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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 1 THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

California’s trashed recycling system and how to fix it PAGE 20

VOTE NOW!

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FEELING THE BERN

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HOMELESS SOLUTIONS

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BUTTE’S MAKER LAB

See SAMPLE BALLOT, page 22


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INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 1 • August 29, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Lisa Van Der Maelen, Jim Williams, David Wyles

N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Publications Art Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

AUGUST 29, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Housing, homelessness plan a positive step When the people assembled in the Butte County Board

of Supervisors chambers broke out in a round of applause and cheers Tuesday (Aug. 27) over the panel’s move to tackle the homeless and housing crises head-on, we were right there with them. The decision was a no-brainer, as it will cost the county nothing while providing much-needed oversight to a system that’s long been fragmented. As we know from the recent Point-in-Time Homeless Count, homelessness is exploding in Butte County. Over the past two years, that population has grown 16 percent—partially due to the Camp Fire, which displaced tens of thousands of residents. But efforts to combat it have been stymied by a lack of leadership. Sure, the Butte Countywide Continuum of Care (CoC) provided some oversight. But, as that body is made up largely of stakeholders volunteering their time outside of their already busy schedules, it has lacked the attention it needs. Finally, the county recognized that. By implementing HHOME (Homeless & Housing Outreach Management Education), which would include paid county employees working across departments and in concert with local nonprofits, we finally may be able to get a handle on this growing problem.

What we find particularly encouraging is the dual focus on addressing homelessness and the lack of housing. Officials have too long looked at the issues separately—by encouraging affordable and lowincome development, as well as bolstering behavioral health and social services, we can get people off the streets and keep them there. As the Jesus Center’s Laura Cootsona said at Tuesday’s meeting, the nonprofit sector is stretched thin and can certainly use the help. We’re encouraged by the program’s intent to support nonprofits that don’t have the expertise or time to write complicated grant proposals—that was a problem earlier this year when the CoC was handing out funding and all but ignored every proposal from Oroville. The county’s taking a huge step by moving forward with the HHOME program. We believe it’s the right thing to do. We know the state is on board, as Gov. Gavin Newsom recently dedicated millions to tackling homelessness. What we’d like to see next is buy-in from the community. That means representatives from local municipalities, hospitals and other stakeholders recognizing the benefits and pitching in to help it succeed. The potential of HHOME certainly has the CN&R’s vote of approval. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

The GOP and the road to autocracy OUnited true democracy. Unfortunately, when observing the States’ electoral process, one does not see this ne person, one vote. That is the benchmark for a

guiding principle being applied equally in America. The Republican Party, with the help of corporate funding, has implemented a hands-on political process to exert control of the legislative powers in individual states, as well as power in any or all of the three branches of government. There’s an old country saying, “There is more than one way to skin a cat.” Likewise, “There is more than one way to keep by people you don’t want voting from Roger Beadle voting.” The author, a Chico For example, following the resident, is a Chico State alum and former 2010 Census in Wisconsin, the small-business owner. Republican-controlled Legislature redrew the maps for the state’s districts explicitly in the GOP’s favor. In 2012, despite receiving only 48.6 percent of the vote, Republicans won 60 of 99 Assembly seats. Democrats won an outright majority of votes cast but secured just 39 seats.

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Known as gerrymandering, this is one illustration of how Republicans undermine fair and lawful voting practices. In certain Republican-controlled states there has been a systematic effort to close polling stations that have a history of traditional Democratic voters—non-white, low-income and elderly. From 2016 to 2018, Georgia and North Carolina purged 10.6 percent and 11.7 percent of registered voters, respectively, from predominantly black districts. Repressive voter identification requirements by Republican-controlled states have likewise targeted voters likely to support Democrats. Foreign disruption and data manipulation in the 2016 election were especially harmful to the integrity of our electoral process. Russian interference in our 2016 presidential election in favor of the candidacy of Donald Trump is well-documented. Trump has since publicly stated he would welcome future election influence from foreign countries. America has long been the world’s beacon of supporting human rights, a free press and the rule of law, all of which are under assault by the Trump administration. But voter suppression is amongst the most egregious forms of suppression: It is undermining citizen participation in government and putting us on course for devolving into an autocratic government. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Top contenders Back in June 2016, just five days before the primary election, nearly every person on the CN&R’s editorial staff headed to the university to see Sen. Bernie Sanders speak. We were stunned that a serious contender for the office of president of the United States would come to our little neck of the woods. We’d already endorsed Sanders for the primary and nearly a year earlier published a long-form piece about the Vermont senator’s so-called political revolution. Still, we devoted a cover story’s worth of coverage based on the local visit and the excitement surrounding it (see “Presidential oratory,” June 9, 2016). Nearly 6,000 people showed up. But we all know how the primary turned out. Indeed, we learned the day before we went to press that Hillary Clinton had snagged the Democratic Party nomination. I headlined my column in that issue “Mourning time.” Fast-forward to last week. On Thursday (Aug. 22), Sanders once again touched down in Chico, this time to a smaller venue. Before that, he toured Paradise to bear witness to a small slice of the destruction wrought by the Camp Fire. This time around, the reaction around the CN&R’s office was, how shall I put it, less enthusiastic. We didn’t exactly draw straws to see who’d cover his speech, but none of us was clamoring for the assignment. The sharp contrast between then and now might be attributable to a few factors. First, the field of presidential hopefuls is massive. Second, thanks to the self-anointed “chosen one” in the White House, we haven’t had a break from national politics since 2016. In any event, Sanders’ appearance got a lot of locals excited about the 2020 primary. His message on climate change was important and well-timed, too, as you’ll read about in Andre Byik’s report on Sanders’ visit and, more important, the local efforts to update Chico’s Climate Action Plan (see page 8).

ANOTHER CANDIDATE Speaking of the campaign season, this week’s issue includes a Q&A with another prominent Democratic candidate, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. Warren recently spoke with Brad Bynum, editor of our sister paper the Reno News & Review, which is located in Washoe County, a former Republican stronghold that’s increasingly turning blue. Yours truly has been keeping tabs on the former Harvard Law School professor for the better part of a decade. I began reading about her during the Great Recession—especially her efforts to put consumer protections into place following the financial collapse— and was intrigued to see her elected to office in 2012. The next year, to accompany a cover story on the subject of rising college tuition and the crushing loan debt carried by students, I wrote an editorial about Warren’s Student Loan Fairness Act, an effort at the time to lower the interest rate on subsidized loans commensurate with that of the banking industry (see “End the profiteering,” Editorial, Aug. 22, 2013). Unfortunately, that amendment and several others over the years have been blocked by Senate Republicans. But Warren is someone to watch, and that goes doubly for those saddled with student loan debt. Right now, she and Sanders are neck and neck in the lead of the pack. March will be here before we know it.


LETTERS

Attention Boomers

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

‘Orgy of consumerism’ Re “Demand a better climate change plan” (Guest comment, by Mark Stemen, Aug. 22): There probably was a time when we had “10 years to save the planet.” But by 1980, the modern environmental movement was dead in the cradle. We coasted through the next four decades reciting the mantra, “I recycle.” At no point in that 40 years did we have an adult conversation about real sacrifice—and that conversation remains off limits. Environmental initiatives from academia are largely academic, as is obvious in the carbon footprint of any college campus: Faculty and staff international jet-setting, alone, incinerates enough oil to make Red Adair roll over in his grave. “Helicoptering” parents burn more oil than the People’s Republic of Bangladesh. Cafeteria choices remain decidedly zoocentric. If anything serious were happening at Chico State, or any university, we’d see significant lifestyle change.

And, it’s true that we can’t rely on government to get it done. Why? We hire them (it’s called “democracy”) and as much as we’d like to think this is not in our control, we don’t want government orchestrating an 80 percent cut in consumption; that is, the deep structural change needed to bring us into a sane relationship with the Earth. So far, we’ve opted for an orgy of consumerism—with windmills, where possible. All else remains unthinkable. Patrick Newman Chico

Deeply concerning plan Re “Lights out” (Newslines, by Ashiah Scharaga, Aug. 8): Watching 20 speakers consecutively trash Police Chief Mike O’Brien’s wildly unprecedented proposal was fun for those of us typically critical of the local police. Still, this is deeply concerning. Not only is O’Brien prepared to suck all public funds into a standing army, but he also seems

eager to move toward normalizing martial law. A couple of City Council members expressed interest in alternative ways to ensure public safety, so I thought this worth sharing: Recently, I was doing research and visited the Mexican city of Cherán. Like much of its surrounding region, Cherán was ridden with crime before a 2011 insurrection incited by illegal logging. They ended up banishing the police and political parties, electing instead to govern themselves by neighborhood assemblies, and organizing modestly paid community patrols. It now vies for the safest municipality in the country. I asked a member of the patrols why they were so successful, and, without need to ponder, he responded: They patrol only their own neighborhood, where everyone knows who they are. Chico has a lot of problems to solve. Police violence is one of them, and others require money; so LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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On a recent morning I met a man who lives near the Jesus Center—a nice, reasonable guy whose house is across from a congregation point for unhoused people. He regularly encounters individuals abusing drugs, and they’re sometimes hostile toward him. He understands that these aren’t representative of all homeless people, that they’re a subset. While he cares about their plight, he admitted to “compassion fatigue,” because after repeated negative encounters, his desire to help has diminished. He speculates that his frustrations are not so much with the addicted individuals as with the local, regional and national leaders who have refused to take decisive action to address the problem. I get it. In the coming months I’ll be asking our Homeless Task Force and City Council to take action on a number of proposals designed to compassionately address the impacts of homelessness in Chico. The first of these proposals asks the council to agendize discussion of a homeless jobs program. I encourage readers to email their council members to show their support for such a discussion. Some will say these proposals are too much, others will say they’re not enough. I invite people with better ideas to bring them forward for discussion. Scott Huber Chico

Editor’s note: The author is a member of the Chico City Council.

No-response rep Re “State of denial” (Newslines, by Andre Byik, Aug. 15): What is Congressman LaMalfa’s position on climate change and the environment? All I know is he thinks it’s a joke to say he believes climate changes. I tried unsuccessfully for three months to talk to a staff person about his policy to no avail. I started in May with the local office, was referred to Kathleen

Devlin, who referred me to Communications Director Parker Williams, who did not respond to any of my emails. I called the Washington, D.C., office several times, was given a name of someone who might know but she did not respond. I called D.C. again and first was told his policy was on his website. When I said I didn’t see it, the staffer said actually it wasn’t there and to talk to Mr. Williams. I said he doesn’t respond, and that was it. So I’m letting readers know our member of Congress is unresponsive to constituents and has no positive climate change policy that I could find, even though it’s the most pressing issue facing us. We should not re-elect such a dinosaur. Gayle Kimball Chico

‘Blasphemous claims’ Imagine President Obama making this claim: “I am the chosen one.” Obama was labeled as the beast rising out of the sea with seven heads and ten horns (aka antiChrist) by local right-wing kook letter writers. In reality, the manchild currently sitting behind the desk in the Oval Office is the person responsible for the aforementioned blasphemous claims. Where is the outrage from so-called evangelical Christians? President Obama risked his entire second term on capturing or killing Osama bin Laden. The raid was a huge success, ending in the death of OBL. Quite a contrast from our current so-called commander in chief, who dodged the draft during the Vietnam War because of “bone spurs.” Calling Obama a coward, with Gen. “bone spurs” holding the White House hostage, hardly passes the laugh test. Once again, it’s just another glaring example of GOP hypocrisy. Ray Estes Redding

Write a letter  tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. deadline for publication is noon on the tuesday prior to publication.


STREETALK

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Katie Bailey teacher

I would recommend Ojiya, which is a sushi house. I love it because the staff there is super friendly and the food is delicious. There’s also a hibachi grill, but we go there for sushi.

James Brock farmer

My own garden, because I get to eat all my different foods. But if I come to town, I like to go somewhere that sells my food, which is Grana. Jeff is a great chef for them. He puts a lot of thought and energy into what he does.

Shannon Singer f itness coach

Nobby’s, because they have the best cheese skirt around, and their fries are bomb.

Jim Monaco retired lecturer

My home, because both my wife and I love to cook, and after 36 years together we’ve gotten good at it. The cost is better, it’s more convenient and all my friends can gather around.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE HOMICIDE IN FOREST RANCH

On Tuesday (Aug. 27), Butte County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a call from a Forest Ranch business that a man, later identified as Robert Anderson, had arrived with a large laceration on his leg. He’d allegedly been dropped off from a residence on Schott Road, according to a press release. Anderson, 25, of Chico, was transported to a local hospital and deputies investigated further. When they got to Schott Road, they discovered blood in a driveway and ultimately the body of 30-year-old Forest Ranch resident Gunther Rupprecht. Anderson was arrested on suspicion of first-degree murder and the investigation is ongoing.

PHILLIPS FAMILY TO APPEAL

The family of Desmond Phillips intends to appeal a judge’s decision last month dismissing a lawsuit brought against the city of Chico over Phillips’ shooting death by police (see “Phillips case dismissed,” Downstroke, Aug. 1). Officers fatally shot Phillips, 25, during a mental health crisis on March 17, 2017. Attorneys for the family filed a notice last Wednesday (Aug. 21) in U.S. District Court in Sacramento indicating they are appealing to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Benjamin Nisenbaum, a civil rights attorney at the high-profile John L. Burris law firm in Oakland, previously told the CN&R it seemed Judge John A. Mendez “reached too far” by granting a city motion for summary judgment, resulting in the case’s dismissal before trial.

A renewable future

Chico groups launch Climate Action Plan update on the heels of Bernie Sanders’ visit and his national policy rollout

Sand member A father of two young children of the Chico chapter of the

teve Breedlove wants humanity to thrive.

MYSTERIOUSLY MISSING ON THE RIVER

The Butte County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the disappearance of 22-year-old Chico State student Anthony Mahr (pictured), who purportedly went missing during a float gone awry last Tuesday afternoon (Aug. 20) on the Sacramento River. Mahr was said to have been with two friends at the time—Lavina Corsbie and Brentston Rhodes, both 22—but wasn’t reported missing until after 9:30 p.m. that night, when Rhodes was arrested on suspicion of burglarizing a home along the riverbank earlier in the afternoon, BCSO said. Following his arrest, Rhodes allegedly told investigators that he, Corsbie and Mahr fell in the river after their vessels hit a snag, BCSO said. Deputies later found Corsbie in the Chico area; she said she was able to swim to safety. The search for Mahr is ongoing.

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Democratic Socialists of America, Breedlove says thriving means leading meaningful, digstory and nified lives. Everyone’s photo by medical needs would be Andre Byik met, and living would and re b @ mean being surrounded n ew srev i ew. c o m by community, music, art and literature. But that vision is predicated on humanity’s survival, and that means addressing climate change, he said. “We’re running into the wall of ecological limits,” Breedlove said. “Industrial civilization is not sustainable, and so we have to figure out how to create … an ecological society rather than an industrial society. I’m saying an ecological civilization.” Breedlove was speaking to roughly 50 other ecologically minded residents gathered Tuesday (Aug. 27) at the CARD Community Center for a listening and brainstorming session to inform an update of the city of Chico’s Climate Action

Plan. The event came on the heels of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ visit to Paradise and Chico last Thursday (Aug. 22), when the presidential candidate rolled out details of his $16 trillion plan to combat climate change. The effort on the local front was organized by the Butte Environmental Council and members of the city’s Sustainability Task Force, who warned of an impending climate disaster in the next decade in the absence of action. Participants offered their ideas for meeting goals of reducing the city’s greenhouse gas emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030 and 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. Those ideas included promoting alternative modes of transportation, increasing urban density and requiring more energy-efficient homes, to name a few. Suggestions also included ways to pay for mitigation measures, such as rethinking the city budget and taking advantage of state and federal funding. Breaking into groups, people spoke of the need for city officials to confront climate change with the same fervor they displayed

while addressing the city’s financial crisis following the Great Recession. The climate crisis is an emergency, they said, and it should be treated as one. May Kay Benson, a longtime activist and member of Chico 350, said more climate-driven disasters like the Camp Fire could happen locally without action. The blaze, she said, made real what some may have thought was an abstract idea. Combating climate change, she said, requires a multifaceted approach, but she sees hope on the horizon—especially in the form of younger generations organizing and demanding change. Mark Stemen, a professor of geography and planning at Chico State and member of the city’s Sustainability Task Force, said he is hopeful that goals can be met to avert disaster. There are signs that change can come quickly in Chico, such as the city and county forming a joint powers authority to purchase and sell energy based on the needs of their residents—a community choice aggregation (CCA), as it’s known (see “Power to the people,” Newslines, July 11). A CCA would mean the city


Hundreds of supporters filled the Chico Masonic Family Center last Thursday (Aug. 22) to hear presidential candidate Bernie Sanders unveil his climate plan.

could potentially achieve using 100 percent renewable electricity by 2025. “It’d take an emergency-level action, but it’s doable,” Stemen told the CN&R. “I think the thing that most people fear isn’t that we can do it technologically, but can we do it politically and culturally. The barriers are no longer technological, and they’re not really even economic. This stuff’s cheaper. It’s social, cultural—making those changes. And humans can change pretty damn quick if given the opportunity.” Stemen was one of several speakers at a

rally held last Thursday (Aug. 22) by Sanders at the Chico Masonic Family Center, which held hundreds of supporters and reached capacity. There, Sanders described his “shocking” and “sobering” experience touring Paradise earlier that day. “The purpose of being here today is to kind of learn a little bit more of what went on here, but most importantly … to make sure that the people of our country understand that President Trump is wrong, wrong, wrong when he believes that climate change is a hoax,” the senator said. Sanders called human-caused climate change an existential threat to which inaction would cost $69 trillion across the world and lead to more than 250,000 annual deaths worldwide. The senator from Vermont said his $16 trillion plan aims to achieve 100 percent renewable energy by 2030 and decarbonization by 2050. His plan calls for the creation of upward of 20 million jobs, a prohibition on fracking, and the end of fossil-fuel extraction on public lands. Sanders, who held a rally in Sacramento later that day, said addressing climate change is a global task. Without action, he said, wildfires will become more severe, droughts more frequent, disease and death more prevalent. “As we look out at the destruction here in Paradise and in the pain that this community and other communities around the country have experienced as a result of climate change, we know that we cannot allow the greed of fossil-fuel billionaires to destroy our planet and our children’s future for one second longer,” Sanders said. “So, to the fossil fuel industry, we want to work with you. We want to make this transition as quick and as painless as we possibly can. But this transition is coming whether you like it or not.” Ω

Neck and neck Sen. Elizabeth Warren talks housing crisis, child care and economic instability After two rounds of the 2020 Democratic Party

debates, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts has risen to the top tier of Democratic presidential candidates. Indeed, in a Monmouth University poll released on Monday (Aug. 26), Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders were tied in the top spot (20 percent of voters), followed by former Vice President Joe Biden (19 percent). Warren is spending quite a bit of time in California, which moved up its primary from June to March 3 to have a louder voice, and in Nevada, whose caucuses on Feb. 22 are the third nominating contests on the calendar. She was in Los Angeles last week, and is scheduled to be in San Francisco early next month for a town hall event on climate change. The second-term senator’s mantra is that she has a plan for everything—health care, criminal justice and, following two recent mass shootings, gun violence. She’s quite busy running for president, but carved a few minutes out of her schedule earlier this month to speak with Brad Bynum, editor of the Reno News & Review, CN&R’s sister paper, during a campaign visit to Nevada. Here are some excerpts of their conversation. Is [the housing crisis] a problem the federal government should help with? And if so, how? Half a century ago, there were two ways that housing was produced for middle-class,

SIFT ER Targeting immigrants Recently released U.S. Department of Justice data show 64 percent of all federal arrests in fiscal year 2018 were of non-U.S. citizens, a sharp increase over fiscal year 2017 and a development The Marshall Project—a nonprofit news organization focused on criminal justice issues—says coincides with the Justice Department’s “zero tolerance” policy “aimed at ramping up criminal prosecution of people caught entering the country illegally.” Of the 125,027 federal non-U.S. citizen arrests in 2018, 105,748 were for immigration-related offenses. In 2017, federal non-U.S. citizen arrests totaled 73,022, with 55,454 being for

working-class, working-poor, poor-poor people—and that was private development and the federal government. The private developers that built the two-bedroom, one-bath house that I grew up in—the garage converted to house my three brothers—they’re not building those anymore. … The second [thing] that’s happened is that the federal government has largely withdrawn from building affordable housing. I will build 3.2 million new housing units across this country—it’s housing for middle-class families, for working families, for the working poor, for the homeless, for seniors who want to age in place,

immigration-related offenses. Looking deeper into the numbers, The Marshall Project found U.S. citizens were arrested more often than non-U.S. citizens in every category of crime except immigration. “For instance, for every non-U.S. citizen arrested for violent crime, 10 U.S. citizens were arrested,” according to the organization. “For every non-U.S. citizen arrested for drug charges, three U.S. citizens were arrested.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts speaks to the California Democratic Party convention in San Francisco in June. PHOTO BY BEN CHRISTOPHER FOR CALMATTERS

for people with disabilities. We need more housing—a lot more housing. And the federal government can make that happen. You unveiled a huge universal child care program. How’s it going to be funded? The universal child care is funded by a 2-cent tax on the largest fortunes in this country. So on fortunes above $50 million. … That will generate enough revenue to pay for child care for every baby in this country age zero to 5, preschool for every 3-year-old and 4-year-old, raise the wages of every child care worker and preschool worker in this country, and cover the costs of college, add $50 billion to historically black colleges and universities, and cancel student loan debt for 95 percent of the kids who have it. … And here’s the thing: It could do all those things I described and there would still be a couple of hundred billion left over. Are you concerned that Trump and the previous Congress have set us up for a financial crisis like we had in 2008, by having rolled back Obama-era protections, like DoddFrank? I’m very worried. Because the Trump administration has weakened regulations, has refused to enforce the regulations that are still in place, and the warning signs are growing around the economy. The number NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D AUGUST 29, 2019

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of small business loans that are in default are through the roof. That should be a red flashing light for this economy. [If] small businesses can’t service their debt, then they’re not going to be long for this world, and if they start falling like dominoes, it’s going to be a real problem for this economy.

“We have an America that works great for a thinner and thinner slice at the top, and it’s not working for much of anyone else.” —Sen. Elizabeth Warren

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Leading up to the last Democratic  debate, a lot of the buzz and promotion was Warren versus Bernie  Sanders. So what is a key major  policy difference between you and  Sen. Sanders? I’m not here to try to define somebody else’s policy. I can tell you what I’m fighting for. The best part of these debates is when we get a chance to do that. We have an America that works great for a thinner and thinner slice at the top, and it’s not working for much of anyone else. Our government in Washington has been captured by money. And it’s far more than just political contributions. It’s lobbyists, bought-and-paid-for experts, think tanks. Washington is flooded with money, and every decision that gets made there is influenced by that money. And day by day, decision by decision, the government does just a little bit more in favor of the wealthy and the well-connected and against everyone else. I believe we can turn that around. I believe we can make this government work, not just for those at the top, but make it work for everyone. —Brad Bynum b rad b @ newsr ev iew.c o m


Auto PAint / Body ShoP

‘The right path’ Supervisors vote to adopt program to take on homelessness, housing Butte County took a huge step

toward tackling the homeless and housing crises on Tuesday (Aug. 27) when the Board of Supervisors voted to take over the local Continuum of Care (CoC) and create four new positions focusing on the issues. “We have a public health, public safety and moral crisis. This is our problem,” explained Jessica Wood, an employee of the Behavioral Health Department who was part of the team that came up with the plan presented Tuesday. “We need a centralized, coordinated system, to bring services together, and partnerships between public and private entities.” Homelessness and housing are two problems plaguing Butte County and communities across California, Casey Hatcher, deputy chief administrative officer, told the board. In the past, they’d been addressed separately—homelessness mostly through social services and nonprofits, housing through planning and zoning. It was time to take a different tack, she said. “We’ve been siloed,” she said. “We need to bring services together, bolster staff, and work better together to provide services to the homeless and provide housing.” The proposal heard Tuesday was presented by Butte County’s Leadership Academy—a group of staff from across departments chosen to receive special leadership training. It includes the creation of a new program under the umbrella of the Department of Employment and Social Services (DESS) called Homeless & Housing Outreach Management Education (HHOME). There would be a homeless/housing administrator, a program manager (basically the same role Jennifer Griggs recently vacated as CoC coordinator), an administrative analyst and a housing navigator. “It will be an integrated countywide response,” said Shelby Boston, DESS director. “We will expand upon [existing] col-

laborations and work better internally with departments we haven’t historically worked with—like Development Services. Plus, we’ll work more with nonprofits.” Laura Cootsona, executive director of the Jesus Center, addressed the board with a big smile. Since taking on that role four years ago, she said, it became immediately evident that there was a “systems problem,” particularly when it came to the CoC. The system simply was not working. “This proposal has been longawaited,” she said. “As I got involved in the CoC, it was my least favorite meeting of my entire life every single month. And I go to a lot of meetings. … I cannot wait for you all to collaborate and to show up and bring some incredible leadership together and help us. The nonprofit sector in this region is stretched thin, especially after the fire. We’re mighty in our tiny boots, but we want your help.” Supervisor Tami Ritter agreed that the CoC system has been flawed. The HHOME program would include help for local nonprofits to apply for grant funding, something that the CoC identified as a need following a particularly cumbersome round of grant disbursements earlier this year. Oroville’s nonprofits received no funding, purportedly because of insufficient grant-writing. “I’m interested in seeing the CoC representing the entire county,” Ritter said. “I want to see a minimum allocation to go to each jurisdiction. Oroville would have a minimum amount entitled to it regardless of their applications. Paradise would have a minimum ….” As for funding, the county already receives grant money from the state that’s set aside for administrative duties. And Gov. Gavin Newsom just added $650 million to the state budget to address homelessness. The county also is hoping to get some seed money from the North Valley Community Foundation, plus contributions from local hospitals and municipalities.

“The city of Chico already contributes to the CoC. Will other communities?” posed Fred Thurman, Leadership Academy member and DESS employee. “We all know that we have a homeless problem in Butte County,” said Oroville City Councilwoman Linda Draper. “We also know ... between 2017 and 2019, homeless numbers increased by 16 percent. A lot of that is due to the Camp Fire. “You set the tone in Butte County,” she told the board. “When you show the initiative, hopefully it will trickle down to local jurisdictions, and they’ll follow your lead.” In the end, not one person spoke against the proposal and the board voted unanimously to adopt it. Because of funding options that

will come available early next year, Boston explained, hiring will begin next month and they’ll open a navigation center in an existing county building in Oroville in coordination with nonprofits within the year. “The impact that this proposed plan could have would reduce our public safety calls, reduce hospitalizations, have a huge impact on all of our emergency response to a degree that we can’t even fathom right now,” Ritter said. “Integrating homeless services with all departments will allow us to modify housing codes, to incentivize compact development. “I’m just so happy we’re on the right path.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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PRIDE FEST

Over 900 people gathered at the Chico City Plaza Saturday (Aug. 24) for an LGBTQ celebration hosted by Stonewall Alliance. The Chico Pride Festival included live music, information and craft booths, speakers, food and dancing, as well as other events around town held over four days. PHOTO BY CHARLES FINLAY

AUGUST 29, 2019

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HEALTHLINES A view down the Skyway of the massive inversion layer that hovered above the valley on Nov. 11, as the Camp Fire continued to burn. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

in 2023, according to a study by TechSci Research presented at a recent meeting of the California Air Resources Board.

The new West

Across the country, annual sales of home air

Smoke in the sky, air purifier at home

by

Mark Kreidler

W November, the owners of the family-run Collier Hardware in downtown Chico faced hen the Camp Fire began to rage last

a situation unlike any they’d seen. A business that might welcome 200 customers on an average day, Collier was suddenly dealing with five times that number—“and they all wanted the same thing,” co-owner Steve Lucena said. Alarmed by dense smoke, shoppers were snapping up portable air purifiers and breathing masks in staggering numbers. Collier sold nearly 60,000 adult-size masks in a couple of weeks, and gave away thousands more that were specially designed for children. “With the purifiers, we had multiple people unloading them from the truck, and they were sold before we could get them all the way into the store,” Lucena said. “People didn’t care what model it was or how much

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AUGUST 29, 2019

it cost. We’d normally sell four to six in a year, and we sold 100 in a day.” As hot, dry weather settled upon the West this summer, fears of massive wildfires—and the smoke they produce—again took hold. It’s true not only in areas directly threatened by fire, but even those hundreds of miles away where people expect to be shrouded in lung-clogging smoke. The health risks are real, and they’re already part of a future that public-health experts—and those who sell air-quality products—are anticipating. “We aren’t depending on wildfire season to make a profit, because we don’t hope for another year of fires,” said Joceline Barron, a spokeswoman for Los Angeles-based Rabbit Air, which makes portable purifiers. “But we know the market does profit from that season,” she said. “When the wildfires were going on, our phones were ringing all the time.” Sales of portable air purifiers in California alone are expected to rise dramatically over the next few years, from roughly 469,000 units in 2017 to a predicted 720,000

filters are expected to cross $1 billion by 2023, according to a report by Research and Markets. “Interest in effective air purification has significantly risen in recent years due to wildfires,” said Jaya Rao, chief operating officer and co-founder of Molekule, a maker of a $799 purifier. Sales of the unit have doubled each year since it debuted in 2017, Rao said. “We have seen people buy solely for the purpose of wildfires, whether proactively or in the moment, but we have also seen that the wildfires have raised a general awareness about the need for good air purification every day,” she said. Workers at Molekule got a close look at the impact of wildfire season last year, when the company was so besieged by orders that it began distributing them out the front of its San Francisco corporate office “to provide relief the fastest,” Rao said. Researchers from Harvard and Yale in 2016 produced a list of more than 300 counties throughout the West that will be at the greatest risk of dangerous pollution in the coming decades due to “smoke waves” emanating from increasingly intense wildfires. Among the most vulnerable are heavily populated areas such as San Francisco, Alameda and Contra Costa counties in Northern California, and King County in Washington. Wildfire smoke is dangerous because of

its concentration of noxious fine particles, which measure 2.5 micrometers or less (a human hair, by comparison, measures 70 micrometers) and which, unlike common dust, can be inhaled into the deepest recesses of the lung. In addition to eye and respiratory tract irritation, this particulate matter—PM2.5 in scientific shorthand—can exacerbate heart and lung issues, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and may lead to premature death. Children, older people and those with respiratory illnesses are particularly at risk. “It can be pretty dense. It seeps through the walls and, of course, doors and windows when they’re opened,” said Linda Smith, chief of the California air board’s health and exposure branch. While much is still unknown about the long-term effects of exposure to wildfire smoke, the microscopic particles are regulated as an air pollutant. A study published last year in the journal GeoHealth found that the number of deaths linked to the inhalation of wildfire smoke in the U.S. could double by the end of the century, to nearly 40,000 per year. Air purifiers essentially function as scrubbers, removing bacteria, viruses and HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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HEALTHLINES

conTinUed from pAGe 12

it was produced by Kaiser Health news, which publishes california Healthline, an editorially independent service of the california Health care foundation.

And while cities and towns will do what they can—officials in Seattle, for example, announced in June the retrofitting of five buildings to use as “clean-air shelters” on smoky days—the choice for many residents will be closer to home. Back at Collier Hardware, the

Lucena family has adjusted its stock. Collier keeps plenty of breathing masks on the shelves, Lucena said, and at least a handful of air purifiers are now in the store at all times. Access to an Ace Hardware supply warehouse in Roseville about an hour and a half away means additional units can be obtained quickly. They are reinforcements the family hopes never to need. “We know we’ll have fires,” Lucena said. “We just hope they won’t be anything like last year. But we will be ready.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

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About this story:

PM2.5 as the air passes through them. The air resources board recommends their use to limit the effects of wildfire smoke in the home. It maintains a list of devices approved for use in California. Portable air-cleaning units were once considered specialty purchases, but sales-driven competition has flooded the market, forcing prices down. Where a high-end portable purifier might cost $800 or more, several models now cost less than $100. Shoppers can find models with well-known consumer appliance names like Dyson, Hunter, Honeywell and Whirlpool, as well as scores of more obscure manufacturers. Several websites have attempted to evaluate air purifiers, including the size of the room they can effectively clean. Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality recently reported that unhealthy air conditions were on the rise throughout the state, including urban areas like Portland that are far from the wildfires. Smoke from the Camp Fire was noted across the continent and as far away as New York City.

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Stay hungry, stay healthy? The suggested benefits of intermittent fasting are plenty: weight loss, improved heart and brain function, more energy and minimizing the effects of aging, to name a few. The basic approach is simple—eat only during an eight-hour window, fast during the rest of the day (a ratio known as 16:8). This can be achieved by skipping breakfast or eating your dinner really early so you can sleep through your hunger pangs. One of the major keys to the success of fasting is the regulation of insulin. The periods when you aren’t eating give the body time to lower insulin levels, which reverses the fat-storing process and leads to other benefits like low blood pressure. Two recent studies have found that fasting and eating low-calorie foods also may reduce the risk of chronic disease by keeping inflammatory immune cells at bay while supercharging other important infection-fighting ones. Is your stomach growling yet?

AdvocAtes Needed Become a state certified Long-Term Care Ombudsman and make a difference in the lives of the residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. We need people in Oroville, Paradise, Glenn and Tehama Counties. If you have time and wish to make a difference, please call!

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CN&R

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GREENWAYS

Closed up shop A $25 million payment wasn’t enough to keep recycler open by

Dan Morain

Aoff hundreds of centers this month, laying 750 workers, went under despite receivmajor California recycler that shuttered

ing state payments of nearly $25 million last year, an internal state record shows. The closure of Ontario-based rePlanet LLC underscored—and exacerbated— California’s recycling crisis, which threatens a pillar of the state’s environmental agenda. The company cited insufficient state payments when it announced its 284 recycling centers would end operations. In a statement, rePlanet blamed “the continued reduction in State fees, the depressed pricing of recycled aluminum and PET plastic, and the rise in operating costs resulting from minimum wage increases and required health and workers compensation insurance.”

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AUGUST 29, 2019

In business in California since 2012, rePlanet was by far the state’s largest collector at grocery stores of used cans and bottles. Its closure came despite a decision by Gov. Gavin Newsom and legislators to include an extra $5 million in the 2019-20 budget to help such recyclers defray their costs. Company representatives have not commented beyond its Aug. 5 announcement. But a document obtained by CalMatters shows that the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, also known as CalRecycle, made $25 million in payments to rePlanet in 2018, including $10.4 million in processing payments, $13.76 million in handling fees and $738,661 in administrative fees. State payments to recyclers are funded by 5-cent recycling charges levied on consumers for redeemable cans and bottles. CalRecycle refused to discuss rePlanet’s payout or the company’s claim that insufficient state support led to its closure. Agency spokesman Lance Klug said details about payments would divulge a company’s “proprietary” or internal information.

About this story:

It is a part of this week’s cover story package on the recycling crisis. Read more on page 20.

“That information should be public,” said

Mark Murray, director of Californians Against Waste, the state’s leading nonprofit advocate for more recycling. Murray noted that the confidentiality requirement dates to the original recycling legislation in the 1980s, when scrap metal collectors insisted that their internal information be hidden from competitors and not be disclosed to the public. Bulk numbers, however, show that rePlanet got nearly 16 percent of the $66 million in overall processing payments the state made in 2018, and 28.5 percent of the $48 million the state paid in handling fees to recyclers that operate in grocery store parking lots. Murray said that while an annual payment of $25 million may seem to be a lot of money, it doesn’t match operating costs. The state should increase payments by at least 20 percent, he said, citing not only rePlanet’s struggle but that of hundreds of other facilities that have shut in recent months. “The state program is not providing small recyclers with sufficient payment … and that is why 1,000 of them have closed,” Murray said. In 2018, then-Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed legislation by Sen. Steve Glazer, an Orinda Democrat, that would have increased payments. Brown cited a need for “reforming and modernizing” California’s recycling program. Similar legislation by Sen. Henry Stern, a Malibu Democrat, has stalled this year. Ω

ECO EVENT

Get fed, wear red Our friends at GRUB CSA are working hard to raise dough for a down payment on their land, and you can help the effort this Saturday (Aug. 31) at the farm with a special four-course Red Hot Luscious Late August Farm to Feast. The menu is “NorCal Italian-inspired food” made with loving attention from the summer garden harvest. The event will feature fortune-telling and a theatrical story teller for entertainment and signature libations, beer and wine. This event is expected to sell out, so get tickets early on the GRUB CSA Facebook page or at the farmers’ market. And don’t forget, wear red!


Scratch & Dent, Mismatched, Discontinued Items…All MuSt go!

AUGUST 29, 2019

  CN&R 

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS phoTo By Andre Byik

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

A heart for paradise

Back to normal

The design has become a ubiquitous symbol of Camp Fire solidarity. Found attached to car windows, worn on T-shirts and transferred to Klean Kanteen bottles, the outline of California with superimposed images of a pine tree and a heart placed upon the North State is the basis for 8th Street Clothing, started by husband and wife team Zac and Karen Acker. The Ackers—who attended Chico State and also own 12 Volt Tattoo on East Eighth Street in Chico—said the design was born in the tattoo shop during the first few days after the fire broke out. Zac, a tattoo artist for 21 years, posted it on social media and “it just kind of took off from there,” says Karen, who works at the University Police Department. “People lined up at the door before we opened, calling, emailing, social media, [asking], ‘How can we get this? We need this.’ We had stores contacting us. It was out of control.” Contestants have worn the design in such competitions as American Ninja Warrior and the International Restaurant and Foodservice Show of New York, and the Ackers have paid the success forward with various donations benefiting Camp Fire recovery efforts. Merchandise from 8th Street Clothing can be found at Made in Chico, Coast Board Shop in the Chico Mall, Timeless Treasures in Paradise and online at etsy.com/shop/

ButteStrong. Zac and Karen recently met the CN&R at 12 Volt to talk shop.

How did you handle the instant popularity and demand? Karen: It was overwhelming at first. We couldn’t keep up. We would get stuff printed and we would say, “OK, we need this,” and we were having it printed locally. “Do it just as fast as possible,” and by the time it was ready, [everything was] already pre-sold. Zac: We would drop off boxes straight from the printer to retail. Karen: It was still warm and people were in a line for them.

Why do you think the design has resonated with people? Karen: I think it’s the aesthetic. If you are from this area, went through the fire in any capacity and you see that—it’s just immediate what it means. It doesn’t need explanation. It doesn’t need any words. It

doesn’t need a lot of detail. It just kind of is like, that’s Paradise. It’s going to rise again. It’s bigger than anything else.

What types of merchandise do you offer? Karen: We have sweatshirts. We have hats. We have T-shirts, tank tops for women. We have some wood carvings. Key chains— those have been very popular. The basic decals. We have Klean Kanteens and tattoos.

What’s on the horizon for 8th Street Clothing? Zac: I really don’t know. It just depends on where it goes. I don’t really have any plans, but it just seems to keep feeding itself. So as long as that’s going, we’ll be around. Karen: Locally inspired art is kind of what we’ve figured out is important to people. It’s important to us, too. —ANDRe Byik a nd re b @new srev i ew. c o m

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

Welcome back, students! You’ve been back a week and already the town is bustling again. Not that I’m itching to say goodbye to lazy summer days, but it does feel like life is back to normal when class is in session. Each new school year comes with news of businesses opening their doors, and this one is no exception. I’m told Hobby Lobby held a massive number of job interviews over the weekend and hired at least 30 people to staff its new shop in the old Toys ‘R’ Us building on East 20th Street. While I don’t support the business’ stances on birth control, I do support employment opportunities. So, there’s a bright spot there (just expect to pay for your own pills, ladies). Over off of Floral Avenue, United Way of Northern California just held its ribbon cutting. The nonprofit, based in Redding, serves nine counties, including Butte, and with a Chico office I think we’ll begin to see more action locally. Its mission is straightforward: “to fight for the health, education and financial stability of every person in our community.” Right on. After doing pop-up events for just the past couple months, the plant-based Pizza Riot is going brick-and-mortar. It’s taking over the spot vacated by Refuel Nutrition at the corner of Second and Walnut streets. (Fans of Refuel’s protein shakes and other drinks can still find them, just at JumpStart Nutrition, at 167 E. Third Ave.) Casa de Paradiso opened to the public last weekend in the old Pete’s Restaurant & Brewhouse spot on Carmichael Drive. What a great location for the former Paradise hotspot, just down the hill. Its grand opening and ribbon cutting will be Wednesday (Sept. 4), 5:30-9 p.m. Stop by for a free buffet and booze for purchase. The Allies Pub opened to the public on Tuesday (Aug. 27) next door to Bank of America downtown. More on that in the coming weeks. And just up the street, The Rawbar Restaurant and Sushi reopened Monday (Aug. 26) after being closed for two months.

MovinG Up Gojo Market on Nord Avenue, owned by Addis Desalegne, is now offering

U-Haul services. There’ll be trucks, trailers, hauling equipment, moving supplies and boxes on-site. What’s even cooler: You can arrange a rental online and pick it up any time, 24/7.

So lonG Not all news is good news, of course. With zero warning, Cold Stone Creamery downtown closed its doors. The sign on the door says it had been open for 20 years. Best of luck to the family. (And bummer for downtown. The last thing we need is another corner spot left vacant!) Win A cAr! Raffle tickets for the annual cross-town rivalry Almond Bowl are always a hot commodity, and they’re already on sale this year. The prize? Your choice between a 2019 Nissan Kicks or a 2019 Hyundai Kona, courtesy of Chico Nissan Hyundai. Tickets are $20 each, feature Round Table Pizza coupons, and can be purchased at Chico High, Pleasant Valley High or Chico Nissan or Hyundai.

got mosquitoes? Need to make a service request? Need Mosquitofish? Got Yellowjackets/Ticks?

Contact 530.533.6038 or www.ButteMosquito.com 18

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CALIFORNIA WASTELAND What shrinking recycling markets mean for the environment, business and our pocketbooks by

Rachel Becker

I

t was more than a year after the seabird died and washed up on a California beach before Jessie Beck prepared to reveal its last meals. Holding its stomach over a laboratory sink, Beck snipped open the slick tissue. With a series of plinks, the stomach contents slumped out onto the metal sieve below.

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A Northern Fulmar is dissected to reveal its stomach contents. The fragments include plastic, styrofoam and cardboard. PHOTOS BY ANNE WERNIKOFF FOR CALMATTERS


Inside were the remains of seabird food, like hooked squid beaks the size of fingernail clippings. Mostly, though, Beck found hard shards of plastic, soggy cardboard, styrofoam, and a maroon hunk of mystery meat that looked like beef jerky—until Beck cracked it open. Its innards were pure white: more styrofoam. The gray bird, called a Northern Fulmar, may have died in the waters off California during its winter migration. And it’s possible that the bird’s garbage-filled meals played a part in its death. But Beck, a scientist with the nonprofit group Oikonos Ecosystem Knowledge, isn’t one to speculate, and she isn’t investigating what killed it. Instead, the bird is part of a larger project to monitor plastic pollution, 4 million to 12 million metric tons of which wash into the ocean around the world every year. Fulmars are known to snack on this trash, particularly when they’re hungry. And when they die and wash up on shore, about 70 percent of them bring some plastic back with them every year. Looking in these birds’ guts is how Beck studies the plastic bobbing on the ocean’s surface and tempting hungry animals. That plastic and cardboard crowding out the squid beaks and seaweed in the dead bird’s stomach are a sign of a global garbage crisis that California hasn’t escaped.

Too much trash Californians generated about 77.2 million tons of waste in 2017, according to the most recent calculations from CalRecycle, California’s Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery. Of that, about 44.4 million tons ended up in landfills in 2017. CalRecycle estimates that the other 32.8 million tons, about 42 percent, was sent to recycling or composting, or was just never tossed in the first place. The numbers are a problem because they mean the state is far from reaching a statewide goal to reduce, recycle or compost 75 percent of waste by the year 2020. That’s in part because cheap natural gas is spurring investments in manufacturing of virgin plastics, which a CalRecycle report said could “undermine source reduction efforts, undercut prices for recovered plastics, and exacerbate plastic litter and marine pollution issues.” There’s also a major shakeup to the international recycling markets, which

About these stories:

They are abridged versions of those originally published by CalMatters.org, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media venture explaining California policies and politics.

affects California because it exports about a third of its recycling, according to CalRecycle estimates. Historically, the bulk of California’s recycling exports went to China. But in 2013, China temporarily scaled up inspection and enforcement against imports of contaminated recycling. And in 2017, China announced new restrictions on imports and tighter contamination standards for materials, including mixed plastics and unsorted paper. “That started sending recyclers and recycling markets into a tailspin here,” said Kate O’Neill, an associate professor in environmental science at UC Berkeley and an expert on the international waste trade. Since then, countries including Thailand, Vietnam and India announced plans to ban scrap plastic. O’Neill, for one, hasn’t lost hope. “Waste is a challenge we can meet,” she said. She hopes the race to find a plastic substitute will take off, and that manufacturers will cut back packaging on consumer goods. But any systemic change, she knows, will take time. “You’re talk-

ing about slowing down and stopping the Titanic,” she said. In the meantime, recyclers and local governments across the state are struggling to cope with a rapidly changing market for recyclables. And they’re trying not to undo the decades of work that made consumer recycling a habit.

Disappearing markets The upheaval in recycling markets means plastic and, especially, paper are piling up for recyclers like Richard Caglia, corporate development officer for the Caglia Family companies, including the Cedar Avenue Recycling and Transfer Station in Fresno. “The market is in a state of flux,” Caglia said, and weathering it has meant raising rates for some of the recycling haulers and cities they work with, including Fresno. “So Ricardo Lopez is the manager of GreenWaste’s materials recovery facility in San Jose. PHOTO BY ANNE WERNIKOFF FOR CALMATTERS

far, we’ve been very fortunate to survive it.” The Cedar Avenue facility accepts about half of Fresno’s residential recycling, as well as recycling from surrounding areas. Caglia is trying to find someone who wants to pay for his bales of mixed paper. Right now, he has roughly 4.2 million pounds of it stockpiled. In spite of the shakeup, the city of Fresno hasn’t raised its garbage fees or changed which recyclables it collects from residents—at least not yet, according to Alicia Real, the city’s recycling coordinator. “We’re at that tipping point right now,” Real said. For now, though, Real said it’s the nonrecyclables people really need to stop tossing in the blue bin, things like dirty diapers, garden hoses, clothing, styrofoam and kiddie pools. That’s why Fresno is running a “Keep Fresno Clean” campaign. The goal is to curb what Real calls wish-recycling. “Most people are trying to do the right thing,” she said. “They look at a product and say, ‘Oh, this is made from half-plastic and half-metal,’ this should be recyclable, and so they throw it into the container.” Caglia appreciates the effort but thinks more work is needed. Garden hoses are a particular nightmare. “Powerful machinery has a tendency to wind things up pretty tight,” Caglia said, and the whole plant can come to a standstill for a wayward hose to be cut loose.

The problem with wish-cycling Keeping trash out of the blue bin has become a matter of survival for companies like San Jose-based GreenWaste Recovery, which collects and processes trash, recycling and yard waste from parts of the Bay Area and Central Coast. In a recent stark example, one glitching computer temporarily closed off an entire market for recycled materials, leaving even fewer options for buyers. On a sunny July day, crushed glass glittered on the ground as the facility’s manager, Ricardo Lopez, gestured at what looked like a mountain of trash. “This is the recycling,” Lopez said. Rolled-up carpet, an oven mitt, pizza boxes and dirt littered the pile. An empty propane tank lay on its side nearby. All of that trash will have to be removed before the good stuff—empty plastic bottles and jugs, glass, aluminum cans, and clean paper and cardboard—can be baled and sold. “They’re giving me a bunch of crap on the front end, so it makes it that much harder to process it,” he said. RECYCLE C O N T I N U E D

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S A M P L E

B A L L O T

2019

2002-2018

Open for Lunch & Dinner Closed Mondays Food To Go

Happy Garden Chinese Restaurant

180 Cohasset Road • All Credit Cards accepted. 893-2574 • HappyGardenChico.com

Over A Century of

Quality

Flowers, Gifts & More

Since 1907

WE WANT TO KNOW: What’s your favorite sandwich shop? Where do you go for your vanilla latte or to get your hair coiffed? Who is simply out of this world? You guessed it—it’s voting time! Best of Chico is upon us—so, we want to know about all of your favorite people, places and things that make Chico such a great place to live and visit. As in years past, we also hope you’ll take a moment to let us know, in your own words, one very stellar thing about Chico so we can share it with other readers. So, don’t be shy! Here’s a little added incentive to vote for all your faves: Everyone 18 and over who votes in

at least 10 categories is entered into a drawing for a special prize—a rockin’ beginner-level telescope so you can view galaxies far, far away (see more prize details at end of this sample ballot). HOW TO VOTE: Best of Chico voting takes place exclusively online at chicobestof.com, where full contest rules are available. The polls are open now, so get to it! To get you thinking, peruse this sample ballot, starting on the next page. VOTING ENDS Wed., Sept. 11, at 11:59 p.m.

891.1881 • www.christianandjohnson.com

chicobestof.com

Best Margarita

Vote for us

1098 E. First Ave, Chico

Best Place for Window Treatments

FIRST PLACE

2009-2017

Best Eye-care Specialist

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Medical and Surgical Eye Care for your family. 605 W East Ave | 530-895-1727 | www.chicoeye.com

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vote for

Your Best Appliance Store! 2505 Zanella Way Chico (530) 342-2182 www.ginnos.com 22

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18 Best Solar Company

AUGUST 29, 2019

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ike’s place

chico’s best sandwiches


S A M P L E best Footwear store

181 E. 2nd Street • Downtown Chico

Oroville 530-533-1488

Chico 530-898-1388

Best Asian Cuisine • Best Take-Out Best Restaurant in Oroville

Main Store: 891-1650 • Shoe Repair : 343-4522

2019

B A L L O T

READERS VOTE ONLINE IN THESE CATEGORIES GOODS & SERVICES Antiques store Appliance store Auto repair shop Auto paint/body shop Bank/credit union Bike shop Cab company Car dealership Car wash Day spa Dry cleaner Feed store/farm supply Florist Gift shop Grocer Barbershop Hair salon Place for a mani/pedi Baby/kids’ clothier Men’s clothier Women’s clothier Consignment/second-hand threads Jeweler

Liquor store Local pet store Nursery Place to buy books Place for electronics/ computer repair Place to buy outdoor gear Place to buy home furnishings Place for window treatments Shoe store Sporting goods Tattoo parlor Thrift store Architect Attorney General contractor Financial planner (name and location) Insurance agent Landscaper Plumber Professional photographer Housecleaning service Interior designer Real estate agent Roofer

Family owned and operated for 81 years

A VOTE FOR US IS A VOTE FOR price-matching

www.shuberts.com

530.877.6312

Serving Chico at Two Locations! 178 East 7th Street Chico Mall (530) 342-7163 (530) 809-4151

Vote inday’s international cuisine

Chico • Paradise www.hudsonsappliance.com

The Hair Co.

Solar company Tree service FOOD & DRINKS Local restaurant – Chico Local restaurant – Oroville New restaurant (opened in the last year) Food server (name and location) Chef Caterer Cheap eats Craft beer selection Date-night dining Fine dining Kid-friendly dining Patio Take-out Delivery service Breakfast Brunch Lunch Small bites (apps/tapas) Munchies Bakery

More categories on next page

352 East 1st st, ChiCo Ca wwww.sierracentral.com

an equal opportunity lender. Federally insured by the NCUa.

AUTO VOTE BEST REPAIR 2106 park ave • chico

892–1774 chi coa ut om ot i ve.com

For 6 Years

2nd LOcaTiOn NorD ave. by W. Sac. We Appreciate Your Vote!

130 Main Street Downtown Chico www.uppercrustchico.com (503) 895-3866

Eighth & Main antiquE CEntEr #1 2004 - 2018

Best

Antique store 745 Main Steet • 893-5534

Your Vote is Appreciated!

vote us best breakfast

Ha ir • Na ils • W ax ing W alk -In s W elc om e 16

inday’s Filipino 1043 W. 8th street

bEst baNk/CrEdit UNioN

18

2760 Espla nade, Ste 150

530. 894. 2002

FIRST PLACE

229 BROADWAY | 530.487.7207 LASALLESCHICO.COM

2016 2017 2018

10

2290 esplanade • 879-9200 365/7-2 • sinofcortez.com

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S A M P L E Thanks for your Vote!

Best Nursery & Gift Shop 406 Entler Ave, Chico • 530.345.3121 www.theplantbarn.com • Find us on

please vote 18

891–6328 18

345 W. 5th Street • Chico

ww.5thstreetsteakhouse.com

Please

VOTE!

Best Baby / Kids’ Clothier

2012-2018

977 East Ave #90 l 530.345.1617 appleblossombaby.com

Diner Local coffee/tea house Spot to satisfy your sweet tooth International cuisine Asian cuisine Italian cuisine Mexican cuisine Vegetarian cuisine Street food Barbecue Burger Burrito Ice cream/frozen yogurt Lemonade Pho Pizza Place for poke Sandwich Sushi Taco Local winery – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama) Locally produced food – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama) Local brewery – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama)

Mixologist (name and location) Happy hour Place to drink a glass of wine Margarita Bloody Mary Karaoke night Place to dance Venue for live music Local music act Local visual artist Art space Place to buy art Theater company Open mic Place to be seen Casino – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama) Beer event

NIGHTLIFE & THE ARTS Bar Sports bar Watering hole for townies Cocktail

COMMUNITY Charitable cause Community event Farmers’ market vendor Museum Party/event venue Place to pray

for Your voTe! 3 Glenbrook Ct | Chico | 892-1234 140 Independence Cir|Chico | 892-1218

Best ItalIan Food

Locally Owned Since 1992

Fine Italian Cuisine

506 Ivy St. • Take-Out (530) 898-9947 Reservations (530) 898-9948 Open 4pm Daily • 11:30 Fri Lunch

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B A L L O T

HEALTH/ WELLNESS Local health-care provider Alternative health-care provider Acupuncture clinic Chiropractor Dental care Dermatologist Eye-care specialist General practitioner Pediatrician Physical therapy office Plastic surgeon Veterinarian Massage therapist Gym Boutique gym Personal trainer

Thank You

2013-2018

2019

Radio station Local video/audio show Youth organization Local personality Instructor/professor Teacher (K-12) Volunteer RECREATION Dance studio Golf course – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama) Martial arts studio Yoga studio Place for family fun Place for kids to play Local league to join (specify sport or activity) Local team to cheer for

VOTING IS FREE AND ENDS WED., SEPT. 11, AT 11:59 P.M.

Vote for SOL

For Best Mexican Food, Bartender & Margarita!

3269 Esplanade, Chico · (530) 342-4616

www.solmexicangrill.com

Downtown Chico

Thank you for your continued support

Candi Williamson, Owner

Voted Best Massage Therapist 2017 & 2018

18

massagebycandichico.com | 530-521-7328 18

Your choice for Best Fine Dining, Best Patio, Best Date Night and so much more.

1250 Esplanade•Chico 530.894.3463 ALL VOTES APPRECIATED!


A N O U T - O F - T H I S - WO R L D P R I Z E ! Vote For Us

Best Burgers 18

18

Best Dental Care

Vote now and you might be the lucky reader* who wins this telescope

Still ChiCo’S BeSt thrift Store!

This KOSMOS entry-level Telescope & Astronomy Kit allows for countless space observations—the moon, stars, planets, nebulae and more. Also, make far-away sightings on Earth! Detailed instruction book included. Provided by: BIRD IN HAND • 320 Broadway Downtown Chico’s fun place to shop

VOTE FOR US TODAY! 2020 Park Ave.

|

Chico’s Best Jeweler

*For full contest rules and to vote, go to:

chicobestof.com Family Dentistry

214 Main St - ChiCo, California (530)345-1500 - Gabrielleferrar.CoM

1307 Esplanade #4 | 898-8511 NelsenFamilyDentistry.com

we’d love your vote! Best Place for Home Furnishings

2101 Dr. MLK Jr PKwy chico | 895.3000 VOTE US

VOTE LOCAL!!!

ChicoEntreeExpress.com Lic#1024110

BEST EYE-CARE

Best Plumber!

Open 24 Hours! 343-0330

Isaac Barthelow, M.D.

Best Yoga studio!

Best tree service!

(530) 513-6574

Voted 3 Years in a Row!

Vote Best Coffee / Tea House

Best Dental Care

18

18

General Contracting (530) 636 4574

Vote for Us! Vote US Best Locally Produced Food!

Best Day Spa

ROONEY LAW FIRM VOtE Us!

Downtown Gardenwalk Mall

Vote for Us!

(530) 924 6400

2539 forest ave. | 530-342-6064 www.ChicoDentalarts.com

FREE DRINK w/ purchase of burrito

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Vote For Us

earlsplumbing.net

Specialists 114 Mission Ranch Blvd., Ste 50 891-1900 • North ValleyEyeCare.com

www.thearcstore.org

exp. 10/1/19

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40 declaration dr. | 530.894.7722 www.sweetwaterchico.coM

2 LocAtionS

2432 Esplanade • Chico 530.774.2158

133 Broadway 1000 D W. Sac Ave 894-0191 343-0909 AUGUST 29, 2019

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RECYCLE C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 2 1

GreenWaste has invested more than $10 million over the past two years, including on new sorting machines and staffing to weed through all that junk. As the recycling moves through the processing facility, its first stop is a machine that spreads it evenly on a conveyor belt so employees don’t have to dig to pick out what doesn’t belong. Then the recycling travels through a series of screens to separate out cardboard and glass before it hits an automated sorting machine that pulls out garbage like latex gloves and diapers. After a pass through yet more screens and automated sorting machines, employees pick through the final paper and plastic streams on conveyor belts to remove any contaminants that sneaked through.

Is recycling correctly enough? Tossing a container into the bin doesn’t guarantee a buyer even when Lopez’s machines are working perfectly. He points to the black plastic containers for rotisserie chicken from the grocery store with a number “1” stamped onto the bottom. “There’s zero market,” he said. “Just because it has a number does not mean that it’s recyclable or that there is a current market.” He blames marketing spin from the packaging industry. “But they wouldn’t be selling this if [we], as consumers, weren’t demanding it.” Are consumers demanding it, though? Not Beck, who, even as a scientist with her hands in the guts of the problem, can’t avoid making plastic waste. As she scrubbed down the industrial cutting board the birds rested on during their necropsies, she revealed what is more discouraging than all the plastic trapped in the birds’ downy gray carcasses. “It’s more demoralizing to go to the market and be like, ‘Oh, if I want to buy anything, it’s going to be a plastic,’” she said over the cutting board. Around the lab were signs that Beck and her fellow scientists are trying to shrink their garbage footprint. Used and washed ziplock bags hung on a wooden dowel to dry. In the musty cold room from which Beck’s colleague wheeled out the cart of bird carcasses, a huge bucket overflowed with crumpled, soiled purple gloves they plan to send back to the glove company for recycling. But going to the store is just a reminder of the scale of the plastics crisis. “I’m going to have to contribute to the problem—just by participating in the normal economy.” Ω

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SAVING RECYCLING Pending legislation would force manufacturers and retailers to reduce waste

A

s bills that take aim at plastic waste make their way through California’s Legislature, the damage they intend to fix already is rippling through the state’s recycling economy. Earlier this month, rePlanet, a major collector of beverage bottles and cans, shut its 284 collection centers in California, citing lower subsidies from the state, as well as challenges facing recyclers and municipalities across California: higher operating costs and dwindling returns from post-consumer recyclables.

It was a vivid example of challenges threatening the ability of Californians to recycle and helps explain the progress a trio of bills is making through the Legislature. All aim to change the economics of recycling by legislating a tough financial incentive for manufacturers. Two of the bills, authored by Democrats Lorena Gonzalez in the Assembly and Ben Allen in the Senate, are identical and would require manufacturers to reduce waste from packaging and certain plastic products. The other, by Assemblyman Phil Ting, calls on manufacturers to increase the minimum recycled content in plastic beverage bottles over the next decade. All of the bills have cleared their houses of origin and their authors say they are cautiously optimistic they will pass in the Democratic-controlled Assembly and Senate. They still face pushback, however, on their way to the governor’s desk, notably from a new and secretive coalition called Californians for Recycling and the Environment that is encouraging the public to tell legislators to vote no on Sen. Allen’s bill, Senate Bill 54. The coalition represents the packaging industry and officially formed “maybe a few weeks ago,” according to spokesman Micah Grant. Despite its effort to kill at least one of the bills, Grant insisted the group “doesn’t ‘oppose’ SB 54.” As the votes near on each of the three bills, industry groups listed as opposition to the twin bills in the Assembly and Senate—including the American Chemistry Council, the Grocery Manufacturers’ Association, and the pow-

erful American Beverage Association— say they’re not trying to kill the legislation. They just want to see changes. The bills come as California’s recycling industry is trying to adjust to recent upheaval in the international recycling markets, including China, whose clamp down on imports of materials such as unsorted paper and certain grades of plastics means a major market has been lost to California. On top of that, CalRecycle warned in a recent report that a surge of investments in plastic manufacturing could “undercut prices for recovered plastics.” For Recology, an employee-owned recycler serving more than a dozen California counties, the market for plastic bags and clear packaging films was never particularly strong. The upheaval, however, means the scraps of plastic wrappings and bags that once left the facility as contaminants in bales of paper now end up in the local landfill, according to Eric Potashner, Recology’s vice president and senior director of strategic affairs. “It’s the option of last resort, and that’s where we are right now as an industry,” Potashner said. He’d prefer that manufacturers stop making as much material that will inevitably end up in a landfill. “Either create a market for it or make something else,” he said.

SKIN IN THE GAME It comes down to the difference between recyclable and recycled, Potashner said. Items aren’t recyclable just because they end up in the blue bin; there has to be someone who wants to

buy recycled materials and turn them into something new. Right now, that’s only rarely the case for packaging and food materials, he said. Ricardo Lopez, the manager of GreenWaste Recovery’s recycling facility in San Jose, said he’s had somewhat better luck finding a home for mixed food containers and clear packaging films. “The market’s hit or miss,” he said. “You have to dangle other items at a cheaper rate for them in order to take certain other items, to put you ahead of other competitors.” That could mean selling bales of detergent bottles at a better rate if a buyer also takes bales of film, for example. The fix, according to Potashner at Recology, is for manufacturers to take responsibility for their products even after they’re tossed in the blue bin. That’s why Recology supports the California Circular Economy and Plastic Pollution Reduction Act, a set of identical bills that started in the Senate as SB 54 and the Assembly as AB 1080. “The one group that doesn’t have skin in this game right now is the one we need most, which is the manufacturers and the retailers that are putting the product in the waste stream in the first place,” Potashner said. As written, the bills require manufacturers to make all single-use packaging and the 10 most-littered single-use plastics out of recyclable or compostable materials by the year 2030. It also sets targets for increasing recycling of plastic packaging and certain single-use plastic products over the next decade, reaching a 75 percent recycling rate in 2030. If manufactur-


GreenWaste Recovery employees sort through plastic items on a conveyor belt at the company’s materials recovery facility. PHOTO BY ANNE WERNIKOFF FOR CALMATTERS

ers don’t hit those recycling rate targets, they could be barred from selling the packaging or single-use products in California. “That’s a pretty big deal,” said Allen, a Democrat from Santa Monica and an author of the legislation. “If you can’t sell, you don’t have access to the market. And it’s the fifth largest economy in the world on its own.” There’s a lot the legislation leaves to CalRecycle to figure out. It doesn’t, for instance, spell out which 10 single-use plastics would be covered. And it doesn’t address whether the state’s recycling infrastructure needs to be improved, or what exactly CalRecycle has the authority to change, according to Julia Stein, project director for the Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at UCLA School of Law. The idea is that the legislation lays the groundwork for CalRecycle to work out details alongside industry and other stakeholders as it develops a scoping plan. Until then, the plastic industry is particularly concerned about an enforcement power that is spelled out in the bill: a 2024 deadline to reach a 20 percent recycling rate, and the threat of being barred from selling in the state without meeting that requirement. “We think that not only is that unworkable, we think that is a little bit onerous in terms of the hammer that comes down on the industry,” said Tim Shestek, senior director of state affairs at the American

Chemistry Council, which represents plastic resin manufacturers. The new coalition, Californians for Recycling and the Environment, emphasizes potential bans on its website. It tells consumers the bills would “eliminate many products that families rely on for food, health, and well-being,” such as toothpaste, and urges them to help the coalition “encourage the Legislature to pass a common-sense solution.” Allen said that toothpaste isn’t a singleuse product, although the packaging the tube comes in is, and would need to be recyclable or compostable. Allen said he intends any ban to be a last resort. The goal instead is for CalRecycle and manufacturers to work together to figure out how to meet the targets. “The condition-of-sale clause does not mean that the second someone’s in noncompliance they will be barred from selling in the state of California,” he said. “This is not about punishing people. This is about nudging the market and manufacturers to create a more sustainable system.” Meghan Stasz, vice president of packaging and sustainability for the Grocery Manufacturers Association, said if that’s the intent, it should be written into the bill. And she argues that recycling rates aren’t something manufacturers can change. “We don’t have any control over consumer behavior, we don’t have any control over the recy-

cling system,” she said. Assemblywoman Gonzalez, a Democrat from San Diego and author of the Assembly’s version of the legislation, is quick to enumerate the ways in which the plastic industry has control. “They can buy material back, or create ways to use the material they are already putting out,” she said by email. “Consumers and recycling facilities are doing their part by sorting; it’s time for the plastics industry to step it up.”

BOTTLE IT UP The third bill in the state Legislature, authored by Ting, a San Francisco Democrat, takes a more direct stab at changing the market for recyclables. As written, Assembly Bill 792 requires manufacturers use sharply escalating percentages of recycled plastic in beverage bottles over the next decade. Targets start at 15 percent by the end of 2022 and rise to 75 percent in January 2030. If manufacturers fail to reach the bill’s targets, they’ll be on the hook for a fine that varies depending on the degree of violation. The more they miss the target the bigger the fine, which could reach up to 2 cents per container for those who meet less than 15 percent of the requirement. It’s not the first time a California lawmaker has tried to set minimum plastic requirements for beverage bottles. Sen. Bob

Wieckowski, a Democrat from Fremont, tried to pass a similar bill in 2018 that didn’t survive the Assembly. Ting, whose new bill passed the Assembly and is now in the Senate, said the bill’s chances improved once China’s import restrictions on recycling went into effect. “We’ve seen how bad the situation is,” Ting said. “We see what people are doing when they’re not shipping it to China.” Ting’s bill also faces industry pushback, including from Nestlé. Alix Dunn, a spokesperson for Nestlé Waters North America, said the company supports “public policy promoting the market for recycled content and increasing its use in beverage containers.” But Dunn cited concerns about price volatility and an inadequate supply of recycled plastic materials, calling the stiff penalties and lack of flexibility “counterproductive.” It’s possible the closure of rePlanet’s beverage bottle recycling centers could put a dent in the plastic bottle supply. In 2016, when the company closed nearly 191 facilities, the recycling rate of beverage containers dropped from 81 percent to 80 percent, according to Lance Klug, a spokesman for CalRecycle. Even if the supply drops, it doesn’t change the bigger economic problem. Mark Murray, executive director of the advocacy group Californians Against Waste, which supports the bills, pointed out the drop in scrap value for plastic bottles contributed to the recent rePlanet closures. “AB 792 is designed to increase demand for recycled plastic, which will increase scrap values and revenue for the collection infrastructure,” he said. Leon Farahnik, head of CarbonLite Industries, which turns post-consumer beverage bottles into food-grade resin that manufacturers can turn back into bottles, said he’s not concerned about an inadequate supply. He suspects that with stronger demand for plastic beverage bottles, collection will increase as well. “We want to keep recycling alive if we can,” Farahnik said. While companies including Nestlé, Coca Cola and Pepsi have pledged to increase the recycled content in their bottles, Farahnik thinks these changes should be required by law. CarbonLite has invested more than $100 million in a Riverside plant, according to Farahnik. “Without certain mandatory requirements, the damage will be done to all the investments of millions,” he said. “With the mandate, it just makes recycling more of a major issue, and it assures the future of California’s recycling.” —RACHEL BECKER

AUGUST 29, 2019

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Arts &Culture Shots Fired at Lost on Main PHOTO BY KEN PORDES

GUITAR TRIPTYCH A showcase of the diversity of rock guitar at Lost on Main

THIS WEEK 29

THU

Special Events RAE GOUIRAND: Poetry and prose reading with Northern California writer. Thu, 8/29, 7pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

Soffered town Chico’s live-music hotspot— a triple bill of guitar-based music aturday night, Lost on Main—down-

that delivered a diverse range of styles and approaches. Blues, rock ’n’ roll and many by variations of funk were Carey Wilson variously showcased by three bands that brought an undying Review: Shots Fired, Blackfoot supply of energy to a Gypsies and Michael lively evening. Russell Trio, Aug. 24, To kick off the Lost on Main night, the local Michael Russell Trio (with Russell on guitar/ vocals; Ben Colbeck, bass; Garrett Smart, drums/vocals) played a brand of electric blues that drew on such forebears and contemporary artists as Stevie Ray Vaughn, Pat Travers and Gary Clark Jr. The trio laid down a selection of Fender Stratocaster-fueled jams that at times emulated their influences and occasionally ascended into moments that revealed their own perspective on how to rock the blues. Russell’s guitar playing effectively exploited the tonal variations to be be wrung from an electric guitar by way of subtle, crafty manipulations of the 28

CN&R

AUGUST 29, 2019

tone and volume knobs with his pinky finger while playing. The surprise high point for this rocker was when drummer/ singer Colbeck took over vocals for a cover of Elton John’s classic “Saturday Night’s Alright (for Fighting),” which gave Russell a chance to cut loose with a rocking solo that drew revelers off their seats and onto the dance floor. Next up, Nashville rockers Blackfoot Gypsies brought good-humored, turbocharged honky-tonk rock and, in bassist Dylan Whitlow’s case, festive regalia and classic showmanship (think the Rolling Stones and The Faces) to the stage. The bassist was decked out in striped flares, broad-brimmed felt sombrero and granny shades, and he exemplified the heart of good-time rock with an elastic performing style that inspired this journalist to abandon his notebook to dance. Blackfoot Gypsies started their career as a drums-and-guitar duo, and frontman Matthew Paige’s guitar style makes it clear how the years of playing as a pair enhanced his ability to combine both rhythm and lead parts seamlessly with infectious energy that played well off of drummer Zack Murphy. Hard to top, I thought at the time, until DJ Williams and his band Shots

Fired raised the bar with a whole new, yet complementary vibe. Fans of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe will recognize Williams as the guitarist who enlivens that manifestation of funky reality, but as a band leader he’s got a whole other world to explore and reveal. The Denver-based guitarist/vocalist plays with an impressive rotating roster of musicians from some of the country’s best funk, jam, rock and hiphop crews (from The Motet to Snoop Dogg), and the tight crew that joined him at Lost—DeShawn Alexander, keytar; Derrick Wong, bass; and Lyrics Born drummer Max MacVeety— immediately had the crowd on their feet as they started playing. The Shots Fired set was rooted in funky grooves, with Williams spiking the energy with his fiery guitar work, but the styles were all over the place. From cosmic waterfall space-funk, to hyper be-bop-inflected jazz, to fusionflavored evocations of Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” and Tears for Fears’ “Everybody Wants to Rule the World,” the band closed out the night with a set that explored of a wide breadth of guitarmusic styles that lasted all the way to last call and beyond. □

PEPE AGUILAR

Monday, Sept. 2 Rolling Hills Casino Resort SEE MONDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

31

Nor Cal Italian-inspired food, fortunetelling and a theatrical storyteller for entertainment. Sat 8/31, 5pm. $10-$45. GRUB CSA, 3269 W. Sacramento Ave. 570-6872.

SAT

Special Events ANNUAL VETERANS RIB COOK-OFF: Barbecue ribs, live music, raffle prizes, silent auction, trophies and cash prizes for winning teams. No pets. Sat 8/31, 11am. $10-$20. Bambi Inn, 7436 Humbolt Road, Butte Meadows. 873-4125/343-3040.

BRENDAN SCHAUB AND BRYAN CALLEN: Popular comics from The Fighter and the Kid podcast here to make you laugh. Sat, 8/31, 8pm. $30-$60. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountry casino.com

GEORGE WINSTON

Thursday-Saturday, Aug. 29-31 Chico Women’s Club SEE THURSDAY-SATURDAY, MUSIC

DOWNTOWN CHICO PUBLIC ART TOUR: Take a walk and see art on this hour-long tour of downtown Chico’s public art pieces while learning a little history about each. Sat 8/31, 10am. Meet at “Our Hands” sculpture, City Municipal Building, 411 Main St.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Thu, 8/29, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

TOTAL JOINT REPLACEMENT SEMINAR: Caregivers discuss the causes and symptoms of joint pain, how physical therapy can help, when a total joint replacement should be considered and more. Thu, 8/29, 6pm. Enloe Conference Center, 1528 Esplanade. enloe. org

SOLD OUT.) Partial benefit for Camp Fire relief. Thu, 8/29, 7:30pm. $35. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

Theater CRIMES OF THE HEART: Sisterly love and laughter turns to anger and tears when old resentments resurface and three sisters come to terms with the consequences of their own actions. Thu, 8/29, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

Music

Special Events CHICO ACCOMPANIMENT & RAPID RESPONSE TO ICE TRAINING: Learn how to assist our undocumented and asylum-seeking communities as they navigate often intimidating situations, such as going to an ICE check-in, or to a legal appointment. Hosted by Nor-Cal Resist. Fri, 8/30, 7pm. Free. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

caster and contributor to Comedy Central Radio is here to crack you up, Chico Live Improv shares the bill. 18-over. Sat 8/31, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

JARROD MULLAN: Live local music for brunch. Sat, 8/31, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

GEORGE WINSTON: See Thursday. Sat, 8/31, 7:30pm. $35. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

Theater BUTCHER SHOP 2019 THE DIRECTOR’S CUT: Gather at dusk in an orchard under the stars to witness original live theater for free. Produced by Slow Theatre. Event includes live music, food trucks, no host bar, free bike parking, $10 car parking and more. Sat, 8/31, 6pm. Free. 2500 Estes Road. facebook.com/TheButcherShopChico

CRIMES OF THE HEART: See Thursday. Sat, 8/31, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

RED HOT LUSCIOUS LATE AUGUST FARM TO FEAST:

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

Red-themed fundraiser dinner featuring

EDITOR’S PICK

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to

GEORGE WINSTON: Celebrated pianist and composer is on tour in support of his 15th solo piano album, Restless Wind. He will play the Women’s Club’s 100-plus-year-old restored Steinway piano. (Thursday and Friday

30

FRI

JOHN MORRIS ROSS IV: Veteran comedian, pod-

Music

DOWNTOWN CHICO PUBLIC ART TOUR Saturday, Aug. 31 Downtown Chico

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

share, an acoustic instrument, your voice, a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested. Fri, 8/30, 5pm. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds in the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 8/30, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music GEORGE WINSTON: See Thursday. (Thursday and Friday SOLD OUT.) Fri, 8/30, 7:30pm. $35. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

TYLER DEVOLL: Snappy guitar tunes for happy hour. Fri, 8/30, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater CRIMES OF THE HEART: See Thursday. Fri, 8/30, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheater company.com

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

MAGIC UNDER THE MOONLIGHT It’s that time again! Slow Theatre presents The Butcher Shop 2019: The Directors Cut this Saturday-Sunday (Aug. 31-Sept. 1) at The End of Normal. This free outdoor festival of original music, plays, film, art and dance is a can’t-miss event that never fails to surprise and entertain. This year’s show follows a film director as she sacrifices everything to release her epic sci-fi masterpiece while her nemesis crushes everyone in his path to control the future of American entertainment. There also will be bands and food trucks—consider riding your bike (car parking is 10 bucks).

AUGUST 29, 2019

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29


THIS WEEK conTinUed from pAGe 29

FINE ARTS

1

SUn

Music 3PINTS DOWN: Good-time music from  several different genres.  Sun, 9/1, 3pm. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132  Meyers St., Ste. 120.

BOGG: Brunch with modern jazz/ hip-hop/future funk band.  Sun, 9/1, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E.  Sixth St.

EMILIANO’S SOUND HEALING BAND: Six  sound healers perform together for  a unique opportunity to experience  deep relaxation. Hosted by Chico  Sound Healing, proceeds fund cancer  support program at Enloe Regional  Cancer Center.  Sun, 9/1, 6pm. $20.  Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

GEORGE WINSTON: See Thursday.  Sat, 8/31, 7:30pm. $35. Chico Women’s Club, 592  E. Third St. kzfr.org

JAZZ AT SCOTTY’S: The Miami Rogue  Roosters jazz up the patio at  Scotty’s.  Sun, 9/1, 12pm. Scotty’s  Landing, 12609 River Road.

PAT TRAVERS BAND: Veteran guitarist performs melodic rock and blues.  Sun, 9/1, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & 

GiVe Voice

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

Shows through Sept. 29 Museum of Northern California Art

SUNDAY SUPERJAM: Jam with Chico  musicians at this weekly pro jam.  Rock, blues, country, funk—anything  goes.  Sun, 9/1, 2pm. LaSalles, 229  Broadway St. (408) 449-2179.

Art

Theater

BSO GALLERY: What Happens in Davis.. 

BUTCHER SHOP 2019 THE DIRECTOR’S CUT: See Saturday.  Sun, 9/1, 6pm. Free.  2500 Estes Road. facebook.com/ TheButcherShopChico

CRIMES OF THE HEART: See Thursday.  Sun, 9/1, 2pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater  Company, 166 Eaton Road, Suite F.

2

Special Events FARM STAND: Fun farmer’s market featuring local growers, plant starts,  homemade bakery goods and medicinal herbs.  Mon, 9/2, 4pm. Blackbird,  1431 Park Ave.

Music PEPE AGUILAR: Award-winning Mexican  singer, songwriter and producer  performs.  Mon, 9/2, 8pm. $35-$125.  Rolling Hills Casino Resort, 2655  Everett Freeman Way, Corning.

for more MUSIC, See NIGHTLIFE on pAGe 32

CN&R

AUGUST 29, 2019

Ceramics Show, exhibition of Chico State  students’ ceramic work as shown in Davis  gallery last spring. Through 9/5. Free.  Chico State, Ayres 105. 898-5331.

CHICO ART CENTER: Master Remix, juried  exhibition features creative remakes and  appropriations of famous artworks by  contemporary artists. Through 8/30. 450  Orange St.

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Connie G. Adams, Enloe 

mon

30

See ArT

Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery featuring Northern California artists whose  lives have been touched by cancer showcases series of watercolor paintings by  breast cancer survivor. Through 10/18.  Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

JACKI HEADLEY UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Bernie  Lubell, artist’s sculptures explore  the relationship between humans and  machines; visitors to the exhibit get to be  active participants. Artist talk Thursday,  Aug. 29, 5:30pm, in Rowland-Taylor Recital  Hall; gallery talk Thursday, Sept. 19, 5:30  pm. Through 10/12. Chico State, Arts 121.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Give  Voice, Empower Me Art presents  exhibition of Northern California and  international artists/survivors of sextrafficking. The organization’s goal is to  empower victims of sex trafficking to use  their creative spirit to help earn their  financial independence and stability, and  permanently escape their exploiters.  Through 9/29. Also, Walls We Create, exhibition reflects the cultural experience  of “barriers.” Through 9/29.  $5. 900  Esplanade. monca.org

NAKED LOUNGE: UMA & the Dragon, collaborative art show featuring Uma Misha 

(age 2) and her father David Dragonboy  Sutherland (old). Through 8/31. 118 W.  Second St.

ORLAND ART CENTER: Group Show, 29 artists  from all over California show their work.  Through 9/21. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Art Gallery  Closeout Sale, local art gallery opens  doors to public for special 25 to 50 percent off sale on all accessories including  vases, flowers, holiday decor and furniture in Suite 3. Through 8/30. 493 East  Ave., Ste. 1.

THE TURNER: Drawn In–By Hand Graphic  Prints, a collaboration with the  Department of Art and Art History’s  foundations faculty, exhibition reveals  how the act of drawing creates an acuity  of vision. Exhibition talk Thursday, Sept.  12, 5:30pm at Zingg Recital Hall with  reception to follow at The Turner. Through  9/28. Free. 400 W. First St., 898-4476. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of  cool stuff for kids to explore including a  miniature city, complete with a junior vet  clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market,  a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room,  imagination playground and much more.  Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325  Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and  Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human  and technological achievements needed  to reach the moon and envisions a  future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625  Esplanade.


SCENE Create Space tech Leon Hatcher demonstrates an Oculus Rift headset in the lab’s “holodeck” room. PHOTO COURTESY OF BUTTE COLLEGE

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Circus Vargas Chico Mall Butte College’s tricked-out new maker lab is ready

Imovies, put your hands on the technologies you’ve seen in sci-fi the future has arrived. The Create Space maker

f you’ve been dreaming about that day when you could

lab at Butte College might not have the jet packs we were promised (yet!), but it is filled with all manner of hightech tools and toys that are just waiting to be used. “Basically, I tried to get it to the point where anyone who comes in here, if they have an idea to do something, we have the equipment to do it,” Manager Daniel Donnelly said during a recent tour. As he walked the CN&R through the colby Jason Cassidy orful, open, high-ceilinged room (plus adjacent enclosed outdoor area) in j aso nc@ the main campus’ ARTS building, he newsrev i ew.c om showed off the Create Space’s dizzying array of gear. There are three kinds of lasers for engraving/cutting wood, glass, leather, Make it your etc.; a handful of CNC (computer space: Sign up for numerical control) routers that can cut MSP 300, Butte preprogrammed designs out of wood College’s Create (guitars, table tops, sculptures, etc.); a Space class—a Formech vacuum-former for making zero-unit open-entry molds; a virtual-reality holodeck (with course—at butte.edu/ admissions. No regis- a couple dozen Oculus headsets to tration fee. For more play with); and multiple 3-D printers, info, call admissions one of which was finishing up a three(895-2361) or the day job of carving a replica of a masMultimedia Studies Program office sive gold nugget as we toured the lab. The space has been open since the (895-2404). beginning of the 2018-19 school year, and as of this semester all of its toys are now available for use as two final, and very expensive, pieces of machinery just came online, including the impressive-looking ArcLight Pro 4800 ($14,000). The large plasma cutter was installed in the outdoor area—where the bigger, louder machines are set up— and can cut a digitally programmed design out of a 4-feet-by-4-feet sheet of up to 26-gauge steel at a rate of 300 inches per minute. “We just got this hooked up also,” said Donnelly, pointing across the patio to a robot-looking machine called the Protomax ($26,000). “This will cut up to [an inch thick] of steel. It will cut glass, it will cut ceramic.

It’s a water-jet cutter, basically, and it uses the garnet [abrasive mineral] and the water to cut things out. … There are only three maker spaces in California that have one—Berkeley, Folsom and then we have one.” The Butte maker lab is the culmination of a threeyear CCC Maker initiative funded by the California Community College Chancellor’s Office. In 2016, $17 million was earmarked for creating a network of maker spaces at community colleges, and Butte was one of 23 to be awarded. “We got $500,000 over two years to build what you see here,” Donnelly said. After their proposal was accepted, he spearheaded the design and construction of the lab—doing double duty managing Create Space while still working as both a digital-design instructor and chair of the Arts and Digital Art & Design departments. This past spring, the CCC Maker program named Butte’s Create Space one of the top five in the state. “It’s so incredible. It’s probably the most exciting thing I’ve ever dealt with,” Donnelly said. “We’re training students to actually do hands-on work now. … The idea is to get students in, let them start actually creating things where it’s not just a virtual thing on the computer.” In addition to creating and playing with the machines and toys, students also gain experience with equipment that’s in use in the modern workplace, Donnelly said. For those who don’t have design expertise, they can go “upstairs and [take] classes in our design program,” he added, and those who already have experience are immediately able to realize their visions, many of them entrepreneurial. “Students sold about $400 worth of jewelry that they did off the laser-cutters last semester,” Donnelly said. The lab is currently not attached to any specific program, but any student can take the zero-unit MSP300 Maker course for access to it. “[It’s] a free class that anyone in the community or any student can sign up for,” Donnelly said, pointing out that non-students just need to register with Butte (also free) to sign up for the course. “Once they learn it, they can come in and just use it,” Donnelly said. “It’s really an amazing deal right now.” Ω

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 8/29—WEDNESDAY 9/4 SUGARKANE & CO: Folk rock band from  Redding with locals Cory Himp Hunt  and Travis + Glisel. Artist Ken Swain  paints live.  Thu, 8/29, 8pm. Argus  Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive 

Band plus special guests.  Thu, 8/29, 8pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582  Esplanade, (408) 449-2179.

THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat 

SUNDAY IRIS

Friday, August 30 Unwined Kitchen & Bar

29THURSDAY

GREEN MOUNTAIN BLUEGRASS: New 

local band performs.  Thu, 8/29, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E.  Sixth St.

GEORGE WINSTON: Pianist and composer is on tour in support of his  15th solo piano album, Restless  Wind. He’ll play three nights on the  Women’s Club’s 100-plus-year-old  restored Steinway piano. (Thursday  and Friday SOLD OUT). Partial benefit for Camp Fire relief.  Thu, 8/29, 7:30pm. $35. Chico Women’s Club,  592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

30FRIDAY

SEE FRIDAY

ABANDON THEORY: Nor Cal band playing  rock, reggae, folk, and funk on the  patio.  Thu, 8/29, 6pm. La Salles, 229  Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

with a rotating list of DJs spinning  vinyl until late.  Thu, 8/29, 8pm. Bill’s  Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

CITYPOP NIGHT 2.0: Featuring DJs  OPEN MIC COMEDY: Free open mic  comedy hosted by Dillon Collins.  Sign-ups at 7pm, showtime at  8pm.  Thu, 8/29, 8pm. The Lab, 250  Cohasset Road, Ste. 10.

RAE GOUIRAND: Poetry and prose  reading with Northern California  writer.  Thu, 8/29, 7pm. 1078 Gallery,  1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

SINGER/SONGWRITER/PERFORMER SHOWCASE: Featuring Sunday Iris,  Zac Yurkovic, Gene Kelly, Christina  Felipe, and Robert Karch.  Thu, 8/29, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359  Esplanade, 343-2056.

Halfplastic and Kendusk.  Fri, 8/30, 9pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

CREEDENCE REVELATION: End-ofsummer barbecue bash with  Creedence tribute band.  Fri, 8/30, 8pm. Gold Country Casino & Hotel,  4020 Olive Highway, Oroville.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERTS: Hot Flash  performs songs from the ’60s to  present day.  Fri, 8/30, 7pm. Free.  City Plaza, downtown Chico.

GOOD DOG: Western swing, Texas  two-step, New Orleans and rural  roots music featuring Gordy  Ohliger and more.  Fri, 8/30, 6pm. Almendra Winery, 9275 

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JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, BOB LITTELL: Groovy dinnertime 

tunes by local trio.  Fri, 8/30, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220  W. Fourth St.

GEORGE WINSTON: See Thursday.  (Thursday and Friday SOLD  OUT).  Fri, 8/30, 7:30pm. $35. Chico  Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr. org

Hit up the 1078 Gallery tonight (Aug. 29) for an evening of literary delight with Northern California poet and prose writer Rae Gouirand. Author of two collections of poetry, two chapbooks and a short work of nonfiction, she’ll read from her recent publications, Glass Is Glass Water Is Water and The History of Art. With work appearing in journals and anthologies nationwide and a host of awards under her belt, Gouirand will be sure to leave a mark.

LONE STAR JUNCTION: Touring outlaw-

country band performs.  Fri, 8/30, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument.  Acoustic/electric guitar and drum  set available to use. Sign-ups at  7:30pm. All ages welcome until  10pm.  Fri, 8/30, 8pm. $1. Down Lo,  319 Main St., 966-8342.

RELOVE: Los Angeles-based reggae 

soul band performs.  Fri, 8/30, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & 

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

RICKETY BRIDGE: Talented Nor Cal duo  putting their spin on your favorite  songs.  Fri, 8/30, 7pm. The Commons  Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

SUNDAY IRIS: Local acoustic folk  duo performs, joined by indiefolk singer/songwriter Jessica  Malone.  Fri, 8/30, 6pm. Unwined  Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

TONY VEE: Songs from the ’60s 

to today’s hits.  Fri, 8/30, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &  Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.  featherfallscasino.com

TYLER DEVOLL: Snappy guitar tunes,  food, beer.  Fri, 8/30, 8pm. The  Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St.,  Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

31SATURDAY

BOB’S COMEDY AND FUNK SHOW: Lineup  features out-of-towners Corde  Snell and Jon Gab and locals Jacob  McCalin, Dean Simcox and Annie  Fischer. Music by Rigmarole.  Sat,

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Oroville State Theater • Fri, Nov. 8, 7-9PM • www.orovillestatetheatre.com State Theater, Red Bluff • Thurs, Nov. 14, 7- 9PM • www.brownpapertickets.com Cascade Theater, Redding • Sat, Nov. 16, 7:30- 9:30PM • www.cascadetheater.org EL Rey Theater, Chico • Sat, Nov. 23, 7- 9PM • www.elreychico.com 32

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AUGUST 29, 2019

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 28 CHICO LATIN ORQUESTA

TIKI LOUNGE LIZARDS: Surf rock meets

SEE SATURDAY

TONY VEE: See Friday. Sat, 8/31,

Saturday, Aug. 31 Hatha House

Montgomery St., Oroville.

JOHN MORRIS ROSS IV: Veteran come-

8/31, 8pm. $5-$8. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

BRENDAN SCHAUB AND BRYAN CALLEN: Popular comics from The

Fighter and the Kid podcast here to make you laugh. Sat, 8/31, 8pm. $30$60. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

CHICO LATIN ORQUESTA: Local salsa band, plus DJ, performs for dance night. Chico Salsa Connection will be teaching a free intro salsa lesson at 8pm. All ages. Sat, 8/31, 8pm. $20. Hatha House, 707 Wall Street.

DOUBLE TROUBLE: Bob Seger tribute duo performs a night of classic rock. Sat, 8/31, 9pm. $5. Feather

Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

FREE BEER: It’s not beer, it’s a blues/ jam band for late-night happy hour. Sat, 8/31, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

GENE EVARO JR. AND LUMBERCAT: Funky soul and rock from acts out of Reno and Joshua Tree. Sat, 8/31, 9pm. $10. Lost on Main, 319 Main St., 892-2445.

HOT POTATO TRIO: Swing music straight from 1930s dance clubs, cartoons and gypsy jazz. Sat, 8/31, 7pm. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive, 899-9250.

JAYSON ANGOVE: Singer/songwriter

playing mellow weekend tunes. Sat, 8/31, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975

dian, podcaster and contributor to Comedy Central Radio is here to make you laugh, Chico Live Improv shares the bill. 18-over. Sat, 8/31, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, BOB LITTELL: See Friday. Sat, 8/31,

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

GEORGE WINSTON: See Thursday. Sat, 8/31, 7:30pm. $35. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

NORTHERN TRADITIONZ: Local band playing good old-fashioned country and rock originals and covers. Sat, 8/31, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

SOUL POSSE: Sing along with local five-piece band rocking the hits from yesterday and today. Sat, 8/31, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 828-8040.

spaghetti-western with fun Nor Cal band. Sat, 8/31, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

1SUNDAY

4WEDNESDAY

ARETHA – QUEEN OF SOUL DINNER SHOW: Hop on the freeway of

love with Aretha Franklin tribute artist. Wed, 9/4, 6:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 9/4, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

DADA LIFE: Popular Swedish DJ duo

performs. Wed, 9/4, 8pm. $20-$25. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

OPEN MIC: Mr. Bang hosts this monthly event. Sign-ups start at 5:30pm. Wed, 9/4, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

SURF NOIR KINGS: Original landlocked surf music with Miles Corbin, Robert Karch, Jerry Morano and Mark Wilpolt. Wed, 9/4, 6:30pm. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade, 894-3463.

PAT TRAVERS BAND: Veteran guitarist performs melodic rock and blues. Sun, 9/1, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

2MONDAY

PEPE AGUILAR: Award-winning Mexican singer, songwriter and producer performs. Mon, 9/2, 8pm. $35-$125. Rolling Hills Casino Resort, 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning.

3TUESDAY

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

know and win prizes. Tue, 9/3, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing

LET’S GET AWKWARD

Comedian John Morris Ross IV will return to town this Saturday (Aug. 31) at Tender Loving Coffee. Known for the popular STAB! Podcast and his appearances on Comedy Central Radio and the Coexist Comedy Tour, Ross’ style has been described as “shattering the boundaries of personal information discomfort” by Submerge Magazine. Masters of spontaneity Chico Live Improv to open the show. Come on down and celebrate over-sharing.

Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

AUGUST 29, 2019

CN&R

33


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1695 Mangrove avenue • 530-895-1195 34

CN&R

AUGUST 29, 2019

Come for the convoluted story, stay for the fine acting and nuanced direction

Ianyoung American ex-patriot who has a central role at orphanage in India. Theresa (Julianne Moore) is a sabel (Michelle Williams) is an earnest and dedicated

flamboyant American businesswoman who offers the orphanage a six-figure donation, but insists that Isabel fly to New York by for a meeting before closing the Juan-Carlos deal. Selznick Isabel arrives to find the meeting cut short and semi-postponed until after the weekend’s wedding of Grace (Abby Quinn), the daughter of Theresa and her husband, Oscar (Billy Crudup), a quirky artist who caters to a ritzy clientele. Grace After the Wedding adores her father, jousts ambivalently Opens Friday, Aug. 30. Starring Michelle with Theresa (who is not her birth Williams, Julianne mother), and has somewhat unstable Moore, Billy Crudup relations with Frank (Will Chase), and Abby Quinn. the supercilious young gent she’s Directed by Bart Freundlich. Pageant about to marry. There are quietly troubling comTheatre. Rated PG-13. plications sprouting among and all around these characters, with some particularly intriguing instances emerging via artfully indirect hints that Isabel and Oscar know each other from some implicitly fraught time in the past. After the Wedding’s gentle, smoldering buildup to the revelation of their secrets (and those of Theresa as well) serves as

3

an increasingly dramatic undercurrent for the film as a whole. Those undercurrents and the performances that give life to them are the best things in this strangely furnished domestic melodrama. The film is an American remake of a 2006 Danish film, which got an Oscar nomination and received much more respectful reviews than this one has. Both versions carry the burden of a bizarre and convoluted plot (created originally by the Danish filmmaker Susanne Bier). Bart Freundlich’s American version has the special benefit of Williams and Moore and Freundlich’s low-key, flavorsome direction. That approach counters the excesses of plot with rapt attention to emotional detail and nuance. All in all, nuance and detail are the heart of the matter here. On paper, the plot—with its orphans, family secrets, role reversals, conflicted parents, emotional zig zags—is blatantly outlandish. Onscreen, it works as a proper scaffolding for a multifaceted study of paradoxical passions in a handful of distinctively “modern” characters. Ω

1 2

3 4

Poor

Good

Fair

Very Good

5 Excellent


Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week

3

After the Wedding

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Bennett’s War

An American soldier is medically discharged from combat after he breaks his back during an IED explosion while serving in an Army Motorcycle Unit. When he returns home, he needs to support his family, so—say it with us—“against all odds” he rehabs and trains to become a pro motocross rider. Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Reopening this week

4

It

In this 2017 adaptation of Stephen King’s novel, the core story remains the same: Children in Derry, Maine, have been disappearing for many years. The film starts with the sad case of Georgie (Jackson Robert Scott), a little boy in a yellow rain slicker who follows his paper boat to the sewer drain and makes an unfortunate acquaintance. That would be Pennywise, the dancing, sewer-dwelling, evil clown, played as a most savage beast by Bill Skarsgard. The kids are great. The standout is Sophia Lillis as Beverly Marsh, and Jeremy Ray Taylor will break your heart as Ben Hanscom, the chubby kid who has a crush on Bev. Their first meeting is one of the best scenes in the film. Director Andy Muschietti scores some big scares, especially during a slideshow gone very wrong, and a meeting between the Denbrough brothers in the family basement: “You’ll float, too!” Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

Spider-Man: Far From Home

47 Meters Down: Uncaged

Teen girls diving among Mexican ruins on holiday find themselves stranded in sharkinfested waters. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Angel Has Fallen

The Angry Birds Movie 2

It’s angry birds vs. green pigs in installment two of the video game-turned-animated-film series. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Dora and the Lost City of Gold

A live-action adaptation of the popular Nickelodeon animated series about the adventure-loving 7-year-old, Dora, and her monkey pal, Boots. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

3

Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

Hobbs & Shaw is actually a spinoff from the series. In other words, rejoice! The leaden, dreary Vin Diesel is nowhere to be seen in this movie. Now we can have some real fun! Hobbs & Shaw is a bizarre hybrid of spy thriller, action flick, screwball comedy and science fic-

The Lion King

Jon Favreau (Elf, Iron Man) directs this photorealistic CGI remake of the 1994 Disney animated classic that features an impressive cast of voice actors, including Chiwetel Ejiofor, Donald Glover, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen, John Oliver and, naturally, James Earl Jones as Mufasa. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

5

Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood

When Quentin Tarantino is behind the camera, mayhem and artistic license win out—history and conventionality be damned. Movie No. 9 is a dreamy doozy, and maybe the director/screenwriter’s most unapologetic film yet. Set in 1969, Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood captures the dying days of both sixties culture and the Golden Age of Hollywood. And through Tarantino’s storytelling lens, they die hard—in mysterious and hallucinogenic ways. For leading men, we get the pairing of Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt starring as insecure, has-been actor Rick Dalton and his trusty stuntman, Cliff Booth, respectively. Dalton’s career has devolved into playing the bad guys on weekly installments of TV’s The F.B.I., while the blackballed and past-his-prime Booth is relegated to driving the actor around and acting as his confidant. The setup allows Tarantino to go hog wild with the sixties visuals and soundtrack. The end of the sixties was bona fide nuts, and this is a nutty movie. It also manages to be quite heartfelt and moving. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

Overcomer

A Christian-based film about a high-school basketball coach who faces a crisis of faith and a new challenge as a mentor for an unlikely cross-country athlete. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

The Peanut Butter Falcon

The story of teen boy with Down syndrome (Zack Gottsagen) who runs away and sets off on a journey to a wrestling camp to realize his dream of becoming a pro wrestler. Also starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson and Bruce Dern. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Ready or Not

A black comedy/thriller about a wedding night that takes a deadly turn when the groom’s family introduces the new couple to a messed up version of hide-and-seek. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

Alvin Schwartz’s 1980s series of children’s scary short stories gets the cinematic horror treatment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Toy Story 4

The whole computer-animated gang is back—including Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) and Bo Peep (Annie Potts)—for a new adventure with a new homemade toy pal named Forky. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated G.

’s Independent Journalism Fund

Gerard Butler and Morgan Freeman return for this third Fallen film (following Olympus Has Fallen and London Has Fallen), with the former as a Secret Service agent now on the run after being framed for an assassination attempt on the latter (now playing the U.S. president). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Three sixth-grade boys embark on an epic, R-rated coming-of-age odyssey. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Show your support at www.independentjournalismfund.org

Now playing

Good Boys

Donate to

A re-release (with four extra minutes of footage) of the sequel to Spider-Man: Homecoming picks up after the events of Avengers: Endgame, and finds Peter Parker/ Spider-Man recruited by Nick Fury to battle new threats to the world. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

tion. Here, Furious franchise regulars Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and Shaw (Jason Statham) are tasked with protecting the latter’s sister, Hattie (Vanessa Kirby), after she injects herself with something that will have worldwide consequences if she’s captured. The main antagonist is Brixton (Idris Elba), a former Shaw ally who has turned into some sort of bionic badass dubbed, by himself, “Black Superman.” Stuntman-turned-director David Leitch, who gave us the first John Wick and Deadpool 2, knows his way around an action scene, and his edits create constant action and laughs—thanks in large part to Johnson and Statham’s great timing and onscreen chemistry. And while it’s expected that the tough-guy leads will kick ass in movies such as this, it’s Kirby who steals the show as the action hero of this installment. She is a total badass. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Community Supported

FILM SHORTS

AUGUST 29, 2019

CN&R

35


36

CN&R

A UGUS T 29 , 20 1 9


CHOW

it’s time to

DisCoVeR

Grow more, worry less

Butte County

New book for better-planned, more fun and relaxing gardens

WTake Kourik sees value in being lazy. a step back, sit down and relax. hen it comes to gardening, Robert

Think before you act, then think some more. Your garden will be better for it, he says. One of Northern California’s most prolific garden writers, Kourik has 17 books to his credit, including four in the last decade. His latest is a distillation of his best time- and energy-saving advice: Lazy-Ass Gardening: Maximize Your Soil, Minimize Your Toil. “It’s not silly-silly; it’s got a lot of content,” Kourik said. “Everybody loves the title, at least out here in California.” by Debbie Arrington Kourik noted that “lazy” and “gardening” can seem like contrad ebbi ea@ dictory terms. “Gardening has a newsrev i ew.c om reputation” for hard work, he said. By lazy, he means thoughtful: Lazy reading: “Basically, think before you act.” Order Lazy-Ass The most common mistakes— Gardening for $20 at wrong plant, wrong place—come robertkourik.com from lack of planning. “Fanatic gardeners don’t plan as much as they should,” he said. “They tend to just act. More planning will save them a lot of time—and work.” Now based in Santa Rosa, Kourik is an organic gardening pioneer. In 1970s Marin County, he launched one of the nation’s first organic garden maintenance businesses. His book Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape has been in print for three decades. In recent years, he’s concentrated on low-water,

Robert Kourik’s favorite “lazy”   vegetable to grow is the versatile chayote. 

easy-care organic landscaping. “I like to call it inspired laziness,” Kourik said. Plants that need less fuss automatically allow a gardener to spend more time relaxing than working. So in his landscape designs, Kourik gravitates toward perennials and small shrubs. His “lazy” favorites: lavender (he grows several varieties), Jerusalem sage, silvery artemisia and grevilleas, a blooming evergreen from Australia. Kourik wrote a whole book on lavender (The Lavender Garden). “Plant lavender in November, just as the winter rain begins,” he said. “It will grow roots all winter and make for a stronger, healthier plant. When you plant in April, the roots can’t keep up. The plant needs more water, more care.” For vegetable gardens, Kourik suggests daily drip irrigation to keep soil evenly moist. Plants are less stressed, and so is the gardener. Though he grows a few tomato plants each summer, Kourik tends to buy his heirlooms at the farmers’ market. “They’re too much work!” he said. His favorite “lazy” vegetable: chayote. “I love things with multiple uses,” he said. “Chayote is my No. 1 favorite. The new shoots taste like asparagus. You eat the fruit like squash, but the big seeds have a wonderful nutty flavor; eat those, too. The tuber is edible like a potato; you can eat a bunch and it will still grow back every year. If you’re going to grow something, why not grow a plant with three or four uses?” His lazy maxim: Relax more and stress less. “When you don’t play in your garden, it becomes work.” Ω

A FREE Guide for Visitors and Locals, too. Advertising in Discover Butte County will enrich the stay of visitors to Butte County by directing them to the best places to shop, eat and stay. Most importantly, it can help them find you and your business. To be a part of the next Discover Butte County, call your Chico News & Review advertising representative today. Publication Date: September 13 Call your News & Review advertising representative today, (530) 894-2300 AUGUST 29, 2019

CN&R

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ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

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CN&R

AUGUST 29, 2019

“There’S A world GoinG on UnderGroUnd” That line from Tom Waits’ song “Underground” is on my mind as the Labor Day weekend approaches and the buzz of preparations by the Butcher shop hive intensifies in these last few days before the annual free outdoor theater festival goes off in a south Chico orchard. “Underground” is the opening track on Waits’ 1983 album, swordfishtrombones, which kicked off a trilogy of gloriously weird and beautiful releases (followed by Rain dogs and Frank’s Wild years—arts dEVo’s three faves from his oeuvre) that found the man fully embracing his persona as the carnival barker for all the freaks and barflies buzzing away down there, “awake while the rest of the world is asleep.” Of course, within the friendly confines of Chico, the freaks and barflies aren’t relegated to the underground. We live in this naturally beautiful Tom Waits and his underground friends. place where creative exploration and having a good time can become a way of life. The Butcher Shop, for me, is the ultimate celebration of that, where Chico’s extended tribe gathers by the thousands in one spot to drink beer and watch a bunch of weird original theater, music and art. One of the most enduring—and foundational—traditions of the Butcher Shop was actually inspired by Swordfishtrombones. dave the Butcher—the house band that’s been accompanying the theater productions, as well as rocking the proceedings on its own since the early formative years when the festival was a backyard happening at the home of the Latimers (the first family of the Butcher Shop, as well as the Blue Room Theatre)—is named after an off-kilter circus-music instrumental from the album. “We were in love with Captain Beefheart and Waits when we started the Butcher Shop in ’89,” said denver Latimer, when I asked him about the band’s origins. Latimer is the arts director for slow Theatre—the theater company that’s produced the festival since it went big in the orchard in 2009—and he said that early incarnations of the group often covered Waits and Beefheart, which were perfect complements to the avant-garde proceedings. While some of the core Butcher Shop performers—most notably Denver’s siblings, dylan and Elizabeth Latimer—have made regular appearances as guest singers for the band since its beginnings, the makeup of Dave the Butcher is ever-changing. In the past three years, local keyboardist/singer/ songwriter Webster Moore has taken on the role of musical director. Some of the players joining him this year are regulars—vocalists Elizabeth Latimer, adriane Westerdahl and donald Beaman, drummers Cody naab and scott Elizabeth Latimer with Dave the Butcher. Lehman (aka scotty imp)—as well as PhoTo by ShAron deMeyer some newcomers, including violinist Peter Washington, bassist aron Linker and trumpet/flute/synth/French horn player Evan Goodson. Moore told me that there aren’t as many stand-alone musical numbers this season, with the bulk of the songs “pretty much directly related to the show.” Nearly all the music was composed specifically for this year’s program, titled The director’s Cut, with Moore saying that sometimes the direction he received was as simple and wide open as composing something “dark and melancholy.” “There’s a lot of freedom to try and experiment new ideas,” he added. “I see it as a palette to get weird.” Amen to that! As always, all this good, dirty fun is free to enjoy. As in, just ride your bike out by 6 p.m. on Saturday or Sunday, Aug. 31 or Sept. 1, and plop a blanket on the grass and let the weirdness wash over you. But it’s not free for the organizers to put it on. If you got it to give, help keep the tradition alive by visiting the Butcher Shop’s fundraising campaign at gofundme.com (search “Butcher Shop 2019”) and depositing some digital coin in the keep-Chico-fun bank.


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Homes Sold Last Week

Lic# 01506350

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc.

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of August 12 - August 16 , 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2286 Burlingame Dr

Chico

$675,000

4/3

SQ. FT. 2554

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

37 Terrace Dr

Chico

$310,000

3/1

SQ. FT. 1042

1707 Estates Way

Chico

$615,000

4/3

2400

220 Henshaw Ave

Chico

$310,000

3/2

1113

146 W Tonea Way

Chico

$600,000

3/2

2084

8 Alameda Park Cir

Chico

$305,000

2/3

1566

3070 Hancock Dr

Chico

$570,000

4/2

2251

2172 Nord Ave

Chico

$300,000

2/2

1310

3459 Peerless Ln

Chico

$568,000

3/2

2045

22 Glacier Peak Ln

Chico

$288,500

3/2

1248

30 Westgrove Ct

Chico

$512,000

3/2

2279

2766 Keith Hopkins Pl

Chico

$283,000

3/2

1162

371 Brookside Dr

Chico

$450,000

3/2

1893

13891 Garner Ln

Chico

$205,000

3/3

1555

177 E Frances Willard Ave

Chico

$449,000

6/2

2103

1110 W 8th Ave #4 Apt

Chico

$185,000

3/2

985

828 Jacobs Ct

Chico

$427,000

3/2

1674

2133 Huntington Dr

Chico

$183,000

2/2

971

7 Kestrel Ct

Chico

$420,000

3/2

1647

354 Humboldt Ave

Chico

$180,000

2/1

1154

653 Larch St

Chico

$393,000

2/2

1542

484 E 1st Ave

Chico

$180,000

2/1

911

602 Acacia Ln

Chico

$390,000

4/2

1426

127 Eagle Vista Dr

Oroville

$450,000

2/2

1878 1220

13 Tilden Ln

Chico

$389,000

3/2

1598

106 Valley View Dr

Oroville

$275,000

3/2

307 Southbury Ln

Chico

$380,000

3/2

1544

585 Plumas Ave

Oroville

$262,000

3/2

1400

2616 Doral Way

Chico

$372,000

3/2

1471

1180 Brereton Way

Oroville

$250,000

4/3

2916

9 Geneva Ln

Chico

$365,000

3/2

1584

3463 Morningside Dr

Oroville

$246,000

3/2

1441

195 Cavalier Way

Chico

$355,000

3/2

1186

2339 Via Canela

Oroville

$240,000

3/2

1064

529 W 11th St

Chico

$350,000

3/3

1527

916 High St

Oroville

$239,000

2/1

1334

2131 Shoshone Ave

Chico

$350,000

3/2

1236

6089 Maxwood Dr

Paradise

$343,500

3/2

1643

894 El Dorado St

Chico

$350,000

4/2

1428

1806 Merrill Rd

Paradise

$335,000

2/2

1624

2765 Camden Ct

Chico

$349,000

3/2

1363

1473 Tobie Ln

Paradise

$255,000

3/2

1142

25 Parkhurst St

Chico

$330,000

3/2

1305

1182 Coral Cir

Paradise

$200,000

3/2

1509

a ug ust 29, 2019

CN&R

39


REAL ESTATE E For more information about advertising in our Real estate section, call us at

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CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A AND M ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES at 660 Manzanita Court, Suite 6 Chico, CA 95926. MASON AXEL MCKELLIPS 24 El Cerrito Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MASON MCKELLIPS Dated: July 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000890 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DRIVE THRU STOP AND SHOP at 6433 Skyway Suite 9 Paradise, CA 95969. GABRIELL HERNDON 5858 Tika Lane Magalia, CA 95954. ESTEFANIA MIRANDA 5858 Tika Lane Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: GABRIELL HERNDON Dated: July 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000829 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SIERRA POOLS INC at 3150 Hwy 32 Suite B Chico, CA this Legal Notice continues

95973. SIERRA POOLS INC 3150 Hwy 32 Suite B Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: TYLER MORELAND, PRES/OWNER Dated: July 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000896 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO’S FINEST LANDSCAPING at 6727 County Road 20 Orland, CA 95963. RAUL J RAMIREZ 6727 County Road 20 Orland, CA 95963. MARCOS F SANDOVAL 220 West 22nd St Apt 1 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RAUL J RAMIREZ Dated: July 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000894 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUMMIT STRUCTURAL DESIGN at 383 Rio Lindo Ave., Suite 200 Chico, CA 95926. SUMMIT STRUCTURAL DESIGN 383 Rio Lindo Ave., Suite 200 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYLAND BURDETTE, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: July 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000882 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

FICTITIIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MACKRAY MANAGEMENT at 2599 Oak Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. JESSE GRIGG 1704 Oak Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JESSE GRIGG Dated: July 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000850 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROOTS LANDSCAPING at 1513 Sherman Ave. Chico, CA 95926. BRADLEY SULLIVAN RELF 1513 Sherman Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRADLEY RELF Dated: July 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000851 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DEER PARK COUNSELING this Legal Notice continues

AND CONSULTING at 15A Williamsburg Lane Chico, CA 95926. DEVJANI BANERJEE-STEVENS 2446 Villa Vista Drive Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DEVJANI BANERJEE-STEVENS Dated: August 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000925 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ILLUMINAID, OMPT, ONE MEDIA PLAYER PER TEACHER, ONE MOBILE PROJECTOR PER TRAINER, POLDER, INC at 645 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. POLDER, INC 645 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: PATRICE YORK, SECRETARY/TREASURER Dated: August 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000922 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LG CONSTRUCTION at 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. LUIS ALBERTO GARCIA 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. MA DEL ROSARIO GARCIA 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. LG AND SONS CONSTRUCTION INC 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: LUIS GARCIA, PRESIDENT Dated: August 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000930 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CRYO SKIN AND BODY at 1366 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926 AMANDA MICHELE BATES 1531 Downing Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMANDA BATES Dated: July 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000901 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SIMPLE SIMIAN, SIMPLE SIMIAN CREATIVE, SIMPLE SIMIAN SUSTAINABLE ARTWEAR at 1483 Trenta Dr Chico, CA 95973. JOSHUA ANTHONY BIGGINTON 1840 Manzanillo Lane Corning CA, CA 96021. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. this Legal Notice continues

Signed: JOSH BIGGINTON Dated: August 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000935 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SIINXBRE at 2181 Oroville Chico Hwy Durham, CA 95938. CINDY CASTANEDA SANCHEZ 1564 Nord Ave Spc 1 Chico, CA 95926. BREANNA VALDOVINOS 1425 Nord Ave Apt 20 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: BREANNA VALDOVINOS Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000944 Published: Aug 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OLOFAT ONE-BITE BARBEQUE, OLOFAT ONE-BITE BBQ at 2769 Ceres Avenue Chico, CA 95928. SIGRAH BILLYOS 757 Hillgrove Court Chico, CA 95926. MD OBET 1050 Columbus Ave. #19 Chico, CA 95926. This busisness is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SIGRAH BILLYOS Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000939 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing busines as EDELWEISS at 1933 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95960. KRISTEN FRIETSCHE 8 Rockerfeller Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTEN FRIETSCHE Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000953 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HOPE IN HEALING COUNSELING SERVICES at 6 Governors Lane Suite A Chico, CA 95926. ALISHA READY 15 Glenbrook Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALISHA READY Dated: August 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000954 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STUDIO 4, STUDIO FOUR at 823 Brandonbury Ln Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTINE ANN DICKINSON this Legal Notice continues

823 Brandonbury Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINE A. DICKINSON Dated: July 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000828 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DOGTOWN HOWLER at 14514 Colter Way Magalia, CA 95954. TAMMY WALLER AVILES 14514 Colter Way Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TAMMY WALLER AVILES Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000968 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUBY’S at 245 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. RAINE DEIGH ELDRIDGE 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAINE DEIGH Dated: July 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000871 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUBY’S at 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. RAINE DEIGH ELDRIDGE 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAINE DEIGH Dated: July 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000872 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as XTRM STEEL at 175 Inglewood Dr. Oroville, CA 95966. XAVIER DIAZ 12 Ruths Ct Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: XAVIER DIAZ Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000969 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SILVERLEAF AGRICULTURE, SILVERLEAF ORGANIC at 679 E 7th Chico, CA 95928. MARC MONROE BRECKENRIDGE 679 E 7th Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: MARC this Legal Notice continues


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BRECKENRIDGE Dated: August 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000926 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THOUSAND ACRE WOOD BOOKS at 2811 North Avenue Chico, CA 95973. TERESA TRAVER 2811 North Avenue Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TERESA TRAVER Dated: August 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000948 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CB WOOD ARTS at 19 Franciscan Way Chico, CA 95973. CRAIG ARTHUR BONNER 19 Franciscan Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CRAIG A. BONNER RH Dated: August 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000979 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SECRETS OF PARADISE at 6433 Skyway 9 Paradise, CA 95969. GABRIELL HERNDON 5827 Wildwood Lane Suite 6 Paradise, CA 95969. ESTEFANIA MIRANDA 5827 Wildwood Lane Suite 6 Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: ESTEFANIA MIRANDA Dated: August 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000984 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KREMER DENTAL CARE PHILADEPHIA SQUARE at 140 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973. KEVIN KREMER, DDS, NORTH STATE, INC. 3 Glenbrook Ct. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KEVIN KREMER, PRESIDENT Dated: August 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000959 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CONNECTIONS COUNSELING at 15 Ilahee Lane Suite 100 Chico, CA 95973. HEATHER MARIE BOGGS 291 Cavalier Way Chico, CA 95973. this Legal Notice continues

This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HEATHER BOGGS Dated: August 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000986 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TREE CITY FILMS at 1729 Oakdale St Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. SHAWN DYER 1729 Oakdale St Apt 5 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHAWN DYER Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000967 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HEART BEAN COFFEE at 777 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. FAELIN KLEIN 777 Victorian Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: FAELIN KLEIN Dated: August 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000980 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 127CC COURTNEY BOYDEN 6x12 (Boxes, Furniture, Suitcases, Misc.) 284SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6x10 (Boxes, Containers, Misc.) 006CC1 THOR BAILY 5x7 (Boxes, totes, cabinets) 205SS CARA MAY 6x12 (Households, Furniture, Boxes, Bags) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday September 14, 2019 Beginning at 1:00PM Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: August 29, September 5, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LOR ZE LEE and SEE VANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LINA MAI NENG LOR-LEE CHARLIE LOR Proposed name: LINA MAI NENG LEE CHARLIE TOU LEE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted.

this Legal Notice continues

Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 6, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02210 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DEBBIE ANN LYNCH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DEBBIE ANN LYNCH Proposed name: DEBBIE ANN BROOKS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02343 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DANA CATHERINE YU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DANA CATHERINE YU Proposed name: DANA CATHERINE WUNDERLICH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the

this Legal Notice continues

reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 1, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02309 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner WILLIAM MORGAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: HUNTER LEE BELANGER Proposed name: HUNTER LEE MORGAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA MOSBARGER Dated: July 24, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01178 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARTHA MAYR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ELLA PHYLLIS BUNTING MILLIE BEATRICE BUNTING Proposed name: ELLA PHYLLIS MAYR MILLIE BEATRICE MAYR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard

this Legal Notice continues

and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: August 16, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02426 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARINA DALIA CARINO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARINA DALIA CARINO Proposed name: MARINA DALIA ESQUIVEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 16, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 21, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02498 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: RACHEL LIZA GOMEZ YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper this Legal Notice continues

CLaSSIfIEdS

CONTINUED ON 42

For the week oF AUGUSt 29, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Here are ex-

amples of activities I recommend you try in the coming days. 1. Build a campfire on the beach with friends and regale each other with stories of your most interesting successes. 2. Buy eccentric treasures at a flea market and ever thereafter refer to them as your holy icons. 3. Climb a hill and sit on the grass as you sing your favorite songs and watch the moon slowly rise over the eastern horizon. 4. Take naps when you’re not supposed to. 5. Sneak into an orchard at night and eat fruit plucked just moments before. 6. Tell a beloved person a fairy tale in which he or she is the hero.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The

hardiest creature on the planet may be the bacterium known as Deinococcus radiodurans. It can endure exposure to radiation, intense cold, dehydration, acid and vacuum. I propose we make it your power creature for the coming weeks. Why? Not because I expect you’ll have to deal with a lot of extreme conditions, but rather because I think you’ll be exceptionally robust, both physically and psychologically. If you’ve been waiting for the right time to succeed at demanding challenges that require you to be in top form, now is a good time to do it. P.S. Deinococcus radiodurans is colloquially referred to as Conan the Bacterium, borrowing from the spirit of the fictional character Conan the Barbarian, who is renowned for his strength and agility.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the yearly

cycle of many Geminis, retreating into a state akin to hibernation makes sense during the end of August and the first three weeks of September. But since many of you are high-energy sophisticates, you often override your body’s signals. And then nature pushes back by compelling you to slow down. The result may be a rhythm that feels like constantly taking three steps forward and two steps backward. May I suggest a different approach this year? Would you consider surrendering, even slightly, to the invitation to relax and recharge?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you de-

cide to travel to a particular place via hot air balloon, you must be prepared for the possibility that your route will be indirect. At different altitudes, the wind may be blowing in different directions—toward the east at a hundred feet high, but toward the southwest at two hundred feet. The trick for the pilot is to jockey up and down until finding a layer that’s headed toward the desired destination. I see your life right now as having a metaphorical resemblance to this riddle. You have not yet discovered the layer that will take you where you want to go. But I bet you will soon.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Considering how

bright you have been burning since the Flame Angels designated you as the Hottest Cool Person of the Month, I hesitate to urge you to simmer down. But I must. Before there’s a meltdown in your vicinity, please lower your thermostat. Not a lot. Just a little. If you do that, everyone will continue to see your gleaming charisma in the best possible light. But don’t you dare extinguish your blaze. Don’t apologize for your brilliant shimmer. The rest of us need your magical radiance.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Shogun is a

bestselling novel about an Englishman who transforms himself into a samurai warrior in seventeenth-century Japan. Written by James Clavell, it’s more than 1,100 pages long. Clavell testified that the idea for the story sprang up in him when he read one line in his daughter’s school book: “In 1600 an Englishman went to Japan and became a samurai.” I suspect it’s highly likely you will soon encounter a seed like that—a bare inspiration that will eventually bloom into a Big Thing.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran athlete

Mickey Mantle is in Major League Baseball’s Hall of Fame. He had a spectacular 18-year career, winning the Most Valuable Player Award three times, playing in 12 World Series and being selected to the All-Star

by rob brezSny team 16 times. So it’s astounding that he played with a torn ligament in his knee for 17 years, according to his biographer Jane Leavy. She quoted an orthopedic surgeon who said that Mantle compensated for his injury with “neuromuscular genius.” I’m thinking that in the next few weeks you’re in a position to accomplish an equivalent of Mantle’s heroic adjustment.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Most

people who belong to the Church of Satan neither believe in nor worship Satan. (They’re atheists, and don’t believe in the supernatural.) I think a comparable principle is true for many right-wing fundamentalist Christians. Their actions and words are replete with bigotry, hardheartedness, materialism and selfishness—so contrary to what the real Jesus Christ taught that they in effect don’t believe in or worship Christ. I mention this in hopes of inspiring you to take inventory of whether your stated ideals are reflected in the practical details of how you live your life. That’s always an interesting and important task, of course, but it’s especially so for you right now. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to purge any hypocrisy from your system and get your actual behavior in close alignment with your deepest values.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): It’s the right time for you to create a fresh mission statement and promotional campaign. For inspiration, read mine: “My column ‘Free Will Astrology’ offers you a wide selection of realities to choose from. With 4,212 years of dedication to customer service (over the course of my last 13 incarnations), I’m a reliable ally supporting your efforts to escape your oppressive conditioning and other people’s hells. My horoscopes come with an ironclad guarantee: If the advice you read is wrong, you’re under no obligation to believe it. And remember: A panel of 531 experts has determined that ‘Free Will Astrology’ is an effective therapy for your chronic wounds and primordial pain. It is also dramatic proof that there is no good reason to be afraid of life.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Here

are good questions for you to meditate on during the next four weeks. 1. How can you attract resources that will expand your mind and your world? 2. Are you bold enough to reach out to wise sources and provocative influences that could connect you with useful tricks and practical treasures? 3. What interesting lessons can you stir up as you explore the mercurial edges, skirt the changeable boundaries, journey to catalytic frontiers and make pilgrimages to holy hubbubs? 4. How best can you encourage lyrical emotion over polished sentimentality? Joyous idealism over astringent zealotry? Exuberant integrity over formulaic kindness?

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “It is the beginning of wisdom when you recognize that the best you can do is choose which rules you want to live by,” wrote author Wallace Stegner, “and it’s persistent and aggravated imbecility to pretend you can live without any.” That will be an excellent meditation for you during the coming weeks. I trust you are long past the time of fantasizing you can live without any rules. Your challenge now is to adjust some of the rules you have been living by, or even dare to align yourself with some new rules—and then completely commit yourself to being loyal to them and enjoying them.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Given the

astrological omens that will symbolize your personal story in the coming weeks and months, I think Piscean author Nikos Kazantzakis articulated the perfect prescription for you. I invite you to interpret his thoughts to fit your circumstances. “We’re going to start with small, easy things,” he wrote. “Then, little by little we shall try our hand at the big things. And after that, after we finish the big things, we shall undertake the impossible.” Here’s an additional prod from Kazantzakis: “Reach what you cannot.”

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. AUGUSt 29, 2019

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All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque

legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: December 21, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV04121 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JODIE LYNN BROWN AKA JODIE LYNN MORSE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. this Legal Notice continues

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There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: September 28, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV03195 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT JENNY L. MASON You have been sued by petitioner: JASON E. BONHAM You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court North Butte County Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: JASON E. BONHAM 2455 Oro Bangor Hwy. Oroville, CA 95966 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 28, 2019 Case Number: 19FL01149 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

this Legal Notice continues

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: ROBERT SCOTT DOBYNE AND ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, OR ANY CLOUD ON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE TO THE PROPERTY, AND DOES 1 THROUGH 100 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: JUNE E. RICHARDSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: JOEL B. MASSAE, ESQ. PO Box 3104 Paradise, CA 95954 Tel. (530) 872-2375 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 6, 2019 Case No: 19CV01710 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: LANDES MEDICAL GROUP, A MEDICAL CORP.;, WILLIAM LANDES, MD, AN INDIVIDUAL; AND DOES 1-5 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: CARWOOD SKYPARK, LLC NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against this Legal Notice continues

you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: JOSEPH L. SELBY 249546 FERRIS & SELBY 2607 Forest Avenue, Suite 130 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 343-0100 Dated: May 21, 2019 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 19CV01535 Published: August 29, September 5,12,19 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE PATRICIA A. LESAN, also known as PATRICIA ANN LESAN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: PATRICIA A. LESAN, also known as PATRICIA ANN LESAN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JERRY O. LESAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JERRY O. LESAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the

this Legal Notice continues

estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: August 12, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00357 Published: August 22,29, September 5, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DOUGLAS JOHN MEYER, aka DOUGLAS J. MEYER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: this Legal Notice continues

DOUGLAS JOHN MEYER, aka DOUGLAS J. MEYER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PAMELA C. HANDLEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: PAMELA C. HANDLEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 17, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: ERWIN WILLIAMS MCKERNAN, LANAM, BAKKE & WILLIAMS LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 877-4961 Dated: August 20, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00371 Published: August 29, September 5,12, 2019


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