__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 47 THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Cultivating the

FARM YTable

SPECIAL ISSUE

future The average farmer is nearing retirement age, so who will grow our food? page 18

9

THIEVES ABOUND

11

TORRES’ TRANSITION

35

EAT YOUR FISH GUTS


Accident? injured?

law oFFiCes oF

Lawrence a. Puritz F o r m e r I n s u r a n c e D e F e n s e at t o r n e y

eae Fr ion sult t

Con

2 

CN&R 

J UL Y 1 8 , 2 01 9

343-0500 northvalleylawyer.com


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 47 • July 18, 2019 OPINION

4

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

32

8

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

12

Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

17

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

11

COVER STORY

18

ARTS & CULTURE

28

Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

REAL ESTATE

39

CLASSIFIEDS

40

ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, Jim Williams, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

3


OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

High hopes for changing of the guard The past eight months in Butte County have been

rough, and it’s safe to say the Public Health Department has had more than a lot on its plate. While we hesitate to guess why its director, Cathy Raevsky, chose to retire in March, we certainly have sympathy for the amount of stress she’d likely experienced in the five months prior. The Camp Fire introduced a huge number of unforeseen public health issues, from air quality to emotional distress to water contamination. Suddenly people were living in RVs, on couches, in their cars, even in tents outside of Walmart. Norovirus hit survivors staying in at least one emergency shelter; a measles outbreak complicated matters months later. Meanwhile, historical data indicate that depression escalates after a disaster, as do domestic violence and drug and alcohol abuse. All of these things have taken a toll on the health of our collective communities. We mention this because earlier this month, Butte County welcomed a new director, Danette York, who hails from rural Washington (see “To our health,” page 12). She has a good amount of experience, but

none in disaster recovery, so she has her work cut out for her. We are encouraged by her statement to us that “our job in public health is education first and foremost, to make sure people are prepared with information.” The CN&R agrees. We have a long history of informing the public, so we know when public agencies miss the mark. When it comes to the Camp Fire, we haven’t been shy about criticizing those who haven’t risen to meet the challenge. We were critical of York’s predecessor—in particular, for not issuing guidelines or warnings to protect the health of residents returning to the Ridge, where there was no potable water in some parts and contamination in others. In the absence of adequate guidance from the state, an issue this newspaper has chronicled in recent months, we believe it was Raevsky’s job to take charge and provide a unified message to the community. With this changing of the guard, our expectation is that there’s a top-down approach to re-evaluating what’s needed to protect the health and wellness of the community and implementing changes posthaste. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Working toward a new, improved police culture Aanddied from suicide than shootings, car accidents, any and all other job-related issues. And, the same cross this country in 2018, more police officers

applies to firefighters and first responders; more died by suicide than the combination of fire-involved fatalities, vehicle accidents, etc. I’m worried about Police Chief Mike O’Brien and the other officers in Chico. There’s something wrong with the police culture when law enforcement personnel are so distraught that they’re taking their own lives in growing numbers. It’s time for a change. by Last year in this community, George Gold when I watched footage of several The author is on the steering committee of 6-foot-tall cops surrounding an Concerned Citizens for 8-year-old boy—his hands cuffed behind him, sitting on the sidewalk Justice-Chico. and crying uncontrollably—and refusing to remove his handcuffs, I knew something was wrong. This is not how we treat our citizens, this is not how we value our children. Having a command-and-control mindset leads to confrontation, rather than problem resolution. Use of

4

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

force must be a last resort, not a first response. We need our police officers to know when to be warriors and when to be guardians. And 99 percent of the time, we need them to be guardians. Concerned Citizens for Justice wants a partnership with our police officers; we want a community effort to build a safer community. That means mutual respect between the police and the community. Our organization is an independent community group focusing on humanizing our police departments so they move away from a command-and-control paradigm. Our police culture must change. One way to ensure that it does is for police to participate in in-depth crisis intervention training (CIT), so that they are prepared to interact with citizens with mental health challenges. Our officers need to learn about and be properly trained in how to apply de-escalation techniques for potential confrontations. This must become the No. 1 priority of the Chico Police Department. More than half of the city of Chico’s general fund budget goes to the police department; it’s time to have some control over how that money is spent. Our police budget should prioritize CIT and de-escalation training. It’s a start to building a new police culture that benefits the officers and the community. Ω

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

FARM YTable

Empty-garden blues

My garden this year is pathetic. It’s just a bunch of cherry tomatoes—probably Sweet 100s, my favorite variety—that sprang up voluntarily from past years’ grows. Arts Editor Jason Cassidy gave me a watermelon start a few months ago. Sadly, I didn’t get it into the ground before a heatwave hit and scorched it into oblivion. Meanwhile, the scrub jays destroyed the plums and apricots dangling from my backyard trees. I did manage to snag one peach before they got it. What remains—aside from the aforementioned tomatoes—is the unripe bounty of a lone dwarf nectarine tree. Typically, I love digging in the dirt. For years after buying my house, my husband and I put in a decent garden and shared the produce with our neighbors. In addition to the tomatoes, we almost always had basil and squash to give away. My earliest memories of the concept of growing food are of my dad’s artichokes in the backyard of our house in south San Jose, where I was born and lived for the first few years of my life. Better ingrained in my memory is the garden tucked next to the pool in my mostly concrete backyard in Livermore—the place I consider my hometown. There, my mom tended a little patch of raised beds. That’s how I came to love cherry tomatoes—ripe off the vine, like candy. Mom would plant just a few things, typically including rhubarb, which she’d mix with strawberries and bake in a pie. Up here in the North State, in the orchards outside of Hamilton City, my grandmother always put in an impressive summer garden at her almond and walnut farm along Stony Creek. Not only was it large, but it also had a fairly wide variety of produce: tomatoes, beans, watermelons, strawberries, pumpkins and several types of squash and cucumbers. She grew blackberries on metal trellises made from leftover T-posts and hog wire. I’d pluck them and eat them straight from the vine. We’d step ever so lightly while harvesting asparagus spears that seemed to appear out of nowhere. Grandma was the first person who introduced me to a tomato sandwich. Only good and ripe fruits will do. Just a little salt and pepper on lightly toasted bread with a dab of mayo. Maybe add some cold slices of cucumber and thinly sliced red onion. All of those memories are good ones for this city kid with country kin. Later, when I lived by myself on that farm during my college years, I put in pretty decent gardens. I’d cut down giant bamboolike Arundo grass stalks that lined the creek and fashion them into trellises for beans and cucumbers, for example. Sometimes I think about what it would be like to go into farming. Admittedly, I probably have romanticized that line of work over the years based on my gardening experiences. But I’m enough of a realist to know that it’s not all happy harvesting. Agriculture is risky and difficult, as our special Farm to Table issue conveys. It also is rewarding. Most of the farmers I’ve known personally or have interviewed over the years have a deep and abiding affection for what they do. Not everyone can say that about their profession.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Attention Boomers

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Two on the cover Re “Why aren’t we discussing population?” (Cover story, by Alastair Bland, July 11): Even some of our most vocal and active international environmental organizations seem loath to address the culprit that underlies most of our planetary woes. In 2009, I was a freshman member of the board of directors for Audubon California. At a meeting to set that group’s conservation agenda for coming years, I naively asked the question: “Almost all of the issues we’re discussing relate to habitat loss due to human population increase—shouldn’t population growth be an issue that Audubon takes a position on?” The room went silent, board members looked at each other or at the ceiling, the conservation director curtly answered “no,” and the meeting moved on. The fear of conservation actions being seen as “too political” or “too radical” is a

reality I’ve observed at many levels and within many otherwise dedicated green organizations; in fact, I’ve been guilty of it myself. Each successive generation inherits a planet less rich and wondrous than the last. Are we going to prioritize having the hard conversations and taking on the difficult actions, or are we satisfied that our children’s children will only know monarchs, meadowfoam and white-tailed kites from the images on their iPads?

systemic female infanticide be kept secret. But the biggest taboo (politically incorrect) subject on population issues (witness the article) is the structural maldistribution of resources and income inherent in capitalism. A significant segment of the earth’s 7.6 billion population are starving not because enough food isn’t produced, but because the capitalist class system denies them access to food (clothing, affordable and “fire safe” housing, drinkable water, life-sustaining work, etc.) while the privileged class lives in wasteful abundance. It’s why thousands of people are at the border.

Scott Huber Chico

I was shocked to read that population control is a “taboo” subject. In fact, it’s a loud and constant refrain of racists (“white world” especially) and eugenicists within the plutocratic class. It is a taboo subject with certain religions (Catholicism comes to mind) and patriarchs whose “preference” for male babies requires that

Beau Grosscup Cohasset

More history Re “Pay attention” (Letters, by Loretta Ann Torres, July 11): Loretta Ann Torres’ response to an excellent letter from Rich Meyers regarding U.S. (and we can add British) involvement in Iran LETTERS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 6

new to medicare? turning 65? Leaving an employer plan? Looking for a competitive quote?

We can help with your medicare options. With over 400 customers served, we can help W you with lowering your Healthcare expenses mae shop carrjor and reducing your prescription drug costs. iers Call today for your free consultation. All agent fees & commissions paid by insurance companies.

Bruce A. Jenkins | CA License #0B86680 530.781.3592 | www.BruceJenkinsInsurance.com

ChiCo’s only

Indoor Family Play Space

A carefully prepared environment that helps cultivate life skills, communication and self-confidence, while providing fun for children and parents.

“Sunny Garden is a sanctuary for me and my child. A safe place to engage my child’s curiosity and to socialize with other kids.” — Yvette Zuniga

Classes available. Call or visit for more info: 530.343.3101 • sunnygardenchico.com 2801 Godman Avenue

NOTICE TO CITY OF CHICO RESIDENTS: OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE Architectural Review and Historic Preservation Board The Chico City Council has an unscheduled vacancy on the ARHPB and is seeking to fill one seat on this board. The seat will serve through January 2021. In addition to its authority established by Chapter 19.18 of the Chico Municipal Code for the review of architectural drawings prior to the issuance of certain building permits, the ARHPB reviews building proposals that may affect buildings or other resources listed on the City of Chico Historic Resources Inventory, including making recommendations to the City Council for new listings on the Inventory. (CMC Sec. 2.56.020) Applicants must be residents of the City of Chico and qualified voters (18 years or older). The Commission meets on the first Wednesday of each month at 4:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber Building, 421 Main Street. An application and supplemental questionnaire must be completed for this position. All applications, with required supplementals are due by July 31, 2019 by 5:00 p.m. in the City Clerk’s Office, City Municipal Building, 411 Main Street. The City Council will make its appointment at a regularly scheduled meeting determined after the closure of the recruitment period. J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

5


LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 over the decades seemed to have missed his point entirely. Instead, we were given a lot of hysterical twaddle about religious nuts. Actually, we have a few of our own. Vice President Pence is one example. Our citizens who believe that the solar system was formed a few thousand years ago are another example. As for the reference to the coming of the 12th Imam, we have our own factions who believe in the second coming of Jesus Christ. Same sort of thing, actually. Also, a good many people will agree that our current president is as dangerous as Iran’s. In Iran and here in the U.S. there are tens of millions of ordinary Iranians going about their daily business who would not want a war anymore than we would. As for the remainder of her letter, it was a nonissue. No, Ms. Torres, when our drone was shot down because it was in Iranian air space, I was not scared. No, when we waste time trying to see the president’s tax returns, I am not scared; Trump may be, though, because he is not nearly as rich as he boasts. Valerie Shaw Flynn Chico

To continue the “history lesson” mentioned, the U.S. “mistakes” in the region go beyond 1914 and the British/U.S. “spoils of war” unilateral decision on borders after World War I, splitting up the Turkish Empire and forming Israel. Let’s not forget our blunder of ousting Iran’s democratically elected prime minister and installing and supporting the infamous despot Mohammad Reza Pahlavi (brutal dictator from 1941-1979). Further back came the Crusades, the armed invasion by a European cult on a people whose religion, though based on the same origin myths, failed to believe in this new prophet Jesus. What scares me is the misappropriation of U.S. government policies by this cult. Their view of a second coming and the ignorant belief that they have the one true answer from their “one true god,” though allegedly held by a “radical few,” seems to be our president’s. Through him this cult has gained access to the largest, already existing nuclear weapons stockpile in the world. I do pay attention, Ms. Torres, and the less Mr. Trump concentrates on events, other than his golf game, 6 

CN&R 

J u LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

the better for the world. In my opinion, he is the biggest threat to world peace today. As-salaam alaikum. Rich Meyers Oroville

Ms. Torres is right about one thing: Iran isn’t like any country. Two facts distinguish Iran from others. 1) Iran hasn’t attacked any country for two centuries. 2) Iran long ago chose not to possess nuclear weapons. Iran’s leaders spend their time maintaining their country, not meddling with others. Meanwhile, Trump breaks the modest deal with Iran, threatens them continuously, flies drones into their airspace repeatedly, and spreads endless lies for endless wars—like, Iran killed U.S. soldiers in Iraq and that they funded 9/11 attacking tankers transporting their oil. Turn on your B.S. detector already. The entire “crisis” is American made. The real terrorists, CIA, and media create a completely false narrative, then act on it in true Hegelian dialectic fashion. Remember when we sabotaged Iran’s nuclear power facility with Stuxnet? If Iran didn’t stop it, a meltdown would have poisoned Iran and the world! This Stuxnet virus migrated to other nuclear power plants, allegedly including Fukushima. Nonsense statements like “Iran would destroy their own country for a caliphate” are pure projection from people who do want to destroy Iran. David Kiefer Chico

Anti-American and cruel MS-13, an international criminal gang, represents to President Trump the scourge of the brown cultures and countries he is waging war against, people he feels threatened by. Those gang members who have been duly arrested, convicted and imprisoned have living conditions far superior than the thousands of brown immigrant children being held in U.S.-sponsored internment camps, living in squalor: It has been documented in court the Trump administration argued that they should not be required to supply the children with toothpaste. Following a tour of the camps by congressional Democrats, members of Congress spoke of shocking, unacceptable and

Those gang members who have been duly arrested, convicted and imprisoned have living conditions far superior than the thousands of brown immigrant children being held in U.S.-sponsored internment camps, living in squalor ... —roger S. Beadle

inhumane conditions. Some described it as a prison—then again, one needs to remember that in prison each prisoner has a bed. Separating children from their parents should happen only in the direst of situations. To do it as a warning to others, to imprison children as examples in conditions that violate human rights, is just plain cruel and is being done without any extended compassion for the thousands of families damaged. Shame on you, President Trump, and to those that suck up to you and write your racist immigration policies that are anti-American to their core. Roger S. Beadle Chico

Moon landing memories On July 20, 1969, I was in the Air Force at King Salmon, Alaska. We had been following the flight of Apollo 11, and I was on duty, watching C-141s on the scope as they shuttled to Southeast Asia. Someone said, “They landed,” and we went out for a quick look at the moon and to say a few profound, profane or prophetic things and then back to watch for Russian surveillance planes at the edges of our radar. Twenty years later I was a pilot flying with Cal Worthington. With a store in Federal Way, Wash., he saw a business trip with an educational opportunity because the Hornet was at Bremerton Naval Base and Buzz Aldrin was going to speak. Cal’s kids and two World War II buddies came along. We followed Buzz to a bookstore for a book-signing. I overheard him say he needed to go to San Jose. I said, “Hey, Cal ...” and he chatted with Buzz. I went to the airport to get things ready, Buzz and Cal showed up, and off we went. People at Cal’s Sacramento store told a TV station

in San Jose, who arranged an interview and a limo. He gave us copies of Men From Earth. Dan Fregin Chico

Taxes and independence Re “Rethink your votes” (Letters, by Loretta Ann Torres, July 4): I don’t recall that deplorable roads and freeways and necessary gas taxes were issues back in 1776. Roger Klaves  Chico

‘A choice, a job’ Re “Check your letters” (Letters, by Gary McHargue and Mike Guzzi, July 18): Being in today’s military is a choice, a job. Being a teacher, a first responder, a parole officer, a social worker or a nurse are among the many jobs that generally make a reliably positive difference to life in the U.S., without harming the world. Having a military is necessary, and the U.S. military played a very important role in bringing the Liberian Ebola epidemic to an end. Also, the National Guard does needed and useful work helping in national disasters, such as after the Camp Fire. Sadly, most of what the military has been doing in the past two decades has made the U.S. less safe, the world more unstable and unsustainable. Those drafted to fight in Vietnam should never have been blamed for that war. But those choosing to be a part of the military are responsible for their actions, and should not blindly trust that their military actions have any real value. Citizens need to respect the military less and respect other life-affirming professions such as teaching more.

I would have liked the county to offer funds available to cover Camp Fire rebuilding permit costs on the basis of need. Lucy Cooke Butte Valley

The ponds, part II Re “The ponds are fine” (Letters, by Dick Cory, July 11): In my previous letter, I was too subtle in my criticism of the Teichert Ponds. I was trying to make a point that the city is willing to accept free labor to eradicate what they want, while ignoring the bigger problem that lies beneath in the water. The ponds are being contaminated by inflow of stormwater draining from developments and the Chico Mall to the east. The pond ecosystem is in trouble and doesn’t need further contamination from human “squatters.” Paul Maslin and his students were mentioned as being different from me in their knowledge of the ponds. I worked with Paul and the city for about 10 years in convincing the city to take ownership of this treasure. I am a biology teacher who has emphasized ecology in my classes, which included a five-week field biology class at the ponds for Chico Unified School District and National Science Foundation summer classes at UC Davis. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to explain my viewpoint. The questions you raise are all-encompassing. I’d like to say “yes,” but that would be an exaggeration of my knowledge. I hope you will continue your interest in the ponds. Dick Cory Chico

Correction Last week’s Arts DEVO column (by Jason Cassidy) incorrectly listed the Blue Room Theatre as one of the places Legacy Stage co-founder Erin Horst taught theater. Horst teaches theater only at Inspire School of Arts & Sciences and Chico State. –ed.

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK FARM

Free Initial Consultations! • • • • • •

Ages 0-18 years Phonological Processing Disorder Speech Delay/Articulation Disorder Sensory Processing Disorder Autism Spectrum Disorder Pediatric Swallowing Disorders/ Food Aversions • Neonatal Oral Motor Assessment for Feeding ages 0-3 months

What’s your favorite vegetable?

YTable

Asked at Thursday Night Market Elizabeth Vichi M.A. CCC-SLP

Mary Fries

fullcirclest@gmail.com 30 Landing Circle Suite 103 Chico, CA 95973 530-892-9127

Enroll Now! • TK-8th Grade • Tuition Free • Small Class Sizes Providing a Balanced & Integrated • California State Curriculum Standard Curriculum

• Science, Art, and Music • Electives • Homework Club • After School Care

2346 Floral avenue ChiCo, Ca 95926 ParadiseCCCs.org • 530.877.2227

sales

I like broccoli a lot. I like roasting it in the oven with lots of herbs, or mixing it with other foods.

Keegan Nazari engineer

My favorite vegetable is a Persian cucumber. It’s about 6 inches long, about an inch in diameter, with tender skin that you don’t have to peel. I like to slice it in half with the skin on and put salt on it. A very simple and easy snack that’s good on salads or on its own.

Paul Villalba sales

Brussels sprouts. I like to slice them in half, pan fry or saute them with a little bacon until they’re crispy and tender. Then I serve them up with a reduced balsamic vinegar.

Rachel Morgan benef it advocate

My favorite vegetable is zucchini, and I like to have it stir-fried with chicken, garlic or steak. It’s really easy to prepare. J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

7


NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE PG&E LOG DECK SITES CITED

Butte County has issued eight citations at three different log deck staging locations operating without permits post-Camp Fire. PG&E contractors had set up these sites to store dead or dying trees from the Ridge or elsewhere in the burn scar, but they never applied for or received county permits (see “Clearing the trees,” Greenways, June 27). On Tuesday (July 23), the Butte County Board of Supervisors will vote on an urgency ordinance that stipulates where lumber storage and processing is allowed. Chris Jellison, code enforcement manager for Butte County, told the CN&R this week that since late June, two sites closed and three received citations for continuing to operate. A judge will determine whether to fine the contractors.

TWO DEATHS, ONE SUSPICIOUS

The California Highway Patrol’s local investigative unit is looking into the death of Maria Curtev, whose identity was released to the public last Friday (July 12), 10 days after her body was found in the Feather River in the Oroville Wildlife Area. Curtev was reported missing in mid-June, according to the CHP, which is investigating in conjunction with the Butte County Sheriff’s Office and has labeled the death as suspicious. Meanwhile, following an inquiry from this newspaper last week regarding a body found on July 3 on East 20th Street, the Butte County Coroner’s Office on Wednesday (July 17) confirmed the death of Robert Johnson, 59, whom law enforcement believe was homeless. According to Chico Police Commander Mike Rodden, no foul play is suspected.

LOCAL COORDINATOR DEPARTING

Aug. 15 will mark Jennifer Griggs’ last day as the coordinator for the Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care (CoC). Griggs (pictured) was the first person to hold the position full-time, having been hired in January 2018. She was tasked with planning and preparing the 2019 homeless census and helping local agencies collaborate and navigate complicated grant application processes. On Monday (July 15), the CoC formed a committee to evaluate its options going forward. Ed Mayer, executive director for the Butte County Housing Authority, said the CoC will hire a contractor to perform her duties in the meantime. Griggs told the CN&R her work with the CoC has been rewarding, but her home flooded twice this winter, and her family has decided to move out of state.

8

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

Hooking up Water purveyors vary on requirements for rebuilding in burn scar

Rmakeliving.headlines So, while he hadn’t set out to for being the first person— ichard Towne builds modular homes for a

along with his wife, Kathy—to move into a newly constructed house in the Camp Fire burn by scar, it’s not all that surMeredith J. prising. Cooper “It took a lot of hard work—it was a fight m er e d i t h c @ n ew srev i ew. c o m to get it to here,” he acknowledged, sitting back in a camping chair under a canopy outfitted with a mister in what’s now his front yard. “But we had tremendous support—everybody was on board.” The permitting process was the easiest part, he said. He used a private debrisremoval company—one he works with regularly on other jobs—and a PG&E employee who lives around the corner greased some wheels to get the power turned on. Del Oro Water Co. came out and conducted a test on the water at the Townes’ meter, and it came back clean. Richard also requested proof that testing

had been done along the water main in his Ishi Drive neighborhood—they emailed the test results promptly, he said. “They said it was all clear, it’s potable,” he said. For his own piece of mind, he said, he had the service line from the meter to the couple’s new home replaced. He also requested Del Oro conduct a test at his kitchen sink, which was done. “It cost $70. They were absolutely cooperative,” he said. On Monday (July 16), three weeks after the Townes moved in, Paradise issued its first new occupancy permit, to the Sinclaire family. Their road to rebuilding was a little tougher, however, because Paradise Irrigation District’s (PID) guidelines are more stringent. That, and there’s been a donot-drink warning in place since December, when benzene was first found in Del Oro’s system. (Del Oro has issued no warnings.) Luckily for the Sinclaires, and others living in Paradise, PID has devised a strategy for removing the warning for properties—whole streets, even. After that has been completed, and the new home builder has replaced the burned-out service line from the meter to the house, there’s

an additional step before hooking in to the system: installing a backflow device. “It’s basically a one-way valve—it lets water in, but won’t let water back out from your property into the main water system,” explained Mickey Rich, information systems manager for PID. The district historically has required them for anyone with a swimming pool or large water storage tank, she said; now, as an added safety precaution following the fire, they’re required for everyone before hooking in to the system. “The way I’ve always explained it is, you may not want to get a backflow device yourself, but you sure want all your neighbors to have one,” she said. Having safe, drinkable, shower-able water

has been a concern on the Ridge since the fire. When the water systems depressurized due to structures burning, they became filled with all manner of debris. On top of that, the extreme heat melted the plastic piping and water meters. It’s believed that the melted plastic was the source of contamination—primarily benzene, a known carcinogen.


But while both PID and Del Oro have discovered similar contaminants, only PID immediately issued warnings to residents to not drink the water, or even use hot water to shower—when benzene is heated, it becomes a vapor and can be breathed in. Many people in Paradise subsequently installed their own water tanks or filtration systems. Restaurants were handed extra requirements for reopening. In Del Oro’s districts—which encompass the Magalia and Paradise Pines communities—there were no additional requirements. A Del Oro representative declined to be interviewed for this story. Over the past couple of months, PID has increased its testing while also beginning to certify certain areas as having potable water. The process is complicated, but the district wants to be thorough, Rich said. Step one is testing the water main to ensure it is not contaminated. Then, a test is conducted on a service lateral— these are like driveways off of a street, Rich explained. PID tests the portion from the main line to the meter. This is where the majority of the contamination has been found, according to both PID and Bruce Macler, a toxicologist with the state Water Resources Control Board. If contamination is found there, that line will be replaced, Rich said. If not, it’s certified clean. “For burned lots, because so many of them are contaminated, what PID wants to do is not even do a test [on the service lateral], just replace it with a brand-new shiny service lateral,” Rich said. “What they’re seeing in the main lines is that nearly all of the main lines are meeting guidelines—97 percent meet guidelines. Over half of our main-line mileage has been tested.” The third step to approval is the most important, she said, and requires a panel of experts assembled by PID to take a look at the individual property. “They actually look at history and location— what do we know about this area? Is there a reason why this would be more at risk [for breaking]? If there is, they won’t approve it.” The process does take time, Rich said, and will take rebuild permits into consideration. Their abundance of caution is for the customers’ sake, however. “We’ve been cautious from the very beginning, because these are our families, these are our friends,” Rich said. “Until we are sure, the last thing we want is someone we love, or our neighbor, going home and taking a big old gulp of something that’s going to hurt them.” Ω

Insult to injury Ridge escapees, other wildfire survivors preyed upon post-disaster Sharon Bagnato lost the two-bedroom house

she shared with her daughter on Sleepy Hollow Lane in Paradise. Her parents, John and Cindy, lost their place on Pentz Road. And her grandparents, both in their mid-80s, lost theirs on Country Club Drive. That left four generations of the family scrambling to find places to live. And for a time, like many others displaced by the blaze, recreational vehicles served as makeshift homes. Bagnato and 5-year-old Allison moved into a travel trailer at Gold Country Casino’s RV park shortly after Christmas. Her parents bought an RV and joined her, followed by her grandparents, who already owned a rig and had been able to haul it off the Ridge when they evacuated on the day of the fire. In April, Bagnato moved into a twobedroom apartment in Chico. Meanwhile, her parents, who’d been outbid on homes there amid the contracted post-fire real estate market, joined forces with her grandparents and purchased a home in Yuba City. Bagnato’s rig was transported to Country Club Drive— to a vacant property immediately adjacent to her grandparents’ burned-out lot that her parents own and had planned to build on to be close to the octogenarians. Her father used three separate cables and locks to secure the RV. It sat there for the past few months, as Bagnato has worked on rebuilding her life, including addressing the post-traumatic stress she suffers as a result of

SIFT ER Trends in ag

an eight-hour harrowing escape on Nov. 8. But like the other things in her life that went up in smoke, the RV has vanished. Last week, her family discovered that someone had stolen it. “It’s been quite emotional for me since that happened,” Bagnato said, tears welling in her eyes. During an interview with the CN&R on Monday (July 15), Bagnato recalled how she and Allison had grown attached to the RV, which had provided a rare sense of stability in the chaos, and how they were looking forward to using it for camping. She explained that the rig—a 20-foot Nomad Joey—had been a gift from a woman who’d set up a GoFundMe campaign that helped generate enough funds to purchase RVs for several evacuees in need. Getting ripped off is another hit in a post-

F RM FA YTable

In May, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service released a report that assesses important trends and changes within the agriculture industry nationwide. Notable findings of the Agricultural Resources and Environmental Indicators report include:

duction was generated by the 3 percent of farms with at least $1 million in gross revenue.

• Since 2015, cropland value has declined by nearly 5 percent. Pastureland values have remained stable, however.

• Acreage enrolled in the USDA Conservation Reserve Program—a federal program that offers rental payment to farmers who protect environmentally sensitive land—declined from 29.5 million acres in 2012 to 22.4 million acres in 2018.

• While 89 percent of farms were considered small (with a gross revenue of less than $350,000) in 2017, 39 percent of pro-

• Organic retail sales generated approximately $49 billion in 2017. The number of certified organic operations more than doubled between 2006 and 2016.

Cindy (left) and Sharon Bagnato, and 5-year-old Allison, visit the Ridge property that had until recently housed Sharon’s RV. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

fire period full of seemingly endless challenges, she told the CN&R. The theft was reported to the Paradise Police

Department. Bagnato is hoping the RV is recovered. If it’s not, she won’t be compensated because it had not yet had been insured. According to Paradise Police Chief Eric Reinbold, the trailer is among 53 vehicles reported stolen in the town since the first of the year. That includes cars, motorcycles and boats, among other transportation modes. Theft became rampant on the Ridge after the fire—as looters migrated in to scour the area for items of value when the town was cordoned off, often under the cover of darkness—but property crime continues to be one of the region’s primary issues during this time of repopulation and recovery. “It’s insult to injury because these people are trying to re-establish or rebuild and it’s very disheartening to hear they’ve been the victim of a theft,” Reinbold said. Paradise’s top cop listed other crimes tallied in 2019, and noted that his officers have made more than 400 arrests in that time period. Most of those taken into custody are locals, but there’s also an element that’s come to the region to prey on its vulnerabilities, Reinbold said, noting the arrests of folks from Yuba City, Marysville and Oroville as examples. “Anytime there’s a disaster like this there are going to be people who unfortunately take advantage of the situation,” he said by NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

O N PA G E 1 0

CN&R

9


$5 OFF

any purchase of $20 or more

GOOd at all arC StOreS!

www.thearcstore.org

Chico 2020 Park Ave. • 530.343.3666 Oroville 2745 Oro Dam Blvd E • 530.532.1272

CNR coupon expires 08.18.19 Excludes ARCoffee & consignments. Not valid with other specials. One coupon per visit.

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI “We help YOU through the System” We assist with paperwork! Attorney at Law

LAw O ffI CES O f B ET SY H. ALBERTS Over 35 years of experience.

976 Mangrove, Chico • 530.893.8387

NEWSLINES c o n t i n U e d f r o m pa g e 9

phone. Before the Camp Fire, Paradise PD was home to 21 sworn officers. Down by about 24 percent, it operates today with 16, Reinbold and a lieutenant included, though a handful of recruits are in the pipeline, the chief said. Since the fire, Reinbold has encouraged folks in the burn scar to remain vigilant, to watch out for their neighbors. But with so few residents re-established— approximately 3,000 people have returned to this former town of 27,000—that type of community policing isn’t easy. In response, Reinbold said his department is setting up a meetand-greet in the coming weeks with residents who are captains in the town’s evacuation zones. The idea is to form relationships with them and help spread a philosophy of working together. Meanwhile, with all of the construction starting up, he’s encouraging folks who are rebuilding to take extra precautions with their equipment and supplies. Simply locking things up—as the Bagnatos learned the hard way—may not be an adequate measure to stop thieves. “While it’s an inconvenience to move stuff in and out all the time, it’s a best practice,” he said. Allison, Bagnato said, has taken the theft particularly hard. Since the fire, she’s expressed her feelings more often in angry outbursts and also through drawings—first of her home on Sleepy Hollow Lane and now of the missing RV. Bagnato nearly purchased a house near her parents in Yuba City—primarily to be closer to her family, her support system— but she changed her mind and was able to back out of escrow. She wasn’t emotionally ready to step away from her life on the Ridge, and she’s comfortable in Chico, where she’s been working part-time. “I don’t want to be far from my house in Paradise,” she said, pausing, “even though it’s not a house anymore.” —Melissa Daugherty me lissad @ newsr ev iew.c o m

10

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9


Branching out Homeless service providers partner, expand programs for emergency sheltering in Chico and Oroville

For the first time in Safe Space Winter Shelter’s

six-year history, the homeless individuals it serves will find refuge under one roof this rainy season instead of moving from church to church. This is thanks to a $189,877 grant-funded partnership between Safe Space and the Torres Community Shelter that’ll provide beds for about 50 people. Though the location has yet to be determined, this is a significant development, says Angela McLaughlin, president of Safe Space’s board of directors. She was anticipating a second short shelter season for the organization this year—churches it has used are still housing Ridge schools post-Camp Fire. Plus, the grant will fund a paid case manager and shelter monitors, placing less demand on volunteers. “We’re pretty excited about it. I think it’s a good opportunity for both [organizations],” McLaughlin said. “[Safe Space has] historically served a segment of the population that doesn’t fit in with the other shelters. … By being able to collaborate with a partner that already has those day services and case management [and] social workers in place, we can really move people forward.” This wasn’t the only news in the service provider realm this week. The Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care (CoC) made grant funding recommendations on Monday (July 15) totaling just over $1 million for local organizations focused on sustaining, expanding or creating new emergency shelter services. This was the first year the body decided to create one application for multiple state and federal funding sources to streamline the process. The recommendations were approved by a majority of the CoC board, coordinator Jennifer Griggs told the CN&R. Four agencies applied; all were awarded except the Jesus Center.

Catalyst Domestic Violence Services and the Torres Shelter each received shelter operating funds—$207,000 and $226,060, respectively. During this process, the CoC also decided where to divide remaining Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) funds—approximately $450,000 had been returned to the CoC by the Jesus Center earlier this year after the center pulled out of a 24/7 low-barrier shelter partnership with Safe Space. Three projects were considered: Safe Space’s new partnership, an expansion of services at the Oroville Rescue Mission, and a new program for temporary housing for families living at the Torres Shelter. What follows is a formality—the CoC’s recommendations have to be rubber stamped by local, state and federal agencies, then contracts will be signed and the organizations can get to work.

Housing, which will serve 36 individuals, or about nine to 12 families. It’ll provide temporary housing with wraparound case management, according to Amaro. She hopes to get families settled in within a month: This week, she met with architects to ensure the home is ADA-compliant. It’s slated to receive $136,326 for operations and staffing. “Having a permanent location that families can come to while they’re awaiting permanent housing is huge,” Amaro said. “It’s providing an environment that is a lot safer and a lot healthier for our children. And that’s critical because they’ve already gone through so much trauma in their little lives.” Plus, it frees up space at the Torres Shelter. For the past couple years, the facility has taken in more folks when Safe Space is at capacity. Also on Monday, the Oroville Rescue Mission was

awarded $317,875 to bring three additional staff members on board for three years, including a fulltime case manager, night-time shelter monitor, and data-entry specialist tasked with bringing the organization into an already established countywide coordinated-entry system for homeless clients. It also will allow them to replace an old freezer and purchase a larger cold storage unit to support its food distribution program for families in need. Annie Terry, Oroville Rescue Mission’s family Changes also are in store for the Torres Shelter’s services coordinator, says she is excited about the parent organization, the Chico Community grant funding—the organization’s first—which will Shelter Partnership, which this week was reborn improve and expand the services the nonprofit offers as True North Housing Alliance. to clients and help it progress toward a goal of estabJoy Amaro, the Torres Shelter and True lishing a 200-bed low-barrier shelter in the city. North’s executive director, said that over the past Right now, the organization’s antiquated, overtwo decades, the organization has experienced crowded facilities are sheltering approximately 60 tremendous growth in the number of people it to 80 people per night, Terry said, and its men’s and serves, as well as the programming it offers, such women’s shelters comfortably hold about half that as transitional and permanent supportive housing. number. They regularly set up cots wherever they “We really want to show the community and can find room to offer more people a safe, warm our donors what we do … we do so much more place to sleep, she said. than just sheltering,” Amaro said. She added that “By a long shot, there’s not enough [shelter the name change also is indicative of the organiza- beds],” Terry said. “We want to do the best job tion’s plans to expand services outside of Butte possible to effect change in the [highest] number County, including a potential project in Tehama of people’s lives. … I think these are the first steps County. toward us being able to do that.” The aforementioned housing project for —ASHIAH SCHARAGA Torres families is called Aurora North Bridge ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

Against detention Hundreds of protesters from throughout the region—including many from Chico— descended upon the Yuba County Jail in Marysville on Friday (July 12) to protest the incarceration of people seeking asylum. In the past year, detention centers across the state have ended their contracts with ICE, forcing the federal government to search farther to house immigrants seized at the U.S.-Mexico border. Yuba County is the last one remaining in Northern California, according to the ICE website. As sunset approached, a group from Jewish Voice for Peace compared the treatment of asylum-seekers to the early days of the fascist regime in Germany. And Chicoan Ali Meders-Knight spoke about how Native Americans were treated and the government’s imprisonment of them.

Acupuncture

Chinese Herbs & Massage Pain Management, Weight Loss, Digestive Issues & Allergies

Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. Elinore Schafer L.Ac. Most insurance accepted

1209 Esplanade Ste 1 530.342.2895 • AmericanChi.net Mon & Thur 10am-6pm • Tues & Wed 9am-6pm Friday 9am-2pm • Sunday Noon- 4pm

Same Day Service

(530) 826-6931 License #1026898

Save up to

50% ts on restauran and events!

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

PHOTO BY CHARLES FINLAY

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

11


HEALTHLINES Danette York says she looks forward to the challenges that lay ahead as the new director of Butte County Public Health.

want to live.” And, it’s great—it’s a beautiful, beautiful area. You’re living in Gridley?

We made a few trips down and started looking for housing. As I’m sure you know, the housing market is tough right now. We were already campers, so we owned a trailer. We hoped to move from a house to a house, but that didn’t work out. So, we brought the trailer down and set it up in a campground in Gridley. We’re under contract for a house here in Oroville and we’re hoping closing will be early August. You came here at an interesting time, with a lot of unprecedented things happening. Did that factor into your decision?

To our health Butte County’s new director of public health talks goals, challenges story and photo by

Meredith J. Cooper mere d i thc @ n ewsrev iew. com

12

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

W one can discern that she’s not from around here. It’s the tinge of a Southern

ithin a minute of meeting Danette York,

drawl that shows her roots. Born and raised in Georgia, she attended the University of Ohio—her husband is from the Buckeye State—where she got her master’s in public health. The couple’s dreams of living in the Pacific Northwest brought them to the West Coast. York worked for nearly a decade as head of Lewis County Public Health and Social Services in Washington. A few weeks before starting her job as director of Butte County Public Health on July 1, she and her husband and their two dogs—a great Dane and a giant schnauzer—moved in their RV to a camp-

ground on Highway 99 in Gridley. York is the successor to Cathy Raevsky, who retired as public health director March 1. She comes in at a time of turmoil and uncertainty in Butte County, in the wake of the Camp Fire— so she certainly has her work cut out for her. Not to mention public health concerns such as a recent measles outbreak, which was just this week declared over, and an opioid epidemic. York brings with her experience working in a rural area, which she says will help her to tackle the issues her new community faces. With just two weeks under her belt in her new position, York sat down for a meet-and-greet with the CN&R at Mugshots in downtown Oroville. What made you interested in coming here?

I had been in Lewis County for almost 10 years. We just wanted a change. It’s just me and my husband now; the kids have grown and are living in different areas. And we were a little tired of the rain, wanted a place a little warmer. I saw the opening in Butte County and put my résumé in. They actually offered to interview me by phone—or, Skype—and I said, “No. I’ll pay for it myself, but I’m going to come down and make sure it’s a place we

I of course was not here during the fire or even shortly thereafter. It is a very unique situation for everyone involved, and it’s a unique situation for me. But, my professional expertise is in public health and I like the area, and the community seems really resilient. So, it didn’t really play HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 15

APPOINTMENT Give blood, save a life Every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood—just a single car accident victim can require up to 100 pints of the stuff. Now that’s a lot of blood. Give what you can this Wednesday (July 24) from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 3:30-5:30 p.m. at the Enloe Conference Center, Room 102. You are eligible if you are at least 110 pounds and in good general health. And there are benefits for you too—giving blood can reduce excess iron in your body, lower your risk of heart attack and keep your liver healthy. Blood donation benefits everyone!


JULY 18, 2019

CN&R

13


“I put it off for a very long time because I’ve had anxiety and dental problems since I was very young. Since having my work done here, I have had more confidence than I’ve ever had. The doctor was amazing, and he did a wonderful job of putting my mind at ease and telling me about the entire process start to finish.” — Chrissy

Q: I have a chronic fear of dental work and heard of oral conscious sedation. What is it exactly? A: Oral conscious sedation allows a patient to be in a relaxed state between being asleep and awake throughout an entire visit. To achieve this, we administer nitrous oxide anesthesia, which has been used safely for years and has found a home in dentistry for both kids and adults. Here at Kremer Dental Care, we are glad to offer the comfort of oral conscious sedation at both of our locations in Chico.

Call today to make your reservation. Glenbrook 530.892.1234 PhiladelPhia Square 530.892.1218

14

CN&R

J UL Y 1 8 , 20 1 9

U.S. department of Agriculture | Food and Nutrion Service | FNS-493 | June 2016 USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer | VOCS is an equal opportunity institution

3120 Cohasset Rd, Ste 6, Chico • 895-3572 • www.ValleyOakChildren.org

Serving All of Butte County


HEALTHLINES

What do you see as your biggest challenge?

My biggest challenge is getting to know the local and state codes and laws that apply to public health and other areas as well— because we’re all partners. Coming from a different state, there is a learning curve, and it takes time. But I’m excited about learning new things. I consider myself a lifelong learner. I’m a geek, I guess—I like to read codes and strategic plans and things like that. Here in Butte County, we have a high rate of drug addiction—and not a lot of treatment centers—and we have a huge homeless population. We just had the Camp Fire, which has introduced issues with air quality and water contamination. We recently had a measles outbreak. So, there are plenty of pretty big issues facing our community. Do you

see any of them as being highest on your priority list?

I think all of those are priorities. And obviously all of them are important. With the exception of the Camp Fire and the recovery for that, the rest of them are not unique to Butte County. So, it’s public healthor social services-related. I look forward to working with my team to learn more about the problems here and how they came about, and what our role can be within them and addressing them as best we can. What kinds of things did you deal with in your last job that prepared you for this one?

Washington state had one of the largest measles outbreaks in recent history. The county that I worked in did not have any positive cases, but the work around public health when an outbreak occurs, regardless of whether you have any cases in your area, creates more work. Physicians start watching it closer—which we want them to do. People get scared. That’s understandable, but our job in public health is education first and foremost, to make sure people are prepared with information. We can use some of the same skills across the different states. Ω

This guy saves you money.

into my decision. I recognize that it’s a challenge and that recovery is a long process, but I have a great team. Everyone told me that ahead of time. And now that I’ve had a chance to meet almost all the employees, I’m really excited about getting started working with our local team, as well as our state and federal partners.

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

WEEKLY DOSE

Attend An upcoming orientAtion: August 8th or 15th

Summer rash

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

It’s hot out, you sweat, and soon you notice itchy, red bumps and blisters on your skin. What is it? Heat rash, also known as “prickly heat,” is a common summer affliction that occurs when a blockage of the sweat glands causes perspiration to be caught in the deeper layers of the skin. People who sweat easily are the most susceptible, as are babies and children because their sweat glands are underdeveloped. Heat rash occurs in the places you sweat the most, and though there is no remedy, there are strategies to ease your pain. Antibacterial soaps can shorten its duration, and topical solutions like calamine lotion can help with the itch, but be wary of oil-based treatments as they can block your sweat glands even more. Most important, keep your skin cool to prevent more sweating by taking cold showers and wearing loose clothing.

Foster Grandparents are volunteers who provide support in schools, afterschool programs, preschools, and child care centers in Butte and Colusa County. They are role models, mentors, and friends to children, focusing on literacy, mentoring, and school readiness. If you are 55 or over and want to stay active by serving children and youth in your community, you have what it takes to be a Foster Grandparent. Foster Grandparents serve 5 to 40 hours per week. Volunteers may qualify to earn a tax-free, hourly stipend. You’ll receive pre-service screening, orientation, placement at your volunteer station and monthly training.

reservations in Advance are required

cAll to reserve A spot todAy! orientatons are from 10am-3pm and lunch is provided

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

15


GREENWAYS WAYS

Butting out Legislation would ban cigarette filters due to environmental toll, lack of purpose

by

Rachel Becker

W one last drag and flicks the cigarette butt onto the ground. It’s instant litter that California e’ve all seen it, the smoker who takes

Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson wants to prevent by banning the filters in most cigarettes. The Democrat from Santa Barbara’s bill, SB 424, would ban filtered cigarettes, disposable plastic holders and mouthpieces, and single-use electronic cigarettes. It also calls for manufacturers to take back any nonrecyclable parts of reusable e-cigarettes. The bill cleared the Senate in May, but it’s now in the Assembly Committee on Governmental Organization—where previous cigarette butt bans have gone to die. If Jackson’s bill meets the same fate, she warns the tobacco and e-cigarette industry could face an even more difficult road ahead. Alameda and Santa Cruz counties are considering policies of their own to curb cigarette butt litter. And the Beverly Hills City Council just voted for a tobacco-products sales ban that goes well beyond the butt. “The last thing these industries want is to have to deal with 58 county or 352 different city ordinances,” Jackson told CALmatters. “I don’t think these folks want to go there. We’re offering them an opportunity to do this on a statewide basis that frankly will benefit everybody.” So far, however, only vaping giant Juul has come to the table, according to Heidi Sanborn, executive director of the National Stewardship Action Council, the lobbying group sponsoring the bill. Juul, which sold a 35 percent stake to tobacco company Altria in 2018, has proposed amendments. But it’s

16

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

uncertain yet how much influence it will have through this process. To the rest of the industry, Sanborn said, “Something is going to happen, whether it’s local or state. And the faster industries come to the table, they won’t be on the menu.” The bill would have far-reaching conse-

quences for tobacco manufacturers and retailers, since almost all cigarettes sold in the U.S. are filtered, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most of those filters are made from a plastic called cellulose acetate, which even scientists working with the tobacco industry admit doesn’t readily decompose. That makes cigarette butts an enduring source of litter. Ocean Conservancy volunteers cleaning up coasts across the world picked up 2.4 million cigarette butts in 2017—including nearly 200,000 in California—making it the most common piece of trash collected. More than 27,000 butts were collected on the shores of Lake Tahoe this past year. And cleaning it up isn’t cheap. San Francisco calculated that picking up cigarette butts cost the city nearly $7.5 million in 2009. “It’s just trash that’s being thrown out in the environment,” said Patricia Holden, a professor at UC Santa Barbara who studies environmental microbiology and chemistry. “Where else, in what other context, do we consider that to be acceptable? We don’t.” Scientists like Holden are still investigating what exactly all these butts mean for the environment, but lab experiments suggest it can’t be good. Smoked cigarette butts leach metals into water. And Thomas Novotny, an emeriAbout this story:

It’s an abridged version of the original, published by CALmatters.org, an independent public journalism venture covering California state politics and government.

tus professor at San Diego State University School of Public Health and founder of the Cigarette Butt Pollution Project, discovered that just a couple of smoked cigarette butts can kill off two different kinds of fish. Even the smoked filters themselves, without any remaining shreds of tobacco, were deadly in higher numbers. “They’re toxic, and it’s preventable,” said Novotny. “And the remedy for something like this is SB 424.” Jackson’s bill isn’t the first time California lawmakers have tried to ban butts. Assemblyman Mark Stone, a Democrat from Scotts Valley, has tried to get a filter ban passed three times. Each time, the bill died in the Assembly Committee on Governmental Organization. “Cigarette waste is the most ubiquitous trash we find in beaches, parks, rivers, everywhere,” he said. “Cigarette waste is so ubiquitous, people stop seeing it.” His bills, too, took aim at the filters. The reaction the proposal tends to get, Stone said, is “‘Holy cow, you’re doing what?’” The worry is that filterless cigarettes would be even worse for smokers. Neal Benowitz, a professor at UC San Francisco who studies nicotine pharmacology, is on the fence. “We do not yet have evidence in people that filters do or do not reduce toxin exposure,” he told CALmatters in an email. Until we know for sure, he’d argue against a ban. But historian of science Robert Proctor points to the tobacco industry’s long and deceptive history with filters to support a ban. “Filters are the chief design fraud that cigarette makers have been using since the 1930s to reassure people it is safe to smoke,” said Proctor, a Stanford University professor and author of Golden Holocaust: Origins of the Cigarette Catastrophe and the Case for Abolition. “They’re more like a seatbelt made of wet spaghetti—they’re really illusory.”

In fact, filters have been linked to an increase

in one particular kind of lung cancer called adenocarcinoma. One theory is that smokers may wind up taking bigger, deeper puffs on filtered cigarettes, exposing more of their lungs to cancer-causing chemicals. “The public has been buffaloed into thinking filters filter when they really don’t,” Proctor said. “That’s why they are the deadliest fraud in human history and should be banned.” Jackson’s ban goes further than Stone’s to tackle waste from electronic cigarettes as well. These devices heat a nicotine solution to produce a flavored, nicotine-filled vapor, and range in form from the first-generation, disposable cigarette look-alikes to the USBshaped reusable Juuls that are dominating the market. The waste these devices produce includes everything from the painted metal case to the lithium-ion battery inside and the disposable plastic pod or bottle that holds the liquid nicotine. For the Juul itself, a company spokesperson told CALmatters in an email that it “should be treated as any other consumer electronic device, such as a cellphone.” As for the pods, “They can be thrown away in a regular trash can.” But a spokesperson for the California Department of Toxic Substances Control said e-cigarettes and pods are classified as hazardous waste if they’re still smeared with nicotine when they’re tossed. Liquid nicotine is a poison and a pesticide that in large enough quantities can cause vomiting, seizures and even death. Jackson isn’t placing bets on the bill’s prospects, though she thinks her colleagues are more aware of the need. “I am optimistic,” she said. “I’m not willing to put any money down on it, but I do think that this is a conversation whose time has come.” □


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY JEREMY WINSLOW

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

New vintage sounds

Allies at last, reinventing Rawbar

There’s nothing like cruising down the street in a six-fo’ with a killer stereo, but what if you could take that stereo with you? Kaden Hill is an engineering wiz who manufactures killer, portable stereos sold under the Rare Bird Stereos moniker at rarebirdstereos.com. The stereos first start with an idea, usually a speaker Hill finds in a junk shop or thrift store. He installs the found speakers into a variety of vintage vessels: canteens, purses, suitcases, toolboxes. Then, after some time and work—cutting holes, lining the interior with acoustic foam and wood, shellacking to prevent rust, wiring—the end product is an “up-scaled Bluetooth stereo,” as Hill describes it, replete with multiple-day battery life and bassthumping speakers. The News & Review caught up with Hill in Sacramento, where he lives, to talk about Rare Bird Stereos, favorite projects, living with attention-deficit disorder and music.

When did Rare Bird start? Rare Bird was probably about four years ago. I was living out in the woods with some friends, and that was kind of a time in my life where I was learning to ride the waves of the universe. I didn’t have a whole lot. I didn’t really have a job. I had a friend that was throwing a market in Sacramento, so I started building stuff for it. I was building little wood reclaimed shelves—anything I can find. My passion has always lied in what I can find around me and what I can make out of it. I kept finding speakers everywhere, just laying on shelves.

Craziest, fave project? I love doing custom work. That’s probably my favorite … when there’s intention behind it. … There’s a sentimental value. It gives it an actual purpose. The coolest one I got to do will forever be—it was actually for an ex-girlfriend of mine who’s a really good, dear friend—was this ’80s red TV… I took the actual screen and cut a wood

piece to go where the screen was. I Mod Podged this static on it so it looked like a dead TV. I put the speakers in there, I put these different lights in it. It was rad and weird.

How does your ADD influence your creativity? [I was diagnosed with dyslexia and ADD in] my junior year of high school. I was like, “That’s why this has sucked.” But I also didn’t truly apply myself because academics was never really my jam. I was lucky enough to have teachers who would let me do art projects instead. I think I’ve come to know myself a lot better than I ever have, where I understand that I get depressed sometimes, or I understand that some days are crazy, but it’s also temporary. Working in the trades, too, you always have so many projects going at one time that it’s really easy to be ADD.

Fave artist, music genre? I listen to a lot of old country, like Hank Williams. That’s my genre. It’s [also] a lot of Steely Dan and rock. I love rock. … And psychedelic rock.

Hair • Wigs • Cosmetics

RENOVATION TIME Not far away, at the corner of Fourth and Broadway streets, Rawbar has closed its doors. But do not fear—it’s only for a couple of months while some of the major renovations on the building it inhabits are undertaken. It’s my understanding there’ll be an outdoor patio when they’re finished, plus the renderings for the façade look amazing. In the meantime, you can get your Rawbar fix this weekend (July 18 and 20) at special pop-up nights at Argus Bar + Patio. BANKROLLING A few weeks ago, I announced in this space that Bank of America had donated its long-empty building in Paradise, which survived the Camp Fire, to the town. Well, it’s not the only financial institution stepping up to help out in the recovery effort. Golden Valley Bank Community Foundation this week announced it will pay the salary for a disaster recovery manager for a year—with the understanding that the position would be retained for at least three years. “In the aftermath of this disaster, it is clear that the Town of Paradise requires someone to oversee what will be a complex and lengthy recovery,” a press release from the town reads. It’s awesome to see the support that was so overwhelming in the immediate aftermath is still strong.

BreakFast & lunch caterInG avaIlaBle saturday dInner By reservatIon

Get in my Belly!

530.520.2593 1043 W. 8th street

meredithc@newsreview.com

When I walked through the door at what’s soon to be the Allies Pub last week, I could hardly believe the transformation. What was once office space—next door to Bank of America, on the back side—is now a warm, vibrant, comfortable pub. When I mentioned that to the owners—Steve and Alison Kay and their daughter and son-in-law, Emma and Justin Martin—they said they were aiming for a cross between a traditional English pub and Cheers. I looked down at my shirt and, yep! I was dressed appropriately for the occasion in my commemorative T-shirt from the venerable Boston bar of the classic sitcom. But, back to Allies. Despite the huge amount of work it took to transform the space, it couldn’t be more perfect. The location is great, right around the corner from the City Plaza, and with a large shaded patio out front and ample parking. The kicker, it turned out, however, was the fact that the historic building actually has a cellar. That allows the Kay/Martin team to cellar-condition their beers the traditional British way. They even imported hand pulls from England to draw directly from the cellar. The menu will be simple, they say, and focus on bangers and mash, as well as traditional pasties and pies. What is of particular interest to me is the large wine list to accompany the British Bulldog and Specialist (their American partner, ahem, ally) beers. They’ll have 18 wines on the menu, including some local ones (see “Wine, beer and Bible hobbies,” The Goods, June 13). Steve Kay told me they’re expecting all their final inspections to happen this week, so look for news about the Allies opening very soon. Maybe I’ll see you there.

TLC Thursdays

Inday’s FIlIpIno

• Hair Care Products

2175 Baldwin Ave Oroville 95966 (530) 533-7720

—JEREMY WINSLOW

by

Meredith J. Cooper

Live Music 7-9

Fresh, Delicious Wood-Fired Food Pizza • Salads • Vegan Menu Artisan Coffee • Beer • Wine Champagne Cocktails 365 East 6th St. @ Flume St., Chico

530.433.0414

@tenderlovingcoffee J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

17


FARM YTable

The future of local farming Will small-scale food producers become a thing of the past?

I

n the CN&R’s annual Farm to Table Issue, we set out to provide a snapshot of today’s local farming landscape, as those in the industry worry about a dearth of young folks joining Butte County’s biggest industry. We check in with a longtime local rancher and farmers’ market board chairman about local food providers; we discuss the challenges facing two couples who got into agriculture despite not having come from farming backgrounds; and we interview local educators about how they’re integrating food gardens and animal-raising into school curricula.

18

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

The calling Young farmers are harder to come by these days— the work is gruelling, and the business is complex

W

hen Richard Coon surveyed the crowd at a recent Wednesday farmers’ market in north Chico, he was pleased to see a colorful and bustling scene as customers interacted with growers. It also worried him, however. As one of the farmer-members of the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market (CCFM) and also chairman of its board of directors, Coon is deeply invested in the success of the markets. “This is how we should be obtaining our food,” he said.

The problem worrying him is that many of the market’s farmers are nearing retirement age. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the average farmer is 58 years old. Unfortunately, too few young people are interested in taking over the business. Locally, this is particularly true of the Hmong families that produce so much of the fresh produce sold at North Valley farmers’ markets. More and more of their kids are going to college and becoming nurses or teachers or engineers. Asked whether she intended to farm when she graduates from San Jose State, Trudy Saechao couldn’t say. Though she is in Chico for the summer to work for her family’s Saeturn Farm, she was unsure what the future held. This concerns Coon, owner of Wookey Ranch in Chico. “As we get older, we have to wonder where it’s all going,” he said. “It’s hard to find people who want to take up farming. It’s hard work.” It’s also hard to find a profession that is more important than feeding people.


According to the

U.S. Department of Agriculture, the average farmer is 58 years old. Unfortunately, too few young people are interested in taking over the business.

expectations when it comes to food. The increasing presence of small-scale farms and consumers’ ever-increasing preference for their products has had ramifications throughout modern agriculture by offering consumers organic products they can trust to be fresh, healthful and free of toxins. Just as important is the impact these farms have had as an alternative to corporate agriculture. They’re designed to serve local markets, bypass middle men and avoid having to transport food long distances. According to the USDA, however, the number of mid-size family farms—including those seen at farmers’ markets—is shrinking and big farms are getting bigger. The number of young people taking up farming is nowhere near enough to replace the number exiting. This is not good for the food system as a whole, nor for consumers. Lee Altier is a professor of plant science

Husband and wife Richard Coon and Christine Hantelman, owners of Wookey Ranch, worry about the future of small-scale farming. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

Unless a person inherits a farm, it’s extremely

difficult to get started in farming, especially in California, where land prices are through the roof. In addition, farming is a capitalintensive occupation, and capital is scarce. Equipment is pricey, worker’s comp is costly, and many young would-be farmers carry substantial student loan debt, making it hard for them to obtain bank loans. It is also a complex business requiring a wide range of skills and knowledge, from accounting and marketing to soil chemistry and meteorology. Yep, the weather. Its unpredictability turns farming into an occupational crap shoot. Monica Szczepanski, CCFM’s office manager, notes that, of every 20 applicants for booth space at the local farmers’ markets, only one is an actual farmer. The growing shortage of farmers creates an “existential threat,” Coon says, to the continued success of the kind of niche, small-scale farming that has led to the proliferation of “farm-to-fork” markets and transformed customers’ perceptions and

at Chico State and director of the Organic Vegetable Project at the University Farm. When he arrived here in the 1980s, he says, there were only about 300 students in the College of Agriculture. Today there are about 1,000. Most of them will graduate and go to work in agriculture, Altier says, but few—mostly those from farm families who own their land—will actually become farmers. Instead, they will work for government agencies such as the Natural Resources Conservation Service and the USDA or become sales reps flogging ag products, from tractors to fertilizers. Some will become ag consultants; others will go into farm or ranch management. Altier notes that his daughter is in that last group: She manages a bison ranch in Hot Springs, Mont. Back at the farmers’ market, a chalkboard sign in front of one of the booths indicated that it was the site of “The Kids’ Farmers’ Market.” A gaggle of youngsters squeezed forward, lured by the ripe strawberries a CCFM volunteer was handing out. Farming isn’t an occupation; it’s a calling, one that often is sparked during childhood. Many of the farmers who sell their products at farmers’ markets are exurbanites who at some point remembered how, as children, they loved working in the family vegetable garden. Only the kind of passion that comes from a great love of the land is sufficient to attract young people to such a difficult occupation. Many of those who heed that calling, however, are forever grateful that they did. —ROBERT SPEER rob e r t s pe e r@new srev i ew. c o m

FARMS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 0

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

19


FARM YTable

Planting the seed

K-12 educators implement new projects to encourage interest in agriculture

M

cManus Elementary School teacher Paige Bush embarked on an exciting project with her second-grade students last year: helping them start their own garden. They cultivated a variety of crops, including lettuce, chard, spinach, broccoli, cilantro, peas, beans and strawberries. Then, they set up a market outside of their classroom and asked for donations. The kids and other schoolchildren ate some of the produce and took some home to their families. “They got to see [the process] from farm to fork, and how much patience and care it takes throughout the month to actually be able to harvest,” Bush said. The bounty didn’t stop there: The kids were able to use the money raised from the market to go on field trips—a local farmers’ market, a walnut orchard and a pumpkin patch. 20

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

Bush, who grew up on a farm and has a degree in agricultural business, said she was inspired to create such a program because she believes it is important for young students to have educational opportunities within that sector of the economy. Most of her students live in the suburbs of Chico, and their families don’t grow their own food. “I saw the interest and the passion [for agriculture] in some of my students, which is the whole reason I’m doing it,” she said. “You want to expose them to: How does food get on your plate? Where does chocolate milk come from? It’s not from brown cows.” The role schools and programs like Future Farmers of America (FFA) and 4-H play has arguably become more important as the average age of the American farmer has continued to increase, reaching approximately 58 in 2017, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s census. To address this trend, local educators have tasked themselves with trying to generate interest in the field by providing enrichment opportunities for children. Butte County 4-H’s latest endeavor is a good example. The local chapter has been around for more than 100 years and provides programming to more than 500 youths ages 5 to 19. Ryan Cleland, the local program representative, says he always is focused on increasing student participation. During the last school year, he instituted a program that offers a ready-made curriculum—and has had success with other 4-H chapters—to teachers this area. For example, this spring, third-grade students at Helen Wilcox Elementary in Oroville used a high-tech incubator to study chicken embryo development, from fertilization to hatching. It was a hit: 75 students enrolled, and they had a 95 percent success rate, Cleland told the CN&R. At the end of the project, they created tri-fold boards and shared what they’d learned. He’s purchasing two more incubators for classrooms next year, and plans on developing more ready-made curricula for teachers in ag and other educational fields. “It is very much in line with 4-H’s greater vision of wanting youth to learn through doing and getting their hands on a project—not just learning the theory of it, but learning it in practice,” he said. Matt Reed, a Gridley High School teacher and

Top: Paige Bush’s second-grade students at McManus Elementary School work in the garden they established this past school year. PHOTO COURTESY OF PAIGE BUSH

Left to right: Kyler Storey, Kaitlyn Miller and Makenzie Hoffman, students in Janet Ashley’s third-grade classroom at Helen Wilcox Elementary School hold chicks they studied, cared for and hatched using an incubator. PHOTO COURTESY OF RYAN CLELAND

Gridley FFA Chapter adviser, says ag education in his community generates a lot of interest. The programs are at capacity every year, with about 285 students enrolled and three advisers who teach ag mechanics, horticulture and animal science pathways. He says one of the focuses is on backyard production: Not everybody can afford to buy big plots of land, “so they have to make do with the half-acre they have, and we have to teach them how to grow crops and raise livestock [on that].” Many students come from low-income families that cannot afford to participate in traditional livestock-raising programs. In those instances, Reed and his colleagues point them to grant, scholarship and loan opportunities with the National FFA Organization and local groups like the Butte County


Cattlemen’s and Cattlewomen’s associations, or encourage them to broaden the scope of projects they’re interested in undertaking. For example, Reed has one student help him work at the school greenhouse each year. Private businesses also are providing resources for urban students to take an interest in agriculture. Take, for instance, M&T Ranch in southwest Chico, which spans more than 8,000 acres and produces almonds, prunes and walnuts. It has provided high-schoolers with barn space and paid summer internships for decades. Les Heringer, who has managed the ranch

since the mid-’80s, says the barn holds up to a dozen animals each year: Typically the space goes to hogs, but they’ve also taken in goats and sheep. These spots are specifically reserved for students who otherwise would have nowhere to house and raise livestock for the Silver Dollar Fair. “Most of the students who are going into agriculture now were not raised on farms,” Heringer said. “We’re hoping the help we’re giving them will help get them involved in agriculture in the future.” Agriculture is Butte County’s largest economic driver. Statewide, more than a third

of the country’s vegetables and two-thirds of the country’s fruits and nuts are grown in California, according to the California Department of Food and Agriculture. “For all the students, it helps them understand what it takes to farm, what it takes to feed not only people in this country but [also] worldwide,” Heringer said. “California ships to markets all over the world.” Heringer says agriculture isn’t something people have to be born into to be successful in the industry. He recruited a Chico High welding student several years ago who ended up working at M&T Ranch the summer after he

graduated. He stayed on and now plays a key role, managing the herbicide and weed spray programs and supervising four employees. “I think it’s critically important for the agricultural community to reach out to the educational program[s] to get students involved … because this is where it happens, out here. And what we’re trying to do is give students a real world experience.” —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

FARMS

c o n t i n U e d o n pa g e 2 7

O’Connell Ranch Pacific Culture LLC Pedrozo Dairy & Cheese Pine Creek Flowers LLC Pure Honey Company Pyramid Farms Rancho Llano Seco Redwood Organic Farm Ransom Orchards Sac Valley Rice Company Saeturn Farms Sierra Cascade Blueberry Farm Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. SK White Ceramics Skylake Ranch Speedy Burrito Mexican Grill Spring Fever Nursery and Garden Steffen Family Farm Sunrise Batik Sweet Cottage Tea Smith’s Tender Loving Coffee The Citrus People The Hat Lady The Joker’s Bakery Tin Roof Bakery and Cafe Vue Family Farm Williamson Farm Woodleaf Farm Wookey Ranch Yamashita’s Japanese Maples Yang’s Family Farm Yony’s Roasted Corn Yoon Chao’s Farm Zook’s Farm Zong Moua ( Ha Lee Moua)

ChiCo Certified farmers market Vendors A Taste of Maidu Adams’ Olive Ranch Alldrin and Sons Alaska Salmon Alvarado Farms Ariza Farm Armstrong Chocolate Company Bamford Family Farms Beber Berryluscious Farm Bock’s Fruit Bonds Family Garden Produce Bordin Bordin-Huitt Ranch Brad Perry Bread Itself Briar Rose Farm California Soulshine Designs Capay Rancho Herb Co. Chaffin Family Orchards Chico Chai Chico Greens Chico Locker & Sausage Co. Inc. Chico Spice Company Chico’s Tamales Citrus Norte Cooper Yang Farm Dhillon’s Farm LLC Divide Ranch Dobis-Beach Oranges Douglass Ranch Down To Earth

Dye Creek Clothing Earth and Fire “Eckert Malting & Brewing Company, LLC” Euphoria Soap Works Everything Cedar and Redwood Fang Farms Farmelot Feather Falls Soap Company Feather River Farms Fiona’s Forest Flick of the Whisk Floral Native Nursery and Restoration Francia Family Farms Frutiya Farm Geffray’s Gardens GK Happy Farms grayc glass GREEN CEDAR FARM GRUB CSA Farm GRUB Grown Guzzetti’s Catering & Indian Food Happy Campers Candy Harpos Organics Heart In Hand Heartbeat Farms Hearth and Stone Bakery HenK Here Today Coffee Her’s Crafts Her’s Produce Hlee Thao

Isern & Sons Inc Julia’s Fruit Stand Kaki Farms Karita’s Handmade Katie Siegfried/Leja Farms Kinnicutt Family Nursery Kirstan Quinn LaRocca Vineyards Lee Family Farm Lee’s produce Leonardo’s Foods Live Life Juice Co. Local Spicery Lor’s Produce Mama Sattva Massa Organics McCartys Very Berry Ranch Michele Miller Photography Milk & Honey 1860 Miller’s Bake House Mind Your Body Massage Mockingbyrd Coffee Montgomery Family Farm Moua’s Produce (Xue Moua) Morning Glory Organics Mug Shots Coffee Mushrooms Adventures My Oven’s Meals Nancy’s Nursery Nickler Acres Noble Orchard Company

got mosquitoes? Need to make a service request? Need Mosquitofish? Got Yellowjackets/Ticks?

Contact 530.533.6038 or www.ButteMosquito.com J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

  CN&R 

21


Support your Local Farmers

22  

CN&R 

J UL Y 1 8 , 20 1 9

WED: Pilsbury R 7: Sat: 2nd & Wall 7:

o

Sat: D


ChiCo

Rd • Year Round, Rain or Shine :30am - 1:00pm St • Year Round, Rain or Shine :30am - 1:00pm

oroville

Downtown Oroville 7:30am-Noon

ChicoFarmersMarket.com (530) 893-FARM

JULY 18, 2019

  CN&R 

23


Pure Rejuvenation

Invigorate • Refresh • Renew • Soothe • Lavender Achieve True Relaxation with the enticing, yet tranquil aroma of certified organic botanicals

Backyard In our

Enjoy these local businesses

California SunShine

PRoducTS Bath & Body Home Essentials culinary

Enjoy Tours Photo Sessions Gifts

in a bottle

Simply the finest oil in every bottle, award winning in fact! Made right here in Butte County. 250 ml and 500 ml bottles.

17 W Rio Bonito Rd. Biggs M-Th 8-4 · F-Sat 10-2 530.868.5151 lavenderranch.com

Locally Grown • Certified Organic • Botanicals & Essential Oils • Vegan

12th annual

Summer Soiree! Saturday July 20th, 2019 from 9am to 5pm

Dust off that tiara, mend that prom dress and shine up those shoes…

…it’s time for the sUmmer soiree!!! Join the Flower Floozies of The Plant Barn for our annual customer appreciation event. Extra Discounts for dressing up! Spin the wheel for giveaways! Delight in Random Sales, Giveaways, Deep Discounts and more!

Up to 73% off certain items! Mention this ad and recieve a free extra spin!

406 Entler Ave, Chico • 530.345.3121 • www.theplantbarn.com • Find us on 24

CN&R

J UL Y 1 8, 2 0 1 9

Available in Chico at Maisie Jane’s, Made in Chico, and S&S Produce. Available in Oroville at Collins & Denny Market and the Wagon Wheel Market.

2950 Louis Ave, Oroville 530 534-8320

in and around Butte County

We make it rain! Wholesale-Retail irrigation supplies for home & agriculture

Chico Sprinkler Inc.

2 Three Sevens Ln. Chico (530) 891-0308


Art Sale

Support Local Businesses Support our Community

Original Paintings by Local Artists As LOw As $35 And UP!

“Art is something everyone needs in their life.” ~ Sally Dimas

Featuring: C. Preble Miles, Sally Dimas, Ann Pierce, Betty Polivka, Ken Moore Sr and More! GAllery HourS: Tues–Sat 11am–4pm 493 east Ave, Suites 1 & 3 | Chico (530) 345-3063 www.SallyDimasArtGallery.com

a true

traditchico ion! For Men & Women

...and more Downtown Chico 345-4880

Paradise 691 Fir St.

now Serving chico at two Locations!

178 east 7th St (530) 342-7163 | chico Mall (530) 809-4151

Summer

Social

Let’s Plant! Crape Myrtle

Carry Out

& eatery 1903 Park ave • Mon-Fri 11-7 • MenuS @baciochico.coM

Lagerstroemia indica Crape myrtles offer the powerful triple allure of brilliant summer blooms, beautiful bark, and vivid fall color. Grown as single or multi trunk trees or shrubs, they thrive in the heat and sun, come in an array of bright colors and are drought tolerant. Plantt • Bloom • Repeat

Mon-SAT 8AM-4pM | 2270 fAir STreeT | 343-7615 JULY 18, 2019

CN&R

25


26  

CN&R 

J UL Y 1 8, 2 0 1 9


FARM

do,” Callender said. “I think it takes hard work—a lot of sweat—to do what we do.”

YTable

Like the folks at GRUB, neither

Small farms, big challenges Community-focused ag businesses soldier on in face of natural disaster, market forces

N

atural disasters. Land prices. Unpredictable landlords. Market forces. Nonlocal competition. The challenges facing small-scale farmers in Butte County are many, and survival can come down to the ability to adapt and diversify. “You can’t expect that it’s going to be easy. You have to be on your game,” said Francine Stuelpnagel, co-owner of the GRUB CSA Farm in Chico. “There’s a lot of moving parts.” Stuelpnagel and her husband, Lee Callender, operate on 10 acres and offer more than 30 different types of vegetables. They run what’s called a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program, which means consumers buy products directly from a farm, paying for the product in advance. “A lot of our stuff is going super fresh from the field straight to the kitchen, prepped, [then] on somebody’s plate—and that’s pretty neat,” Callender said. For GRUB, the CSA means 85-100 families that pay monthly—like a magazine subscription—for shares of tomatoes, potatoes, broccoli, cauliflower and lettuce, among other available veggies. “It’s really a great program for [the consumers], because they get a better deal, and it’s a good program for us because it’s guaranteed income,” Stuelpnagel said. She added: “We’re trying to make a living, and we’re trying to offer a great, amazing, diverse amount of vegetables to our community.” It’s making a living that can be tricky. Callender says he believes fewer people are venturing into the small-farm business, or aren’t able to maintain one, and the reasons vary. One friend, he said, was forced to abandon a farm last year on the south end of Chico because it became unsustainable, adding that housing costs may have played a role. Samantha Zangrilli, who runs TurkeyTail Farm, which also has a CSA, says mealdelivery services such as Blue Apron threaten her business, which she says operates under a similar model but is truly local. Stuelpnagel, 41, and Callender, 39, went

Francine Stuelpnagel, left, and Lee Callender run the GRUB CSA Farm on West Sacramento Avenue in Chico. PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

Right: Seen here in 2017, Samantha Zangrilli and Cheetah Tchudi on their Yankee Hill property. CN&R FILE PHOTO

through an upheaval about six years ago, moving from a farm off Dayton Road because the landowner did not renew their lease. The couple took a year and a half to settle on their current property on West Sacramento Avenue. Now, they are looking to buy the land they operate on, holding farmto-table dinners to raise money for a down payment. Buying the land would mean long-term security, they said, and a defense against having their farm taken out from under them. “We’re passionate about what we

Zangrilli nor her husband, Cheetah Tchudi, grew up with farming backgrounds. Zangrilli studied environmental politics at Chico State and was introduced to farming while living on a co-op in town. She says farming allows her to provide a “clean, organic” source of meat in place of “adulterated” sources whose labor practices pose animal rights questions. And Tchudi says he stumbled into farming as a student at Evergreen State College in Washington, where he worked on an educational farm. Since 2008, they’ve run the 40-acre

TurkeyTail Farm in Yankee Hill, which suffered massive destruction during the Camp Fire. Zangrilli and Tchudi were comfortable with the prospect of an evacuation. They knew their roles and the things they should take with them, so when they woke up the morning of Nov. 8 and saw the plume, they got to work. Tchudi began moving propane cylinders into the open and hitching trailers. Zangrilli grabbed the ducks, saving 60 out of 80 of them. The pregnant ewes and newborn lambs also were loaded up. And then there were the products in storage. The couple had thousands of dollars’ worth of meat that needed to stay cold or risk becoming rotten without power. That would go, too. Several days after the Camp Fire roared through Butte County, Tchudi, 36, gained permission to bypass roadblocks and check out the communityfocused farmstead he and Zangrilli, 33, had been cultivating. “It was brutal,” Tchudi said. “We had a firefighter friend that confirmed that our house had burned down, and I wasn’t sure if I was going to find any animals. We had heard some reports through the sheriff that there was a pig herd running around, and so I was hoping that was us. But yeah, literally kicking through the ashes of my scorched home … digging through where my bedside table was, hoping to find my keys. It was pretty crushing.” As if running a farm wasn’t enough of a challenge in itself—TurkeyTail sold a variety of food products at Thursday Night Market, plus ran a successful CSA—they now faced the prospect of starting over. Tchudi and Zangrilli say they contemplated leaving after the fire, but decided to rebuild, largely starting from square one. Where else could they go as farmers and not confront the effects of climate change? Why abandon the customer base they’d built over the last decade? TurkeyTail maintains a presence at Thursday Night Market in Chico, selling duck eggs, herbs and flowers. Tchudi said he recently rebuilt greenhouses for mushroom cultivation—a specialty of his—on the foundation of the couple’s former home. They currently live in a fifth-wheel trailer, sharing space at a family home on the property that did not burn. “We are staying because the Chico community has shown us so much support,” Zangrilli said, “and we do this because everybody needs food— everybody eats.” —ANDRE BYIK a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

27


Arts &Culture

Iver: (from left) Jon Simcox, Mackenzie Zevely-Howlett and Sawyer Goodson.

THIS WEEK The cold synthy sound of Chico’s Iver

Tingbright these days. Or is it lookdark? Dark and cold, sending

he goth scene in Chico is looking

reverb and sadness shivering through the music community. At the center of the local storm story and photo by clouds is Iver, born Jason Cassidy as a duo in the spring of 2018 (currently a jasonc @ new srev iew.c om trio) and specializing in a chilly brand of Preview: synthy goth music. Iver performs And that’s it ... Iver Tuesday, July 23, with is the beginning and LOVATARAXX (from the end of the list of France), Scout and Mercury’s Butterfly. Chico bands currentCost: $7 ly playing original dark wave, or cold Blackbird wave, or any other 1431 Park Ave. goth-like synth-based 433-1577 facebook.com/ post-punk music. But being a blackbirdchico scene of one hasn’t stopped founders (and engaged partners) Mackenzie Zevely-Howlett and Sawyer Goodson from cultivating a neo-goth movement of sorts in Chico; they’ve just had to reach outside of the area to make it happen. Over the past year or so, working in conjunction with the Chico Area Punks, they’ve introduced Chico to Nox Novacula (goth rock from Seattle), Clayface (goth/“grief wave” from Olympia, Wash.), Terremoto (goth-inspired post punk from Australia/Oakland) and Cruz de Navajas (dark wave from Mexico), among others. “All these bands are amazing,” said Goodson. “[We’re] stoked to play more shows with them and more like-minded bands soon.” Next up: Tuesday (July 23), LOVATARAXX, a dark-wave 28

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

band from Grenoble, France, with Iver and others at Blackbird. The tool that’s made it possible for Goodson and company to plug Chico into this worldwide niche is, of course, the internet, which also is where Zevely-Howlett (21) and Goodson (25) have taken a deep dive into musical genres that were born more than a decade before they were. In a one-hour interview with the band (including new bassist John Simcox, who recently replaced Miles Claibourn), the topics ranged from Zevely-Howlett describing with admiration how German musician Blixa Bargeld (of Einstürzende Neubauten and Nick Cave’s Bad Seeds) used to squat in warehouses, and that the band’s namesake—musician/ music-show host Peter Ivers—was bludgeoned to death with a hammer, to Goodson singing the praises of the trashy noise of a cymbal used by former Cure drummer Boris Williams. “You can’t have [that] era of The Cure without that China cymbal.” The depth of knowledge is a bit of a jolt at first, until you realize that the two youthful bandleaders are already seasoned local players. Goodson has been playing music since he was 10, starting with his junior-high crew, Jet Fuel Only (which had a 15-minutes-of-fame moment courtesy of an appearance on the Rachael Ray Show), before moving on to playing drums for dozens of local punk bands. Zevely-Howlett started writing and singing songs for her first band, Lips of Renegade, when she was 13, before joining Goodson in Cell Block, the gothy punk band that was the precursor to the current project.

“Iver started because we would lay in bed at night and say we’re going to be in a band called Iver,” ZevelyHowlett said. “[It’s a] band that we talked about throughout our whole relationship.” Despite the members’ goth preoccupation, Iver is not a nostalgic replay of the likes of Siouxsie Sioux or Bauhaus. Instead, the two have studied the dark sonic elements and repurposed them to create their own sound “I love sad music,” explained Zevely-Howlett when asked about the attraction to goth, and the aesthetic that Iver has achieved is wellsuited to projecting such a mood. With a melodic bass guitar driving in its own lane, the lead couple present a striking visual side-by-side, sporting contrasting black and blond new-wave mullets (or the more fully shaved “skullet” in Goodson’s case) behind their their sparse keyboard setups. While her fiancé keeps a cold repetitive beat on a Roland drum machine (and accents with clangs on his own solitary China cymbal), Zevely-Howlett’s reverb-coated voice takes flight alongside the soaring synths. “Musically, I think the appeal is how cold yet dreamy this music can be. It can be like a blanket of sound embracing the listener, but it could also be [an] icy gust to cement you in reality,” explained Goodson. “For me, it feels like a healthy escape from continual anxiety and gives me something to look forward to: playing the style of music I enjoy/can relate to the most out of almost 15 years of being a musician.” □

18

THU

Special Events COMEDIAN KRIS TINKLE: Bay Area-native has opened for Dave Chappelle and Bill Burr. Lineup includes Robert Omoto, Phil From Chico and Sam Mallett. Thu, 7/18, 7pm. $17. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

RAWBAR POP-UP: The Rawbar Restaurant & Sushi will be offering a special menu at Argus while the restaurant is closed for a few months. Argus will also provide a small sake and Sapporo menu. Thu, 7/18, 8pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

SUMMER CONCERTS IN THE PARK: Bald Rock Boys perform everything from Sinatra to Springsteen. Thu, 7/18, 6:30pm. Riverbend Park, 50 Montgomery St., Oroville. THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Thu, 7/18, 6pm. Downtown.

Theater ARSENIC AND OLD LACE: Classic madcap comedy about poison and murderous old ladies. Thu, 7/18, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercom pany.com

19

FRI

Special Events FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT: Don’t shoot your eye out! A Christmas

RAWBAR POP-UP

Thursday & Saturday, July 18 & 20 Argus Bar + Patio SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

21

KRIS TINKLE

Tonight, July 18 Unwined Kitchen & Bar

Story is playing near the food court for the mall’s Christmas in July festivities. Fri, 7/19, 7pm. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St.

SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

FORK IN THE ROAD: Food truck rally, drinks and live music by Triple Tree. Fri, 7/19, 6pm. Degarmo Park, 199 Leora Court.

Theater

NO COST/LOW COST DROP-IN HEALING CLINIC:

ARSENIC AND OLD LACE: See Thursday. Sun, 7/21, 2pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166

Donation-based health care offering ear needles, Moxa pressure and acupressure/ massage therapy. Fri, 7/19, 11am. Chico Kodenkan, 254 E. First St.

pulling weeds in the park. Call Shane at 8967831. Fri, 7/19, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music KYLE WILLIAMS: Music in the Hop Yard with local singer/songwriter. Fri, 7/19, 4:30pm. Sierra Nevada Brewery, 1075 E 20th St.

Theater ARSENIC AND OLD LACE: See Thursday. Fri, 7/19, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercom pany.com

BLOOD DRIVE: Give blood, save a life. To make

Paradise singer/songwriter with an R&B vibe. Sun, 7/21, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

plus classic customs and motorcycles, beer garden and live DJ. Fri, 7/19, 5pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and

Special Events

FREE MOVIE: Free movie every week, call 8912762 for title. Sun, 7/21, 2pm. Chico Branch

SKIP CULTON: Vegan brunch with live music by

HILLBILLY RUKKUS CAR SHOW: Rat rod car show,

share, an acoustic instrument, your voice, a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested. Fri, 7/19, 5pm. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

Special Events

Music

downtown Chico, 132 W. Fourth St.

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to

WED

Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Esplanade performs your favorite ’80s hits. Fri, 7/19, 7pm. City Plaza,

Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercom pany.com

20

SAT

Special Events BUTTE COUNTY ART ON WHEELS FUNDRAISER: Help raise funds for traveling art studio providing art healing projects for students/staff of schools on the Ridge impacted by the Camp Fire. Merchandise being sold comes from local projects and Art on Wheels founder Jess Mercer. Sat 7/20, 11am. Made in Chico, 127 W. Third St.

DEVOTED DRINKERS APPRECIATION EVENT: Chicobi food truck and live music by the

BUTTE COUNTY ART ON WHEELS FUNDRAISER Saturday, July 20 Made in Chico

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Blue Hippies at the winery. Sat 7/20, 5:30pm. $0-$5. Nascere Vineyards, 3471 Durham-Dayton Hwy.

HILLBILLY RUKKUS CAR SHOW: See Friday. Sat, 7/20, 8am. Free. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

24

SUN

22

MON

an appointment, go to bloodsource.org/ drives and enter location code “H004” or call Margie at 332-7300, ext. 26444. Wed, 7/24, 11:30am. Enloe Conference Center, 1528 Esplanade.

INDOOR MARKET: Shop local vendors and listen to live music by Bradley Relf. Wed, 7/24, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

MYSTERIES AND MISCHIEF: Magic and mentalism night with Dean Waters and Stephen Chollet. Be prepared to laugh and have your mind blown. Wed, 7/24, 7pm. $15. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

PARTY IN THE PARK MUSIC & MARKETPLACE: Weekly summer celebration of community and commerce with vendors, artisans, crafters and music. This week, ’70s and ’80s classic rock with Overdrive. Wed, 7/24, 5:30pm. Paradise Community Park, 5582 Black Olive Drive, Paradise.

Special Events FARM STAND: Fun farmer’s market featuring local growers, plant starts, homemade bakery goods and medicinal herbs. Mon,

7/22, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 32

LANDING PARTY: Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Activities include rocket launches, robot and rover explorations, Lego challenges and more. Sat 7/20, 12pm. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade.

EDITOR’S PICK

RAWBAR POP-UP: See Thursday. Sat, 7/20, 8pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

Music CAT DEPOT: Hop Yard Music Series with local guitarist/vocalist accompanied by drums. Sat, 7/20, 4pm. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com.

CHICO LATIN ORQUESTA: The Arc of Butte County presents new local ensemble performing originals and Latin favorites. No-host bar, salsa lessons. Sat, 7/20, 7pm. $25-$45. Apollo Music and Arts, 936 Mangrove Ave.

OBE: Relaxing brunch tunes. Sat, 7/20, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

SWAMP ZEN: A night of get down and dancing with local funk/jam band. Sat, 7/20, 8pm. $12. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Theater ARSENIC AND OLD LACE: See Thursday. Sat, 7/20, 7:30pm. $14-$18. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercom pany.com

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

GET UP OFFA THAT THING Rising from the sweaty din of jam band rock comes Swamp Zen—the longtime lifeblood of Chico’s enduring hippie music scene. With original tunes that blend the soul of James Brown, the improv of the Grateful Dead and the lyricism of Van Morrison, the band always gets people on the dance floor. If you dig the jam, head out to the Sierra Nevada Big Room this Saturday (July 20) where they will be bringing the funk and recording it for a live record. The brewery will be re-releasing a special beer for the event called a PilZen Ale. J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

29


Make a

difference. California MENTOR is seeking individuals and families who have an extra bedroom and want to make a difference in the life of an adult with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Special Needs Adult(s) live with you in your home and you Mentor them toward a brighter future. Receive ongoing support and a generous monthly payment (Approx. $1100/ mo - $4400/mo). Requirements: *Valid drivers license *Vehicle *Must be at least 21 years of age *A spare bedroom *Clean criminal record

FINE ARTS

Save up to

50% ts on restauran and events!

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

as a Mentor, you become a teacher, an advocate and a friend. Information Sessions are held weekly. Please call now to R.S.V.P. Sarah Lucas (530) 221-9911

ASHLEY PENNING Art

Shows through July 26 Great Northern Coffee SEE ART

BLACKBIRD: Delectable Cannibal, collage exhibition by Heather Kelly. Reception July 20, 7-9pm. Drinks, prints, postcards and pins for sale, DJ Sprech Magic will be spinning records. Through 7/31. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Currents, national juried exhibition draws from all media from across the United States. Juried by Mima Begovic, founder of ARTSPACE 1616 in Sacramento. Through 7/26. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

GREAT NORTHERN COFFEE: Ashley Penning, print and mixed-media exhibition by local artist. Through 7/31. 434 Orange St.

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography by late Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 7/19. 265 Cohasset Road.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Map It Out, exhibition of Northern California artists presenting works invented and inspired by the theme of maps. Works represent Chico, the Bay Area and Northern California. Through 7/28. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Triple Exposure Crosscurrents, photography exhibit features artists James Canter, Stephanie Luke and Harvey Spector. Through 7/20. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Momentum, artwork by J.P. Bruce. Through 7/25. 122 W. Third St.

30

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer›s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. 400 W. First St.


SCENE

Live Music at Ike’s

July 25: JAMM, Flying Fish Cove (Seattle), Mountain Chimes (San Jose), Kairomone $5, 7pm

Murder and other hijinks

July 28: Wolf & Bear (Sac), Demon In Me (Bay Area), Sunny Acres, Citysick $5, 7pm 648 W. 5th Street, Chico (530) 924-3171 ILikeIkesPlace.com

Dusting off the laughs in a communitytheater staple

Arsenic and Old Fhelps Lace—now showing at Chico Theater Company—it to go in knowing that the play is a dark farce. It’s or anyone viewing a performance of

easy to be fooled by the seeming ordinariness, even sweetness, of its two principal murderers, the spinster aunts, Martha and by Abby Brewster (Sandy Huseth and Robert Speer JJ Hunt, respectively). rober tspeer@ It turns out the gals are happily newsrev i ew.c om putting poison in the homemade elderberry wine they serve to the Review: elderly gentlemen who board in their Arsenic & old Lace house. They say they just want to shows thursday- relieve them of their lonely suffering. Saturday, 7:30 p.m. At last count the biddies had killed a & Sunday, 2 p.m., through July 28. baker’s dozen of them and buried all tickets: $14-$18 but their most recent victim in the cellar. As the play begins, that poor felChico Theater low is stashed in the window seat. Company Written by Joseph Kesselring, the 166 eaton road, Ste. F 894-3ctc play was a big hit and a welcome chicotheater diversion from the gloom of war folcompany.com lowing its 1941 Broadway premiere, running for 1,444 performances. Its 1944 film version, directed by Frank Capra and starring Cary Grant, was even more successful and long ago was recognized as a comedy classic. More recently, the play has become a popular vehicle for community theater productions, such as the one that opened last Friday (July 12) at CTC. The story centers around Mortimer Brewster (Alex Limper), Abby and Martha’s nephew. He’s a drama critic in Brooklyn who is dealing with family issues while nervously deciding whether to go ahead with his promise to marry the woman he loves. She’s Elaine Harper (Kaitlin Tracy), who lives next door and is the local minister’s daughter. The first time the audience begins to think something is amiss in the Brewster family is when Teddy Brewster

A Menu From Around the World • 10 New Menu Items • Breakfast & Lunch • Authentic Flavors - Exceptional Service!

The murderous Jonathan Brewster (Bill Petree, left) and his accomplice Dr. Einstein (John Los) stand over Mortimer Brewster (Alex Limper) in Arsenic and Old Lace. Photo bY SUe AnderSon/bLAck cAt PhotogrAPhY

(Denver Nash), Mortimer’s brother, appears. He’s not a killer, but he’s clearly nuts. He thinks he’s President Teddy Roosevelt and periodically runs up the stairs— yelling, “Charge!” as if attacking San Juan Hill—with his aunts looking on in amusement. To them this is normal behavior. As it turns out, it’s Teddy who is burying the bodies in the cellar. He thinks they died from yellow fever while building the Panama Canal. Things get complicated when Mortimer’s longabsent brother, Jonathan (Bill Petree), shows up accompanied by his sidekick, the bibulous plastic surgeon Dr. Einstein (John Los). Like his aunts, Jonathan is a serial murderer who has killed a dozen men and is looking for a place to stash his 13th victim. That’s the setup: two groups of a dozen dead men, two more dead men needing a grave, and one window seat, with a romance on the side. Madness ensues. It’s fair to say that much of the time CTC’s staging is successful—which is to say, really funny—but not always. At the performance I saw Saturday (July 13), the actors at times seemed to be reading lines rather than creating indelible characters. Their portrayals too often were either on the nose or over the top. To be fair, the play generated a lot of laughs, especially as its setups started paying off (and the bodies started piling up). And other elements—especially the excellent and versatile set designed by David Bristow, who also directed—were first-rate. Some of the performances were quite good. I especially liked what Los did with the character of Dr. Einstein. With his gigantic white eyebrows, wild hair (à la the other Dr. Einstein) and slurred speech, he was the funniest person on the stage, as was intended. □

Breakfast Grill

3221 EsplanadE | 530.891.4500 | mon-fri 8am-2pm sUn 8am-1pm

SISTEr SpArrow & ThE DIrTy bIrDS LIVE AT

ThE bIG rooM

TuESDAy, AuGuST 6 2019 SIErrA NEVADA brEwING Co. 1075 E. 20Th ST., ChICo. TICKETS oN SALE Now! TICKETS $25 AVAILAbLE IN ThE GIFT Shop or oNLINE AT www.SIErrANEVADA.CoM/bIGrooM

SierraNevadaBeer

@SierraNevada

@SierraNevadaChico J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

31


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 07/18—WEDNESDAY 07/24 SUMMER CONCERTS IN THE PARK: Bald Rock Boys perform everything from Sinatra to Springsteen. Thu, 7/18, 6:30pm. Riverbend Park, 50 Montgomery St., Oroville.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band, plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 7/18, 7pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

19FRIDAY

EGRETS ON ERGOT

BASSMINT: Every Friday, visiting

Tonight, July 18 1078 Gallery SEE THURSDAY

18THURSDAY

AZUAH: Alternative folk artist from the Bay Area, rock/soul trio Sweet Lew share the bill. Thu, 7/18, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

COMEDIAN KRIS TINKLE: Bay Areanative comedian has opened for Dave Chappelle and Bill Burr. Lineup includes Robert Omoto, Phil From Chico and Sam Mallett. Thu, 7/18, 7pm. $17. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

EGRETS ON ERGOT: Experimental post-punk band from LA. Joining will be rockers Shadow Figures

(featuring ex-members of Licky Lips) and fellow newcomers Dorthy Valens. Thu, 7/18, 8pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery. org

JEFF PERSHING: Long-time local favorite playing rock, funk, blues and world music on the patio. Thu, 7/18, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

NATE SMITH: Country artist from

Paradise. Thu, 7/18, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

SOLAR ESTATES: Indie-electronic rockin’ and country-tinged shoegazing with local future-pop band. Thu, 7/18, 8:30pm. $5. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

and local EDM producers and DJs throw a bass-music party in the Peking Restaurant bar. Fri, 7/19, 9:30pm. $5. BassMint, 243 W. Second St.

BLACK MAGNET + SCOUT: Chico Pride benefit with local experimental noise rock band and heartfelt singer/songwriter. Fri, 7/19, 9pm. $7. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

BLACKOUT BETTY: High-energy, highoctane rock by local headbanging tribute band. Fri, 7/19, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

THE CHARITIES: Soul-funk band from So Cal. Local indie rockers Scarlet Pumps share the bill. Fri, 7/19, 9pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Esplanade performs your favorite ’80s hits. Fri,

PARTY OF ONE

Legend has it Bob Log III lost his hand in a boating accident as a child and it was replaced with a monkey’s paw, but he insists that he just has a “very, very hairy” hand. On stage, Log pummels his guitar and drums to pulp, cranking out footstomping Delta blues while wearing a cannonball suit and a helmet attached to a telephone receiver. Bask in his glory this Tuesday (July 23) at Duffy’s Tavern with Chico’s own Sex Hogs II and Bad Mana.

7/19, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico, 132 W. Fourth St.

JAMM BAND: Local band performs and the Rare Barrel Brewery takes over the taps with sour beers. Fri, 7/19, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

KYLE WILLIAMS: Music in the Hop Yard

by local singer/songwriter. Fri, 7/19, 4:30pm. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E 20th St. sierranevada.com

MAX MINARDI: Singer/songwriter

with a country-tinged voice. Fri, 7/19, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

MICHAEL RUSSELL TRIO ALBUM RELEASE: Roots rock ’n’ roll group

celebrates release of Electric Blue Dream. Local dirty-blues band Little Black Cloud opens. Fri, 7/19, 8pm. $5. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign up at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 7/19, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

ROCKIN’ DOWN THE HIWAY: Cover band performs tribute to the Doobie Brothers as well as other American road trip hits. Fri, 7/19, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SOUL POSSE: Fun five-piece dance

SAFETY ORANGE: San Diego band brings surf vibes with beach-rock and reggae. Fri, 7/19, 8:30pm. Feather

band plays hits from yesterday and today. Event is tropical-themed and will debut new gin from the distillery. Fri, 7/19, 6pm. Almendra

gooD fooD, great entertainment,

granD time!

Delicious Hot Wings & Nachos! All Day! Happy Hour D Light & $2 Draft Bu s t & $3 WeLL Coors Ligh 1672 a hammonton smartville road, marysville Next to City Limits Showgirls

Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

SUMMER RURAL CONCERTS: Strung Nugget Gang plays bluegrass and Americana. Fri, 7/19, 6:30pm. Berry Creek Community Park, 300 Rockerfeller Road, Berry Creek.

joIN ouR

teAm

CN&R Is LookINg FoR • AdveRtIsINg CoNsuLtANt • dIstRIbutIoN dRIveR the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. FoR moRe INFoRmAtIoN, vIsIt www.NewsRevIew.Com/CHICo/jobs

530-443-2089 32

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

equal opportunity employer


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 28

GREX & GUEST NO. 66 Tuesday, July 23 Tender Loving Coffee SEE TUESDAY

SKYNNYN LYNNYRD: Lynyrd Skynyrd

tribute band. Sat, 7/20, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SOUL POSSE: Five-piece dance band

TYLER DEVOLL: Local singer/songwriter performs for happy hour. Fri, 7/19, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

20SATURDAY

AMAHJRA: Psychedelic alternative

blues band plays the Box with The Manimals and DJ Circuitree. Sat, 7/20, 9pm. $8-$10. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

CHICO LATIN ORQUESTA: The Arc of Butte County presents new local ensemble to play original compositions and Latin favorites. No-host bar, salsa lessons with VIP tix. Sat, 7/20, 7pm. $25-$45. Apollo Music and Arts, 936 Mangrove Ave.

DRAG SHOW: Watch your favorite drag

performers slay the stage. Sat, 7/20, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

THE DRAPER BROTHERS: Cameron Ford

and Lee Shawland share the bill. Sat, 7/20, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: All-

request music soiree. Sat, 7/20, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

NR SATURDAY: Dubstep, EDM and

Trap DJs sling beats. Sat, 7/20, 9pm. $5-$7. The Lab Bar and Grill, 250 Cohasset Road, Ste. 10.

RETROTONES: Classic rock and country

tunes for late-night happy hour. Sat, 7/20, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

playing hits from the ’50s and today. Sat, 7/20, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

STRUNG NUGGET GANG: Bluegrass swing with a twist. Sat, 7/20, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

SWAMP ZEN: A night of get-down and dancing with local funk/jam band. Sat, 7/20, 8pm. $12. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

21SUNDAY

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Sign-ups start at 8pm. Sun, 7/21, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

23TUESDAY

BOG LOG III: Trash Rock Tuesday with the legendary one-man guitar party himself. Chico’s Sex Hogs II and Bad Mana share the bill. Tue, 7/23, 9pm. $10. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

comedians. Sign-ups start at 8pm. Wed, 7/24, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 7/24, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

PARTY IN THE PARK MUSIC & MARKETPLACE: Weekly summer celebration of community and commerce with vendors, artisans, crafters and music. This week, ’70s and ’80s classic rock with Overdrive. Wed, 7/24, 5:30pm. Paradise Community Park, 5582 Black Olive Drive, Paradise.

GREX: Art rock band from Oakland performs, locals Guest No. 66 open. Tue, 7/23, 8pm. $7. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

PUMP UP FOR PRIDE

LOVATARAXX: Darkwave sounds from

Chico Pride celebrations commence the weekend of Aug. 22, with festivities all around town—the theme this year is “Stay Gold” in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in New York. The Naked Lounge will hold a fundraiser for the upcoming events this Friday (July 19), with a concert featuring local heavies Black Magnet and singer/songwriter Scout. There also will be info available about Pride Weekend, including details on passes and tickets.

France. Local bands Iver, Scout, and Mercury’s Butterfly share the bill. Tue, 7/23, 7pm. $7. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. Come on down and get on the list. Tue, 7/23, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

24WEDNESDAY

DYSPHOTIC: New Mexico death metal

for the apocalypse. The Deprived and Lyfecoach open. Wed, 7/24, 8pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org.

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly Wednesday dose of free comedy with experienced and first-time

Best Diner in Chico!

15% OFF Total Guest Check

Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

Not valid with any other discount, coupon or 2 for 1 special pricing. Expires 8-30-19

1695 Mangrove avenue • 530-895-1195

15% OFF Total Guest Check

Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

Not valid with any other discount, coupon or 2 for 1 special pricing. Expires 8-30-19

1695 Mangrove avenue • 530-895-1195

15% OFF Total Guest Check

Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

Not valid with any other discount, coupon or 2 for 1 special pricing. Expires 8-30-19

1695 Mangrove avenue • 530-895-1195 J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

33


REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Crawl

Opening this week

5

Midsommar

The Last Black Man in San Francisco

A traditional festival in Sweden—which only happens once every 90 years—devolves into something much darker than a group of visiting young Americans anticipated. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

The Lion King

Jon Favreau (Elf, Iron Man) directs this photorealistic CGI remake of the 1994 Disney animated classic that features an impressive cast of voice actors, including Chiwetel Ejiofor, Donald Glover, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen, John Oliver and, naturally, James Earl Jones as Mufasa. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Home and abroad

The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Two fine films—one regional, one international— at the art house

T

he Last Black Man in San Francisco has an exceptional and perhaps surprising emotional richness to it. As the title suggests, racial issues and nearby elements of regional perspective are key parts of it, but a complex, deeply ingrained by friendship is at the heart of it and Juan-Carlos deep attachments of several sorts Selznick figure prominently in the overall drama. Jimmie (Jimmie Fails, playing a version of himself in a story that he co-authored with childhood friend Joe The Last Black Man in San Talbot, who directs) and one Francisco Montgomery Allen (known as Opens Friday, July “Mont” and played by Jonathan 19. Pageant Theatre. Majors) are longtime buddies Rated R. who move into a temporarily unoccupied Victorian in the Fillmore district. The place was once the residence of Jimmie’s The Souvenir family, and the two young men Ends tonight, July see themselves not as squatters 18. Pageant Theatre. but as fastidious and respectful Rated R. caretakers of a monument to family history and cultural diversity. Quirky diversity of character makes itself felt in a variety of ways in the film. Jimmie works as a retirement home caregiver, and a skateboard is his favored mode of transportation. Mont has a job in a fish market and works around the clock on notes and sketches for a play about the everyday life around him (a performance of the play is part of the film’s climactic scenes). The increasingly fraught interplay of myth and reality in the young men’s lives eventually

5

4

pushes the story toward a vividly contemporary kind of tragicomedy. Fails (untrained as an actor) and Majors give strong, unique performances. Danny Glover is jovial and iconic as Mont’s blind grandfather. Standouts in secondary roles include Willie Hen as an activist street preacher, Jamal Truelove as a doomed neighborhood friend of Jimmie and Mont, and Finn Wittrock as a too-smooth real estate agent who’s also from the neighborhood. Writer-director Joanna Hogg’s The Souvenir is a fasci-

nating puzzle of a film that centers, more or less, on a young woman who aspires to writing and directing films and a well-dressed young swell who takes a sidelong interest in her. A kind of love story develops between them, but it’s a tale told unconventionally through a somewhat mystifying array of fragments. Stylishly edited in terms that suggest a somewhat unhinged stream-of-consciousness approach, the film’s shape-shifting narrative foregrounds an oddball romance that defies easy explanation. But as The Souvenir’s more enthusiastic reviews note, it might also be taken as a convoluted evocation of the creative process, or as a paradoxical set of reflections on upper-middle-class Britain in the late 20th century. Honor Swinton Byrne (daughter of Tilda Swinton, who also appears in the film) and Tom Burke play the central couple, and both are very good in their contrastingly ambiguous roles. Brilliant editing of sound and image combine with those performances in ways that let The Souvenir flourish as a kind of cubistic character study in which two oddly interesting people fight a perhaps losing battle with how little they understand themselves and each other. □

Worlds of Ursula K. Le Guin

A documentary on the life of the enormously influential speculative-fiction/ feminist author Ursula K. Le Guin, probably best known for her 1968 fantasy novel A Wizard of Earthsea and her 1969 sci-fi work The Left Hand of Darkness. One showing: Sunday (July 21), 7 p.m. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

Now playing Aladdin

Guy Ritchie (Sherlock Holmes, Snatch) wrote and directed this live-action adaptation of the classic Middle Eastern folk tale starring Naomi Scott as Princess Jasmine, Mena Massoud as impoverished thief Aladdin, and Will Smith as the genie who can make wishes come true. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Annabelle Comes Home

The Conjuring Universe of films (including The Conjuring, The Nun and Annabelle series) continues to bear horror fruit with this continuation of the dolly-occupied-byevil-spirit plot. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

4

Avengers: Endgame

There are tons of questions this movie needed to answer: Is everybody really dead? Where’s Thanos (Josh Brolin)? Where’s Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner)? Is Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) doomed in space? Does Star-Lord (Chris Pratt) still have his Walkman in the great beyond? And, how can I really talk about anything specific in this film without becoming the Spoiler King? I can say that the movie answers many of the questions everyone’s been asking, and more, thanks to another well-balanced screenplay and a crack directorial job from the team of Anthony and Joe Russo. All of this zips by in spectacularly entertaining fashion and very rarely misses the mark. And in the midst of all the action, Downey Jr. delivers another soulful, endearing performance, well beyond anything you would’ve expected from a Marvel movie before he started showing up in them. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

The Secret Life of Pets 2

In this second film in the computer-animated franchise, Max the Jack Russell Terrier (voiced by Patton Oswalt, who replaced Louis C.K.) and his animal friends continue to have adventures whenever their humans aren’t around. Cinemark 14 Rated PG-13.

Spider-Man: Far From Home

This sequel to Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) picks up after the events of Avengers: Endgame, and finds Peter Parker/ Spider-Man recruited by Nick Fury to battle new threats to the world. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Stubor

A comedy starring Kumail Nanjiani (Silicon Valley) as an Uber driver who picks up a detective and joins him in his pursuit of a deadly terrorist. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

4

The Souvenir

See review this issue. Ends tonight, July 18. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Toy Story 4

The whole computer-animated gang is back—including Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) and Bo Peep (Annie Potts)—for a new adventure with a new homemade toy pal named Forky. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated G.

1

Yesterday

Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire) directs the strained saga of Jack Malik (Himesh Patel), a wannabe musician working part-time in a grocery store. Riding his bike home—at the same time the world suffers some sort of momentary power loss—Jack gets hit by a bus. Post-accident, his manager/would-be girlfriend Ellie (Lily James) and some friends gift Jack a new guitar and suggest he bust out a song . He goes with “Yesterday” by The Beatles, and they are moved, as if hearing it for the first time. That’s because they are. A quick Google check by Jack confirms the impossible: Somehow, someway, he now lives in a parallel world where John, Paul, George and Ringo never came together to make music. So what does Jack do? He plagiarizes The Beatles’ catalog and—with the band’s music propelling him—starts to go places and maybe starts to develop a relationship with Ellie. So, rather than explore the dark side of plagiarism, or seriously address a world without The Beatles, the movie seems scared of itself and becomes nothing but a lame rom-com. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

34

After a major hurricane hits Florida, a woman and her father must evade hungry alligators that have moved into their town. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent


CHOW NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

Is freshness overrated?

friday

July 19th @ 6-9pm Herring guts and heads fermenting in a bucket.

Fermented fish sauce has been a condiment for centuries

Iever fermented spicy-sour cabbage—for a couple of years, since tasting a friend’s homemade batch in early ’ve been making kimchi—the Korean dish of

2016. Lacto-fermentation was trending at the time, and countless gastronauts and chefs were making kimchi and sauerkraut and serving it as a story and photo by garnish or side dish. Alastair Bland But fermentation hardly stops at cabbage—just about anything edible can be transformed by placing it in a jar with salt or brine and letting molds, yeasts and bacteria do their thing. Kombucha, kefir, yogurt, beer, wine, sourdough and miso are all made by fermentation. While exploring different kimchi recipes, I noticed something: many called for fermented shrimp paste. Curious about fermenting animal matter, I did some research. I discovered that beyond the trendy world of cultured tea, milk and veggies, there is a less explored, almost morbid, realm where bacteria and enzymes are cultured in flesh, blood and offal, mainly of fish. Of all the literature on fermented fish, most focused on garum, an umami condiment essential in Asian cuisine and, long ago, prized by ancient Greeks and Romans. According to historical texts, Romans made garum by putting salted fish, guts and all, in clay pots for months to bake in the sun. Eventually, they strained a strong-smelling, honey-hued liquid from the ripened mash. In these products, wonderful things happen: Enzymes originating in the fish convert fats and proteins into a variety of acids, which help preserve the flesh. The chemical changes, assisted by bacteria, also produce powerful aromatics that people either loathe or love. Canning and freezing have largely made these methods obsolete, but they are seeing a modern revival among gourmands.

I wanted a taste of this wilder world of fermented things, and when my brother and I lucked into a bounty of fresh anchovies (more than 100 pounds), I saw my chance. Following a basic garum recipe, I filled a couple of mason jars with fish heads, gills and innards. I poured in a heavy dose of kosher salt, thoroughly stirred the mixture, and put the jars in my backyard. Over several weeks, the fish solids settled into a reddish-amber liquid. The transforming sludge, though it was baking in the summer sun, did not smell the least bit foul. Rather, at week four, it was redolent of miso, onion and, well, salted anchovy. Four months later, I strained the liquid and it was gorgeous—maple-colored and clear of particles. Held to the sunlight, it glowed. However, I had recently read that botulism can grow in environments of less than 10 percent salt. Since I had, for no reason except rookie error, neglected to precisely measure the salt additions, I was uncertain if my fish sauce was safe to consume. Botulism can be treated, but the damage it causes cannot always be reversed, and symptoms of fatigue and shortness of breath can persist for years. I couldn’t be sure that my sauce had enough salt for safety, so I pasteurized it. The heating process ruined the garum, which coagulated and immediately smelled like burned beans and soy sauce. Heartbroken, I dumped it down the drain. Fortunately, I soon got another chance when my two brothers, my two nephews and I caught enough herring to fill a cooler. I jarred about 17 pounds of innards and heads and carefully calculated a conservative 20 percent salt addition. Eight months later, I strained out the garum. As a dressing and finishing sauce, it is fishy, gamey and umami—fantastic. A spoonful does wonders for a batch of kimchi. With fermentation, time becomes a tool and age an asset. Neither fresh nor foul, fermented fish occupies a place in between. □

DeGarmo Park 199 leora ct.

Over a dOzen fOOd trucks Live Music triPle tree

Free to Attend! Locally Raised, Organically Grown Business.

Serving Northern California since 1998. • Water Well Pump Extraction Services • Well Pump Repair & Installation • Pressure Tank, Bladder Tank & Storage Tank Installation • Control Box & Pressure Switch Testing & Repair • Booster Pumps • Water Pressure Diagnosis • Water Well Inspection Service • Emergency Well Service 2264 Park Ave, Chico, CA 95928 Open 24 hours • (530) 343-0330 • earlsplumbing.net J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

35


We Need

artists

ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

the Cn&r Artbox ProjeCt is looking for creative minds to transform our newsracks into functional works of art.

Contact mattd@newsreview.com to find out more!

Arriving Soon 2 Best of 0

Chico

1 9

ATTENTION LOCAL BUSINESS OWNERS: The CN&R is designing Best of Chico Posters with a QR code that links directly to the Official Best of Chico 2019 online ballot. It’s the perfect way to remind your customers that it’s time to vote for you, their favorite! This 11x17 poster will be available at no cost to you (limit 2 per business).

DON’T MISS YOUR ONLY OPPORTUNITY TO RECEIVE POSTERS FOR THIS YEAR’S BEST OF CHICO CONTEST! Pick up your FREE posters July 29–August 2, 9am-5pm at the CN&R office, 353 E. Second St.

BEST OF CHICO VOTING BEGINS THURSDAY, AUGUST 8 ONLINE

36

CN&R

J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CHICO MUSIC TELEVISION Those

dance-happy fun-makers of Chico newcomers Astronaut Ice Cream have hit the ground running. To coincide with last week’s debut-CDrelease party at the 1078 Gallery, the electro-pop duo also dropped a video for their first single, “Want.” Astronaut Ice Cream It’s an appropriately colorful romp (directed by local actor/photographer Joey Moshiri) that matches the fun energy of the infectious track. Find it at tiny.cc/wanticecream And speaking of local-band videos, Arts DEVO is late in sharing that dreamy pop-rock crew The Empty Gate recently released one as well, for its song “Hold on Forever.” Created by the band’s bassist, Mark Zempel, it’s a trippy collage to match the band’s trippy style. Witness: tiny.cc/holdonforever

LOUNGE MUSIC Word on the street is that rocker-about-town Jake

Sprecher has joined forces with the Naked Lounge to reinstate its live-music program, and one look at its calendar confirms that the hip downtown spot will once again be much louder in the evenings. Upcoming shows include a Chico Pride benefit with Black Magnet and Scout on Friday (July 19), New York singer/songwriter Ryan Martin on July 27, and a Chico Area Punks joint (with some noise from Montana and the local punkers of Mr. Bang) on July 31.

LANDING PARTY For the entire second half of 2019, the Gateway Science Museum is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the first man on the moon with its Before and Beyond the Moon exhibit, and this Saturday (July 20), the museum is marking the date Apollo 11 touched down with a Landing Party. For the price of regular admission ($7/adults; $5/kids 3-plus), you and your kids can take part in “rocket launches, robot and rover explorations, K’nex and LEGO challenges, ice orbs, sundials and more.”

JUMP JUMP TO THE RHYTHM! Rolling Hills Casino

is hosting what could be the party of the summer at its new outdoor amphitheater. The ’90s House Party tour rolls into Corning Aug. 11, with a stacked bill of two- and three-hit wonders: Vanilla Ice, Ton Loc, C+C Music Factory and All-4-One. (Now, how do we get Hammer’s House Party—currently on tour with MC Hammer, En Vogue, Coolio, Biz Markie, among others—to come to town as well?)

“TALK TO ME, GOOSE’S SON” There’ve been a bunch of birdies (flying through the air at around Mach 2) singing something about Butte County being on the highway to the danger zone in the upcoming Top Gun sequel, Top Gun: Maverick (with Tom Cruise’s character now a middle-aged flight instructor at Top Gun, where he trains his old partner’s son). The folks at Northgate Aviation at the Chico Airport wouldn’t comment on the mysterious jets that have been seen coming and going from their facility, but pictures from inside the hangar showing jets and helicopters with giant cameras mounted to the outside and vans and trucks with logos for Cinejet and Helinet (“aerial production experts”) have made it to Facebook. After some online flight-tracking snooping, I found an Aero L-39 Albatross with a week’s worth of flight paths that have zigged and zagged all over the county—up and down Feather River Canyon and over upper Magalia, Berry Creek, Belden and even up to Butt Mountain. The planes reportedly left the area on Sunday or Monday. Even though it’s obvious some flying and filming happened, whether it’s Top Gun or not is just a rumor still. We’ll have to wait and see if anything familiar streaks by on the big screen as Goose Jr. barrel rolls into theaters next summer. These guys!


JULY 18, 2019

  CN&R 

37


38  

CN&R 

J UL Y 1 8, 2 0 1 9


REAL ESTATE

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the professionals at Century 21 Select 530.345.6618 www.C21SelectGroup.com 2308 Ritchie Circle 5 bd 3.5 ba, Pool, Solar $499,000 880 Whispering Winds P E N D IN G $1,489,000 505 Windham Way S o lD 3 bd 2 ba $449,000

Steve Ka SprzyK (Kas-per-ziK) You don’t have to spell it for me to sell it! 28 years representing clients in our area Century 21 Select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com (530) 518–4850 License#01145231

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925 DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

BeautifuL Home and yard! 4 bed/3 bth, 1,881 sq ft, possible RV parking. Updated kitchen with Quartz Counters ........................................................................ $529,950 faBuLouS 2 Bed/1.5 BtH! 1,310 sq ft, 2-car detached garage, granite + other quality features. .........................................................................................................$299,900 darLing park Location! 2 bed/1 bth, 1052 sq ft cul de sac, updated kitchen, 2-car garage. ............................................................................................. $309,000 oWned SoLar! Beautiful condo, 3 bed/2.5 bth, 1,889 sq ft, 2-car garage, lovely courtyard! ................................................................................................. $365,000 Large yard! 3 bed/2.5 bth, 2,402 sq ft, formal living + dining, plus family room! Huge master! $499,909

AdorAble bungAloW located near downtown Chico. Home has a garage and very large backyard. $275,000 updATed HoMe in the Avenues located on a tree lined cul de sac. Home features 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. $329,000 ClAssiC CHiCo HoMe Me across from Lindo Channel! HomePhas immaculate D IN G wood flooring EN and a park like back yard. $285,000

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

Curious about your home’s value in today’s marketplace? Call me, I can help! SMILES ALWAYS!

JoYcE TurnEr

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

14855 klamath ct. magalia • $249,900 New exterior & interior paint, septic tank, windows, wood stove, appliances & so much more!

1.59 Acre Double Lot with beautiful valley and canyon views. $120,000 3/1 with huge yard in Chico. $263,000

CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l 530.520.3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Homes Sold Last Week

Lic# 01506350

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc.

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of July 1- July 5, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

4240 Tuliyani Dr

Chico

$830,000

3/4

SQ. FT. 3319

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

6 Greg Ct

Chico

$330,000

3/2

SQ. FT. 1498

4510 Garden Brook Dr

Chico

$801,000

5/3

3325

9 Glenshire Ln

Chico

$325,000

3/2

1231

124 W Frances Willard Ave

Chico

$695,000

3/3

1858

6 Rainier Ln

Chico

$317,000

3/2

1119

1140 N Cedar St #5 Apt

Chico

$308,500

4/2

1167

905 Mcintosh Ave

Chico

$305,000

3/2

1120

1041 Bryant Ave

Chico

$300,000

3/3

1538

1062 E 8th St

Chico

$295,000

2/1

1076

666 Esplanade

Chico

$675,000

3/2

2572

384 E 6th Ave #1 Unit

Chico

$630,000

3/2

1914

2291 River Bend Ln

Chico

$580,000

3/2

2381

709 Burnt Ranch Way

Chico

$551,000

3/2

1867

3208 Mystery Run

Chico

$507,500

4/2

2215

1280 Marian Ave

Chico

$499,000

3/2

1690

2607 Waverly Ct

Chico

$294,000

2/2

1357

Chico

$260,000

3/2

1412

4/2

1501

320 Gooselake Cir

Chico

$485,000

3/2

1660

2551 Nord Ave

4 Shearwater Ct

Chico

$483,000

4/2

1790

2703 Monterey St

Chico

$255,000

3261 Rogue River Dr

Chico

$480,000

3/2

1754

13891 Garner Ln

Chico

$220,000

3/3

1555

747 Hastings St

Chico

$475,000

4/3

2332

555 Vallombrosa Ave #53 Apt

Chico

$205,000

2/1

902

1140 N Cedar St #1 Apt

Chico

$462,500

4/2

1167

1114 Nord Ave #38 Apt

Chico

$170,000

3/2

960

8 Discovery Way

Chico

$440,000

3/2

1236

1140 N Cedar St #2 Apt

Chico

$154,500

4/2

1167

3839 Circle J Rd

Oroville

$637,000

3/3

2940

2345 B St

Oroville

$540,000

4/3

932

15 Pleasant Oak Ln

Oroville

$460,000

3/3

2193

4 Highland Cir

Chico

$440,000

3/3

1756

1343 Yosemite Dr

Chico

$435,000

4/3

2132

813 Brookwood Way

Chico

$406,500

3/2

1577

2655 Cactus Ave

Chico

$405,000

2/1

1339

1893 Autumn Hill Ln

Chico

$395,000

3/2

1544

496 Entler Ave

Chico

$395,000

3/2

1854

6375 Woodman Dr

Oroville

$426,500

3/3

2059

65 Hunter Dr

Oroville

$279,000

3/2

2555

2314 Ritchie Cir

Chico

$380,000

3/2

1650

104 Tuscan Dr

Paradise

$700,000

4/3

2819

1143 Berrington Rd

Chico

$375,000

3/2

1417

4875 Round Valley Ranch Rd

Paradise

$445,000

2/1

1052

jul y 18, 2019

CN&R

39


CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE E

Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

For more information about advertising in our Real estate section,

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

call us at

(530) 894-2300

some upgrades.

Need a hand with your home purchase?

bidwell TiTle & esCrOw

With locations in:

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

saves you money! Inday’s

$10 Value You pay $5

50%

Denied Social Security Disability? Appeal! If you’re 50+, files for SSD and denied, our attorneys can help get you approved! No money out of pockets! Call 1-844-218-7289 (AAN CAN) ENERGY SAVING NEW WINDOWS! Beautify your home! Save on monthly energy bills with NEW WINDOWS from 1800Remodel! Up to 18 months no interest. Restrictions apply. Call Now 1-855-900-7192 (AAN CAN) DISH TV - Over 190 Channels Now ONLY $69.99/mo! 2yr price guarantee, FREE Installation! Save HUNDREDS over Cable and DIRECTV. Add Internet as low as $14.95/mo! Call Now 1-800-373-6508 (AAN CAN)

Need a roommate? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN)

10

off

Rant Restau 0.2593 Inday’s | 530.52 ble for st 8th st -1749.6. Not redeema Sections 1749.45 credit. 1043-B We

Civil Code as store a Civi according to Californi used for gratuity. Change will be given te and does not expire Cannot be This is a gift certifica with other discounts and offers. cash. Can be used

Roots

$10 Value You pay $6.50

10

$

ROOTS CA TERI & RESTAURA NG NT 322

This is a gift certifica te and does not expire 1749.45-1749.6. according to Californi Not redeemable for a Civil Code Sections cash. Can be used offers. Cannot be with used for gratuity. Change will be given other discounts and as store credit.

1 ESPLANAD E CHICO, CA , 959 530.891.4500 73

35% off

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

40

CN&R

j u ly 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

Smart Monkey (See Chinese Zodiac) Would like to have that magnetic attraction-reaction with a wise male. Call 530-345-6228 Estate Moving Sale: 8-12 Sat 7/20 - 8 Falcons Pointe Dr. Chico Furniture, electronics,household goods, books, etc PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP. Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guaranteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN)

more services online www.newsreview.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as READING FOR LIFE at 1280 Pennisue Way Chico, CA 95926. DEVA WINONA DANIEL 1280 Pennisue Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DEVA WINONA DANIEL Dated: June 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000730 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTURY 21 SELECT COMMERCIAL GROUP, CENTURY 21 SELECT REAL ESTATE at 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JACUZZI LYDON LTD 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DANIEL C. JACUZZI, PRESIDENT Dated: June 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000739 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS at 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS, INC 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: PATRICIA L. DOBRICH, CFO Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000709 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COMMUNITY CONSULTANTS at 1005 Mildred Ave. Chico, CA

this Legal Notice continues

95926. SHERISSE ALLEN 1005 Mildred Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHERISSE ALLEN Dated: June 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000696 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS INC at 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS INCORPORATED 7 Laguna Point Road Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed; GAIL NOTTINGHAM, PRESIDENT Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0001369 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TIME PHO BOBA at 1124 Oro Dam Blvd E Suite F Oroville, CA 95965. CHIAD IAN TERN 52 Coarse Gold Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHIAD TERN Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000582 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as L SQUARED PRODUCTIONS at 16 Sega Dr Chico, CA 95928. LINDSEY JEAN LUNDBERG 16 Sega Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LINDSEY LUNDBERG Dated: June 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000760 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SPEC-WEST CONCRETE SYSTEMS at 2350 Park Ave. Chico, CA 95928. BORDER CONSTRUCTION SPECIALTIES, LLC 8901 E. Pima Center Parkway Suite 205 Scottsdale, AZ 85258. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: GREG VISCONTI Dated: June 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000717 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RHAPSODY RESALE at 2860 Burnap Ave Chico, CA 95973. KRISTY NALL 2860 Burnap Ave Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by

this Legal Notice continues

an Individual. Signed: KRISTY NALL Dated: July 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000792 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as STEWART PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 1924 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95928. BREE L. JONES TRUSTEE OF THE STEWART 2019 FAMILY TRUST 1924 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95928. RICHARD L STEWART TRUSTEE OF THE STEWART LIVING TRUST 1924 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: BREE JONES Dated: June 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000768 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORD AVE. MINI STORAGE at 1424 Nord Ave Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN PATRICIA BETTY TRUSTEE 3634 Bell Rd Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Trust. Signed: KATHLEEN BETTY Dated: June 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000751 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TOUCHSTONE TRUCKING at 172 Rich Gulch Road Oroville, CA 95965. CHRISTOPHER SWAIN 172 Rich Gulch Road Oroville, CA 95965. SANDRA SWAIN 172 Rich Gulch Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: SANDRA SWAIN Dated: July 1, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000793 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EVERYDAY VIETNAMESE CUISINE at 951 Nord Ave #1 Chico, CA 95926. SHUK CHING LO 1001 W. Sacramento Ave #18 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHUK CHING LO Dated: June 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000778 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LA FAMILIA RESTAURANT at 1008 West Sacramento Ave Suite E Chico, CA 95926. ROSA ELBA VASQUEZ 1336 Oak Ranch Ln Chico, CA 95973. this Legal Notice continues

This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROSA ELBA VASQUEZ Dated: July 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000814 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE PEDDLERS CLOSET at 1285 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. JOHN KIRK POWELL 1285 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. LEANN MARIE POWELL 1285 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: LEANN M. POWELL Dated: July 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000816 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GLAM MORE GODDESS at 562 Manzanita Ave #5 Chico, CA 95926. JENNIFER BRUN 13231 Taylor Street Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER BRUN Dated: July 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000818 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CLASSIC CLEANING CO. at 1285 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. JOHN KIRK POWELL 1285 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. LEANN M POWELL 1285 Filbert Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: J. KIRK POWELL Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000636 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WINDOW WASHER BOB at 175 N. Villa #8 Willows, CA 95988. ROBERT HAMILTON 175 N. Villa #8 Willows, CA 95988. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT HAMILTON Dated: June 27, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000777 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2019

NOTICES CITATION TO PARENT IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BUTTE THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO: MICHAEL STOFFER By order of this Court you are hereby advised that you may this Legal Notice continues

appear before the judge presiding in Department 9 of this court on September 4, 2019 at 1:30p.m. then and there to show cause, if any you have, why KARLY ABIGAIL ZUCKER should not be declared free from your custody and control for the purpose of freeing KARLY ABIGAIL ZUCKER for placement for adoption. The following information concerns rights and procedures that relate to this proceeding for the termination of custody and control of said minor as set forth in Family Code Sections 7800 et seq., Family Code Section 7822 and Probate Code Section 1516.5. 1. At the beginning of the proceeding the court will consider whether or not the interests of the minor child require the appointment of counsel. If the court finds that the interests of the minor do require such protection, the court will appoint counsel to represent her, whether or not she is able to afford counsel. The minor will not be present in court unless she requests or the court so orders. 2. If a parent of the minor appears without counsel and is unable to afford counsel, the court must appoint counsel for the parent, unless the parent knowingly and intelligently waives the right to be represented by counsel. The court will not appoint the same counsel to represent both the minor and her parent. 3. The court may appoint either the public defender or private counsel. If private counsel is appointed, he or she will receive a reasonable sum for compensation and expenses, the amount of which will be determined by the court. That amount must be paid by the real parties in interest, but not by the minor, in such proportions as the court believes to be just. If, however, the court finds that any of the real parties in interest cannot afford counsel, the amount will be paid by the county. 4. The court may continue the proceeding for not more than thirty (30) days as necessary to appoint counsel to become acquainted with the case. Attorney for Jessica and Benjamin Houchin, Petitioner: MIRIAM E. MCNALLY (SBN 233092) Attorney at Law 669 Palmetto Avenue, Suite H-I Chico, CA 95926 (530) 342-4033 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: June 28, 2019 Case No.: 18AB00134 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 042CC1 JESSIE EVERETT 6x12 (Boxes, Personal items, Misc.) 219SS CANDACE CARBY 6x15 (Personal items, Furniture, Misc.) 249SS LUKE KLOSTERMAN 5x12 (Boxes, Misc) 303SS WAYNE COLE 5x10 (Mattresses, Misc.) 305SS JENNIFER MUNNS 5x7 (Personal items, Outdoor decor, Misc.) 496AC E’LEXUS HILL 6x7 (Personal items, Misc.) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday August 3, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: this Legal Notice continues


Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: July 18,25, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ELISSA TANITH GLASSER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ELISSA TANITH GLASSER Proposed name: ELISSA TANITH HAWK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA MOSBARGER Dated: June 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01739 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CRIS ALAN CUMMINGS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CRIS ALAN CUMMINGS Proposed name: CRIS ALAN STEWART THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 14, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: July 2, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01796 Published: July 11,18,25, August 1, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner EVAN JAMES DODD filed a petition with this this Legal Notice continues

court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EVAN JAMES DODD Proposed name: EVAN JAMES GUILLEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: July 8, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02025 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner EILEEN JOANNE HOWESON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EILEEN JOANNE HOWESON Proposed name: JOANNE EILEEN HOWESON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 11, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: July 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01982 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: RICKEY LEE CARPENTER and CATRINA MISKELLA CARPENTER aka CATRINA MISKELLA doing business as RICK CARPENTER ROOFING; and DOES 1 TO 20. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: EFFICIENT ENERGY CONCEPTS, INC. NOTICE! You have been sued. this Legal Notice continues

The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Law Office of David J. Murray DAVID J. MURRAY, ESQ. 354 E. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. (530) 896-1144 Dated: April 22, 2019 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 19CV01244 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: MONICA M CHAVIRA YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver this Legal Notice continues

form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: September 28, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV03187 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: FRANK PROSINSKI, JOSE ACENCION MALDONADO, and DOES 1 TO 20 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: FRED BARICKMAN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), this Legal Notice continues

or by contacting you local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: ROONEY LAW FIRM 1361 Esplanade Chico, California 95926-4900 Dated: July 25, 2018 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 18CV02409 Published: July 18,25, August 1,8, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ELIZABETH D. BLACKSTOCK, also known as BETSY BLACKSTOCK To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ELIZABETH D. BLACKSTOCK, also known as BETSY BLACKSTOCK and BETSY DERN BLACKSTOCK A Petition for Probate has been filed by: ROBERT JACKSON BLACKSTOCK in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: ROBERT JOCKSON BLACKSTOCK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 30, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before this Legal Notice continues

cLaSSIfIEdS

CONTINUED ON 42

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF JULY 18, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): An Aries

reader sent me a boisterous email. “I was afraid I was getting too bogged down by my duties,” he said, “too hypnotized by routine, too serious about my problems. So I took drastic action.” He then described the ways he broke out of his slump. Here’s an excerpt: “I gave laughing lessons to a cat. I ate a spider. I conducted a sneezing contest. I smashed an alarm clock with a hammer. Whenever an elderly woman walked by, I called out ‘Hail to the Queen!’ and did a backflip. I gave names to my spoon (Hortense), the table (Beatrice), a fly that was buzzing around (Fallon), and a toothpick (Arturo).” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’d be wise to stage a comparable uprising.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Welcome

home, homegirls and homeboys. After observing all your homesteading in homes away from home, I’m pleased to see you getting curious about the real home brew again. I wonder how many times I’ll say the word “home” before you register the message that it’s high time for you to home in on some homemade, homegrown homework? Now here’s a special note to any of you who may be feeling psychologically homeless or exiled from your spiritual home: The coming weeks will be a favorable time to address that ache and remedy that problem.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The world is full of eternally restless people who seethe with confused desires they don’t understand. Fueled by such unfathomable urges, they are driven in unknown directions to accomplish fuzzy goals. They may be obsessed in ways that make them appear to be highly focused, but the objects of their obsession are impossible to attain or unite with. Those objects don’t truly exist! I have described this phenomenon in detail because the coming months will offer you all the help and support you could ever need to make sure you’re forever free of any inclination to be like that.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): What

would you say if I asked you to tell me who you truly are? I wouldn’t want to hear so much about your titles and awards. I’d be curious about your sacred mysteries, not your literal history. I’d want to know the treasured secrets you talk about with yourself before you fall asleep. I’d ask you to sing the songs you love and describe the allies who make you feel real. I’d urge you to riff on the future possibilities that both scare you and thrill you. What else? What are some other ways you might show me core truths about your irrepressible soul? Now is a good time to meditate on these riddles.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Isaac Asimov wrote

a science fiction story about a physicist who masters time travel and summons William Shakespeare into the present time. The Bard enrolls in a night school class about his own plays—and proceeds to flunk the course. Modern ideas and modes of discourse are simply too disorienting to him. He is unable to grasp the theories that centuries’ worth of critics have developed about his work. With this as a cautionary tale, I invite you to time-travel not four centuries into the future, but just 10 years. From that vantage point, look back at the life you’re living now. How would you evaluate and understand it? Do you have any constructive criticism to offer? Any insights that could help you plan better for your long-term future?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The coming

weeks will be a favorable time for you to buy yourself toys, change your image for no rational reason, and indulge in an interesting pleasure that you have been denying yourself for no good reason. In addition, I hope you will engage in at least two heart-to-heart talks with yourself, preferably using funny voices and comical body language. You could also align yourself gracefully with cosmic rhythms by dancing more than usual, and by goofing off more

bY rob brezsnY than usual, and by wandering in the wilderness and seeking to recapture your lost innocence more than usual.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Although you’ll

never find an advertisement for Toyota or Coca-Cola or Apple within my horoscope column, you will find hype for spiritual commodities like creativity, love and freedom. Like everyone else, I’m a huckster. My flackery may be more ethical and uplifting than others’, but the fact is that I still try to persuade you to “buy” my ideas. The moral of the story: Everyone, even the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu, is selling something. I hope that what I’m saying here purges any reluctance you might have about presenting yourself and your ideas in the most favorable light. It’s high time for you to hone your sales pitch; to explain why your approach to life is so wise; to be a forceful spokesperson and role model for the values you hold dear.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You are

growing almost too fast, but that won’t necessarily be a problem—as long as you don’t expect everyone around you to grow as fast as you. I suspect that you also know almost too much—but I don’t anticipate that will spawn envy and resistance as long as you cultivate a bit of humility. I have an additional duty to report that you’re on the verge of being too attractive for your own good—although you have not yet actually reached the tipping point, so maybe your hyper-attractiveness will serve you rather than undermine you. In conclusion, I invite you to celebrate your abundance, but don’t flaunt it.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

The snow leopards of Central Asia crave a lot of room to wander. Zoologists say that each male prefers its territory to be about 84 square miles, and each female likes to have 44 square miles. I don’t think you’ll require quite that vast a turf in the coming weeks. But on the other hand, it will be important not to underestimate the spaciousness you’ll need in order to thrive. Give yourself permission to be expansive.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I

want to do things so wild with you that I don’t know how to say them.” Author Anaïs Nin wrote that in a letter to her Capricorn lover Henry Miller. Is there anyone you could or should or want to say something like that? If your answer is yes, now is a good time to be so candid and bold. If the answer is no, now would be a good time to scout around for a person to whom you could or should or want to say such a thing. And if you’d like to throw in a bit more enticement, here’s another seductive lyric from Nin: “Only the united beat of sex and heart together can create ecstasy.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Did you

hear the story about the California mom who started a series of forest fires so as to boost her son’s career as a firefighter? She is an apt role model for behavior you should diligently avoid in the coming weeks. It’s unwise and unprofitable for you and yours to stir up a certain kind of trouble simply because it’s trouble that you and yours have become skilled at solving. So how should you use your problem-solving energy, which I suspect will be at a peak? I suggest you go hunting for some very interesting and potentially productive trouble that you haven’t wrangled with before— some rousing challenge that will make you even smarter than you already are.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The heroine

of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass is curious, adventurous and brave. First she follows a well-dressed rabbit down a rabbit hole into an alternate universe. Later she slips through a mirror into yet another parallel reality. Both times, with great composure, she navigates her way through many odd, paranormal and unpredictable events. She enjoys herself immensely as she deals with a series of unusual characters and unfamiliar situations. I’m going to speculate that Alice is a Pisces. Are you ready for your very own Alice in Wonderland phase? Here it comes!

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. J U LY 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

41


the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: KELLY ALBRECHT, ESQ. 1440 Lincoln Street Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 534-9900 Dated: June 25, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00293 Published: July 3,11,18, 2019

eXpAnd

Your business

reACh

A d v er t is e in Ch iCo, r e no, And sACrAmento!

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE GERALD WAYNE FAUNCE aka this Legal Notice continues oCt

obe

Get

e’ Vlad

Page

14

s

e mra k o k brea

See Art

s&Cultu

From

On the n o s sea BALLOT

Sac ram

ent o’S

ent ert ain new S &

mid voter guide

|

kly men t wee

Vol ume

ue 27 30, iSS

obe ay, oct

8 r 18, 201

|

funn y to he artfe lt,

vin

page 12

thu rSd

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2018

WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

lo c a l f o lk s s h a r e t h e ir t a le s a b out ser

+t e r m

|

SPECIAL ISSUE: 2018 election primer

g n or

the

rn

mens

nev

om

4 ENDORSEMENTS!

ada

truat

, ta h

oe

27 BLOOD ON HER HANDS 24 ZOMBIELAND

F or sp e C iA l mu lt i - mArket rA tes ,

CAll us At (530) 894-2300

www.newsreview.com 42

CN&R

j u ly 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

re, pag

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 8

flynn by John

Vie w.c new Sre

r

t

25-3

1,

and

ion

tru

cke

e

e 14

this Legal Notice continues

Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Case Number: 19PR00304 Published: July 11,18,25, 2019

2018

g r e e ni n G t h e l ig h t

e he ha s th t th ro ne , bu ng s’ ca n th e ki nt er fo rm er ce ne ra l ge as le ru ? m an ag er

GERALD FAUNCE aka JERRY FAUNCE To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GERALD WAYNE FAUNCE aka GERALD FAUNCE aka JERRY FAUNCE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LINDA D. FAUNCE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LINDA D. FAUNCE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 30, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave.

SUNDAY & MONDAY $10.00 ADMISSION 8:00 PM TO CLOSE TUESDAY TWO FOR ONE LAP DANCES ALL NIghT WEDNESDAY

FREE

ADMISSION ALL ACTIVE MILITARY

City Limits

ShowgirlS “Taking it to the Limit”

18 years or older

SUNDAY - THURSDAY 8PM TO 2AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8PM TO 3AM 1672 HAMMONTON SMARTSVILLE RD Marysville • 530.269.9422

0 .0 ith 5 $ w F d oF is a h t


jul y 18, 2019

CN&R

43


r o f s u join

h c n u l y a

d i r f 13

16

16

13

15

17

18

17

18

345 West FiFth street ChiCo, CA 95928 (530) 891–6328 Please call for reservations Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am to 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour 7 days a week 4:30 to 6:00pm

15

Profile for News & Review

20190718 110447  

20190718 110447