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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 52 THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

POWER PLAY BY SCOTT THOMAS ANDERSON

PAGE

Sussing out PG&E’s outages, dominance and future green initiatives

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ON OFF VOTE NOW!

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BLACKOUT READY?

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RECALL MONEY

26 CLAM ROCK

See SAMPLE BALLOT, page 20


Accident? injured?

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Lawrence a. Puritz F o r m e r I n s u r a n c e D e F e n s e at t o r n e y

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343-0500 northvalleylawyer.com


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 52 • August 22, 2019 OPINION 

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES 

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES 

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Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS 

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS 

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY  

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ARTS & CULTURE 

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

REAL ESTATE  

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CLASSIFIEDS  

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ON tHE COVER: IllustRatION by MaRIa RatINOVa

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring . To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare . To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live . Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J . Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, Jim Williams, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview .com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview .com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview .com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext . 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview .com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview .com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview .com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview .com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

august 22, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Dire need getting the attention it deserves Mark your calendars, Chicoans. On Tuesday (Aug. 27),

an ad hoc housing committee will hold the first in a series of public meetings related to our community’s needs—led by three of the Chico City Council’s progressives, Mayor Randall Stone and Councilmen Karl Ory and Scott Huber—that culminates in a city of Chico conference on affordable housing. The contracted housing market is something ATTEND THE MEETINGS: this newspaper has been The Tuesday ad hoc committee chronicling for years. As we meetings begin at 3 p.m. in Conference Room 1 adjacent reported in an in-depth piece to the Chico City Council back in 2017 (see “Squeezed chambers. The final meetout,” March 9), the shortage ing—an Affordable Housing resulted from a combination Conference—is on a Saturday, Sept. 28. Time and location TBA. of factors, including a lag in construction following the Great Recession and a lack of state and federal incentives for developers to build low-income housing. Both the real estate and rental realms lacked inventory even then and the construction boom over the past couple of years has not made the gains to meet the demand. Then came the Camp Fire. As everyone knows, it’s been slim pickings since the disaster displaced tens of thousands of residents. Real estate prices skyrocketed as

a result, putting homeownership out of reach for even middle-income families. Meanwhile, the rental market was whittled down not only by the influx of newly homeless wildfire survivors but also by the landlords who put their properties up for sale. The first two meetings of the ad hoc group (the second gathering is on Sept. 10) apparently will focus on the barriers to building—with local developers invited to speak to the issue. Affordable housing agencies and nonprofits are invited to discuss subsidized housing at the third meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 24. Finally, the city of Chico has scheduled an Affordable Housing Conference for Sept. 28. What we’re experiencing locally is not unlike what happened in Louisiana post-Hurricane Katrina, and there are indeed ways to provide the type of housing that would serve the area’s most vulnerable, experts tell the CN&R (see Ashiah Scharaga’s report on page 10). We encourage local leaders to reach out to them. Chico and the greater Butte County region have long been deficient in low-income housing, but the need post-Camp Fire is dire. Nine-plus months after the disaster, many of the displaced—through no fault of their own—remain in unstable living environments or homeless. We’re looking forward to these conversations. This is progress. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Demand a better climate change plan Sclimate transform our existing systems in order to avert a disaster. In other words, we have one year to

cientists tell us we have only 11 years to profoundly

create a 10-year plan for our city. Admirably, this past February, the Chico City Council voted to update the municipality’s existing Climate Action Plan to achieve the new state goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, and 80 percent by 2050. But recent science shows that 80 percent is not enough. If we want by to survive a future of more fires, Mark Stemen floods and searing heat, we need to The author is a demand a better plan. professor in the This summer, I attended the Geography and Planning Department California Climate Action Planning at Chico State, and a Conference, where 200 planners member of the city of from around the state wrestled with Chico Sustainability these very issues. My main takeTask Force and the away—no offense to my friends in Butte Environmental office—was that government planCouncil. ners will not save us. The barriers to

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climate action are no longer technological or economic, but rather the outdated and inflexible institutional structures of our own public agencies. That said, I left the conference inspired by the towns and cities pursuing community-driven climate resiliency planning, where residents participate in their own community solutions. Places like Richmond and Marin City are demanding democratic engagement in a planning process that also inspires social cohesion. Chico must do the same. Everyone needs to be part of this vital conversation, especially the youth, so the Butte Environmental Council is hosting a Climate Action Plan listening session on Tuesday (Aug. 27) from 6-8 p.m. at the CARD Community Center on Vallombrosa Avenue. Members of the city’s Sustainability Task Force will be in attendance to collect your feedback. Both groups believe it is extremely important that as many voices as possible are heard, so please take advantage of this opportunity to make our community and our own lives better. If you can’t attend the listening session, please email your suggestions directly to the Chico City Council. Our voices need to rise higher and faster than the temperature. Our collective future depends on it. □

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Crickets On the occasions this newspaper editor comes down on organizations run amok—that is, when I speak truth to power—oftentimes I learn there are others who have similar gripes. Such was the case last week, when I dropped the hammer on Chico State, its public relations department in particular. ICYMI: The flacks there attempted to stymie the CN&R’s efforts to report on—among other things—the university’s enrollment woes, a more than 8 percent drop in the incoming freshman class (see “Bad PR,” Second & Flume, Aug. 15). As a result, I received messages from colleagues at other outlets with complaints about efforts to interfere with their reporting on subjects the campus would like to bury. Another response to my criticism: messages from faculty and staff about a lack of transparency related to varying issues. For example, why did Milton Lang, vice president for student affairs and chief diversity officer, leave the university only 17 months into his tenure? That’s a good question. Here’s one of my own: Why did the university wait until this week to announce his departure, when it appears he’s been gone since early June? Further: Why was that announcement made only internally—not to the media? The CN&R attempted to contact Mr. Lang weeks ago for comments regarding the enrollment drop (one of his “areas of direct report” was enrollment management, according to his profile via the online Office of the President) post-Camp Fire. Among other things, we wondered how concerned the university was about such a steep decline and what it might do to address additional losses moving forward. We received an automated reply noting that Lang was “out of the office” and Sandy Parsons-Ellis (associate VP for student affairs and dean of students) should be contacted in his absence. However, when we reached out to Parsons-Ellis directly, we got a response from one of the public relations underlings asking the CN&R’s Ashiah Scharaga to email questions for the VP to him “in the spirit of efficiency.” This signals a few things: First, there’s apparently an internal edict on campus that comments on enrollment come only through the official mouthpiece. Second, it’s a pretty prime indicator that administration is nervous as hell about messaging on the subject. My response: No. 1: That’s not how journalism works. No. 2: Conversations driven by the press are actually helpful to finding solutions. No. 3: Such resistance will blow up in the university’s face. Say, in the form of two consecutive columns in the most-circulated newspaper north of Sacramento. I hope that message has been received—it’s been crickets from Kendall Hall. Indeed, since the PR department (aka University Communications) has blocked such important conversations—a move that is antithetical to providing context to what likely is a complex issue— this write-up is my way of making an open invitation to Parsons-Ellis to expound on the enrollment dilemma. I’ll report back on what we hear. In the meantime, I welcome more info from the university community. Last but not least: It’s great to see students trickling back into town. Some locals get cranky about traffic and parking once classes commence. Personally, I love the energy when the university is in session. Welcome back!


LETTERS

FOR SALE

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Obstructionists always

Oblivious establishment

Re: “Bad PR” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Aug. 15): The university is not going to provide you with information. That’s not what those people are about. They’re about firing John Gardner, and when a CIA agent is appointed as university president, they actually put up with it. They invite to speak a sieg heiler like William Shockley, and then won’t let anybody talk to him. Then there’s Robert Fredenburg, the human mole, who would only agree to be interviewed in the dark. After they broke the occupation of the administration building, which began in what was then known as the Free Speech Area, they went out and uprooted the sign reading Free Speech Area, replacing it with one reading Open Discussion Area. That’s who these people are. Hopeless.

Re “Good people and an unrecognizable America” (Guest comment, by Dean Carrier, Aug. 15): Mr. Carrier, you and others saw what you wanted to see in America. Angry, cynical Americans elected a sleazy, racist president, and few people, especially Democrats, have objectively asked why. The status quo protecting establishment Democrats quickly manipulated the mindset of shocked Democrats to blame Russia. In the American economy, only the top 10 percent have been thriving, though thriving better are the top 1 percent, and thriving most supremely are the top 0.1 percent, who take in 188 times more than the bottom 90 percent. Obama bailed out the banks, but most Americans suffered, while the top 1 percent took the

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gains. Obama was too cowardly to prosecute any bankers, or to have a commission to look into the lies that promoted the Iraq War that killed hundreds of thousands of Iraqis and added trillions to the national debt only to make the U.S. less safe. Obama was too cowardly to prosecute anybody for the U.S. torture programs. Obama was a decent person with a great smile, and fine oratory, but he had little vision and no courage. The establishment was oblivious, while America deteriorated. Good leaders are rare, but America desperately needs a president with vision and courage.

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

Cannabis is helpful Re “Ignoring the science” (Letters, by Steve Simpson, Aug. 15): The “science” has proven the positive effectiveness of cannabis compounds on so many levels; the list is long and readily available to the public from many reputable sources, so I won’t go into them here. Let’s channel our energy and efforts toward real science like climate change instead of threatening to take medicine away from children, the elderly and others who don’t want to treat their disorders with pharmaceuticals that come with many unwanted side effects and are so costly that too many cannot even afford them. Steve, you seem to be passionate. Why not direct that passion to a truth that will help many, rather than focusing on misinformation that denies your fellow humans their only relief from what ails them? Lisa McSmith Chico

GDP down, deficit bigger I was scoffed at by right-wing letter writers for insinuating that President Trump “has ridiculous depression causing policies.” I’m just curious if these same Trump lackeys still disagree with my clairvoyant letter dated eight months ago (Dec. 27, 2018) in light of last week’s 800-point stock market crash? The gross domestic product growth rate in 2018 (after Trump’s so-called tax cuts went into effect) was 2.85 percent with a $779 billion deficit, while in 2015 the GDP came in at 2.88 percent with a $439 billion deficit. The Congressional Budget Office projects a deficit of $896 billion for 2019. Remember the right-wing letter writers that complained about Obama taking his family to Hawaii for Christmas vacations while he was president? Just more examples of GOP hypocrisy. Ray Estes Redding

McConnell stalls bills Boy, school has started and that brought back a lot of memories for me. I remember being nervous about new kids, teachers, schedules, and whether I would make friends 6

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auguSt 22, 2019

I am a 72-year-old To his credit, the young man called me back and apologized profusely. white woman, He said he would handle things differently in the future. but had I been a Now I must recommit myself to person of color, this advocating for respectful and fair likely would not dealings by those in positions of have been the first power. I hope you join me. Kathryn McCreary time I experienced Orland such demeaning Speaking of which treatment. —Kathryn mccreary

and so on. I’m sure it’s the same for today’s kids, and on top of all that, they have all this new technology and what else? Oh yeah, today’s kids are being taught how to react in cases of an active shooter act of terrorism. Meanwhile, our new Democratic- (not Democrat) led House of Representatives passed not one but two gun legislation bills, including background checks in February of this year! Do-nothing Congress? Only on the Republic—excuse me—I mean the Republican side of the aisle. What happened to these bills? Moscow Mitch McConnell won’t bring them to the floor for a vote. Who is he representing? Ed Pitman Chico

Calling for respect As I was leaving a local grocery store, I was stopped by a male employee and told I must open my purse and show him everything. He said a customer had observed me stealing. As he and two other male employees watched, I emptied my purse onto the cement, feeling humiliated and offended, falsely accused and helpless. By the time I got to my car, I was crying. I decided I would never again show my face there, though I have been a customer since 1980 and like many of the workers. Then I had another thought. I am a 72-year-old white woman, but had I been a person of color, this likely would not have been the first time I experienced such demeaning treatment. It was a visceral reminder of the harassment our brothers and sisters endure without recourse. I overcame my embarrassment and called the store to describe what happened and how it made me feel.

I’m an African-American male who was pulled over in Chico for expired tags. In the process, police searched me and racially profiled me. I have never been to jail, nor have I ever even gotten a ticket. I’m a husband and father of five kids! They treated me with no respect, refused to answer my questions, illegally searched me, and then towed my car. The four officers had their hands on guns the whole time. Even after searching and learning I had no record, they still treated me like a criminal. I felt hopeless and judged by the color of my skin. Another time, they pulled me over but never said why. They asked where was I going. Did I have any weapons? Can I search your car? I told them no and asked about the probable cause. When they realized my 3-year-old son was in the back seat, the officers stopped everything, got in their cars and drove away. But the other incident was confirmation that I was being targeted as a black man. I didn’t sleep that night because of the anxiety. I was scared for my life thinking that they were going to shoot me. That was their attitude, that was their aggression. Niehla Bryant Chico

Correction In last week’s The Goods column (“History, music and connection,” by Meredith J. Cooper), the date of the Jonesville Hotel fundraiser dinner was incorrect. It’s this Saturday (Aug. 24). The error has been corrected online. —ed.

Write a letter tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. deadline for publication is noon on the tuesday prior to publication.


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Vivian Faber Yes, I am very scared of being a victim. I am scared due to the shootings in Texas, Walmart, and all the young kids who have access to guns. That should never be happening.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE CAMP FIRE VICTIM ID’D

The Butte County Sheriff’s Office used circumstantial evidence to identify the remains of Camp Fire victim Judith Sipher, 68, of Paradise, her brother, Wally Sipher, told the CN&R. BCSO released Judith’s name last Friday (Aug. 16), and her brother said it’s hoped DNA confirmation will be obtained in the next three months (see “Vanished,” cover story, July 25). The Camp Fire killed at least 86 people and the names of 81 of them have been released. Of the remaining five, three have been tentatively identified and two remain unknown. BCSO has said it is awaiting DNA confirmation in the outstanding cases but could make positive identifications using circumstantial evidence if necessary.

COUNTY, DRIVER SUED IN CYCLIST’S DEATH

The family of Chico doctor William Doherty— who was killed in a bicycling crash last year on Cohasset Road between Chico and Cohasset—has sued Butte County and the driver who struck him, according to court documents reviewed by the CN&R. The wrongful death suit alleges the county failed to maintain a deteriorated portion of Cohasset Road near Sigler Lane, where Doherty, 75, was struck by a pickup on July 28, 2018, driven by Jim Voyles, 88, of Chico. The suit, which alleges Doherty was hit as a result of the “dangerous condition” of the road, was filed last Wednesday (Aug. 14) in Butte County Superior Court. The family is seeking unspecified monetary damages. Voyles also has been charged with misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter in connection with Doherty’s death, and he is scheduled to stand trial Dec. 9.

BCSO MAKES ARREST IN COLD CASE

After a decades-long investigation, a man has been arrested and charged with killing a Stirling City woman in the early 1990s, according to a Butte County Sheriff’s Office press release. Tracy Zandstra, 29, was reported missing in November 1991. At the time, she was living with Richard Pyle, “with whom she was romantically involved,” according to BCSO. During the investigation, detectives uncovered evidence that Zandstra had been killed and her body, which has still not been found, disposed of. Detectives arrested Pyle (pictured), now 55, in Stockton last Thursday (Aug. 15), where he was listed as a transient by local police. His bail has been set at $1 million.

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Power plans Local officials prepare for safety-related power shutoffs

Tfirstfuels prompted PG&E to conduct its public safety power shutoff in Butte

he threat of high winds coupled with dry

County in June. The outage—which came after the utility’s electrical equipment was story and found to have caused photo by the Camp Fire in Andre Byik November—lasted less and re b @ than a day and was carn ew srev i ew. c o m ried out to avoid sparking another wildfire. The event prompted a number of questions at a subsequent Board of Supervisors meeting, where it was discussed. Whom did PG&E notify about the impending outage and how? How will residents and businesses keep their food cold during an extended outage? Most important: Are those with medical needs being considered? As PG&E has warned it could cut power for extended periods of time because of wildfire danger, city and county officials throughout California have grappled with how to respond and protect their most vulnerable citizens (see “Power play,” page 18). In Butte County, local plans were put to the test June 8, when 21,000 customers in Oroville, Paradise, Magalia, Forest Ranch and surrounding communities had their power turned off.

Cindi Dunsmoor, the emergency services officer under the Office of Emergency Management for Butte County, is charged with emergency planning and preparedness. Local officials, she said, would have preferred to receive more advance notice—the county received about 24 hours’ notice— but procedures were followed to notify vulnerable populations in the affected areas and make sure government services continued to run. Dunsmoor said the county Department of Employment and Social Services called people signed up for its voluntary Special Needs Awareness Program (SNAP), which includes about 800 folks who are clients of in-home supportive services (IHSS), as well as wheelchair users, people who are bedbound and others who may need extra help with planning for emergencies. PG&E, she said, also alerted customers enrolled in the utility’s medical “baseline” program, which provides discounted rates for people with medical devices that require electricity to operate. PG&E has shared that list with counties that sign nondisclosure agreements. Butte County, Dunsmoor said, didn’t have the list at the time of the June shutoff but has since received it. About 1,500 baseline customers were affected in the June shutoff,

according to PG&E data. The county’s SNAP registry may not identify every person who could be considered vulnerable—some may not want to sign up for the program—but it is “fairly comprehensive,” Dunsmoor said. “I know it’s not perfect,” she said, adding, “and this list isn’t a guarantee that someone is going to come save you, [but] it is helpful for preparing as much as we can, [to] give advance notice, check on folks, make sure that they’re aware of whatever we’re aware of.” Paul Moreno, a spokesman for PG&E, told the CN&R that the utility has campaigned for its electric customers to confirm they have given PG&E their most current contact information, so they can receive phone calls, text messages or emails alerting them to potential power shutoffs. In Butte County alone, he said, the utility has identified 2,100 customers for whom it does not have contact information. Further, PG&E has not yet solved the problem of identifying people who are not on the utility’s customer rosters but may be affected by a prolonged power outage— such as tenants and other household members not signed up with PG&E. “We’ve been working to try to find a solution to that,” Moreno said.


Chico Fire Chief Steve Standridge says while the city continues to plan for fire-related PG&E power outages, Chico would likely be less affected than surrounding communities.

He noted the utility conducts outreach through multiple channels, including social media and news outlets, to alert people as to when and where a planned shutoff is scheduled to occur. In some cases, he said, weather and fuel conditions may precipitate a sudden or unexpected power shutoff. In June, the utility opened a temporary resource center in Oroville where people could charge their devices and cool off. Such centers are expected to be set up going forward. “In recent years and decades, the risk of wildfires has continued to increase,” Moreno said. “Some people said, ‘How come you never did this before? You didn’t have to do this before. Why now?’ Well, we’re facing very different fire conditions than we were just a decade or two ago.” For the city of Chico, emergency manage-

ment facilitation runs through Fire Chief Steve Standridge’s office. City departments are given discretion to identify how they should respond to events such as a planned PG&E outage. The police department, for example, has suggested a citywide curfew during planned shutoffs (see “Lights out,” Newslines, Aug. 8). For the fire department, a shutoff would trigger putting additional engines on the street in preparation for a possible spike in calls for service. It also means conducting regular welfare checks on what Standridge calls “vulnerable facilities,” such as assistedliving homes. Those automatic welfare checks, however, do not extend to individuals, the fire chief said, adding that his department does not have a list of people who could be vulnerable during a planned power outage. The city, he said, is evaluating a program to address that issue. There is a lower probability Chico will be broadly affected by public safety power shutoffs in part because of how PG&E can cut power to specific areas in the city, Standridge said. During the June outage, only a few homes within city limits were affected. Planning remains “very much a fluid situation,” the fire chief said. “Quite frankly, the first step was really understanding the nature of the … hazard and risk prior to really [delving] deep into, ‘OK, now what do we need to do from here?’” Ω

No limits Both sides of council recall effort throw down thousands of dollars An effort to recall two Chico City Council mem-

bers, launched just two months ago, already has attracted at least $13,000 in donations. A billboard has gone up in north Chico and yard signs have popped up around town as well. Based on campaign finance reports filed with the city, local voters can expect to receive mailers in the coming months. One of the unique things about recall elections is that “they have both the characteristics of a ballot measure and a candidate election,” according to the Fair Political Practices Commission, a nonpartisan board that oversees campaign financing, conflicts of interest and governmental ethics. This anomaly means that, unlike Chico’s council elections, there are no contribution limits. And there’s not a guarantee that an election will even take place, as the petitions must first be filed— they’re due at the end of November—and validated, which can take up to a month, according to Debbie Presson, Chico’s city clerk. A group of vocal locals filed the two recall petitions—targeting Chico Mayor Randall Stone and City Councilman Karl Ory. Both men are accused of, among other things, an “inability to uphold Chico’s mission to make Chico a safe place to raise a family, an ideal location for business and a premier place to live.” Also, both are criticized for opposing Assembly Bill 430, which eases environmental regulations to spur building. The petition against Stone says he “exhibits narcissistic behavior” and says he is “not carrying out the will of the people.” Ory is accused of costing the city money by being sued for his part in a citi-

zens group (Move the Junkyard). Nichole Nava, one of the petition filers, declined to comment for this story. A message left for another petitioner went unanswered. Nava and others filed the petitions with the city June 19. The first deadline for filing campaign finance documents was June 30. By that date, two committees had been formed: Recall Councilmen Stone & Ory and No Recall Councilmember Karl Ory. Only the former had raised any money, to the tune of $7,884.76. Ory said his committee had raised about $6,000, but after the June 30 deadline. “I take things seriously. I’ve been a campaigner for many years,” Ory told the CN&R. “I’ve got $6,000 in the bank—that’s with 250 individual contributors. If you look back at the [political action committee] created to support Sean Morgan for council—they raised $40,000. There are fringe Republican groups in town whose members are quite

SIFT ER Republicans, men own the most guns A recent Gallup poll aimed to gauge Americans’ viewpoint on guns by tallying the number of people who own a firearm or live in a household with one. A full 30 percent of respondents said they personally own a gun, and 43 percent reported living in a gun household. Here are some other key findings: • Men (43 percent) are more likely to personally own a gun than women (17 percent). • 33 percent of adults 50 years old and

older own a gun, while 19 percent of those 18 to 29 own one. • Republicans (45 percent) are more likely than independents (32 percent) and Democrats (16 percent) to be gun owners. • When looking at education levels, people with some college or a college degree were the most likely to own a gun (34 percent and 33 percent, respectively) than those with no higher education (27 percent) or postgraduate degrees (23 percent).

Yard signs have popped up around town, paid for by the Recall Councilmen Stone & Ory committee. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

willing to put in $500 per person.” But that was with the $500 cap on contributions, he pointed out. This time around, things are different. For instance, according to the report filed with the city, Matthew Dutton, a local consultant, has contributed $2,841.80 to the Recall Councilmen Stone & Ory committee. Michael Hale, a USDA relations specialist, has donated $1,074.31. Leslie Wright, listed as retired, donated $600. There were 28 donors total. As for Stone, he says he’s not creating a committee or campaigning against the recall. “People want to divide a community, especially in a time of crisis, and that’s what’s happening now,” he said. When it comes to the money, “It appears to be an economic boon for signmakers in Texas and the like.” (The recall committee spent $975 on yard signs at signsonthecheap.com out of Austin, Texas.) The petitions must be turned in to the city no later than Nov. 26 and must include signatures of at least 15 percent of registered voters. That’s 7,592. There is a primary election in March, but the deadline to submit an item to the county to get it onto that ballot is Nov. 5, according to Butte County Clerk-Recorder Candace Grubbs. So, enough signatures would trigger a special election, which could cost upward of $150,000, based on the last time the city held a special election, Presson said. “They wouldn’t be able to win in March, and they wouldn’t be able to win in November when four seats are open,” Ory said. “So they’re looking to force a special election as a power grab to take back the majority.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Homelessness in Butte County increased by at least 16 percent since 2017, and service providers are finding it incredibly challenging to secure housing for the people they serve post-Camp Fire. PHOTO BY KATAR ZYNABIALASIEWICZ/ISTOCK

Dedicated to recovery Homeless service providers talk housing challenges, solutions post-Camp Fire Nicole LiBaire sees parallels between

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a Butte County reeling from the impacts of the Camp Fire and what communities experienced in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She worked for more than a decade on disaster recovery initiatives for Louisiana, including a 3,000-unit permanent statewide supportive housing program implemented post-disaster. “Time and time again” LiBaire witnessed extremely low-income folks “pushed out of the market,” she told the CN&R. As prices skyrocketed, homes were sold and rentals were snatched up by those who could afford them. She recalled an instance in which a rental was listed despite a floodwater-soaked bedroom floor. LiBaire, who now works as a senior associate for the Technical Assistance Collaborative (TAC), has been helping the Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care (CoC) through a contract with the California Department of Housing & Community Development. Though TAC, a Boston-based nonprofit, is assisting CoCs statewide, Butte County is receiving additional attention post-Camp Fire, she said. The contract expires at the end of April 2020. “Everything is amplified in

Butte just because of the sheer size of the impact,” she said. “And it’s not something that just goes away overnight.” Butte County homeless service providers were feeling the strain of a tight housing market even before the Camp Fire. And the community’s poorest are now being hit the hardest, because they can’t afford anything within the remaining small inventory. Preliminary Homeless Point-in-Time Count figures released by the CoC show that homelessness increased by at least 16 percent since 2017 (see “Homelessness snapshot,” Sifter, June 20). At a CoC council meeting on Monday (Aug. 19), local agencies provided perspective on the struggles they’ve experienced serving these populations. While presenting an annual program report required for U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) grantees, Butte County Housing Authority representative Bow Lee put it bluntly: “We have the participants, we have the funding, but the lack of housing, particularly postCamp Fire, is very challenging.” Other providers echoed that sentiment. Take, for instance, Butte County Behavioral Health. The department is choosing to abandon

two grants—totaling $62,864 that serve 10 mentally ill individuals—because it has become too difficult to exhaust all of the funds for rental assistance programs. These dollars will return to the CoC, with the intent that they be awarded to another local organization after a competitive application process. Don Taylor, Behavioral Health assistant director of clinical services, told the CN&R after the meeting that the department made this decision “because of the lack of units” available— Behavioral Health cannot change the grant amounts and cannot find enough units to fully utilize the funds. They will be relinquished next summer, Taylor said, and Behavioral Health will help those 10 clients get section 8 vouchers to keep their housing. The department intends to continue pursuing renewal for three other HUD grants totaling $100,000 for its supportive and permanent housing programs. Though the department has housing case managers who work with property managers, Taylor said, it’s hard to convince landlords to deal with the “red tape” that comes with government funding— payments often come in arrears, and extensive paperwork and inspections are required. “There are less property managers willing to take HUD dollars because they can get market rate,” he said. “Our individuals are competing against households with higher incomes, better rental histories.”


Mediterranean Market Auto PAint / Body ShoP

Carolina Cruz, Catalyst Domestic Violence Services housing program coordinator, added that affordability also is an issue. “We also need units that are low-income and affordable housing,” she said. “The populations we serve, most of them are not going to be able to afford the units that are [currently] being built.” As the recovery effort continues,

Butte County will be able to take advantage of federal disaster relief: HUD approved $491.8 million for California communities for the 2018 wildfires through the Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery program. The TAC, which helped the CoC implement its first streamlined application process this year (see “Up for grabs,” Newslines, May 30), also will help it review and revise its governance charter next month. LiBaire said TAC also plans to help providers improve the coordinated entry process for folks they serve to best utilize the housing supply and services that are available and avoid long wait-lists. Since her work in Butte County began, LiBaire has witnessed service providers working together to make sure “everyone is able to recover and that people don’t continue living on the street,” she said. This is what she saw and participated in with service providers in New Orleans. LiBaire got choked up when she reflected on her time administering housing vouchers to people who qualified for Louisiana’s permanent supportive housing program. More than onethird of those it served were homeless before moving in, she said. “As awful as [a] disaster is, there’s opportunity to rebuild … [what] was never there before,” she said. “You can take this infusion of millions of dollars, sometimes billions, and really make something that is long-term and sustainable and actually makes … the community more resilient. “There’s great opportunities for the [Butte] CoC to partner with the state and to be a driver of what happens within the county [post-Camp Fire].”

Now opeN 715 W. 9th St. Chico 530.891.8350 Facebook: abcmediterranean

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—AshiAh schArAgA ashiahs@ n ewsrev i ew. com

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HEALTHLINES Dr. Lance Lee helped launch Ampla Health’s first Alpha  Recovery Center, which provides buprenorphine and  counseling to those seeking opioid-addiction treatment. 

Ampla doesn’t just provide Suboxone treatment for those with opioid dependency. It is a nonprofit community health center with medical, pediatrics, dental, behavioral health, chiropractic, social and specialty services offered at more than a dozen locations across Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Sutter, Tehama and Yuba counties. The physician team’s approach, Lee said, is geared toward accepting patients as they are and reducing stigma. “We make it pretty easy to access care in a nonjudgmental environment, offering them other support services,” he said. “Drug addiction is a disease, not a weakness of character.” More people in Butte County still die from

opioids at a higher rate than much of the state. The opioid-induced death rate is HEALTHLINES c o n T i n U e d

Tackling the epidemic Ampla Health expands opioid addiction treatment services story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev iew. com

Sthisoffering opioid addiction treatment early year in Oroville, site administrator ince Ampla Health launched its first clinic

Suzanne Dolan has “seen a huge transformation” in its patients. “They’re not coming in seeking drugs. They’re seeking help and they’re appreciative, they’re grateful and they’re thankful,” she told the CN&R. The clinic specializes in prescribing buprenorphine, also known by the brand name Suboxone, an opioid medication used to treat addiction. The service, offered via what Ampla calls an Alpha Recovery Center, is in such demand in Northern California that Ampla already is expanding it less than a year later, thanks to federal

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funding. Butte County has been a hot spot when it comes to the rate of painkillers prescribed per person, and has an aboveaverage opioid-induced death rate in California. With a $200,000 grant from the California Department of Health Care Services’ MAT Access Points program, Ampla will launch Suboxone services at its Lindhurst and Chico clinics and expand services in Oroville and Yuba City. Plus, four full-time opioid use disorder counselors are coming on board, splitting their time across the four locations. Right now, there’s a small pool of patients in treatment at Ampla’s Yuba City clinic and 45 in Oroville, Dolan said. The three doctors at the latter can technically take up to 230 patients, based on their experience prescribing buprenorphine and federal requirements, but workload is a factor. That’s part of why the expansion, which aims to have more Ampla doctors

become certified prescribers, will be so beneficial, Dolan said. She’s also relieved because the patient load increased so rapidly the clinic has desperately needed more counseling services (it has one part-time counselor currently). “The need is definitely here in Butte County,” she said. “When our patients were on these [pain] medications, we had no way to get them off of it besides weaning them off or cold-turkeying them, and that didn’t work. … We don’t want to push our patients away; we want to support and help them in any way we can.” Dr. Lance Lee had already been prescribing buprenorphine to patients in Oregon a year before accepting a job with Ampla at its Oroville clinic. In fact, when they brought him on board about a year ago, he said, they specifically asked him to help launch their program. He said it took about six months to get the electronic system up and running and train staff, but “the program has steadily grown since then.” Speaking to the need of the program, Lee said he has noticed several patients seek treatment after receiving Suboxone illegally from a friend during withdrawal. “That’s what brought them in, and now they want to get clean and have been sticking with the program,” Lee said. It’s also been an avenue to establish regular health care for these patients. In addition to opioid use disorder counseling, Lee said he likes to become his patients’ primary care provider as well.

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AppoinTMenT

Go natural Healthy, seasonal food is key to good health, and here in Chico we have four days a week to stock up. Early Monday evenings you can hit up the Blackbird back patio farm stand for fresh veggies and vegan baked goods. Chico Certified Farmers’ Market offers both a Wednesday morning market near Trader Joe’s and a Saturday morning market downtown filled with delicious fruits and vegetables, fresh juice, bread and more. Lastly, the Thursday Night Market never fails to impress with live music and a wide array of artisan goods, food trucks, flowers and vibrant local produce. What are you waiting for?


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY a ug ust 22, 2019

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Visit amplahealth.org to learn more about Ampla Health’s services.

Hewitt said. “By strengthening the region’s access to MAT services and education, this funding will ensure that the delivery of MAT facilitates positive treatment outcomes, safe management of care transitions and long-term recovery for people with opioid and other substance use disorders,” he wrote via email. Lee said the overprescribing epidemic “has greatly improved,” and, with it, access to illegally obtained painkillers has declined. But he recognizes that there’s still more work to be done, and that as folks transition from painkillers, some may turn to heroin or other street drugs. “[The epidemic] is huge. It’s not just our county, it’s all across America,” he said. “We’re just trying to get the most help for the most people in the safest way possible.” □

WEEKLY DOSE

What your fingernails are telling you

Our nails are made up largely of keratin, a hardened protein found in skin and hair, and it turns out they can act as a window into what’s going on inside the rest of our bodies. Here are a few changes to look out for in nail health and appearance that might suggest specific issues to look into: For starters, brittle nails can be a sign of anemia or thyroid disease, and sometimes small cysts on or near your cuticles can mean you have arthritis. “Nail pitting,” (tiny, ice pick-like dents) can be indicative of psoriasis, connective tissue disorders or autoimmune diseases, while “nail clubbing,” when your nails curve up around your fingertips, might suggest lung, inflammatory bowel, cardiovascular or liver disease. As a general rule, improve the health of your nails by eating a well-balanced diet and getting the right amount of vitamin B and zinc. Source: The Mayo Clinic

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque

Seeking care?

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

6.55 per 100,000 residents, the 22nd highest in California, according to preliminary 2018 data from the California Department of Public Health’s California Opioid Overdose Surveillance Dashboard. The state average is 5.54 per 100,000. There is a silver lining, however: Local efforts seem to be working. The death rate hasn’t been that low since 2014, when it was 5.79, per the state dashboard. Buprenorphine prescribing efforts increased 28 percent from 2015 to 2017. Chet P. Hewitt, president and CEO of Sierra Health Foundation and The Center, which manages the MAT Access Points Project, said that while medication-assisted treatment is “the gold standard of care” for those suffering from opioid use disorder, barriers hinder its implementation and availability throughout California, such as stigma and shortage of providers. Ampla recognized these obstacles and the need for more access to such care in the North State,

conTinUed from pAGe 12

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Sale-A-Bration Everything 30% off to celebrate our customers Saturday, August 24th 10am-6pm Habitat ReStore 220 Meyers St, Chico Free watermelon and cool drinks!

AUGUST 22, 2019

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GREENWAYS

Adjusting to life with wildfires California must build a reliable energy system, says Cal Fire representative by

Tim Edwards

Ecalthechallenge Legislature tackled part of a criticonfronting California with

arlier this year, Gov. Gavin Newsom and

legislation that stabilized electrical utilities, implemented new safety requirements and protected wildfire victims. But now they must face up to this reality: In an era of climate-change-driven fires, they’re just getting started. More than ever, the times demand that California have a robust, resilient energy system that ensures electrical power will always be available. Without it, communications systems will collapse after power drains from cellphone batteries and towers. Transportation systems will be halted without power to pump gasoline or charge electric vehicles. Extended power outages of more than three days could disrupt drinking water and sewage systems. All the smart devices upon which daily life relies become stupefied without electricity. The electrical grid is foundational to life in the 21st century, and it’s not nearly as inviolate as we’d like to believe. We’ve seen how wildfires and earthquakes can knock out power to entire communities for days. We’ve seen how quirky events— bird excrement and squirrels are often culprits—can trigger blackouts. Ominously, we also know that the electrical grid is potentially vulnerable to malevolent hackers. Now in California, there is also the very real—in fact, highly likely—possibility of experiencing public safety outages that are

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triggered when power lines are intentionally shut down as a precaution during extreme wildfire conditions (see Cover story and Newslines for more on this topic). California simply cannot accept the risk of having to live with on-again, off-again electrical power. We must build greater resiliency into the system, and we need to move beyond the 20th century back-up technology of inefficient, dirty, diesel-powered emergency generators. Cleaner, smarter and more durable technology exists. It’s technology that has successfully provided uninterrupted power after outages caused by hurricanes, extreme heat waves and wildfires. Microgrids create islands of self-contained power that provide energy resiliency to businesses, health care facilities and community shelters. Using fuel cells that convert natural gas or biogas into electricity through a noncombustion process, they can operate off the grid indefinitely. Because they rely on underground fuel lines, they are not affected when power lines go down and they do not create the fire risks of sparks from wires or power poles. In addition, they can be paired with other forms of distributed generation, such as solar. With the advent of planned public safety shutdowns, the durability of backup systems has become a critical concern. Extreme wildfire conditions can persist for days, and so there could be five- to seven-day public safety blackouts. California has been a leader in reinventing About this commentary:

The author, president of Cal Fire Firefighters, wrote it for CalMatters (calmatters.org).

its electrical power framework. It has set, and met, aggressive standards to ramp up the use of renewable power generation, and the state is committed to reaching 100 percent clean power by 2045. It has incorporated rooftop solar and other forms of distributed generation into its infrastructure. But it is shockingly behind in building resiliency into its system. We cannot allow our commitment to renewable energy to cloud our judgment. To be sure, our electricity supply must be sustainable, reliable, safe, accessible and affordable. But it also must be resilient—and on that score, we are falling dangerously short. For several years, experts have recognized the benefits of microgrids, but regulatory roadblocks and resistance from investorowned utilities have stymied their deployment. Gov. Newsom and the Legislature must seize their opportunity to establish California as an energy leader that can incorporate both sustainability and resiliency into its electrical power systems. They must acknowledge that there is an undeniable public good in creating safe zones in our cities in which power will always be on, regardless of disruptions in the grid, and then create market incentives that will provide microgrids with a rate of return for establishing this essential benefit. They must recognize the huge economic losses and public safety risks that a prolonged outage will inflict on affected communities, and then create market incentives to encourage investment in solutions that will minimize those losses and risks. California has never been a stranger to fires, floods, earthquakes and all manner of natural disasters. And it always has responded

with a resilient spirit. The specter of longer fire seasons and wildfires that grow more fierce by the year is now testing that spirit. We must summon our commitment to resiliency by building it into our electrical power systems. Ω

ECO EVENT

Attention, birders! Experience the beauty of the fall shorebird migration with the Altacal Audubon Society at the Oxidation Ponds Wildlife Sanctuary at the Water Treatment Control Plant, west of Chico, this Saturday (Aug. 24) from 8 to 11 a.m. Expect to see yellow-headed blackbirds, rails, yellowlegs, sandpipers, dowitchers and hopefully some unexpected migrants. This flat walk is just less than 2 miles and should last about three hours—perfect for beginners. Bring binoculars, water, spotting scopes, walking shoes and proper clothing for expected weather conditions (heat!). To reserve your spot, contact Matthew Forster at findforster@yahoo.com.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PhoTo by AShiAh SchArAGA

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

evolving style

Up-and-coming Meriam Park

It’s hard not to be inspired while running the first business to open (to the public) in Meriam Park. As Danielle Dietz watches the new Chico neighborhood grow around her, she envisions Da Capo Style House as a constantly evolving community spot. Its main function is as a salon, but Dietz also plans to host art shows, classes (i.e., makeup and styling tutorials, paint-and-sips and daddydaughter hairstyle dates) and set up a retail area. Dietz, a first-time business owner, opened up shop on June 1, after working at Dimensions Salon for about a decade. Her team is a tight-knit group of stylists, some of whom have known and worked with one another for 10 years. So far, business has been great, she says: Some days Da Capo brings in 40 to 50 clients. Check out the salon’s grand opening event on Sept. 20 from 6-10 p.m., with live music, hors d’oeuvres, wine and raffle prizes at 1925 Market Place, Unit 130. Go to vagaro.com/ dacapostylehouse, call 715-7183 or walk in to make an appointment.

Driving down East 20th Street toward Bruce Road, one can’t help but feel like the area is on the cusp of awesomeness. The first building to go up was the courthouse, and it seemed like forever before ground was broken on the other pieces of the Meriam Park puzzle. But now things are going up fast, and I predict that six months from now the landscape on that edge of town will be very different indeed. This past weekend, the Veteran’s Administration of Northern California’s new Outpatient Clinic held its ribbon-cutting ceremony. It’s super energy-efficient, having received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) silver rating. The best part: It will employ 50 additional staff (for a total of 150), so the agency will be able to provide more services to local vets. There’s more going on in the vicinity, too. I got a tour of The Kitchen, the “makerspace” commissary kitchen. It’s impressive—so much stainless steel! Everything is brand-new and squeaky clean, as only a few tenants have claimed their corners. The first, naturally, was Pacific Culture, owned by Carlos Gonzales, son of Meriam Park developer Dan Gonzales. While I was there, with Director of Business and Development Nicole Carter, we ran into John Ralston and Ryan Poirier, owners of The Joker’s Bakery. They’re stoked on the space. “The ovens have allowed us to improve our efficiency so that we can bake nearly twice as many cakes in about half the time,” Poirier told me. (More of their cheesecake is never a bad thing.) Plus, the plan is to create a sort of co-op among the Meriam Park businesses. So, when Daycamp Coffee Co. opens up around the corner, expect to see Pacific Culture kombucha and slices of cheesecake. (And maybe sushi and other deliciousness, too? Japanese Blossoms is also a Kitchen tenant.) In the same building as Daycamp, which is owned by Dan Gonzales and slated to open soon, is Da Capo Style House (see “Evolving style,” this page). And next Friday (Aug. 30) there will be a ribbon-cutting at Xytogen BioTech Lab, which specializes in stem-cell-based skin care. Also in what’s being called the Tank District—the “social center”—is the bones of a century-old barn, recently moved from a property off of Meridian Road. That, Carter explained, will be an event space. Think food truck rallies and weddings, she said. And in the Dwell District, across the street, apartments are already completed, with more on the way. Apply online for The Quads at MP—two bedrooms for $1,550-$1,600 (go to meriampark.com/quads for more info).

Why did you become a stylist? I realized quickly that school did not come natural to me, but creating things did. Hair, to us, is a functional piece of temporary art.

What services do you offer? Fun fact: Da Capo actually translates into “starting from

the top.” So all services here [are] neck up, pretty much. So we do makeup, special event styles and, more importantly, we’re hair professionals. So all of us do cutting, all of us do coloring, and we all try to find our niche of what we like to do most and then fill our time with that.

What do you love about what you do? There’s not any two days that are ever the same. And you get people that come in here that say they need a haircut, and really they need an emotional support hour. You have to [stand] there and pretend like you’re cutting their hair so that they can talk (laughs). And they always leave with a new style or something like that. I guess just helping people got me here, too.

What’s it like being among the first businesses in Meriam Park? I had one meeting with the developer, [Dan Gonzales], out here and he said, “skylight” and

“tall ceilings” and “walkable community,” and I was pretty much sold. We see eye-to-eye, too. Everybody out here in Meriam Park has, like, a very creative vision. There’s nothing cut-and-paste, nothing’s being repeated. We’re really fortunate to be the first one here, in that case—we get to build our business based upon what’s happening around us, which I think is really fun. I know that there’s a coffee shop going in next door and people might be walking by. It’s encouraged us to really [be] like, we need more retail, we need more of a shop.

What do you want people to know about Da Capo? I try to create an atmosphere where anybody can feel comfortable coming in, and just create a space where it’s fun to hang out for a couple of hours. —ASHiAH SCHARAGA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

GeT yoUr leArn on I’ve written in this space about Michael DaRe’s business classes through Oroville Adult Education, and they’re expanding. DaRe is now teaching single classes focused on management skills. They’re on Wednesdays through Sept. 4, and cost just $20. He’s still teaching four- and eight-week-long classes as well. Go to orovilleadulted.com or michaeldare.net for more info. □

got mosquitoes? Need to make a service request? Need Mosquitofish? Got Yellowjackets/Ticks?

Contact 530.533.6038 or www.ButteMosquito.com AUGUST 22, 2019

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ON OFF

Power Play

For a huge number of californians, safety, energy security and environmental hopes are in the hands of one embattled monopoly 18

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by Scott thomaS anderSon scotta@newsreview.com

T

he city of Winters is a cluster of old Italianate façades and worn Western storefronts tucked between Putah Creek and a dry, sweeping expanse of the Vaca Mountains. Over the years, the ranchers and farming families who live here have weathered drought, disease and at least one devastating earthquake. It takes a hardy mindset to keep the hamlet thriving. It survives mainly on the whims of the beef industry and the health of its endless tracts of almonds and walnuts. Most residents are self-reliant. So when homesteads beyond the city’s outskirts were hit with a complete blackout June 7, Yolo County’s Office of Emergency Services wasn’t flooded with worried calls.


FIRE THREAT AREAS That’s partly because Winters residents don’t fluster easily, but it’s also because county officials prepared for this moment for nearly a year. The outage was only the second time ever that Pacific Gas & Electric Co. activated its Public Safety Power Shutoff program. The controversial initiative is aimed at stopping catastrophic wildfires before they start by flagging a combination of dry conditions, high winds and low humidity—and then de-energizing entire sections of the power grid in those areas. PG&E equipment has been blamed for sparking hundreds of wildfires in California, including last November’s Camp Fire—the deadliest and most destructive in the state’s history—that killed 86 people, burned more than 150,000 acres and all but wiped out the town of Paradise. The estimated $30 billion in claims from those fires forced the utility giant to file for bankruptcy protection in January. PG&E first rolled out the safety program in October 2018 by shutting off power to 60,000 customers in seven counties. The utility soon heard from irate customers, bewildered officials and frustrated emergency responders. The unexpected power-down cost local economies tens of thousands of dollars in lost wages and revenues. Phone lines, cell towers and the internet went dark for days in some rural neighborhoods. By PG&E’s own admission, hundreds, if not thousands, of medical “baseline” customers—people who depend on oxygen tanks, respirators and nebulizers— were left vulnerable. The question of how many isolated seniors and disabled citizens couldn’t call family members or 911 led to a hearing at the California Public Utilities Commission. But on June 7, Yolo County officials were determined to have a better result. “There was a lot of difference from last year,” said Dana Carey, manager of the Yolo County Office of Emergency Services. This time, Carey’s team had information on where all of PG&E’s medical baseline customers lived. For months they’d been combining that data with their own information on at-risk residents, creating a digital mapping system that sheriff’s deputies and firefighters could use in real time. When Yolo

More info:

California Public Utilities map

County authorities learned PG&E would cut the power near Winters, they sent alerts through voice calls, text messages, phone apps and a special communication system for the hearing impaired. First responders also were ready to conduct welfare checks on anyone there was a concern about. Not all Northern California counties are working as hard as Yolo to deal with future PG&E power shutoffs. But experts say they should be. Even though PG&E provides power to much of the state’s $2.7 trillion economy, the company is fighting for its very survival. If the investor-owned, for-profit utility manages to emerge from bankruptcy, it still will face a chorus of calls for the company to be split up or taken over by the state.

Top: Map shows counties most vunerable to wildfires. Above: PG&E monitors conditions for potential wildfires in Northern California from a command center in San Francisco. PHOTO COURTESY OF PG&E

Further muddling the picture, clean energy advocates are worried that only a company of PG&E’s size and scope can push California to reaching its ambitious climate change goals, in part to stave off global warming that’s already exacerbating the state’s wildfire season. The power shutoff program is one of PG&E’s main strategies to stay in business. But how will it manage its new task of constantly making decisions about when and where people can have electricity—and sometimes, life and death?

Throwing the big switch After PG&E triggered its first safety shutoff in the fall of 2018, a line of stunned residents flooded the El Dorado County supervisors’ chambers to describe near-miss scenarios in which infirm, isolated seniors might have experienced medical crises with no way to call for help. But PG&E managers appeared at the same meeting to describe a different close call that happened during the shutoff: High winds flung a tree into a power line in a rural corner of Amador County. If the system hadn’t been de-energized, a blaze could have been sparked, sweeping through the towns of Pioneer, Pine Grove and Volcano, where more than 5,000 live around dry, dense forest. PG&E manager Aaron Johnson called that a “data point” to prove the new program works. Similar evidence emerged during the June outage. PG&E’s team of meteorologists initiated power shutoffs in three different regions: The farms and ranches outside of Winters, a much larger swath of terrain across Butte and Yuba counties and areas of El Dorado, Nevada and Placer counties. While only 1,500 customers living near Winters were affected, some 26,900 customers lost power in the other regions. According to a report PG&E filed with the state utilities commission, prior to bringing the grid back online, its inspection teams found five spots where fires could have started, including three in Butte County, a place already brought to its knees by the Camp Fire. There, the company’s inspectors discovered a wind-split tree that had fallen into a PG&E structure cable and service drop in Oroville, as well as two different power lines that had been hit by flying branches in Chico. “In each case, PG&E repaired or replaced the damaged equipment prior to re-energizing,” the company told the state. “In addition to these damaged assets, PG&E personnel discovered three instances of documented hazards, all vegetation-related, such as branches found lying across conductors, which were cleared.” Ironically, on Nov. 6, 2018, PG&E’s Wildfire Safety Division had POWER C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 4

To learn how Butte County is responding to PG&E’s plan to shut off power, see Newslines, page 8. AUGUST 22, 2019

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S A M P L E

B A L L O T

2019

2002-2018

Open for Lunch & Dinner Closed Mondays Food To Go

Happy Garden Chinese Restaurant

180 Cohasset Road • All Credit Cards accepted. 893-2574 • HappyGardenChico.com

Over A Century of

Quality

Flowers, Gifts & More

Since 1907

WE WANT TO KNOW: What’s your favorite sandwich shop? Where do you go for your vanilla latte or to get your hair coiffed? Who is simply out of this world? You guessed it—it’s voting time! Best of Chico is upon us—so, we want to know about all of your favorite people, places and things that make Chico such a great place to live and visit. As in years past, we also hope you’ll take a moment to let us know, in your own words, one very stellar thing about Chico so we can share it with other readers. So, don’t be shy! Here’s a little added incentive to vote for all your faves: Everyone 18 and over who votes in

at least 10 categories is entered into a drawing for a special prize—a rockin’ beginner-level telescope so you can view galaxies far, far away (see more prize details at end of this sample ballot). HOW TO VOTE: Best of Chico voting takes place exclusively online at chicobestof.com, where full contest rules are available. The polls are open now, so get to it! To get you thinking, peruse this sample ballot, starting on the next page. VOTING ENDS Wed., Sept. 11, at 11:59 p.m.

891.1881 • www.christianandjohnson.com

chicobestof.com

Best Margarita

Vote for us

1098 E. First Ave, Chico

Best Place for Window Treatments

FIRST PLACE

2009-2017

Best Eye-care Specialist

18

Medical and Surgical Eye Care for your family. 605 W East Ave | 530-895-1727 | www.chicoeye.com

18

vote for

Your Best Appliance Store! 2505 Zanella Way Chico (530) 342-2182 www.ginnos.com 20

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18 Best Solar Company

AaUuGgUuSsTt 2222,, 22001199

18

ike’s place

chico’s best sandwiches


S A M P L E best Footwear store

181 E. 2nd Street • Downtown Chico

Oroville 530-533-1488

Chico 530-898-1388

Best Asian Cuisine • Best Take-Out Best Restaurant in Oroville

Main Store: 891-1650 • Shoe Repair : 343-4522

2019

B A L L O T

READERS VOTE ONLINE IN THESE CATEGORIES GOODS & SERVICES Antiques store Appliance store Auto repair shop Auto paint/body shop Bank/credit union Bike shop Cab company Car dealership Car wash Day spa Dry cleaner Feed store/farm supply Florist Gift shop Grocer Barbershop Hair salon Place for a mani/pedi Baby/kids’ clothier Men’s clothier Women’s clothier Consignment/second-hand threads Jeweler

Liquor store Local pet store Nursery Place to buy books Place for electronics/ computer repair Place to buy outdoor gear Place to buy home furnishings Place for window treatments Shoe store Sporting goods Tattoo parlor Thrift store Architect Attorney General contractor Financial planner (name and location) Insurance agent Landscaper Plumber Professional photographer Housecleaning service Interior designer Real estate agent Roofer

Family owned and operated for 81 years

A VOTE FOR US IS A VOTE FOR price-matching

www.shuberts.com

530.877.6312

Serving Chico at Two Locations! 178 East 7th Street Chico Mall (530) 342-7163 (530) 809-4151

Vote inday’s international cuisine

Chico • Paradise www.hudsonsappliance.com

The Hair Co.

FOOD & DRINKS Local restaurant – Chico Local restaurant – Oroville New restaurant (opened in the last year) Food server (name and location) Chef Caterer Cheap eats Craft beer selection Date-night dining Fine dining Kid-friendly dining Patio Take-out Delivery service Breakfast Brunch Lunch Small bites (apps/tapas) Munchies Bakery

More categories on next page

352 East 1st st, ChiCo Ca wwww.sierracentral.com

an equal opportunity lender. Federally insured by the NCUa.

AUTO VOTE BEST REPAIR 2106 park ave • chico

892–1774 chi coa ut om ot i ve.com

For 6 Years

2nd LOcaTiOn NorD ave. by W. Sac. We Appreciate Your Vote!

130 Main Street Downtown Chico www.uppercrustchico.com (503) 895-3866

Eighth & Main antiquE CEntEr #1 2004 - 2018

Best

Antique store 745 Main Steet • 893-5534

Your Vote is Appreciated!

vote us best breakfast

Ha ir • Na ils • W ax ing W alk -In s W elc om e 16

inday’s Filipino 1043 W. 8th street

bEst baNk/CrEdit UNioN

Solar company Tree service

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2760 Espla nade, Ste 150

530. 894. 2002

FIRST PLACE

229 BROADWAY | 530.487.7207 LASALLESCHICO.COM

2016 2017 2018

10

2290 esplanade • 879-9200 365/7-2 • sinofcortez.com

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18

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aAuUgGuUsStT 2222, , 22001199

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S A M P L E Thanks for your Vote!

Best Nursery & Gift Shop 406 Entler Ave, Chico • 530.345.3121 www.theplantbarn.com • Find us on

please vote 18

891–6328 18

345 W. 5th Street • Chico

ww.5thstreetsteakhouse.com

Please

VOTE!

Best Baby / Kids’ Clothier

2012-2018

977 East Ave #90 l 530.345.1617 appleblossombaby.com

Diner Local coffee/tea house Spot to satisfy your sweet tooth International cuisine Asian cuisine Italian cuisine Mexican cuisine Vegetarian cuisine Street food Barbecue Burger Burrito Ice cream/frozen yogurt Lemonade Pho Pizza Place for poke Sandwich Sushi Taco Local winery – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama) Locally produced food – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama) Local brewery – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama)

Mixologist (name and location) Happy hour Place to drink a glass of wine Margarita Bloody Mary Karaoke night Place to dance Venue for live music Local music act Local visual artist Art space Place to buy art Theater company Open mic Place to be seen Casino – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama) Beer event

NIGHTLIFE & THE ARTS Bar Sports bar Watering hole for townies Cocktail

COMMUNITY Charitable cause Community event Farmers’ market vendor Museum Party/event venue Place to pray

for Your voTe! 3 Glenbrook Ct | Chico | 892-1234 140 Independence Cir|Chico | 892-1218

Best ItalIan Food

Locally Owned Since 1992

Fine Italian Cuisine

506 Ivy St. • Take-Out (530) 898-9947 Reservations (530) 898-9948 Open 4pm Daily • 11:30 Fri Lunch

22 22

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AaUuGgUuSsTt 2222,, 22001199

B A L L O T

HEALTH/ WELLNESS Local health-care provider Alternative health-care provider Acupuncture clinic Chiropractor Dental care Dermatologist Eye-care specialist General practitioner Pediatrician Physical therapy office Plastic surgeon Veterinarian Massage therapist Gym Boutique gym Personal trainer

Thank You

2013-2018

2019

Radio station Local video/audio show Youth organization Local personality Instructor/professor Teacher (K-12) Volunteer RECREATION Dance studio Golf course – Regional (Butte/Glenn/Tehama) Martial arts studio Yoga studio Place for family fun Place for kids to play Local league to join (specify sport or activity) Local team to cheer for

VOTING IS FREE AND ENDS WED., SEPT. 11, AT 11:59 P.M.

Vote for SOL

For Best Mexican Food, Bartender & Margarita!

3269 Esplanade, Chico · (530) 342-4616

www.solmexicangrill.com

Downtown Chico

Thank you for your continued support

Candi Williamson, Owner

Voted Best Massage Therapist 2017 & 2018

18

massagebycandichico.com | 530-521-7328 18

Your choice for Best Fine Dining, Best Patio, Best Date Night and so much more.

1250 Esplanade•Chico 530.894.3463 ALL VOTES APPRECIATED!


A N O U T - O F - T H I S - WO R L D P R I Z E ! Vote For Us

Best Burgers 18

18

Best Dental Care

Vote now and you might be the lucky reader* who wins this telescope

Still ChiCo’S BeSt thrift Store!

This KOSMOS entry-level Telescope & Astronomy Kit allows for countless space observations—the moon, stars, planets, nebulae and more. Also, make far-away sightings on Earth! Detailed instruction book included. Provided by: BIRD IN HAND • 320 Broadway Downtown Chico’s fun place to shop

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214 Main St - ChiCo, California (530)345-1500 - Gabrielleferrar.CoM

1307 Esplanade #4 | 898-8511 NelsenFamilyDentistry.com

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ChicoEntreeExpress.com Lic#1024110

BEST EYE-CARE

Specialists

Best Plumber!

Open 24 Hours! 343-0330

Best Yoga studio!

Best tree service!

(530) 513-6574

Voted 3 Years in a Row!

Vote Best Coffee / Tea House

Best Dental Care

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General Contracting (530) 636 4574

Vote for Us! Vote US Best Locally Produced Food!

Best Day Spa

ROONEY LAW FIRM VOtE Us!

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earlsplumbing.net

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exp. 10/1/19

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40 declaration dr. | 530.894.7722 www.sweetwaterchico.coM

2 LocAtionS

2432 Esplanade • Chico 530.774.2158

133 Broadway 1000 D W. Sac Ave 894-0191 343-0909 aAuUgGuUsStT 2222,, 22001199

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POWER c o n T i n U e d

from pAGe 19

issued a media alert stating that dangerous fire conditions were being predicted by its threat matrix for Butte County. If they continued, the company said then, it likely would initiate a power shutoff. Though its officials were still monitoring high winds and low humidity around the town of Paradise, they never cut off the power. In May, state fire investigators announced that one of the two ignition points for the Camp Fire was a PG&E power line. The contrast between decisions PG&E’s management team made in Butte County in 2018 and 2019 shows just how much control they potentially have over life, property and a community’s livelihood. That’s a level of responsibility to which PG&E is trying to adjust. Thirty-six hours before the June safety shutoff, PG&E warned sheriff’s offices, fire stations and county emergency departments that it was about to happen. Unlike 2018, the utility says any counties that signed a nondisclosure agreement now have access to its list of a medical baseline customers who depend on power-run medical equipment. Yolo and Butte counties had that information in June. Placer and Yuba counties did not, because their attorneys and elected officials were still reviewing the details of the nondisclosure agreement. El Dorado County declined to answer whether it had signed the NDA. PG&E spokesman Jeff Smith said that, regardless of which counties are using the medical baseline list, PG&E has its own protocol to warn those customers and make sure they have a safe place to go that still has power. “Medical baseline customers are our highest priority when we’re calling for one of these events,” Smith said. “If we’re not reaching them by phone, then we’ll actually dispatch a team to go out and make contact.” But Smith also noted that PG&E’s medical baseline list is part of a voluntary program where customers with health issues can sign up for savings on their bills. That

PG&E’s

blackout on JunE 7-8, 2019 24

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AUGUST 22, 2019

means there could be a lot of people who are medically vulnerable who aren’t currently known to PG&E or county emergency response officials. “What the medical baseline list is not is a panacea of knowing every customer that has a medical issue,” Smith acknowledged. “It is the best tool we have, but it doesn’t tell us everything. Anyone with a medical issue who relies on power needs to get a hold of us.” The Utility Reform Network, a San Francisco-based organization that’s one of PG&E’s loudest critics, has expressed skepticism of the safety shutoff program. It told the San Francisco Chronicle in May that the corporation’s messaging around the initiative indicates it could be used too

Number of counties affected

often—and thus put too many vulnerable people at risk. Smith says that PG&E isn’t taking the power outages lightly, but admitted it can be “a double-edge sword” with unintended consequences. For county officials such as Carey, who has worked to not only lessen the impacts of the shutoffs but also to provide residents real-time digital maps of spreading fires and open escape routes, PG&E’s program is part of how a hotter, drier California is confronting all emergency agencies. “We were already doing a lot of work before the blackouts started,” Carey said. “The fact is, we’ve burned five out of five years in our county.”

Number of households affected

PG&E crews work along Clark Road in Paradise on Nov. 9, the day after the Camp Fire began. phoTo by meliSSA dAUGherTy

Price and power of monopoly It has not been a quiet year at the California Public Utilities Commission. Since the Camp Fire, enraged protesters have shown up at meetings to demand PG&E be dismantled as a for-profit corporation. These critics have been quick to remind commissioners that a San Francisco jury in 2017 found PG&E guilty of six felonies linked to the 2010 San Bruno gas pipe explosion, which killed eight people and convinced a judge to put the utility on federal, court-monitored probation.

Number of public officials preemptively notified

Number of local governments/public safety preemptively notified

8 28,400 167 54


“You won’t accomplish anything to break the company up into pieces. You won’t have different electric lines in the same place. It doesn’t create competition.” —Frank Gevurtz, McGeorge School of Law

“I think the working people of California are fed up with the continued death and destruction caused by the utilities, by PG&E,” Steve Zeltzer of United Public Workers for Action told commissioners in November. “The utility executives should be in jail for what they’ve done. They’ve lied to the people of California …. And the utility should be a public utility. Take the profits out of utilities. The public should control it, not these profiteers who don’t give a damn about what they’ve done.” To some extent, that message was heard. A month later, the commission started the formal process of reviewing whether PG&E should be broken up into regional subsidiaries or restructured as a state-owned company. While that review continues, the city of San Francisco is separately exploring whether it can take over control of PG&E’s power distribution within its limits. PG&E has publicly warned that any forced restructuring likely would result in higher utility bills for the average Californian. Frank Gevurtz, a professor at McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento who specializes in antitrust litigation, says the company is probably correct in that assumption. Gevurtz also notes that while PG&E is a for-profit entity under its state corporate structure, it also falls into what California law defines as “a natural monopoly.” He explains that, throughout U.S. history, natural monopolies have been allowed when it’s not economically or practically efficient to have different or overlapping service infrastructure. For example, major telephone companies once were natural monopolies. Some railroad companies still are. “In PG&E’s case, it’s not feasible for multiple companies to have duplicate power and gas lines,” Gevurtz said. For that reason, the professor is skeptical that ratepayers would benefit from a state takeover or major restructuring of PG&E since the transmission grids would remain unchanged.

“You won’t accomplish anything to break the company up into pieces,” Gevurtz said. “You won’t have different electric lines in the same place. It doesn’t create competition. If you’re a natural monopoly, you’re a natural monopoly.” And PG&E’s status as a monopoly has created another major concern within California’s environmental movement, one that ultimately might help maintain its status quo. PG&E currently has contracts to buy roughly $42 billion worth of clean energy from wind and solar providers over the next 20 years. It also has made an estimated $1.7 billion in additional investments in other clean energy initiatives. Finally, PG&E is the main player in the plan to take the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant near San Luis Obispo offline by 2025 and replace it with zero-carbon energy sources. In other words, PG&E is not only capable of taking major steps to combat climate change, it also has already been willing to do so. If the utility is broken up, environmental advocates worry that would be a significant setback. “The utility companies continue to be essential partners in the clean energy programs that California has pioneered for the country and the world, and PG&E has been the largest partner in that effort,” said Ralph Cavanagh, energy program co-director with the Natural Resources Defense Council. “If you’re someone who is worried about the direction of clean energy, it’s certainly not obvious that breaking PG&E up would help. “There are certain advantages to scale,” he added. “If you look at California’s record in driving down the cost of clean energy, companies like PG&E were a big part of that.” The deadline for PG&E to emerge from bankruptcy is June 2020. It’s expected to present its plan for doing that next month. Cavanagh said that if PG&E can successfully do so, it would constitute the clearest path for the company to begin compensating wildfire victims, qualify for the state’s new fire emergency fund and keep its own herculean environmental commitments on track. This potential outcome could determine its future, along with PG&E’s new initiatives such as the safety shutoff program, its satellite fire detection and alerting system, its expanded weather stations and vegetation clearing efforts. “PG&E has turned to a radical approach on wildfire safety now, and I think we have to let them try it and give them a chance to see if it can be done,” Cavanagh said. “And I think we need to remember that whether you’re a wildfire victim or a clean energy advocate, as long as PG&E is in bankruptcy, nobody’s hopes and dreams can be realized.” Ω

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Arts &Culture Sing along with the Clams

W the Clams, a lot of familiar things probably come to mind. You

hen you first hear Shannon and

might detect some 1950s doo-wop, a little flash of Elvis, ’60s garage sounds and punkby rock energy. It’s Robin Bacior melodic, it’s gritty, it’s driving, and it’s Preview: all inseparable from Shannon and the Clams perform the band’s overall Tuesday, Aug. 27, sound. 8 p.m. Trox & The “It is a really Terribles open. hard band to Tickets: $15 describe, but I love that,” vocalist and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. bassist Shannon 1075 E. 20th St. Shaw said. “We 892-4647 don’t love just one sierranevada.com kind of music. We have a plethora of things we’re absolutely in love with.” The four-piece has been an East Bay favorite for the last decade, coming up in the area’s warehouse/underground party scene, churning out albums and touring all over the country. The band eventually caught the ear of the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, who produced the 2018 album Onion—an introspective release written with an eye toward the band’s community in the wake of Oakland’s

Ghost Ship Fire—and put it out on his label, Easy Eye Sound. “It felt like a very natural progression,” Shaw said. “I don’t know where we’re going, but we’re going up and it still feels good and we still love what we do.” That passion is palpable. Shannon and the Clams have become known for dynamic live shows, which combine the buoyant pop tunefulness of Shaw and guitarist and co-songwriter/ vocalist Cody Blanchard with the pulsating energy of a punk show. “When we’re on stage, we’re working really hard, we’re always giving a show,” Shaw said. “You’ll never go to a Clams show and see us in our street clothes staring at our feet playing songs exactly how they sound on the album. When I play songs, it’s really important to me to give a genuine performance; I have to kind of go back to the original feelings and stir them back up. It’s definitely an emotional rollercoaster ride, but I’m so lucky that I feel the audience going through that, too. That’s incredibly important to me.” And while the thread of influences runs from Ennio Morricone soundtracks to Thrasher magazine skate-punk tapes, there is a continuity to be found in solid songwriting pre-

sented with emotional intent. “I listened to a lot of oldies growing up, and I think that punk music is actually a lot more similar to ’60s girl groups and crooners than a lot of people realize,” Shaw said. “They’re using their voices as an instrument to emote, to put more into the song, which I think is something that’s kind of lost these days.” The band will head back to Auerbach’s Nashville studio next year to make a new record, but before that, Shannon and the Clams will perform three one-off shows—one at the Sierra Nevada Big Room this Tuesday (Aug. 27)—before rounding out the year with a couple of arena tours, first with Zeppelin-esque sensation Greta Van Fleet, then with the Black Keys. (Tip: Go see them at the relatively intimate Big Room while you can, before you have to share the experience with 10,000 others.) “Honestly there’s nothing more thrilling in my life than hearing people sing along,” Shaw said. “I love singing along; it’s such a way to connect where you don’t have to have anything in common. If you just know the lyrics to ‘Under the Boardwalk’ and a hundred people are singing it or 10 people are singing, it just makes you feel so good.” □

THIS WEEK 22

THU

Special Events CHICO PRIDE – LET ME BE PERFECTLY QUEER COMEDY SHOW: Celebrate Pride with a fantastic lineup of queer and trans comedians from Chico and beyond. Thu, 8/22, 9pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 358 E. Sixth St., 893-3336.

CHICO PRIDE – QUEER JUSTICE IS RACIAL JUSTICE RECEPTION: Art showcase featuring various queer and trans people from the local community and beyond, featuring music by Scout. Event is free and all-ages. Thu, 8/22, 6:30pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave., 893-3336. 1078gallery.org

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Thu, 8/22, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

The show is everything for Oakland garage-rock crew

WILD PHLOX POP-UP EXTRAVAGANZA Saturday, Aug. 24 Fusion Fitness

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Shannon and the Clams

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FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

CHICO PRIDE – SATURDAY NIGHT SUPER SHOW: Epic drag show featuring all of your favorite drag queens and kings. Sat, 8/24, 10pm. $12. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

FUR ADOPTION AND FUNDRAISER EVENT

Saturday, Aug. 24 Apollo School of Music SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

FUR ADOPTION AND FUNDRAISER EVENT: Friends United in Rescue hosts adoption and fundraising event for unclaimed Camp Fire cats that need forever homes. Merchandise available for purchase, along with homemade dog treats and jewelry. Sat 8/24, 9am. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

SOUTH CARIBOU WILDERNESS: Hike 4.5 mile loop through the forest and visit several lakes along the way. Meet at Chico Park & Ride west lot. Call Woody Elliott at 588-2555 for info and reservations. Sat 8/24, 8am.

WILD PHLOX POP-UP EXTRAVAGANZA: Full day of art, fashion, food and live music with the best of local vendors and artists offering handmade goodies. Sat 8/24, 12pm. Fusion Fitness, 135 W. Eighth Ave.

Theater CRIMES OF THE HEART: Sisterly love and laughter turns to anger and tears when old resentments resurface and three sisters come to terms with the consequences of their own actions in this heartwarming classic. Thu, 8/22, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicothe atercompany.com

23

FRI

Special Events

CHICO PRIDE – TEEN DANCE: All-ages dance featuring a live DJ, guest drag performances, face painting, cookies, non-alcoholic drinks and a photo booth. Fri, 8/23, 7pm. Free. First Christian Church, 295 E. Washington Ave., 893-3336.

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to share, an acoustic instrument, your voice, a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested. Fri, 8/23, 5pm. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds in the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 8/23, 9am. Bidwell Park.

CHICO PRIDE – PERFORMANCE SHOWCASE: An evening of entertainment featuring ADA VOX, Kelly Houston and Uncle Dad’s Art Collective. Fri, 8/23, 7pm. $15-$35. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 893-3336. stonewallchicopride.com

Music TANNER RICHARDSON: Tender-hearted singer/ songwriter performs for happy hour. Fri, 8/23, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater CRIMES OF THE HEART: See Thursday. Sat, 8/24, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

25

SUN

Special Events CHICO PRIDE – COMMUNITY BRUNCH: Pride brunch by Leon Bistro. Expect a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options in addition to the usual fare, along with live music. Takes place in the Oak Grove picnic area in Lower Bidwell Park. Sun, 8/25, 9am. $5. 893-3336.

FREE MOVIE: Free movie every week, call 8912762 for title. Sun, 8/25, 2pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

Music OBE: Relaxing brunch tunes. Sat, 8/24, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

lasalleschico.com

Theater CRIMES OF THE HEART: See Thursday. Fri, 8/23, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

24

EDITOR’S PICK

SAT

Special Events

TACOS BORREGO POP-UP Sunday, Aug. 25 Blackbird

SEE SUNDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

BACK TO THE IMPROV: First show of the season with some old and new favorites. BYOB Sat 8/24, 7pm. $10. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

CHICO OXIDATION PONDS WILDLIFE SANCTUARY BIRDING: Get an up-close view of the seasonal shorebird migration with an easy 2-mile walk among yellow-headed blackbirds, sandpipers, dowitchers and more. Meet at the Oxidation Ponds headquarters, contact Matthew Forster at findforster@yahoo.com to reserve your spot. Sat 8/24, 8am. Free. Oxidation Ponds, 4287 Chico River Road.

CHICO PRIDE – DANCE NIGHT: Dance night featuring special guest DJs, “Stay Gold” costume theme, no-host bar, refreshments and a photo booth. 18 and older. Sat, 8/24, 8pm. $5-$10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 893-3336. stonewallchicopride.com

CHICO PRIDE – DOWNTOWN FESTIVAL: Familyfriendly festival featuring live bands, over-the-top performances, speakers, booths and vendors, activities, food, dancing and more! Sat 8/24, 10am. $5-$10. City Plaza, downtown Chico. 893-3336.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

YOU’RE INVITED! Hey, it’s Stonewall Chico Pride Weekend and there is so much to do you’d better call in sick. The theme this year is Stay Gold, in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, and the mission is to improve the lives of everyone by increasing visibility of LGBTQ people and making the North State community a safer place for all. Festivities include a queer comedy showcase, DJ dance nights, a rad art show, drag performances and a huge downtown celebration with live music, food and entertainment. Events run from Thursday (Aug. 22) through Sunday (Aug. 25) and you can find more info in This Week listings (pages 26-27) and at stonewallchicopride.com.

AUGUST 22, 2019

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27


THIS WEEK CoNTINUED fRom PAGE 27

FINE ARTS

TACOS BORREGO POP UP: Great tacos,  sweet vegan options too!  Sun, 8/25, 11am. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Music EMMA GARRAHY & WILL HARTMAN: Local duo  performs hit songs, from a variety  of decades and genres, with a bluesy  twist.  Sun, 8/25, 3pm. Secret Trail  Brewing Co., 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120,  370-3573.

INDIGO GROOVE: Vegan brunch and live  music.  Sun, 8/25, 11am. Tender Loving  Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

Theater CRIMES OF THE HEART: See Thursday.  Sun, 8/25, 2pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater  Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

26

moN

Special Events FARM STAND: Fun farmers’ market featuring  local growers, plant starts, homemade  bakery goods and medicinal herbs.  Mon, 8/26, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

27

TUE

DRAWN IN—BY HAND: GRAPHIC PRINTS

Special Events BUTTE ENVIRONMENTAL COUNCIL CLIMATE ACTION PLAN LISTENING SESSION: Community  discussion on the city’s declaration of  climate emergency.  For more information contact Mark Stemen at mstemen@ csuchico.edu.  Tue, 8/27, 6pm. CARD  Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave.

Music SHANNON & THE CLAMS: Popular Bay Area  psychedelic throwback garage-pop  band. Local goth-punks Trox & The  Terribles open.  Tue, 8/27, 8pm. $15. Sierra  Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St.   sierranevada.com

Art

28

Special Events OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken  word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis  Rowdy.  Wed, 8/28, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431  Park Ave.

MYSTERIES AND MISCHIEF: Magic and mentalism night with Dean Waters and  Stephen Chollet. Be prepared to laugh  and have your mind blown.  Wed, 8/28, 7pm. $15. Unwined Kitchen & Bar,   980 Mangrove Ave.

Art Exhibit, celebrate Chico Pride with  art showcase from various queer and  trans people from the local community  and beyond. Reception, Thursday, Aug. 22,  6:30-10 p.m., featuring music by Scout.  Event is free and all ages. Through 8/25.  1710 Park Ave., 893-3336. 1078gallery.org Brandon McKie. Reception, 8/28, 4-9pm,  with DJ sets by McKie, Aye Jay, Pat Hull  and Aric Jeffries. Through 8/30. 212 W.  Second St. exhibition features creative remakes and  appropriations of famous artworks by  contemporary artists. Through 8/30. 450  Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Connie G. Adams, Enloe  Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery featuring Northern California artists whose  lives have been touched by cancer showcases series of watercolor paintings by  breast cancer survivor. Through 10/18.  Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Walls  We Create, exhibition reflects the cultural  experience of “barriers.” Through 9/29.  $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

NAKED LOUNGE: UMA & the Dragon, collab-

ORLAND ART CENTER: Group Show, 29 artists  from all over California show their work.  Through 9/21. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

28

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AUGUST 22, 2019

Prints, exhibition reveals how the act  of drawing creates an acuity of vision.  Exhibition Talk Thursday, Sept. 12, 5:30pm  at Zingg Recital Hall with reception to  follow at The Turner. Through 9/28. 400 W.  First St., 898-4476. theturner.org

ARGUS BAR + PATIO: Collage, new works by 

orative art show featuring Uma Misha  (age 2 ) and her father David Dragonboy  Sutherland. Reception Wednesday, Aug. 28,  6-8pm. Through 8/31. 118 W. Second St.

foR moRE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE oN PAGE 30

SEE ART

1078 GALLERY: Queer Justice Is Racial Justice 

CHICO ART CENTER: Master Remix, juried 

WED

Shows through Sept. 28 The Turner

THE TURNER: Drawn In–By Hand Graphic 

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of  cool stuff for kids to explore including a  miniature city, complete with a junior vet  clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market,  a giant fish tank and much more. Check  the website for hours and admission  information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main  St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and  Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human  and technological achievements needed  to reach the moon and envisions a  future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625  Esplanade.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of  cool stuff for kids to explore including a  miniature city, complete with a junior vet  clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market,  a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room,  imagination playground and much more.  Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325  Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond  the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibit  celebrates the human and technological  achievements needed to reach the moon  and envisions a future Mars landing.  Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.


SCENE “Max Boil,” acrylic  painting by Alexander  Lynch.

to any individual with an interest in DIY, print and zine culture,” Moreno said. “We didn’t feel the need to limit anyone that was willing to participate, and so this is why we have different mediums up on display, from zines to framed collaged artwork, paintings, prints and even works including found objects.” The Blackbird space provides a suitably homey, intimate setting for displaying the pieces submitBlackbird DIY art show previews ted for the DIY-ers show. In fact, some of the pieces—such as Will upcoming Chico festival Bryant’s series of contemplative hand-drawn color postcards (“Get Off the Internet”) and Alex Hilsee’s show DIY-ers Unite! The exhibit f the many offspring of print features works by local and out-of- delightful black-and-white drawings technology, the zine remains town zine-makers and is being pre- (“A Baba Yaga Gaga Christmas one of the most vital and interesting. Story”)—are small enough to be sented as a preview of Chico Zine Thanks to the ubiquity of desktop posted on the wooden columns that Fest, a day featuring zine creators, printers and the vendors, speakers and workshops at frame the entryway of the space that affordability of story and was once a home. Blackbird Sept. 28. photocopying, photo by Other drawings and paintings in The festival and the current even those with Carey frames cover the walls and dot the exhibit are the brainchild of artist Wilson relatively limited Kristy Moreno, a So Cal transplant end tables of the gallery proper. funds can craft Of course, there also are the who was inspired by Blackbird their visions into Review: zines themselves, each a selfwhen she moved here to attend publications that DIY-ers Unite! shows contained art show. Those curChico State last year. “[I] started can be produced through Aug. 31. rently on offer at Blackbird cover a checking out their books and for little cash Reception Friday, wide range of topics and aesthetic noticed that they had a zine selecoutlay. The zine Aug. 23, 7-9 p.m. tion on the shelves. I thought it was approaches. On one end of the specAlso, next month: is thus a do-itChico Zine Fest, Sept. trum, there’s “Housing for All, super rad that they actually had a yourself artform/ 28, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. How We Made It Happen,” a phozine library, and [I] knew that the outlet available zine world must be alive in Chico,” tocopied and stapled collection of to those with an Blackbird kids’ drawings produced by a chilMoreno said by email. 1431 Park Ave. urge to examine 433-1577 dren’s workshop given by the North After receiving encouragement and express their facebook.com/ from Blackbird to pursue a festival, Valley Childcare Collective. And points of view in blackbirdchico on the other end is the well-known, Moreno contacted Aimee Murillo, print without havprofessionally typeset and designed a friend who organizes the OC ing to depend on “Razorcake,” an impressive music established commercial mechanisms. Zine Fest in Orange County: “We spoke she gave me some wonderful zine full of essays, interviews and With distribution often being as commentary on the current state of advice on so many aspects to runmuch of a challenge as creation, DIY punk music. ning the event, and said that I was venues like Chico’s Blackbird—a Anyone interested in humanistic, already on a great start being that I combination community meeting rather than capitalistic, art should had landed the location already.” space, cafe, gallery and bookstore With the ball rolling, ideas began make their way to Blackbird for the specializing in nonmainstream literexhibit’s reception this Friday to coalesce, including the addition ary and sociological works—are (Aug. 23) to experience local perof the preliminary art show. “This vital to the dissemination of such idea snowballed into not just includ- formers Scout, Calvin Black and small-scale endeavors. And for the ing zine-based artwork—which can Leonel Castillo-Ferreyra offering month of August, in addition to its include photocopied, paper-based art musical examples of the aesthetic to usual selection of zines, Blackbird complement the DIY show. and collaged artwork—but is open Ω also will showcase the group art

Zinesters unite

O

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CN&R

29


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 08/22—WEDNESDAY 08/28 Presented by North State Vintage Record Society. Thu, 8/22, 8pm. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

YURKOVIC: An evening of brews and

local lo-fi electric blues. Thu, 8/22, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade, 343-2056.

23FRIDAY

BACK TO THE IMPROV Saturday, Aug. 24 Chico Live Improv Comedy

3 PINTS DOWN: Country, rock and SOUL POSSE: Hits from the ’50s to

SEE SATURDAY

22THURSDAY

CHICO PRIDE – LET ME BE PERFECTLY QUEER COMEDY SHOW: Celebrate

Pride with a fantastic lineup of local and visiting queer and trans comedians. Thu, 8/22, 9pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 358 E. Sixth St., 893-3336.

CHICO PRIDE – QUEER JUSTICE IS RACIAL JUSTICE RECEPTION: Showcase featuring various queer and trans artists from the local community and beyond, with music by Scout. Free and all-ages. Thu, 8/22, 6:30pm. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave., 893-3336. 1078gallery.org

LEANN COOLEY: Local singer/song-

writer performs. Thu, 8/22, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

today with five-piece band on the patio. Thu, 8/22, 6pm. Mike’s Grande Burger, 2896 Olive Highway, Oroville.

THOSE DUDES: Dance band performs hits from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. Thu, 8/22, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 8/22, 8pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (408) 449 2179.

TREMBLER: Screamo band from Texas performs; Chico’s Shades of Glam and LDF share the bill. Thu, 8/22, 8pm. $5. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

VINYL TO THE PEOPLE!: Open decks, bring your own records and play what you want, any genre.

HOmesTyle DininG!

18 Kid-Friendly dining Best Food server

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18

gospel sing-along tunes from local trio. Fri, 8/23, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

BANG BANG

pop reggae fusion band Mystic Roots performs. Fri, 8/23, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico, 132 W. Fourth St.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVIE COOK: Relaxing dinner tunes

by popular local trio. Fri, 8/23, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

NOCHE LATINA: Put on your nice clothes and head to Lost for a night of dancing to a wide range of Mexican beats. Ages 21 and over. Fri, 8/23, 9pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. lostonmainchico.com

’80S DAZE: Dance party with all

OBE AND LOKI: Live music at the

BRANDI ROSE: Live music, beer,

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument.

of your favorite hits. Fri, 8/23, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. food. Fri, 8/23, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

CHICO PRIDE – PERFORMANCE SHOWCASE: An evening of entertainment featuring ADA VOX, Kelly Houston and Uncle Dad’s Art Collective. Fri, 8/23, 7pm. $15-$35. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 893-3336. stonewallchicopride.com

FIERCE FUN QUEER SOUNDS: Celebrate Chico Pride with an early evening show of summer goth, transcendent experimental, celestial hip-hop and more. Fri, 8/23, 5:30pm. $7. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Shots Fired is the brainchild of guitarist DJ Williams, member of legendary funky soul crew Karl Densen’s Tiny Universe. Built from a revolving assembly of heavyhitters including members of the Dave Matthews Band and Lyrics Born, Shots Fired fuses classic funk and rock ’n’ roll for a stage show you gotta experience. The band rolls in this Saturday (Aug. 24) to Lost on Main, where it will be joined by Nashville’s Blackfoot Gypsies and Chico’s own Michael Russell Trio.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERTS: Five-piece

winery. Fri, 8/23, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign-ups at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 8/23, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 966-8342.

Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

BRANDI ROSE: See Friday. Sat,

8/24, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975

Montgomery St., Oroville.

RETROTONES: The best in classic rock covers. Fri, 8/23, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

CHICO PRIDE – DANCE NIGHT: Dance night featuring special guest DJs, “Stay Gold” costume theme, no-host bar, refreshments and a photo booth. 18 and older. Sat, 8/24, 8pm. $5-$10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., 893-3336. stonewallchicopride.com

24SATURDAY

BACK TO THE IMPROV: First show of the season with some old and new favorites. BYOB Sat, 8/24, 7pm. $10. Chico

CHICO PRIDE – SATURDAY NIGHT SUPER SHOW: Epic drag show featuring all of your favorite drag queens and kings. Sat, 8/24, 10pm. $12. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVIE COOK: See Friday. Sat, 8/24,

6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

THE KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Allrequest, sing and dance jubilee on the patio. Sat, 8/24, 8pm. $10. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

Public Notice

Glass–Free Zone Declared Aug. 30 – Sept. 2, 2019

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that pursuant to Chapter 9.32., Glass-Free Zone of the Chico Municipal Code, the City Manager has declared the Glass-Free Zone ordinance operative from 6:00 p.m. on Friday, August 30, 2019, through 6:00 p.m. on Monday, September 2, 2019. Generally, the possession of glass containers on city owned property is prohibited within the Glass Free Zone during this time period.

Sign up today for Butte County’s First Ever BYOC Cannabis-Friendly Art Classes www.ButteCounty CannabisArtClub.com

A map of the Glass-Free Zone is set forth below.

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 26 7pm.  Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive.

TOM BLODGET AND THE KITES: 1960s

and ’70s pop and rock/originals. Sat,  8/24, 6:30pm.  Farm Star Pizza, 2359

HUMAN OTTOMAN Monday, Aug. 26 1078 Gallery LEGAL ADDICTION: Sacramento band performs a variety of classic rock, R&B, and country favorites. Sat,  8/24, 8:30pm.  Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

LOW&SLOW THE BAY ADDITION: DJ Byrdie brings the best in old soul vinyl for a night of dancing your heart out. Special out-of-town guests Abrilita (B-Side Brujas) and Sultana join the fun. Sat, 8/24,  9pm.  $2. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

MAX MINARDI: Folk-y singer/songwriter performs for late night happy hour. Sat, 8/24, 10pm.  La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

MIXTAPE: Local cover band playing the

songs of yesterday and today. Sat,  8/24, 9pm.  Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

ONE HOT IRISH NIGHT: Little Red Hen hosts benefit for local children’s music programs with a performance by Ha’penny Bridge. No-host bar

SEE MONDAY

provided. Sat, 8/24, 6pm.  $20. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

PAPERBACK WRITER: Come together for

cover band playing The Beatles. Sat,  8/24, 9:30pm.  $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

ROLLER DERBY: Nor Cal Roller Girls take on the Ol’ Derby Bastards. Beer garden and silent auction. Sat,  8/24, 7pm.  $6-$12. Funland, 2465 Carmichael Drive.

SHOTS FIRED: Funk, rock, soul and jazz fusion with LA-based band fronted by DJ Williams (of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe). Nashville’s Blackfoot Gypsies and Chico’s Michael Russell Trio open. Sat, 8/24, 9pm.  $10-$13. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

SOUL POSSE: Romantic R&B, soul and

soft rock with local band. Sat, 8/24, 

Esplanade.

VIRGINIA MARLO: Piano and heartfelt vocals blend pop, alternative, and hip-hop with a singer-songwriters perspective. Sat, 8/24,  6pm.  Almendra Winery, 9275 Midway, Durham. almendrawinery. com

25SUNDAY

CHICO PRIDE –  DRAG KING SHOW & TEA  DANCE: Dancing followed by drag show featuring Mr. Will Ryder and Ty from The Golden Empire and Mr. Gay Sacramento Ben Flicker and Sir Vix. Sun, 8/25, 5pm.  $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON: Relaxing dinner tunes with popular local duo. Sun, 8/25, 6pm.  5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 8/25,  9pm.  The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

26MONDAY 28WEDNESDAY

HUMAN OTTOMAN: Power quartet of

electric vibraphone, cello, bass and drums from Portland performs. Locals Pervert and Cat Depot share the bill. All ages. Mon, 8/26, 7pm.  $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

27TUESDAY

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 8/28, 6pm.  Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

OPEN MIC: New open mic in Paradise! Come play your tunes and/or be part of the audience. Wed, 8/28,  7pm.  Lotus Guide Center, 6268 Skyway, Paradise.

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly Wednesday dose of free comedy with experienced and first-time comedians. Sign-ups start at 8pm. Wed, 8/28, 9pm.  Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

RANCHERO: Dirty rock out of Livermore (featuring members of Diego’s Umbrella). Locals Little Black Cloud and Otis Bog People share the bill. Wed, 8/28, 8pm.  $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

HAUNTED HORSES: Industrial punk

duo from Seattle performs, joined by fellow hardcore homies Fucked and Bound, Paradise metal band Aberrance and Needle Beach from Redding. All ages. Tue, 8/27, 8pm.  $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

SHANNON & THE CLAMS: Popular Bay Area band performing psychedelic, throwback garage-pop. Local goth-punks Trox & The Terribles open. Tue, 8/27, 8pm.  $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

know and win prizes. Tue, 8/27,  6:30pm.  Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

CELEBRATION OF VOICES

To kick off Chico’s Pride weekend, the 1078 Gallery will host a reception for Queer Justice Is Racial Justice Thursday (Aug.  22). The all-ages event will showcase works by local and visiting queer and trans people of color and will feature live music from Scout and DJ Thrasher Trasher, a presentation by North Valley Two Spirits with Ali Meders-Knight of the Mechoopda tribe, refreshments and a photo booth! Get there.

AUGUST 22, 2019

CN&R

31


REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week Angel Has Fallen

Gerard Butler and Morgan Freeman return for this third Fallen film (following Olympus Has Fallen and London Has Fallen), with the former as a Secret Service agent now on the run after being framed for an assassination attempt on the latter (now playing the U.S. president). Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

3

The Nightingale

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Overcomer

A Christian-based film about a high-school basketball coach who faces a crisis of faith and a new challenge as a mentor for an unlikely cross-country athlete. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Murder ballad

The Peanut Butter Falcon

Australian revenge tragedy strikes a dark historical note The shapes up as one of the best films this Fyear.Nightingale And for me, at least, those intermittent virtues or about half of its 136-minute running time,

are more than enough to sustain this multifaceted action adventure through and beyond its lesser intervals. by Written and directed by Jennifer Juan-Carlos Selznick Kent (The Babadook), the story is set in Australia’s Tasmanian wilderness in the early 19th century, and sports a cast of characters that includes Irish convicts, British soldiers, uprooted aboriginals and assorted yokels and thugs. The The Nightingale central figures are Clare (Aisling Opens Friday, Aug. Franciosi), an Irish convict whose 26. Starring Aisling Franciosi, Sam husband and child are killed by the Claflin and Baykali British; Lt. Hawkins (Sam Claflin), Ganambarr. Directed an ambitious and blithely corrupt by Jennifer Kent. British officer who treats Clare and Pageant Theatre. Rated R. others as his personal property; and Billy (Baykali Ganambarr), an orphaned aboriginal tracker who eventually makes common cause with Clare. The central story scheme has Clare pursuing Hawkins into the wilds in a quest for revenge after his attacks on her and her family. Billy is enlisted as her guide, but soon finds himself immersed in a parallel quest of his own. That sets The Nightingale up as a combination epic adventure and revenge tragedy as well as a ferocious critique of colonialism and the racism and patriarchal sexism that go with it. Rape, murder and an assortment of systemic brutalities raise the narrative temperature to a boil early on. But the potential for cheap-shot sensationalism is

3

held at least partly at bay by the complications and parallels that arise in the course of the action. The crossfire of tensions between the Irish and the British and between the aboriginals and “the whites,” and the class distinctions among the British take some unexpected turns. And in separate but parallel ways, Clare and Billy both bring dream, myth and the supernatural into the proceedings. Franciosi and Ganambarr both give strong performances. Some of Kent’s dialogue sounds somewhat anachronistic, but the most glaring problem with delivery and characterization emerges with Claflin’s Lt. Hawkins who comes across with a blandness so lacking in irony that he’s little more than a cliché villain of the most vapid sort. Damon Herriman (familiar from TV’s Justified and his current role as Charles Manson in Once Upon a Time in ... Hollywood) fares much better with the dynamics of British injustice—as the brutally loyal Sgt. Ruse. Other noteworthy contributions include Harry Greenwood as the conflicted young soldier “Jago,” young Charlie Shotwell as the fledgling criminal Eddie, Michael Sheasby as Clare’s anguished husband, Aidan, and Charlie Jampijinpa Brown as Billy’s revered Uncle Charlie. The title is part of the film’s mythological bird imagery, but it also refers specifically to Clare herself. She’s dubbed the prison colony’s “nightingale,” its singer, at the start, and at the end she’s a singer of a different, and changed, sort. □

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

32

CN&R

AUGUST 22, 2019

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent

The story of teen boy with Down syndrome (Zack Gottsagen) who runs away and sets off on a journey to a wrestling camp to realize his dream of becoming a pro wrestler. Also starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson and Bruce Dern. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Ready or Not

A black comedy/thriller about a wedding night that takes a deadly turn when the groom’s family introduces the new couple to a messed up version of hide-and-seek. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing 47 Meters Down: Uncaged

Teen girls diving among Mexican ruins on holiday find themselves stranded in sharkinfested waters. Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

The Angry Birds Movie 2

It’s angry birds vs. green pigs in installment two of the video game-turned-animatedfilm series. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Dora and the Lost City of Gold

A live-action adaptation of the popular Nickelodeon animated series about the adventure-loving 7-year-old, Dora, and her monkey pal, Boots. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

3

Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

Hobbs & Shaw is actually a spinoff from the series. In other words, rejoice! The leaden, dreary Vin Diesel is nowhere to be seen in this movie. Now we can have some real fun! Hobbs & Shaw is a bizarre hybrid of spy thriller, action flick, screwball comedy and science fiction. Here, Furious franchise regulars Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and Shaw (Jason Statham) are tasked with protecting the latter’s sister, Hattie (Vanessa Kirby), after she injects herself with something that will have worldwide consequences if she’s captured. The main antagonist is Brixton (Idris Elba), a former Shaw ally who has turned into some sort of bionic badass dubbed, by himself, “Black Superman.” Stuntman-turned-director David Leitch, who gave us the first John Wick and Deadpool 2, knows his way around an action scene, and his edits create constant

action and laughs—thanks in large part to Johnson and Statham’s great timing and onscreen chemistry. And while it’s expected that the tough-guy leads will kick ass in movies such as this, it’s Kirby who steals the show as the action hero of this installment. She is a total badass. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Good Boys

Three sixth-grade boys embark on an epic, R-rated coming-of-age odyssey. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Lion King

Jon Favreau (Elf, Iron Man) directs this photorealistic CGI remake of the 1994 Disney animated classic that features an impressive cast of voice actors, including Chiwetel Ejiofor, Donald Glover, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen, John Oliver and, naturally, James Earl Jones as Mufasa. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

4

Maiden

The press kit for Maiden pitches the film as the “story of Tracy Edwards, a 24-year-old cook on charter boats, who became the skipper of the first ever allfemale crew to enter the Whitbread Round the World Race in 1989.” And Alex Holmes’ film certainly delivers in those terms, but—somewhat surprisingly—there’s even more to it than that. Edwards’ story is indeed central to the entire film, but with straight-up biography taking a backseat to a steadily fascinating account of the 1989 Round the World Race, before, during and after. And both the racing drama and the biography gain a good deal from the oncamera reflections of Edwards’ crew, three decades after the fact. The film’s emerging portrait of Edwards is a study in the paradoxes personality—a kind of feminist heroine growing out of the grassroots rebellion of an angry young woman. She’s the central character in all this, and yet she’s also the most mysterious. Much to the film’s point, she’s the one we learn the most about, but she’s also the least likely to be understood in any conveniently conventional way. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

5

Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood

When Quentin Tarantino is behind the camera, mayhem and artistic license win out—history and conventionality be damned. Movie No. 9 is a dreamy doozy, and maybe the director/screenwriter’s most unapologetic film yet. Set in 1969, Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood captures the dying days of both sixties culture and the Golden Age of Hollywood. And through Tarantino’s storytelling lens, they die hard—in mysterious and hallucinogenic ways. For leading men, we get the pairing of Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt starring as insecure, has-been actor Rick Dalton and his trusty stuntman, Cliff Booth, respectively. Dalton’s career has devolved into playing the bad guys on weekly installments of TV’s The F.B.I., while the blackballed and past-hisprime Booth is relegated to driving the actor around and acting as his confidant. The setup allows Tarantino to go hog wild with the sixties visuals and soundtrack. The end of the sixties was bona fide nuts, and this is a nutty movie. It also manages to be quite heartfelt and moving. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

Alvin Schwartz’s 1980s series of children’s scary short stories gets the cinematic horror treatment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.


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There’s something about Mary A love letter to the definitive Chico-style taqueria

IFifth moments as I pedaled my bike up to the intersection of and Ivy streets. Chico State students would return t felt like one of those eerie calm-before-the-storm

in a week and this epicenter of the south campus hood would go back to being arguably the story and loudest and liveliest area in the city. photo by Jason Cassidy But on that Monday morning it was dead quiet as I rounded the corner j aso nc @ and rolled up to a shabby, standalone newsrev i ew.c om hole in the wall for one last taste of a local culinary icon—the Tacos Mary burrito—before all hell broke loose. Tacos Mary “Burrito the size of my arm and 429 Ivy St. so delicious; can’t wait to go back 892-8176 for more.” Well said, random online Open daily at 10 a.m., reviewer. Whether technically true or closes Mon. at not, accepted local lore is that Tacos midnight, Tues.-Sat. Mary’s burritos win the size battle in at 2 a.m., Sun. at 1:30 a.m. Chico. The object of my morning quest was the chorizo-and-egg breakfast version ($6)—which also is packed with rice, refried beans, cheese, cilantro and onions. And standing alone with my bounty in the taqueria’s barren dining room, a pang of worry shot through me as I considered the logistics of fitting a meal equal in dimensions to a 32-ounce Klean Kanteen into my body. (It isn’t even the biggest on the menu. There’s also a “grande” option for the truly reckless.) Now, a couple of days later, I can tell you that I did indeed finish the entire creation in one sitting, and I did not eat food again until the following day. The chorizoand-egg has been on my list of Chico staples for more than 25 years, and it is with a mixture of nostalgia and guilt that I still take advantage of summer student desertion to peacefully indulge in what is, for me, the taste of Chico. Tacos Mary—or “Tacos de,” as locals who’ve been here since before it changed its name from Tacos de Acapulco in 2012 still call it—isn’t much to look at. It’s basically a lunch counter with a few crummy tables and self-serve soda machine. Sometimes bass-heavy

norteno or ranchera music rumbles through the walls, and always a variety of meats bubble up from steam table pans behind a sneeze guard. The food is that Nor Cal variety of Mexican fare—a combo of taco-truck street meats and iceberg lettuce-and-sour creamslathered combo plates—served in massive proportions. It’s beautiful and quintessentially Chico. The breakfast bomb was my third pilgrimage in a week. I’d also ventured in for a carne asada burrito ($7.99; or $9.50 for the grande) that was of course enormous and sloppy and stuffed with a generous portion of super-salty yet remarkably tender beef. And before that I was party to a Tuesday-night reunion of current and former locals who enjoyed a variety of combo plates (ranging from $8 to $9.50). My pastor tacos were solid, if not remarkable, while the chicken taquitos I stole from my wife’s plate were so impossibly crispy and flavorful they made my eyes roll back in my head. I do actually appreciate the return of all the young energy to town, and I hope everyone goes nuts and parties often and stumbles into Tacos Mary at 1:30 a.m. to sop up the poison with rice, refried beans and lard. I have made the walk to Student Town for the cure many times myself over the years and will again. But it’s certainly a different, much busier, scene when school is in. No more lazy vibing with Chico ex-pats on an annual “Tacos de” pilgrimage as we moan with pleasure over styrofoam dinner plates. No more peaceful lunches sitting and sweating alone on the curb hunched over a torso-size burrito. No more quiet mornings ordering a day’s worth of calories by myself. No more summer. But, of course, even though the break is over, it is still summer for another month or so. And since I left one box unchecked on my menu—for the Tacos Mary Nachos Supreme ($10.99), which is basically all the good toppings and your choice of meat atop a layer of house-fried tortilla chips in a pile big enough for two—I need to grab a buddy and find a quiet moment in between shifts to properly gorge away the last crumbs of summer. □

Back to School Student Special Small Pita, Chips and a Soda

669

$

Not valid with other offers.

(Must show student ID)

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner 240 Broadway st. chico, ca | 530.899.2847 | www.pitapitusa.com

AUGUST 22, 2019

CN&R

33


ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

All killer no filler Damn, Chico! There are some rad concerts on the

We Need

a r t i s t s

the Cn&r Artbox ProjeCt is looking for creative minds to transform our newsracks into functional works of art. Contact mattd@newsreview.com to find out more!

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CN&R

AUGUST 22, 2019

immediate calendar. If you can’t get down with at least one of these artists visiting town over the next two months, you might not like music. In addition to the aural badassness mentioned previously in this space— Howlin’ Rain at argus Bar + Patio (Sept. 12); Tropa Magica at the sierra nevada Hop yard (Sept. 13); Elvin Bishop and Charlie Musselwhite at Laxson auditorium (Oct. 6) and, of course, shannon & The Clams Tuesday (Aug. 27) at the sierra nevada Big Room (see “Sing along with the Clams,” page 26)—there is the wild Fierce Fun Queer sounds lineup at Blackbird this Saturday (Aug. 24) in celebration of Chico Pride week. The four-act bill features local neo-goth trio iver, plus Sac’s spaceWalker (“She’s as punk rock as hip-hop gets.”), and two Oakland acts—otzi (cool darkwave punks) and dynamic experimental performance artist/ musician Wizard apprentice (“a digital folk artist who vividly and simplistically expresses her inner world using resourcefulness and honesty”). Get there! And there’s more! Here are four Wizard Apprentice that recently crossed my radar:

• sept. 22: Tom Brosseau at 1078 Gallery. This is the third visit to Chico in the last year and a half for the “highplainsman troubadour,” and the consummate storyteller returns as part of a tour in support of the just-released in the shadow of the Hill: songs from the Carter Family Catalogue, Vol. 1. It’s a collaboration between Brosseau and sean Watkins of nickel Creek and features some of the more obscure selections from various generations of the first family of country music. Local fave Pat Hull opens.

• sept. 25: Richard Buckner. Chico loves the endearing singer/songwriter who can spin a tale as well as Mr. Brosseau. Buckner’s intimate night of songs and stories at Tender Loving Coffee last year was a 2018 highlight for arts dEVo, and this time around he’s playing a house show. Get info and tix at undertowshows.com. • oct. 5: The Jack Moves at Argus. Real talk: Don’t take a date to this show unless you are cool seeing each other naked, because this New Jersey duo plays a brand of “sweet soul” that borrows heavily from sexy 1970s R&B and funk (think The Delfonics with a touch of Curtis Mayfield) and will put everyone with a pulse in the mood to at least move that body on the dance floor.

• oct. 12: sum 41 at the senator Theatre. There is little doubt in my mind that, if I was born a decade later, I would’ve been a mall punk for a minute. I know me. Just as with Kiss, Quiet Riot and Twisted sister during my actual junior high/early high school years, I would have been powerless to resist the gargantuan ear-worm anthems of The offspring, Blink-182, sum 41 and the rest. Even today, if “In Too Deep” comes on the radio, I’ll cop a faux-British accent and Sum 41 sing my whiny heart out into my thumb mic. Sum 41 frontman deryck Whibley is sober now and his band will be in Chico as part of a tour in support of the just-released album order in decline. See you and the rest of the Hot Topic crew in the pit!


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of August 5 - August 9 , 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

382 Brookside Dr

Chico

$844,000

4/4

SQ. FT. 3409

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

475 E 10th Ave

Chico

$285,000

2/1

SQ. FT. 960

143 Estates Dr

Chico

$620,000

4/3

2609

1455 Normal Ave

Chico

$260,000

3/1

1008

3201 Mount Whitney Ct

Chico

$539,000

3/2

1892

1289 E 10th St

Chico

$235,000

2/1

624

814 Westmont Dr

Chico

$535,000

4/3

2300

1125 Sheridan Ave #7

Chico

$216,000

2/2

986

636 Burnt Ranch Way

Chico

$449,000

4/3

2515

53 Brenda Dr

Chico

$432,000

4/2

1647

906 Cedar St

Chico

$210,000

2/1

832

1515 W 8th Ave

Chico

$419,000

3/3

1831

1114 Nord Ave #13 Apt

Chico

$189,000

3/2

960

223 Legacy Ln

Chico

$387,500

3/2

1684

1412 N Cherry St #13 Apt

Chico

$170,000

3/2

960

108 Delaney Dr

Chico

$385,000

3/2

1506

2055 Amanda Way #25 Apt

Chico

$170,000

2/1

864

Chico

$125,000

2/2

1354

Oroville

$525,000

2/3

2523

1125 Neal Dow Ave

Chico

$380,000

3/2

1576

453 E 3rd Ave

1777 E 8th St

Chico

$380,000

4/2

1442

13 Mims Ct

3008 California Park Dr

Chico

$375,000

3/2

1705

63 Quail Point Ln

Oroville

$480,000

3/4

3168

320 Mission Serra Ter

Chico

$365,000

3/2

1414

2845 Oro Garden Ranch Rd

Oroville

$439,000

3/2

1768

1870 Bedford Dr

Chico

$365,000

3/2

1842

1981 Belgium Ave

Chico

$352,000

4/3

1821

2122 Floral Ave

Chico

$348,500

3/3

1476

1255 Calla Ln

Chico

$344,000

3/2

1486

2605 Navarro Dr

Chico

$333,000

3/2

1364

226 W 3rd Ave

Chico

$325,000

3/2

1424

74 Lacewing Ct

Chico

$325,000

4/2

1402

6417 Jack Hill Dr

Oroville

$397,273

3/4

2748

210 Fairhill Dr

Oroville

$379,000

3/2

2056

11 Cove Ct

Oroville

$268,000

3/2

1408

5279 Saddle Dr

Oroville

$265,000

3/2

1474

3541 Stauss Ave

Oroville

$255,000

4/2

1987

1960 7th St

Oroville

$230,000

3/2

1176

Oroville

$200,000

3/1

1162

2881 Vistamont Way

Chico

$324,000

3/2

1126

2794 Fay Way

2068 Rochester Dr

Chico

$293,000

3/2

1320

2189 De Mille Rd

Paradise

$250,500

3/2

1296

2607 Burnap Ave

Chico

$289,000

2/1

1144

467 Boquest Blvd

Paradise

$220,000

2/1

1300

a ug ust 22, 2019

CN&R

35


REAL ESTATE TATE For more information about advertising in our REAL ESTATE SECTION, call us at

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LOREAL MATSON Dated: July 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000873 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2019

Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as L AND T FARMS at 1005 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. LINDSEY CAFFERATA 1005 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. TODD SIMMONS 1005 Liberty Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: TODD SIMMONS Dated: July 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000836 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LO AND BEHOLD BEAUTY at 940 Mangrove Ave. Chico, CA 95926. LOREAL MATSON 1718 Magnolia Ave. Chico, CA this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as M R ELECTRICAL at 3947 Keefer Road Chico, CA 95973. MARK REHBRUG 3947 Keefer Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MARK REHBURG Dated: July 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000789 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WIENER MAN at 200 Broadway St Chico, CA 95926. KEEFER SWEET 178 Terrace Dr Chico, CA 95926. LEROY LIN SWEET 178 Terrace Dr Chico, CA 95926. WENDY ERIN SWEET 178 Terrace Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: LEROY SWEET Dated: July 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000888 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as A AND M ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES at 660 Manzanita Court, Suite 6 Chico, CA 95926. MASON AXEL MCKELLIPS 24 El Cerrito Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MASON MCKELLIPS Dated: July 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000890 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DRIVE THRU STOP AND SHOP at 6433 Skyway Suite 9 Paradise, CA 95969. GABRIELL HERNDON 5858 Tika Lane Magalia, CA 95954. ESTEFANIA MIRANDA 5858 Tika Lane Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: GABRIELL HERNDON Dated: July 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000829 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

SIERRA POOLS INC at 3150 Hwy 32 Suite B Chico, CA 95973. SIERRA POOLS INC 3150 Hwy 32 Suite B Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: TYLER MORELAND, PRES/OWNER Dated: July 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000896 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO’S FINEST LANDSCAPING at 6727 County Road 20 Orland, CA 95963. RAUL J RAMIREZ 6727 County Road 20 Orland, CA 95963. MARCOS F SANDOVAL 220 West 22nd St Apt 1 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RAUL J RAMIREZ Dated: July 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000894 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUMMIT STRUCTURAL DESIGN at 383 Rio Lindo Ave., Suite 200 Chico, CA 95926. SUMMIT STRUCTURAL DESIGN 383 Rio Lindo Ave., Suite 200 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RYLAND BURDETTE, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: July 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000882 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

FICTITIIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MACKRAY MANAGEMENT at 2599 Oak Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. JESSE GRIGG 1704 Oak Park Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JESSE GRIGG Dated: July 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000850 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROOTS LANDSCAPING at 1513 Sherman Ave. Chico, CA 95926. BRADLEY SULLIVAN RELF 1513 Sherman Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRADLEY RELF Dated: July 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000851 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

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The following person is doing business as DEER PARK COUNSELING AND CONSULTING at 15A Williamsburg Lane Chico, CA 95926. DEVJANI BANERJEE-STEVENS 2446 Villa Vista Drive Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DEVJANI BANERJEE-STEVENS Dated: August 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000925 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ILLUMINAID, OMPT, ONE MEDIA PLAYER PER TEACHER, ONE MOBILE PROJECTOR PER TRAINER, POLDER, INC at 645 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. POLDER, INC 645 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: PATRICE YORK, SECRETARY/TREASURER Dated: August 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000922 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LG CONSTRUCTION at 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. LUIS ALBERTO GARCIA 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. MA DEL ROSARIO GARCIA 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. LG AND SONS CONSTRUCTION INC 15283 Cana Pine Creek Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: LUIS GARCIA, PRESIDENT Dated: August 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000930 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CRYO SKIN AND BODY at 1366 Longfellow Ave Chico, CA 95926 AMANDA MICHELE BATES 1531 Downing Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMANDA BATES Dated: July 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000901 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SIMPLE SIMIAN, SIMPLE SIMIAN CREATIVE, SIMPLE SIMIAN SUSTAINABLE ARTWEAR at 1483 Trenta Dr Chico, CA 95973. JOSHUA ANTHONY BIGGINTON 1840 Manzanillo Lane Corning this Legal Notice continues


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY CA, CA 96021. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: JOSH BIGGINTON Dated: August 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000935 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SIINXBRE at 2181 Oroville Chico Hwy Durham, CA 95938. CINDY CASTANEDA SANCHEZ 1564 Nord Ave Spc 1 Chico, CA 95926. BREANNA VALDOVINOS 1425 Nord Ave Apt 20 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: BREANNA VALDOVINOS Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000944 Published: Aug 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OLOFAT ONE-BITE BARBEQUE, OLOFAT ONE-BITE BBQ at 2769 Ceres Avenue Chico, CA 95928. SIGRAH BILLYOS 757 Hillgrove Court Chico, CA 95926. MD OBET 1050 Columbus Ave. #19 Chico, CA 95926. This busisness is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SIGRAH BILLYOS Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000939 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing busines as EDELWEISS at 1933 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95960. KRISTEN FRIETSCHE 8 Rockerfeller Berry Creek, CA 95916. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KRISTEN FRIETSCHE Dated: August 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000953 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HOPE IN HEALING COUNSELING SERVICES at 6 Governors Lane Suite A Chico, CA 95926. ALISHA READY 15 Glenbrook Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ALISHA READY Dated: August 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000954 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STUDIO 4, STUDIO FOUR at this Legal Notice continues

823 Brandonbury Ln Chico, CA 95926. CHRISTINE ANN DICKINSON 823 Brandonbury Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINE A. DICKINSON Dated: July 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000828 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DOGTOWN HOWLER at 14514 Colter Way Magalia, CA 95954. TAMMY WALLER AVILES 14514 Colter Way Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TAMMY WALLER AVILES Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000968 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUBY’S at 245 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. RAINE DEIGH ELDRIDGE 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAINE DEIGH Dated: July 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000871 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RUBY’S at 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. RAINE DEIGH ELDRIDGE 1955 Montgomery St Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RAINE DEIGH Dated: July 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000872 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as XTRM STEEL at 175 Inglewood Dr. Oroville, CA 95966. XAVIER DIAZ 12 Ruths Ct Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: XAVIER DIAZ Dated: August 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000969 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this

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court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EIDEN AARON CHURCH Proposed name: EDEN AARON KING THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 11, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: July 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02152 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2019

ALEJANDRA YOHANNA ESQUIVEL Proposed name: ALEJANDRA YOHANNA SILVAS ESQUIVEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 28, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: July 8, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01966 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CITLALLY SILVAS ESQUIVEL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BRIAN GIOVANNI CRUZESQUIVEL Proposed name: BRIAN GIOVANNI CRUZ-ESQUIVEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 28, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: July 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01967 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CITLALLY SILVAS ESQUIVEL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CITLALLY SILVAS ESQUIVEL Proposed name: CITLALLY SILVAS ESQUIVEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 28, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: July 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01965 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CITLALLY SILVAS ESQUIVEL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name:

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner RAFELIO PADILLA CORDENAS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: RAFELIO PADILLA CORDENAS Proposed name:

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ROGER PADILLA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: July 25, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02261 Published: August 1,8,15,22, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LOR ZE LEE and SEE VANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LINA MAI NENG LOR-LEE CHARLIE LOR Proposed name: LINA MAI NENG LEE CHARLIE TOU LEE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 6, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02210 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DEBBIE ANN LYNCH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name:

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For the week oF AUGUSt 22, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s not

cost-efficient to recycle plastic. Sorting and processing the used materials to make them available for fresh stuff is at least as expensive as creating new plastic items from scratch. On the other hand, sending used plastic to a recycling center makes it far less likely that it will end up in the oceans and waterways, harming living creatures. So in this case, the short-term financial argument in favor of recycling is insubstantial, whereas the moral argument is strong. I invite you to apply a similar perspective to your upcoming decisions.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

African-American slaves suffered many horrendous deprivations. For example, it was illegal for them to learn to read. Their oppressors feared that educated slaves would be better equipped to agitate for freedom, and took extreme measures to keep them illiterate. Frederick Douglass was one slave who managed to beat the ban. As he secretly mastered the art of reading and writing, he came upon literature that ultimately emboldened him to escape his “owners” and flee to safety. He became one of the 19th century’s most powerful abolitionists, producing reams of influential writing and speeches. I propose that we make Douglass your inspiring role model for the coming months. I think you’re ready to break the hold of a certain curse—and go on to achieve a gritty success that the curse had prevented you from accomplishing.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): For 25

years, businessman Don Thompson worked for the McDonald’s fast food company, including three years as its CEO. During that time, he oversaw the sale and consumption of millions of hamburgers. But in 2015, he left McDonald’s and became part of Beyond Meat, a company that sells vegan alternatives to meat. I could see you undergoing an equally dramatic shift in the coming months: a transition into a new role that resembles but is also very different from a role you’ve been playing. I urge you to step up your fantasies about what that change might entail.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The

learning process is something you can incite, literally incite, like a riot,” wrote author Audre Lorde. As an astrologer I would add this nuance: although what Lorde says is true, some phases of your life are more favorable than others to seek deep and rapid education. For example, the coming weeks will bring you especially rich teachings if you incite the learning process now.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The American

idiom “stay in your lane” has come to mean “mind your own business,” usually in a pejorative sense. But I’d like to expand it and soften it for your use in the coming weeks. Let’s define it as meaning “stick to what you’re good at and know about,” or “don’t try to operate outside your area of expertise” or “express yourself in ways that you have earned the right to do.” Author Zadie Smith says that this is good advice for writers. “You have to work out what it is you can’t do, obscure it and focus on what works,” she attests. Apply that counsel to your own sphere or field.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Yisrael

Kristal was a Polish Jew born under the sign of Virgo in 1903. His father was a scholar of the Torah, and he began studying Judaism and learning Hebrew at age three. He lived a long life and had many adventures, working as a candle-maker and a candy-maker. When the Red Army liberated the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1945, Kristal emerged as one of the survivors. He went on to live to the age of 113. Because of the chaos of World War I, he had never gotten to do his bar mitzvah when he turned 13. So he did it much later, in his old age. I foresee a comparable event coming up soon in your life. You will claim a reward or observe a milestone or collect a blessing you weren’t able to enjoy earlier.

by rob brezSny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Sailors have

used compasses to navigate since the 11th century. But that tool wasn’t enough to guide them. A thorough knowledge of the night sky’s stars was a crucial aid. Skill at reading the ever-changing ocean currents always proved valuable. Another helpful trick was to take birds on the ships as collaborators. While at sea, if the birds flew off and returned, the sailors knew there was no land close by. If the birds didn’t return, chances were good that land was near. I bring this to your attention because I think it’s an excellent time to gather a number of different navigational tools for your upcoming quest. One won’t be enough.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What do

you want from the allies who aren’t your lovers? What feelings do you most enjoy while you’re in the company of your interesting, non-romantic companions? For instance, maybe you like to be respected and appreciated. Or perhaps what’s most important to you is to experience the fun of being challenged and stimulated. Maybe your favorite feeling is the spirit of collaboration and comradeship. Or maybe all of the above. In any case, I urge you to get clear about what you want—and then make it your priority to foster it. In the coming weeks, you’ll have the power to generate an abundance of your favorite kind of non-sexual togetherness.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

As the CEO of the clothes company Zappos, Sagittarius entrepreneur Tony Hsieh is worth almost $1 billion. If he chose, he could live in a mansion by the sea. Yet his home is a 200-square-foot, $48,000 trailer in Las Vegas, where he also keeps his pet alpaca. To be clear, he owns the entire trailer park, which consists of 30 other trailers, all of which are immaculate hotbeds of high-tech media technology where interesting people live. He loves the community he has created, which is more important to him than status and privilege. “For me, experiences are more meaningful than stuff,” he says. “I have way more experiences here.” I’d love to see you reaffirm your commitment to priorities like his in the coming weeks. It’ll be a favorable time to do so.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Medical researcher Jonas Salk developed a successful polio vaccine, so he had a strong rational mind. Here’s how he described his relationship with his nonrational way of knowing: “It is always with excitement that I wake up in the morning wondering what my intuition will toss up to me, like gifts from the sea. I work with it and rely on it. It’s my partner.” I bring this up because the coming weeks will be a favorable time to celebrate and cultivate your own intuition. You may generate amazing results as you learn to trust it more and figure out how to deepen your relationship with it.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Aquarian environmentalist Edward Abbey once formulated a concise list of his requirements for living well. “One must be reasonable in one’s demands on life,” he wrote. “For myself, all that I ask is: (1) accurate information; (2) coherent knowledge; (3) deep understanding; (4) infinite loving wisdom; and (5) no more kidney stones, please.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now would be an excellent time for you to create your own tally of the Five Crucial Provisions. Be bold and precise as you inform life about your needs.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “We may be surprised at whom God sends to answer our prayers,” wrote author Janette Oke. I suspect that observation will apply to you in the coming weeks. If you’re an atheist or agnostic, I’ll rephrase her formulation for you: “We may be surprised at whom Life sends to answer our entreaties.” There’s only one important thing you have to do to cooperate with this experience: Set aside your expectations about how help and blessings might appear.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. AUGUSt 22, 2019

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DEBBIE ANN LYNCH Proposed name: DEBBIE ANN BROOKS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02343 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DANA CATHERINE YU filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DANA CATHERINE YU Proposed name: DANA CATHERINE WUNDERLICH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: August 1, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02309 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

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equal opportunity employer

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SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: RACHEL LIZA GOMEZ YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue

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Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: December 21, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV04121 Published: August 8,15,22,29, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JODIE LYNN BROWN AKA JODIE LYNN MORSE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: September 28, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV03195 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

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SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT JENNY L. MASON You have been sued by petitioner: JASON E. BONHAM You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court North Butte County Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: JASON E. BONHAM 2455 Oro Bangor Hwy. Oroville, CA 95966 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 28, 2019 Case Number: 19FL01149 Published: August 15,22,29, September 5, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: ROBERT SCOTT DOBYNE AND ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, OR ANY CLOUD ON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE TO THE PROPERTY, AND DOES 1 THROUGH 100 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: JUNE E. RICHARDSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property this Legal Notice continues

may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: JOEL B. MASSAE, ESQ. PO Box 3104 Paradise, CA 95954 Tel. (530) 872-2375 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 6, 2019 Case No: 19CV01710 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE PATRICIA A. LESAN, also known as PATRICIA ANN LESAN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: PATRICIA A. LESAN, also known as PATRICIA ANN LESAN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JERRY O. LESAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JERRY O. LESAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the

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authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: September 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: August 12, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00357 Published: August 22,29, September 5, 2019

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner WILLIAM MORGAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: HUNTER LEE BELANGER Proposed name: HUNTER LEE MORGAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the

petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA MOSBARGER Dated: July 24, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01178 Published: August 22,29, September 5,12, 2019


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