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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 45 WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Pet Annual

issue

100 Camp Fire cats and counting are still homeless eight months later PAGE 18

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STRESS OVER WATER

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CUTEST PET WINNERS

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BRAVO, MATILDA


Accident? injured?

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Lawrence a. Puritz F o r m e r I n s u r a n c e D e F e n s e at t o r n e y

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343-0500 northvalleylawyer.com


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 45 • July 3, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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Pet Annual

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF CAMP FIRE SURVIVOR “THE ROCK” BY SUE ANDERSON

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

PG&E’s water giveaways short-sighted Hours after this newspaper went to press last

Wednesday (June 26), a PG&E spokesman reached out to let us know that the utility soon would begin delivering water by truck free of charge to those contracted to receive allotments via the Miocene Canal. As reported in last week’s three-story cover package (see “Dried up, desperate,” June 27), the upper portion of the historic water conveyance system is owned by PG&E and was destroyed during the Camp Fire. That cut off supplies to dozens of farms, ranches and other properties in Butte County’s eastern foothills, and also resulted in environmental consequences and potential changes to future wildfire suppression. Those agricultural users and others had become desperate to quench their land—provide water to their crops and livestock—as the spring gave way to the North State’s parched summer months. Many of these operations purchased water from PG&E for so long that their contracts refer to miner’s inches, a Gold Rush-era measurement. Post-Camp Fire, however, the utility announced that it’s not going to repair the infrastructure. PG&E maintains that it’s not contractually obligated to provide water, but that’s not our read on the documentation presented by members of the Miocene Canal Coalition during a meeting with utility

representatives. Furthermore, we don’t believe that the company has begun the aforementioned water deliveries out of the goodness of its heart. (See this week’s follow-up story on page 9.) The company has a well-established track record of looking out first and foremost for its bottom line. PG&E’s water giveaways are a good start to addressing its customers’ needs, but they’re not a long-term solution and for some in the region the gesture is too little, too late. Farmers already have had to sacrifice orchards to sustain other, more lucrative crops with the little supplies on hand. Ranchers have incurred the costs of moving livestock to other regions or selling off herds that are unsustainable given the circumstances. Moreover, the deliveries are not equal to the volume received prior to the disaster. Ultimately, if PG&E continues to turn its back on these longtime customers, the issue will be ripe for litigation. Adequately servicing them will require the company to shell out $15 million to repair the canal. That’s a drop in the bucket compared with liabilities it faces from the $16.5 billion in Camp Fire damages. It appears that PG&E needs a reminder not only that its equipment sparked the fire, but also that the company is responsible for making things right. In this case, that includes either rebuilding this historic infrastructure or paying for another long-term solution. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Advice for happier, healthier dog park trips Iequipment, from Oregon to Florida. Many of them have agility swimming pools, hiking trails and even ’ve visited numerous dog parks with my dog, Izzy,

community-driven wine and cheese “yappy hours.” Nearly every community has a dog park and no two are alike. It is with this experience that I’ve come up with some tips to help keep a dog park visit positive. Stay healthy: Bring biodegradable poop bags to keep the park clean. It’s also important to bring your own by fresh water; this will keep your Lori Wells dog from ingesting a toxin. The author is manager of I put slices of cucumber and TrailBlazer Pet Supply and blackberries in Izzy’s water to an advocate for pets. She is trained in pet nutrition help boost her immune system for our visits. Before you leave a and loves traveling with her dog, Izzy. park, be sure to wipe down your 4

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dog. This will decrease the spread of parasites and bacteria. I like to make an apple cider vinegar/green tea spray that I keep in my car. Be present: Put your cellphone away. Issues often arise when an owner is distracted. Stay active with your dog. I like to walk and toss treats for Izzy to find. She loves this brain-boosting exercise that tires her out. Timing is key: Find the right time of day to visit the park. Some dogs like a more quiet atmosphere, while others want to be the life of the party. Leave your dog’s favorite toy at home. Toys encourage resource guarding. Be your pet’s advocate: Not all dogs get along. That’s OK, but keep a leash handy to safely remove your dog from the park. Offer your dog a peaceful timeout if needed. Not all dogs are “just playing.” Be proactive and take a training class in dog body language. This will help you identify problems before they arise, which will keep your dog safe. Use these tips to keep the dog park experience positive and, most important, have fun with your dog! Ω

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Ginger I don’t know what makes some kids wild about horses, but I was definitely obsessed with them while growing up in the suburbs of the Bay Area. Perhaps it’s in my blood. A late great aunt and her husband ran quarter horse ranches in Texas, New Mexico and California, including a huge operation down in Southern California known for selling to movie stars, including John Wayne. I’ve seen the photos. Several family members here in the North State—where my dad grew up and my grandfather raised a small herd of cattle on his nut farm— are horse people as well. When I was in middle school, I raided my savings account— birthday and Christmas money, and allowances—to buy my first horse. I’d been leasing Ginger, a blue roan, for about a year when she went up for sale. She was out of my price range, though, and I was devastated. Unbeknownst to me, however, her owner, Jan—whom I’d never met—had come out to the boarding stables and watched me ride and groom Ginger. The mare had been fairly neglected when I first encountered her—she had a dull coat and basically ran wild in a pasture. She also had a mean streak, and had bitten the last person who attempted to ride her. Ginger tried to take a chunk out of me in the early days, but I stuck with her. With a lot of love, that cranky mare transformed into a dog-like companion. She muscled out from near-daily riding and her coarse hair turned slick and shiny from a supplement regimen of grain, oil and eggs. When I met with Jan to offer what I could afford, she noted that she’d sneaked over to the barn to see how I treated the mare. We had a bond, Jan said, and she knew I’d take excellent care of her. Then she basically cut the price in half. Jan was right. I pampered Ginger until she passed away years later. Other horses have come and gone since then. Lenny, Cinder, Petey and Cash—named after Johnny, of course. The latter three came with me to this area—to the aforementioned farm where I lived during college. I let go of my horses when I was pregnant with my son. I was experiencing complications and had little time or energy to devote to them. I still get my equine fix every once in a while, because my mom and her husband have horses, but sometimes I long for my very own. I miss so much about those amazing animals. The smell of horse hair and leather. Running my hand along the soft crest of the neck. Galloping so fast tears stream from the corner of my eyes. Waking up to quiet nickers just before I walk to the barn to toss flakes of hay. I hope to take up riding again one day. Right now, I don’t have the time for that kind of commitment. The pressures of an intense job and motherhood do not equate with horse ownership. But in my mind, sometimes I’m still there, saddling up for a ride along the trails or the vineyards in my hometown. For now, those memories will have to do.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Attention Boomers

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Utility challenges stories Re “Dried up, desperate” (Cover story, by Ashiah Scharaga, June 27): PG&E is concerned about the impacts of no canal water in the Middle Miocene Canal and is committed to working with stakeholders to identify potential short- and long-term solutions, including offering trucked water in the short-term to the contracted users at no charge to help them with critical needs. Last week’s article omitted several important facts. It did not mention water contracts clearly state there is no guarantee of delivery, or that users have been urged to have alternatives. Nor is it mentioned that even if repairs had already begun on the upper canal, it would take years and cost PG&E electric customers more than $15 million. The references to foothill yellowlegged frogs (FYLF) are misleading.

The incidental observations of adult FYLF passing through pertained to the upper canal (not middle) and only close to the west branch of the Feather River when the canal was out of service. The canal is not suitable breeding habitat for FYLF. No egg masses or tadpoles were ever observed. According the California Department of Fish and Wildlife database, there have been no recorded sightings of FYLF near the Middle Miocene Canal since the 1950s. Paul Moreno, PG&E spokesman Chico

Editor’s note: Regarding PG&E’s view that it is not obligated to supply water, please see Ashiah Scharaga’s follow-up story in this week’s issue (page 9) that includes the precise contract language. As reported in last week’s companion story (“Where the wild things aren’t,” by Scharaga), a memo authored by a California Department of Fish and Wildlife

biologist charged that the absence of water in the Miocene Canal likely jeopardizes at least two species, including the foothill yellow-legged frog and the California black rail. Regarding the price tag for fixing the canal, it was inadvertently omitted from the story and has been added to the online version.

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Goodbye, Grant Re “Fatal conditions” (Newslines, by Andre Byik, June 27): Grant—aka Wilson Tyler—was a fixture at City Plaza where we often met, usually on Sundays at the CFOTS (Chico Friends on the Street) gathering. He seemed to literally live in the square, though he’d find places to hide and sleep at the margins. Grant was a great source of information about the downtown and the unhoused homeless—the homeless who do not typically seek shelter. I asked Grant if he would accept a housing unit were it available, LETTERS C O N T I N U E D

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 possibly with help from a social worker. He was unequivocally positive about the idea. I don’t remember a specific conversation on the subject of why Grant was not interested in staying at a high-density shelter, such as Torres Community Shelter. But, it was clear he was not successful in that kind of environment. Facilities such as the proposed Orange Street Shelter are needed, but it’s important to never lose sight of the human rights principle of basic autonomy, unless a person is a danger to themselves or others. We fall into a grave error when we use an empty shelter bed as the justification for issuing a “camping” ticket to a man like Grant—often leading to arrest on a failure to appear (FTA) warrant. Mr. Tyler, you are missed. Patrick Newman Chico

Water and other worries Re “Thanks, local officials, for standing up to the state” and “For health’s sake, don’t listen to the state” (Editorials, June 20 and 27): I agree with the editorial, where it said, “Anyone living in the burn zone should question the state’s minimalist approach to the contamination issue.” Face it, the water is bad. I seriously doubt you should even take a shower in it. When they use parts per billion, they fail to mention that even lower levels “could” be a problem with cancer. This brings me to more obvious conclusions—if the water is bad, and it really is, what else have they lied about? What about the truckloads of debris that are being driven all over five counties? They say there is no problem, but I feel they are lying here as well. Would they like some of this soil to put in their vegetable gardens? We are exposing communities to dangerous chemicals, and they know it. Time to check trucks for thousands of people’s safety.

it is the best article I have read on [forest management and wildfire threat] and there’s been a deluge of information since the [Camp Fire]. I urge everyone to refer to the CN&R archives for this valuable information, because at this point in time, we should all be wellinformed. Yes, controlled fires will destroy good trees and wildlife. Dr. Albert Schweitzer describes a similar dilemma in French Equatorial Africa in the early part of the 20th century. Even he, a major environmentalist, had to concede that there was no choice. Susan Grant Milpitas

Protect the children The Trump administration’s plan to house 1,400 immigrant children at the Fort Sill, Okla., Army post has become a point of protest for Japanese-Americans hoping to prevent children from being confined into what they call “concentration camps.” Some protesting the repetition of history were children themselves when they were concentrated into camps during World War II. Founded in 1869, Fort Sill has an inhumane history. Native American children were separated from their families and boarded there; then it was used as a segregation camp for 700 JapaneseAmerican men in 1942. This post was last used to house 1,861 unaccompanied children in 2014. During the Obama administration, Oklahoma’s Republican leaders opposed lockups at Fort Sill, but they are now defending them. Ill treatment of refugee children separated from their guardians causes captivity trauma and other mental, emotional and physical harm. It must be stopped now. People of the world must be shaking their heads at the way this administration treats innocent children. We must do better.

Zane Libert Palermo

Diane Suzuki-Brobeck Chico

An important story

MAWA?

Re “Environmental catastrophe” (Cover story, by Julie Cart, April 12, 2018): When the CN&R published an article called “Environmental catastrophe,” by Julie Cart, it was a huge wake-up call for me, and the statistics freaked me out. I still think

Make America What Again? Mexico, Canada, Britain, Europe— no longer trust us. We withdraw from nuclear deal with Iran—attack! Pull out of NATO, our protection from Russia—now our friend. Saudis kill journalists, fly into Twin Towers—friend! Russia undermines

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Ill treatment of refugee children separated from their guardians causes captivity trauma and other mental, emotional and physical harm. It must be stopped now. Diane Suzuki-Brobeck

votes—friend. Lies, rape, child torture, inhumane photos—the daily quota. Mueller report, important—ignore. News, FBI, CIA, Congress—fake, don’t trust. Cabinet ministers—in, out, graft, crime. Make America Great Again? Unemployment down—good. “Economy booming.” But wait! Food prices up. Boom! Household items, prescription drugs up— boom, boom! Much-heralded new tax bill. My wife and I retired. We’re on a fixed income and “own” (mortgage company’s euphemism) our home, small savings and contributions—but were slammed for extra thousands this year! Boom! Each has his/her opinion. Along come the politicians: Here are our opinions. Repeat, repeat, a mantra, believe. Their opinions replace ours. Time for a new slogan: Keep America What Again? Lynn H. Elliott Chico

‘Destroy and divide’ GOP strategist Jeff Roe tweeted to his 16,000 followers to donate $1 to the campaign of self-help guru Marianne Williamson to “keep this vibrant Democrat on the debate stage.” This is the same tactic used by Rush Limbaugh in the 2016 presidential primary race between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. It could be referred to as what former Sanders staffer Tezlyn Figaro called “destroy and divide.” It seems as though Sanders has a competitor in Williamson for the Ralph Nader award. Roe is no stranger to dirty tricks—he was Texas Sen. Rafael “Ted” Cruz’s campaign manager in the 2016 presidential election. Furthermore, Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez couldn’t have dreamed of a better way of ensuring four more years of the White House being held hostage by Trump than the ridiculous format of the so-called recent Democratic debates. Candidates need to concentrate

on Trump, and give up the Kamala Harris-led “food fight.” Ray Estes Redding

Disappointed by favoritism  Supervisors Bill Connelly and Tami Ritter requested funds to cover the full cost of building permits for veterans who are rebuilding after the Camp Fire. I expected a wiser sensibility from Ritter than such pandering to veterans—reinforcing the worshipful awe the U.S. has for its military, when that military has been making us less safe, while creating huge debt. Since fighting the very necessary World War II, veterans have engaged in military efforts mostly aimed at keeping the U.S. dominant, protecting U.S. corporate interests while wrecking countries, killing hundreds of thousands and destabilizing Europe with floods of refugees. U.S. military actions have made the U.S. less liked, less trusted and, most important, less safe and the world more unstable. A military is necessary and the U.S. must keep commitments made to veterans. But too much veneration puts the military on an undeserved pedestal, obscuring that the real and very serious threats to U.S. citizenry are not from terrorism, Russia or China, but from the effects of climate change and the likelihood of a pandemic for which our profit-driven pharmaceutical industry does not find it profitable enough to do the necessary research. To survive, the U.S. needs cooperation, not military confrontations. Lucy Cooke Butte Valley

Rethink your votes You happy we Californians just had to swallow another gas tax? Do you feel we’re being taxed without representation? There’s no balance in Sacramento for us taxpayers. Democrats have the majority, so much so they have the two-thirds

majority they need for any tax on us. Let’s go back a few years: 1776. The colonists were being taxed on their tea. Taxes were being raised higher and higher every year. Taxes were being imposed on them from faraway England. There were no voices in London to stand up to those higher and higher taxes. Sound familiar? You know the ending: Our country won its freedom after a bloody and ugly war with England. Lucky for us Californians, we don’t need a war. We just need to send different representatives to Sacramento to stop our unfair gas taxation. Time to rethink your Democrat-voting habits. Loretta Ann Torres Chico

Pond problems Thinning of the riparian growth around the Teichert Ponds has opened the viewscape. The work was done by a crew provided by a state program. The plant removal improved access while uprooting homeless encampments. A win-win situation at no cost to the city. Beneath the brush removal lies a deeper problem. Water detention has flooded trails. The standing water and silting creates larger breeding areas for insects, such as West Nile virus-carrying mosquitoes. Algae blooms form from the stinky, stagnant, standing water. This was discussed at length during last year’s storm drain meetings. These problems can be solved. Unplugging the pond outlet to Little Chico Creek is essential to drain down water from the ponds. The outlet—plugged first by beavers and now trash, slash and dirt—has caused rampant excessive growth of cattails and silting. The ponds next to the freeway are becoming a bog. Restoration plans—approved by the city and permits given in 2008—await funding. A beaverproof gate, proposed at the outlet, would allow for controlled vertical draining. Opening the outlet is essential now. Join me in making this a peaceful pond, for which we can all be proud. Dick Cory Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


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STREETALK

Favorite pet? Asked at Round Table Pizza Julie O’Keefe self-employed

I never met an animal I didn’t love with all my heart. However, my first pet as an adult was a greyhound/black Lab mix I had for 14 years. He was fun and loved adventures. He trotted after me wherever I went. He was my “little lamb.”

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When I was younger, I caught a brown tarantula in the woods. I kept it in a glass terrarium. They’re very calm, like a big furry cat, but you could freak people out by having it crawl across your hand or face.

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My chow-andgolden retriever Milo. We got him when I was 8, and I really liked him because he was like a giant, fluffy ball, but he kind of had an attitude with others. The day he died, I laid with him and it was the sweetest moment I ever had with him.

Evie Lawson teacher’s aide

A copper-colored border collie named Penny when I was 17 to 20. She had a really adventurous spirit. She was obsessed with water and would chase ducks for hours. She ran away. I think someone stole her because she was so precious.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE HORSESHOE LAKE CONTAMINATED

Cyanobacteria has been detected in Upper Bidwell Park’s Horseshoe Lake, according to a press release from Butte County Public Health. Lab results showed concentrations above state warning levels. The city of Chico’s Park Division has barricaded the lake and is urging visitors to keep their dogs leashed and away from the water. That’s not all: Department of Water Resources officials have discovered algae blooms in Lake Oroville and a warning is in place at the Middle Fork. Cyanobacteria can cause harmful algal blooms after becoming overactive— generally spurred by warm weather, stagnant water or excessive nutrients. Those exposed should rinse with clean water as soon as possible to avoid poisoning. Symptoms can occur within 48 hours and include sore throat, congestion, coughing, a rash, blisters or hives, earache, diarrhea or vomiting, agitation, headache and abdominal pain.

DAM ROAD ATTRACTS PUBLIC

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) reopened Dam Crest Road—which runs along the ridge of Oroville Dam, the tallest dam in the United States—to pedestrian and bicycle traffic on Saturday (June 29). There, residents—including Rep. Doug LaMalfa, who was spotted riding a bike—got a bird’s-eye view of Lake Oroville and the repaired main spillway. Also reopened was the Upper Overlook parking area. Public access had been closed since the failure of the dam’s infrastructure, including an adjacent emergency spillway, back in February 2017. DWR anticipates reopening its Spillway Boat Ramp in August, according to a press release from the agency.

FINES FOR FIREWORKS

Anticipating impending holiday shenanigans, Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey (pictured) warned residents this week that it isn’t just the act of lighting fireworks that is illegal in unincorporated Butte County and other jurisdictions: Anybody found in possession of the pyrotechnic devices also can receive up to a $1,000 fine and six months in county jail. This includes fireworks designated as “safe and sane.” Only Oroville and Gridley allow for the sale and use of fireworks within city limits. Any fire intentionally or negligently caused by such devices will be prosecuted as a felony, Ramsey added. “Fire danger is high and any possession in the county area will be vigorously prosecuted,” he said in a press release. “No fireworks can leave the city limits.” 8

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Stressed about water Engineers release results of Camp Fire survey, find many unclear, anxious about contamination

KhomeHamilton City since the Camp Fire hit. Theirs is the only standing on her block along Nunnelly Road in Paradise,

elly Towne and her family have been staying with relatives in

and they long to return home. She’s been back, to do work around the house, but before moving back permanently she wants to be sure the water is safe. “Everybody knows water is life,” she said during a recent interactive workshop on post-Camp Fire plumbing held at Paradise Alliance Church. “It’d be nice to know we can resume some kind of normalcy. We got the clear from Paradise Irrigation District [that our water line is safe], but we don’t know what to use—a filter or a tank? No one will recommend anything.” After a brief reflective pause, she said, story and “Am I going to take years off my life?” photo by Towne’s concerns echo those of many Meredith J. of her neighbors on the Ridge. In fact, Cooper during a presentation later that evening m er e d i t h c @ (June 27), Caitlin Proctor, a postdoctoral n ew srev i ew. c o m researcher at Purdue University who came with a group of academics that day to talk and teach, said many residents had experienced stress or anxiety over water contamiSee for yourself: nation since the fire. The results to the She was highlighting responses to a surCamp Fire survey vey conducted over two weeks in May. It can be found at plumbingsafety.org. asked 90 questions of people living within the Camp Fire zone and revealed a few key findings. Among them: • Over 40 percent of people living in the Camp Fire zone who responded to the survey said they’d experienced anxiety and stress specifically related to drinking water contamination. • 4.7 percent said they’d experienced an illness—most commonly headache, skin irritation and cough—since the fire that they attributed to the water. An additional 18.5 percent said they’d been sick but couldn’t say it was because of the water. • 40.3 percent of Paradise Irrigation District (PID) customers and 41.2 percent of private well users had tested their home plumbing; only 15.8 percent of Del Oro Water Co. custom-

ers had done so. (PID maintains a do-not-drink warning, though it has determined some areas are free of contamination; Del Oro has issued no such warning to date.) • 41.7 percent of respondents who had purchased a water tank said their insurance helped pay for it. • Over 20 percent said they did not know if their water is contaminated. “People are unsure of the safety of their water in the community, and that’s not great—that’s almost as bad as knowing it’s contaminated,” Proctor said. Walking from table to table in the church’s foyer earlier in the day,

one got an immediate sense of the confusion that has built since the Camp Fire hit eight months ago. The tables were manned by students and faculty from Purdue— their visit paid for by the Paradise Rotary Club—along with colleagues from UC Berkeley, Chico State and Butte College. They ranged in topic from plumbing construction to how to take a proper water sample to how infrastructure can be affected by extreme heat. At Proctor’s table, plastic pipes from the Camp Fire burn zone that looked perfectly untouched on the outside were filled with melted plastic and other materials when viewed via cross-section. “Building plumbing is complex,” explained Andrew Whelton, who led the Purdue team and runs the university’s Center for Plumbing Safety. His talk preceded that of Proctor that evening and


Andrew Whelton holds an example of a water meter that melted into its plastic box and other debris during the Camp Fire.

provided an overview of what’s happened to date. Through his presentation, he expressed dissatisfaction with guidelines recently released to the public by the state Water Resources Control Board and redistributed by Butte County Public Health. There were several reasons for concern, many of which already have been printed by this newspaper (see “Clash of plans,” Newslines, June 20). A few additional ones, however, were noteworthy: The state recommends taking one water sample at one site—the kitchen sink—and from the cold faucet only. But benzene (the main contaminant found thus far) changes properties when heated—so, hot water faucets, which have their own pipes, also should be tested. (The town of Paradise has found contamination in hot water samples taken from bathroom sinks in some of its buildings.) “The Department of Drinking Water only cares about drinking water—aka cold water,” Whelton said. “But we know plumbing, we know exposures.” Also, the state’s guidelines take into consideration only ingestion, but benzene is known to cause health effects through inhalation and skin contact as well. In fact, the state conducted a test, the results of which the CN&R obtained from the water board last month via public records request, which documented that “several of the testers noted throat irritation and constriction after smelling the test sample(s).” Whelton’s presentation included data from the PID and Del Oro water systems. Del Oro has maintained that its system is less contaminated than PID’s, primarily because it did not experience the same amount of depressurization. At the time Whelton prepared his presentation, the highest level of benzene known to have been found in PID’s system was 2,217 parts per billion (the state recommends no more than 1 ppb for drinking) and the highest in Del Oro was 46. New data released last week, however, reveal 380 ppb at a burned service line on Andover Drive. The test results are available on Del Oro’s website (delorowater.com). “I would expect more contamination to be found,” Whelton told the CN&R. “Until you test every service line, you have to acknowledge that [there might be contamination].” Ω

Deliveries en route PG&E pledges water, but Miocene users say volumes aren’t sufficient

Though 5,000 gallons isn’t a quarter of what Cindi Williams used to

receive from the Miocene Canal, she’s desperate to get water not only for her home but also for her garden, grape vines and fruit trees, she told the CN&R. “That would be a great help, compared to nothing,” Williams said. “We would still be really, really frugal with the household water, but our plants, the trees, they’re dying.” Williams is one of the many longtime canal users now in talks with PG&E regarding free water and delivery to their properties. In November, the Upper Miocene Canal—also known as “the flumes”—was destroyed by the Camp Fire, leaving two dozen contracted users, most of them farmers and ranchers, without water for their livestock and orchards, and, for some, their homes. Other residents living alongside the canal have reported additional impacts—the leaky system, which is about 150 years old, has sustained streams, ponds and wells that are now drying up. PG&E confirmed that it will not repair the damaged portion of the canal because of the cost, with initial estimates reaching at least $15 million. After deadline for last week’s Cover story (“Dried up, desperate,” June 27), PG&E spokesman Paul Moreno told the CN&R that the utility will coordinate and schedule deliveries for up to 5,000 gallons per week per household starting this week. This offer will remain until the rainy season, he added, unless another short-term solution is found before then. Butte County has been serving as a mediator between PG&E, Cal Water (which owns the Lower Miocene), water users and providers to work toward a solution. Their next meeting will be in mid-July. “While these trucked water deliveries will not be able to provide water users with the volumes of water the canal could deliver,” Moreno wrote in a statement to the CN&R, “it will be of help for those with critical water needs while we continue exploring potential long-term solutions with the broader stakeholders.”

SIFT ER Best places for pets California ranked high among states deemed most friendly for pets, according to a recent survey conducted by Safewise, which considered anti-abuse laws; pet-friendly restaurants, hotels and activities; as well as the number of “no-kill” shelters and veterinarians in each state, among other criteria. The Golden State was named the fourth most pet-friendly state, trailing neighboring Oregon, which placed first and was lauded for its anti-abuse laws and pet-friendly establishments. “California has the most veterinarians in the country,” according to the survey. “[California] is also home to 500 dog parks, 81 dog-friendly beaches, and a handful of stunning national parks and monuments. California is also highly protective of abused animals.” Here are some of the results.

Most pet-friendly 1. Oregon 2. Colorado 3. Maine 4. California 5. Washington

Cindi Williams (center) and her son, Brandon, and neighbor Laura-Lyn Burch stand before a 1,600-gallon tank the Williamses installed after the Camp Fire to provide water to their home. They anticipate receiving free water from PG&E soon. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Moreno told the CN&R that the utility has encouraged users to secure other sources of water at times when the canal is not available, including during annual maintenance and times of natural disasters requiring repairs. Earlier this week, the CN&R spoke with water users about the deliveries. As of deadline, Williams, who lives near Butte Valley, said PG&E had scheduled someone to visit her home and assess her water needs. She anticipated her first delivery would arrive next week. Since November, she has been paying $250 to $550 every month for water delivery. Another contracted user, Kurt Albrecht, told the CN&R that 5,000 gallons per week could provide water for his family’s livestock at Chaffin Family Orchards. Currently, they are drawing from a private reservoir for the cattle’s needs. However, he is still concerned because it’s “not going to make a dent in the orchard.” He estimates 20 acres of the family’s stone fruits will have to be sacrificed if the farm’s water needs are not met by next summer, and 200 acres of olive trees are going dry. At a public meeting last month, several other families reported similar scenarios will take place at their properties. In Williams’ opinion, PG&E has had a contractual obligation to deliver this water since the canal went offline. Her contract states: “In case of shortage of supply from whatever cause, and during the period of such shortage, PG&E will make such Least pet-friendly appointment of its available supply of 1. Iowa water among its customers in what, in 2. Missouri its sole judgment, is the most reasonable 3. Wyoming manner possible.” 4. New York In an email, Moreno said that, in 5. Mississippi PG&E’s view, this clause does not guarantee water delivery but defines its “ability to manage the amount of water delivered to users along the canal during times of low supply so that as many contracted customers as possible can receive some water.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

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NEWSLINES

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 9

Homeward bound Butte Humane Society anticipates breaking ground on new facility by early 2020 Katrina Woodcox isn’t in denial about the

current state of the Butte Humane Society, which she oversees as executive director. Its operations are inefficient, she recently told the CN&R—scattered across three outdated, overcrowded facilities. That’s why she’s so relieved that in less than a year, BHS should be breaking ground on a new facility, the first the organization will have owned since it was established 108 years ago. It isn’t just a singular location that the BHS team is looking forward to: The new facility will increase the nonprofit’s animal housing capacity by 66 percent, and include segregated spaces for smaller animals (i.e. hamsters, rabbits and guinea pigs), pregnant and sick animals, as well as those with behavioral or special needs. Woodcox says the forthcoming facility is “as far away as possible from the stereotypical pound.” It is designed to allow the nonprofit to meet best practices and standards in animal wellness and minimize the spread of disease, she added. Since January 2018, BHS has raised about $5.4 million for the project—this week, it accepted a $500,000 donation from the Wayne & Gladys Valley Foundation. It also received 10 acres of donated property in north Chico worth $3.5 million from its capital campaign co-chairs, Katie Gonser and Ken Grossman, placing BHS just under $2 million shy Join the journey: of its $11 million funGo to buttehumane.org/thejourneyhome draising goal. It’s the to volunteer or donate. back half of a 20-acre parcel currently leased by Sunset Hills Golf Course. The planned facility will be 23,000 square feet. BHS design renderings include a layout with three community dog parks and a dog pool, kitten and puppy nurseries, a walking trail, an education center, a feral cat holding room, a bereavement site, and a retail store stocked with supplies for new pet owners, as well as dog and cat adoption centers. At its new location, the shelter should be better equipped to tackle what it sees as an underserved segment of the community, Woodcox added: low- to moderate-income pet owners who cannot afford veterinary care for their animals. That’s why it opened its low-cost nonemergency clinic in 2018, which offers vaccinations and care for minor issues like infected teeth and abscesses. The demand exceeded BHS’ expectations: “There’s such a need … we’re booked out through August,” Woodcox said. The organization is hiring a second full-time veterinarian to handle the workload.

Katrina Woodcox and her dog, Sadie, at BHS’ future home. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

BHS has had a long and, at times, tenuous history with

the city of Chico. The nonprofit operated the city’s sheltering services for 25 years before the city reclaimed those services, signing a new contract with BHS for adoptions and community outreach in 2012. Gonser, a former BHS board president, got involved with the organization that same year because of her passion for animal welfare. She said she realized that, like many nonprofits, BHS “needed a lot of help in bringing it up to the 20th century.” She got to work tightening up its business model, governing body and internal operations, preparing for the day the organization would be ready to move. That’s when she shifted to co-chairing its capital campaign. The new site will provide BHS with operational freedom, Woodcox told the CN&R. Under its current agreement, the nonprofit leases city kennel space and can only accept dogs from Chico. At its own, new location, BHS will be able to operate as an “animal welfare hub for the North State,” Woodcox said, taking in surrendered animals when other shelters run out of space, and hopefully reducing local and regional euthanasia rates. While Tracy Mohr, the city’s Animal Services manager, said she has concerns about capacity and


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Butte Humane Society’s new location, off Garner Lane in north Chico, will expand the organization’s work by providing more space for veterinary care and housing animals up for adoption. PHOTO COURTESY OF RUSSELL GALLAWAY ASSOCIATES INC.

disease spread when organizations take in animals from outside the community, she added that BHS’ new location “would be huge” for city staff, alleviating its workload. “We run pretty much at capacity right now,” she said. “Because we are not mandated to take in surrendered dogs, we do have a wait-list.” BHS began quietly fundraising for its new facility in January 2018, then went public after the Camp Fire. Gonser said the disaster underscored how much the community needs this facility. “Chico has grown tremendously since the 1980s and our animal welfare really hasn’t,” she said. Woodcox envisions its new campus as a resource for future disaster responses—whether it be for temporary shelter for displaced pets and livestock or a triage center for injured animals. BHS also intends to offer space for nonprofits to use for training and education. “We want this to be a community investment,” she said. “There’s such a need for animal welfare services, especially in rural areas. We really would like to serve as a model.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ashiahs@ n ewsr ev i ew. com

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HEALTHLINES Scott Lindstrom, left, and Roy Applegate have linked to facilitate post-Camp Fire trauma and recovery initiatives at Butte County schools.

Stressing support in schools $1.6 million grant aids trauma response and recovery initiatives story and photo by

Andre Byik

andre b@ n ewsrev iew. com

In the weeks after the Camp Fire hit, school psychologists Roy Applegate and Scott Lindstrom knew the trauma caused by the disaster would affect the emotional and social well-being of students, teachers and staff across Butte County. What they weren’t prepared to deal with was the scope of the aftereffects. Applegate, who worked for the Paradise Unified School District for over 20 years and went on to oversee the special education programs in Butte and Glenn counties, and Lindstrom, who worked at Chico Unified School District for 30 years developing counseling and guidance programs, walked out of meetings with teachers and staff fol12

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lowing the fire asking, “What’s going on?” Teachers recounted escaping the flames with children in their cars or on buses, believing with conviction that they were bound for death. Thousands of homes were destroyed, upending tens of thousands of lives. Students were suddenly displaced, and it was unknown whether they would return. “We’re school psychologists by training, and, having done lots of crisis response over the years, this has been just like nothing else I ever experienced,” Lindstrom told the CN&R. “The feds have said the only comparables are like ….” “Katrina,” Applegate said. “Hurricane Katrina, basically,” Lindstrom finished. Over the past seven months, Applegate and Lindstrom have coordinated post-Camp Fire trauma response and recovery efforts

for the Butte County Office of Education (BCOE). They’ve facilitated the placement of counselors who have worked at schools for varying amounts of time, as well as trainings and other outreach activities. In June, BCOE was awarded a $1.6 million grant through the Butte Strong Fund, which is managed by the North Valley Community Foundation, to continue trauma response initiatives through the next school year. The grant, the coordinators said, will support the hiring and placement of about 25 to 30 “fire recovery” counselors—most of whom will work part-time—whose focus will be on students and staff displaced by the fire at public, private and charter schools. The grant will pay for a parent-facilitator position whose work will inform families about trauma and coordinate outreach activities. The grant also will pay for a program evaluator, as well as a grant developer, who will pursue funding to support long-term mental health services at Butte County schools. The goal is to address the immediate mental health needs of students and staff, shortening the time from when people realize they need help to receiving it, the coordinators said. The fire recovery services supported by the grant, they said, overlap with a broader initiative at BCOE, which had identified problems associated with

trauma and mental health at schools even before the fire. It’s hoped the work being done now will pave the way for individual school districts to prioritize funding for mental health services. In the months following the fire, trauma has shown itself in myriad forms. Stress. Anxiety. Loss of sleep. Memory problems. Trouble completing tasks. Anger and aggression. Withdrawal and isolation. The list goes on, the coordinators said, and the reasons behind the symptoms can include long commutes to and from schools, families that have been separated because of a lack of housing options and stress caused by moving in with relatives or friends. Then there are the more unpredictable trauma-related circumstances. In one case, the coordinators said, a school counselor reported concerns about a child who had suffered a series of dog bites. The bites were so bad they broke the child’s arm. It turned out the child was attacked by the family dog, which was being protective of the child’s mom. A veterinarian later confirmed that the dog had suffered trauma by living with another dog it was unfamiliar with. The animal’s stress likely came into HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 1 5

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What was once play, and the “We have to be two elementary veterinarian was schools will invited to present transformed be one. The a safety lesson high school for children at the whether we like it or not. and intermedischool. ate school will It’s inciOur county will share a campus. dents like those, never look the Before the Applegate said, fire, Paradise that “I would same as it did Unified School never even have before Nov. 8 …” District served thought in my about 3,600 wildest dreams —Scott Lindstrom students. It’s that could be an projected about issue.” 1,200 to 1,500 Treatment students will return. at schools will vary from person “Schools are going to look to person, and the goal is to proreally different up there,” vide stable, short-term outreach, Applegate said. “Really different.” Lindstrom said. Counseling for Lindstrom holds the view that children could mean engaging for trauma and recovery initiatives a short period on the playground introduced following the fire or in lines for buses and food. could change the way agencies Other students and staff could across the county work with one receive more traditional counselanother, resulting in a transformaing sessions. tion that would mean better colFor those in need of more laboration. serious intervention—such as to “We have to be transformed address intense post-traumatic stress—counselors are encouraged whether we like it or not,” Lindstrom said. “Our county will to refer people to outside experts never look the same as it did who are better equipped to probefore Nov. 8, so our hope is to vide treatment. There are still questions regard- be kind of facilitators of a positive transformation that includes ing just how many students will more services, better linkages return to schools most affected by the fire. Campuses in Paradise will across service providers and better access.” be reconfigured, Applegate said. Ω

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GREENWAYS WAYS

Hidden gems Small greenways within Chico offer wildlife refuge, change of scenery

story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga Shane Romain stands just off the trail at Verbena Fields, a 20-acre former gravel quarry that’s now a dedicated wetland, riparian habitat and Mechoopda Maidu interpretive garden.

ashiahs@ newsrev iew. com

W more than 20 years ago, he hopped on his bike and explored. That’s how he discovered hen Shane Romain first moved to Chico

Comanche Creek Greenway and Teichert Ponds. At the time, the two natural spaces weren’t in such good shape, he told the CN&R: Portions of Comanche Creek, in south Chico at the intersection of Park and East Park avenues, looked like a fenced-off shanty town, and Teichert Ponds—bordering Bikeway 99 off Humboldt Road—resembled a toxic waste dump. A lot’s changed since then. For one, the city now owns those properties. And due to significant volunteer work and grant assistance, the spaces have been developed and cleaned up considerably, with dedicated, tree-lined pathways, informational kiosks and natural habitat teeming with wildlife. After 12 years working in the city Park Division—the last four of those as park services coordinator—Romain continues to relish spots such as these, which are smaller and less renowned than Bidwell Park. There are at least a dozen such green spaces sprinkled throughout Chico, he said. “They’re more intimate [and] accessible to the neighborhood,” he said. “Oftentimes in these smaller pockets, the chances of seeing wildlife increase because they’re not as populated.” Though they’ve certainly come a long way since their unmanaged days, these spaces are always in need of TLC, he said. The city has four park maintenance workers, and their main task is the crown jewel: the 3,670 acres that make up Bidwell Park. The division uses contractors to keep up basic maintenance on its other green spaces, but it doesn’t cover everything. That’s where volunteers come in. Two weekends ago, Chico Rotary and Chico Community Watch members assembled to

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clean up Mercer Grove. The small patch of shaded natural space between Mangrove and East Lindo avenues is visible from the bustling roadway, but easy to miss. Patrick Brooks, a rotary member, spearheaded the project. He has been familiar with the grove since he opened his business, Recognition Products, across the street four years ago. He admitted that the task was personal at first: The spot was overgrown and unkempt. Once Brooks started learning about the park and its history, however, he grew more invested. The space honors Gene Mercer, a beloved dedicated local game warden. Mercer’s friend and fellow game warden Terry Hodges compiled Mercer’s adventures and shared them in the book Sabertooth: The Rip-Roaring Adventures of a Legendary Game Warden, published in 1988. Mercer died shortly after, and local public officials wanted to honor him, Hodges said, according to a North State Public Radio feature. “I decided it was time to pick it up and make some changes,” Brooks said. “One of my biggest things I wanted to do was honor Gene Mercer.” The volunteers cleared out dense brush and poison oak, and one tree was removed because it was posing a safety hazard, impeding the walkway on the Lindo Channel bridge. They’re finishing up a split-rail fence, and also will install a rock with a bronze plaque to memorialize Mercer and remind folks why the green space is there, Brooks added. Brooks estimates 80-100 hours of volunteer labor will be completed before the rehab

is finished. He envisions completing a project like this at least once per year. “There’s little pocket parks, or things we’ve done to honor people in our community,” he said, “and I’d love for people to make [Rotary] aware of those things that have gotten lost.” Like Mercer Grove, many of these hidden parks have an intriguing history. Teichert Ponds is an accidental wetland, formed from gravel mining in the 1960s. The ponds, which function as stormwater detainment for the city, also provide habitat for dozens of species of birds, as well as beavers, turtles, bobcats, fish and amphibians. Steve Overlock, president of the local Altacal Audobon Society, said that with all of the development going on in Chico, these spaces preserve lush habitat for all wildlife. “Besides being a nice, meditative space for people, it’s a nice space for birds to establish themselves … or just pass through. “Teichert Ponds, because of the water, we get shore birds that come through, and they wouldn’t stay unless the water’s there [and] available to them.” In the past year, the ponds have had a facelift. With the help of the Butte Environmental Council and Alliance for Workforce Development, the city has cleared overgrown vegetation and removed an unsightly chainlink fence. It’s been refreshing to see renewed activity lately, Romain said, as outdoor enthusiasts have hopped in kayaks, explored and fished. He hopes to bring awareness to these lesserknown natural spaces within the city—in his

view, the more they’re enjoyed, the more they can thrive. “These are fantastic places for the public to visit, to appreciate and to utilize, and a lot of people don’t know about them,” he said. “People need to get out and explore more.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Attention: birdwatchers The Indian Fishery Nature Preserve—located about 4.5 miles outside Chico at the west end of West Sacramento Avenue—is home to a variety of cool insects, birds and other wildlife that fluctuate with the seasons. Summertime brings pipevine swallowtail butterflies, the rare yellow-billed cuckoo, flycatchers, swallows, warblers and terns, while year-round wildlife admirers can spot river otters and turtles on the area’s oxbow lake. The Altacal Audubon Society is hosting an Indian Fisheries & Washout Birding Trip this Sunday (July 7). Meet at the preserve’s parking lot at 8:30 a.m. Contact Matthew Forster at findforster@ yahoo.com or 619-347-2269 for more info.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

High-end bunny food When Kevin Niemeyer started working at Rabbit Hole Hay about a year ago, he had no idea how picky rabbits and guinea pigs could be when it came to what they eat. His employers—Michael and Kathryn Redman, owners of marketing/advertising/consulting company Half a Bubble Out, and Jason Krueger—had found a niche market in highend hay that’s sourced right here in Northern California. The web-based business (rabbitholehay. com), which launched about five years ago, sells hay, bedding and some chews (and will soon add pellets) to customers all over the world—directly but also through other online stores like Chewy and Amazon. And though there is no storefront, local rabbit, chinchilla and guinea pig owners regularly stop by the warehouse, located by the Jesus Center on 13th Street, to pick up their online orders. With a background in warehouse management, Niemeyer is the business’ manager, though he says with a small team, they all wear many hats. He recently took the time to chat with the CN&R about the very unique local business.

Tell me about your niche. We specialize in Timothy hay, which is grown in the high desert of Northern California. It’s the preferred hay for rabbit owners, as it’s high in nutrients. We’re in touch with the farmers who grow it, and they send us the best of the best—then we take the bales back and grade them. Rabbits and guinea pigs are surprisingly picky. I had no clue before I started working here, how picky those little [things] are. They’ll eat an electrical cord but turn their noses up at bad hay.

How’s the response been? We’re really big on customer service. The end customer is the people, but really it’s their pet. We get letters and pictures from pet owners. They tell us how excited [their pets] get when our particular product comes through the door—as opposed to a generic product. Evidently, they know the difference as soon as it comes in the front door. I hear that consistently. It’s a whole other breed of pet— and the people who are into them are really into them. I had no idea that there were super high-end

Same Day Service

Trees and chiles

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

I’d driven by the new store on Main Street across from Chico Natural Foods a dozen times before I finally stopped to check it out. The sign on the window said “WTS”—and since it looked like lumberjack equipment inside, I thought to myself, Maybe it’s a storefront for M&S Wesley Tree Service. I was right. When I popped in last week, I was surprised by how much specialized equipment they have in there. The clerk told me their best-sellers are the carabiners. I don’t think I’ve seen so many different styles in my life. “This thing looks like a weapon!” I said about a hunk of metal that resembled brass knuckles. “No,” the clerk chuckled. “That’s for attaching different tools to your belt.” Ah …. “When my husband, [Marc], and I drove up Skyway to see our property after the fire, I could see all the tree trucks everywhere. I cried with gratitude to see them all here,” Shuree Wesley told me. “I felt close to a community of people that I understood was here for us and … it made me think about the shortage we have in supplies in our local area, and so my husband and I went to work getting the store up and running.” bunnies! They’re really cute, but they need highend supplies.

Besides hay, what do you sell? We do mostly hay, and some chew sticks—apple chew sticks, literally apple sticks off an apple tree. We sell chewable housing and bedding. They make a lot of the bedding out of willow and wicker, because they’re going to chew on it.

So, business is good? When it started, it was in a side office. Now we’ve got a 7,000-square-foot warehouse [near] downtown Chico. … I sent off a 40-foot cargo container to Taipei yesterday. And I’ve got orders from Singapore, the Philippines …. People from all over the world want this Timothy hay from Northern California.

And you like your job? This is a local business owned by local people, who are part of the community and love helping the community. It’s a rare treat to really enjoy working for the people you work for. It keeps me motivated to succeed because I feel appreciated in the areas where I excel. —MEREDITH J. COOPER m e re d i t h c @new srev i ew. c o m

NEIGHBORLY LOVE Speaking of that strip of Main Street, chef Ann Leon, of Leon

Bistro, competed on an episode of Guy’s Grocery Games filmed Nov. 14, as the Camp Fire raged. Leon competed against three other accomplished chefs, all of them hoping to donate their winnings to worthy causes. Leon’s, naturally, was for Camp Fire recovery. Watching Leon concoct recipes on the fly and execute them for the judges was super exciting. It’s one thing to go to her classes and watch her demonstrate a time-tested recipe and quite another to see the chef under pressure. I’m told her chile relleno she made on the show will be a special on the menu when she reopens after vacation July 10. Check it out on the Food Network.

COMFORT FOOD I had an opportunity last week to sit down for the Camp Fire community dinner held at Paradise Alliance Church each Thursday. What an event! Hundreds of people were in attendance, with lines out the gym door and around the corner. I asked a woman, standing at the end of the buffet line, who had prepared the food. She said the church members did most of it, but that she and her husband made the main event: chili. Turns out I was chatting with Kathy Macias, who with her husband, Manny, had owned Manny’s Chile Bowl. They retired 20 years ago, but the community has not lost its appetite for their cooking. I had to taste it—and it was divine. The flavor was robust, with tender chunks of ground beef, beans and, of course, plenty of chiles. No wonder there were lines! CIAO Two local Italian restaurants called it quits this past week, with almost no warning. So long, Panighetti’s Eatery and Pete’s Restaurant and Brewhouse. I have it on good authority that Casa de Paradiso, which lost its home on the Ridge days before its 25th anniversary, will be taking over the latter.

Your plumbing

Fixed Right, Right Now!

(530) 826-6931 License #1026898

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Nine lives in

Male, CF655, “Prancer”

Paradise

Eight months later, Camp Fire cats are still being found story by

Jason Cassidy jason c@new srev i ew. c o m photos by

Sue Anderson bl ackcat p h o tog ra p h y. u s

J

ellybean is home. On his own in Magalia since the Camp Fire, the elusive long-haired tabby was finally trapped by Friends United in Rescue volunteers on June 9 and returned to owner Julie Walker the next day. That’s more than seven months in the wild!

Male, CF848, “Clark”

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It’s a testament to a cat’s ability to survive, and also a reminder to not give up hope. Even though most animal rescue efforts have ceased, there are certain sturdy-yet-skittish pets—i.e., cats—still being found in the burn scar and owners who might not know that a reunion is possible. But time is running out. On June 30, the FieldHaven Feline Center’s Paradise Transfer Station (one of the primary shelters for Camp Fire rescues) closed its doors at the same time that the Camp Fire Pet Rescue and Reunification organization, which shared that space, ceased its trapping operations. However, there are still other groups working to bring cats in, namely the grassroots Friends United in Rescue (FUR—previously Friends of Camp Fire Cats) in Paradise and Fire Cat Farm in Butte Valley, as well as a slew of citizen-led Facebook pages. The cats from FieldHaven will be transferred to foster homes, as well as the organization’s Feline Center in Lincoln. At press time, there were more than 100 unclaimed Camp Fire cats being taken care of by those three groups. Even though Camp Fire Pet Rescue and Reunification is no longer trapping, its reunification efforts continue, largely via the organization’s impressive database of found pets, which includes animals picked up by trapping/shelter groups,

as well as the other Butte County shelters, animal control, and even private citizens posting to Craigslist, Facebook, etc. As of last week, 1,420 rescued cats had been listed in the database since the fire broke out—plus 477 dogs and 175 other animals (horses, chickens, sheep, etc.). Camp Fire Pet Rescue and Reunification was co-founded by Jennifer Petruska, who was posted up in an RV outside the Paradise Transfer Station between late February and the end of June (and had been in Butte County—and away from her Santa Rosa home—since Nov. 10). Pet Rescue and Reunification (the parent group) was started by Petruska and others in the wake of the 2015 Valley Fire in Lake County, and since then has brought its organizational structure to fires in Napa/Sonoma, Mendocino, Redding and now Butte County, working with local organizations to centralize pet rescue efforts as much as possible. Given the great need, it was a no-brainer for the CN&R to devote this year’s Pet Issue to helping these survivors get back to their owners—or to fosters or new homes (many unclaimed cats are, or will be, available for adoption). We visited two of the Paradise shelters—FUR FOUND CATS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 0


Female, CF904, adoption pending

Female, CF731, “Emerald”

Female, CF845, “Coral”

Female, CF920

Find your cat Online databases have up-to-date listings with photos of found Camp Fire pets Camp Fire Pet Rescue and Reunification (CPRR): campfirepetrescue.org, (707) 349-6005 An exhaustive database of found pets culled from multiple sources. Browse the pictures and share your cat’s info and ask their experts to help you make a match.

Friends United in Rescue (FUR):

friendsofcampfirecats.com, 413-7955 Active grassroots trapping/shelter group (formerly Friends of Camp Fire Cats) based in Paradise with a database of rescued cats. Male, CF919, adoption pending

Fire Cat Farm

firecatfarm.com, 255-4795 Grassroots trapping/shelter group based in Butte Valley with a database of rescued cats.

FieldHaven Feline Center

fieldhaven.com, (916) 434-6022 The shelter just closed its Paradise Transfer Station, but the online database is still active with info on recently found cats that were moved to the home site in Lincoln or into foster homes.

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FOUND CATS C O N T I N U E D

F R O M PA G E 1 8

and FieldHaven—a couple of weeks ago to take these photos, and we brought along someone with experience, Sue Anderson of Black Cat Photography. In addition to her petportrait business, Anderson donates her time to photograph the shelter cats at Butte Humane Society, and she volunteered to take pictures of these Camp Fire cats. Anderson also belongs to HeARTs Speak, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to use art to increase visibility of shelter animals. HeARTs Speak’s slogan is “seen equals saved,” and that’s the goal with this year’s Pet Issue. We hope by publishing these pictures and providing information on where to find other cats, pet owners will see that it’s not necessarily too late to check to see if their pets survived the fire and were rescued. If you see your cat in one of these pictures, contact FieldHaven or FUR right away. If you don’t see your missing cat here, visit the Camp Fire Pet Rescue and Reunification and other trapping/shelter sites and scroll through the photos. Your cat might be waiting for you to come looking. Note about photo IDs: “CF” numbers indicate FieldHaven cats, and “FUR” numbers are Friends United in Rescue. See “Find your cat,” page 19. Ω

Female CF926, “Nova” Male, FUR138, “Ron”

Male, CF929

Female, CF922

Male, FUR163, “Victor”

Female, CF921, pregnant

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Female, FUR167, “Pickle”

Female, FUR223

Male, FUR207, “The Rock” Male, FUR179, “Lion,” eye infection

Female, FUR192, “Lola”

PET FIRE PREP Include your animals in your evacuation plan Male, FUR189, “Big Red”

1. Tag ’em: Microchip your pet and make sure it wears a collar with ID tag that has your cell number. (Tip: Add your pet as a contact in your phone with microchip number as its “phone” number.) Female, FUR220

2. Paint a picture: Take note of your pet’s unique markings and keep a few pet photos in your phone. 3. Pack a go bag: Fill a pet crate with extra leash/harness, bowls, food, a jug of water, litter for cats and pet carriers for small animals, and keep it in an accessible spot.

4. Don’t wait: Bring your pets with you as soon as an evacuation is ordered (place cats in carrier early before they get freaked and bolt); you might not be able to return for them. Sources: Pet Rescue & Reunification and North Valley Animal Disaster Group

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Our Mission... Help Our Community Did You Know We Have…

• Raised over $90,000 for local animal organizations.

• Created and sustained Chico’s longest operating & largest therapy pet squad.

• Co-founded Walk Woof Wag, the annual fundraiser for Chico • Co-hosted NO-COST microchip Animal Shelter’s medical fund. clinics to reunite people & pets.

Serving Chico Area Dogs & People Since 2002 • Dog Daycare

• Puppy Classes • Teen & Adult Manners • Agility & Dog Sports

• Premium Boarding • Solutions for Aggression & Anxiety

Dr. Sarah, Canine Connection founder and owner is a certified trainer, dog behavior consultant, and separation anxiety trainer specializing in positive, force-free training.

Look at that face!

Cutest pet—Facebook fan choice

The cute pets of the CN&R’s photo contest e want to thank the proud parents who entered the cute pet contest on the CN&R’s W Facebook page. The most “liked” pet was Moose Montana, a Camp Fire survivor with cancer. Congratulations to owner Megan Rawie. Spend every second you can with that adorable dude. And, because one pet pic just isn’t enough, the CN&R editorial staff pored over the other entries to choose a few of our favorites as well.

Moose Montana • Owner: Megan Rawie

Atticus Owner: Lacy Tomich Thorne

(530) 345–1912 www.TheCanineConnection.com Check out our happy dogs yourself on our website &

Kingsley Owner: Richard Kokoletsos

Leah & Whitey Owner: Annie Lewis Daisy Dana Owner: Amanda Abelar

Bonzo Owner: Samantha Francis

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Freddy Mercury August Owner: Mary August


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Arts &Culture Southern showman St.Paul and band explore family history and tight grooves

W

hen you talk about Southern values, family certainly ranks as a cornerstone. For Alabama-born and -raised Paul Janeway, lead singer of St. Paul & the Broken Bones, the connection to his loved ones has always been strong, but complicated. by As a liberal artist Dave Gil de growing in the South Rubio (“a blue dot in a very red part of the world,” Preview: St. Paul & The he says in the band’s Broken Bones peronline bio), he saw form Friday, July 5, the world differently 7:45 p.m., as part of than those around him. High Sierra, July 4-7. And for the band’s latVisit site for ticket est album—which he and lineup info. initially envisioned as a trio of EPs—he set out High Sierra Music to explore and better Festival Plumas-Sierra understand his connecCounty Fairgrounds, tions, especially those Quincy. between his grandfather, highsierramusic.com his dad and himself. “It was going to be through my eyes, my father’s eyes and my grandfather’s eyes,” he said during a recent interview. “I had a desire to do it because they are complicated relationships, which I kind of think a lot of people can relate to. It doesn’t have to be a father, but family in general. For me, I wanted to kind of work through that. ... It became a bigger project than I thought.” The work on the new album, Young Sick Camellia, came in the wake of two 24

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albums and whirlwind years of success for the Birmingham, Ala.-based octet. With a vintage soul vibe and a charismatic leader in Janeway, the band became a critical darling, scoring performances on NPR, Austin City Limits and many of the late-night talk shows, and even a couple of slots opening for the Rolling Stones. For its third release, the band wanted to move away from the “retro soul” tag, so in addition to Janeway’s thematic vision, the group also was inspired to mix things up musically and to that end teamed up with producer hip-hop/R&B producer Jack Splash (known for his work with Kendrick Lamar and Alicia Keys). “On the musical end, it was one of those things where we worked with … a producer that was ‘out of our realm.’ That was musically important because it changed things for us. For him, he was just enthusiastic about the project. For us, it felt right and we just kind of led with our guts. If it feels right, then it probably is right on the creative and artistic side,” Janeway explained. “It was kind of like a blind date in a lot of ways when you do these kinds of things. … We said it was an open canvas, that we needed to figure out what to do. Working with him—he’s an overly positive guy, he extracts the best effort out of everybody, which is really what a producer should do.” Having grown up as a preacher’s kid, Janeway brings a kind of performative fervor to his music—both on stage and

THIS WEEK St. Paul & the Broken Bones. PHOTO BY MCNAIR EVANS

3

WED in the studio—much like his musical forbearers/influences, Sam Cooke and Al Green. And despite the desire to move away from the throwback sound, Janeway’s showman’s energy and his evocative vocal phrasing—bouncing between a biting falsetto and yearning croon—remain even as the music explores later eras of R&B, plus disco, hip-hop and even some electronic music. The lead single, “Apollo,” is a mashup of Hammond organ, funky synth squiggles and a dash of ambient psychedelia punctuated by spacey lyrics like: “Lookin’ down from my orbit/Captain, can you get her to call me?” And its follow-up, “GotItBad,” brings out more synths for a dance number that’s a straight-up disco romp. As the group worked things out, the EP grew to a full album. Young Sick Camellia may yet end up being part of a trilogy, but could also simply remain standalone project. Adding to its esoteric vibe are snippets of dialogue from conversations Janeway recorded with his late grandfather interspersed throughout. And it closes with “Bruised Fruit,” a slowburner with Janeway’s blistering vocals playing off subdued orchestration— mournful horns, strings, sparse and dramatic piano, fleeting organ flourishes— that frames lyrics that seem get back to the familial matters at hand: “You did nothing right/you did nothing wrong/But no one seems to recall the love that you gave/The love that you forsake.” Ω

Special Events PARTY IN THE PARK MUSIC & MARKETPLACE: Weekly summer celebration of community and commerce with vendors, artisans, crafters and music. This week, blues and swing with Rube & the Rhythm Rockers. Wed, 7/3, 5:30pm. Paradise Community Park, 5582 Black Olive Drive, Paradise.

Music AN AMERICAN QUILT CONCERT: Traditional and classic songs performed by the Oroville Community Concert Band and the Oroville Community Chorus. Wed, 7/3, 7:30pm. $10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville.

TRACE ADKINS

Thursday, July 4 Rolling Hills Casino & Resort SEE THURSDAY, MUSIC


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

Theater

KYLE WILLIAMS

Friday, July 5 The Hop Yard at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. SEE FRIDAY, MUSIC

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to  share, an acoustic instrument, your voice,  a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested.  Fri, 7/5, 5pm. Feather River  Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and 

4

THU

Special Events CAR RACE & FIREWORKS: Giant fireworks display  and fast cars. Kids under 11 get in free.  Thu, 7/4, 6pm. $18. Silver Dollar Speedway, 2357  Fair St.

FOURTH OF JULY WINE BBQ: Hot dog lunch and  wine to celebrate the holiday.  Thu, 7/4, 1pm. $10. Spencer Shirey Wines, 6857 La  Porte Road, Bangor.

FOURTH OF JULY IN THE PARK: Celebrate the  holiday in Paradise with music by the USAF  band and more.  Thu, 7/4, 3pm. Paradise  Community Park, 5582 Black Olive Drive,  Paradise.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh  flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food  trucks.  Thu, 7/4, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 3456500. downtownchico.com

pulling weeds in the park. For more info call  Shane at 896-7831.  Fri, 7/5, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music AN AMERICAN QUILT CONCERT: See Wed.  Thu, 7/4, 1:30pm. $10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489  Myers St., Oroville.

HOWARD JONES: New wave icon/synth pioneer  performs, Men Without Hats and All Hail The  Silence open.  Thu, 7/4, 1pm. $35. Feather Falls  Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

TRACE ADKINS: Nashville icon and Grammynominated country artist performs.  Thu, 7/4, 8pm. $35 - $40. Rolling Hills Casino & Resort,  2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning.

5

FRI

Special Events NO COST/LOW COST DROP-IN HEALING CLINIC: Donation-based health care.  Fri, 7/5, 11am. Chico Kodenkan, 254 E. First St.

MATILDA: See Friday.  Sat, 7/6, 2pm and 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts,  1475 East Ave.

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SUN

Music KENDRA MCKINLEY: Bay Area singer and songwriter performs for brunch.  Sun, 7/7, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

KYLE WILLIAMS: Music in the Hop Yard by local  singer/songwriter.  Fri, 7/5, 4:30pm. Sierra  Nevada Brewery, 1075 E. 20th St.

TYLER DEVOLL: Local singer/songwriter plays  for happy hour.  Fri, 7/5, 4pm. La Salles, 229  Broadway St.

Theater MATILDA: California Regional Theater presents  musical version of Roald Dahl classic about  an extraordinary girl with psychokinetic  powers.  Fri, 7/5, 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD  Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave.

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SAT

Special Events BIKE NIGHT: Cake, snacks, drinks, deals, a live  DJ, raffles and games.  Tue, 7/9, 5pm. Cycle  Gear, 2501 S. Whitman Place.

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WED

Special Events PARTY IN THE PARK MUSIC & MARKETPLACE: Weekly 

Theater MATILDA: See Friday.  Sun, 7/7, 2pm. $15-$30.  CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave.

Music

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MON

Special Events FARM STAND: Fun farmer’s market featuring  local growers, plant starts, homemade  bakery goods and medicinal herbs.  Takes place outdoors in back.  Mon, 7/8, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

PRISONER LETTER WRITING: The North Valley  Prisoner Support crew gathers to write letters to incarcerated individuals.  Mon, 7/8,

summer celebration of community and  commerce with vendors, artisans, crafters and music. This week: Driver.  Wed, 7/10, 5:30pm. Paradise Community Park, 5582  Black Olive Drive, Paradise.

POETRY READING: Hear local poets and bring  your own poetry to read at this monthly  meeting of creative minds.  Wed, 7/10, 5:30pm. 15th Street Cafe, 1414 Park Ave. Suite  120. (760) 898-0825.

Music CHRISTONE “KINGFISH” INGRAM: Mississippi-based  blues prodigy performs. Big Mo & the Full  Moon Band open.  Wed, 7/10, 6:30pm. $15.  Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 28

EDITOR’S PICK

Special Events KENNEDY MEADOWS AND BOGS: The Mount Lassen  Chapter of the California Native Plant  Society hosts this hike to see wetland  flowers and more. Meet at Chico Park &  Ride (Hwy 32/99) west lot, call Marjorie  McNairn at 343-2397 for more info.  Sat 7/6, 8:30am. Lassen National Forest.

FARM STAND Monday, July 8 Blackbird Cafe

SEE MONDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Music MISS BEBE: Summer Reading Series presents  free afternoon performance.  Sat, 7/6, 2pm. Chico Branch Library, 1108 Sherman  Ave.

STEVE JOHNSON: Groovy tunes for brunch.  Sat, 7/6, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

POP GOES THE WORLD FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at  www.newsreview.com/calendar,  or email the CN&R calendar editor  at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com.  Deadline for print listings is   Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior   to the issue in which you wish the   listing to appear.

The 1980s have come and gone, but some performers of the era never went away. A master of the keyboard and ear-candy hits like “Everlasting Love” and “Like to Get to Know You Well,” Howard Jones continued making music even after he trimmed his big hair, and he is coming to Feather Falls Casino Brewing Co. on Thursday (July 4) in support of his new album Transform. Jones is also expected to play from his catalog of fan favorites. Opening the show will be Men Without Hats, of “The Safety Dance” fame, and electronic music duo All Hail the Silence. J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

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FINE ARTS

NATIONAL JURIED EXHIBITION

Shows through July 26 Chico Art Center

Art 1078 GALLERY: Members Show 2019, each  member gets two-square-feet of wall  space to show their work. Through 7/14.  1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

CHICO ART CENTER: National Juried  Exhibition, exemplary artwork of all  media from across the United States.  Juried by Mima Begovic, founder of  ARTSPACE 1616 in Sacramento,. Reception  on Friday, July 12, 5-7 pm. Through 7/26.  450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography  by late Northern California artist. The  Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery  features artists whose lives have been  touched by cancer. Through 7/19. 265  Cohasset Road.

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: California’s Girl of the  Golden Sunshine, Tehama County Arts  Council presents retrospective exhibit  of late California artist Babette Fickert  Dowell’s work. Through 7/6. 710 Main  Street, Red Bluff, 391-3259.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Map It  Out, works by Northern California artists  inspired by the theme of maps. Through  7/28. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Triple Exposure  Crosscurrents, photography exhibit  features artists James Canter, Stephanie  Luke and Harvey Spector. Through 7/20.  732 Fourth St., Orland.

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J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

SEE ART

PROVISIONS GALLERY: Momentum,  artwork by  J.P. Bruce. Through 7/25.  In the back of  Upper Park Clothing, 122 W. Third St.

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of  cool stuff for kids to explore including a  miniature city, complete with a junior vet  clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market,  a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room,  imagination playground and much more.  Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325  Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and  Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia  exhibition celebrates the human and  technological achievements needed  to reach the moon and envisions a  future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625  Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds  and humans, in partnership with the  Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose  Festival. Exhibits include bird songs  and behaviors, local photography and a  robotic recreation of the late Jurassic  Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. 400 W.  First St.


SCENE

Not just kids’ stuff

SwAmp ZEn LIVE AT

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Matilda is a song-and-dance tour de force

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Iwon’t the choreography is mentioned only at the end. That do with California Regional Theatre’s staging n most reviews of musical theater productions,

of the Broadway hit Matilda. Its dancing deserves to be noticed right away. It’s spectacular, the most dazzling element of a production that is full of dazzle. There are 17 musical numbers in Matilda, each accompanied by an elaborate dance routine. The leads are performed quite nicely by adults, but otherwise the dancing is done by the many children in the 25-member cast. Together they’re as good as some professional groups I’ve seen. Choreographer Sarah Shoemaker, working with director Bob Maness, assistant director Mindy Foutz and music director Olivia Cerullo, has created some of the most delightfully complex—and acrobatic—set pieces by I’ve seen staged locally. Robert Speer It helps that they’re performrober tspeer@ ing at the Center for the Arts, on newsrev i ew.c om the Pleasant Valley High School campus, which has a stage that’s large enough to accommodate Review: even the most expansive numbers. California Regional A flexible set design (by Maness) Theatre presents enables quick scene changes, Matilda Friday & enhancing the dancers’ ability to Saturday, 7:30 p.m. do Broadway-quality routines. The and Saturday & Sunday, 2 p.m., center’s state-of-the art lighting through July 7. system also helps in this regard. Tickets: $20-$30 Matilda is based on Roald Dahl’s book of the same name. CUSD Center for the Arts Like Dahl’s other books (Charlie 1475 East Ave. and the Chocolate Factory, The (800) 722-4522 Witches, James and the Giant crtshows.com Peach), it is an unsentimental and often darkly comic portrait of a child in a world where the adults frequently are mean and hostile. Matilda the Musical (its original title) differs from the book in fundamental ways. Most important, it unspools its story primarily through music and dance, rather than dialogue. What dialogue there is comes mainly from Matilda. She’s played by Charlie Sue Ansorge, who is only 9 years old but handles her huge role—many dozens of lines, numerous songs—with conviction and aplomb. There is nothing tentative about her performance. Her Matilda may be young, but she’s smart and tough, and that comes across. Matilda has to be tough, because she’s sur-

Nine-year-old Charlie Sue Ansorge plays the irrepressible Matilda. PHOTO BY JENNIFER REDEKER

rounded by unkind people, beginning with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wormwood, who are played by Brandon Kuiper-Morgan and Kaila Davidson. Both give remarkable performances, incorporating a range of movements and gestures that enrich their characterizations. The creativity just keeps on coming. Among the other notable performances are those of Linda Burchett as the villainous headmistress, Miss Trunchbull; Marquita Goodman as Mrs. Phelps, the kindly librarian who encourages Matilda’s love of books; and Ruby Ocampo as Miss Honey, the lovable school teacher who tries to protect Matilda from Miss Trunchbull. There is such depth to this cast that even the secondtier performers stand out. A good example is Luciano Castaldo, who plays Rudolpho. It’s a minor role, but it involves a lot of dancing, and Castaldo is gifted in that regard. When he’s on he dominates the stage. As mentioned, there are 17 musical numbers in Matilda, with music and lyrics by Tim Minchin. These range from duets to huge production numbers, and here they’re given wonderful treatments. For every excellent dancer in this production, there’s an equally talented singer. Matilda originally was commissioned by the Royal Shakespeare Company and opened in the West End of London in 2011. Its American debut was in 2013 at the Shubert Theatre on Broadway. Reviews have been almost universally positive. Writing in The New York Times, theater critic Ben Brantley called Matilda “an exhilarating tale of empowerment, as told from the perspective of the most powerless group of all. I mean little children. … Matilda captures the particular dread that runs like an icy rivulet through even the happiest of childhoods.” Ω

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Chico: 2300 Fair St. • 343-8641 • Hours: Monday-Saturday 8am–3:45pm J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

3WEDNESDAY

C.J. BOYD: One-of-a-kind bassist, 

composer and traveling man performs. Locals Weiner and Cat Depot  open.  Wed, 7/3, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender  Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

OPEN MIC: Showcase your talents at  open mic hosted by Mr. Bang! All 

ages, sign-ups start at 5:30pm.  Wed, 7/3, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly  Wednesday dose of free comedy 

HANNAH JANE KILE & MATILDA KRULDER Saturday, July 6 Tender Loving Coffee

WEDNESDAY 7/3—WEDNESDAY 7/10 with experienced and first-time  comedians. Sign-ups start at  8pm.  Wed, 7/3, 9pm. Studio Inn  Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

PARTY IN THE PARK MUSIC & MARKETPLACE: Weekly summer  celebration of community and  commerce with vendors, artisans,  crafters and music. This week,  blues and swing music with Rube  & the Rhythm Rockers.  Wed, 7/3, 5:30pm. Paradise Community Park,  5582 Black Olive Drive, Paradise.

4THURSDAY

CAR RACE & FIREWORKS: Giant fireworks display and fast cars.  Kids under 11 get in free.  Thu, 7/4, 6pm. $18. Silver Dollar Speedway,  2357 Fair St.

FOURTH OF JULY PARTY: Front-row  seats to the fairground fireworks  plus a live DJ.  Thu, 7/4, 6pm. Tackle  Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

FOURTH OF JULY CONCERT: Local  band 3Pints Down performs hits  from a variety of genres.  Thu, 7/4, 7:30pm. Free. City Plaza, downtown  Chico, 132 W. Fourth St., 228-0846.

HOWARD JONES: New wave icon/synth 

Hannah Jane Kile

We Need

pioneer performs, Men Without Hats  and All Hail the Silence open.  Thu, 7/4, 1pm. $35. Feather Falls Casino &  Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

SOUNDS FROM THE DELTA

REGGAE FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION: Reggae DJs, beer,  and a view of the fairground fireworks.  Thu, 7/4, 6pm. The Commons  Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

SOUL POSSE: Local cover band plays  Fourth of July dance party on the  patio.  Thu, 7/4, 6pm. La Salles, 229  Broadway St.

Fresh off of a tour opening for Buddy Guy, Mississippi-born blues guitarist and vocalist Christone “Kingfish” Ingram is on the road in support of his debut album, Kingfish. Described as “a rising blues prodigy” by NPR Music, he will be performing at the Chico Women’s Club Wednesday (July 10) along with Big Mo and the Full Moon Band. Don’t miss the future of American blues in person—this guy is the real deal.

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive  Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts  welcome.  Thu, 7/4, 7pm. Studio  Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (408)  449-2179.

TRACE ADKINS: Nashville icon and  Grammy-nominated country artist  performs.  Thu, 7/4, 8pm. $35-$40.  Rolling Hills Casino & Resort, 2655  Everett Freeman Way, Corning.

WEBSTER MOORE: Local singer/pianist  performs.  Thu, 7/4, 7pm. Tender  Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

5FRIDAY

ARIZONA JONES: Reno-based cover  band puts a spin on classic R&B  hits from the ’60s and ’70s.  Fri, 7/5, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &  Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

BONFIRE: Get thunderstruck with AC/

DC tribute band.  Fri, 7/5, 9:30pm. $5.  Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 

KYLE WILLIAMS: Music in the Hop Yard 

Alverda Drive, Oroville.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Accordion soul  music by Bay Area’s Andre Thierry  & Zydeco Magic.  Fri, 7/5, 7pm. City  Plaza, downtown Chico.

by local singer/songwriter.  Fri, 7/5, 4:30pm. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.,  1075 E. 20th St.

OPEN MIC: Sign-ups at 7:30pm. All ages 

artists! the Cn&r Artbox Proje ProjeCt is looking for creative minds to transform our newsracks into functional works of art.

cn&r is Looking for • advertising consuLtant • distribution driver Do you love Chico? Do youwant to help local businesses succeed? So do we!

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CN&R

J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

for more information, visit www.newsreview.com/chico/jobs

equal OppORTuNiTy emplOyeR


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 24 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

OUTLIT DRAG SHOW Friday, July 5 The Maltese

9TUESDAY

SEE FRIDAY

OPEN MIC: Hosted by veteran Matilda Krulder opens. Sat, 7/6, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

NATIONAL PLEASURE BURLESQUE: Local burlesque troupe The Malteazers showcase their talents (for a Nicolas Cage-themed program?). Sat, 7/6, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

OBE & LOKI: Popular local musicians playing hits for late-night happy hour. Sat, 7/6, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

welcome until 10pm. Fri, 7/5, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 966-8342.

OUTLIT DRAG SHOW: Drag, drinks and dancing. Show will feature new and visiting guest performers. Fri, 7/5, 10pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

SOUL POSSE: Five-piece local band playing hits from the ’50s to the present. Fri, 7/5, 7pm. Southside Community Resource Center, 2959 Lower Wyandotte Road, Oroville.

6SATURDAY

TENNESSEE RIVER: Take a trip to Dixieland with Alabama tribute band. Sat, 7/6, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

ARIZONA JONES: See Friday. Sat, 7/6, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino &

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

7SUNDAY

DRIVER: Classic rock, rhythm and

blues band from Paradise. Sat, 7/6, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

instrumentalist and composer performs. Soulful local vocalist

SUMMER BEER PAIRING DINNER: Summer five-course dinner with special seasonal dishes. Tue, 7/9, 6pm. $40. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

10WEDNESDAY

CHRISTONE “KINGFISH” INGRAM: Mississippi-based blues

guitar prodigy. Not to be missed. Big Mo & the Full Moon Band opens. Wed, 7/10, 6:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr. org

bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Sign-ups start at 8pm. Sun, 7/7,

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celebration of community and commerce with vendors, artisans, crafters and music. This week: Driver. Wed, 7/10, 5:30pm. Paradise

FOURTH OF JULY FESTIVITIES

Holiday hangouts around town are abundant this year, with live music, DJs, drinks, food and fireworks. The Commons and The Tackle Box will have DJs, and both spots allow for a good view of the fireworks at the Silver Dollar Speedway. La Salles has Soul Posse rocking the patio with fun dance music, and threeman band 3Pints Down will perform classic rock and country hits at the City Plaza downtown.

Wednesday dose of free comedy with experienced and first-time comedians. Sign-ups start at 8pm. Wed, 7/10, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

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Chico singer/songwriter Andan Casamajor. There’s always a guitar to borrow and a house cajón for frisky fingers, so come on down and get on the list. Tue, 7/9, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

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Ydidn’ttheexist?”—and world be like if the music of The Beatles totally squanders it.

esterday takes an interesting premise—“What would

Danny Boyle (127 Hours, Slumdog Millionaire) directs the strained saga of Jack Malik (Himesh Patel), a wannabe musician working part-time in a grocery store while also busking on street corby ners and playing small solo gigs with Bob Grimm his trusty guitar. Jack’s music career bg ri m m @ is managed by Ellie (Lily James), new srev i ew. c o m who nurtures a decades-old crush on Jack as she books him gigs at hotels and music-fest side-tents. One day while riding his bike home—at the same time the world suffers some sort of momentary Yesterday power loss—Jack gets hit by a bus. Starring Himesh The wreck knocks out a couple of his Patel and Lily teeth and busts his guitar. Just before James. Directed his accident, he’d sworn to end his by Danny Boyle. music career—probably a good idea Cinemark 14, Feather River because he totally sucks. Cinemas. Rated Post-accident, Ellie and some PG-13. friends gift Jack a new guitar and suggest he bust out a song for them. He goes with “Yesterday” by The Beatles, and they are moved, as if hearing the song for the first time. That’s because they are hearing it for the first time. A quick Google check by Jack confirms the impossible: Somehow, someway, he now lives in a parallel world where John, Paul, George and Ringo never came together to make music.

1

So what does Jack do? Why, he plagiarizes The Beatles catalog. He plasters Post-its for their songs all over his room, and starts re-creating their tracks. He struggles with the lyrics to “Eleanor Rigby,” but he gets enough right to catch the ears of agents and producers everywhere. Jack does not look like a rock star, but no matter. With the music of The Beatles propelling him, this average kid starts to go places. Now, this act—stealing the music of the best group in rock history—is a grievous action, is it not? Only a true prick would steal music and try to pass it off as his own, right? And this is where the film goes terribly wrong. Rather than explore the dark side of plagiarism in a comedic way, or seriously address a world without The Beatles, the movie seems scared of itself and becomes nothing but a lame rom-com. An opportunity for some mindbending alternate reality is squandered for an exercise in whether Jack and Ellie will kiss. Movies that feature The Beatles’ music can be great. Across the Universe stands as a fine exercise on how to use their tunes in film. Yesterday is a vapid, unimaginative mess. Given the mode in which it’s presented, I actually winced when the music came on. You have to really screw up to make The Beatles boring. Ω

1 2

3 4

Poor

Good

Fair

Very Good

5 Excellent


Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week Midsommar

A traditional festival in Sweden—which only happens once every 90 years—devolves into something much darker than a group of visiting young Americans anticipated. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Pavarotti

Ron Howard directed this new documentary on the life of the most recognizable opera singer ever, Italian tenor Luciano Pavarotti. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

Spider-Man: Far From Home

This sequel to Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) picks up after the events of Avengers: Endgame, and finds Peter Parker/SpiderMan recruited by Nick Fury to battle new threats to the world. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Aladdin

Guy Ritchie (Sherlock Holmes, Snatch) wrote and directed this live-action adaptation of the classic Middle Eastern folk tale starring Naomi Scott as Princess Jasmine, Mena Massoud as impoverished thief Aladdin, and Will Smith as the genie who can make wishes come true. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Annabelle Comes Home

The Conjuring Universe of films (including The Conjuring, The Nun and Annabelle series) continues to bear horror fruit with this continuation of the dolly-occupied-byevil-spirit plot. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

4

Avengers: Endgame

A gorgeously shot documentary that follows a young married couple over the course of eight years as they leave city life behind and move to the country to try and start a farm and live in harmony with nature. In the process they encounter challenges and conflicts that lead to a better understanding of biodiversity and a new way of life. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

In part three of the film series, “retired” super-assassin John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is in big trouble as a guild of elite killers hunts him down to claim the $14 million price placed on his head. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

2

Men in Black: International

This amounts to a wasted opportunity, an admirable attempt to restart a franchise with a new cast that misses most of its marks. Replacing Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones are Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson, playing Agents H and M, respectively. H is the bold, brash, superhot agent, and M is a new recruit, having found MIB’s secret headquarters after years of searching. The duo proved they worked well together in Thor: Ragnarok, and while it is fun to see them sharing the screen again, it’s a little baffling what the script puts them through. After a fairly strong start, the action devolves sloppily into boredom. Each passing location—Paris, Italy, Marrakesh—takes the story nowhere, and scenery changes serve only to disguise the fact that the film has no purpose. A “mole in MIB” subplot doesn’t add much mystery, and the finale in Paris (after an opening in Paris) offers few surprises and no thrills. The movie ends with a big “Huh?” Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

join us for

h c n u l y frida

Rocketman

An appropriately fantastical musical biopic on the life of piano-playing rock legend Elton John. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Secret Life of Pets 2

In this second film in the computer-animated franchise, Max the Jack Russell Terrier (voiced by Patton Oswalt, who replaced Louis C.K.) and his animal friends continue to have adventures whenever their humans aren’t around. Cinemark 14 Rated PG-13.

Toy Story 4

The whole computer-animated gang is back—including Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) and Bo Peep (Annie Potts)—for a new adventure with a new homemade toy pal named Forky. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated G.

1

Yesterday

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

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There are tons of questions this movie needed to answer: Is everybody really dead? Where’s Thanos (Josh Brolin)? Where’s Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner)? Is Tony Stark/ Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) doomed in space? Does Star-Lord (Chris Pratt) still have his Walkman in the great beyond? And, how can I really talk about anything specific in this film without becoming the Spoiler King? I can say that the movie answers many of the questions everyone’s been asking, and more, thanks to another well-balanced screenplay and a crack directorial job from the team of Anthony and Joe Russo. All of this zips by in spectacularly entertaining fashion and very rarely misses the mark. And in the midst of all the action, Downey Jr. delivers another soulful, endearing performance, well beyond anything you would’ve expected from a Marvel movie before he started showing up in them. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

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CN&R

J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

It’s time to spit out your beer, just like the wine-drinkers do

W story? Mine takes me back a decade or so, when I was at a

hat’s your best spit bucket

pinot noir tasting in San Francisco and, upon stepping up to a booth to try by the wine, I emptied Alastair my glass into a tall Bland metal vessel on the table. The winemaker politely told me I had just poured my wine into a prized singlevineyard release, which he was decanting in a steel vase. Mortified, I slunk away, hoping we wouldn’t meet again. My second best spit bucket story took place in 2010 at the Boonville Beer Festival, and didn’t actually involve a spit bucket: I dumped a generous pour of some high-alcohol stout into the grass, rather than guzzle it, as I approached the next beer table. Almost immediately, I saw a nearby man smirk, look from

me to his friend and say, barely audible under the noise of the crowd, “Total rookie move.” It was 30 minutes into a day-long, all-you-can-drink beer extravaganza, and this guy was giving me a hard time because I was pacing myself? Anyway, the last laugh is on him, because nine years later, dumping beer—even good stuff—is standard practice at tastings. Rare is the beer table where there isn’t a dump bucket. Indeed, the handsome steel vessels have become an ordinary piece of beer festival table décor, whereas a decade ago they were scarcely seen, recalls Brendan Moylan, owner of Moylan’s and Marin brewering companies. “In the old days, you had maybe 20 beers to choose from at a festival,” Moylan said. “Now, there might be hundreds.” He says the overall increase in

beer diversity and quantity at beer tasting events has given rise to the use of beer dump buckets. He says even spitting out a beer already in your mouth is becoming acceptable in the beer sampling culture, too. “When you have hundreds of beers to taste, why shouldn’t you spit some out, especially if you don’t like it?” he says. One reason people might not spit, or even dump, their beer is that they have paid a price to enter a festival and therefore feel a compulsion to consume as much as they can to get their money’s worth. Another reason is that it, frankly, looks kind of gross, and indeed is considered a vulgar act in our culture. Thus, it’s remarkable that the wine culture has made the sound and sight of expelling wine from the mouth into a mark of class. The beer culture, I believe, is working its way there. Tom McCormick, the president of the California Craft Brewers Association, says dump buckets are typically for dumping beer into only from one’s glass but that this could change as attitudes and customs shift. “I suppose people should feel comfortable about spitting into dump buckets as well rather than swallowing,” he said. On the other hand, there is a case to be made for swallowing a beer to more thoroughly taste it. Deschutes Brewery explains on its website the importance of putting beer in your belly in order to adequately assess and experience its flavor. “Unlike wine, beer has carbonation (CO2), and as you take a sip, CO2 escapes the liquid as gas and rises from your throat to your nasal passage, carrying some flavor of the beer. Thus, the sense of smell combines with taste to get an overall flavor of the beer in a different manner than uncarbonated wine. To get the full flavor experience of beer, one must swallow.” With the festival season upon us—and beer weeks and beer fests happening all over California, culminating with the California Craft Beer Summit (Sept. 12-14) in Long Beach— and hundreds of beers to sample in the sun, pace yourself, remember those dump buckets and take the opportunity to safely sample dozens of new beers that you’ve never had before. Because getting drunk at a tasting is a total rookie move. Ω


JULY 3, 2019

  CN&R 

33


ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

In Celebration of Independence Day, the CN&R Office will be CLOSED Thursday, July 4th. ✪ ✪ ✪

Best of 20

Chico

1 9

Arriving Soon ATTENTION LOCAL BUSINESS OWNERS: The CN&R is designing Best of Chico Posters with a QR code that links directly to the Official Best of Chico 2019 online ballot. It’s the perfect way to remind your customers that it’s time to vote for you, their favorite! This 11x17 poster will be available at no cost to you (limit 2 per business).

DON’T MISS YOUR ONLY OPPORTUNITY TO RECEIVE POSTERS FOR THIS YEAR’S BEST OF CHICO CONTEST! Pick up your FREE posters July 29–August 2, 9am-5pm at the CN&R office, 353 E. Second St.

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES A new theater group has plans to start up in Chico next fall, and it will hit the boards with a bold opening statement. The debut production of Legacy Stage will be an outdoor showing of Macbeth in Bidwell Park’s Cedar Grove. Not only is the troupe tackling Shakespeare’s great tragedy, but it’ll be presenting it a dozen times throughout the month of October (Oct. 3-Nov. 3). Legacy is being launched by a group of local theater folks who decided to pool their resources to collaborate on projects, according to co-founder Erin Horst, who teaches theater at Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, Chico State and the Blue Room Theatre (with the theater’s Young Company). Horst’s coconspirators are actress and Chico State Theater lecturer Jami Witt and local actress/director Lara Tenckhoff. Macbeth is already cast, with John Crosthwaite in the title role, Witt as Lady Macbeth, Witt’s husband and Chico State Music and Theater Department professor Matthew Teague Miller directing. Horst said that it isn’t Legacy’s intention to try and create a new Shakespeare in the Park; rather “Beware the Thane of Fife!” the group is focused on presenting intimate, low-tech performances in the park. In fact, seating will be limited to 20-25 audience members. Arts DEVO will share more info on tickets, dates and times as he gets it. THEATER CAMP! The Blue Room’s youth theater camp program kicks off next week (for kids ages 6 to 16), and will feature four weeks’ worth of classes on “all aspects of theater: acting, design, improv, behind-the-scene responsibilities and etiquette.” The cost is $150 week (with $50 discount for signing up up for all four), and each week culminates with a short play. Email amber@blueroomtheatre.com to register. ART GRANTS The city of Chico’s transient-occupancy-tax-funded art grants

are back and submissions can be made via the North Valley Community Foundation website at nvcf.org/city-of-chico-arts-grant-program. Grant

amounts range from $2,000 to $5,000 and a total of $27,000 will be awarded to artists and arts organizations for projects that “deliver or provide support for the delivery of opportunities for the community to engage in arts and cultural experiences.” Deadline for submission is July 30.

PAINT-AND-SPLIFF Making art while high is

BEST OF CHICO VOTING BEGINS THURSDAY, AUGUST 8 ONLINE

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CN&R

J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

not a new concept. From the Green Fairy to LSD, mind-altering substances have played a role in the creative process of some of the most noteworthy painters, writers and musicians in history. And while weed surely already has inspired many a groovy all-night jam and colorful piece of art in our fun-loving city, now that pot is legal in Cali, there are more possibilities available. To that end, the new Butte County Cannabis Art Club is offering “instructor-led, cannabis-friendly art classes.” With posters popping up around town calling for those who want to let their “creativity soar,” the group is seeking sign-ups for its smoke-friendly art workshops. It’s a strictly bringyour-own-pot (and 21-over) enterprise, but other materials are provided as part of the class fee. Currently on the schedule: a Bob Ross/Northern Lightsthemed Paint and Smoke (July 13; $49 fee) and a sushi- and joint-rolling class (July 14; $69 fee). Visit buttecountycannabisartclub.com to sign up.


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of June 17- June 22, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

80 Riviera Ct

Chico

$805,000

3/2

SQ. FT. 2264

1805 Citrus Ave

Chico

$365,000

3/2

1488

22 Fairway Dr

Chico

$789,000

4/3

3238

378 E 8th St

Chico

$358,091

2/1

1003

2030 Huntington Dr

Chico

$350,000

3/2

1234

4203 Magness Ct

Chico

$765,000

4/3

2664

606 Jardin Way

Chico

$720,000

3/3

3013

124 Estates Dr

Chico

$701,000

3/4

3906

616 Parkwood Dr

Chico

$665,000

3/3

2265

5 Lower Lake Ct

Chico

$550,000

4/2

1800

676 Cromwell Dr

Chico

$526,000

3/2

2110

9 La Casa Ct

Chico

$519,000

5/3

2516

SQ. FT.

36 Sunland Dr

Chico

$350,000

3/2

1604

656 E 20th St

Chico

$342,000

2/1

850

3205 Godman Ave

Chico

$335,000

3/2

1196

1071 Sarah Ave

Chico

$319,000

3/1

1060

685 E 16th St

Chico

$288,500

3/2

1137

Chico

$250,000

3/2

1244

Chico

$177,500

3/2

960

200 Denali Dr

Chico

$515,000

3/2

1961

2055 Amanda Way #6 Apt

1262 Orchard Ln

Chico

$451,000

3/3

1952

1114 Nord Ave #20 Apt

1139 Autumnwood Dr

Chico

$450,000

3/2

1616

1106 W 8th Ave #14 Apt

Chico

$165,000

3/2

988

13601 Garner Ln

Chico

$435,000

3/3

1448

2166 Ceres Ave

Chico

$163,000

2/1

880

1835 Broadway St

Chico

$431,500

4/2

2080

2860 Clark Way

Chico

$425,000

3/1

1339

3 Lily Way

Chico

$420,000

3/3

1842

2 Carson St A Apt

Chico

$419,000

3/2

2100

2612 Tuolumne Dr

Chico

$395,000

3/2

1585

4 Vermillion Cir

Chico

$385,500

3/2

1498

97 Benson Ter

Chico

$383,000

3/3

1965

2220 Notre Dame Blvd #7 Apt

Chico

$140,000

2/1

864

1410 Heather Cir

Chico

$130,000

3/1

1135

7506 Reservoir Rd

Oroville

$315,000

2/1

1196

2531 Foothill Blvd

Oroville

$290,000

3/3

1353

195 Valley View Dr

Oroville

$280,000

3/2

1263

217 Redbud Dr

Paradise

$480,000

2/3

2565

3342 Bayleaf Ln

Paradise

$343,000

3/2

1524

20 Mayfair Dr

Chico

$380,000

3/2

1775

2784 Lucy Way

Chico

$380,000

3/2

1496

6203 W Wagstaff Rd

Paradise

$302,000

3/2

1408

643 Earl Ave

Chico

$375,000

3/2

1759

6681 Shay Ln

Paradise

$289,000

2/2

1334

jul y 3, 2019

35


CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE E

Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

FBN Number: 2019-0000668 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

For more information about advertising in our Real estate section,

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

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(530) 894-2300

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ZAVALA REAL ESTATE SOLUTIONS at 1280 E 9th Street, Suite A Chico, CA 95928. JOSE ZAVALA CHAVEZ 2070 Mansfield Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSE ZAVALA CHAVEZ Dated: May 29, 2019 this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PEEKING CHINESE RESTAURANT at 243 West 2nd Street, #4 Chico, CA 95928. BRUCE WAI SZE CHENG 10136 Lofton Way Elk Grove, CA 95757. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRUCE CHENG Dated: May 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000662 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WITHINREACH RESOURCES, WITHINREACH RHYTHMS at 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN MARIE NAAS 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. KENNETH NELSON NAAS 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KENNETH N. NAAS Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000712 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY PET HOSPITAL at 2156 Pillsbury Road Suite 160 Chico, CA 95928. WILLOWS WAGS AND WHISKERS 32158 Camino Capistrano Suite A152 San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CHERI LYON, TREASURER Dated: May 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000675 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GELAYO at 1380 East Ave #136 Chico, CA 95926. MANO GELYAYO, INCORPORATED 1380 East Ave. Suite 136 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELLE PARK, MANAGER this Legal Notice continues

Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000642 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELEVATED NATURAL BEAUTY at 3 Governors Lane Ste B Chico, CA 95926. ANASTASIA TERRY 355 E Lassen Ave Apt 31 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANASTASIA TERRY Dated: June 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000722 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KAIA FIT CHICO at 2700 Hegan Ln. Suite 108 Chico, CA 95928. BC SHIRLEY LLC 1681 Park View Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CARA SHIRLEY, MEMBER Dated: June 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000708 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION at 39 Parkside Ct Chico, CA 95928. BARBARA FURRY 39 Parkside Ct Chico, CA 95928. JOHN FURRY 39 Parkside Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JOHN FURRY Dated: June 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000723 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CJ CONSTRUCTORS at 3029 Esplanade 5 Chico, CA 95973. CRAIG JEFFERY WENNER 13968 Pomegranate Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CRAIG JEFFERY WENNER Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000710 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2109

this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SUSTAINME COMPANY at 1410 Heather Circle Chico, CA 95926. JORDON LEE VERNAU 1410 Heather Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JORDON VERNAU Dated: May 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000690 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STYLE BOMB, STYLE BOMB CLUB at 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE CORONA 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY CORONA Dated: June 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000734 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as READING FOR LIFE at 1280 Pennisue Way Chico, CA 95926. DEVA WINONA DANIEL 1280 Pennisue Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DEVA WINONA DANIEL Dated: June 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000730 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTURY 21 SELECT COMMERCIAL GROUP, CENTURY 21 SELECT REAL ESTATE at 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JACUZZI LYDON LTD 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DANIEL C. JACUZZI, PRESIDENT Dated: June 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000739 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS at 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. this Legal Notice continues

HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS, INC 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: PATRICIA L. DOBRICH, CFO Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000709 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COMMUNITY CONSULTANTS at 1005 Mildred Ave. Chico, CA 95926. SHERISSE ALLEN 1005 Mildred Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHERISSE ALLEN Dated: June 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000696 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS INC at 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS INCORPORATED 7 Laguna Point Road Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed; GAIL NOTTINGHAM, PRESIDENT Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0001369 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TIME PHO BOBA at 1124 Oro Dam Blvd E Suite F Oroville, CA 95965. CHIAD IAN TERN 52 Coarse Gold Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHIAD TERN Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000582 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as L SQUARED PRODUCTIONS at 16 Sega Dr Chico, CA 95928. LINDSEY JEAN LUNDBERG 16 Sega Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LINDSEY LUNDBERG Dated: June 21, 2019 this Legal Notice continues


FBN Number: 2019-0000760 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SPEC-WEST CONCRETE SYSTEMS at 2350 Park Ave. Chico, CA 95928. BORDER CONSTRUCTION SPECIALTIES, LLC 8901 E. Pima Center Parkway Suite 205 Scottsdale, AZ 85258. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: GREG VISCONTI Dated: June 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000717 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ADAM CHASE MERRIMAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ADAM CHASE MERRIMAN Proposed name: ADAM CHASE BYERS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01578 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VICKI LEA WENDT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VICKI LEA WENDT

Proposed name: VICKI LEE EGGEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: June 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00747 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SU HLAING CHAMM filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SU HLAING CHAMM Proposed name: EZECAIRA AEINDRA VOZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: June 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01701 Published: June 20,27, July

3,11, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ELISSA TANITH GLASSER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ELISSA TANITH GLASSER Proposed name: ELISSA TANITH HAWK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA MOSBARGER Dated: June 11, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01739 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT RICKEY LEE CARPENTER and CATRINA MISKELLA CARPENTER aka CATRINA MISKELLA doing business as RICK CARPENTER ROOFING; and, DOES 1 TO 20. You are being sued by plaintiff: DAVID J. MURRAY NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your writen response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You

can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. you may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org.), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: DAVID J. MURRAY, ESQ. 354 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928 (530) 896-1144 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: April 2, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01024 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JOELENE N GILMAN YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your

written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: June 29, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02136 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JOANNA FAE SHAPIRO AKA JOANNA FAE DAUGHERTY YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF JULY 3, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): When the

universe began 13.8 billion years ago, there were only four elements: mostly hydrogen and helium, plus tiny amounts of lithium and beryllium. Now there are 118 elements, including five that are key components of your body: oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus. All of those were created by nuclear reactions blazing on the insides of stars that later died. So it’s literally true to say that much of your flesh and blood and bones and nerves originated at the hearts of stars. I invite you to meditate on that amazing fact. It’s a favorable time to muse on your origins and your ancestry; to ruminate about all the events that led to you being here today—including more recent decades, as well as the past 13.8 billion years.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Most

American women couldn’t vote until 100 years ago. Women in Japan, France and Italy couldn’t vote until the 1940s. Universal suffrage has been a fundamental change in how society is structured. Similarly, same-sex marriage was opposed by vast majorities in most countries until 15 years ago, but has since become widely accepted. African-American slavery lasted for hundreds of years before being delegitimized all over the Western world in the 19th century. Brazil, which hosted 40% of all kidnapped Africans, didn’t free its slaves until 1888. What would be the equivalent of such revolutionary transformations in your own personal life? According to my reading of the astrological omens, you have the power to make that happen during the next 12 months.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Gemini

musician Paul Weller is famous in the U.K., though not so much elsewhere. According to the BBC, he is one of Britain’s “most revered music writers and performers.” To which I say: revered, maybe, but mentally healthy? Not so much. He bragged that he broke up his marriage with his wife Dee C. Lee because “things were going too well, we were too happy, too comfortable, everything seemed too nice.” He was afraid that “as a writer and an artist I might lose my edge.” Don’t you dare allow yourself to get infected with that perverse way of thinking. Please capitalize on your current comfort and happiness. Use them to build your strength and resilience for the months and years to come.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cancerian

voice actor Tom Kenny has played the roles of more than 1,500 cartoon characters, including SpongeBob SquarePants, Spyro the Dragon, Jake Spidermonkey, Commander Peepers and Doctor Octopus. I propose that we make him your role model in the coming weeks. It will be a favorable time for you to show your versatility; to demonstrate how multifaceted you can be; to express various sides of your soulful personality.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Leo author Donald

Miller reminds us that fear can have two very different purposes. On the one hand, it may be “a guide to keep us safe,” alerting us to situations that could be dangerous or abusive. On the other hand, fear may work as “a manipulative emotion that can trick us into living a boring life.” After studying your astrological indicators for the coming weeks, I have come to the conclusion that fear may serve both of those functions for you. Your challenge will be to discern between them; to know which situations are genuinely risky and which situations are daunting but promising. Here’s a hint that might help: Trust your gut feelings more than your swirling fantasies.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Why do flocks

of geese fly in a V formation? Because doing so enhances the collective efficiency of their travel. Each bird generates a current that supports the bird behind it. Let’s make this phenomenon one of your power metaphors for the coming weeks. What would be the equivalent strategy for you and your tribe or group as you seek to make your collaborative efforts more dynamic and

bY rob brezsnY productive? Unforeseen help will augment any actions you take in this regard.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “A conversa-

tion is a dialogue, not a monologue,” mused Libra author Truman Capote. “That’s why there are so few good conversations: due to scarcity, two intelligent talkers seldom meet.” That cynical formulation has more than a few grains of truth in it, I must admit. But I’m pleased to tell you that I suspect your experience in the coming weeks will be an exception to Capote’s rule. I think you have the potential to embark on a virtual binge of rich discussion and intriguing interplay with people who stimulate and educate and entertain you. Rise to the challenge!

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In accor-

dance with astrological rhythms, you are authorized to make the following declarations in the next two weeks: 1. “I refuse to participate further in this situation on the grounds that it might impinge on the expansiveness of my imagination.” 2. “I abstain from dealing with your skepticism on the grounds that doing so might discourage the flights of my imagination.” 3. “I reject these ideas, theories and beliefs on the grounds that they might pinch, squash or deflate my imagination.” What I’m trying to tell you is that it’s crucial for you to emancipate your imagination and authorize it to play uninhibitedly in the frontiers of possibilities.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): I invite you to make a copy of the testimonial below and give it to anyone who is in a position to support your Noble Experiment. “To Whom It May Concern: I endorse this Soulful Sagittarius for the roles of monster-tamer, fun-locator, boredom-transcender, elation-inciter and mountaintop visionary. This adroit explorer is endowed with charming zeal, disarming candor, and abundant generosity. If you need help in sparking your enthusiasm or galvanizing your drive to see the big picture, call on the expansive skills of this jaunty puzzle-solver.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Life

will conspire to bring you a surge of love in the coming weeks—if you can handle it. Can you? Will you be able to deal adeptly with rumbling love and icy-hot love and mostlysweet-but-also-a-bit-sour love? Do you possess the resourcefulness and curiosity necessary to have fun with funny spiritual love and running-through-the-labyrinth love and unexpectedly catalytic love? Are you open-minded and open-hearted enough to make the most of brilliant shadowy love and unruly sensitive love and toughly graceful love?

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I don’t

endlessly champion the “no pain, no gain” theory of personal growth. My philosophy holds that we are at least as likely to learn valuable lessons from pleasurable and joyful experiences as we are from difficult and taxing struggles. Having said that, I also think it’s true that our suffering may lead us to treasure if we know how to work with it. According to my assessment, the coming weeks will bring one such opening for you. To help you cultivate the proper spirit, keep in mind the teaching of Aquarian theologian and author Henri Nouwen. He said that life’s gifts may be “hidden in the places that hurt most.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The

Japanese word “wabi-sabi” refers to an interesting or evocative imperfection in a work of art that makes it more beautiful than if it were merely perfect. “Duende” is a Spanish word referring to a work of art that gives its viewers the chills because it’s so emotionally rich and unpredictably soulful. In the coming weeks, I think that you yourself will be a work of art with an abundance of these qualities. Your wabisabi will give you the power to free yourself from the oppressive pressures of seeking too much precision and purity. Your duende can give you the courage you need to go further than you’ve ever dared in your quest for the love you really want.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

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unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: July 20, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02375 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: RICKEY LEE CARPENTER and

CATRINA MISKELLA CARPENTER aka CATRINA MISKELLA doing business as RICK CARPENTER ROOFING; and DOES 1 TO 20. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: EFFICIENT ENERGY CONCEPTS, INC. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Law Office of David J. Murray DAVID J. MURRAY, ESQ. 354 E. 5th Street

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Chico, CA 95928. (530) 896-1144 Dated: April 22, 2019 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 19CV01244 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: MONICA M CHAVIRA YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928

LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: September 28, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV03187 Published: July 3,11,18,25, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE STEVEN JOHN MUDERS, AKA STEVEN J. MUDERS, AKA STEVEN MUDERS, AKA STEVE MUDERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: STEVEN JOHN MUDERS, AKA STEVEN J. MUDERS, AKA STEVEN MUDERS, AKA STEVE MUDERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LINDA L. MUDERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LINDA L. MUDERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court

before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: ERWIN WILLIAMS McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00263 Published: June 20,27, July 3, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ELIZABETH D. BLACKSTOCK, also known as BETSY BLACKSTOCK To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ELIZABETH D. BLACKSTOCK, also known as BETSY BLACKSTOCK and BETSY DERN BLACKSTOCK A Petition for Probate has been filed by: ROBERT JACKSON BLACKSTOCK in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: ROBERT JOCKSON BLACKSTOCK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent

Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 30, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the

decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: KELLY ALBRECHT, ESQ. 1440 Lincoln Street Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 534-9900 Dated: June 25, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00293 Published: July 3,11,18, 2019

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