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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 44 THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

HIGH AND DRY

PG&E balks on fixing historic Miocene Canal, imperiling ranchers, farmers and wildlife post-Camp Fire BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA PAGE

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8 DYING ON THE STREETS 9 MENTAL HEALTH ON TRIAL 26&32 SUMMER PARTY SUPPLIES


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 44 • June 27, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: VIEW OF COAL CANYON FLUME PORTION OF THE MIOCENE DITCH, CIRCA 1880. PHOTO COURTESY OF MERIAM LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, CHICO

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

For health’s sake, don’t listen to the state Last week, Butte County Public Health put out a press

release giving residents in the region charred by the Camp Fire advice on how to protect themselves from contaminants in the water. Frankly, we believe residents, especially those serviced by the Del Oro Water Co., should disregard it. Public Health encourages residents to review the testing advice of the state Department of Drinking Water, a division of the California Water Resources Control Board, whose testing protocols aren’t sufficient to gauge whether the water is safe to consume. We know this not only from interviews with experts in water contamination, but also because we’ve reviewed documentation proving that the state’s recommendations fail water users. As we reported last week (see “Clash of plans” Newslines), the town of Paradise recently chose to test its municipal buildings’ water based on the more strenuous guidelines recommended by the aforementioned experts. What the tests revealed is that its water is not potable— while it isn’t contaminated with benzene, it does contain other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at levels that surpass the state’s maximum standards for human health. Eschewing the state’s advice was the right call—as it would not have detected those VOCs—and that’s

exactly what everyone else should do, too. This isn’t the first time we’ve chided Public Health over its response to the water crisis. As noted in a March editorial (see “Better late than never,” March 21), it wasn’t until more than four months after the fire—following prodding from this newspaper—that the department issued its first press advisory explicity on that aspect of the disaster. We were right to worry. As the CN&R recently reported (see “Cancer risks revealed,” Newslines, June 13)—based on documentation obtained through public records requests—the water contamination poses a significantly higher risk of cancer and other adverse health effects than has been reported to the public. The Department of Drinking Water sat on that info for months—and still has not released it publicly. Given the state’s flawed track record, we urge the county to steer clear of its advice. This is no time for diplomacy. Instead, let’s turn to the experts. The public has an opportunity to meet with them today (June 27) at Paradise Alliance Church at two events: a forum with interactive demonstrations on sampling, testing and plumbing (4-6 p.m.) and another during which watersurvey results will be revealed (7-8:30 p.m.) We urge both those affected by the Camp Fire and Public Health to attend. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Calling for permanent wildfire-protection solutions Oproposal California, PG&E, recently has introduced a in which the company’s operatives will cut ur longtime supplier of electricity in Northern

off the power supply in any location any time they see a risk for fire. Since PG&E has admitted liability for a number of disastrous fires, including the Camp Fire, this would seem to be a logical step to reduce the possibility of starting such conflagrations. The other proposal advanced by PG&E is to take out all trees that might be a hazard to their power lines. Both of these options pose by numerous problems that require Robert Woods action by our local representatives. The author, a My home is in Forest Ranch, longtime Forest where for many decades we Ranch resident, is an have lived among the trees and environmentalist and author. enjoyed the beauty and coolness of the evergreen forest. We have a Fire Safe Council, a well-run fire department near our grocery store, and a Cal Fire station 5 miles up Highway 32. The big Ponderosa pine trees in my

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neighborhood have stood for 150 to 200 years and don’t have any fire scars, which means they’ve never been subjected to a major fire in all those years. We must take a more reasoned approach to the fire dangers in our region. Modern developments have placed their power lines underground. Even back in the 1980s, when I bought a Forest Ranch home in Forest Knolls, a 100-acre subdivision, our power lines were underground. If PG&E wants a permanent solution to our current problems, the company must direct its resources differently. Instead of paying large sums to tree cutters, it should use that money to begin burying lines. If it’s too expensive, partner with our California government to do the job right. We’re weary of Band-Aid solutions to satisfy PG&E stockholders. The power outages in Forest Ranch drive us crazy. They disrupt our water systems and cause our food to spoil; we can’t cook or take showers. Necessary medical equipment cannot be used. Telephone service is often disrupted, so the elderly can’t call in emergencies. Citizens are endangered. It’s time for government to enter the picture and find real solutions. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Inconvenient truths People tend to make excuses and come up with wacky explanations when their narrative is at odds with the evidence at hand. I’ve always known this, but I got a real kick out of watching such a scenario unfold in response to our coverage of the Chico City Council’s last regular meeting. Posted on the CN&R’s Facebook page last week, Andre Byik’s story (see “Crime down, chief says,” Newslines, June 20) focuses on Police Chief Mike O’Brien’s report revealing that crime dropped during the first four months of the year when compared with the same time period in 2018. But several readers and one of the primary organizers of the effort to recall a couple of Chico City Council members dismissed the data. Seems O’Brien’s analysis presents an inconvenient truth at this juncture. That’s because one of the recall group’s main gripes with the embattled representatives—Councilman Karl Ory and Mayor Randall Stone—is that Chico is less safe these days due to them not prioritizing public safety. What O’Brien presented to the public was the number of crimes reported to the police department, not a per capita analysis factoring in Chico’s population surge post-Camp Fire. Indeed, the chief explicitly noted during his presentation that the volume was down despite the city being home to nearly 20,000 more residents following the disaster. The recall petitioner in question suggested that, between last year and this one, residents had stopped reporting minor crimes. “I don’t think this is accurate,” the woman posited. She was joined by several others voicing bunk theories about the data—the same stats the chief reports to the FBI—and suggesting that there’s simply an illusion crime has decreased. One person straight up called O’Brien a liar. Inconvenient truths work both ways, however. Crime may have dropped shortly after the council flipped to the progressives in December, but that’s not necessarily attributable to the new majority’s work. But back to the recall effort ... I learned last week after deadline that the aforementioned petitioner started the process over due to a paperwork error—one of the signatory’s names appearing twice. An amended version was approved on June 19, according to City Clerk Debbie Presson. That means the group now has until Nov. 26 to collect the requisite 7,592 signatures—15 percent of the city’s registered voters. That brings me to yet one more inconvenient truth. I’ve heard from a few readers suggesting that the recall petitioners actually need to gather a higher percentage of the city’s registered voters. That’s because they are basing the count on the total from the last general election. Back then, there were 49,413 Chicoans on the voter rolls. They point to recall election language noting a 20 percent requirement when there are more than 10,000 but fewer than 50,000. In that case, the group would need 9,882 signatures—a much bigger challenge. What they’re ignoring is part of the California Election Code— section 11221—which clearly denotes that “the number of registered voters shall be calculated as of the time of the last report of registration by the county elections official to the Secretary of State.” That number—updated in February—is 50,610. Just over the threshold for 15 percent.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

‘Disservice to Chico’ Re “Crime down, chief says” (Newslines, by Andre Byik, June 20): By doing away with the “owner occupancy” requirement to build second dwelling units, the City Council has handed over Chico to land grabbers. Not only is the city greatly reducing developer fees in hopes of stimulating accessory dwelling units (ADUs), it also is eliminating requirements for infrastructure improvements, like sidewalks and gutters, drainage and off-street parking. If you live next to a rental, that absentee landlord can build another one right on the spot, at a greatly reduced cost. It’s called “infill,” and the owner of a home is no longer required to live there when an ADU is added. Owner occupancy lends assurance that grievances are dealt with without hassle to the neighbors. This gives carte blanche to profit-driven development, potentially turning our old, beautiful neighborhoods into a replica of what we see north and south of the Chico State campus. I believe it is a real

disservice to Chico in the long run, and to homeowners who have lived in this community for decades. This vote to eliminate the owner occupancy requirement would have been expected from a conservativeleaning, developer-friendly City Council. I don’t believe this town seated a liberal council so they could sell us out to the dogs. Pam Stoesser Chico

Roundabout outrage Re “Potholes and peens” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, June 20): You call the project at the roundabout “awesome.” I strongly disagree. [The city spent] $380,000 for a brick monstrosity that blocks the view across the roundabout! Something small would have been fine. In your editorial, you mention a small town that fixed 40 holes for $5,000. That’s $125 a hole. And $380,000 divided by 125 = 3,040! I don’t know what it costs in Chico to fill a pothole, but

that’s a lot of potholes! And how many people showed up for the dedication? Held at 10 a.m. on a weekday. Sorry, like most people, I’m at work! This city sure knows how to waste our money.

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Of Jesus and POTUS Re “Of Trump and Jesus” (Letters, by Paul Di Grande, June 20): I agree with Paul Di Grande, “Actions speak louder than words” and “I do cringe at times.” Ask the “Central Park Five” or people in Charlottesville, Va., if the president has helped African-Americans. Ask the farmers who have soybeans going bad in storage because of tariffs if he’s helped them. Ask our volunteer military members who don’t know if the next tweet will put us into a war with Iran, whose military is 10 times bigger than Iraq had, better equipped, and battle hardened in LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 Syria thanks to our regime change mentality in the region. Ask one of several children who have died, or the thousands of children in for-profit concentration camps at the southern border, if he’s helped Mexican-Americans. They don’t even have water to bathe in, let alone some kind of compassionate care and decent food. Children taking care of children because they are separated from their families, paid for by us. This is a national disgrace, recognized by the United Nations, made worse because we don’t care. Please, Mr. Di Grande, don’t mention Jesus and this “Wise Guy wannabe” president in the same breath. I cringe. Rich Meyers Oroville

Thanks, from CHAT Re “The village needs the town” (Editorial, June 20): Chico Housing Action Team (CHAT) is very appreciative of the outpouring of community support for our tiny house village project here in Chico. The response to our “gofundme” campaign for Simplicity Village has been so enthusiastic that we have decided to increase our goal to $150,000! This increased level of funding will allow CHAT not only to cover more of the infrastructure costs, but also to purchase a much-needed multipurpose building for vocational training, classes and other group activities for our 55-and-older residents. Thank you so much for your continued support and for sharing the word about our wonderful tiny-house project. Simplicity Village will give older people who have lost their housing a place to be safe, a place to contribute, and a place to belong. You can donate at gofundme.com, if you search for “CHAT Simplicity Village.” Please share about this with others who might be interested as well. Leslie Johnson Chico

A model citizen I attended the June 20 swearing in of 600 people in Sacramento to become U.S. citizens. They were from 64 countries. One of them was a longtime friend, Sergio Garcia of Chico. Sergio was born in Mexico and his family moved to Durham, where his father was a farmworker, then they moved back to Mexico for

several years, then back to Durham. Sergio got through high school, college, law school and passed the bar on his first attempt (Republican Gov. Pete Wilson failed his first two bar exams). Sergio was undocumented, so he could not practice law. The Democrats in the Legislature passed a bill to allow him to practice, Gov. Jerry Brown signed it, and the State Supreme Court ruled 7-0 in Sergio’s favor. After Sergio was sworn in, [television stations] interviewed him outside as hundreds of new citizens and families walked by. They asked why Sergio had all the TV reporters surrounding him. Some asked a Univision reporter, “Who did you interview—is he a soccer player?” Sergio is an inspiration to many immigrant communities. His success is America’s success and a great Chico story. Bob Mulholland Chico

Cat lovers, keep looking I recently was reunited with my cat after he disappeared during the Camp Fire. I had given up hope, but for some strange, inexplicable reason decided to check the website for lost animals in Paradise just one more time: campfirepetrescue.org. I sent them his photos, and they had him. He was trapped on May 12 and in good health, therefore ready to be adopted. These people are simply extraordinary, wonderful volunteers—special thanks to Jennifer, Erika, Nisa and Angela. It’s not too late to contact them if you are still looking for your pet. But don’t put it off, because they’ll be moving out soon. Sad to think another summer is coming and we can surely expect more fires. Susan Grant Milpitas

Editor’s note: Pick up next week’s issue of the CN&R for more on this subject.

Two of a kind North Korea’s vice premier was executed for dozing off during a meeting by leader Kim Jong Un. During a recent interview with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos, Trump’s chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, was booted out of the room by Trump for coughing while Trump was talking. Trump and Kim Jong Un have striking similarities. Both obviously are overweight, they both have weird hair-dos, both are power-hungry to

the extreme, both show tendencies of uncontrolled outbursts of anger and frustration, both are self-centered egomaniacs, and so much more. Perhaps this is why they write “love letters” to one another? May the good Lord help us all. Ray Estes Redding

Support the Ridge Have you or your friends been asked, “Been up to Paradise since the fire?” What’s your response? I confess I have, until recently, responded with, “Gee, it’s just too tragic, I can’t bring myself to drive around up there,” or “I can imagine and that’s enough.” Not until I went up for Veterans Day—to help to plant the flags—did I understand, just a little, what residents must deal with every day when they go to work or the market or the doctors. Familiar landmarks— gone! Trailer dwellers, dry camping on their burnt-out lots! The drive will jar you—it will make you want to cry, but it will remind you of the ongoing struggle Paradise residents have every day and will continue to have going forward. If you are short-tempered from the crazy traffic, the ongoing stories of struggles to rebuild Paradise, I say: Shame on you, if you don’t take a drive up to Paradise once a week or once a month! Make sure you stop in any stores that are opening. Give them your business. Pay it forward. As Paradise businesses are coming back, you can Google: Paradise opening list of business open for business. Loretta Ann Torres Chico

Omission Last week’s story on the drinking water contamination on the Ridge did not include the names of all the universities that collaborated with Purdue and Manhattan College to prepare proper testing guidelines for the region. Also involved: Virginia Tech, the University of Iowa and the University of Rhode Island. That info has been added online. —ed.

Write a letter tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@news review.com. Special Holiday Deadline for July 3 issue: monday noon, July 1.


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A two-week summer vacation at Yellowstone National Park. It was when they let you feed the bears. Almost everyone who pulled over to the roadside fed the bears.

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Riding downhill on a mountain bike at Northstar [California Resort] in Tahoe. You just go up to the lift and they load your bike so you don’t have to peddle going up. You only do the downhill part, which is gnarly and fast.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE PRESTIGIOUS HONOR

Local NPR-affiliate North State Public Radio has been recognized with a national 2019 Edward R. Murrow Award—one of broadcast journalism’s most prestigious honors—for its reporting on the Camp Fire. The station was recognized last Tuesday (June 18) for its weekly program After Paradise, which was produced by News Director Sarah Bohannon and reporter Marc Albert and initially hosted by Tess Vigeland, a veteran journalist who created the show and anchored it daily in its first three weeks. The final episode of the show aired in May. After Paradise was recognized for Continuing Coverage in the Small Market Radio category. “Our community turned to us and put their trust in us during this disaster, and we put them at the forefront of our reporting,” Bohannon told the CN&R.

David and Sandra O’Neill, longtime homeless advocates, say a lowbarrier shelter is urgently needed in Chico. Below: Grant Tyler

LOW-BARRIER SHELTER IN OROVILLE?

Haven of Hope on Wheels is pursuing its next project: a low-barrier emergency shelter for up to 25 homeless individuals at 3010 Myers St. in Oroville. Today (June 27) the Planning Commission will decide whether to grant a use permit that would allow the nonprofit to use the former pharmacy building, for which Haven of Hope already has a lease. Haven of Hope intends to operate the shelter from 4:30 p.m. to 8 a.m. and provide two meals a day. The plan is to offer life skills courses and case management to assist clients with obtaining permanent or supportive housing during the day. Participants will be able to access the Haven of Hope mobile hygiene unit’s shower and laundry services, which launched earlier this month.

SIMPLICITY VILLAGE APPEALED

Despite community support that garnered $98,000 in donations in less than a month, a future neighbor has filed an appeal of Chico Housing Action Team’s tiny-home project, Simplicity Village. A hearing will be scheduled for an upcoming Planning Commission meeting. Attorney Rob Berry, writing on behalf of Frank Solinsky, owner of Payless Building Supply, argues the project is not an emergency facility, does not prove it is a temporary use and does not qualify under the city’s shelter crisis declaration. CHAT co-founder Leslie Johnson (pictured) told the CN&R via email that CHAT believes all appropriate standards have been met: “This project will be great for our community, and CHAT will continue to work hard to be a good neighbor, as we do with all our projects throughout Chico.” 8

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Fatal conditions Recent homeless deaths highlight need for low-barrier shelters, advocates say

YtheHe chess tables at City Plaza. went by Grant, and he was described ou could often find Wilson Grant Tyler at

as kind, quiet and soft-spoken. The 61-yearold was well-liked and story and loved to read—especially photos by works of nonfiction. He’d Andre Byik devour any newspaper he could get his hands on and an dr e b @ n ew sr ev i ew. c o m stayed up-to-date with the investigations surrounding President Donald Trump. Tyler was also homeless, and he suffered a health emergency near the bathrooms at the plaza about two weeks ago, on June 10, according to Chico police. First responders attempted CPR before he was taken to a hospital, where he died two days later. The listed causes of death were multiple organ failure, acute respiratory failure and community-acquired pneumonia, according to the Coroner’s Office. “He shouldn’t have died at the plaza,” Richard Muenzer, a friend of Tyler’s and member of the Greater Chico Homeless Task Force, recently told the CN&R. “When did a civilized nation say it was OK to die on the streets? When did a first-world

nation—a leader in civil rights—say it’s OK to die in the streets?” Tyler was the second Chico homeless person to die this month. On June 3, 47-year-old Jason Hicks was found dead near a business at East Fourth and Wall streets. His cause of death is pending, according to the Coroner’s Office. Several other homeless people have died while living on the streets this year, advocates say. Tracking those deaths, however, has proven incomplete in the county. The Butte County Sheriff’s Office sent the CN&R data this week indicating it had only two confirmed “transient” deaths in 2018, and only one so far this year. The data did not include Tyler’s death, nor Hicks’. It also didn’t include that of Vance Lee, who died March 2 (see “Deadly status quo,” Second & Flume, June 6), or that of Thomas Avakian, who died Jan. 23, 2018 (see “Death on the streets,” Newslines, Feb. 2, 2018). The Coroner’s Office currently does not explicitly track homeless deaths. However, Mike Thompson, an analyst for the Sheriff’s Office, said that he has set the issue for review to develop an efficient way to monitor those numbers.

Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien told the CN&R this week that the police department tracks all deaths in the city. That information, however, was not available by press time. Homeless advocates point to the recent

deaths as highlighting an urgent need for unrestricted—or low-barrier—shelters where sobriety and other requirements are not mandated. Specifically, several mentioned the Orange Street Shelter, which was proposed by Safe Space Winter Shelter, but whose grant funding was pulled following community opposition. Such shelters, they said, could save and extend lives. Muenzer, who is homeless, said he supported the Orange Street Shelter, adding that such a facility near downtown could better serve the city’s homeless population that congregates there. Tyler, in fact, had been excited about the idea of the Orange Street Shelter opening near downtown, according to Sandra O’Neill, a longtime homeless advocate. He had used the city’s Depot Park emergency warming center and said he liked that they didn’t ask questions there.


“I think he knew how ill he was,” O’Neill said. “He was very interested because it’s low-barrier, but he wasn’t a drinker—it was not that. I think for Grant it was a principle thing. You have to have independence and freedom.” O’Neill also criticized so-called “quality-of-life laws” such as the city’s sit/lie and anti-camping ordinances. “Whose lives are you talking about,” O’Neill said, “and is it worth your being uncomfortable when you walk around downtown and having people die from your laws?” The Chico Police Department’s Target

Team, a specialized unit that comprises a sergeant and three officers, is tasked with addressing chronic issues of crime in the city, and it also takes on much of the department’s homeless outreach efforts. Chico police Sgt. Cesar Sandoval, who leads the unit, says homelessness is the biggest issue on the team’s plate. Persistently pushing services is the focus. One challenge, the sergeant says, is a large percentage of the city’s homeless population does not want to use services that are already available, for a variety of reasons. At times, when shelters aren’t full, citations are written for camping. Officers also conduct outreach: They recently reconnected a regular downtown heroin user with his father, for instance. Homeless advocate O’Neill recalled Tyler having been given a citation in the weeks before his death. She pointed to programs like low-barrier shelters as offering settings that can provide stability and reduce stress factors from living on the street, such as being being cited or rousted from sleep and asked to move along by a police officer or searching for refuge from the elements. But finding the community will to offer services such as the Orange Street Shelter has been the challenge, they said. “Safe Space had the opportunity to add 100 shelter beds in Chico,” said Angela McLaughlin, board president of Safe Space. “And not only did we not do anything … the president of the university wrote a letter opposing that. Community members—4,500-5,000 community members—signed a petition opposing that. “We’re becoming more polarized,” she continued. “It feels like a breakdown of whatever social contract we ever had here. There have always been people who couldn’t work—couldn’t function— and in a lot of communities they were taken care of. Now it’s shifted [from] beyond no one is taking care of these folks [to] we should offer no services. It’s insane how we’re falling down.” Ω

Diversion deliberation Courts, Behavioral Health work to establish mental health court Rachelle Witherell has come a long way since last

May. At the time, she was using methamphetamine and not taking her medication for bipolar disorder with schizoaffective tendencies, she told the CN&R. She stole a car, got arrested and lost custody of her daughter. Witherell started using drugs when she was 18 years old. Now 37, she is four months clean, taking her medications and living in a sober living environment in west Chico. She has multiple weekly visitations with her daughter. And she is one of the first people in Butte County to be approved for mental health diversion services, which allow qualified defendants to enter a supervised treatment program as an alternative to prison time. Witherell described the moment when her application was reviewed and granted during a recent appearance in court: “The judge had a smile on her face the whole time and she said she was really proud of me. “Not a lot of people have said that to me in my life. For a judge to say that is extremely huge.” Last year, then-Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law Senate Bill 215, which calls for mental health diversion services. However, counties have discretion and flexibility when it comes to development and implementation. Locally, efforts to get the ball rolling have been slow, according to local attorneys and mental health advocates who have been clamoring for an expansion of the program.

SIFT ER Bees’ plight worsens Despite years of studying the phenomenon of colony collapse disorder, which began to kill off commercial honey bee populations in 2006, the problem is only getting worse. Apparently the disorder is caused by tiny mites that infest the hives and latch onto the bees, weakening them and making them more susceptible to pesticides. Add to that less crop diversity and habitat, and bees are facing a rough road ahead. That’s all

During a Butte County Bar Association meeting earlier this week, Butte County Superior Court Judge Clare Keithley confirmed court officials have been discussing a partnership with Butte County Behavioral Health to create a mental health therapeutic courtroom to be “more efficient and effective.” Mental health diversion is similar to drug diversion, which is offered by the Butte County Probation Department’s Treatment Court (formerly known as drug court) through a collaboration with Behavioral Health. Where the former differs, however, is that offenders can have their criminal charges dismissed and arrests expunged; in drug court, convictions can be reduced. As District Attorney Mike Ramsey put it at the meeting, “It’s as if the crime never happened.” A link must be demonstrated between the crime and mental health diagnosis, and those who have committed homicide, rape and sexual offenses are ineligible, according

according to a new survey of commercial honey beekeepers conducted by the University of Maryland’s Bee Informed Partnership. Here are some key numbers from that study: • Since 2006, beekeepers have lost about 30 percent of colonies every winter. • This past winter, nearly 40 percent of commercial colonies failed. • There are about 2.69 million commercial honeybee colonies across the country. • Every year, commercially raised honeybees pollinate $15 billion worth of food crops in the United States.

Source: NPR

Lisa Currier, left, was with Rachelle Witherell when she was granted court approval for mental health diversion services— she’s one of the first in the county to achieve this. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

to the law. There is no state mandate for a specialized court, according to Chico attorney Philip Heithecker, director of the local public defender consortium. However, they tend to be more successful when it comes to tracking and reviewing individual cases. Since the law went into effect, Butte County Superior Court has received approximately 20-30 mental health diversion applications. Those that have been granted are being tracked independently, he said, without a review team or assigned prosecutor or defense attorney. Behavioral Health had a similar program in place from 2001 to 2004, funded by the state Mentally Ill Offender Crime Reduction Grant Program. Those enrolled received case management and medication-assisted treatment. Don Taylor, assistant director of clinical services at Behavioral Health, said they showed a roughly 20 percent increase in functioning and in life satisfaction, and a lower percentage of subsequent jail bookings. For Witherell, pursuing diversion services was

far from easy. She first applied to drug court and was denied. Then she reconnected with Lisa Currier, founder of Crisis Care Advocacy and Triage, whom she’d met while staying at Safe Space Winter Shelter in 2014. Currier told her about mental health diversion and encouraged her to pursue it. Witherell then started a months-long process of getting reference letters and working with multiple providers from Behavioral Health to get a treatment plan solidified to present to the judge. She’s hopeful a separate therapeutic court will be established soon to help more people with mental illness. NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

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“I think it’s a huge opportunity for people,” she said. “Deep down, I wanted to change my life. I was done. I knew I deserved better.” Currier said there are hundreds of people who will have a harder time getting through the application process, because they aren’t as stable and have no assistance. Take, for instance, some of attorney Saul Henson’s clients. Providing the treatment resources the court requires for mental health diversion cases to be granted is important for it to be successful: When his clients are experiencing a mental health crisis, he calls Currier, because she is the only person who will answer the phone and check in on them at 3 a.m., he said at the association’s meeting. “I have 50 people who need help yesterday,” he said. “And I think that we have an absolute moral, legal and professional and ethical obligation to our community to move this model faster than we have been.” Keithley said buy-in from Behavioral Health is necessary to avoid a diversion system that only serves people with private insurance. Behavioral Health is looking at realigning existing resources to make this program work, Taylor told the CN&R. Such a program could easily cost millions of dollars to implement, yet it is “not unusual for legislation to be passed that does not have funding that comes with it.” While proposed Senate Bill 389 wouldn’t provide more funding, it would allow counties to use Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) grants for diversion programs. These grants are based on personal income taxes—for the 2019-20 fiscal year, Butte County anticipates receiving about $12 million, according to Holli Drobny, county MHSA coordinator. In attorney Ron Reed’s view, the community is in a “state of desperation” and that law could “make a world of difference,” he shared at the association’s meeting. “I think we need … something where the county actually comes forward, takes the money, raises the funds and follows through,” he said. “We’re not really winning the battle. What we’re doing is not enough.” —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

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About this story:

Secret stash Does California State University have a $1.5 billion slush fund? The report released last week by

California’s state auditor looked like a bombshell: California State University has been sitting on a $1.5 billion budget surplus, it found, failing to fully disclose the existence of the money to legislators and students even as it raised tuition and lobbied for more state funding. CSU, however, quickly disputed the audit’s conclusions, saying it has been transparent about the reserves and that it needs them to cover short-term debts, pay for onetime expenses such as new buildings, and hedge against a possible recession. Readers who care about higher education might have questions. We thought we’d answer a few. What exactly were the auditor’s concerns? CSU tuition has almost doubled over the last decade, funding a sizable increase in the university’s reserves, State Auditor Elaine Howle found. But CSU, she wrote, continues to argue that it has only two options to avoid cutting programs: getting more state dollars or raising tuition even more. “By failing to disclose this surplus when consulting with students about tuition increases or when projecting CSU’s resources and needs to the Legislature, the Chancellor’s Office has prevented legislators and students from evaluating CSU’s financial needs in light of its unspent financial resources,” Howle wrote. $1.5 billion—that’s a lot, right? The surplus could cover about 2 1/2 months of expenses for CSU, says the university, which serves nearly 500,000 students. Chancellor Tim White likened it to a family savings account, or the state’s rainy day fund. About $662 million is earmarked for short-term debts, White told CALmatters, such as when the university has to front financial aid checks to students before it receives the funds from the federal government. He said the university is saving $376 million toward capital projects, including deferred mainte-

nance on buildings, and a final $459 million in case the economy goes south. “If we didn’t have that reserve, when the economy flattens we’d either have to offer less or raise tuition more than we otherwise would,” White said. “We don’t want to do that.” The revelation of the funds— which the university is holding in separate investment accounts outside the state treasury—comes a week after state lawmakers passed a 2019-20 budget that increases CSU funding by about $400 million to pay for an additional 10,000 undergraduate slots in the overcrowded system. “Had we known [about the surplus], would things have gone differently? That’s the $1.5 billion question,” said Democratic Assemblyman Kevin McCarty of Sacramento, who chairs a subcommittee on the education budget. “Is that the right amount to have in a reserve, or are some of these monies available to address student needs today?” Was this money really “hidden?”

The university says the reserve funds have been hiding in plain sight, pointing to a 2017 trustee meeting and other correspondence with legislators in which the investment accounts were discussed. CSU has even launched a new financial transparency website that allows users to view university spending down to the campus level. The audit, however, says that while lawmakers might have known about the total balance in the accounts, they weren’t necessarily aware how much was being held in reserve. “That issue never came up,” said McCarty, when asked if legislators discussed the surplus during budget hearings. The law requires CSU to discuss any proposed tuition increases with the Cal State Student Association. But the university did not provide information about the reserves to students during conferences that led to a tuition hike in the 2017-18 school year, the audit found—an omission that student association President Mia Kagianas called “dis-

appointing and concerning.” “Students deserve accessible information on the institution’s budget in decision making processes that directly impact their lives,” Kagianas said in a statement. Administrators didn’t bring up the reserves with students, White said, because they would never use such one-time savings to cover ongoing operating expenses. That’s actually smart fiscal policy, said Kevin Cook, a higher education researcher at the Public Policy Institute of California. “It’s a good idea for the system to have these reserves, because if revenue goes away and they have to tap into the reserves, then they can preserve access,” he said. “But obviously if they’re making money and not disclosing it, then that’s an issue.” What else did the audit find? The audit also examined CSU’s parking system, criticizing the university for raising the cost of student permits as high as $236 a semester without significantly increasing the number of spaces. Administrators failed to consider alternative transportation options such as shuttles, buses and bicycles before building expensive parking garages, the audit found. Auditors focused that review on four campuses: Channel Islands, Fullerton,

Adria Watson contributed to this report, which was originally published by CALmatters.org and supported by the College Futures Foundation.

Sacramento and San Diego. While the audit did not find that the university misused any of the parking proceeds, it highlighted disparities in parking fees, with students paying nearly three times what faculty and staff pay to park. The average parking permit for students costs about $171— compared with $68 for faculty and $70 for staff. White said he accepted the challenge to “think more deeply about alternative transportation” and agreed with students’ concerns that charging them more for parking was unfair. “I think as we go into the future, that will be something we will be working hard to make more fair for our employees as well as for our students.” What happens now? The Legislature’s audit committee could call a hearing, at which both the auditor and CSU would testify. Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, who sits on the CSU board of trustees, also has called for a discussion of the audit at the trustees’ July meeting. —FELICIA MELLO

Motors running Participants of the Great Race 2019—a “competitive controlled-speed endurance road rally”—drove into downtown Chico Monday evening (June 24) to the delight of car enthusiasts young and old. The race began on Saturday (June 22) in Riverside and finishes in Tacoma, Wash., this Sunday (June 30). Chico was the third stop of the day for drivers of the hundredplus antique, vintage and collector vehicles—from muscle cars and sedans to wagons and pickup trucks. The procession had spent the morning driving from Gardnerville, Nev., to Grass Valley, before making a pit stop in Oroville and then heading into Chico for an overnight stay. Learn more about the event at greatrace.com. See a slideshow of photos at newsreview.com/ chico. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

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HEALTHLINES hospital doesn’t take the patient’s plan should not have to pay more than they would for an in-patient service. But they differ on how much doctors, hospitals and other providers should be compensated and how the disputes should be resolved. Tom Nickels, an executive vice president of the American Hospital Association, cautioned against using benchmarks to set pay levels, such as local customary averages or a price set in relation to Medicare. He said such a plan might underpay providers and hospitals could lose their leverage to negotiate with insurers. Elizabeth Mitchell, president and CEO of the Pacific Business Group on Health—a group that represents employers, including some who are self-insured who pay their workers’ health costs—said doctors should be paid 125 percent of what Medicare pays. She told senators that an independent arbitration process like the one Nickels advocates would add unnecessary costs to the system. Benedic Ippolito, a researcher with the American Enterprise Institute, said requiring

HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT

Sticker shock U.S. senators agree surprise medical bills must go. But how? by

Rachel Bluth

package of legislation later, a Tkeybipartisan Senate committee said it was ready to wo years, 16 hearings and one massive

start marking up a bill this week designed to contain health care costs. But it might not be easy since lawmakers and stakeholders at a final hearing June 18 showed they are still far apart on one simple aspect of the proposal. That sticking point: a formula for paying

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for surprise medical bills, those unexpected and often high charges patients face when they get care from a doctor or hospital that isn’t in their insurance network. “People get health insurance precisely so they won’t be surprised by health care bills,” said Sen. Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.), the coauthor of a separate proposal to tamp down surprise bills. “So it is completely unacceptable that people do everything that they’re supposed to do to ensure that their care is in their insurance network and then still end up with large, unexpected bills from an out-ofnetwork provider.”

It’s a cause that has been taken up by President Donald Trump and various bipartisan groups of lawmakers on Capitol Hill. The wide-ranging legislative package on curbing health care costs is sponsored by Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.), the chairman and ranking member of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee. Given the committee’s influence, and because this legislation has bipartisan support in the Senate, where not many bills are moving, industry observers are taking the HELP panel’s proposal very seriously. Alexander and Murray’s bill lays out three options for paying surprise medical bills but does not specify which path the final legislation should take. Advocates for each of the choices were among the five witnesses Tuesday. Their positions fell along familiar fault lines. Everyone acknowledged that patients who stumble into a surprise bill because their emergency care was handled at a facility not in their insurance network or because a doctor at their in-network

Compassionate care The National Center for Health Statistics estimates that one American dies of a drug overdose every 11 minutes. Those suffering from addiction can be a neighbor, boss, family member or friend—this reality highlights our responsibility to help in the event of overdose, and with access to Naloxone and some training, you could save a life. Blackbird: Books, Gallery, Cafe offers free Drop-In Opioid Overdose Response Trainings every Friday between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. The session takes 10 minutes and attendees receive two doses of Narcan nasal spray. This bit of preparation could make all the difference.


June 27, 2019

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HEALTHLINES

About this story:

It was produced for Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

providers from telling patients the cost of a procedure or service. “Patients and families absolutely have skin in the game … but they are in a completely untenable and unfair situation. They have no information,” said Mitchell, from the Pacific Business Group on Health. “We’re talking about providers not being allowed to share information. … Transparency is necessary so people can have active involvement.” If one thing is clear, it’s that Alexander doesn’t want this summer to be a rehash of last year, when it appeared he had a bipartisan deal to address problems in the federal health law’s marketplaces before the effort fell apart. “For the last decade, Congress had been locked in an argument about the individual health care market,” said Alexander at Tuesday’s hearing. “That is not this discussion. This is a different discussion. We’ll never lower the cost of health insurance until we lower the cost of health care.” Ω

This guy saves you money.

all providers in a hospital to be innetwork was the cleanest solution. “On surprise billing, all three approaches are equal in that first and foremost they protect the consumer,” said Sean Cavanaugh, chief administrative officer for Aledade, a company that matches primary care physicians with accountable care organizations. There was also broad support among the witnesses for some of the legislation’s transparency measures, especially the creation of a nongovernmental nonprofit organization to collect claims data from private health plans, Medicare and some states to create what’s called an all-payer claims database. That could help policymakers better understand the true cost of care, these experts told the committee. Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) expressed trepidation about the allpayer claims database, noting that increased transparency could hurt rural hospitals, which typically charge higher prices than those in cities because their patient base is small and they need to bring in enough revenue to cover fixed costs. The witnesses also offered support for eliminating “gag clauses” between doctors and health plans. These stipulations often prevent

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

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GREEN GREENWAYS Large-scale lumber yards popped up seemingly overnight. This one is near Butte College.

Clearing the trees

County creates urgency ordinance following PG&E’s massive nonpermitted timber removal project story and photo by

Meredith J. Cooper mere d i thc @ n ewsrev iew. com

Sroads, on the corner of Durham-Pentz and Clark one can look in any direction and see

itting at the Clear Creek Crossing gas station

rolling hills, fields filled with crops, and even the Sutter Buttes on a clear day. Over the past couple of months, however, that view has changed. Now there are two large-scale lumber yards stacked high with hundreds of logs each. They popped up seemingly out of nowhere, with no warning, prompting an inquiry by Butte County officials, who first addressed the issue at their May 21 meeting and this week came back with a proposed ordinance to govern them. Turns out, these log decks, or staging sites, are storing trees cut down for PG&E, which plans to clear 91,000 trees from the Camp Fire zone, either because they’re dead or dying or because they pose a threat to future construction. The problem: Neither PG&E nor its contractors ever applied for or received permits for such activity. Steve Lambert, chair of the Board of Supervisors, has a farm near Clear Creek Crossing and sees the massive operations daily. Among his concerns: Increased fire risk and traffic, and the environment. “My problem is, we’ve gotta take [the logs] out of Paradise and find a place for them—but we don’t want to create a problem

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for another region,” he told the CN&R. “Both of those places have creeks—they’re environmentally charged areas—so that is a concern. “It was convenient for them,” he continued, referring to PG&E. “They popped up clearly overnight. They’re not legal; they’re not even close to being legal.” Tim Snellings, director of development services for the county, agreed, sharing Lambert’s frustration. “There should have been better coordination between PG&E and the county,” he told the CN&R. “It was frustrating that they didn’t do that.” At one point, there were 10 such staging sites—parcels of land PG&E contractors are using to store the tens of thousands of logs en route elsewhere—none of them permitted. Also on-site: offices, heavy equipment used to process the logs, and trucks for hauling them. Of the two sites near the intersection of Durham-Pentz and Clark roads in unincorporated Butte County, one is zoned for agriculture; the other for commercial, Snellings told the Board of Supervisors at its May 21 meeting. “I have a problem, personally, with that lack of outreach to the county,” Snellings told the board. “Under our zoning ordinance, the use for processing this type of operation is only allowed in timber management, timber production and heavy industrial zones and it requires a use permit.” Others were similarly peeved. With a permit comes oversight and accountability. Many of the concerns were environmental: What impacts does this kind of work have on air quality? On stormwater runoff? On dust

control? Are these logs that have been taken from the Camp Fire zone considered toxic, increasing risks to the groundwater in agricultural zones? PG&E spokesman Dan Blair approached the dais to speak to the issue and County Counsel Bruce Alpert addressed him: “Why wasn’t this coordinated?” he asked pointedly. “It’s a simple question.” “The short answer is that it should have been,” Blair replied. “These log deck operations are managed by our contractors. It’s the expectation of PG&E that, through that contract with PG&E, they [follow] all local, state and federal regulations ….”

urgency ordinance, we’ll have ability to come back and change these standards. But we heard the concerns brought up at [the May 21] board meeting about these log yards [and generated] additional requirements for anyone who wants to locate in areas where they’d be allowed.” The ordinance, as tentatively approved, allows for lumber storage in agricultural and general commercial zones, as well as in the Neal Road Recycling, Energy and Waste Facility overlay zone. Environmental requirements are plentiful, and include perimeter control for stormwater runoff, an air quality and dust control plan, and a water pollution plan for sites over an acre. There also are protections for plants and animals: “Temporary log storage yards shall not be located on lands containing wetlands, and/or endangered and protected plants and animal species. A biological report shall be furnished to the Department of Development Services demonstrating that the site does not contain wetlands and/or protected plants and animal species.” Despite these guidelines, PG&E appears to be getting a pass, because, as spokesman Paul Moreno told the CN&R, its logging activities are slated to be finished by June 30. “At this point, if they clean up the sites and wrap it up, we’ll move along,” Snellings said. “We need to have a place to do it, and that might be it,” Lambert said of the Clear Creek Crossing sites. “But we need to have a plan. We can’t just cowboy these things in.” Ω

ECO EVENT

The urgency ordinance discussed Tuesday

(June 25) will set up rules for the type of land use that PG&E has been employing. With some amendments to staff’s proposal, the board voted unanimously that it intends to adopt a final version at its next meeting. And among those amendments includes verbiage that actually will disallow some of PG&E’s actions, such as processing or storing logs from nonburned trees. Despite the fact that PG&E is nearly finished with its logging operation, it isn’t a moot point. The county’s Department of Public Works will be removing some 8,000 trees, and the local Fire Safe Council has identified another 443,000 hazard trees— small-diameter trees within 300 feet of residences. “This is relatively new to us,” county Planning Division Manager Chuck Thistlethwaite told the CN&R. “With this

A waterfall, canyon and so many birds Altacal Audubon Society is hosting a Feather Falls Field Trip this Saturday (June 29) at the crack of dawn, 5:30 a.m. The hike is a 7.6-mile moderately-trafficked loop trail that leads past Bald Rock Dome and Bald Rock Canyon to a massive 640-foot waterfall. Plan to see brilliant black swifts soaring through the sky, as well as chestnut-backed chickadees, Pacific and canyon wrens, golden-crowned kinglets, band-tailed pigeons and many more midelevation birds. Meet at the west Park & Ride in Chico (the closest to 99). Contact Matthew Forster at findforster@yahoo. com or 619-347-2269 for more info.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Head space

Green market, community coffee

Bruce Bussard got into the head shop business in 1983 when he was a junior in high school, selling pipes out of his mother’s bead and silver store in Redding. Today, Bussard, who lives in Anderson, owns a trio of shops in Redding, Red Bluff and Chico called The Darkside. He carries a variety of tobacco and cannabis pipes, as well as vaping supplies, skateboard equipment and other gifts. “We call it ‘Skates and Vapes’ quite often,” Bussard told the CN&R, adding that he’s been called “the Walmart of my industry” because of the pricing and diversity of his merchandise. Bussard’s Chico location, which opened a couple of months ago at 245 Walnut St., is spacious at 3,500 square feet and well-lit. Rows of skateboard decks line the back wall, and Bussard and store Manager Roxy Hoofard were behind the counter during a recent visit.

from all over the United States.

Have the changing politics of marijuana helped business? Bussard: No, it’s actually made

What can people expect at the store? Hoofard: Everybody walks in and says we have everything. Bussard: Yeah. And they like that we’re large and open, because most people go into head shops and they’re kind of small, dark and very crowded. We sell a lot of skateboard stuff. This is a big skate community. We probably sell more skate stuff than we do any other product, followed by vapes and then pipes …. When it comes to our glass, we buy from a lot of local blowers, and we buy pipes

business tougher. I used to be virtually the only shop for years and years and years. And now even in this town there’s 10 to 15 head shops. A lot of people have gone into this industry, which 20 years ago would have never [been] done … because of the condemnation that went along with head shops.

So, why “Darkside”? Bussard: A lot of people think it’s connected to Star Wars, and it’s not. When I first started this, I looked at it as, everybody has a dark side. Everybody. It doesn’t matter whether you’re the pope, the little old lady next door—you.

Everybody’s got a side to them they don’t want the public to know. This used to be something that—people would come and buy, but they wouldn’t share with the neighbors the fact that they smoked pot. So, it was their dark side.

What’s your dark side, Bruce? Bussard: What’s my dark side? I don’t know. I’m pretty open, and I don’t care what people know about me. I’ll tell them anything. If you have a question, I’ll answer it. I have no shame. No vanity. I don’t care. So, I don’t know. Hoofard: I think you’d rather hide from people, but here you are, not hiding from people. So, I mean, there’s that. Kind of a solitary creature. —ANDRE BYIK a nd re b @new srev i ew. c o m

A Menu From Around the World • 10 New Menu Items • Breakfast & Lunch • Authentic Flavors - Exceptional Service!

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

It’s officially summer! I can’t believe it’s already almost July and I finally had a free hour to spare last week to peruse the booths and chat with folks at the Thursday Night Market. There was an eclectic mix of booths, including a number of newcomers, which was exciting to see. The evening was gorgeous, not too hot, with a slight breeze—perfect for a deliciously spiced horchata from La Flor de Michoacán Paletería y Neveria. The flavor was great, and I love that they don’t fill the cup with a ton of ice (or any at all), so you definitely get your four bucks’ worth. I’d had a huge lunch, so I didn’t partake in any of the wonderful-smelling food offerings, but I was happy to see Café Petra peddling shwarma and other goodies, since the restaurant has been closed for several months now following a fire in the kitchen. I also noticed my favorite Filipino foodies—Inday’s—were there, as always, and they are offering something new: wooden sporks, to replace the planet-killing plastic kind. In fact, the restaurant/mobile kitchen has made several moves to be more green. In addition to wooden utensils for to-go orders, owners John and Inday Geiger have eliminated plastic straws and styrofoam packaging, in favor of paper products. And at the restaurant (at 1043 W. Eighth St.), they’ve put up 48 solar panels, which John tells me should offset their power needs. Right on!

TINCTURES AND BALMS One booth that was new to me was Serenity CBD. I chatted with one of the reps for a few minutes and he informed me that the local business has no storefront at the moment, but is starting out at the Thursday Night Market. They use all organic ingredients, including essential oils, in their tincture, topical balm and topical roller. I’ve found some relief from CBD lotions on sore muscles and other aches, so it’s cool to see more locals getting into this market. If you’re out and about, Serenity CBD also is sold at Chico Natural Foods, Dragon Tobacco, New Earth Market and S&S Natural Foods. Go to serenitycbd.com for more info.

ROASTING TIME While the folks over at Stoble Coffee prepare their cafe/co-working

space by Bank of America in downtown Chico, they’ve decided to go ahead and start roasting. I took the opportunity to chat with one of the owners, Matt Johnston, who said he and his wife, Natalie, moved here specifically to open Stoble with their best friends, Matt and Lauren Thiede. Johnston explained the concept of the co-working space: It’ll be similar to ChicoStart—with shared office and conference spaces, kitchen, equipment, etc.— but with a wider variety of membership options. Also, their focus is on “anybody who appreciates community and wants to work around others and build relationships.” The space is slated to open next year—and the designs Johnston sent me look rad. In the meantime, check out the “coffee made for community” at stoblecoffee.com.

Mediterranean Market

Now opeN 715 W. 9th St. Chico 530.891.8350 Facebook: abcmediterranean

Breakfast Grill

3221 EsplanadE | 530.891.4500 | mon-fri 8am-2pm sUn 8am-1pm J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

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Dried up, desperate PG&E balks on repairing its Camp Fire-scorched canal, imperiling the Butte County farms, ranches and wildlife that relied on the infrastructure for generations

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Ashiah Scharaga as hi ahs @ n ew sr ev i ew. com

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s Kurt Albrecht walked among the rows of his family’s apricot trees on a recent blustery morning, parched, yellow grass crunched beneath his boots. There’s no longer any irrigation nourishing this orchard, but the small orange fruits hung from the boughs above him, ready for harvest, “due almost entirely to our weird rainfall this [May],” he said. Next year, it’s likely these trees—20 acres of apricots, cherries and peaches, some A view from a destroyed section of the Upper Miocene that have been there for 50 years— Canal east of Adventist Health Feather River Hospital off of will no longer exist at Chaffin Family Pentz Road in February. Orchards, Albrecht told the CN&R. PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT C. SHAW 18

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Albrecht and his wife, Carol Chaffin Albrecht—third-generation owners and operators of the farm—are in a tough spot. The Miocene Canal, the primary water source for their 2,000 acres of orchards and cattle pastures in Butte Valley, has run dry since Nov. 8, when the upper portion of it— otherwise known as the Paradise flumes— was destroyed by the Camp Fire. If they remain without water, the Albrechts will have to sacrifice those stone fruit trees. The couple’s 200 acres of century-old olive orchards, their primary crop, can handle going dry this year, but how they will fare is uncertain. For example, if a hot summer gives way to a relentless fall, Albrecht said, come harvest time there could be no olives to pick and press for oil. “It’s definitely going to translate to less


Where the wild things aren’t Wildlife disappearing in Miocene Canal’s absence or decades, Jim and Laura-Lyn Burch Fducks, have enjoyed watching hundreds of geese and red-winged blackbirds

Paul Gosselin, director of Butte County’s Department of Water and Resource Conservation, has served as a mediator of sorts in discussions between water users and PG&E—it is the county’s goal to help the region retain surface water rights that have historically flowed through the Miocene Canal. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

A view of the canal before the Camp Fire. PHOTO BY CARPE DIES VIA FLICKR

product, but it also makes it very difficult to plan and have any predictability in crop sizes … which relates to gallons of oil, in our particular case,” Albrecht said. The Miocene Canal has a rich history. Its roots go back approximately 150 years. PG&E has owned portions of the canal since 1917. This year, however, the utility giant— filing for bankruptcy and finding itself culpable for the deadliest and most destructive fire in state history—announced it would not repair the system. It’s a devastating turn of events not only for the Chaffin family and the two dozen other contracted water users—including ranching and farming families that relied upon the Miocene for generations—but also for many other residents and wildlife in this rural stretch of Butte County. The system’s water has sustained thousands of acres of ranch and farm land throughout its history. Several landowners have reported that their wells, streams and ponds are now drying up. As a result, some have spent thousands of dollars to purchase water tanks and have water delivered. But it still isn’t enough to support their livelihoods. Orchards are going dry, livestock are being sold or moved. A group of concerned property owners

have joined forces, forming the Miocene Canal Coalition and advocating for restoration of water to the Middle and Lower Miocene, which were not damaged in the fire. While Butte County has assembled various agencies to discuss short- and long-term options, nothing concrete has emerged. In the meantime, landowners are devising ways to get through the summer. Chaffin Family Orchards, for example, can draw from a private reservoir to provide water for cattle and irrigate citrus trees, which otherwise would not survive. “We’re going to try to spread water too far, too thin to stay viable for a long-term sustainable plan [of] operation,” Albrecht told the CN&R. “Financially, it’s devastating. … We’re having to tap [family savings] in order to get through this year.”

Miocene history The Miocene Canal is a byproduct of California’s Gold Rush era. The 25-mile-long, man-made infrastructure—a system of ditches and wood-supported metal channels—was originally created in the late 1860s or early 1870s by the Miocene Gold-Mining Co., which owes its name to the Miocene Age, when basalt flows covered up placer deposits in eastern Butte County and beyond. The flumes diverted the Feather River so miners could excavate, according to the “Miocene Ditch” edition of Diggin’s, the Butte County Historical Society’s magazine, published in 1983. Gold miners were the first water-system builders in the Sierra Nevada foothills: It is estimated that over 8,000 miles of ditches were constructed at the height of hydraulic mining, which used canal systems to pressurize water and direct it against banks of gravel that would then disintegrate and wash over sluices. CANAL C O N T I N U E D

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gist for Butte, Yuba and Glenn counties, issued a memo to Cox stating that a dry canal could result in the “indirect” deaths visit the pond on their property off Pentz of foothill yellow-legged frogs (a state Road in Oroville. candidate for listing) due to habitat loss Lately, they have no idea where the and increased vulnerability to predators. birds have gone. Since the Miocene The habitat of another species (listed as Canal was damaged in the Camp Fire threatened), the California black rail, also and stopped flowing, the wildlife they’ve could be in jeopardy, he added. grown accustomed to sharing their lives “Without immediate corrective with have disappeared or even died as a action to restore minimum water flow result. down the [ditch] before May 15, 2019, As the pond dropped dangerously ‘take’ of the threatened species listed low this year, the couple’s grandchildren above is likely to occur … alternative carted 5-gallon buckets of polliwogs to a temporary measures are strongly neighboring pond with more water. But encouraged to be evaluated that prothey couldn’t save them all: Hundreds vide a minimum flow to sustain life to were left flopping about. these listed species,” the memo reads. “[Our granddaughter] was so upset The department asked PG&E to do … and there’s nothing we can a survey for foothill yellowdo,” Jim said. legged frogs in early The man-made May, said MaryLisa Miocene Canal—25 Cornell, water unit miles of earthen supervisor for the and cement ditchCDFW’s north es and wooden central region. and metal The survey flumes spanning was completed from Magalia the day after to Oroville—is Lomeli’s deadmore than a line of May 15 century old. and came back However, the full with no sign of the extent of its envispecies. There’s ronmental impact has not much more the never been publicly docudepartment can do, mented. Cornell says, because the A foothill yellowMemos dating back to 2013 canal is privately owned and is legged frog. from PG&E to the California not a natural stream. PHOTO BY ALESSANDRO Department of Fish & Wildlife “It’s a very different CATENAZZI VIA FLICKR (CDFW) obtained by the CN&R situation if PG&E has for some provide some information reason stopped releasing regarding the life sustained by the canal. water into a natural waterway … then it Biologists performed fish rescues of becomes a public trust resource and the brown and rainbow trout, California department will always step in,” she said. roaches and Sacramento suckers during Cox expressed frustration at how annual maintenance outages. At the same the environmental concerns have been time, they reported observing and saving handled. Debris removal operations foothill yellow-legged frogs, which are have been halted for threatened speon the CDFW’s list of state and federally cies in Paradise—why is the Miocene threatened animals as of April. any different? The Miocene Canal Coalition pleaded “That’s absolutely true they aren’t with the CDFW to survey the canal during there today,” Cox said of the frogs. the rainy season post-Camp Fire, before “They’ve allowed it to go so long that now it dried up. “We just got stonewalled left the environment is radically changing, and and right,” said Ed Cox, coalition spokesnot for the better.” man. “I spent weeks leaving messages —ASHIAH SCHARAGA for people.” ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m In April, Henry Lomeli, CDFW biolo-

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through miners’ sluices. Two years ago, PG&E put its portion of the Miocene Canal system and powerhouses up for sale. Moreno explained that, in the company’s view, “the value of the power generation doesn’t really cover the cost of running and operating the system.” PG&E had a potential buyer before the 36 Camp Fire destroyed the Upper Miocene. Washington-based Tollhouse Energy Co. still is interested, company engineer RedAdam Bluff Cleveland said at a recent public meeting, but needs “to determine if it would make economic sense for us.” Moreno told the CN&R that water rights could be part of a sale but would not disclose further details.

[the Miocene Canal] or what water to take into [it],” Alpert said. “It is up to individual landowners, unfortunately, in this situation to hire counsel to take whatever action they deem appropriate or they think they have a right to take.” Earlier this month, the parties assembled and attempted to carve a path forward during a three-hour meeting at the Feather River Tribal Health auditorium in Oroville. It was the first gathering at which water users were brought to the table with representatives from PG&E, Del Oro99 Water Co., Paradise Irrigation M District (PID) and other stakeholders to hash things out. It was at times a tense exchange—frustration and fatigue were evident as coalition members pressed PG&E and Cal Water for A coalition emerges answers periodically throughout the meeting. Every time, their representatives offered a Members of the Miocene Canal similar reply: They understand and were Coalition have been pressing PG&E since there to be a part of the solution. However, the fire and in April took their concerns to 32 they didn’t offer specific ideas. PG&E repthe Butte County Board of Supervisors. resentatives did confirm that the company Ed Cox, the group’s spokesman, has would not repair the Upper Miocene, and argued these main points: The canal is a PID and Del Oro to get water flowing had not considered building a pipe to get historical landmark that should be repaired into Kunkle Reservoir. But both face water flowing into the Middle Miocene from and preserved, and its water feeds Kunkle capacity challenges when it Forest comes to 5 nearby Lake Oroville, as water users have Reservoir and ponds downstream that are Ranch providing enough water to the Miocene, suggested. an invaluable resource for fire suppression, and it isn’t cheap for the companies to Former county water commissioner as well as habitat for wildlife, including purchase water from PG&E. John Scott, a longtime advocate for groundimperiled species (the latter has been debatIn the meantime, the coalition pressed water protection in Butte Valley, was the ed—see “Where the wild things aren’t,” PG&E on its contract language, arguing first to address the elephant in the room: page 19). that the company had promised to deliver “The people that burned the Miocene Canal Per the direction of the supervisors, Paul water in emergency situations such as this. Magalia Gosselin, director of the county’s Department down … and who had obligations to a lot 99 told the CN&R later that PG&E Moreno of people sitting at these tables should be of Water and Resource Conservation, essenParadise “is happy to discuss” water delivery with coming to the table and telling us what tially has served as a mediator between A its contracted users. YW they’re going to do other than just saying, PG&E, Cal Water, the coalition, other water SK There could be funding avail‘We’re out of here.’” 32 UPPER MIOCENE CAN users and providers. However, because the able through grants as well. The U.S. Gosselin quickly interjected: “Some of canal is privately owned, there’s not much Department of Agriculture can provide more the county can do to steer the outcome. us have different lawsuits against some of funds to help property owners dig wells, Kunkle the people around the table, but we’re … County Counsel Bruce Alpert said as much Reservoir put in storage tanks and stock ponds. going to keep it focused on … solutions,” at a supervisors meeting in late April. There’s a caveat, however: because the he said. “We can’t tell PG&E what to do with foothills rest on fractured rock, not in When it was their turn to take the floor, the basin, well-digging is “a lot less relimany landowners shared stories similar to Che Richvale Gosselin said. able” and “unpredictable,” MIDDLE MIOC that of the Chaffin family: facing uncertain Grant funding is available to deliver crop yields, moving livestock temporarily, Butte Valley water to low- to moderate-income famipaying exorbitant prices to truck in water. lies, according to Casey Hatcher, county Cattle rancher John Crowe said the latter spokeswoman. is just not affordable to sustain operations. What it boiled down to for the water “You could burn the Butte County roads up LOWER MIOCEN users, however, is that they don’t see a all you want … but it’s not going to irrigate 99refillpath forward that doesn’t involve olive orchards … hauling water is not in the 70 ing most of the leaky Miocene because Orov cards. Hauling water is for flushing toilets,” of the streams, ponds and habitat it has he lamented. created and supported for more than a Toward the end of the meeting, a few century. possible solutions were discussed. Del Oro is researching the cost of drawing 20 acrefeet per day from Lake Oroville, 162What comes next? which would be enough to return Laura-Lyn Burch stands A second meeting with the agencies flows down the length of the before two water tanks the and water users has been scheduled for Middle and Lower Miocene. family installed after a 2016 5 offline mid-July. The county has Biggs applied for PID, Del Oro and PG&E also fire took the Miocene for six months. several “planning grants,” Gosselin said, are exploring a partnership to use PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA which could fund research on the enviexisting infrastructure shared by

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In the late 19th century, these systems started being used for hydroelectric power generation. The Oroville Water, Light and Power Co. (known later as the Oro Electric Co.) purchased the Miocene, constructing a head dam in the west branch of the Feather River Canyon, east of Magalia, in 1909. This water flowed down the Upper Miocene, then into Kunkle Reservoir off of Pentz Road before winding through the turbines at the company’s Lime Saddle Power House, built in 1906. From there, the water moved through the Middle Miocene, flowing southwest through Butte Valley, where it reached the Coal Canyon Powerhouse, built in 1907, and entered the Lower Miocene, a part of the conveyance system that runs roughly parallel to Highway 70 before reaching the Cherokee Reservoir. PG&E purchased the Miocene and both powerhouses in 1917, including the water delivery system for Oroville, according to PG&E spokesman Paul Moreno. Ten years later, the company sold the Oroville water system, including the Lower Miocene, to what later became California Water Service Co., which owns that section to this day and has a contract to purchase water from PG&E. Moreno told the CN&R that PG&E performed annual maintenance and repairs on its portion of the canal, shutting off water temporarily for those efforts: Most years, according to families the CN&R spoke with, PG&E gave farmers and ranchers notice so they could store water. The utility would shut the canal down during the rainy season, in early spring, for about four to five weeks, so it would have minimal impact. Many of the property owners adjacent to the canal, like the Albrechts, have purchased water from PG&E for so long their contracts are written in miner’s inches, a measurement of water representing flows

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The Miocene Canal (shown in red) spans 25 miles, from Magalia to Oroville. MAP BY TINA FLYNN

ronmental impact of the Miocene and, once solutions are identified, could inform the best way to proceed with applications and ideal funding sources. “It does look like some of the more immediate, short-term things are going to be pretty limited for this season. That’s the reality,” Gosselin told the group. “The system’s gone in and out [of service]—I mean you all know it—for a long time because of other fires and floods …. I think broadening the options for water supply is what we’re looking at for resiliency along the line. That’ll take some time and some creativity.” Cattle rancher Gail Tozier reflected after the meeting, telling the CN&R she appreciated seeing so many agencies willing to attend and participate with a “genuine desire” to come up with solutions. But in reality, she said, nothing came out of it. “They need to realize really and truly the only viable solution is to recharge the canal,” she said. Tozier lives just up the road from Chaffin Family Orchards. Her family has operated Tozier Ranch across 275 acres, raising cattle and tending olive orchards, for 16 years, but the property has been used for agriculture since the early 1900s. The lack of water has impacted every aspect of her ranch’s operation and increased the cost of doing business, she told the CN&R. Like the Albrecht family, they have 100-year-old olive trees going dry this season with “no idea what’s going to happen” after a sweltering summer with

Kurt Albrecht, of Chaffin Family Orchards, examines the farm’s apricot crop. Next year, it’s likely the family will have to let 20 acres of stonefruit trees (including the ones pictured) die if there is no water flowing in the Middle Miocene Canal.

Cindi Williams stands before the dry pasture bordering her home on Pentz Road, near Highway 70. Typically, it’d be green and trim from browsing goats.

PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

no water. They already lost last year’s crop due to smoke contamination from the Camp Fire. Additionally, they typically lease nearby property for their small herd of cattle but cannot this year because of the lack of water. They’re having to move the herd to less-than-ideal land—where they have to haul water and feed—and may have to sell some cattle because of the disruption it has had on calf weaning. They are using their domestic well to pump water to tanks they have purchased for the livestock. “We’re just kind of winging it,” Tozier said. “I’m just hoping and praying there will be some solution where they can recharge the canal.” Albrecht said if the family loses those 20 acres of apricots, cherries and peaches, they won’t replant until they know if or when water is available. Even if they get water back next fall, it’s not a quick turnaround. “We’re looking at probably four or five years before we get significant harvest of [those trees],” he said. “We’d use the opportunities to change varieties, [that’s] probably the upside, but it’d be a lot easier to do that in small blocks of time, not to be forced, because there’s not new revenue … for a number of years.” It’s a complete shift in operations, he continued. Then there’s the potential loss of the farm’s client base, who will now go out and find fruit elsewhere. “It’s pretty difficult from a marketing standpoint. … We’ll lose those customers and have to find them again after we’ve regrouped,” Albrecht said. “For a long time, I always thought … if PG&E decided to turn the canal system off, they would write us a check … that we would be compensated for the loss of revenue.” When asked what a second dry summer could mean, many property owners told the CN&R they would have no choice but to downsize their operations. Many, like Albrecht, said that they felt PG&E has a responsibility to make things right, or to compensate their families for the loss. Tozier says so many people think of the canal for the recreational value it had for their families. Her kids and grandkids have enjoyed playing and walking near the canal and watching wildlife, too. But the bottom line is that the water is needed for irrigation and livestock. “Everybody in our situation has felt somewhat guilty because we still have our homes,” she said, “but we’re still a casualty of the fire.” Ω

Defense challenge Property owners adjacent to the Miocene Canal have no water to draw from for fire suppression

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n a typical year, the Williams family would have a large herd of goats munching down the fields surrounding their home on Pentz Road for a few reasons: meat, supplemental income and fire suppression. Since the Miocene Canal went off-line after the Camp Fire, the family—Cindi, her mother and son—has but four sheep in its parched pasture near Butte Valley. The Williamses can’t afford to provide water to any more livestock—Cindi has shelled out more than $3,000 to install a 1,600 gallon water tank for their home and the sheep, and that doesn’t include the $200 to $250 monthly expense to have water delivered to fill it. “We’re trying to get back a little bit of a herd because I can’t imagine going out there and weed-eating that whole pasture,” she said. Though goats are more ideal for fire suppression, the sheep help mow down the grass in the meantime—and aren’t as wily. When it comes to Cal Fire’s abilities to respond to wildfire, Assistant Chief John Messina told the CN&R that Kunkle Reservoir, which feeds the Middle Miocene, is “absolutely” advantageous to draw from. “If that reservoir has water in it, it makes it quick for our helicopters and water tenders to utilize it,” he said. “But if it’s not there, we will go to the next closest water source that’s available.” The department can utilize nearby Lake Oroville or Paradise’s hydrant system on Pentz Road. The lack of water likely will be a more significant challenge for landowners: If they are no longer able to irrigate their fields to create a defensible space, that is a fire hazard, he said. By law, they will have to come up with another plan. The Williamses are doing their best, but fear it won’t be enough. Cindi’s son, Brandon, spoke plainly about the family’s concerns this fire season. “We had a water source that supplied us … with approximately 16,000 gallons of water a day. And then it went away,” he said. “Not having a water source during the threat of wildfire season, it’s bad. We’re screwed. Some butthead could flick a cigarette butt in the pasture and poof, there goes the livestock, there goes the pasture, there goes the house.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

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Arts &Culture Eye on

“The Seeker,” by Lauren Ruth

local galleries

THIS WEEK

Two birthdays and two group art shows

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Iof1078 Gallery. To mark another year providing a home for contemporary t’s a summer tradition at the

and experimental works in Chico, the nonprofit throws a party in honor of the people who make the volunteerrun space possible: its members. And with a cake, pork tacos and 36 pieces of original art, the 1078 kicked off its 38th birthday celebration with a rocking opening reception for Members’ Show 2019 last Saturday (June 22). The first piece in the show to catch my eye was the strategically placed “The Seeker,” by Lauren Ruth, an story and photo oversized, 3-D, mixedby Saunthy media, mostly realistic Singh eyeball about 2 feet in diameter, dangling from the ceiling. Zooming Review: in for a closer look, Members’ Show 2019 the mirror-like Showing through July 14 material that takes 1078 Gallery the place of the 1710 Park Ave. sclera of the eye 1078gallery.org throws back your own reflection. Is it the eye in the sky? Map it Out Or maybe Big Showing through July 28 Brother? MONCA Bill Houck’s 900 Esplanade monca.org photo-on-metal composition, “Metal/metal,” transforms a photo of irregular strips of corrugated metal. Melding textures with shadows and lights, Houck turns his image into an intriguing black and silver atmospheric alchemy. Saturated pink pairs with purple and fleshtones in amorphic shapes that whirl around recognizable forms 22

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THU

Special Events THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Thu, 6/27, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

in Jilly Mandeson’s mixed-media, “Playful.” Mandeson uses black to create texture and delineate form. There’s so much activity and movement in this piece, it’s almost like a Where’s Waldo exercise. Look too quickly, and you’ll miss the human limbs that blend in with the teeming background. Overall, it’s a fun and appropriately eclectic show for the always adventurous artspace. Also celebrating a birthday last week-

end was the Museum of Northern California Art (MONCA). The multigallery museum has become a kind of twin sister to the 1078, growing into a second hub of community-arts activity over its two years in existence. MONCA hosted a street party outside last Friday (June 21), while inside was the Map It Out exhibit, a group show featuring pieces by Northern California artists. The 32 works offer varied interpretations on cartography. In “Topographic C,” a stoneware tile series by Emil Yanos (Napa), land mass comes into play. In what could be an aerial view of a volcano, layers of unglazed clay incised with lines create an almost opart effect that dazzles the eyes. Jemal Diamond (Sunnyvale) takes a page from Russian painter Wassily

Kandinsky’s abstraction notebook in “Traveling Treasures,” a digital print that focuses on geometric forms with washes of color. The only thing akin to a map that I saw are lines that could represent a compass rose. Chico map artist Jeffrey Obser used small tables to present a number of pieces with a map theme. But his “Locked Lands” acrylic on a wood table is most enticing. The pedestal of iron and wood slats supports a small table with rounded edges. Obser painted an antique-looking map, like a flattened globe with unrecognizable green land masses swimming in a rich blue sea. A key lays across each continent, and each takes your eye to the small lock on a line in the center that divides the piece in half. The large pieces by Carlo Abruzzese (San Francisco) take their cues from computer punch cards, with pixels of color to designate information. But he explains in a statement that the acrylic and graphite on mylar “Mapping: Ethnic Diversity of 4 Coastal Cities” are really abstracted maps of Manhattan, Boston, San Francisco and New Orleans. Abruzzese’s maps quantify location and pattern of seven ethnic groups in each city, with one square inch equaling 500 people. You’ll never look at a map the same way again.

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FRI

Special Events COMEDY MALFUNCTION 3: Popular Sacramento comic Alfonso Portela headlines, supported by Aurora Singh and a local lineup that includes Becky Lynn and Alyssa Cowan. Fri, 6/28, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

DROP-IN OPIOID OVERDOSE RESPONSE TRAININGS: Learn how to prevent, identify and respond to an opioid overdose. Fri, 6/28, 11am. Free. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to share, an acoustic instrument, your voice, a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested. Fri, 6/28, 5pm. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

STONEWALL RIOTS 50TH ANNIVERSARY: Brief presentation on the history of Stonewall and a Know Your Rights Training (when interacting with police) for queer and trans folks, specifically. Fri, 6/28, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

THE COMMONS ONEYEAR ANNIVERSARY Saturday, June 29 The Commons Social Empourium SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

MATILDA

Shows Friday-Sunday, through July 7 CUSD Center for the Arts

30

SEE FRIDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

MON

Special Events

Special Events

FREE MOVIE: Free movie every week, call 8912762 for title. Sun, 6/30, 2pm. Butte County

FARM STAND: Fun farmers’ market featuring

Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave.

HIGH TEA: Put on a hat and enjoy a traditional English high tea. Call 895-1515 for reservations. Sun, 6/30, 2pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

HOME BUILDERS RESOURCE EXPO: See Saturday. Sun, 6/30, 10am. Free. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St.

IMPROV SHOW: Regular CLIC improv night featuring farewell roast for one of its founders, Matt Taylor. Sun, 6/30, 7pm. $10. Chico Live Improv Comedy.

Music VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Pick up litter and pull weeds at various spots throughout the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 6/28, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music TANNER RICHARDSON: Tender-hearted guitar and vocals for happy hour. Fri, 6/28, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater MATILDA: California Regional Theater presents musical version of Roald Dahl classic about an extraordinary girl with psychokinetic powers. Fri, 6/28, 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

COMEDY MALFUNCTION 3 Friday, June 28 The Maltese

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

29

SAT

Special Events CHRISTMAS IN JUNE: Kids on the Ridge summertime Christmas party with Mr. and Mrs. Claus. Sat 6/29, 9am. Veterans Memorial Hall, 2374 Montgomery St., Oroville.

COMMONS ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY: All-day celebration with live music from Tim Bluhm (The Mother Hips), The Coffis Brothers, Reese Weil and Steelhead. There will be food trucks and lots of beer. Sat, 6/29, 11am. $10-$15. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

DODGEBALL TOURNAMENT: Celebrate the grand opening of the Salvation Army’s new community center with some dodge ball, food, a petting zoo and bounce house. Proceeds to raise money for summer youth programs. Visit chico.salvationarmy.org to register. Sat 6/29, 10am. Salvation Army Community Center, 567 E. 16th St.

EAT FOR THE SEASONS: Hatha

LYNN BROWN: Local guitarist and vocalist plays for vegan brunch. Sun, 6/30, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. House is hosting an evening to eat and celebrate health and wellness for the passing of seasons. Speakers will present a recipe and list of foods in season. Call 771-6466 for tickets and info. Sat 6/29, 6pm. $30. Hatha House, 707 Wall St.

Theater MATILDA: See Friday. Sun, 6/30, 2pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

FEATHER FALLS FIELD TRIP: Meet at West Park and Ride in Chico (the closest to 99) at 5:30am for a 7.6 mile hike to see birds and the waterfall. Contact Matthew Forster, findforster@yahoo.com or (619) 3472269. Sat 6/29. Feather Falls, Oroville.

1

SUN

local growers, plant starts, homemade bakery goods and medicinal herbs. Mon, 7/1, 4-7pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

3

WED

Special Events PARTY IN THE PARK MUSIC & MARKETPLACE: Weekly summer celebration of community and commerce with vendors, artisans, crafters and music. This week, blues and swing with Rube & the Rhythm Rockers. Wed, 7/3, 5:30pm. Paradise Community Park, 5582 Black Olive Drive, Paradise.

Music AN AMERICAN QUILT CONCERT: Traditional and classic songs performed by the Oroville Community Concert Band and the Oroville Community Chorus. Wed, 7/3, 7:30pm. $10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 28

EDITOR’S PICK

HOME BUILDERS RESOURCE EXPO: Learn how to rebuild after a wildfire: the building process, permitting, timelines, etc. Visit paradisechamber.com to register. Sat 6/29, 10am. Free. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St.

PENSTEMON SPECIES IN THE BUCKS LAKE AREA: Auto tour to see several Penstemon flowers. Contact Linnea Hanson 345-6229 or linneachanson@gmail.com for more info. Sat 6/29, 8:30am. Chico Park & Ride, West Lot, Highway 99/32.

Music DICK AND JANE: It’s showtime! Summer Reading Series presents fun, folky duo for a free performance. Sat, 6/29, 2pm. Butte Country Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave.

ERIC PETERS: Eclectic mix of music for brunch. Sat, 6/29, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Theater MATILDA: See Friday. Sat, 6/29, 2pm and 7:30pm. $15-$30. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. crtshows.com

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

SUMMER SHINDIG Throughout July, the Paradise Ridge Chamber of Commerce will host a weekly Party in the Park Music and Marketplace in the historic heart of the town, Paradise Community Park. The festivities take place Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m., and will feature live music from a rotating lineup of local bands, including Rube & the Rhythm Rockers, Soul Posse and Overdrive. A wide array of vendors, artisans, crafters and produce growers also will sell their wares. Join in this special celebration of community and commerce and help the town of Paradise heal and rebuild.

J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

CN&R

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ANTONIO RAMIREZ Art 1078 GALLERY: Members Show, each member gets 2-by-2 square-feet of wall space to show their work. Through 7/14. 1710 Park Ave.

BEATNIKS COFFEE HOUSE & BREAKFAST JOINT: Portrait and Figure Drawing, drawings and paintings by Chico Art Center artists. Through 6/28. 1387 E. Eighth St. chicoartcenter.com

CHICO ART CENTER: Small Works, group exhibit of 12-by-12-inch artworks. Through 6/28. 450 Orange St. chicoar tcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography by late Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 7/19. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

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FINE ARTS

Golden Sunshine, Tehama County Arts Council presents retrospective exhibit of late California artist Babette Fickert Dowell›s work. Through 7/6. 710 Main St., Red Bluff, 391-3259.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Map It Out, exhibition of Northern California artists presenting works invented and inspired by the theme of maps. Works will represent Chico, the Bay Area and Northern California. Through 7/28. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Triple Exposure Crosscurrents, photography exhibit features artists James Canter, Stephanie Luke and Harvey Spector. Through 7/20. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

Shows through July 19 Healing Art Gallery – Enloe Cancer Center SEE ART

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. 400 W. First St.


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MUSIC Lizzo

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J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

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all-new jams that your party needs. Start chill: Let your guests know you’re not messing around by Jason right from the start with “Bury Cassidy a Friend,” by Billie Eilish. The third single from the 17-year-old j aso nc @ new srev i ew. c o m songwriter’s debut full-length is her darkest yet, with a gloomy tone contrasted with a muted-butbouncy beat that will vibrate the Play it back: Queue up the summer neighborhood, and a sing-songy soundtrack: melody that’ll have every person tinyurl.com/juicy2019 walking through the gate nodding along. Stay cool with “Cattails” by Big Thief, “Nobody” by Mac DeMarco and the gorgeous melodies of “Aaron” by Boston-based Palehound. Pick up the tempo a bit: The Dutch four-piece Pip Blom is named after its frontwoman, and the indie band’s debut, Boat, is the perfect ’90s throwback, featuring great poppy melodies and alternately jangly and distorted guitars. Play both “Ruby” and “Daddy Issues” to give the proceedings a fun boost. Follow up with a couple more lively indie-rockers: “No Bullets Spent,” by Spoon, and “Dylan Thomas,” by Better Oblivion Community Center (a new collaboration between Conor Oberst and Phoebe Bridgers). Now, it’s time to dance: If your party isn’t warm yet, there is probably no better current song to heat things up than “Juice,” by Lizzo. The Detroit-born singer/ rapper (and flautist!) is a straight-up badass, and this sexy jam will have everyone, well, juicy: “Ya-ya-ee,

ya-ya-ee, ya-ya-ee, ya-ya-ee!” Follow with a hard-topredict set of danceable tracks: from a sweet slow jam (“Nice Things,” Tank and the Bangas) to a weird slowjam (“Earfquake,” by Tyler the Creator) to bouncy afropop guitars (“This Life,” Vampire Weekend) to electro-empowerment-pop from L.A. (“Run,” WASI) to distorted dance-rock from London (“In Your Head,” Nilüfer Yanya). Starting to feel it: As dopey and cliché as another rock anthem about booze might sound, “Alcohol” by FIDLAR is a big song with a chorus that you can already sing along with, and it works for all stripes— punk rockers, frat dudes and recovering alcoholics like lead singer Zac Carper. The frontman for a band that made its reputation with party-hard skate-rock is just being honest about his cravings as he tries to make it through another day. (Bonus points for best opening line of the year so far: “I walk around with a screwdriver!”) Follow up with “Drunk II,” the incredible hazy rocker from Philly’s Mannequin Pussy about partying away the break-up blues. And then go hot to the end with a couple of catchy garage-rockers—“Calquer the Hound,” by Gotobeds and “Into the Iris,” by Flat Worms—and bring the fist-pumping back with a couple more punky ravers: “(I Blame) Society,” by Titus Andronicus and “Pub Feed,” by Australian pub-punks The Chats. You don’t have to go home, but you can’t stay here: Lastly, clear the yard and test the patience of your neighbors with “bmbmbm,” by Black Midi. The brandnew London experimental-rock four-piece is young and thrilling, and this tune switches back and forth between a weird nervous driving rhythm (reminiscent of vintage Wire) and chaotic improvised noise. Just the thing to shake out the stragglers. Ω


We Need

artists the Cn&r Artbox ProjeCt is looking for creative minds to transform our newsracks into functional works of art.

Contact mattd@newsreview.com to find out more! June 27, 2019

CN&R

27


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 6/27—WEDNESDAY 7/3 THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat

RADIO BODEGA

with a rotating list of DJs spinning vinyl til late. Thu, 6/27, 8pm. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

Saturday, June 29 Farm Star Pizza SEE SATURDAY

28FRIDAY

BASSMINT: Every Friday, visiting and local EDM producers and DJs throw a bass-music party in the Peking Restaurant bar. Fri, 6/28, 9:30pm. $5. BassMint, 243 W. Second St.

BLUE COLLAR MEN: Come sail away

with Styx tribute band. Fri, 6/28, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

27THURSDAY

BLACK MAGNET: Heavy, experimental rockers joined by Chico’s favorite new band WRVNG. Thu, 6/27, 8pm. $5. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

JOHN HOOVER AND THE MIGHTY QUINNS: Washington-based folk-rock band playing originals and hits from a variety of eras and genres. Thu, 6/27, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

KAITLYN WILLIAMS BAND: TLC Thursdays presents jazz singer/ songwriter from Denver. Thu, 6/27, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

COMEDY MALFUNCTION 3: Popular LOW & SLOW WITH BRAINSTORY: DJ Summer Soul Series presents a special night of all-vinyl afrobeat jams. Thu, 6/27, 9pm. $10. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

OROVILLE CONCERT IN THE PARK: This week: The Crawlers, local American roots band. Thu, 6/27, 6:30pm. Riverbend Park, 50 Montgomery St., Oroville.

STATE FAULTS & SADGASM: A night of raucous noise with hardcore SF trio State Faults, Sadgasm from Oregon, Ukiah’s Fall Children, and locals Lightfinder. All ages. Thu, 6/27, 7pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

Sacramento comic Alfonso Portela headlines, supported by Aurora Singh and a local lineup that includes Becky Lynn and Alyssa Cowan. Fri, 6/28, 8:30pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

DJ COOTDOG: Spinning tunes for

late-night happy hour. Fri, 6/28, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

GUIDANCE BAND: Groovy reggae band from Hawaii performs, DJ Weez & AZ.Redsmoke open. Fri, 6/28, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Funky jazzrock band Rigmarole brings the party. Fri, 6/28, 7pm. Chico

WAYFARING STRANGER

Downtown Plaza, 132 W. Fourth St.

THE HOUSE CATS: Local band plays

hits from all genres. Fri, 6/28, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery,

9275 Midway Road, Durham.

JASON WEEKS: Live music, beer,

food. Fri, 6/28, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

Bassist, composer and self-described vagabond C.J. Boyd has been touring America for 10 years straight. His new album, Kin Ships, chronicles this journey through song, each track a cover version of a song by an artist from a different state. The result is a four-hour opus of dreamy, fractured lyricism and atmospheric sound. Boyd will perform from his diverse musical catalog this Wednesday (July 3), at Tender Loving Coffee. Locals Weiner and Cat Depot open.

JIM SCHMIDT, LARRY PETERSON: Soulful sounds to relax to. Fri, 6/28, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

METAL SHOW: Free, all-ages metal show with Death of Bear, Myth, Splitjaw, and Skelter. Potluck dinner, $5 a plate. Fri, 6/28, 4pm. The Metal Shop, 4950 Cohasset Road, Ste. 42.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign up at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 6/28, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 966-8342.

SUMMER RURAL CONCERT SERIES: Upbeat cover band Soul Posse plays hits from yesterday and today. Fri, 6/28, 6:30pm. Martin Luther King Park, 2821 Wyandotte Ave., Oroville.

XDS, BEEHIVE & IVER: Locals night with Chico’s favorite disco-punk duo XDS, garage-rock duo Beehive and dreamy goth-punks Iver. Fri, 6/28, 8pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

29SATURDAY

ABERRANCE: Celebrating 10 years of

rock with the Paradise metal band. There’ll be cake and hella other metal bands, including Steaksauce

Mustache and FOES from Oregon, Farooq (Fresno), The Deprived (Paradise), Aitherios (Chico/ Redding), Splitjaw (Dogtown) and Burial Grounds (Oroville). Sat, 6/29, 5pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

cn&r is Looking for • advertising consuLtant • distribution driver Do you love Chico? Do youwant to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Chico News & Review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. Our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow while respecting personal welfare, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. 28

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J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

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THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22 TARA VELARDE Saturday, June 29 Tender Loving Coffee SEE SATURDAY

6/29, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

STRUNG NUGGET GANG: Bluegrass string band performs. Sat, 6/29, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

TARA VELARDE: Diva-folk artist and poet from Portland, Ore., performs, joined by local musician Alex Brown. Sat, 6/29, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

YURKOVIC: Local delta blues/soul trio CHICAGO THE TRIBUTE: Groove to 40

years worth of Chicago’s hits. Sat, 6/29, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

JIM SCHMIDT, LARRY PETERSON: See

Friday. Sat, 6/29, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

hour. Sat, 6/29, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

PINE DOGZ: Jazz, country standards,

R&B, rock and originals. Sat, 6/29, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

QUIPS AND CHAINS: EP-release show

plays the Box. Sat, 6/29, 9pm. $10. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

for local psychobilly band. Down the Well and Jet Fuel Only share the bill. Sat, 6/29, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

LOCOMOTIVE: Rock ’n’ roll dance band

RADIO BODEGA: Local trio playing Latin

JOSH WARD: Texas country superstar

performs for late night happy

songs of yesterday and today. Sat,

performs. Sat, 6/29, 8:30pm. $5. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

30SUNDAY

IMPROV SHOW: Regular CLIC improv

night featuring farewell roast for one of its founders, Matt Taylor. Sun, 6/30, 7pm. $10. Chico Live Improv Comedy.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials.

Sign ups start at 8pm. Sun, 6/30, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

Iver

SMASHED SPELLING BEE: Monthly adult spelling bee drinking game with

cash prize and a medal. Sun, 6/30, 7pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

3WEDNESDAY

C.J. BOYD: One-of-a-kind bassist,

composer and traveling man performs. Locals Weiner and Cat Depot open. Wed, 7/3, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

OPEN MIC: Showcase your talents at open mic hosted by Mr. Bang! All

ages, sign ups start at 5:30pm. Wed, 7/3, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly Wednesday dose of free comedy with experienced and first-time comedians. Sign ups start at 8pm. Wed, 7/3, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

PARTY IN THE PARK MUSIC & MARKETPLACE: Weekly summer celebration of community and commerce with vendors, artisans, crafters and music. This week, blues and swing music with Rube & the Rhythm Rockers. Wed, 7/3, 5:30pm. Paradise Community Park, 5582 Black Olive Drive, Paradise.

LOCALLY GROWN

Level up your Friday (June 28) night with a visit to the patio at Argus Bar + Patio, which will feature a hearty menu of killer Chico bands to start your weekend right. The always amazing XDS will make you dance whilst searing your ears. Sharing the bill is Beehive, a two-man garage-rock band with a cavernous howl and a vintage Hammond drum machine, and melancholic gothy punks Iver.

J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

CN&R

29


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CN&R

J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

Bill Murray is chief of police, Adam Driver and Chloë Sevigny are his only officers, and something Very Weird—a zombie uprising maybe?—is already starting to happen. The chief is named Cliff by Robertson, and the officers are Juan-Carlos Ronnie Peterson and Mindy Selznick Morrison, respectively, but I give first mention to the names of the actors playing them because The Dead Don’t Die, the Jim Jarmusch film in which these people appear, plays amusingly fast and loose with matters The Dead of movie genre, deadpan drollery, Don’t Die social commentary and all-star castStarring Bill Murray, ing. Chloë Sevigny, Adam There is an adequately generic Driver. Directed by Jim Jarmusch. horror story in play here, but the Pageant Theatre. special virtues of this oddly compelRated R. ling film have mostly to do with the manner of its telling, the panoramic bounty of its many fleeting characterizations, and its teasing glimmers of social commentary. This is a film that can at times be an excursion into escalating dramas of social and moral paralysis, and at others a selfreflexive goof in which Driver’s character and others keep up a running commentary on the film’s “theme song,” which we (and they) have first heard during the opening credits. Apart from the three police officers, the most significant character just might be “Hermit Bob,” a hirsute wild man (Tom Waits, of course) who has long since

paid by the

ema Change will be given ble for cash. as consume r minus any store credit. amount used .

taken up permanent residence in the wooded areas on the outskirts of the little town of Centerville (“A Real Nice Place”) whence he spouts, with equal authority, prophecies and violent threats. He’s a kind of framing character who impacts the opening scenes and then returns only at the end. His is the last voice we hear in Jarmusch’s film. Steve Buscemi plays the fatally irascible Farmer Frank Miller. Danny Glover is working man Hank Thompson, who makes common cause with countercultural store owner Bobby Wiggins (Caleb Landry Jones). Eszter Balint (who starred in Jarmusch’s 1984 breakthrough film, Stranger Than Paradise) plays Fern, everybody’s favorite café waitress. Drunken Mallory O’Brien (Carol Kane) dies in Chief Robertson’s jail, but of course doesn’t stay dead for very long. Iggy Pop and filmmaker Sara Driver play a pair of “coffee zombies.” Selena Gomez, Austin Butler and Luka Sabbat play Zoe, Jack and Zack, a trio of “Cleveland hipsters” whose stopover in Centerville comes at exactly the wrong time. Two young women (Maya Delmont and Taliyah Whitaker) and a whimsical young man named Geronimo (Jahi Winston) flee a local detention center with similar results. The jokey name games (Murray named after a well-known actor—Cliff Robertson—etc.) continue elsewhere: Rosie Perez plays a TV news anchor named Posie Juarez. And Tilda Swinton is superb in the role of the town’s otherworldly undertaker, whose name is Zelda Winston. Meanwhile, Sturgill Simpson, author and performer of the film’s thematically apt and perfectly listenable theme song (“The Dead Don’t Die”), appears briefly as a guitar-dragging zombie. Ω


FILM SHORTS

4 2

The Dead Don’t Die

Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

Opening this week

Godzilla: King of the Monsters

King of the Monsters does have some terrific monster battles in it, and the special effects are mind-bogglingly good. But the human stuff in between and during the monster scenes is dreadful. The story, such as it is, picks up where the previous film, Godzilla (2014), left off, with a world in a state of disarray after monster attacks on San Francisco and Las Vegas. And how do the humans dust themselves off and find a way to coexist with the likes of giant sea reptiles and moths after the decimation of the Bay Area? Apparently, according to writer-director Michael Dougherty, we deliver inane dialogue really slowly, and inexplicably play with a sonar gadget that calls out to the monsters in a manner that either chills them out or fires them up and, of course, winds up sparking the monster mayhem. The monsters get the only well-staged scenes, featuring beautiful closeups and battered landscapes. Meanwhile, the poor actors are left to sit around in a situation room looking lost as they observe and comment on the action taking place elsewhere. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Annabelle Comes Home

The Conjuring Universe of films (including The Conjuring, The Nun and Annabelle series) continues to bear horror fruit with this continuation of the dolly-occupied-byevil-spirit plot. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Yesterday

Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire, Trainspotting) directs this musical fantasy about an unknown singer/songwriter (Himesh Patel) who, after a worldwide blackout erases The Beatles from everyone’s memory except his, climbs the fame ladder by passing off their tunes as his own. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Now playing Aladdin

Guy Ritchie (Sherlock Holmes, Snatch) wrote and directed this live-action adaptation of the classic Middle Eastern folk tale starring Naomi Scott as Princess Jasmine, Mena Massoud as impoverished thief Aladdin, and Will Smith as the genie who can make wishes come true. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

In part three of the film series, “retired” super-assassin John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is in big trouble as a guild of elite killers hunts him down to claim the $14 million price placed on his head. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Anna

The latest from writer/director Luc Besson (The Professional, Lucy, La Femme Nikita) is about a Russian supermodel (Sasha Luss) turned elite government assassin. Also starring Helen Mirren and Cillian Murphy. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

4

Avengers: Endgame

There are tons of questions this movie needed to answer: Is everybody really dead? Where’s Thanos (Josh Brolin)? Where’s Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner)? Is Tony Stark/ Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) doomed in space? Does Star-Lord (Chris Pratt) still have his Walkman in the great beyond? And, how can I really talk about anything specific in this film without becoming the Spoiler King? I can say that the movie answers many of the questions everyone’s been asking, and more, thanks to another well-balanced screenplay and a crack directorial job from the team of Anthony and Joe Russo. All of this zips by in spectacularly entertaining fashion and very rarely misses the mark. And in the midst of all the action, Downey Jr. delivers another soulful, endearing performance, well beyond anything you would’ve expected from a Marvel movie before he started showing up in them. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

once a week. newsreview.c o m

Best of 20

Chico

1 9

Arriving Soon

Men in Black: International

This amounts to a wasted opportunity, an admirable attempt to restart a franchise with a new cast that misses most of its marks. Replacing Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones are Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson, playing Agents H and M, respectively. H is the bold, brash, superhot agent, and M is a new recruit, having found MIB’s secret headquarters after years of searching. The duo proved they worked well together in Thor: Ragnarok, and while it is fun to see them sharing the screen again, it’s a little baffling what the script puts them through. After a fairly strong start, the action devolves sloppily into boredom. Each passing location—Paris, Italy, Marrakesh—takes the story nowhere, and scenery changes serve only to disguise the fact that the film has no purpose. A “mole in MIB” subplot doesn’t add much mystery, and the finale in Paris (after an opening in Paris) offers few surprises and no thrills. The movie ends with a big “Huh?” Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Rocketman

An appropriately fantastical musical biopic on the life of piano-playing rock legend Elton John. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

A remake of the 1998 cult-classic slasher flick about the murderous doll named Chucky, voiced in the reboot by Mark Hamill. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Echo in the Canyon

A documentary on the Laurel Canyon neighborhood in the Hollywood Hills, specifically the music scene of the 1960s and the “California Sound” created by the area’s residents—which included members of the the Byrds, the Beach Boys, The Mamas and the Papas, Buffalo Springfield, etc. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

Poor

getting it

ATTENTION LOCAL BUSINESS OWNERS: The CN&R is designing Best of Chico Posters with a QR code that links directly to the Official Best of Chico 2019 online ballot. It’s the perfect way to remind your customers that it’s time to vote for you, their favorite! This 11x17 poster will be available at no cost to you (limit 2 per business).

DON’T MISS YOUR ONLY OPPORTUNITY TO RECEIVE POSTERS FOR THIS YEAR’S BEST OF CHICO CONTEST! Pick up your FREE posters July 29–August 2, 9am-5pm at the CN&R office, 353 E. Second St.

The Secret Life of Pets 2

Child’s Play

1

2

You should be

In this second film in the computer-animated franchise, Max the Jack Russell Terrier (voiced by Patton Oswalt, who replaced Louis C.K.) and his animal friends continue to have adventures whenever their humans aren’t around. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Toy Story 4

The whole computer-animated gang is back—including Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) and Bo Peep (Annie Potts)—for a new adventure with a new homemade toy pal named Forky. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated G.

2

3 4

Fair

Good

Very Good

BEST OF CHICO VOTING BEGINS THURSDAY, AUGUST 8 ONLINE

5 Excellent J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

CN&R

31


We’ve got SPAM IndAy’S CHOW you want! FIlIPIno BreAkFASt & lunch cAterIng AvAIlABle SAturdAy dInner By reServAtIon

530.520.2593 1043 W. 8th Street

Summerbrew survey Chico beer purveyors share their favorite warm-weather cold ones

INothing one—a Bud, Modelo, whatever. wrong with that. But there t’s hot and you just want a cold

are other options for summer beers that won’t go sweet and lifeless as they warm up, and that boast a range of refreshing traits—crisp, clean, tart, lightly toasted maltiness—that will replenish the wilted spirit. The CN&R reached out to bunch of local beer pros to seek out some summer-beer options. We asked by them two questions: Jason What’s your favorCassidy ite style of beer j aso nc @ to drink on a hot new srev i ew. c o m summer day? And, can you recommend one? Additionally, though we allowed those who worked for breweries to highlight one of their own, we asked them to include something from another brewery as well. Here’s what people had to say: Kevin Jaradah, owner of Brew Kettle

Taproom & Bottle Shop, The Lab Bar & Grill and Spike’s Bottle Shop Style: Pilsner—“They’re very clean and crisp, super refreshing on a hot summer Chico day.” Recommendation: Russian River STS Pils—“It’s super drinkable, and easily approachable, [from a] beer drinker who’s just getting into craft beer all the way up to experts. Semi-sweet, light hop character, medium body, light citrus notes, very clean and crisp finish.” Stephen Kay, owner of The Allies Pub

and British Bulldog Brewery Style: “A nice crisp blonde ale or well-presented pilsner—daytime drink needs to be cool, clean, crisp and not too strong.” Recommendation: British Bulldog Queen Bea Norfolk Blonde Ale—It has “a light toasted honey flavor with a subtle old-world hop bite.” And Ol’ 32

CN&R

J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

PHOTO BY JARED SCHMIDT

Republic’s Dead Canary—It has “a classic pilsner malt flavor and noble hops at just the right level.” Charlie Barret, owner/head brewer

at Secret Trail Brewing Co.

Style: Kölsch. Recommendation: “My favorite beer

to drink on a hot summer day is our Delta Breeze Kölsch-style beer. It is a sessionable, easy drinking, and well-balanced beer. The malt flavors from the German pilsner malt is balanced nicely by the German noble hops. And the Kölsch yeast gives the beer just a touch of tartness that I find very refreshing. Honestly, I don’t drink a lot of other breweries’ beers, but one that I found super tasty recently is the Bike Dog [Brewing] Mosaic Pale Ale. It is a fairly light and easyto-drink pale ale with fairly low bitterness, and the mosaic hops come across almost like candy. Delightful beer!”

Miyagi Pocock, beer buyer at Burgers & Brew and assistant brewer at Sacrament Brewing Co. (Sacramento) Style: “Like many people, I enjoy a nice clean pilsner on a hot day, but I’m becoming more and more fond of Berliner Weisse and goses that both have a subtle tartness to them and are generally 5 percent ABV.”

Recommendation: “Well, as I’m

sure most beer lovers are aware, Russian River [Brewing Co.] is again available in Chico, and even though most people know them for Pliny the Elder, I think their STS Pils is one of the best beers ever. The Doggy Pils from Sacrament is quickly becoming my go-to light beer when I’m downtown. If you want a delicious Berliner [Weisse] that won’t break the bank, try some of the offerings from North Coast [Brewing Co.]. They do several different fruit variations, and they are always delicious. The Zephyr Weisse from Secret Trail is amazing, and when you’re in the tap room they can add different flavors to it, too. How [can I] mention goses in Chico without shouting out [Sierra Nevada’s] Otra Vez? Beyond that, I’m a big fan of Anderson Valley’s Briney Melon and Blood Orange goses, and if you can find cans of Modern Times Berliners or goses, they are always perfect for hot days.”

Garth Archibald, co-founder of The

Commons Social Empourium

Style: Hard kombucha—

“Refreshing!”

Recommendation: Boochcraft Grape

+ Coriander + Anise—“It tastes healthy!” Ω


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ARTS DEVO by JASON CASSIDY • jasonc@newsreview.com

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J U N E 2 7, 2 0 1 9

CREATE OR DIE Arts DEVO turns 50 this summer. I’d like to say this will be the

only time you’ll have to suffer through me talking about myself leading up to the big day, but I have too much on my mind, and I have a column, so ... During my time in Chico, music has been my primary artistic outlet, and I’ve played in 14 different groups from ages 18 to 49. If my foggy calculations are correct, I’ve composed roughly 100 songs since I scribbled my first lyrics—for “Muffin Girl”—on a notebook while riding Greyhound from Boston to California in the spring of 1992. In recent weeks, I’ve been listening to old recordings on CDs and warped cassettes, and filtering my life through that musical lens. “Muffin Girl” was written for my first Chico crew, Pinecone, which was actually my second band. (The first one I ever played in was Household Morgan, a post-high school group with my Redding dudes. I played bass, badly, and the 31st anniversary of our first show—in a garage under an open parachute—is actually this week, on July 1.) The song was about a pretty barista with dark hair who worked at that long-gone downtown Chico institution Perché No, and it’s the perfect representation of my life at that time. Just writing the title here makes my cheeks blush at the memory of 22-year-old me, too afraid to speak to women and so insecure that I pawned off the singing of the song to my band’s frontwoman, Tamie “War Eagle” Hallock. A couple of years later, after a female human approached me and busted me out of the shell of social awkwardness, the young Mrs. DEVO and I joined forces to write songs together as part of a super-hyper poppy five-piece called Pep Rally (with old-school pals Jason Willmon, Cindy Lall and Jeff “Papa” Ochs). And those songs … those freakin’ songs from the shaky salad days, with hopeful lyrics about making the best of very meager circumstances (on the ridiculously perfectly titled album, Puberty ), have been destroying me. I wish I could reach my arms back and hug those scared squeaky-voiced kids. This extended listening party has been a surprisingly revealing autobiographical exercise—equal parts cringe-worthy and comforting, and really beautiful. There was the blind confidence of Cowboy, with more fully realized songwriting prowess (honed in crews like Mid-Fi and Kick ’em) fueling my late-20s swagger to play loud and destroy what was wrong with the world and replace it with my “better” indie-rock idealism (see album title: Explosion and Collapse). The moody, sad-bastard tunes of The Party came after the fall, when life got real and absorbing the music of Cohen, Cave and the mystical Anthology of American Folk Music helped me write songs for processing the dark stuff. (“Life is short; I disagree/I’ve fucked up; I need redeemed ...”) Years later, as careers settled and life experience filled in, I came to realize that I had been right all along. Partying with your friends while shaking your fist at the universe is the best way to live life. And as I made my way back to playing music regularly—goofing around with short-lived projects like MURDER and Holocene, and jamming with new friends, like the irrepressible Ken Smith—I wrote a song for like-minded lifelong friend Conrad Nystrom called “No Bongos.” It’s partly a friendly jab at hippie culture and mostly a call to sonic arms—“Let’s warm up the scene, let’s heat up these amps/Let’s pick up a brick and find something to smash.” Blending that worldview with the peace/power that comes from not giving a shit what other people think about you (a beautiful superpower that grows stronger as you age)—both personally and in my latest musical project, the recklessly noisy Viking Skate Country (also featuring Nystrom, Robert Smith and Mike Strishak)—has been the basis for what’s been the most gratifying/humbling love- and adventure-filled time in my life. I don’t know if it’s the band informing my life, or the other way around. Maybe it’s both? We’ll see.


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6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic & power in place $98,500 2 bed 2 bath, Senior Park $99,900 Duplex! 1 bed 1 bath each $325,000

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Hard to find 3 bed/2 btH, Condo! Tile flooring throughout (except bedrooms), fresh interior paint, newer HVAC unit, new oven/range + hood! 985 sq feet $185,000

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sponsored by Century 21 select Real estate, Inc.

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of June 10- June 17, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

13891 Garner Ln

Chico

$625,000

3/3

SQ. FT. 1555

918 Karen Dr

Chico

$269,000

3/3

1747

3637 Bridle Ln

Chico

$530,000

5/4

2803

710 W Lindo Ave

Chico

$247,000

3/2

1652

2099 Hartford Dr #29 Unit

Chico

$235,000

3/2

1375

3355 Hubbard Ln

Chico

$495,000

5/2

1838

16 Goldeneye Ct

Chico

$479,000

3/2

1724

907 Netters Cir

Chico

$451,000

4/3

2096

SQ. FT.

1405 Arbutus Ave

Chico

$230,500

3/2

1385

1650 Davis St

Chico

$218,000

2/2

1030

6392 Woodman Dr

Oroville

$550,000

3/4

3356

1135 Montgomery St

Oroville

$509,000

4/3

2660

855 Dunstone Dr

Oroville

$464,000

3/3

2152

Oroville

$450,000

3/3

1678

2265 Floral Ave

Chico

$449,000

3/1

1040

18 Titleist Way

Chico

$445,500

3/2

1653

256 Pinyon Hills Dr

Chico

$445,000

3/2

1590

221 Mission Serra Ter

Chico

$415,000

3/2

1414

1996 Modoc Dr

Chico

$400,000

3/3

1701

3741 Dulcinea Dr

1414

39 Mockingbird Ln

Oroville

$394,000

3/2

2180

318 Mission Serra Ter

Chico

$400,000

3/3

1259 Glenshire Ln

Chico

$400,000

3/2

1340

1629 Hammon Ave

Oroville

$368,000

4/3

3430

1670 Albion Ct

Chico

$395,000

4/2

1578

1196 Manzanita Ave

Chico

$386,000

3/2

1719

7995 Reservoir Rd

Oroville

$332,000

3/2

1900

8 Bartram Ter

Chico

$385,000

3/2

1341

169 Brookdale Ct

Oroville

$229,000

3/2

1400

1361 Greenwich Dr

Chico

$370,000

3/3

1447

1768 12th St

Oroville

$211,000

2/1

1183

3373 Silverbell Rd

Chico

$355,000

3/2

1120

2775 Vistamont Way

Chico

$350,000

3/2

1126

1962 Belgium Ave

Chico

$327,727

3/2

1406

1411 Pomona Ln

Chico

$320,000

3/2

1760

4518 Casa Sierra Vis

Paradise

$570,000

3/3

2685

94 Valley View Dr

Paradise

$512,000

4/3

2319

6281 Lancaster Dr

Paradise

$375,000

3/2

2039

1924 York Towne Mnr

Paradise

$375,000

3/2

1860

4817 Pentz Rd

Paradise

$360,000

3/2

1375

1503 Sunset Ave

Chico

$319,000

3/1

1023

2122 Algonkin Ave

Chico

$315,000

3/1

1184

195 Wayland Rd

Paradise

$303,000

5/5

3751

2186 Nord Ave

Chico

$305,000

2/2

1310

4262 Rocky Ridge Ct

Paradise

$197,500

2/2

1427

june 27, 2019

35


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CN&R

j u N E 27, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following person is doing business as EVERGRACE CRAFTS at 573 Upham Road Bangor, CA 95914. CHRISTINA JACKELYNE PAEZ-SISINO 573 Upham Road Bangor, CA this Legal Notice continues

95914. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINA PAEZ-SISINO Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000578 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STYLE BOMB CLUB at 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE CORONA 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY CORONA Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000660 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOUGHIE BOY at 2607 Forest Ave, Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. JOSEPH LUTHER SELBY 1975 Bruce Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH L. SELBY Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000659 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADOPTION CHOICES OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA at 1469 Humboldt Rd Ste 200 Chico, CA 95928. CHICO FEMINIST WOMENS HEALTH CENTER 1901 Victor Ave Redding, CA 96002. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARIKATHRYN HENDRIX, DIRECTOR Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000622 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE SOCIAL CHICO at 1400 W. Third St. Chico, CA 95928. FPA6 CRAIG HALL, LLC 2082 Michelson Drive 4th Floor Irvine, CA 92612. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: M. EURL, VICE PRES. Dated: May 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000569 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROD BROKER at 55 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. BRENT WILLIAM CLINE 55 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. this Legal Notice continues

This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRENT CLINE Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000652 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OROVILLE DRY DOCK BOAT AND RV STORAGE at 170 Kelly Ridge Road Oroville, CA 95966. ROBERT LEE POSTIGO 330 Tres Pinos Rd Ste C-4 Hollister, CA 95023. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT L. POSTIGO Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000657 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY MUTUAL AID at 1431 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. ZACHARY D BLUE 1820 Mulberry Street Chico, CA 95928. MALAMA MACNEIL 1252 E 8th Street Chico, CA 95928. MILES MONTALBANO 1206 Salem Street Chico, CA 95928. ALIZA Z SCHER PO Box 686 Hayfork, CA 96041. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: MALAMA MACNEIL Dated: May 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000687 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WHISPERING TREES APARTMENTS at 1501 North Cherry #19 Chico, CA 95926. JESSE E PIPKIN 9500 Crystal Bay Ln Elk Grove, CA 95758. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JESSE PIPKIN Dated: May 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000654 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIVE STAR RANCHES at 470 B Street Biggs, CA 95917. STEPHANIE GWINN 1907 Marin Ave. Berkeley, CA 94707. JONATHAN LAVY 428 Lyndsey Ln Yuba City, CA 95993. MARK LAVY 69 Rio Bonito Road Biggs, CA 95917. GAYLE LELAND 9316 Turner Lane Durham, CA 95938. KELSEY LELAND 4274 Bladwin Ave. Culver City, CA 90232. RICHARD LELAND 9316 Turner Lane Durham, CA this Legal Notice continues

95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RICHARD LELAND Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000644 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ZAVALA REAL ESTATE SOLUTIONS at 1280 E 9th Street, Suite A Chico, CA 95928. JOSE ZAVALA CHAVEZ 2070 Mansfield Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSE ZAVALA CHAVEZ Dated: May 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000668 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PEEKING CHINESE RESTAURANT at 243 West 2nd Street, #4 Chico, CA 95928. BRUCE WAI SZE CHENG 10136 Lofton Way Elk Grove, CA 95757. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRUCE CHENG Dated: May 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000662 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WITHINREACH RESOURCES, WITHINREACH RHYTHMS at 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN MARIE NAAS 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. KENNETH NELSON NAAS 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KENNETH N. NAAS Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000712 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY PET HOSPITAL at 2156 Pillsbury Road Suite 160 Chico, CA 95928. WILLOWS WAGS AND WHISKERS 32158 Camino Capistrano Suite A152 San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CHERI LYON, TREASURER Dated: May 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000675 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are this Legal Notice continues

doing business as GELAYO at 1380 East Ave #136 Chico, CA 95926. MANO GELYAYO, INCORPORATED 1380 East Ave. Suite 136 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELLE PARK, MANAGER Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000642 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ELEVATED NATURAL BEAUTY at 3 Governors Lane Ste B Chico, CA 95926. ANASTASIA TERRY 355 E Lassen Ave Apt 31 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANASTASIA TERRY Dated: June 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000722 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KAIA FIT CHICO at 2700 Hegan Ln. Suite 108 Chico, CA 95928. BC SHIRLEY LLC 1681 Park View Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CARA SHIRLEY, MEMBER Dated: June 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000708 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION at 39 Parkside Ct Chico, CA 95928. BARBARA FURRY 39 Parkside Ct Chico, CA 95928. JOHN FURRY 39 Parkside Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JOHN FURRY Dated: June 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000723 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CJ CONSTRUCTORS at 3029 Esplanade 5 Chico, CA 95973. CRAIG JEFFERY WENNER 13968 Pomegranate Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CRAIG JEFFERY WENNER Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000710 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2109

this Legal Notice continues


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SUSTAINME COMPANY at 1410 Heather Circle Chico, CA 95926. JORDON LEE VERNAU 1410 Heather Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JORDON VERNAU Dated: May 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000690 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STYLE BOMB, STYLE BOMB CLUB at 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE CORONA 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY CORONA Dated: June 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000734 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as READING FOR LIFE at 1280 Pennisue Way Chico, CA 95926. DEVA WINONA DANIEL 1280 Pennisue Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DEVA WINONA DANIEL Dated: June 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000730 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTURY 21 SELECT COMMERCIAL GROUP, CENTURY 21 SELECT REAL ESTATE at 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. JACUZZI LYDON LTD 1101 El Monte Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: DANIEL C. JACUZZI, PRESIDENT Dated: June 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000739 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS at 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS, INC 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: PATRICIA L. DOBRICH, CFO Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000709 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS this Legal Notice continues

NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COMMUNITY CONSULTANTS at 1005 Mildred Ave. Chico, CA 95926. SHERISSE ALLEN 1005 Mildred Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SHERISSE ALLEN Dated: June 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000696 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITIUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS INC at 2540 Zanella Way #30 Chico, CA 95928. HYDROTEC SOLUTIONS INCORPORATED 7 Laguna Point Road Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed; GAIL NOTTINGHAM, PRESIDENT Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0001369 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TIME PHO BOBA at 1124 Oro Dam Blvd E Suite F Oroville, CA 95965. CHIAD IAN TERN 52 Coarse Gold Road Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHIAD TERN Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000582 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SARAH ELIZABETH ADAMS and ANDREW BIGLER BURKE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: FERN BIGLER ADAMS-BURKE Proposed name: WINTER FERN ADAMS-BURKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA this Legal Notice continues

Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 20, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01522 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUSTIN JAMES SHULTS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: THOMAS JAMES SKYTTE Proposed name: THOMAS JAMES SHULTS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 15, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01443 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BERNICE LOUISE MCDONALD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BERNICE LOUISE MCDONALD Proposed name: L AARON MILLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 17, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 29, 2019 this Legal Notice continues

Case Number: 19CV01551 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ADAM CHASE MERRIMAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ADAM CHASE MERRIMAN Proposed name: ADAM CHASE BYERS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01578 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VICKI LEA WENDT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VICKI LEA WENDT Proposed name: VICKI LEE EGGEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: June 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00747 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SU HLAING CHAMM filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SU HLAING CHAMM Proposed name: EZECAIRA AEINDRA VOZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: June 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01701 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT RICKEY LEE CARPENTER and CATRINA MISKELLA CARPENTER aka CATRINA MISKELLA doing business as RICK CARPENTER ROOFING; and, DOES 1 TO 20. You are being sued by plaintiff: DAVID J. MURRAY NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your writen response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. you may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an this Legal Notice continues

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME this Legal Notice continues

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For The week oF JUNe 27, 2019 These are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead:

by rob brezsNy Unanticipated plot twists can help heal old dilemmas about intimacy. DECEMBER: Come up with savvy plans to eliminate bad stress and welcome good stress.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): JULY: Disci-

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): JULY: Say this

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): JULY: If

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): JULY:

pline your inner flame. Use your radiance constructively. Your theme is controlled fire. AUGUST: Release yourself from dwelling on what’s amiss or off-kilter. Find the inspiration to focus on what’s right and good. SEPTEMBER: Pay your dues with joy and gratitude. Work hard in service to your beautiful dreams. OCTOBER: You can undo your attractions to “gratifications” that aren’t really very gratifying. NOVEMBER: Your allies can become even better allies. Ask them for more. DECEMBER: Be alert for unrecognized value and hidden resources.

you choose to play one of life’s trickier games, you must get trickier yourself. AUGUST: Shedding irrelevant theories and unlearning old approaches will pave the way for creative breakthroughs. SEPTEMBER: Begin working on a new product or project that will last a long time. OCTOBER: Maybe you don’t need that emotional crutch as much as you thought. NOVEMBER: Explore the intense, perplexing, interesting feelings until you’re cleansed and healed. DECEMBER: Join forces with a new ally and/or deepen an existing alliance.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): JULY: It’s

time to take fuller advantage of a resource you’ve been neglecting or underestimating. AUGUST: For a limited time only, two plus two equals five. Capitalize on that fact by temporarily becoming a two-plus-twoequals-five type of person. SEPTEMBER: It’s time and you’re ready to discover new keys to fostering interesting intimacy and robust collaboration. OCTOBER: The boundaries are shifting on the map of the heart. That will ultimately be a good thing. NOVEMBER: If you do what you fear, you’ll gain unprecedented power over the fear. DECEMBER: What’s the one thing you can’t live without? Refine and deepen your relationship to it.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): JULY:

Acquire a new personal symbol that thrills your mind and mobilizes your soul. AUGUST: Reconfigure the way you deal with money. Get smarter about your finances. SEPTEMBER: It’s time to expedite your learning. But streetwise education is more useful than formal education. Study the Book of Life. OCTOBER: Ask for more help than you normally do. Aggressively build your support. NOVEMBER: Creativity is your superpower. Reinvent any part of your life that needs a bolt of imaginative ingenuity. DECEMBER: Love and care for what you imagine to be your flaws and liabilities.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): JULY: Transform

something that’s semi-ugly into something that’s useful and winsome. AUGUST: Go to the top of the world and seek a big vision of who you must become. SEPTEMBER: Your instinct for worthy and constructive adventures is impeccable. Trust it. OCTOBER: Be alert for a new teacher with a capacity to teach you precisely what you need to learn. NOVEMBER: Your mind might not guide you perfectly, but your body and soul will. DECEMBER: Fresh hungers and budding fascinations should alert you to the fact that deep in the genius part of your soul, your master plan is changing.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): JULY: I’d love

to see you phase out wishy-washy wishes that keep you distracted from your burning, churning desires. AUGUST: A story that began years ago begins again. Be proactive about changing the themes you’d rather not repeat. SEPTEMBER: Get seriously and daringly creative about living in a more expansive world. OCTOBER: Acquire a new tool or skill that will enable you to carry out your mission more effectively. NOVEMBER:

every morning: “The less I have to prove and the fewer people I have to impress, the smarter I’ll be.” AUGUST: Escape an unnecessary limitation. Break an obsolete rule. Override a faded tradition. SEPTEMBER: What kind of “badness” might give your goodness more power? OCTOBER: You’re stronger and freer than you thought you were. Call on your untapped power. NOVEMBER: Narrowing your focus and paring down your options will serve you beautifully. DECEMBER: Replace what’s fake with the Real Thing. Stretch yourself. Freelance, moonlight, diversify and expand. AUGUST: Having power over other people is less important than having power over yourself. Manage your passions like a wizard! SEPTEMBER: Ask the big question. And be ready to act expeditiously when you get the big answer. OCTOBER: I think you can arrange for the surge to arrive in manageable installments. Seriously. NOVEMBER: Dare to break barren customs and habits that are obstructing small miracles and cathartic breakthroughs. DECEMBER: Don’t wait around hoping to be given what you need. Instead, go after it. Create it yourself, if necessary.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): JULY: Can you infuse dark places with your intense light without dimming your intense light? Yes! AUGUST: It’s time for an archetypal Sagittarian jaunt, quest or pilgrimage. SEPTEMBER: The world around you needs your practical idealism. Be a role model who catalyzes good changes. OCTOBER: Seek out new allies and connections that can help you with your future goals. NOVEMBER: Be open to new and unexpected ideas so as to get the emotional healing you long for. DECEMBER: Shed old, worn-out self-images. Reinvent yourself. Get to know your depths better.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): JULY: You have an enhanced capacity to feel at peace with your body, to not wish it were different from what it naturally is. AUGUST: You can finally solve a riddle you’ve been trying to solve for a long time. SEPTEMBER: Make your imagination work and play twice as hard. Crack open seemingly closed possibilities. OCTOBER: Move up at least one rung on the ladder of success. NOVEMBER: Make yourself more receptive to blessings and help that you have overlooked or ignored. DECEMBER: You’ll learn most from what you leave behind—so leave behind as much as possible.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): JULY:

I’ll cry one tear for you, then I’ll cheer. AUGUST: Plant seeds in places that hadn’t previously been on your radar. SEPTEMBER: You may seem to take a wrong turn, but it’ll take you where you need to go. OCTOBER: Open your mind and heart as wide as you can. Be receptive to the unexpected. NOVEMBER: I bet you’ll gain a new power, higher rank, or greater privilege. DECEMBER: Send out feelers to new arrivals who may be potential helpers.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): JULY: Your

creative powers are at a peak. Use them with flair. AUGUST: Wean yourself from pretend feelings and artificial motivations and inauthentic communications. SEPTEMBER: If you want to have greater impact and more influence, you can. Make it happen! OCTOBER: Love is weird but good. Trust the odd journey it takes you on. NOVEMBER: If you cultivate an appreciation for paradox, your paradoxical goals will succeed. DECEMBER: Set firm deadlines. Have fun disciplining yourself.

➡ www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

J U N e 27, 2019

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attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org.), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: DAVID J. MURRAY, ESQ. 354 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928 (530) 896-1144 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: April 2, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01024 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JOELENE N GILMAN YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a this Legal Notice continues

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civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: June 29, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02136 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JOANNA FAE SHAPIRO AKA JOANNA FAE DAUGHERTY YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 this Legal Notice continues

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Dated: July 20, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02375 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: RICKEY LEE CARPENTER and CATRINA MISKELLA CARPENTER aka CATRINA MISKELLA doing business as RICK CARPENTER ROOFING; and DOES 1 TO 20. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: EFFICIENT ENERGY CONCEPTS, INC. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Law Office of David J. Murray DAVID J. MURRAY, ESQ. 354 E. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. (530) 896-1144 Dated: April 22, 2019 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 19CV01244 Published: June 27, July 3,11,18, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER

this Legal Notice continues

ESTATE RODOLFO MARTINEZ CORTEZ, aka RODOLFO CORTES MARTINEZ, aka RODOLFO M. CORTEZ, RODOLFO CORTES M., RODOLFO CORTEZ MARTINEZ To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RODOLFO MARTINEZ CORTEZ, aka RODOLFO CORTES MARTINEZ, aka RODOLFO M. CORTEZ, aka RODOLFO CORTES M., aka RODOLFO CORTEZ MARTINEZ A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RODOLFO C. CORTEZ and FRANCISCO J. CORTEZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RODOLFO C. CORTEZ and FRANCISCO J. CORTEZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, this Legal Notice continues

you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON, ESQ. 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00255 Published: June 13,20,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE FRANK EDWARD MERCALDO, aka FRANK E. MERCALDO, aka FRANK MERCALDO To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: FRANK EDWARD MERCALDO, aka FRANK E. MERCALDO, aka FRANK MERCALDO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PATRICIA WISSERT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: PATRICIA WISSERT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. this Legal Notice continues

Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: May 24, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00249 Published: June 13,20,27, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE STEVEN JOHN MUDERS, AKA STEVEN J. MUDERS, AKA STEVEN MUDERS, AKA STEVE MUDERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: STEVEN JOHN MUDERS, AKA STEVEN J. MUDERS, AKA STEVEN MUDERS, AKA STEVE MUDERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LINDA L. MUDERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. this Legal Notice continues

The Petition for Probate requests that: LINDA L. MUDERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your this Legal Notice continues

claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: ERWIN WILLIAMS McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00263 Published: June 20,27, July 3, 2019

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