1213 960 1360 1323 1145 1170 1300 2186 1052 1080 2204 632 1125 2258 2118 1478 2784 3782 2611

CN&R

39


REAL ESTATE E

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

FBN Number: 2019-0000954 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

For more information about advertising in our Real estate section,

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

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ico nter of Ch

Yoga Ce 100 | 530.342.0ble for cash. brosa #150 1749.6. Not redeema credit. 250 Vallom not expire according to CA CC Sec. 1749.45-Change will be given as store

used. e & does for gratuity. minus any amount This is a gift certificat discounts & offers. Cannot be used by the consumer other to the amount paid Can be used with certificate is equal Cash value for this

Roots Catering & Restaurant $10 Value You pay $5

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CN&R

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing busines as EDELWEISS at 1933 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95960. KRISTEN FRIETSCHE 8 Rockerfeller Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTEN FRIETSCHE Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000953 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HOPE IN HEALING COUNSELING SERVICES at 6 Governors Lane Suite A Chico, CA 95926. ALISHA READY 15 Glenbrook Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALISHA READY Dated: August 13, 2019

this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STUDIO 4, STUDIO FOUR at 823 Brandonbury Ln Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTINE ANN DICKINSON 823 Brandonbury Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINE A. DICKINSON Dated: July 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000828 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DOGTOWN HOWLER at 14514 Colter Way Magalia, CA 95954. TAMMY WALLER AVILES 14514 Colter Way Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TAMMY WALLER AVILES Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000968 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUBY’S at 245 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. RAINE DEIGH ELDRIDGE 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAINE DEIGH Dated: July 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000871 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUBY’S at 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. RAINE DEIGH ELDRIDGE 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAINE DEIGH Dated: July 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000872 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as XTRM STEEL at 175 Inglewood Dr. Oroville, CA 95966. XAVIER DIAZ 12 Ruths Ct Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: XAVIER DIAZ Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000969 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SILVERLEAF AGRICULTURE, SILVERLEAF ORGANIC at 679 E 7th Chico, CA 95928. MARC MONROE BRECKENRIDGE 679 E 7th Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: MARC BRECKENRIDGE Dated: August 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000926 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THOUSAND ACRE WOOD BOOKS at 2811 North Avenue Chico, CA 95973. TERESA TRAVER 2811 North Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERESA TRAVER Dated: August 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000948 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CB WOOD ARTS at 19 Franciscan Way Chico, CA 95973. CRAIG ARTHUR BONNER 19 Franciscan Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CRAIG A. BONNER RH Dated: August 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000979 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SECRETS OF PARADISE at 6433 Skyway 9 Paradise, CA 95969. GABRIELL HERNDON 5827 Wildwood Lane Suite 6 Paradise, CA 95969. ESTEFANIA MIRANDA 5827 Wildwood Lane Suite 6 Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: ESTEFANIA MIRANDA Dated: August 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000984 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KREMER DENTAL CARE PHILADEPHIA SQUARE at 140 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973. KEVIN KREMER, DDS, NORTH STATE, INC. 3 Glenbrook Ct. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KEVIN KREMER, PRESIDENT Dated: August 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000959 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CONNECTIONS COUNSELING at 15 Ilahee Lane Suite 100 Chico, CA 95973. HEATHER MARIE BOGGS 291 Cavalier Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HEATHER BOGGS Dated: August 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000986 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TREE CITY FILMS at 1729 Oakdale St Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. SHAWN DYER 1729 Oakdale St Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHAWN DYER Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000967 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEART BEAN COFFEE at 777 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. FAELIN KLEIN 777 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FAELIN KLEIN Dated: August 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000980 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EDELWEISS at 1933 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. KRISTEN FRIETSCHE 8 Rockerfeller Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTEN FRIETSCHE Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000953 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADVENTURE QUEST at 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. DRUIN DANIEL HARVEY HEAL 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. ELIZABETH (HEAL) MARTIN 285 E. 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: DRUIN (DANIEL) HEAL Dated: August 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000982 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SANTINOS CATERING at 40 Quadra Ct Chico, CA 95928. KAELEN DAVIS 40 Quadra Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAELEN W. DAVIS Dated: August 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000994 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUILDING MARKET INTELLIGENCE, MISSING MIDDLE METRICS, PELOTON RESEARCH ECONOMICS at 125 W 3rd Street, Suite 250 Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD FRANKLIN HUNT 1040 Macy Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD F. HUNT Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001007 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CORVO JEWELRY at 1293 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. CORVO LLC 1293 Parque Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: LILY ANN RAVEN, CEO Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000938 Published: September 5,12,19,26, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name F.E.W. PRODUCTS at 5050 Cohasset Rd. Unit 50 Chico, CA 95973. LANCE A WALDSMITH 14064 Limousin Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LANCE A WALDSMITH Dated: September 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000418 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PLANT MADNESS at 3856 Cosby Ave Chico, CA 95928. JOHN FENDLEY 3856 Cosby Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOHN FENDLEY Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001005 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STEPHANIE KAY FILMS at 3117 Bay Ave Chico, CA 95973. STEPHANIE KAY VALDES 3117 Bay Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHANIE VALDES Dated: September 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001023 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BENJAMIN’S INSURANCE SERVICES at 1661 Forest Avenue Unit 74 Chico, CA 95928. BENJAMIN HENRY 1661 Forest Avenue Unit 74 Chico, CA 95928. JODY HENRY 1661 Forest Avenue Unit 74 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: BENJAMIN HENRY Dated: August 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000929 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BABY’S BREADS at 2654 Fair Street Chico, CA 95928. MARY OLIVER 2654 Fair Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARY OLIVER Dated: September 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001032 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as 10-4 CONSTRUCTION at 15 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. SCOTT A MCCOLLUM 15 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SCOTT A MCCOLLUM Dated: July 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000825 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CAMINA at 2560 Dominic Drive Ste A Chico, CA 95928. CAMINA BAKERY LLC 851 Netters Circle Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limitied Liability Company. Signed: TATTON WHITE, CFO Dated: September 3, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001018 this l egal Notice continues

Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DEBBIE ANN LYNCH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DEBBIE ANN LYNCH Proposed name: DEBBIE ANN BROOKS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02343 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DANA CATHERINE YU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DANA CATHERINE YU Proposed name: DANA CATHERINE WUNDERLICH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 1, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02309 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner WILLIAM MORGAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: HUNTER LEE BELANGER Proposed name: HUNTER LEE MORGAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA MOSBARGER Dated: July 24, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01178 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARTHA MAYR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ELLA PHYLLIS BUNTING MILLIE BEATRICE BUNTING Proposed name: ELLA PHYLLIS MAYR MILLIE BEATRICE MAYR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: August 16, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02426 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARINA DALIA CARINO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARINA DALIA CARINO Proposed name: MARINA DALIA ESQUIVEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02498 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOHN MARK KRAMER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JOHN MARK KRAMER Proposed name: JACK MARK KRAMER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 23, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 30, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02631 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: ROBERT SCOTT DOBYNE AND ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, OR ANY CLOUD ON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE TO THE PROPERTY, AND DOES 1 THROUGH 100 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: JUNE E. RICHARDSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: JOEL B. MASSAE, ESQ. PO Box 3104 Paradise, CA 95954 Tel. (530) 872-2375 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 6, 2019 Case No: 19CV01710 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

Cla SSIfIEdS

CONTINUED ON 42

For the week oF September 12, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Hi, I’m your

sales representative for UnTherapy, a free program designed to provide healing strategies for people who are trying too hard. Forgive me for being blunt, but I think you could benefit from our services. I don’t have space here to reveal all the secrets of UnTherapy, but here’s an essential hint: Every now and then, the smartest way to outwit a problem is to stop worrying, let it alone and allow it to solve itself.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): People

in northeast India weave long, strong suspension bridges out of the living roots of fig trees. The structures can measure as long as 150 feet and bear the weight of hundreds of people. In accordance with astrological omens, let’s make these marvels your metaphors of power for the coming weeks. To stimulate your meditations, ask yourself the following questions. 1. How can you harness nature to help you to get where you need to go? 2. How might you transform instinctual energy so that it better serves your practical needs? 3. How could you channel wildness so that it becomes eminently useful to you?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you climb

to the top of Mount Everest, you’re standing on land that was once on the floor of a shallow tropical sea. Fossils of marine life, 400 million years old, still abide there in the rock. Over the course of eons, through the magic of plate tectonics, that low flat land got folded and pushed upward more than 5 miles. I suspect you will have the power to accomplish a less spectacular but still amazing transformation during the next 10 months. To get started, identify what you would like that transformation to be.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In 1996,

when Gary Kasparov was rated the world’s best chess player, he engaged in a series of matches with a chess-playing computer named Deep Blue. Early on in the first game, Deep Blue tried a move that confused Kasparov. Rattled, he began to wonder if the machine was smarter than him. Ultimately, his play suffered and he lost the game. Later it was revealed that Deep Blue’s puzzling move was the result of a bug in its code. I’ll encourage you to cultivate a benevolent bug in your own code during the coming weeks. I bet it will be the key to you scoring a tricky victory.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): American hero Harriet Tubman escaped slavery as a young woman. She ran away from the wealthy “master” who claimed to own her, and reached sanctuary. But rather than simply enjoy her freedom, she dedicated herself to liberating other slaves. Nineteen times she returned to slave territory and risked her life, ultimately leading 300 people out of hellish captivity. Later she served as a scout, spy and nurse in the Union Army during the Civil War, where her actions saved another 700 people. In 1874, the U.S. Congress considered but then ultimately rejected a bill to pay her $2,000 for her numerous courageous acts. Don’t you dare be like Congress in the coming weeks. It’s crucial that you give tangible acknowledgment and practical rewards to those who have helped, guided and supported you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Novelist

Wallace Stegner wrote, “Some are born in their place, some find it, some realize after long searching that the place they left is the one they have been searching for.” I hope that in the last nine months, Virgo, you have resolved which of those three options is true for you. I also trust that you have been taking the necessary actions to claim and own that special place—to acknowledge it and treasure it as the power spot where you feel most at home in the world. If you have not yet fully finished what I’m describing here, do it now.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Earth’s spe-

cies are going extinct at a rate unmatched since the dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago. Among the creatures on the verge of being lost forever are birds such

by rob brezSny as the cryptic treehunter and Spix’s macaw, as well as the northern white rhino and the vaquita, a type of porpoise. So why don’t we clone the last few individuals of those beleaguered species? Here are the answers. 1. Cloned animals typically aren’t healthy. 2. A species needs a sizable population to retain genetic diversity. 3. Humans have decimated the homes of the threatened species, making it hard for them to thrive. Conclusion: Cloning is an inadequate stopgap action. Is there a better way to address the problem? Yes, by preserving the habitats of wild creatures. Inspired by this principle, I ask you to avoid trying halfway fixes for the dilemmas in your personal sphere. Summon full measures that can really work.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Though

patched together and incomplete, the 2,200-year-old marble sculpture known as the “Winged Victory of Samothrace” is prominently displayed at Paris’s Louvre Museum. It’s a glorious depiction of Nike, the winged goddess of victory, and is regarded as one of ancient Greece’s great masterpieces. For hundreds of years it was missing. Then, in 1863, an archaeologist discovered it, although it was broken into more than a hundred pieces. Eventually it was rebuilt, and much of its beauty was resurrected. I see the coming weeks as a time when you, too, could recover the fragments of an old treasure and begin reassembling it to make a pretty good restoration.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): “I’ve learned that I must find positive outlets for anger or it will destroy me,” said actor Sidney Poitier. That can be a dynamic meditation for you during the next three weeks. I think you will derive substantial power from putting it into action. If you’re ingenious and diligent about finding those positive outlets, your anger will generate constructive and transformative results.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

In 1905, at the age of 30, Lucy Maud Montgomery wrote the novel Anne of Green Gables. It was a tale about an orphan girl growing up on Prince Edward Island. She sent the manuscript to several publishers, all of whom rejected it. Discouraged, she put it away in a hatbox and stored it in a closet. But two years later, her ambitions reignited when she re-read the story. Again she mailed it to prospective publishers, and this time one liked it enough to turn it into a book. It soon became a bestseller. Since then it has sold more than 50 million copies and been translated into 36 languages. I figure you are at a point in your own unfolding that’s equivalent to where Anne was shortly before she rediscovered the manuscript she’d put away in the hatbox.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The

Toxorhynchites are species of large mosquitoes that don’t buzz around our heads while we’re trying to sleep and will never bite our skin or suck our blood. In fact, they’re our benefactors. Their larvae feast on the larvae of the mosquitoes that are bothersome to us. In accordance with astrological omens, I propose that you be alert for a metaphorically comparable influence in your own life: a helper or ally that might be in disguise or may just superficially seem to be like an adversary.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Audre Lorde identified herself as a black writer, lesbian, librarian, mother, feminist, civil rights activist and many other descriptors. But as ardent as she was in working for the political causes she was passionate about, she didn’t want to be pigeonholed in a single identity. One of her central teachings was to celebrate all the different parts of herself. “Only by learning to live in harmony with your contradictions can you keep it all afloat,” she testified. These approaches should be especially fun and extra meaningful for you in the coming weeks, Pisces. I encourage you to throw a big Unity Party for all the different people you are.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. September 12, 2019

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SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: LANDES MEDICAL GROUP, A MEDICAL CORP.;, WILLIAM LANDES, MD, AN INDIVIDUAL; AND DOES 1-5 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: CARWOOD SKYPARK, LLC NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: JOSEPH L. SELBY 249546 FERRIS & SELBY 2607 Forest Avenue, Suite 130 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 343-0100 Dated: May 21, 2019 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 19CV01535 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT PAUL JOSEPH GHIMENTI You have been sued by petitioner: GRACE ANN GHIMENTI You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage this Legal Notice continues

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or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court Of California County of Glenn Willows Branch - Main Courthouse 526 West Sycamore St Willows, CA 95988 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: GRACE ANN GHIMENTI 425 E Walker St Orland, CA 95963 Signed: CINDIA MARTINEZ Dated: May 14, 2019 Case Number: 19FL06504 Published: September 12,19,26, October 3, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DOUGLAS JOHN MEYER, aka DOUGLAS J. MEYER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DOUGLAS JOHN MEYER, aka DOUGLAS J. MEYER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PAMELA C. HANDLEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: PAMELA C. HANDLEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 17, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926.

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IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: ERWIN WILLIAMS MCKERNAN, LANAM, BAKKE & WILLIAMS LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 877-4961 Dated: August 20, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00371 Published: August 29, September 5,12, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE NADINE I. REGAS, also known as NADINE IDA REGAS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NADINE I. REGAS, also known as NADINE IDA REGAS, NADINE REGAS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JUDITH K. TESSIEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUDITH K. TESSIEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an this Legal Notice continues

objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 24, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: August 28, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00384 Published: September 5,12,19, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE BETTY ANN VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY A. VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY VANDEGRIFT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BETTY ANN VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY A. VANDEGRIFT, aka BETTY VANDEGRIFT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARK D. VANDEGRIFT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARK D. VANDEGRIFT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal this Legal Notice continues

representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 24, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: August 28, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00385 Published: September 5,12,19, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHERI L. MEYERS, aka SHERI LYNN MEYERS To all heirs and beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHERI L. MEYERS, aka SHERI LYNN MEYERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JUSTIN MEYERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JUSTIN MEYERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: October 15, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate this Legal Notice continues

Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: JUSTIN MEYERS, IN PRO PER 6447 Hollywood Rd., #3 Magalia, CA 95954 Case Number: 19PR00399 Published: September 12,19,26, 2019

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