__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 42, ISSUE 43 THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

Serving up sweet

Success Local pros offer tips on facing challenges and growing in business

In our annual ENTREPRENEUR ISSUE

4

Taking a stand

11

Commercial air?

32

Love is gay


Tuition-Free Chico Public Charter School

Celebrate the Joy & Adventure of Learning!

Now Accepting Applications for K-8th for fall 2019-2020! WHAT MAKES WILDFLOWER UNIQUE? Community of Learners Project Based Curriculum Connections to the Community through Field Trips, Internships, Service Learning Projects

Small Multi-Age Classrooms Music, Art and Physical Education Mindfulness and Conflict Resolution

Last School Year included over 60 Field Trips & Adventures!

Navigate today’s legal challeNges Now Accepting Applications

CAL NORTHERN SCHOOL of LAW

Choose between two convenient, affordable legal education options: JURIS DOCTOR Earn a J.D. in 4 years, attending classes only three nights a week

maSTeR Of legal STUDIeS Complete the M.L.S. in two years, part time

New for 2019!

• Affordable- 1/3 the cost of traditional law schools • Accessible- Part-time evening programs • Accredited- By the CA State Bar • Practical- Experience and Instruction

Expanded Middle School Facility & School-wide Meal Program

530-892-1676      wildflowerschool.com 2414 COHASSET ROAD STE. 3, CHICO, CA 95926

2

CN&R

J une 2 0, 2 01 9

Celebrating 36 Years of Quality Legal Education


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 43 • June 20, 2019 OPINION

4

39

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

8

Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

12

Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

16

Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

17

15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

16

COVER STORY

18

ARTS & CULTURE

32

Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

REAL ESTATE

43

CLASSIFIEDS

44

ON THE COVER: FOOD STYLING BY BURKE COOKIE CO. DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

3


OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Thanks, local officials, for taking a stand Last week, when the CN&R spoke with Butte County

Supervisor Doug Teeter, we were pleased to note his loss of patience when it comes to state officials’ response to water contamination in the Camp Fire burn zone (see “Cancer risks revealed,” Newslines). We, too, have lost patience—and it was about time more local officials spoke up. One of the most frustrating results of the Camp Fire response has been the mixed messaging going to the public—particularly those whose homes and businesses are still standing. Beyond a boil-only notice in the days following the fire, some residents—those served by the Del Oro Water Co.—have been told their water is fine to drink, to bathe in, to swim in, despite known contaminants in the water system. Their neighbors to the south, in the Paradise Irrigation District, are getting a different story: Don’t drink the water until we know for sure it’s safe. In the Del Oro service area, testing of standing structures is recommended solely at the kitchen sink and only for benzene, which state water officials maintain is a good benchmark for other

contamination. PID disagrees, as do water contamination experts from Purdue University brought in to consult on the problem. And the town of Paradise is following suit, having recently tested its standing buildings for a wide variety of contaminants and at numerous locations. Officials found contamination, too, though the State Water Resource Control Board is disregarding it (see “Clash of plans,” page 8). Anyone living in the burn zone should question the state’s minimalist approach to the contamination issue, especially in light of its ignoring health data produced by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment that shows acute effects of high levels of benzene exposure over short periods of time, as first reported by this newspaper, and the fact it’s been mum on a specific result that showed 2,217 parts per billion of the cancer-causing chemical. We applaud entities like PID, the town of Paradise and Supervisor Teeter for taking a more cautious route. Nobody wants Butte County to be the next Flint, Mich. This is people’s health, after all. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Safe Space is not giving up on chronically homeless Fweta weather winter filled with bone-chilling temperatures and is a logistical and psychological crisis, and

or hundreds of people living in Chico without shelter,

almost every winter in our community, someone who lives outside dies. It’s also during these cold winter months that something revolutionary happens. Safe Space Winter Shelter, in partnership with 10 local churches and nearly 300 community volunteers, opens its doors. Safe Space is full throughout the season, with a wait-list almost every night. Whether it’s because our guests have pets, by want to sleep next to their partner, Siana Sonoquie won’t pass a drug/alcohol test or The author is have PTSD so severe that it often shelter operations is more stressful to be inside than manager for Safe outside, most people who come to Space Winter Shelter Safe Space don’t seek shelter from and also sits on the any other organization during the nonprofit’s board of directors. rest of the year. Safe Space is a low-barrier shelter, designed specifically for a segment of our community the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development calls “chronically homeless.” These are

4

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

people who have experienced homelessness for at least a year—or repeatedly—while struggling with a disabling condition. While not all unsheltered people are chronically homeless, most chronically homeless people are unsheltered. Stigma associated with homelessness pushes those most in need further away from services, but Safe Space brings this population closer, restoring dignity, empowerment and social inclusion. The number of people seeking shelter and services has grown since the Camp Fire, increasing the urgency to establish a year-round, low-barrier shelter. Months ago there was a promising pot of funds earmarked specifically for opening such a facility, and Safe Space was to be the model. Through a heartbreaking series of events, that project was bypassed. Ultimately, the majority of the money was given to a Goliath whose focus is on funding a future multimillion-dollar mega project. Safe Space and our currently unsheltered chronically homeless community have been left empty-handed but not broken. Plans to apply for new funds are in motion, and Safe Space will continue to provide seasonal shelter, as well as pursue a permanent location. Effective yearround, low-barrier shelter—managed by an organization trusted by its users—is absolutely critical for the health and safety of our whole community, and the Safe Space team and our supporters are not giving up. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Potholes and peens I couldn’t help but chuckle recently when I read a story about an anonymous graffiti artist—perhaps tagger or vandal is a better descriptor—who paints phalluses on badly maintained roadways in Manchester, England. The artist is called Wanksy. I kid you not. “The road is my canvas,” he writes at wanksy.mycindr.com. Readers can head to that webpage or Facebook for a rundown of Wanksy’s “fight against potholes and just generally shite road conditions.” There, folks also will be treated to a thesaurus’ worth of synonyms for penis—you know, shlong, dong, etc.—in Wanksy’s hilarious descriptions of various street doodles. The goal of encircling those hollow depressions in the streets is to get them filled. And, according to Wanksy—yes, that name is a play on England-based street artist Banksy—many of the potholes get filled quite swiftly. Wanksy actually is an artist, according to a Manchester-based newspaper that interviewed him, though you wouldn’t know it from his cartoon-like drawings. Given the circumstances, however, that style is better than realism. This may be the first time in my life I’ve had penis envy—albeit not the Freudian sort. It’s just that Chico is plagued with potholes, too. There’s even a sizable one right in front of the Chico Municipal Center—on Main Street by the fish fountain. Of course, I’d never encourage anyone to copy the mysterious peen painter from across the pond. For one thing, it’s illegal. For another, I know a lot of pothole-filling is taking place locally these days. I noticed a couple of biggies on Vallombrosa had been taken care of recently, for example. I just find it absurd that somebody feels compelled to deal with the situation in such an unorthodox manner. Also ludicrous: Domino’s Pizza has a campaign called “Paving for Pizza” in which the Americanbased chain pays local governments to fill potholes in exchange for positive public relations. The city of Milford, in Delaware—population 11,075—reportedly filled 40 holes with the $5,000 it received. Potholes are a popular perennial topic among Chicoans, especially after the winter rains when they seem ubiquitous. With all that talk—including during City Council meetings over the past four or five years—I was pretty surprised a few weeks ago when our elected representatives voted unanimously for a budget that moves $350,000 in general fund revenue previously earmarked for road repairs to public safety. That money is being taken from the $800,000 in wastehauling franchise fees that the panel in 2017 explicitly dedicated to road maintenance and repair for a five-year period. That couple hundred thousand dollars was a little bit of help, but so much for that. As we’ve reported repeatedly, the city doesn’t have the funds to maintain the roads—43 percent of which are graded as poor or very poor—let alone improve them. It’s so bad that even conservatives Stephanie Taber and Loretta Torres have suggested the city raise taxes. I do have to give city staff a hand for working hard to generate funds through grants. That’s how the roundabout at Second and Flume streets was finally completed. Speaking of which, that awesome project is being dedicated this Friday (June 21) at 10 a.m.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Attention Boomers

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Reject the recall  Should recall elections become the new norm? A small group of extremists has undertaken a vacuous recall effort against Mayor Randall Stone and Councilman Karl Ory. Just don’t sign the thing. The complaints of the recall group are vapid and dangerous. They fail entirely to think of the consequences of their actions. If it’s a recall for every transient disagreement we have in Chico, what happens when the other side does the same? Should the recall gain traction, it would be in my best interest, as a supporter of all but two of the council members, to start a recall of Councilman Sean Morgan and Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds. If the only way to win in Chico becomes to engage in a death spiral of constant recalls, so be it. Neither has done anything corrupt. I just disagree with them. But if this is the new normal, regular elections won’t matter. This community doesn’t want that. I don’t want that. The best

thing for Chico would be for the group to just back down from its simpleminded effort, rather than engage in the politics of division. But I don’t expect them to consider the long-term approach, nor what’s best for Chico. They haven’t yet. Matthew Sutter Chico

Commissioner’s comeback Re “Insurance fallout” (Newslines, by Andre Byik, June 13): As a member of the governor’s Strike Force, [Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara] is exploring ways to reduce wildfire risk for those in rural counties such as Butte. Everything is on the table to keep insurance affordable and available, including new rules for hardening properties against wildfires, addressing underinsurance, and re-evaluating the coverage limit of $500,000, which has not kept up with inflation and rising costs. Last week, Commissioner Lara testified in support of recommendations to the Legislature, including

creating a statewide standard for a hardened home and requiring insurers to write policies for homeowners who meet that standard. Home hardening benefits consumers, insurers, and the state by reducing anticipated future losses. With local governments making decisions about development in environmentally sensitive areas, the state must engage with those like Butte County who want to be proactive in managing the risks of catastrophic events. Michael Soller Sacramento

Editor’s note: The author is deputy insurance commissioner for communications and press relations, writing here on behalf of the Department of Insurance.

Letter misses the mark Re “It’s the pensions” (Letters, by Juanita Sumner, June 6): I feel compelled again to ask that letters to the editor not be allowed to stand unchallenged when they LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

o n pa g e 6

new to medicare? turning 65? Leaving an employer plan? Looking for a competitive quote?

We can help with your medicare options. With over 400 customers served, we can help W you with lowering your Healthcare expenses mae shop carrjor and reducing your prescription drug costs. iers Call today for your free consultation. All agent fees & commissions paid by insurance companies.

Bruce A. Jenkins | CA License #0B86680 530.781.3592 | www.BruceJenkinsInsurance.com

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI “We help YOU through the System” We assist with paperwork! Attorney at Law

LAw OffIC ES Of BETSY H. A LBERTS Over 35 years of experience.

976 Mangrove, Chico • 530.893.8387

Make a

difference. California MENTOR is seeking individuals and families who have an extra bedroom and want to make a difference in the life of an adult with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Special Needs Adult(s) live with you in your home and you Mentor them toward a brighter future. Receive ongoing support and a generous monthly payment (Approx. $1100/ mo - $4400/mo). Requirements: *Valid drivers license *Vehicle *Must be at least 21 years of age *A spare bedroom *Clean criminal record

as a Mentor, you become a teacher, an advocate and a friend. Information Sessions are held weekly. Please call now to R.S.V.P. Sarah Lucas (530) 221-9911 June 20, 2019

  CN&R 

5


LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

Best Diner in Chico!

15% OFF Total Guest Check

Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

Not valid with any other discount, coupon or 2 for 1 special pricing. Expires 7-30-19

1695 Mangrove avenue • 530-895-1195

15% OFF Total Guest Check

Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

Not valid with any other discount, coupon or 2 for 1 special pricing. Expires 7-30-19

1695 Mangrove avenue • 530-895-1195

15% OFF Total Guest Check

Michael Hornick Chico

Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

Not valid with any other discount, coupon or 2 for 1 special pricing. Expires 7-30-19

Why housing first?

1695 Mangrove avenue • 530-895-1195

Superior Services at a Fair Price

Specializing in:

Commercial & Recreational Building Services

Offices, Businesses, Schools and More!

Menu of Services to Address Your Unique Needs Eco-friendly Cleaning Products & Methods Supporting us Supports our Mission

We are a non-profit affiliate of the Work Training Center. By choosing our cleaning services, you also support our mission of providing work for adults with disabilities.

DAILY • WEEKLY • MONTHLY

SERVING BUTTE COUNTY BUSINESSES Call today for your fREE consultation!

2300 fAIR STREET | 530-343-7994 ExT 3401 6

CN&R

June 20, 2019

contain clearly false information. From Juanita Sumner’s letter June 6: “Chico has not grown by 20 percent” and “traffic impacts ... following the fire were temporary.” Apparently extensive corroborating input from numerous state (California Department of Finance), county and city sources proves otherwise. “Housing prices … are now back to 2017 levels,” Sumner says. Zillow shows that the median Chico home cost $304,000 in May 2017, but $368,000 in May 2019. The author goes on to give numbers regarding city employee costs. I do not know if they are accurate or not, but what is the reader expected to believe when random numbers and statements abound? In our current national environment of everyday lies and fiction presented as fact, it would be helpful to at least have a reliable and credible local source of discussion. Thank you.

Housing homeless first only gives shelter to the addicted and mentally ill, with no hope of ever getting to the root cause. How heartless are we who want to approach our growing homeless numbers in a different way? If you address someone’s basic reason for becoming homeless (mental illness, addiction, job training) by offering two choices: let us help you or leave our city. That idea has been called radical and inhumane by several letter writers in this paper. One writer mixed the current Chico Council recall groups of Karl Ory and Randall Stone together as one uncaring radical group. No. The two groups are unrelated. Solutions to address the homeless have had little effect in California so far. How successful have L.A., Seattle, Portland and San Francisco been in getting true help for the mentally ill and addicted? Compassion by government, without follow through, just equals political policies that encourage dependency. How about more examples of small community efforts that have really succeeded? Let’s hear more of those. Let’s not begin by namecalling possible solutions as radical and inhumane. This will just keep good people from sharing more and better ideas that just may work. Loretta Ann Torres Chico

Of Trump and Jesus I’m a white guy who never understood this “white power” B.S. If someone could ever talk to these idiots, you could remind them that no matter what skill/aptitude they have, you could find a woman/man of any ethnic background/religion that could do it better. And I mean hundreds of them, although I don’t think common sense is one of their strengths. Regarding the president, actions speak louder than words. He says some wild stuff, but he has helped African-Americans, MexicanAmericans and women far more than Obama/Bush/Clinton. He’s also helped students get jobs at a better pace than past presidents. Have you forgotten Obama’s two books and his 20 years of association with The Rev. Jeremiah Wright? Did you ever read some of his sermons—anti-American, anti-white and anti-Semitic, for sure. And Obama listened to over 1,000 weekly sermons, when you and I would have walked out after two weeks. I do cringe at times when Trump says some things. But even Jesus said, “If you do not believe in me, believe in the work I do.” I’m hoping America keeps improving. Paul Di Grande Chico

See this film Over 20 years ago, a growing group of young people dedicated themselves to the survival of a particular stand of old-growth forest in southern Oregon called Warner Creek. The documentary Pickaxe, with much original footage, reveals their passion and dedication as they are handcuffed and dragged away to jail. Through nearly a year of sacrifice, dozens of men and women built a resistance so radical that it spread throughout the Pacific Northwest and prevented the logging of many square miles of trees. I was closer to this effort than I realized when I decided to see the film at the Pageant on [a recent] night. The Eugene area was my home for the 1970s, but I wound up in Hawaii for the late ’90s, when all this went down. Kudos to the people at the Pageant Theatre for bringing this reminder to Chico. Not enough

people were there to see it. Maybe this will help. Benjamin Hills Chico

Smoke-free parks, please Abigail Torres, Victor Leyva and I are dedicated members of the Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) youth coalition at Hamilton High School. As SWAT youth coalition members, we have had the opportunity to pass on our knowledge about the negative effects of tobacco to younger students and strive for a tobacco-free community. We feel smoke-free parks are a necessity for all communities to protect children, pets and the environment. I have younger siblings, nieces and nephews that often play at our local Hamilton City parks. I would like to be able to take them there without having to worry about them picking up, playing with or consuming cigarette butts or any other tobacco waste. Hamilton City parks currently are not smoke-free, which allows smokers to smoke freely there and tobacco litter to be scattered throughout. This creates an unsafe environment for everyone who resides in Hamilton City and spends time at the parks. We hope that all the work we have contributed toward SWAT can help lead to smoke-free parks in Hamilton City and for our community to become a healthier place to live and play. Jessica Hamm Orland

Corrections Last week’s Greenways (see “Panels be gone,” by Evan Tuchinsky), included the wrong first name of Joanne Brasch of California Product Stewardship Council. Additionally, in Downstroke, Board of Supervisors candidate Sue Hilderbrand was misidentified as a Chico State professor. She is a lecturer at the university. We apologize for the errors, which have been corrected online. —ed.

Write a letter tell us what you think in a letter to the editor. Send submissions of 200 or fewer words to cnrletters@ newsreview.com. deadline for publication is noon on the tuesday prior to publication.


STREETALK

What’s your dream job?

Just Approved! by City of Chico and Butte County to place on Your Property as a secondary unit and/or Move it to Paradise and Live on Your Homesite while you Rebuild!

Asked at Chico Bicycle Music Festival

Earl Hallett housekeeper

It would be nothing. I would love to get paid to sit around for eight hours doing nothing. You couldn’t Facebook, you couldn’t tiddlywink, you’d just have to do nothing for eight hours.

Roberto Pomart home health aid

I would like to go around the world sampling street food as a traveling food show host.

More pictures and floor plans at canterburycabins.com Model Home on Display at 15 Commerce Ct, Suite 100 (off Meyers) Model Home Shown by Appointment

15 Commerce Ct, Suite 100, Chico, CA

530.899.8297 | canterburycabins.com

Same Day Service

Amy Yurus self-employed

The one that I have now. I’m a yoga teacher and a massage therapist. So every day at work I get to spread the gift of stress-reduction and relaxation. I love my life and love my work.

(530) 826-6931 License #1026898

• Hair Care Products

Hair • Wigs • Cosmetics

Curtis Zwinger interior plant decorator

I’d like to be in charge of communication and getting everyone together and talking so everything would work—helping everyone communicate to make the world a better place.

2175 Baldwin Ave Oroville 95966 (530) 533-7720 JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

7


NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE FEDS BUST ALLEGED METH TRAFFICKERS

Three Orland men with suspected gang ties are among half a dozen recently charged in federal court with distributing methamphetamine and conspiracy to distribute the drug. A grand jury last Thursday (June 13) in Sacramento returned indictments against Manuel Perez, 33; Gregorio Rojas, 28; and Jorge Zarate, 23, following a joint investigation by local, state and federal authorities, U.S. Attorney McGregor Scott announced in a press release. The men—and several other defendants from Los Angeles, Sacramento and Oregon— have allegedly been linked to Sureño street gangs that claim allegiance to the Mexican Mafia, according to the release. Most of the indictments targeted suspected gang members who held senior positions in their organizations. If convicted, the men face the possibility of life in prison.

Clash of plans

MENINGITIS KILLS LOCAL TEEN

A 16-year-old Oroville high school student died June 11 of meningococcal meningitis, the Butte County Public Health Department confirmed this week to the CN&R. The girl was treated at Oroville Hospital, according to May Thao, a nursing supervisor for the department’s communicable diseases program. Public health officials are confident they acted swiftly enough to contain the highly contagious disease. They contacted everyone the girl may have had close contact with. Meningitis is spread through saliva—as through kissing or coughing into the air, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There is a vaccine. Meningitis is increasingly rare in the United States, where there were 350 cases in 2017, 45 of them fatal.

STONEWALL HIRES NEW CHIEF

The Chico Stonewall Alliance Center—Chico’s preeminent LGBTQ-advocacy organization— soon will have new leadership with the hiring of Celeste Cramer as executive director. Cramer, administrative analyst for the Butte County Department of Behavioral Health, starts July 1. She also runs an event-planning and marketing business, and serves on the foundation board of Inspire School of Arts & Sciences, a Chico charter high school. She arrives just over a year after an organizational shakeup in which the center’s board fired then-Executive Director Thomas Kelem (pictured), then underwent board member changes (see “Fresh start for Stonewall,” Newslines, July 12, 2018). 8

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

State water board, expert release conflicting plumbing guidelines for Camp Fire zone

A mixed messaging being given to the public in regard to the safety of water and

ndy Miller has been frustrated with the

plumbing post-Camp Fire. What it seems to have come down to, he says, is the State Water by Meredith J. Resources Control Board Cooper vs. Andrew Whelton, a Purdue University water m er e d i t h c @ n ew srev i ew. c o m contamination expert and head of its Center for Plumbing Safety. “I can’t tell you why that is, or who is right,” said Miller, Butte County’s public health officer. “I welcome every voice, even though those voices are leading to confusion, because I think that’s the only reasonable approach that we’re afforded.” Miller is the first to acknowledge he’s no water expert. So, in looking out for the public’s health, he has little choice but to listen to those who are. This past week, however, the battle came to a head after the water board’s Department of Drinking Water released testing guidelines for residents with standing homes and businesses concerned about the safety of their plumbing. It’s in stark contrast to the guidelines Whelton has been advocating—and which his Purdue/ Manhattan College team released two days later. “I ask that the [water board] please

retract and revise the guidance as I believe there are critical flaws,” Whelton wrote in a letter addressed to California Office of Emergency Services Director Mark Ghilarducci and water board Executive Director Eileen Sobeck. “… [T]hat guidance is not adequately protective of public health.” The biggest difference between the two documents, Miller confirmed, is the approach that they take. While the Purdue guidelines assume contamination exists and recommend caution, the water board assumes no contamination and recommends a screening test to determine if more testing is necessary. Both entities agreed about that characterization, and both stood their ground when interviewed for this story. In reading through the two sets of guidelines, there are similarities: Both offer detailed recommendations for flushing a building’s plumbing system, then letting the water sit stagnant before taking a sample. That’s about where the similarities end, however. The water board, for instance, recommends allowing the water to stagnate for a minimum of eight hours (i.e., overnight), while Purdue maintains that 72 hours is appropriate and necessary for detecting contamination. “We’re looking at it from a convenience standpoint,” said Bruce Macler, a water toxi-

cologist working for the water board who collaborated on the guidelines. “A 72-hour stagnation period is putting somebody out of their home for three days. Our guidance says if you want to do that, you’re certainly welcome to. But eight hours is perfectly adequate—if it is bad, it’ll be bad at eight [hours] or 72.” The water board says to take one cold water sample at a representative location— the kitchen sink, for instance—and to test only for benzene, which it says is “an appropriate indicator of the presence or absence of other contaminants that could pose adverse health risks.” Purdue says while benzene is an indicator, other harmful compounds may be present even if benzene is not. Whelton points to recent test results by the town of Paradise, which followed the Purdue-prescribed guidelines, as has its water purveyor, the Paradise Irrigation District. Those results, which the town provided to the CN&R, show no benzene present but do indicate other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at levels that surpass the state’s maximum standards for human health. Several of them were in hot water samples taken from bathroom sinks. A memo from Assistant Town Manager Marc Mattox regarding the results says that “we have closed the detection locations to employee use,” then details a regimen of


Dr. Andy Miller, public health officer for Butte County. CN&R FILE PHOTO

flushing, stagnation and retesting before reopening those spots. “If the town had followed the benzeneonly advice given by the state, they never would have known they had unsafe water in some of their town buildings. People could have been exposed to it,” Whelton said. “This is another clear example of how the state’s guidance about buildings, which isn’t based on understanding buildings, clearly did not protect the town of Paradise employees, citizens and visitors from potential harm.” The water board has chosen to disregard those results, blaming a “mistake in the lab,” Macler told the CN&R, referring to “cross-contamination.” Whelton’s response: “You can’t ignore data you don’t like. That’s not how science works.” The water board is in the process of con-

sidering Whelton’s letter and his team’s guidelines, spokesman Blair Robertson confirmed. In the meantime, the Purdue team is set to hold a day of workshops and discussions in Paradise next Thursday (June 27). Early in the day, Whelton and his team will be meeting with the Paradise Rotary Club. Then, later on, from 4-6 p.m., they’ll be holding a plumbing safety workshop at the Paradise Alliance Church, with help from volunteers from Butte College, Chico State and UC Berkeley. “It’s for people and their families who want to learn a little more—who want to see damaged pipes and meters, or ask questions about how to read a lab report,” Whelton said. “We’ll be teaching individuals about how to make sense of that information, and have demos—show people how to fill up water bottles properly without overfilling them, [etc.].” At 7 p.m., the team will present results from the community survey conducted in the spring (which also will be live-streamed at m.facebook.com/campfirezoneproject). While there may be conflicting messages about what level of testing or caution is appropriate, Miller said he appreciates Whelton and his team’s participation and continued persistence. “Butte County citizens deserve the best water safety advice that they can trust will protect them, their friends and families,” Whelton said. “There’s a positive way forward and many experts on building plumbing have already stepped forward to help. We and others still are willing to help. No one should ever have to worry about the safety of their drinking water or their plumbing.” Ω

Crime down, chief says Chico’s top cop reveals post-Camp Fire stats during council meeting also focused on housing Shortly after the Camp Fire—and an influx

of 19,000 residents in the city of Chico— concerns of rising crime rippled through the community. At a City Council meeting in March, Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien delivered preliminary data exploring the issue, reporting that violent crime had spiked from November 2018 through January 2019 when compared with the same reporting period the year before. Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds later indicated a public safety emergency declaration should be considered, and the council took on the discussion at its meeting Tuesday (June 18), when O’Brien dropped a bombshell: The overall crime rate in Chico has dropped 7 percent this year, and that includes decreases in both violent and property crimes. “That is pretty remarkable … coming out of an increase of 19,000 people,” O’Brien told the council, adding, “I would be happy with just a slight increase, but having a decrease really demonstrates the hard work that your police department has been doing—really the community has been doing as well.” The police chief delivered statistics comparing crime numbers from January through

April 2019 with the same period last year. Violent crime was down 13 percent, and property crime was down 5 percent. O’Brien cautioned that the numbers could change, but the trend is encouraging. He further focused on other issues of concern, including 2017 data from the California Opioid Overdose Surveillance Dashboard—a collaboration among several state agencies—that showed Butte County was a state leader in opioid hospitalizations and prescriptions. Additionally, the chief delivered stats showing that a small number of people have racked up up a large number of arrests. A multifaceted approach to solving both problems, he said, are needed. The crime numbers appeared to quell any desire to declare a public safety emergency. Reynolds said she did not know how moving forward with such a designation would influence city staff to work any harder or differently. She said, however,

SIFT ER Homelessness snapshot The Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care (CoC) this week released an executive summary of its latest Homeless Pointin-Time (PIT) Count—a federally required biennial survey intended provide a “snapshot of the county’s visible homeless” population. According to the document, homelessness has increased by at least 16 percent since 2017, attributable to the Camp Fire, as well as efficiencies in surveying methods, among other things. The count was conducted over a 24-hour period in late March. Here are the results, broken into categories, compared with the previous PIT results. Note: The CoC did not include homeless individuals staying with family/friends for 2019

Total homeless counted Unsheltered (on the streets, in cars, etc.) Sheltered (emergency shelters, transitional housing, etc.) FEMA-housed (supported by Federal Emergency Management Agency)

2017

2019

1,983

2,304

747

891

1,236

420

N/A

993

Chico City Councilwoman Kasey Reynolds, right, said Tuesday (June 18) that it was unclear what declaring a public safety emergency would accomplish in the city. PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

that public safety should remain a top priority for the council. Mayor Randall Stone lauded the police chief’s report, reiterating that an initial spike in crime following the fire did not result in a trend. Despite the news, the tone of the discussion remained serious. Councilman Karl Ory said the city is one recession away from laying off police officers and firefighters. Further discussion regarding the city’s revenues is needed, he added, and that should include the consideration of a public safety tax. Until such time, he said, the council will continue to have feel-good discussions about decreasing crime rates when “we know that people are fearful in the city.” Dan Herbert, Chico State’s director of offcampus student services, said he represented the university and told the council that the city must maintain public safety as a priority. There have been 11 shootings in neighborhoods surrounding the campus over the last two semesters, he said, including an incident that left one student wounded. “When parents, families, find out that their children are being shot in our streets, we need to recognize that there’s no other item that we can discuss as a community that tops public safety,” he said. Herbert, a former Chico city councilman and mayor, said the university is an economic engine for the city and must also contribute to any solutions. But it would take only one article from a major regional newspaper such as the San Francisco Chronicle or the Los Angeles Times describing Chico as the “Wild West” before the school starts losing students and the city begins to feel the effects. The council voted unanimously to send the public safety discussion to the city’s Internal Affairs Committee, which will review safetyNEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D JUNE 20, 2019

O N PA G E 1 0

CN&R

9


$5 OFF

any purchase of $20 or more

GOOd at all arC StOreS!

www.thearcstore.org

Chico 2020 Park Ave. • 530.343.3666 Oroville 2745 Oro Dam Blvd E • 530.532.1272

CNR coupon expires 07.20.19 Excludes ARCoffee & consignments. Not valid with other specials. One coupon per visit.

A vAcAtion for your mouth!

indAy’s filipino BreAkfAst & lunch cAtering AvAilABle sAturdAy dinner By reservAtion

530.520.2593 1043 W. 8th street

NEWSLINES c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 9

related topics and develop options for the council to consider. Earlier in the meeting, the panel took

on the city’s housing crunch, approving amendments to the municipal code regarding accessory dwelling units (ADUs)—such as so-called “granny units”—that eliminate a requirement for property owners to live on-site in either an ADU or primary home. The issue had been studied in the wake of the fire, which has exacerbated the city’s already low housing availability. Stone said the removal of the owner-occupancy requirement for ADUs is needed. “This is sweet-spot housing,” he said. “This is for low-income residents. One and two bedrooms, maybe threes, in our existing infrastructure.” Vice Mayor Alex Brown, who said she resides in an ADU, supported the move, saying it addresses availability problems for populations such as young professionals and other people who cannot afford to buy a home. “I think we need to do everything to empower that type of housing.” During public comment, resident Rob Berry told the council that eliminating the owner-occupancy requirement was the wrong move. He said the biggest problems with rental properties include maintenance, aesthetic and nuisance issues. Without a landlord on-site, the surrounding neighborhood suffers. The move does not affect the West Avenues neighborhood area, which already had a special permitting process for ADUs because of infrastructure and density concerns there. That didn’t go unnoticed by Reynolds, who, along with Councilman Sean Morgan, voted against removing the owneroccupancy requirement. “I think if you remove the owner-occupancy requirement you will soon have neighborhoods that look like [the West Avenues neighborhood], and you’ll wish you had not done it,” Morgan said. In approving the amendments, the council also tasked the city’s housing committee with exploring extra protections, enforcement ideas and ways to increase landlord accountability. —AndrE Byik a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m

10

CN&R

June 20, 2019


Taking off

Money headed this way

Added revenues make Chico’s airport manager optimistic about commercial service

PG&E, public agencies strike $1 billion deal in fire settlements dating to 2015 There’s a whole lot of money coming in to Butte

The Chico Municipal Airport has been a

hub of extra activity the past eight months. The Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES), in the wake of the Camp Fire, leased a westside portion of airport land to house up to 250 workers in mobile units, generating revenue for the city. That camp remains. Cal OES, whose lease runs into December, has 100 trailers accommodating 105 people at the airport now. Fire season has started, but Airport Manager Sherry Miller has witnessed little activity from Cal Fire, which uses the space as a staging area—beyond routine helicopter movement, she saw two tanker planes head to the runway one recent afternoon, with only one taking off and the other taxiing back. That lull doesn’t extend to Miller’s office. Aided by the first paid city intern she’s had, Chico State alumna and grad student McKena Barker, Miller is ramping up a years-long push to return commercial air service to Chico with new approaches. Speaking with the CN&R at her airport office Tuesday morning (June 18), she expressed fresh optimism after meeting with carriers at the JumpStart Air Service Development Conference the first week of June in Nashville, Tenn. That event, she said, “matches up” airports with airlines. Meanwhile, Chico Public Works Director of Operations Erik Gustafson and Airport Commission Vice Chair Mike Antlock met with a different carrier at its headquarters. The latter yielded promising conversations that the city would receive support for its application for a $1 million grant that would subsidize Chicoto-Los Angeles service—the route preferred by the majority of North State residents, according to a “catchment area” survey conducted for the airport. Such funding, from the U.S. Department of Transportation (DoT), would cover the revenue guarantee that airlines expect Chico to front before reestablishing service. The application is due July 15; Gustafson told the CN&R he anticipates receiving a letter of sup-

port from the carrier but that the airline had not publicly announced it and, thus, he requested its identity be withheld. Councilman Karl Ory, a former airport commissioner, sees this as a significant step. A letter of support for the grant “is not a commitment” to provide air service, he told the CN&R by phone, “but I think it’s an indication of their interest.” Passenger air travel at the Chico airport ended in December 2014, when SkyWest Airlines—operating United Express flights—stopped its service to San Francisco, where weather often caused delays. Ory said the timing coincided with a pilot shortage that prompted airlines to streamline. Economics and business plans change: Last year, Miller said, United returned to smaller markets, “and it’s done well for them. So I’m hoping that it’ll do well for us, that they’ll take a look at us again.” Chico officials have spoken with SkyWest, Alaska Airlines, Contour Airlines and JetSuiteX, a charter airline that books scheduled flights. The commercial airlines want a revenue guarantee: a fund from which they could draw if ridership drops below 80 percent in a fiscal quarter. Gustafson explained that the city would administer the fund, toward which the City Council already has allocated $115,000 over two years. Businesses, Chico State and other organizations could contribute, help offset costs such as advertising or

Sherry Miller, manager of the Chico Municipal Airport, is working to bring commercial air service back to town. PHOTO BY EVAN TUCHINSKY

participate in a “ticket bank” of prepaid airfares. “We’re really going to focus our effort on the revenue guarantee,” Gustafson said, because carriers look at that capacity when assessing a market. Miller, who’s worked in the airport industry for over 30 years, said her “gut feeling is this is going to work.” Chico Airport should be able to ramp up for air service in a six-month period, with the most significant upgrade being two portables to meet requirements for security screenings; after that, it’s up to the airlines. Ory has a sense of urgency. Chico just lost transportation to Sacramento International Airport with the shutdown of North Valley Shuttle, citing decreased ridership since November. With that loss, plus no local flights, he said, “I can’t imagine us being more isolated.” The catchment study indicated Chico could fill two 70-passenger planes a day, roughly 20 percent of the area residents who fly out of Sacramento. To return air service, “it’s not going to be easy,” Ory added. “[There] are expenses, but it’s well worth the investment in most people’s minds.” —EVAN TUCHINSKY eva nt u c h i ns k y @new srev i ew. c o m

County because of the Camp Fire. That much is sure after PG&E—the utility found to have caused last year’s devastating blaze—came to financial agreements on Tuesday (June 18) with 14 public entities that had filed lawsuits. The settlements total $1 billion and include damage incurred by Northern California fires going back to 2015. “The town of Paradise will rebuild, and this is an important step towards our recovery,” Paradise Mayor Jody Jones said in a press release. Her municipality will receive the largest share at $270 million. “On behalf of the town, we hope to receive the money as soon as possible so we can put it towards rebuilding our infrastructure and providing those necessary services for community resiliency.” A separate statement indicated the town has yet to decide what to do with the money—which may take some time to secure, as it must first be approved in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. “The town’s financial future is critical to the recovery of our community,” the statement reads. “The town lost 90 percent of its property tax base and, virtually, all of its sales tax revenue. The settlement will help cover these losses while the town works to re-establish its revenue base.” Also receiving funds related to the Camp Fire are Butte County ($252 million), Paradise Recreation and Park District ($47.5 million), and Yuba County ($12.5 million). “This is an important step towards stabilizing the county so we can continue to provide key services to residents, especially as our communities recover from the Camp Fire,” County Counsel Bruce Alpert, who represented the county, said in a press release. Nine entities will split $415 million related to 2017 and 2015 fires. They include the cities of Clear Lake, Napa and Santa Rosa; plus the counties of Lake, Mendocino, Nevada, Sonoma and Yuba (separate from the $12.5 million mentioned above). Also, the Calaveras County Water District will receive $3 million related to the 2015 Butte Fire. The money will be disbursed as part of PG&E’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy hearing, which includes a plan of reorganization. Earlier this month, two top executives announced their departure from the utility, which came under fire in December for its lack of safety culture. “There will be long-term impacts to the county that are unknown and unquantifiable at this time,” Alpert said. “We know this is the first step in a long process, and many more approvals have to happen before the county receives any money.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

11


HEALTHLINES What would this proposal do?

Services denied Trump administration rule would undo health care protections for LGBTQ and other patients by

Emmarie Huetteman

A change the civil rights rules dictating whether providers must care for patients

new Trump administration proposal would

who are transgender or have had an abortion. Supporters of the approach say it protects the freedom of conscience, but opponents say it encourages discrimination. The sweeping proposal has implications for all Americans, though, because the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) seeks to change how far civil rights protections extend and how those protections are enforced. California has the second-highest percentage of transgender adults of any state, after Hawaii, according to a 2016 report from the Williams Institute on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Public Policy at UCLA’s law school. Roger Severino, the director of the HHS 12

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

Office for Civil Rights, has been candid about his intentions to overturn an Obamaera rule that prohibited discrimination based on gender identity and termination of a pregnancy. In 2016, while at the conservative Heritage Foundation, he co-authored a paper arguing the restrictions threaten the independence of physicians to follow their religious or moral beliefs. His office unveiled the proposed rule on May 24, when many people were focused on the start of the long Memorial Day holiday weekend. The rule is the latest Trump administration proposal to strip protections for transgender Americans, coming the same week another directive was proposed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development that would allow homeless shelters to turn away people based on their gender identity. The public was given 60 days to comment on the HHS proposal. Here’s a rundown of what you need to know about it.

Fundamentally, the proposed rule would overturn a previous rule that forbids health care providers who receive federal funding from discriminating against patients on the basis of their gender identity or whether they have terminated a pregnancy. The Trump administration proposal would eliminate those protections, enabling providers to deny these groups care or insurance coverage without having to pay a fine or suffer other federal consequences. That may mean refusing a transgender patient mental health care or genderconfirming surgery. But it may also mean denying patients care that has nothing to do with gender identity, such as a regular office visit for a bad cold or ongoing treatment for chronic conditions like diabetes. “What it does, from a very practical point of view, is that it empowers bad actors to be bad actors,” Mara Keisling, executive director of the National Center for Transgender Equality, told reporters. The proposal also would eliminate protections based on sexual orientation and gender identity from several other health care regulations, like nondiscrimination guidelines for the health care insurance marketplaces.

Does it affect only LGBTQ people? The proposal goes beyond removing protections for the LGBTQ community and those who have had an abortion. It appears to weaken other protections, such as those based on race or age, by limiting who must abide by the rules. The Trump proposal would scrap the Obama-era rule’s broad definition of which providers can be punished by federal health officials for discrimination, a complicated change critics have said could ease requirements for insurance companies, for instance, as well as the agency itself. And the proposal erases many of the enforcement procedures outlined in the earlier rule, including its explicit ban on intimidation or retaliation. It also delegates to Severino, as the office’s director, full enforcement authority when it comes to things like opening investigations into complaints lodged under the nondiscrimination rule.

Why did HHS decide to change the rule? The Obama and Trump administrations have different opinions about whether a health care provider should be able to refuse service to patients because they are transgender or have had an abortion. It all goes back to a section in the Affordable Care Act barring discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex. President Barack Obama’s health officials said it is discrimination to treat someone differently based on

gender identity or stereotypes. It was the first time Americans who are transgender were protected from discrimination in health care. But President Donald Trump’s health officials said that definition of sex discrimination misinterprets civil rights laws, particularly a religious freedom law used to shield providers who object to performing certain procedures, such as abortions, or treating certain patients because they conflict with their religious convictions. “When Congress prohibited sex discrimination, it did so according to the plain meaning of the term, and we are making our regulations conform,” Severino said in a statement. “The American people want vigorous protection of civil rights and faithfulness to the text of the laws passed by their representatives.” Much of what the Office for Civil Rights has done under Severino’s leadership is to emphasize and strengthen so-called conscience protections for health care providers, many of which existed well before Trump was sworn in. Last year, Severino unveiled a Conscience and Religious Freedom Division, and his office recently finalized another rule detailing those protections and their enforcement. The office also said the proposed rule would save about $3.6 billion over five years. Most of that would come from eliminating requirements for providers to post notices about discrimination, as well as other measures that cater to those with disabilities and limited English proficiency. The rule also would save providers money that might instead be spent handling HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 1 5

APPOINTMENT Hot trot for a cause It’s time for another benefit run, this one in support of Butte County Sheriff’s Office employees who lost their homes in the Camp Fire. Run with the Law takes place in lower Bidwell Park on Saturday (June 22) at 8 a.m. You can choose to run a full 5k or tap out at a mile. Participation is $35, plus a minimal sign-up fee. Visit buttecountycoa.com to register. It’s going to be another summer sizzler, so be prepared with water and sunscreen, and consider a cold dip in Sycamore Pool after crossing the finish line.


june 20, 2019

CN&R

13


Acupuncture

Disability

Support Group

Are you interested in joining a support group for people living with disabilities? Please come check out our new disability support group!

Chinese Herbs & Massage Pain Management, Weight Loss, Digestive Issues & Allergies

Jennifer Conlin L.Ac. Elinore Schafer L.Ac. Most insurance accepted

WHEN: 2 Monday otherof Monday, 2:30-4:00 each month, 2:30pm-4pm, 4 Wednesday of each month, 10:30am-12pm nd Every

th

WHERE: Disability Action Center office, Formerly ILSNC 1161 East Ave, Chico 95926

1209 Esplanade Ste 1 530.342.2895 • AmericanChi.net Mon & Thur 10am-6pm • Tues & Wed 9am-6pm Friday 9am-2pm • Sunday Noon- 4pm

QUESTIONS? Contact ContactSandra Anna Morales at 893-8527 or at 893-8527 x 104 anna.smith@ILSNC.org or sandra@actionctr.org

Assessing and Treating Trauma in Older Adults: A Trauma-Informed Approach

FeATurIng

Dr. Caroline giroux

Dr. Andres Sciolla

June 28, 2019 | 1-3 PM FREE EVENT! LAKeSIDe PAVILIOn 2565 CALIFOrnIA PArK Dr. CHICO regISTer: https://passagesptsdseminar.eventbrite.com Or call the Caregiver resource Center: (530) 898-5925 regISTrATIOn DeADLIne: 6/26 14  

CN&R 

J une 2 0, 20 1 9


grievances from those no longer protected. The office “considers this a benefit of the rule,” said Katie Keith, co-founder of Out2Enroll, an organization that helps the LGBTQ community obtain health insurance. “Organizations will have lower labor costs and lower litigation costs because they will no longer have to process grievances or defend against lawsuits brought by transgender people.”

Why does this matter? Research shows the LGBTQ community faces greater health challenges and higher rates of illness than other groups, making access to equitable treatment in health care all the more important. Discrimination, from the misuse of pronouns to denials of care, is “commonplace” for transgender patients, according to a 2011 report by advocacy groups. The report found that 28 percent of the 6,450 transgender and gender nonconforming people interviewed said they had experienced verbal harassment in a health care setting, while 19 percent said they had been refused care due to their gender identity.

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

About this story:

It was produced by Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The report said 28 percent had postponed seeking medical attention when they were sick or injured because of discrimination. Critics fear the rule would muddy the waters, giving patients less clarity on what is and is not permissible and how to get help when they have been the victims of discrimination. Jocelyn Samuels, the Obama administration official who oversaw the implementation of the Obama-era rule, said that for now, even though the Trump administration’s HHS will not pursue complaints against those providers, Americans still have the right to challenge this treatment in court. Multiple courts have said the prohibition on sex discrimination includes gender identity. “The administration should be in the business of expanding access to health care and health coverage,” Samuels told reporters on a conference call after the rule’s release. “And my fear is that this rule does just the opposite.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

Sign up for our newSletter. get 10% off.

HEALTHLINES

Senior Companion Volunteers Needed Give the Gift of Friendship! Join Senior Companions Today!

The Senior Companion Program is open to volunteers 55 and over who can serve between 5 and 40 hours per week. You don’t need formal experience, just time, compassion and the desire to help. Companionship can include: transportation to medical appointments or the grocery store, going out to lunch, walks in the park, or simply just spending quality time together at your client’s home. You’ll receive pre-service orientation and ongoing training through PASSAGES Volunteer Services.

Put a little pep in your step Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Next time you go for a walk, you may want to consider picking up the pace. According to a new study out of the University of Leicester in England, fast walkers are more likely to live longer than those who prefer a more leisurely stroll. While brisk walkers cover about 100 steps a minute and move at approximately 3 mph, slow walkers accomplish half that. Researchers studied 474,919 people and found the quicker group had a longer life expectancy across all weight categories, while the slower group had the lowest life expectancy at an average of 64.8 years for men, 72.4 for women. Interestingly, the results suggested that physical fitness is a greater indicator of long life than body mass index (BMI) and whether or not you smoke. Sounds like stopping to smell the flowers may not be all it’s cracked up to be—reduce your risk of heart-related death by leaving your fellow walkers in the dust.

Orientation Training June 28th, 2019 • 10am-3pm 35 Main Street Room 200 on the second floor. Snacks & a nice lunch are served. *Call 530.898.6761 for more information. Must pre-register for orientation JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

15


GREENWAYS Jacob Montgomery fishes with his dog at a campground near Iron Gate Dam on the Klamath River.

Eco-friendly camping

California Water Resources Control Board, the county says removal could negatively impact the environment and cause flooding, “in addition to socioeconomic impacts on the local community.” Compared with typical supermarket

Can individual choices help save the planet? Or is the system too rigged? story and photo by

Tess Townsend

Ffish.pingI’ma hook into water and pulling out a told it’s an exercise in patience, and

ishing isn’t supposed to be as easy as dip-

that you’ll often come home empty-handed. But those insights do not describe my experience on a recent camping trip near the Oregon border. There, in a reservoir on the Klamath River, yellow perch—a species not native to California—thrives in water made artificially still by Iron Gate Dam. And the fish are all too eager to snap at silicone lures on the ends of fishing line. The trip is an annual pilgrimage by my partner and his friends, an outdoorsy group, many of them research biologists. The friend who started the trip collects a large proportion of the fish he’ll eat at home for the next year when he goes. He and others who attend try to only eat meat they’ve hunted themselves. The trip to Iron Gate was presumably as green a vacation as one could take. We slept in tents, gave up showers, fished a sustainable food source and did it all a few hours by carpool from home. Compared with flying to a hotel or resort with electricity and running

16

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

water, we spent this long weekend of camping consuming a fraction of the energy and resources. But I had this nagging feeling that it would be irresponsible to hold up the trip as an ecofriendly model. Many parts of the trip reflected the ecounfriendly system in which we live. We stored our fish fillets in plastic bags, a petroleum product. We brought food packaged in plastic. We used plastic coolers. We cooked with portable kerosene stoves. Some of us threw down fishing lines weighted with lead sinkers. We drove to the campsite in fossilfuel-powered cars. And we camped on a man-made reservoir that dramatically altered the ecosystem from its natural state. A common sight at our tent compound was

campers filleting dead fish, a process that left the wooden picnic table strewn with fish guts as a container of carcasses steadily filled at each sitting. What made that image so frequent was the abundance of yellow perch, a fish native to the Northeast and Midwest that has thrived in the man-made reservoir. Iron Gate Dam interrupts the flow of the Klamath River, creating a 944acre reservoir that is “lake-like” and warmer than if the river were allowed to flow unimpeded, says fisheries biologist Peter Moyle, a distinguished former UC Davis professor. How exactly yellow perch got into the Klamath River isn’t clear. Moyle said the now-defunct U.S. Fish Commission introduced the species to the Central Valley near the turn of the 20th century.

PacifiCorp owns seven dams on the Klamath, which the company website says provide “enough power to supply the energy needs of approximately 70,000 households.” That’s about 15 percent of all the hydropower produced by the company, according to spokesman Bob Gravely. PacifiCorp also generates energy from coal, natural gas and wind. Dams are often controversial. On the one hand, reservoirs help irrigate land and store water for human needs. On the other, dams harm river ecosystems and aging dam infrastructure poses a flood risk. Dams on the Klamath River interrupt the migration of native coho and chinook salmon. Coho are listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act on the Klamath River in California, and there is a petition to list spring-run chinook as threatened or endangered in a portion of the river. The relatively still and warm water in the reservoir makes the river more prone to toxic algae that Moyle says can kill small fish as well as invertebrates that fish eat. “The dams are ruining the river and they are basically making the river sick. And because the river’s sick, everything that’s dependent upon the river is also sick,” said Amy Cordalis, general counsel for the Yurok tribe. Four dams on the Klamath, including Iron Gate, are scheduled for removal in 2021 after extensive efforts by the Yurok and Karuk tribes, environmental nonprofits and government agencies, and the cooperation of PacifiCorp. Plans for removal still require federal approval, and the Board of Supervisors in Siskiyou County, where three of the four dams are located, opposes removal. In letters to the

options—food produced with intensive energy and often transported over long distances— yellow perch are more sustainable. “As a matter of fact, it’s great to harvest them,” and makes little difference for the overall yellow perch population in the reservoir, Moyle says. Teejay O’Rear, who started the camping tradition, says that when he goes to Iron Gate, he usually brings back between 150 and 200 fish. “That’s at least six months of dinner meat,” he said. He wasn’t able to make it to the river this year. But Moyle also says, “You’re just taking advantage of an unnatural situation.” The fish are able to thrive at Iron Gate only because a dam creates an artificially favorable environment. Remove the dam and the yellow perch will disappear from Iron Gate Reservoir, though they’ll still remain in some other portions of the river. The last morning of the camping trip, my partner and I took his canoe out on the reservoir to fish. Later I told Moyle how surprised I had been at how easy it was to hook yellow perch. According to historical records, he said, it was once just as easy to catch native salmon. Ω

ECO EVENT

Cleanup get-together The Butte Environmental Council is hosting its June Block Party With a Purpose this Saturday (June 22) from 9 a.m. to noon. In partnership with the California Native Plant Society and the city of Chico, these regular community cleanups help remove invasive plant species and garbage from our waterways, restoring these areas for the benefit of both humans and wildlife. Buckets, trash bags and gloves are provided for every event, along with donated snacks and coffee. This month focuses on the Comanche Creek greenway with meetup at the junction of East Park Avenue and Midway.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY NEESA SONOQUIE

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Choose your adventure

Restoration, resiliency

Druin Heal is an experienced tracker and hunter, a master of knots and lashings, an archer, a tomahawk thrower, an Eagle Scout and a genius at orienteering. And he wants to take you on an adventure. A certified California naturalist, Heal gathered quite a following while running the science and nature program at the Chico Creek Nature Center. He recently ventured out on his own, developing his popular field trips into something more spectacular— Adventure Quest. Combining his love for medieval times, passion for useful outdoor skills and desire for adventure, Heal now provides personally curated quests for birthday parties, wedding proposals, bachelor/ bachelorette parties, class field trips and more. These events come with ancient treasure maps, ciphered clues, complicated riddles and battles with trolls. They can last hours, days, weeks or more; the details are personalized and pricing varies. Check out Heal’s Facebook page @quest4adventure for his event calendar (he offers free monthly field trips) and for info on how to create your own quest.

How did this idea come about? It was born out of Ranger Corps, a group I created about eight years ago—we camp and hike in medieval gear, teaching and learning woodsman stuff

like tool use and pioneering, all with a fantasy twist. From that, I thought, wouldn’t it be cool to go on a quest? You get these stories in books and the movies, there are great deeds to be done, but I wanted to do it. Who wants to file paperwork? Wouldn’t you rather go and fight some orcs?

What does Adventure Quest offer? We have three major themes to choose from. Quests are medieval, Lord of the Rings-style; adventures are more Indiana Jones or Tomb Raider; and then treasure hunts are piratethemed. There are mental and physical challenges, like maybe you have to fight a bunch of bandits ... . Right now we mostly use [foam-padded swords], but as we earn more money we are getting LARP [live action roleplaying]-type swords that look real, because the greater the immersion the better.

What are some of the coolest quests you have created so far? I’m a leathersmith and my wife makes jewelry, so we make quest items and costumes, we color scrolls and maps with tea and burn the edges to make it look really old. We recently did a quest at Monkey Face with a magical stone. It was for a school class, fairy-themed, and we used a lot of Celtic mythology. I dressed up as the God of Wild Things and gave them three clues—one was underground, one in the deepest waters, one up high in a tree. What I love about the kids ones is that they are just so into it, they really believe it. The challenge with the adults is in creating the clues, the intricacy. We try to make it as real as possible, and it is real. You are out in the physical world, climbing ropes, scaling rocky bits, finding caves with real items and real clues. It’s a blast. —NEESA SONOQUIE ne e s as @new srev i ew. c o m

MAKING SPACE About two years ago, Bank of America chose to close its only branch in Paradise, but as it turns out, the company never did anything with its empty building on the Skyway. Since it didn’t burn in the Camp Fire, now is the time: Last week it was announced that BofA donated it to the town of Paradise. It could clearly use the space, having added a team of building officials to handle the influx of permit applications—so the timing is good. “The town intends to utilize the building as a Resiliency Permit and Housing Resource Center,” a town press release reads. “After the fire, our new reality requires more public outreach and assistance than ever before as our community digs deep to build back our town.” SOMETHING TO CHEER FOR Hype Dance Studio has some exciting news: It’s been

chosen to help choreograph routines for the 916 Crew, the Sacramento Kings’ gender-inclusive hip-hop group. The Chico-based studio will be working with Dance Elite All Stars from Rocklin and KAST Academy of the Arts out of Elk Grove for the group’s debut season. Apparently this job is nothing new for Hype owner Sarah Schneeweis, who said in a Kings press release that, “I had the great pleasure of choreographing the Sacramento Kings Dancers for 15 years and this trend toward coed dance teams is exciting.” Agreed—can’t wait to see what they come up with.

er of Chico Yoga Cent 0.342.0100

50%

| 53 for cash. brosa #150 49.6. Not redeemable credit. 250 Vallom not expire according to CA CC Sec. 1749.ity.45-17 as store Change will be given

t used. cate & does used for gratu minus any amoun This is a gift certifi offers. Cannot be by the consumer other discounts & to the amount paid Can be used with certificate is equal Cash value for this

off

Boba Tealicious

Inday’s

$20 Value

$10 Value

$10 Value

You pay $10

You pay $5

You pay $6.50

10

BOBA TEA 225 MA LICIOUS IN ST, S This is a gift UITE M certificate | 530.9 and 1749.45-1749 .6. Not red does not expire accord 66.207 Cannot be used for gra eemable for cash. Can ing to California Civi 7 l Code Sec tuity. Cha be used

50% off

Yoga Center of Chico

meredithc@newsreview.com

For me, one of the most charming things about any downtown—including Chico’s and Oroville’s—is the history in which it’s steeped. I love walking around and looking up at big, historic buildings, reading the plaques that explain their past and admiring the grand architecture. Sometimes, sadly, that grandeur gets butchered by time and owners who care more about their singular missions than the cohesive whole. Restoring and maintaining old buildings comes at no small cost, of course. Thankfully there are things like historic registries that open up some funding sources—and prohibit certain modifications. I mention this because the Oroville State Theatre is undergoing a restoration project that its parent company, the nonprofit State Theatre Arts Guild (STAGE), has dubbed Miracle on Myers Street. It cleared one hurdle last year, with the installation of a Wurlitzer organ. Now, it’s hoping to get the go-ahead from the city Planning Commission to update its marquee. Turns out, according to the STAGE website, when United Artists bought the place in the 1970s, it tore down the old “State” sign as it “modernized several aspects of the theatre, but with considerable loss to the interior detail and damage to the theatre’s infrastructure.” The guild wants to re-create the sign—similar to those that adorn the Senator and El Rey theaters in Chico (in fact, Timothy Pflueger, who designed the State Theatre, designed the Senator that same year, 1928). I can’t see any reasons to think STAGE’s bid will be turned down—it’s already gotten the blessing of the state Office of Historic Preservation.

ate Gift Certific

saves you money!

by

Meredith J. Cooper

nge will be

with other tion discounts and s re credit. offers.

given as sto

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

10

uRant Resta 0.2593 Inday’s | 530.52 st h 8t t redeemable for es 49.6. Not rede Sections 1749.45-17 credit. 1043-B W

Code given as store to California Civil ity. Change will be expire according t be used for gratu icate and does not and offers. Canno This is a gift certif with other discounts cash. Can be used

35% off

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

17


Fields of dreams

CN&R’s annual Entrepreneur Issue celebrates success, from retail to farming

E

ver thought of starting up your own business, be it a restaurant, a home bakery or a small farm? Well, you’re not alone. But finding success is based on more than just a little know-how. That’s why, for our annual Entrepreneur Issue, the CN&R decided to sit down with a handful of local business people who’ve proven themselves up to the task. In the following pages, you’ll find stories about a local bar owner/ restaurateur with three successful downtown businesses—and one in the works; a startup home-based cookie shop where decorations range from unicorns to eyeglasses; a flower farm where beauty and eco-friendliness are key; a tech guru whose latest e-commerce endeavor includes a component that tackles crushing student debt; the owner of a comic book store that’s stood strong for 26 years despite the wrath of Amazon; and a nonprofit arts organization that’s become a cultural hub in Chico. Entrepreneurs are the dreamers among us. Whether their visions are big or small, these folks have turned them into reality. We hope you’re inspired by their stories.

18

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

Downtown dynamo Bar owner/restaurateur Will Brady talks about travel, Guy Fieri and being mean

W

ill Brady started working in restaurants—even if they were of the fast-food variety—at the age of 13. So, after he “failed out of college,” where he was seeking a degree in philosophy and the classics, the fallback was to find work in kitchens. Who could have predicted that work would pay such dividends? Today, at 46 years old, Brady owns three of downtown Chico’s most bustling spots for food and drinks: The Banshee, B Street Public House and, the latest, Bill’s Towne Lounge. In fact, when Food Network star Guy Fieri brought his show Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives to town a few months ago, one of his stops was to The Banshee, where Brady made a couple of the house favorites: the Pho-Rench Dip Sandwich and Bahn Mi Tacos. “He was very down-to-earth off-camera,” Brady said of Fieri. “We had drinks for a couple of hours one of the nights— he’s very likable.” The path from McDonald’s to “Triple-D”—Fieri speak for his show—was far from straight, however. Brady moved back and forth from his hometown of Boston to places like Los Angeles, Chicago and even Dublin, Ireland. At first, he gained experience working in restaurants—under a number of James Beard Award winners, including Ed LaDue, who created the first pizza menus at California Pizza Kitchen and Wolfgang Puck’s Spago in L.A.

response was immense—the place is reguThen he started getting hired to help larly full of patrons. It was so successful, restaurateurs launch their own menus, in fact, that Brady’s initial plan was to spending three months here, three months open a string of Banshees across Northern there, working for room and board and California. He had no intention of stayenough cash to get him to the next place. ing in Chico over a decade. Something When he finally was ready to settle down, about the other communities he’d eyed he went back home and opened an Irish for Banshee 2 or Banshee 3, however, just pub in Boston that was more pub than resdidn’t jibe with him. taurant. Ultimately, though, “I got tired of “I decided to stick with Chico. Being breaking up fights,” he said. present calmed me,” he said. So, almost on a whim, he folSo, instead of multiple Banshees, lowed one of his regular Brady set out to create something customers—Sebastian Brady’s pro tip: different. A lengthy, frustratTamarelle—to Chico, Know what you’re doing, whether it be ing battle over obtaining a and they opened The front of house or back of house. Don’t liquor license for his second Banshee together in try to do everything and assume you business—just around the 2007. know how to run a restaurant because you’ve eaten at restaurants. corner from The Banshee “I basically The Banshee: 134 W. Second St., 895-9670 on Broadway—was infudid what I did in B Street Public House: 117 Broadway St., riating, but eventually he, Boston, here,” 899-8203 Tamarelle and another partBrady said. The Bill’s Towne Lounge: 135 Main St., 487-7031


26 years in business

LocaLLy Made

LeAnn CooLey owner

It’s easy to see the impact LeAnn Cooley has made on the city of Chico. Signs created by Cooley, owner of Signs & Graphic Design, hang proudly on storefronts throughout the area. A licensed C-45 Electrical Sign Contractor with 20+ years of experience in the sign industry, Cooley is well-versed in every aspect of sign fabrication and has produced high profile projects for Disneyland, Legoland and the Getty Museum. Clockwise from lower left: Will Brady says the “B” names seem to be working, so he’s sticking with the theme. No. 4 will be Bodega. Jon Luken tends bar at The Banshee, Brady’s first Chico establishment. PHOTOS BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

Brady demonstrates how to make The Banshee’s Bahn Mi Tacos on a recent episode of Guy Fieri’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.

ner opened B Street Oyster Bar in 2013. “I started out with the idea of traveling,” Brady said. The Banshee was supposed to evoke the ambiance of Dublin or Boston; “with an oyster bar, I wanted it to feel like you were in Brooklyn or Venice.” He realized early on that his plan for B Street was flawed. “People in Chico couldn’t afford to eat oysters every day,” he said. “We had to change.” That’s part of what’s made Brady’s businesses successful—the ability to recognize when something isn’t working and change it rather than stubbornly trying to make it work. He dropped the “Oyster Bar” from B Street’s name and added “Public House.” It’s worked. At Bill’s Towne Lounge, which opened last fall, he’s still working out the menu, though the overall goal is 1960s-’70s L.A. The patio is set to open in a week or two, which will complete the construction phase. Brady’s accomplishments haven’t gone unnoticed by those around him. At the Downtown Chico Business Association’s last annual meeting, he was presented with the Kudos Award “for economic development and capital investment in downtown Chico,” said Kathleen Rivard, DCBA administrative assistant. “To have three very separate, different, individual restaurants is amazing.” During a recent interview inside Bill’s,

Brady could barely sit still—he quietly chided a host who wasn’t greeting customers walking in the door; the music was boring, so he asked the bartender to liven it up. Brady acknowledges he’s got a bit of a reputation for being loud and obnoxious. He’s calmed down over the years, he says,

though sometimes he finds it difficult to bite his tongue. “Be ready to be mean,” he said by way of advice for anyone hoping to open a restaurant, bar or any business, really. “I now have about 110 employees. Someone always needs to be fired.” That said, he estimates he pays better than many other restaurants because he wants to attract good workers. “If you want good food, you have to pay better. And treat people right or you’re not going to get the product you want.” He and his various business partners promote from within, as well, offering incentives including part ownership. Good quality staff is one thing; good quality ingredients are another. “Use good stuff,” he said simply, but figuring out food costs is a must. “We used to grind our own burgers at The Banshee. Then we started getting it ground at S&S [Produce]—and that works better [in terms of staff time], plus people like to hear that [we’re supporting local businesses].” For his next venture, Brady and Rawbar owner Darren Chadderdon are working on the former Cyclesport space at the corner of Second and Main streets across from Bill’s Towne Lounge. That one is going to serve a few functions, he says: First, it will be a bakery to provide bread for all of his restaurants; second, it’ll offer quick food options for people on the go. He envisions Bodega will serve doughnuts and breakfast sandwiches for breakfast, plus offerings from a coffee counter. For lunch, there will be deli sandwiches—no paninis or anything that requires cooking, unless it’s premade. “The goal is to be a deli, like the ones they have in Boston and Philly,” he said. At night, there’ll be a dessert bar, since none of his places serve dessert. “I just want to create something new that we don’t have in Chico,” he said, adding, “If you’re gonna copy someone, do it better.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER m e re d i t h c @new srev i ew. c o m

MORE

ENTREPRENEURS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 0

She enjoys working closely with her clients to provide solid design, fair pricing, and professional project management. Cooley Whether she’s singing a song or designing a has a reputation in the sign industry for her sign, LeAnn loves making people happy. If you ability to design signs that add beauty to the are in need of a sign, give her a call today! environment. She is also known to light up any room she enters, and customer relations are one of her greatest strengths. Cooley has also made an impact on the Chico music scene and performs lively swing and vintage jazzy blues at many of our local establishments. 158 CommerCiAL Ave, ChiCo | 530.343.2543 m-th 8:30Am-4:30pm | f 9Am-1pm | www.signsofChiCo.Com

19 years in business

LocaLLy Made

Kevin Riley Michael WeaR nicK andReW Michael hall OWneRs Locally owned and operated 5th Street Steakhouse opened in August 2000, featuring U.S.D.A. prime cuts of beef, fresh seafood, a full service bar, and an extensive wine list. The owners and staff pride themselves in providing consistent and excellent personal service along with the finest quality food. This passion for quality food, top-notch service and a lively atmosphere has made 5th Street Steakhouse a memorable and cherished landmark of the Chico community as well as a graduations, fundraisers, Best of Chico Living Legend 14 years running. holiday parties, and private meetings. 5th Street Steakhouse also offers a banquet With an array of menu options and an extensive room which is attached to the main dining wine list, you are sure to find 5th Street room area, but provides a private section Steakhouse to be the ideal fit for your event. for any special event. This beautiful facility is perfect for birthdays, wedding rehearsal dinners, anniversaries, religious celebrations,

Everyone at 5th Street Steakhouse looks forward to serving you soon!

345 West 5th stReet | chicO | 530.891.6328 WWW.5thstReetsteaKhOuse.cOM JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

19


30+ years in business

LocaLLy Made

Petal power

Jeffrey & Shelby Plummer OwnerS

CharlOtte, lyla & elOiSe DaughterS

Farming couple produce local, sustainable and beautiful flowers

Jeffrey and Shelby Plummer first met at a bakery in Sacramento. Shelby was a cake decorator and Jeffrey was the head baker. It was love at first bite! Moving back to Chico when they began their family, an opportunity to work at Upper Crust opened up and they knew it was meant to be. Their dream of owning a bakery came true last year when they took over as the new owners of Upper Crust after having worked there for over 7 years. Continuing to provide delicious food and beautiful desserts to their amazing customers remains top priority. “Our customers are incredible, and because of that, we always strive to put out the best products we can. We always want our customers to feel at home when they walk in the door. Everything we make here is made with not only the best ingredients, but is also made with love. The pride we have in everything

we do, is extremely important to us as a business,” said Jeffrey. So, if you’re in the mood for an out-of-this-world quiche, a pastry fresh out of the oven, a beautiful cake for a special event or a fantastic salad or sandwich for lunch, Upper Crust is the spot.

130 main Street, ChiCO Ca | 530.895.3866 infO@uPPerCruStChiCO.COm | www.uPPerCruStChiCO.COm

20 years in business

Kremer Dental Care Dr. Kevin Kremer Dr. Kevin Kremer is celebrating 20 years of dentistry in Chico and its surrounding communities after opening his first dental office in 1999. As a local dentist who is active in our community, he is happy to find ways to give back and make it great. Dr. Kremer believes that people should not fear going to the dentist, leading to him creating a dental practice that was different; “Our focus is consultations, same-day-crowns, and state-ofon customer service and quality care, as well the-art computer guided dental implant surgery. as a great environment for team members.” Call today to schedule a reservation. As a general and cosmetic dentist, Dr. Kremer is one of only 2% of dentists nationwide to be certified by the prestigious LVI Dental Institute in advanced training in modern dentistry. His team is committed to providing the highest standard of care to every guest, every time. He offers many dental services at each location including anxiety-free dentistry, emergency visits, extractions, veneers, denture and implant

3 GlenbrooK Court | ChiCo | 530.892.1234 140 inDepenDenCe CirCle | ChiCo | 530.892.1218 20

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

E

mma Harris was ringed by color on a recent muggy morning at her flower farm. Cosmos, Asiatic lillies, echinacea and nigella cast a rainbow around her as she arranged dozens of bouquets in the shade of a carport. In the coming weeks, dalias—their blooms delayed by the North State’s unusually long spring—will join summertime varieties, such as zinnias and sunflowers. Harris and her husband, Craig Piluso, are owners of Pine Creek Flowers, a west Chico farm specializing in “slow flowers”—that is, plants that are grown and sold locally. “Most flowers you find in a grocery store have traveled from Guatemala, Ecuador, New Zealand,” Harris explained. “That’s too much of a carbon footprint for what’s sustainable. And most of those flowers can be grown right here.” Indeed, with organic practices—Harris and Piluso eschew traditional farming techniques, such as pesticides and herbicides—the couple raise dozens of hearty and beautiful varieties throughout the seasons. Both work on the farm full time, and while many of their jobs overlap, they also tend to their own tasks. Piluso, for example—whom Harris affectionately refers to as her “field beast”—runs myriad machinery, including the tractor. He also makes the organic compost tea that fertilizes the crops. Harris orders the farm’s seeds, does the seed-starting, and is the point-person for customers. Of course, both spend long days in the field—weeding and harvesting. Piluso’s pull to agriculture was natural. He was born into a farming family here in Chico, and he holds a degree in ag business. Harris’ journey was more circuitous. A Harris’ pro tip: Connecticut native, Embrace your failures; they she studied philosoare opportunities for learning phy and religion in and growth. college in upstate Find Pine Creek Flowers at New York. There, the Saturday Chico Certified she started going Farmers’ Market and the Thursday Night Market. to farmers’ markets pinecreekflowers.com and discovered the slow food movement. “It’s a really good thing for the environment, for the local economy,” she said, “and once I discovered there’s a

Emma Harris of Pine Creek Flowers shows off a big bouquet of zinnias. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERTY

slow flowers movement, I thought, Well, that’s a dream.” Harris never imagined she’d find her dream job, let alone her future husband, in Chico. She came here “on a whim” for a nine-month internship at an organic produce farm. When it ended, she began working for California Organic Flowers. Five years later, after its owners announced they planned to retire in the spring of 2016, Harris and Piluso—who got married last year—decided to fill the niche. They started at a familyowned parcel adjacent to Pine Creek—hence the name—and began selling at the Saturday Chico Certified Farmers’ Market right on cue. “That was nothing short of a miracle, because literally they had their last market and our first sunflowers bloomed,” Harris said. Pine Creek Flowers quickly outgrew that space and moved to a larger parcel to gradually expand the operation. Nowadays, Harris and Piluso also operate a booth at the Thursday Night Market, sell to local florists and three local grocers—Chico Natural Foods, New Earth Market and S&S Organic Produce and Natural Foods—and take occasional special orders for weddings. Though the farm is hitting its stride this year, Harris says a lot of trial and error has brought the business to this point. “There’s definitely some failure in the process, but that’s how you learn and make things better,” she said. —MELISSA DAUGHERTY me lissad @ newsr ev iew.c o m MORE

ENTREPRENEURS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 2


53

71 years in BUsiness

LocaLLy Made

years in business

Green BUsiness

john dahlmeier

Harry Swinney

owner

Owner

The insurance business has changed dramatically since Dahlmeier Insurance Agency first opened its doors in Oroville in 1948.

Founded in 1966, Evans Furniture has served the Yuba-Sutter area since inception, and to this day continues to be a locally owned Evans family business. With the addition of the Chico location in 2011, Evans continues to pursue every measure possible in providing exemplary service to all who visit them at either location. Their goal; to ensure their customer’s satisfaction beyond the initial purchase of their furniture, in hopes of earning their trust and commitment in the future.

The family owned and operated business has grown and prospered by adhering to the same core values it began with 71 years ago when John Dahlmeier’s dad, Hal, and his uncle Ed were running it. “Old fashioned customer service never gets old” John says. “We continue to hear from new customers that tell us one of the main reasons we earned their business is because we were the only ones to respond to their inquiry in a timely manner”

The agency remains independent, selling a range of policies—residential, commercial, automotive, health, life, etc.—from a variety of companies. Call Dahlmeier Insurance today for a free quote. Oroville- 530.533.3424, Chico530.342.6421 CA LICENSE #0680951

With a commitment to the professional development of its employees and embracing the tools of developing technologies, the company has combined the past and the present to chart a bright future.

2080 myers street | oroville | 530.533.3424 1368 longfellow avenue | ChiCo | 530.342.6421 dahlmeier.Com

Today, Evans showcases over 36,000 square feet of home furnishings making them the largest home furnishings retailer north of SacraEvans Furniture invites you to be their guests, mento to the Oregon border. The staff of sales and experience the Evans Furniture difference! associates are professionally trained by the manufacturers and are ready to assist anyone in fulfilling their needs without making them feel pressured. The relaxed atmosphere makes it easy for everyone to feel comfortable and able to roam the gallery as they please. HigHway 29, yuba City | 530.673.2745 2101 Dr. Martin LutHer King Jr. PKwy, CHiCO | 530.895.3000

15

55

years in business

years in business

Sandi Bauman

Vince & Kristina clarKson

RealtoR® ChiCo homeS

owners

Sit down. Let’s talk real estate. Sandi Bauman of Chico Homes uses this mantra because she believes listening to her clients is key to getting them exactly what they’re looking for. Why choose Sandi to be your real estate agent? It’s simple...she has consistently performed within the top 1% of local realtors, has sold over 1,200 properties in Butte, Glenn and Tehama Counties, and was voted Realtor of the Year in 2018. Integrity, unstoppable work ethic, honest communication and a desire to continuously improve are the hallmarks of the Sandi Bauman Team. Clients see results as their needs are addressed and their problems solved. Exceptional service is given to each and every client they represent.

easy market to navigate! If you’re in the real estate market you need a knowledgeable realtor capable of reading the local market to get you the very best deal. Sandi Bauman is that agent!

Local home inventory levels fluctuate often, as we saw during the Camp Fire, and can make buying or selling a home difficult. It’s not an

2751 CalifoRnia PaRk dR. Ste 200, ChiCo 530.864.5407 | ChiCohomeSeaRCh.net

For over 55 years, Hudson’s Appliance Center in Paradise has been serving the Butte County area offering sales and service of major appliances for your home. The newest generation of owners, Vince and Kristina Clarkson, have committed themselves to providing exceptional service that goes well above and beyond what you might experience at other appliance stores. By providing American made products, exceptional service and expert product knowledge, they insure that their customers walk out feeling good about their purchase, and how they were treated by the Hudson’s staff. Hudson’s Appliance Center will price-match their competitors, even the “big box” stores, while offering outstanding no-pressure service. Hudson’s Appliance Center serves all of Butte County and is located in Chico at Skyway & Dominic Drive. Their Paradise location is still closed due to damage caused by the Camp Fire but will be reopening before the end of this year. You owe

it to yourself to experience the difference, and visit Hudson’s Appliance Center when shopping for your next major appliance. Hudson’s Appliance Center is your authorized Whirlpool dealer serving all of Butte County.

2525 Dominic DriVe, suite D, chico 530.877.6312 | huDsonsappliance.com June 20, 2019

CN&R

21


7

Success in adaptation

years in business

BoB Maness

BaT Comics owner Trent Walsh on surviving the internet, other trends as a retail business

owner/Director

CRT has become one of the north state’s favorite choices for high quality Broadway performance. Started in 2012, this top-notch theatre company has brought 72 shows to Chico in it’s brief existence. Owner and director Bob Maness comes from a 30 year history of working in community and professional theatre, from Los Angeles to San Francisco and now here in Chico.

profits. They are excited for the coming season which will include, ‘Matilda the Musical’, CRT has several divisions beyond full Broad‘Sweeney Todd’, and for youth ‘Frozen Jr’. way shows, including a Black Box venue for intimate performances, and a youth theater academy (CRT KIDS) hosting over 140 students ranging from ages 5-16! “One of our core values”, says owner Bob Maness, “is People Over Project. We believe if we invest in the performers, the show will come together easily”. Local community is important to CRT who has donated thousands in ticket sales to local needs including Camp Fire victims, local School districts and many other local non-

1.800.722.4522 | www.crtshows.coM

84 years in BUsiness

LocaLLy Made

Green BUsiness

Lewis Johnson owner

Butte View Olive Co. and Stella Cadente, two wildly popular olive oil labels that serve cooks across the nation, are produced right here in Oroville by Lewis Johnson and his family. It all began in 1935, when Johnson’s grandfather first began farming the 150 acres of olive trees that they still have today. In 1999 Johnson produced the first bottle of Butte View olive oil after three years of fine-tuning his process.

Mr. Johnson welcomes you to come experience California sunshine in a bottle! Available in Chico at Maisie Jane’s, Made in Chico, and S&S Produce, in Oroville at Collins & Denny Market, and Wagon Wheel Market, in 250ml and 500ml bottles.

Today, Butte View produces a wide variety of extra virgin olive oils infused with flavors including: jalapeño, garlic, basil, lemon, lime, blood orange and rosemary. These pure, light and delicate hand crafted oils provide wonderful aromas and distinctive accents to any dish making them truly unique and excellent – just one more reason why these olive oils are “Gold” and “Best of Class” medal winners.

2950 Louis Ave | oroviLLe | 530.534.8320 www.butteview.com 22

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

T

wenty-six years ago, Trent Walsh opened BaT Comics & Games on Broadway in downtown Chico. He’s moved the store a few times—some of his landlords weren’t the greatest, he says—but for the past 11 years, he’s occupied a spot about a block away from that first storefront. He couldn’t imagine being anywhere else. “When we first started, we had to decide what kind of business we wanted to be,” he said of himself and former business partner Benny Louie. “We wanted to be geared toward the college crowd—so that meant being downtown, and not, say, in the mall.” That was 1994. Since then, the internet certainly “has taken a toll” on the industry— “Amazon is fairly terrible,” Walsh said. “Most of my down [times] are attributed to that.” But it’s not all been bad. For instance, there are a plethora of blogs and YouTube channels dedicated to comic books and games that never would have existed without the internet. They spur random bursts of product popularity. Something he’s been carrying for years might suddenly become a hot commodity because Walsh’s pro tip: a celebrity hypes it Get a business degree or at online, or a populeast take some business classes. It’s great to have passion— lar blogger turns necessary, really—but you have people onto it. to have some basic business Walsh has seen understanding or you’ll not surtrends come and vive long-term. go, most noticeably 218 Broadway St., 898-0550, batcomicsandgames.com in the realms of board games and comics. The former have evolved past the “I’m beating you or you’re beating me” style to more involving team efforts

Trent Walsh sees downtown as a vital segment of Chico’s economy, part of why he’s kept his store, BaT Comics & Games, in the district for 26 years. PHOTO BY MEREDITH J. COOPER

in accomplishing goals, he says. And while comics and graphic novels still make up the majority of his business, Walsh says they’ve gone from constituting about 60 percent to 65 percent of sales to 40 percent to 45 percent. “Literacy is much lower than it used to be,” he said. People would rather come in and buy T-shirts with comic book characters on them than the comic books themselves—because they’re just not that into reading, he says. “One of the things we do—and we do well—is we have a huge variety of stuff,” Walsh said, adding that he carries 30 distinct product lines in the store. “We try to have enough variety so if comics aren’t that popular for a while we hopefully have enough other stuff to make up for it. If you want to survive long-term, you have to be able to adapt to trends.” That adaptation applies to Walsh, too. When he first started, he was the demographic he hoped to reach. Now he finds he relies on his employees’ opinions on what’s cool. “I’m terrible at choosing ‘cute’ things,” he said as an example, pointing to a large plush unicorn he was preparing to put in the window display. “People wouldn’t necessarily think of us as selling plush toys—but we sell a ton of them. We’ve got to do whatever we can to get people in.” —MEREDITH J. COOPER me r e d i th c @ newsr ev iew.c o m MORE

ENTREPRENEURS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 4


52

99 years in BUsiness

LocaLLy Made

years in BUsiness

Green BUsiness

Square Deal MattreSS Factory

They make mattresses engineered to provide a superior night’s sleep, using proven craftsmanship, new sleep innovations and quality USA materials right here in Chico. Using a higher quality mattress means a higher quality sleep for you and your family—and a higher quality sleep equals a higher quality of life.

Gaumer’s Jewelry started out as an oldtime classic rock shop founded by a family of rockhounds and gold miners. In the 52 years since, Gaumer’s has evolved to include jewelry and jewelry services; rocks, minerals and fossils; and a mining and mineral museum to share with the public. Current owner Bill Gaumer is the third generation of the founding Guamer family to head up the business. Gaumer’s knowledgeable staff is honest and passionate about the beauty, quality and workmanship of the jewelry they make, and the jewelry they repair and restore for others. They have an artful eye for design, and they can create custom designs using their stones or stones customers bring in. Gaumer’s has three jewelers, allowing them to do their work in-house.

Gaumer’s carries a great selection of fine gold and silver jewelry, original handcrafted jewelry, semiprecious and precious stones, lapidary equipment and jewelrymaking supplies. The giftware portion of the business offers books, coasters, vases, unique decorative items and beautiful hand-crafted jewelry boxes. Come in and see this treasure in your community.

78 Belle mill road | red Bluff 530.527.6166 | www.Gaumers.com

1354 huMbolDt ave. | chico | 530.342.2510 www.SquareDealMattreSS.coM

15

41 years in business

Green BUsiness

Gaumer’s Jewerly

2 nD Generation loiS laSh, 3 rD Generation richarD laSh 4 th Generation JeSSica laSh & JaMie anDerSon FOR ALMOST 100 YEARS Square Deal Mattress Factory has been helping people get the rest they need to live the life they want. In 1920, Ennis Rife wanted to give people a “square deal” so he began Square Deal Mattress Factory & Custom Upholstery. In 1970, Richard Lash came to work for his Grandparents when he went to Chico State. In 1982, Ennis retired giving the business to his daughter, Lois Lash and grandson Richard. Upgrades were made to the mattress factory with new sewing machines, foam saws and quilters. In 2013, great granddaughters Jessica Lash and Jamie Anderson became “Dreamologists” carrying on the family’s legacy and traditions. Since then, Square Deal’s custom designs have attained a new level of firmness, consistency, breathability and durability that sets their products far apart.

LocaLLy Made

LocaLLy Made

years in BUsiness

LocaLLy Made

Green BUsiness

Dave & Kelly Gomez

carol munson owner

owners

It all started in the Fall of 1978 on the corner of 5th and Salem, that Carol Lynn Rhodes open her doors for the first time. Little did she know she would become a Chico landmark. Since then, her business has grown, made a lasting impression at the Fashion Market and has become a premier retailer of Eileen Fisher on the west coast. Carol’s passion and style has drawn and entertained lifelong customers. Carol’s influence extends into the next generation through her daughter Jennie. Who has the same passion for the business as her mother, she has become the ideal partner to continue the 5th Street Clothing legacy. Their partnership will ensure this local landmark will continue dressing women and changing lives for years to come.

For the past 15 years, David and Kelly Gomez have been committed to providing the freshest food and the finest service at their locally owned restaurant and catering company, Roots Catering and Restaurant.

With style, quality and customer service, 5th Street Clothing has the perfect selection to making your wardrobe just right. Follow us on Facebook and find us on BROADWAY!

328 Broadway | downtown chico | 530.345.5754 www.5thstreetclothing.com

They can they help you plan and execute the perfect event with their years of culinary expertise and appreciation for the best locally grown and produced food and products. In fact, David is a certified Executive Chef Roots will definitely make your job easy and through the American Culinary Federation and your guests happy with fabulous food and holds a Culinary of Arts degree from The Culi- incredible service! nary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY. “We went into this line of work for the love of food and the history and culture it carries with it! We enjoy the daily challenge and the satisfaction of making something delicious and authentic for someone. Our customers love that our food is not your normal catering fare, but dishes that are exceptional, on time and delivered with a smile.” said Kelly.

3221 esplanaDe ChiCo, Ca 95973 | 530.891.4500 rootsCaterinG.Com June 20, 2019

CN&R

23


20 years in business

LocaLLy Made

Repay-man

Nick ANdrew keviN riley Mike weAr

Build.com co-founder takes on nation’s student debt crisis

OwNers

Reopened for just a little over a year now, LaSalles has proven itself to still be a lively place where guests feel welcome and valued and are provided top-notch service. From an incredible list of specialty cocktails with fresh ingredients to an indulgent menu filled with the likes of short ribs, caprese flatbread, ahi poke nachos and more, patrons have fallen right back in love with this wonderful establishment. Yet, the creative American fare in this contemporary casual atmosphere isn’t all you get when it comes to LaSalles. Live music, friendly and attentive service, and a spacious patio with games and fire pits are all provided too. All the makings of a perfect location for larger group gatherings or to just grab a drink with a longtime friend. You can’t go wrong at LaSalles!

Pictured: Chef de Cuisine Travis Anderson, Assistant Manager Stephanie Templeton, General Manager Courteney Cox, Assistant Manager Zachary Bogart, Executive Chef Mike Hall, Sous Chef Connor Murphy

229 BrOAdwAy | chicO | 530.487.7207 www.lAsAlleschicO.cOM

D

64 years in business

Sierra Central Credit Union In 1955, Beale AFB Credit Union was established. Merging with Shasta Cascade Credit Union in 1963, Sierra Central Credit Union was formed. Beale AFB Credit Union served military personnel and Shasta Cascade served the lumber industry. After becoming Sierra Central Credit Union, a community-based credit union, the emphasis became focused on providing the best financial services at competitive rates to their members in their Northern California footprint. These members live, work or attend school in branch location counties.

Union is locally governed and managed, as all decisions are made by the individuals living in these northern communities. If you are looking for a friendly and helpful financial institution that provides a full range of financial services, check out Sierra Central Credit Union. A better banking option!

Now with 18 branches (soon to be 19!), their team of employees are committed to providing exceptional service on a daily basis and truly care about the needs of their members. Their team of nearly 200 employees all live and work in Northern California. In addition, Sierra Central Credit

Corporate HeadqUarterS | 1351 Harter pkwy | yUba City, Ca 95993 CHiCo branCH | 352 eaSt 1St St | CHiCo, Ca 95928 plUS 17 additional branCH loCationS | 1.800.222.7228 | www.SierraCentral.Com

24

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

avid Boctor was on the hunt for a good business opportunity, and that meant paying attention to the front page of The New York Times. Over and over again, he read articles about an apparently widespread studentdebt problem. “I find when a story continually shows up in a newspaper, and gets high visibility within that newspaper, there’s an indication that there’s a problem for a lot of people because, obviously, the readership is fascinated with this problem,” Boctor recently told the CN&R from his home in east Chico. “So, my job as an entrepreneur is to figure out, how do I take what is a social and national problem and figure out how that … manifest[s] itself as a personal/ individual problem that I can work on,” he added. Boctor’s pro tip: Cut to Monger.com. The only way you can have a Boctor, a cochance at being successful is founder of one of if you position yourself very strongly and very clearly. Chico’s leading That’s an important part of employers, the popugiving people a choice they lar home improvedon’t have. ment retailer monger.com Build.com, created Monger about four years ago. He describes it as an online retailer with a rewards program

designed specifically to help people pay off their student loans. Monger members can shop the website for everyday items such as soap, coffee and cereal, in addition to electronics, furniture and home improvement products, and earn points with their purchases. The points— one point equals 1 cent—are then converted into a monthly loan payment, which is sent to a lender. “Monger is … a very specialized company,” Boctor said. “It has a particular benefit that you can’t get at Amazon that matters—or can matter—to a very particular customer.” As he sees it, the student-loan problem isn’t related to the balances that people carry but rather the inability to make payments on those balances. About two-thirds of students who graduated from public and private nonprofit colleges in 2017 had student loan debt, owing an average of about $28,650, according to the Institute for College Access and Success. And currently, borrowers with federal direct loans in default total about 5.2 million, according to the U.S. Department of Education. “I determined that the most important part of creating any solution for student loan borrowers—to make their lives better—is going to involve payments,” Boctor


34 years in BUsiness

LocaLLy Made

Green BUsiness

BoB Ferrari owner David Boctor, co-founder of Build.com, has created an online retailer aimed at easing the burden of student loan payments. PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

said, “because ... it’s the point in which the problem actually occurs or shows itself.” Boctor, 43, grew up in

the Shadow Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles, playing soccer and football in high school while nurturing a love for science. He earned his bachelor’s in anthropology at UC Berkeley before enrolling in a computer science graduate program at Chico State, where he met classmate Chris Friedland. Together, Boctor and Friedland started a company called Faucet Direct, selling faucets online and incorporating the business in 2000. Faucet Direct, Boctor said, was his graduate project, though he never defended it before his professors and ultimately dropped out of school. The company, however, quickly grew over the next seven years and would eventually become Build.com. Friedland says he considers Boctor a visionary who is interested in chasing big problems and whose thinking can be years ahead of the pack. “I’m more a get-shit-done-now” type, Friedland said, adding, “I’m more pragmat-

“I determined that the most important part of creating any solution for student loan borrowers— to make their lives better—is going to involve payments.” —David Boctor

ic, and he’s a little more idealistic.” The combination worked for the pair, and they remain friends, Friedland said. Boctor said he and Friedland sold Build.com in 2007, with Boctor leaving the company about 18 months later flush with cash in a weakened economy. “At some point I opened my eyes and saw the real estate market had tanked,” he said. “I actually started doing some home improvements and flipping houses” but found many others had the same idea, resulting in too many people pursuing too few properties. That’s when Boctor shifted course. Instead of flipping homes himself, he began loaning money to investors doing their own flipping. “Essentially, I started loaning money to real estate speculators who were doing renovations on properties in Sacramento and Chico,” Boctor said. “I did the underwriting of those loans … the marketing of those loans and the servicing of those loans. And that’s the part I liked the most—the servicing, which is kind of boring, but I found it really fascinating.” He said he didn’t realize it at the time, but his work servicing loans would become a cornerstone of the business he’s continuing to build with Monger, which he says operates at a loss but is undergoing a transition toward becoming a type of company he believes does not currently exist—one that will be an advocate for a borrower, countering the efforts of loan servicers and lenders who “work together to essentially extract as much money out of a borrower as possible.” It could be quite lucrative, he said, if done right. Boctor says Monger will maintain a retail presence moving forward, but the intention is to grow beyond retail into a type of business that helps people come up with money to aggressively pay down loans and reduce the cost of borrowing. “I think what’s needed is another type of company whose fiduciary responsibility is to the borrower and acts as an expert—a financial expert—to essentially help the borrower make good decisions to make a loan as unprofitable as possible.” —ANDRE BYIK a nd re b @new srev i ew. c o m MORE

ENTREPRENEURS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 2 6

Bob Ferrari lived on $250 for a year, got married five weeks after meeting his future wife, hitchhiked into Redding at 26% unemployment, with little education and no job skills. Bob did anything, for any amount of money. The Ferraris delivered their youngest child in a cabin. Bob has climbed Pik Lenin, Mt. Ararat, Denali and others. Bob started the chimney business in 1984 with $60. Now his business includes five trucks, two locations, and a hearth store that employ ten people. Bob has held six certifications in the trade and is an an expert regarding your hearth.

White Glove provides expert cleaning and installation of wood, gas, and pellet burning appliances. They clean air ducts and clothes dryer vents, and install, repair, and service evaporative coolers. Their fireplace showroom will take your breath away. Gas and Kamado BBQs are in the yards of people who like to eat good food with good friends. Fire brings people together. Get yours at House of Fire.

Bob says, “My success is a stable, productive family who freely express love to one another. I’m married to the same girl. I’m lucky to have the energy and health to stand on the high places.”

3128 ThornTree Dr | ChiCo | 530.924.3164 www.whiTeGloveChimney.Com

32 years in business

Peter tichinin Broker AssociAte century 21 select reAl estAte Dre#00828481

Peter Tichinin has been a full time Chico Realtor since 1987. Last year, he joined the local respected team at Century 21 Select Real Estate to continue to serve his clients with strength and experience. He has a strong business background, excellent negotiating and contract skills, strong marketing capabilities and he has a great love of our area. Peter is eager to share with you his knowledge of the real estate market and what makes Northern California such a wonderful place to live.

“Market Strength and Transaction Experience”

Peter is very experienced and will guide you in making smart real estate decisions…and above all, he will never compromise his ethics or commitment to honesty. You will always know the upside as well as the downsides of a property so that you can make informed and smart decisions.

1101 el Monte Ave | 530.680.1900 Peter@chicohoMes.coM JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

25


26 years in business

“Wings of EaglEs”

Georgia Alvarez founded Wings of Eagles in June of 1993 in memory of her son Joseph Alvarez, who died of a rare form of leukemia at the age of 9 in 1991. Wings of Eagles has supported hundreds of families with seriously ill children in Butte, Glenn, Colusa, Tehama, Sutter and Yuba Counties over the last 26 years. Georgia’s drive and passion to help other families with seriously ill children came out of her own experience. “I know how they feel and what they need because I’ve been there. It’s the worst feeling in the world when you hear that your child has cancer.”

Cookie connection Georgia alvarez and Miranda DeVaLera

After 26 years of service to the community, Georgia will be stepping down, and Wings of Eagles will continue serving the community under the new guidance of Miranda DeVaLera as of July 1st. Miranda is married to Shane DeVaLera and they have three children and live in Chico. Miranda is currently enrolled at Chico State in the Masters program for Social Workers and will graduate in December.

Jen Burke bakes, sells small batches of masterfully decorated sugar cookies through home business

530.893.9231 | WWW.WingsofEaglEs.org P.o. Box 4031, ChiCo, Ca 95927

45 years in business

Rape CRisis inteRvention & pRevention Adults who experienced sexual violence as a child are not alone. No matter what, the abuse was not their fault. Adult survivors live with these memories for a long time. Some survivors keep the abuse a secret for many years. Often when people are in recovery, experience partner abuse or if their perpetrator dies, all of these unwanted feelings come flooding back. They may have tried to speak to an adult or felt there was no one they could trust when the abuse occurred. For these reasons and many others, the effects of child sexual violence can occur many years after the abuse has ended. There is no set timeline for dealing with, and recovering from, this experience.

big impact on the survivor. It is not always easy to know what to say, but you can help the healing process begin. Rape Crisis intervention and Prevention is the perfect resource and are always there to help and listen.

If someone you care about suffered sexual violence as a child your reaction can have a

Butte/Glenn: 530.891.1331 | tehama: 530.529.3980 24hR: 530.342.Rape | m-F 10a-6p exC. holidays www.RapeCRisis.oRG 26

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

E

very night around 8 p.m., after her kids are sound asleep, Jen Burke sneaks to her kitchen, pops on an episode of The Office and ties an apron around her waist. She’s ready to start baking. Burke officially launched her home business, Burke Cookie Co., in May, inspired by the cookie-decorating videos she watched while rocking her daughter to sleep at night. Before setting up shop, however, she started out by exploring her newfound hobby. In February, she began baking and decorating cookies for her family and coworkers at Enloe Medical Center’s Nettleton Mother & Baby Care Center. She wasn’t prepared for the explosive reaction: More and more people gushed over the treats and started making requests. That’s when she decided to take the leap and establish her own home business as a “side hustle.” Because she sells directly to consumers, Burke says, the process wasn’t too extensive or expensive: She looked up the city’s license requirements online, submitted an application, paid a few hundred dollars and was ready to go in about a week. Burke’s pro tip: “I got so much Go for it with your whole support and such heart … [but] be consistent in a good response what you’re producing. Don’t from people, that’s have lower standards just what kind of motibecause you’re [working] out of your home. vated me,” she said. facebook.com/burkecookieco “This makes people happy.” The allure of Burke’s cookies involves two key ingredients: a top-secret sugar cookie recipe and her immaculate, thoughtful designs.

Jen Burke, of Burke Cookie Co., works from the comfort of her own home, baking and decorating sugar cookies like these bridal shower treats. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

She specializes in small-batch (one or two dozen) custom orders, but always puts an original spin on her creations. “I’ve done all kinds of things, from uteruses to unicorns,” Burke told the CN&R. And for different occasions: bridal showers, birthday parties, gifts and holidays. “Every day is a cookie occasion,” she added. In general, her prices run about $36 per dozen, she said, but that varies depending on the order complexity. She’s been so busy, orders have to be placed two to three weeks in advance. All are picked up from her porch in north Chico. People often ask Burke how she finds the time to run her business. She’s at work by 6:30 a.m. five days a week, then has a few hours for dinner and play with her kids, Emily and Eli, before it’s time to bake until 11:30 p.m. Saturday is the family’s only full day together, but they make the most of it, going on day trips or visiting the farmers’ market and grabbing breakfast together. Burke’s husband, Josh, was diagnosed with ocular melanoma—this year marks the third with “no evidence of disease.” While this is a “huge milestone,” Burke said she still feels anxiety and worries about the future. Creating her cookies is a mindfulness practice that helps her cope. “Life is short. So you just gotta do the things you like,” she said. “Anything you can find like that, I feel you [should] just grab onto it. And there’s an added bonus … [I] make cookies out of it!” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

MORE

ENTREPRENEURS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 3 0


36 years in business

Children’s Community Charter sChool

LocaLLy Made

Cal NortherN SChool of law

The goal of Children’s Community Charter School (CCCS) is to incorporate voluntary parent participation on a small cohesive campus where teachers facilitate the students’ learning process with high academic expectations. The focus is on integrated curriculum emphasizing the knowledge needed to function in our CCCS offers a unique, tuition free educational diverse society. opportunity for students K-8. CCCS provides a balanced and integrated curriculum aligned to Here at CCCS we work as a team to help students develop skills and character traits that the California State Standards. will allow them to have a positive impact in •  SMALL CLASS SIZES  the world. We have high expectations aca•  SCIENCE demically and socially for all CCCS students. Our role as educators is to promote higher •  MUSIC  level thinking skills for students inside and out•  ART  side of the classroom. Embracing differences and expanding upon similarities is vital for •  HOMEWORK CLUB prosperity. Staff is dedicated, self-less, caring, •  AFTER SCHOOL CARE empathetic and prepared to do whatever it takes for students to achieve success. •  ELECTIVES

2346 Floral avenue | ChiCo, Ca 95926 ParadiseCCCs.org | 530.877.2227

For the past 36 years, Cal Northern School of Law (CNSL) has provided an affordable quality legal education to residents of the North State who may not have otherwise had the opportunity to attend law school. Both CNSL’s programs, the Juris Doctor and Master of Legal Studies offer a remarkable educational value. CNSL is not only essential to its students but also to the surrounding communities. Its campus provides a location for local bar association events and mediations and its students work throughout the community in law firms, district attorney’s offices and businesses. Its Self-Help Legal Clinic also assists members of the public who do not have access to an attorney with their family law, small claims and landlord/tenant cases.

tion to provide a free legal clinic to answer the myriad of legal questions facing those impacted by the Camp Fire. Volunteer attorneys assisted over 120 members of the community. While every volunteer left the clinic emotionally drained, it was wonderful to know that we were able to contribute to our community in this difficult time and provide a valuable service.

During the recent Camp Fire crisis, CNSL partnered with the Butte County Bar Associa-

1395 ridgewood drive, ChiCo 530.891.6900 | www.CalNortherN.edu

10 years in business

ElizabEth Vichi M.a ccc-SlP

Kristy Cowell owner and direCtor

Kristy Cowell has been in the world of education for quite some time. She started teaching preschool in 1976 and eventually began educating teachers in 2008 after completing her Masters Degree from Pacific Oaks College. Being a Montessori trained teacher as well, she made the decision to open Sunny Garden in October of 2010.

room and materials should be beautiful and inviting for children. This type of environment needs to be prepared by a trained teacher.

“Customers tell me all the time that they are so happy that Sunny Garden is available, because there is no other place in Chico where “Sunny Garden Montessori was a dream you can take a crawling child and just put that came from my Masters program. One them down and let them explore and learn. of my first jobs at Butte College was to teach Parents love the support they get from other the Parent Ed class where the students would come, with their child, to a preschool program parents and the expertise they get from me,” said Cowell. a couple times a week, as well as a lecture that would cover topics like toilet training and discipline once a week. When that program was canceled I saw the need for parents to have a place where they could spend quality time with their little ones and Sunny Garden was born,” said Cowell. Part of the Montessori philosophy is that the

play@sunnygardenChiCo.Com | sunnygardenChiCo.Com 530.343.3101 | 2801 godman ave. ChiCo, Ca 95973

Full Circle Speech Therapy is a private practice in Chico CA. Proudly serving the greater Butte and Tehama county areas, Full Circle Speech Therapy provides complete speech, language and swallowing evaluations and evidencebased treatments for the pediatric population ages 0-18 years of age. Each client of Full Circle becomes a member of our family of professionals including speech pathologist, occupational therapist and registered nutritionist. From an infant with feeding complications to a toddler with language delay or sensory processing delays, to the school-aged child with a speech impediment, Full Circle Speech Therapy is the community’s single location to access everything a child needs to increase overall development! Specialties include:

• Neonatal Oral Motor Assessment for Feeding Ages 0-3 Months All staff at Full Circle Speech Therapy are licensed and certified professionals bringing only the best in plan of care development and execution!

• Phonological Processing Disorder • Speech Delay/Articulation Disorder • Sensory Processing Disorder • Autism Spectrum Disorder • Pediatric Swallowing Disorders/Food Aversions 643 W. EaSt aVEnuE | chico, ca 95926 officE: 530.892.9127 | fax: 530.809.4881 | fullcirclESt@gMail.coM june 20, 2019

CN&R

27


41

30

years in business

years in business

DaviD Halimi

MiChael thoMas

& His WonDerful staff

owner

Diamond W Western Wear, an icon in Downtown Chico since 1978! Locally owned for 41 years, offering a lot more than Western Wear for the entire family. Diamond W has grown over the years to be Northern California’s largest full service Western Wear store by simply providing exemplary customer service with “Lowest Prices Guaranteed”. Inside Diamond W’s award winning two-story store, you will also find Pat’s Shoe & Boot Repair, in business since 1949, and Diamond Productions, producing quality events since 1978.The employees are like one big happy family and treat their customers as their extended family. David Halimi believes that if you want to be in business long-term, you need to think long-term. “We don’t look to make money on every transaction with a customer, we do whatever it takes to keep our customers happy and coming back.” Diamond W’s friendly and knowledgeable staff will take the time to find whatever you need and special order anything you want at no additional charge with 100% satisfaction guaranteed! Diamond W offers a lot more than just Western Wear for Men, Ladies, and Kids.

“Meet me at Tres!” These are four words that ensure a good time. Whether you’re meeting to eat, drink, or both you will be impressed. An excellent staff combined with consistently good, fair priced food ensure every visit is top notch. Their long bar is a favorite place to meet and their margaritas are consistently voted “Best of Chico” by CN&R readers. You can sample from the 120 premium tequilas beautifully displayed behind the bar, sit at the taco bar and watch your food being prepared, or enjoy the out-door patio and watch the vibrant down-town Chico scene cruise by. Tres Hombres is a great destination for a family night out or to celebrate a special occasion. With the newly added Blue Agave Room, a private banquet facility, you can host your own private event. With seating of up to 60 and its own private bar, celebrate that special birthday, rehearsal dinner or family reunion in fun and style.

181 e 2nD st | CHiCo | 530.891.1650 WWW.DiamonDWonline.Com

6 years in business

For over six years, The Handle Bar has been established as one of the go-to spots in Chico for a casual atmosphere, world class beer and great food. The popular south Chico hangout opened modestly but, quickly became a fixture in the local craft beer community, taking top honor as Best Watering Hole for Townies in its first three years! Brian and Carolyn continue to re-invest in the business, with a full remodel and expansion two years ago that brought more taps and a larger menu. The newest update, a full liquor license, allows them to now offer cocktails to their guests. With an eye to future development in the south of Chico the two have additional projects on the horizon, while remaining focused on exquisite beer, outstanding service and more options for patrons to explore…all with that same, great Chico vibe!

2070 e 20Th ST #160 | ChiCo | 530.894.Beer (2337) faCeBook.Com/handleBarChiCo

CN&R

Tres Hombres Long Bar & Grill...Chico’s premier restaurant for over 30 years.

1st & Broadway | downtown ChiCo 342.0425

21 LocaLLy Made

The handle Bar

28

Photo courtesy of Upgraded Living

J une 2 0, 2 0 1 9

years in business

Clinton & niCole owners earl’s Plumbing

“Plumbers are late (if they even show up at all!) It seems they charge you whatever they feel like, and if there is an issue with the work performed, good luck getting them back out!” This was the image that the Earls set out to change when they opened in the fall of 1998. The Earls believe that by looking at how they conduct business from their customer’s point of view, they can provide the absolute best plumbing experience. A live operator answers the phone 24/7 and appointments are scheduled in a two hour window, 92% of their customers receive same day service, all their technicians wear booties to protect your home, and a complete written quote is given before any work begins.

530.343.0330 |

“We are proud of our commitment to the environment and offer products and services geared toward energy efficiency.” With goals of complete customer satisfaction, and the health and well-being of their North State Community, the Earls are on the road to success.

www.earlsPlumbing.net


26

70

years in business

LocaLLy Made

years in business

Teresa Larson

Deanna Mccoy aca, Bc-HIS

reaLTor® DoubLe CenTurian

* auDIoproStHologISt, BoarD certIFIeD HearIng InStruMent SpecIalISt & HearIng aID DISpenSer

For years Teresa Larson has worked hard to provide Quality Service to all of her clients. This has always been one of the many things that she strives for, as well as the level of heartfelt caring for each person and each home that she is involved in. Real Estate changes continuously due to so many factors, for example this past year due to the Camp Fire. No one would ever had thought that something like this would happen to the degree that it did. Our market changed over night. As many of the people have found out, the prices have risen due to supply and demand. It is hard on Agents as well as Buyers to have this change. We don’t set the market. The market set’s itself by what is a buyer willing to pay for a home and that then changes the prices. It’s been hard on everyone to be in such a competitive market.

Teresa has been able to assist many of the Camp Fire Victims and her heart goes out to all. In the ever changing world of Real Estate, the one thing that should always remain as a constant is that Buyers and Sellers should have an Agent that cares about their needs, provides Quality Service, knows the market, works well with others and is a professional.

1101 eL MonTe avenue | ChiCo | 530.514.5925 www.ChiCoLisTings.CoM | bre #01177950

As owner of Chico Hearing Aid Center, Deanna McCoy proudly carries on the tradition of a family owned local business that has been “Changing Lives Through Better Hearing” since 1949. Deanna and her staff are focused on helping people enjoy the best hearing possible, which is why she offers the unique no deposit TryBefore-You-Buy program. This allows people to wear hearing aids adjusted to their needs in their normal environments to see how beneficial hearing aids can be, before they invest money in a purchase. As a Certified Audioprosthologist*, Deanna McCoy has completed a comprehensive course of upper level education in hearing instrument fitting, which far surpasses state requirements. She is active in state professional associations and continually

invests in additional education to stay at the forefront of her profession. With many technological advances, hearing aids have become more discreet, more sensitive, and more effective. There are also more options. After a thorough evaluation to see how you can benefit with hearing aids, and a lifestyle needs analysis, Deanna can find the right solution for each person. *By the American Conference of Audioprosthology

1600 Mangrove avenue, SuIte 160 | cHIco 530.513.6507 | www.cHIcoHearIngaIDcenter.coM

16 years in business

LocaLLy Made

ChiCo Dental arts Dr. Cyrus oster, Dentist Dr. DaviD Kyle, Dentist We love being able to change patients lives by giving them confidence with a radiant smile! Cosmetic & General dentistry has come a long way and today, is very affordable thanks to advances in both technology and dental techniques BOTH of which Chico Dental Arts brings to each and every patient.

Oster DDS are both graduates of the prestigious Loma Linda University School Of Dentistry graduating in the same dental class. They are both avid mountain bike racers and “enjoyed competing in 24 hour mountain bike races together” after graduation. They are compassionate and apply the Dr. Oster & Dr. Kyle are compassionate, experienced professionalism and expertise you would expect from Chico’s favorite dental group. dentists whose office provides cutting edge technology such as 3D imaging, same day crowns, Both doctors grew up in the business, as they have implants, periodontal services whitening, dentures, “family in the dental field” says Dr. Oster. Dr. Kyle, clear braces, veneers and more. a Chico native and Graduate of PV High School adds, “My father is a dentist, my mother is a dental One of the biggest benefits of Chico Dental Arts hygienist. We are a dental family”. is that there are two of Chico’s top dentist’s in one location. Dr David C. Kyle DDS and Dr. Cyrus G.

general dental services, look no further than Chico Dental Arts. We provide quality dental services in Chico. Our experienced dentists offer a wide array of dental care services. Our well-trained staff is committed to providing exceptional dental care in a friendly atmosphere.

Whether you are looking for cosmetic procedures or

2539 Forest ave, ChiCo | www.ChiCoDentalarts.Com | 530.342.6064 june 20, 2019

CN&R

29


81 years in BUsiness

Green BUsiness

Green BUsiness

The business of community

Kasey PulliamReynolds nathan Pulliam

Uncle Dad’s Art Collective enters nonprofit realm

owneRs Nathan Pulliam and Kasey Pulliam-Reynolds, owners of Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy, are the fourth generation carrying on a family tradition of serving up great homemade ice cream and candy. Nathan and Kasey credit their ability to multitask and juggle lots of treats at once as a key to their success. In the eighty one years Shubert’s has been in business, they’ve seen generations of customers come into the shop and make Shubert’s a part of their lives. Shubert’s makes their ice cream in the same machine Leonard C. Shubert started with in 1938, and to this day their ice cream is made with careful attention to quality. All of Shubert’s sweet treats are hand made with high quality products, many of them local. Much of the butter, cream, honey and nuts are purchased from family-

F owned farms surrounding Chico. The fourth generation plans to stay rooted in that same tradition while always keeping their eyes open for future opportunities. Come into the shop and make Shubert’s part of your family tradition!

C el eb ra ti ng

81 ye ar s!

178 east 7th st. 530.342.7163 | ChiCo mall 530.809.4151 www.shubeRts.Com

46 years in business

LOcaLLy Made

Green business

KirK’s Jewelry KirK Bengston - owner It all started in a tiny second story space on 3rd Street in Downtown Chico where the store originally opened in 1973. Founded by jeweler and metalsmith Kirk Bengtson, Kirk’s Jewelry started out as a one-man shop, but it didn’t stay that way for long. As his reputation and clientele grew, so did the need for more studio space. Kirk’s Jewelry relocated to its current location at the corner of 3rd and Salem Downtown Chico. Kirk’s Jewelry specializes in crafting custom engagement rings and wedding bands. They strive to exceed industry standards in ethical diamond and gemstone sourcing, and sustainable manufacturing practices by using recylced and re-refined precious metals.

Uncle Dad’s Art Collective Managing Director Josh Hegg. PHOTO BY KEN PORDES

Visit Kirk’s to find a stylish gift from their extensive jewelry collection or you can create acustom piece by re-purposing your gold and gemstones. To learn more, find them here instagram.com/kirksjewelry facebook.com/kirksjewelry email: info@kirksjewelry.com

Enter their recently remodeled gallery and you will find brilliantly colored gemstones and diamonds, unique, one of a kind engagement rings, wedding bands, pendants and earrings in every color and shape imaginable.

246 west 3rd street | ChiCo 891.0880 | www.KirKsJewelry.Com 30

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

or all of its notoriety as a vibrant arts community, Chico’s reputation as a place to make a living in the field is not so remarkable. Even popular artists and organizations—such as the Uncle Dad’s Art Collective—with respectable followings and consistently high-quality output are usually sustained more by artist passion than dependable cash flow. “[I was] still writing checks from my personal checkbook,” noted Josh Hegg— one of the Uncle Dad’s founders and its current managing director—when looking back at even the most recent productions. The high-profile shows that the collective of musicians, producers, dancers, actors and artists has put on have brought in crowds, but their scope—with dozens of performers and support staff staging multidiscipline events at Laxson Auditorium Hegg’s pro tip: (such as the re-creBefore you go down this road ation of Queen’s into the nonprofit arts world, ask yourself what your role A Night at the is. You really need to enjoy Opera) or the full watching other people sucorchestras of the ceed, [because] there’s not Small Town, Big much money in it. Sound concerts at uncledad.co the Sierra Nevada Big Room—meant margins were thin and spreading the proceeds was challenging. If Uncle Dad’s was going to move past its operating model of living project-to-project, it needed to become a nonprofit. The group took the first step toward long-term sustainability when it received official notice of its tax-exempt status from

the Internal Revenue Service in April. A tax-exempt designation means that a business isn’t required to pay federal income taxes, and that contributions to the group are tax-deductible for donors. It also means that Uncle Dad’s can apply for funding available to nonprofits. “I’m teaching myself how to write grants and how to research,” Hegg said. Uncle Dad’s received a lot of help with the process from local attorney Todd Amdor, who—after finding out the group wasn’t a nonprofit upon trying to make a donation—handled the submission of paperwork pro bono. It took about a year to get everything done—to write bylaws, assemble a board, and bring the grand scope of the Uncle Dad’s goals into focus. Those goals include continuing with its mission “to realize the artistic ideas of our members and collaborators in a way that makes significant positive impacts—artistically and fiscally— for the individual, the collective, and the community.” While being a nonprofit will benefit Uncle Dad’s future projects, Hegg says his personal goal is to lay the foundation for supporting the wider Chico-area arts community. “In my perfect world, Uncle Dad’s can help organize and fund creative ideas that people have in town,” he said. After he puts in the time learning about funding sources, and how to interact with the board as well as the community, Hegg hopes to be able to hand a guidebook of sorts to whoever needs it, so others don’t have to start from square one every time. “That way, it never burns out, ideally,” Hegg said. —JASON CASSIDY jaso nc @ newsr ev iew.c o m


42 years in BUsiness

LocaLLy Made

Green BUsiness

ChiCo News & Review The best news all week comes from one place only: The Chico News & Review. For over 40 years, the consistently award-winning newspaper of Chico has been the No. 1 place for in-depth reporting and stellar arts coverage in the North State. No other paper has been able to capture the magic of our community, and we at the News & Review pride ourselves on our ability to do just that. We are dedicated to making our community a better place to live; and with the most experienced reporting staff in the North State, we are not afraid to speak truth to power.

Donate • Shop • Volunteer Save 50-75% off building materials • Appliances • Doors • Building Supplies • Windows • Paint • So much more!

220 Meyers St Chico (530) 895–1271

The News & Review recognizes that our readers are well-educated, outspoken and involved in our community. We provide a platform for all community voices to be heard and are a smart and entertaining read. We are passionate about providing informative and engaging coverage of grassroots issues, and continue to be a trusted member of our North State community. Readers turn to us to find out not only what is going on in our area, but also how they can get involved. We are the largest-circulated newspaper north of Sacramento and the most-read print publication in the area – with an average readership of roughly 110,000 adults. We dominate this market with readers ages 18-74, making us the most cost-effective option for businesses and organizations to partner with for advertising and marketing themselves. Whether it’s our arts and entertainment coverage, or our investigative reporting, the News & Review is a vital source of information for the North State, and the most effective medium for advertising.

353 e. 2Nd stReet, ChiCo Co | 530.894.2300 NewsReview.Com | CNRsweetdeals.NewsReview.Com june 20, 2019

CN&R

31


Arts &Culture THIS WEEK

Pop-song activism with L.A.’s WASI

B

e yourself. Easy, right?

Merilou Salazar and Jessie Meehan, leaders of WASI, the L.A.-based, selfproclaimed “riot-pop” group, know that realizing one’s identity can be a challenge. In fact, it’s the theme running through their just-released album—also named Riot Pop—a series of synth-pop songs propelled by bright beats and dark lyrics. The peppy feel of the music contrasts the personal challenges the album addresses, as if to bring positive energy when things by seem impossible. Robin Bacior “The foundation is definitely Preview: dark—that’s where Love Is Gay Tour, the feelings truly featuring WASI, come out—but the Polartropica, communication is and Lucy and La Mer. optimistic,” Salazar Plus, Scout. Wednesday, said in a recent June 26, 7:30 p.m. interview. “I think $8-$10 donation that’s also how we requested are as individuals, The Maltese and that’s what’s 1600 Park Ave. kept us in pursuit 343-4915 of art and music facebook.com/ themaltese for so long. Things are chaotic inside and out, but it’s our optimism as a couple and in our community that keeps things fresh for us.” The new album’s first single, “Run,” bears this out with a hurried dance beat and stressed-out lyrics about trying to find one’s place in a chaotic world. Yet in the song’s bridge, there’s shelter from the storm: “We are here for each other/ Together we create a space to make/a better place.”

20

THU

Special Events Merilou Salazar (left) and Jessie Meehan of WASI. PHOTO BY KAT CONTRERAS

Salazar and Meehan met in high school, playing in a band called the Midol Poppers, followed by various musical projects. In 2014, they decided to fuse their ideas together into a pop package. They transformed their electronic project, We Are She Is, shortened the name to WASI, and crafted a slew of synthy, somewhat punky sing-along anthems—across a trio of EPs—that dealt with themes of coming of age (“Adolescence”), personal identity (“And the World”), and gender equality (“Pussy Grabs Back”). “We come from a place where it’s always been hard to fit in, be it our music or the scene—you’re not enough of this to play at this venue, you’re not enough of that to play at that venue—so that’s kind of what stemmed our ideas of creating our own kind of spaces,” Salazar said. In celebration of the new record, WASI will come through Chico as part of the three-band Love Is Gay tour, which is moving in tandem with Pride celebrations throughout the West Coast. “When we play shows we try to make it more than, ‘Here’s the live show of a band,’ but we try to make it a whole experience,” Salazar said. “Taking Love Is Gay to that level for us was kind of

natural. For myself, it’s been creating a world you wanna exist in, [even] if that’s just a show for four hours.” Over the last several years, the two have become active in the queer community— Salazar as a co-founder of the Women Fuck Shit Up Fest, and Meehan partnering with the ACLU to create gender-neutral bathrooms at Walgreens nationwide. While this type of action is born of strength, there is a vulnerability that remains, something the duo try to honor. “Vulnerability is such a thing [on] social media, but there’s also so much tied to that we forget about,” Salazar said. “I [recently] posted on my personal Instagram [about] coming out being the hardest thing. I got really sweet feedback— ‘you’re great’—but it still doesn’t capture how hard the past year was. Because our culture is progressing I had to, for myself, acknowledge, ‘Fuck, I need to be out and I need to be proud.’ “I think that only added to more mental health vulnerability I was dealing with. I think the mental health conversation tied to the activism is a big theme WASI tries to capture. There’s so much inner personal trauma that this album tries to acknowledge. We’re moving forward, but it doesn’t mean that everything is solved.” Ω

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Local produce, fresh flowers, music, arts and crafts, and food trucks. Thu, 6/20, 6pm. Downtown Chico. 345-6500. downtownchico.com

Theater DAMN YANKEES: Classic romantic comedy about baseball and a deal with the devil. Thu, 6/20, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

PULP: Noir mystery by Joseph Zettelmaier about a private investigator who has taken on the strangest case of his life. Directed by Jerry Miller. Thu, 6/20, 7:30pm. $10-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

21

FRI

AYURVEDIC TEA CEREMONY: Experience a sattvic herbal purification with immersion in mantra yoga and breathwork practices for natural stress relief, integrative healing, and cultivation of inner peace. Fri, 6/21, 7pm. $20. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

STREET PARTY Friday, June 21 Museum of Northern California Art

SEE FRIDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

32

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE BOB’S COMEDY SHOW

23

Saturday, June 22 The Maltese

SUN

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Special Events CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT: Gather a team and play for prizes. Sun, 6/23, 12:30pm. The Commons

CHICO MALL FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT: Summer movie

Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

series presents the newest Jumanji, with Jack Black. Shows near Dick’s Sporting Goods; bring low-back chairs and blankets. Fri, 6/21, 7pm. Free. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St. Ste. 727. 343-0706.

Music LOVE HARMONY TOUR: Soul-pop singers Andrea Desmond and Melanie Taylor perform. Sun, 6/23, 3pm. Secret Trail Brewing Co., 132

FORK IN THE ROAD: Food trucks, drinks and live music by The Tiki Lounge Lizards. Fri, 6/21, 5:30pm. DeGarmo Park, 199 Leora Court.

Meyers St., Ste. 120.

Yoga with 108 sun salutations, food, drinks and a DJ. Fri, 6/21, 5pm. Hatha House, 707 Wall St.

Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

TIM MCKEE AND LARRY PETERSON: Full band with horns plays that old school sound. Sun, 6/23, 2pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

NO COST/LOW COST DROP-IN HEALING CLINIC: Donation-based health care offering ear needles, Moxa pressure and acupressure/massage therapy. Fri, 6/21, 11am. Chico Kodenkan, 254 E. First St.

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to share, an acoustic instrument, your voice, a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested. Fri, 6/21, 5pm. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

STREET PARTY: An art party outside the museum, with activities for all ages, plus food and drinks for purchase. Fri, 6/21, 6-9pm. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

22

SAT

Special Events AN EVENING WITH CHICO LIVE IMPROV COMEDY: Chico’s newest and brightest improv group live at the cafe. Get your tickets early! Sat 6/22, 8pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

ANNIE’S BIRTHDAY TEA: Elegant tea party with

Music KYLE WILLIAMS: Music in the Hop Yard by local singer/songwriter. Fri, 6/21, 4:30pm. Sierra Nevada Brewery, 1075 E. 20th St.

ORQUESTA AKOKÁN: Legendary mambo ensemble from Havana perform on the Big Room stage. Fri, 6/21, 7:30pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Theater DAMN YANKEES: See Thursday. Sat, 6/22, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

PULP: See Thursday. Fri, 6/21, 7:30pm. $10$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

HAM RADIO FIELD DAY Saturday, June 22 Chico Masonic Family Center

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

seatings at 11:30am and 2:30pm. Proceeds benefit education and interpretation at Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park. Sat 6/22, 11:30am. $45. Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park, 525 Esplanade.

BLOCK PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: Communitysupported cleanup of Comanche Creek hosted by the Butte Environmental Council. Snacks and coffee provided. Sat 6/22, 9am. Comanche Creek, E. Park Ave and Midway (Comanche Creek Greenway Parking Lot).

BOB’S COMEDY SHOW: Features headliner Xander Beltran and opener John Gab, both from SF. Kerri Bell, Dillon Collins, and Jace also perform, Lo & Behold provides the tunes. Sat 6/22, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

HAM RADIO FIELD DAY: Golden Empire Amateur Radio Society (GEARS) hosts celebration of old-school radio. Ham operators will have a demonstration station for visitors and will provide information on how to become

Theater a radio operator. Contact Jim Matthews at 521-1412 or visitgearsw6rhc.org for more info. Sat 6/22, 12pm. Chico Masonic Family Center, 1110 W. East Ave.

RUN WITH THE LAW: 5K or 1-mile run benefiting Butte County Sheriff’s Office employees who were victims of the Camp Fire. Visit butte countycoa.com/about/run-with-the-law-5k to register. Sat 6/22, 8am. Bidwell Park.

Music SOUL POSSE: Music festival with local cover band playing danceable hits from yesterday and today. There will be food, drinks and more bands, proceeds benefit veterans. Sat, 6/22, 12pm. $10. Chico Elks Lodge, 1705 Manzanita Ave.

DAMN YANKEES: See Thursday. Sun, 6/23, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

PULP: See Thursday. Sun, 6/23, 2pm. $10-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 877-5760. totr.org

24

car rally will be making an overnight stop in town. Teams and cars come from Japan, England, Germany, Canada and the U.S. Mon, 6/24, 5pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

Music hits town on special Rarities & Requests tour. Lovesick singer/songwriter Christian Lee Hutson opens. Mon, 6/24, 8pm. $20-$25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

25

TUE

Special Events COVER CROPS AND SOIL HEALTH INTENSIVE: See Monday. Tue, 6/25, 8pm. $25-$50. Chico State University Farm, 311 Nicholas C. Schouten Lane.

26

WED

MON

Special Events

Special Events

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken

COVER CROPS AND SOIL HEALTH INTENSIVE: Chico Center for Regenerative Agriculture hosts Christine Jones for a two-day workshop on regenerative soil practices. A panel of local

word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 6/26, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 38

STEVE JOHNSON: Fingerstyle guitarist plays light rock, country and more for brunch. Sat, 6/22, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. 3454128. lasalleschico.com

THE GREAT RACE 2019: The world’s premiere old

OKKERVIL RIVER: Quintessential indie rock band

SPARE QUARTERS: Groovy jazz quartet plays for vegan brunch. Sun, 6/23, 11am. Tender

HATHAFEST 2019: Celebrate International Day of

innovative farmers joins the discussion. Call (925) 768-8686 to register. Mon, 6/24, 8am. $25-$50. Chico State University Farm, 311 Nicholas C. Schouten Lane.

EDITOR’S PICK

Theater DAMN YANKEES: See Thursday. Sat, 6/22, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

PULP: See Thursday. Sat, 6/22, 7:30pm. $10$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

WITCHES?! IN SALEM!?: Preview performance of Inspire School of Arts and Sciences’ 2019 Edinburgh Festival Fringe entry. Two real witches find themselves in Salem, Massachusetts in the year 1692. Comedy ensues. Sat, 6/22, 7:30pm and 9:30pm. $20. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

BANDA GIGANTE FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Orquesta Akokán (Yoruba for “from the heart”) is the name of both a band and an album that have taken the world of contemporary tropical music by storm. Currently on Daptone Records, this extraordinary mambo ensemble from Havana includes some of Cuba’s finest musicians and harkens to the big brass bands of the 1940s and ’50s with a sound described by NPR as “a groove as intense as a runaway train.” Take a trip to the Tropicana Club this Friday (June 21), when these Grammy-nominated masters of wind and rhythm heat up the Sierra Nevada Big Room stage. JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

33


FINE ARTS

This guy saves you money.

Volunteers needed Become a state certified trained sexual assault

MEMBERS’ SHOW 2019

counselor for Butte, Glenn and Tehama counties !

Shows through July 14 1078 Gallery

We accept CSUC interns and Butte College Work Study

Art

SEE ART

1078 GALLERY: Members Show 2019, each member gets 2-by-2 square feet of wall space to show their work. Reception and gallery’s 38th birthday celebration on Saturday, June 22, from 6-8pm. Through 7/14. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

Training Schedule

BEATNIKS COFFEE HOUSE & BREAKFAST JOINT: Portrait and Figure Drawing Group

Tues & Thur 6-10pm, Sat 9am-5pm for 4 consecutive weeks

Art Show, drawings and paintings on display by Chico Art Center artists. Through 6/28. 1387 E. Eighth St.

*Pre-Interview is required. Space is limitied

Butte/glenn: 530-891-1331 Tehama: 530-529-3980 24hr CriSiS line: 530-342-raPe (7273) Collect Calls accepted 34

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

exhibit of 12-by-12-inch artworks. Through 6/28. 450 Orange St.

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Call for more informaTion regarding our nexT Training CourSe

CHICO ART CENTER: Small Works, jury-free

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography by late Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 7/19. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: California’s Girl of the Golden Sunshine, Tehama County Arts Council presents retrospective exhibit of late California artist Babette Fickert Dowell’s work. Through 7/6. 710 Main Street, Red Bluff, 391-3259.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Map It Out, exhibition of Northern California artists presenting works on the theme of maps. Works represent Chico, the Bay Area and Northern California. Through 7/28. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Triple Exposure Crosscurrents, photography exhibit features artists James Canter, Stephanie Luke and Harvey Spector. Through 7/20. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. 400 W. First St.


june 20, 2019

CN&R

35


Good Food, GReAt enteRtAinMent,

GRAnd tiMe!

Delicious Hot Wings & Nachos! 2-7pm Happy HouCrooRS LiGHt & $3 WeLLS d LiGHt &

$2 dRAFt Bu

mon 1672 A Ham

le Road, ton Smartvil

89 Next to 530-443-20

Mar ysville

owgirls City Limits Sh

on

35%

sweet meals! Roots

15th Street Café

You pay $6.50

You pay $5.00

$10 Value

Buy online anytime with a credit card or in person with cash, check or credit card M-F 9am – 5pm at 353 E. Second Street, Downtown Chico.

off

$

10

ERING S CAT ROOT URANT TA & RES LANADE ESP 3221 , CA, 95973 O CHIC .4500 91 530.8

Sections Civil Code California ounts and ording to disc expire acc used with other dit. does not be cre tificate and able for cash. Can given as store cer gift be a redeem This is nge will 749.6. Not for gratuity. Cha d 1749.45-1 not be use offers. Can

$10 Value

50%

GIFT CERTIFICATE

off

15TH STREET CAF E 1414 PARK AVE SUITE 120 | 530 .809.1087

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

This is a gift certificate and does not Can be used with other discounts expire according to California Civil Code Sections 1749.45-1 and offers. Cannot be used 749.6. Not redeemable for for gratuity. Change will be cash. given as store credit.

10

3x3 2.20.19

You

should be getting it

once a

week.

newsreview.com 36

CN&R

June 20, 2019


SCENE

? t e P e Cut Divine union

Stained-glass maker honored for Vina windows

Prove it!

The stained-glass windows were installed at New Clairvaux last summer. PHOTO BY RON SCHWAGER

SClairvaux, 1989, she attended a retreat at the Abbey of New the Cistercian monastery 25 miles to the

hortly after Elizabeth Devereaux moved to Chico, in

north, in Vina. The leader of the retreat was Father Paul Mark Schwan, who since then has become the monastery’s abbot. by Robert Speer It was the beginning of a decadeslong friendship that has led to rober tspeer@ Devereaux’s creation of a magnifinewsrev i ew.c om cent set of stained-glass windows at New Clairvaux. Earlier this month Learn more: she journeyed to Las Vegas for the For more about annual convention of the American Devereaux Architectural Institute of Architects, where she Glass, go to devglas. com. For more on the garnered a prestigious award for her Abbey of New Clairvaux, windows in the category of religious including its tour art and architecture. schedule, go to The windows are the finishing newclairvaux.org. touch on a project more than 25 years in the making—the reconstruction of an 800-year-old monastery using, to a considerable extent, stones from that same long-abandoned Trappist monastery in northern Spain. The story of how newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst purchased the stones, brought them to San Francisco, decided not to use them and dumped them behind the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park has been told many times, in this newspaper and elsewhere. The stones—originally part of a chapter house—lay there for more than 40 years, until Father Thomas Davis, a monk then living at a Cistercian (Trappist) monastery in Kentucky, determined to use them in building a new church at the Vina abbey. (Father Thomas later became the monastery’s abbot.) It was a monumental undertaking involving the participation of many people—German stone carvers, British and Spanish historians, American architects and, at the end, the members Elizabeth Devereaux of Devereaux’s art PHOTO BY MELANIE MACTAVISH

glass team, Owen Gabbert, Kyle Campbell and Chris Tallant, who installed the windows in July 2018. (For more about Devereaux, whose career spans 45 years and includes more than 200 commissions, see “The mysticism of light,” in the Nov. 13, 2012, issue of the CN&R.) The finished windows are marvelous to behold. The church itself is a stunning building, with its trans-vaulted ceiling that seems to soar into space. The addition of subtly placed ambient lighting cast upon the huge stone pillars gives the room even greater depth, but the pièce de résistance is the set of three tall and narrow—and brilliantly colorful—windows on the room’s east side, above and behind the abbot’s chair. The windows have symbolic weight, Devereaux says. The bottom section is amber colored, representing the brothers’ prayers. As the prayers rise up, the glass begins to clear, such that the top section is completely translucent, representing union with God. Because the monks—there are now 16 of them, Father Paul said—worship both day and night, Devereaux added reflective 24-karat gold luster to the glass so that the windows glow even when the sun is down. They’re also positioned to catch first light in the morning, when the brothers are at prayer. The church is a meditative space where the emphasis is on silence and prayer. Next to it, on its west side, is the light-filled atrium, which serves as a courtyard of sorts where worshipers can gather for conversation. Floor-to-ceiling windows look out on the fields of walnuts, grapes (for the monastery’s signature line of wines) and other income-producing crops. Altogether, Devereaux created five other windows for the church complex’s various rooms. Thematically they refer back to the three windows in the church proper, but they also are designed to be functional—which means they let in a lot of light. On a tour of the church with Devereaux and Father Paul, I asked whether he had put the windows project out to bid. “Oh, no,” he said. “We always knew it would be Elizabeth.” Ω

Visit Chico News & Review’s Facebook page and reply to the pet-contest post with a photo of your fur baby and get your friends to “Like” your pic!

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: JUNE 27, 9 A.M.

facebook.com/ChicoNewsandReview

join our

team

Cn&r is Looking For • advertising ConsuLtant • distribution driver

the Chico news & review is a family owned business that has been part of the Chico community since 1977. our mission is to publish great newspapers which are successful and enduring, create a quality work environment, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

For more inFormation, visit www.newsreview.Com/ChiCo/jobs

equal opportunity employer

JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

37


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 6/20—WEDNESDAY 6/26 party for Nor Cal garage rock band. Local musicians The Exclusionaries, Garret Gray, and Chris Miller share the bill. Fri, 6/21, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

BASSMINT: Fridays, Peking Restaurant bar hosts bass music DJs and producers. Fri, 6/21, 9:30pm. $5. BassMint, 243 W. Second St.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Fun local roots and reggae band Triple Tree. Fri, 6/21, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

MISS LEO TRIO Tonight, June 20 Tender Loving Coffee SEE THURSDAY

20THURSDAY

MISS LEO TRIO: TLC Thursdays presents fun bluegrass string band from San Luis Obispo. Thu, 6/20, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

OVERDRIVE: Playing a variety of ’70s

1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

YARN: Brooklyn-based alt-country rock group performs, local multi-genre improvisational band The Ascenders open. Thu, 6/20, 9pm. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. facebook.com/lostonmain

and ’80s rock for late night happy hour. Thu, 6/20, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat with a rotating list of DJs spinning all vinyl til late. Thu, 6/20, 8pm. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

WILLIAM IRWIN: Chill tunes, drinks and

food. Thu, 6/20, 6pm. The Exchange,

21FRIDAY

ALEX VINCENT: Live music from singer/ songwriter. Fri, 6/21, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

ALVORD BROTHERS: Record release

ATTENTION DOWNTOWN CHICO BUSINESSES: Your Guide to All Things Downtown

CHICO’S DOWNTOWN DIRECTORY

Filled with complete listings for shopping, dining, and specialty services, this easy-to-carry compact guide helps our community navigate the cultural and business hub of Chico.

HERD ON THIRD: Local band playing songs from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s with a blues and jazz influence. Fri, 6/21, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham. almendrawinery.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: Easy dinnertime tunes. Fri,

6/21, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

KYLE WILLIAMS: Music in the Hop Yard

by local singer/songwriter. Fri, 6/21, 4:30pm. Sierra Nevada Brewery, 1075 E. 20th St.

LOOKING 4 ELEVEN: Popular local classic rock band plays the box. Fri, 6/21, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign up at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 6/21, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 966-8342.

ORQUESTA AKOKÁN: Legendary mambo ensemble from Havana perform on the Big Room stage. Fri, 6/21, 7:30pm. $25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada. com

PULP: See Thursday. Fri, 6/21,

7:30pm. $10-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise, 8775760. totr.org

OLD SCHOOL/NEW SCHOOL

Duffy’s Tavern hosts a Nor Cal punk reunion of sorts this Friday (June 21) with local rockers Severance Package and the Oakland-based Smokers (pictured)—members of both bands were founders of ’90s hardcore legends Black Fork, which ruled the East Bay punk scene from 1994 to 1998. Local experimental band Guest No. 66 will join the party for a hot night of wild sounds.

SMOKERS: Former members of East Bay punk band Black Fork perform, local legends Severance Package and newcomers Guest No. 66 share the bill. Fri, 6/21, 9pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SOUTH 65: Country/rock kickabilly band playing the hits and taking requests. Fri, 6/21, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

STEEL BREEZE: Party cover band performs hit songs from the ’70s, ’80s ‘and ’90s. Fri, 6/21, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

22SATURDAY

AEROMYTH: Aerosmith cover band

brings the sweet emotion. Sat, 6/22, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino &

Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

BOB’S COMEDY SHOW: Features headliner Xander Beltran and opener John Gab, both from SF. Kerri Bell,

We Need

Dillon Collins, and Jace also perform, Lo & Behold provide the tunes. Sat, 6/22, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: Easy dinnertime tunes. Sat,

6/22, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Jon and

Chris play your requests. Sat, 6/22, 9pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

artists! the Cn&r Artbox Proje ProjeCt is looking for creative minds to transform our newsracks into functional works of art.

2019/2020 edition hits the stands July 19. To place an ad in the Downtown Directory please contact your CN&Radvertising representative today: 530-894-2300 Want to make sure you are listed? Contact Katie Valenzuela, DCBA Membership Services Director at 345-6500 or katie@downtownchico.com 353 E. Second Street, Chico 530-894-2300 www.newsreview.com 38

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

Contact mattd@newsreview.com to find out more!


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 32

25TUESDAY

PAT HULL & CAT DEPOT

PAT HULL ACOUSTIC HOUSE SHOW: Annual house show with

Tuesday, June 25 1735 Elm St.

local master of song and sound. Guitar wizard Cat Depot shares the bill. Tue, 6/25, 7pm. $10. pathull houseshow4.brownpapertickets. com

SEE TUESDAY

TRIVIA WITH JOCALI: Teams, questions, Music by This Valve Controls and Organ Donor (aka DMT). Sun, 6/23, 8:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

MOBILITIES: Four-piece experimental rock band from Portland joined by local rockers Sunny Acres and Little Black Cloud. Sun, 6/23, 7:30pm. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a KYLE WILLIAMS: Soulful singer

shares stories and songs. Sat, 6/22, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery Street, Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

PATIO DANCE PARTY: An evening of dancing with a live DJ to benefit Chico Pride. Sat, 6/22, 10pm. $2. B Street Public House, 117 Broadway St.

SURF NOIR KINGS: Hang loose for an evening of original surf music featuring Miles Corbin, Robert Karch, and more. Sat, 6/22, 7pm. Wine Time,

26 Lost Dutchman Dr., 521-6473.

ZEPPARELLA: All-female Led Zepplin tribute band from SF performs. Local hard-rockers Up to 11 open. Sat, 6/22, 9:30pm. $18-$20. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave. jmaxpro ductions.net

23SUNDAY

CHOPPING BLOCK VOL. 1: A night of

beats and rad local artwork for sale.

bit? See if it’s a hit or heckleworthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Sign ups start at 8pm. Sun, 6/23, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

24MONDAY

OKKERVIL RIVER: Quintessential indie rock band hits town on special Rarities & Requests tour. Lovesick singer/songwriter Christian Lee Hutson opens. Mon, 6/24, 8pm. $20$25. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

Your Neighborhood Place for Coffee, Food & More

~

Featuring Specialty Coffees Pastries Breakfast & Lunch Local Wines and Craft Beers

26WEDNESDAY HEATHER MICHELLE: Soulful singer/

songwriter returns to Chico, supported by Portland indie-folk artist Laura May and local musician Jeff Coleman. Wed, 6/26, 7:30pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave.

LOVE IS GAY TOUR: Pride celebration featuring music by WASI Polartropica, and Scout. LGBTQ riot-pop DJ dance party follows, $1 per ticket goes to Stonewall Alliance Chico. Wed, 6/26, 7:30pm. $8-$10. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

MYSTERIES AND MISCHIEF: Magic and mentalism night with Dean Waters and Stephen Chollet. Be prepared to laugh and have your mind blown. Wed, 6/26, 7pm. $15. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

be DJ? Come to the Downlo and spin a set. All you need is a USB drive or a laptop with the music you want to play. Wed, 6/26, 9pm. DownLo, 319 Main St., 487-1050.

OPEN MIC COMEDY: Your weekly Wednesday dose of free comedy with experienced and first-time comedians. Sign ups start at 8pm. Wed, 6/26, 9pm. Studio Inn

Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken word hosted by Bob the Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 6/26, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

STEVE COOK, JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON: Soulful sounds for

dinner. Wed, 6/26, 6pm. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd.

PRIDE POWER

Chico Pride week (Aug. 22-25) is right around the corner and the prep has begun. This week there are two benefit events to raise money for Stonewall Alliance Chico. B Street Public House hosts a Patio Dance Party on Saturday (June 22) with a live DJ and The Maltese will be hosting a Love Is Gay concert on Wednesday (June 26) with live music by Polartropica, WASI and Scout, followed by a DJ dance party. Get pumped!

Sign up for our newSletter. get 10% off.

Café

visit CnrSweetdealS.newSreview.Com

15th Street

beer. Sign up at 6:30pm, starts at 7pm. Tue, 6/25, 6:30pm. Chico Taproom, 2201 Pillsbury Road, Ste. 114. thechicotaproom.com

OPEN DECKS NIGHT: So you’re a wanna-

7am to 3pm Monday through Saturday 8am to 2pm Sunday 1414 Park Ave, Ste 120 Chico 530-809-1087 ~ JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

39


REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week Anna

The latest from writer/director Luc Besson (The Professional, Lucy, La Femme Nikita) is about a Russian supermodel (Sasha Luss) turned elite government assassin. Also starring Helen Mirren and Cillian Murphy. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Child’s Play

A remake of the 1998 cult-classic slasher flick about the murderous doll named Chucky, voiced in the reboot by Mark Hamill. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

The Dead Don’t Die

The latest from writer/director Jim Jarmusch (Dead Man, Mystery Train) is a zombie flick about a small town that’s suddenly overrun by the undead. The impressive cast includes Bill Murray, Adam Driver, Chloë Sevigny, Tilda Swinton, Steve Buscemi, Selena Gomez and Danny Glover, among many others. Feather River Cinemas, Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Mind eraser

Toy Story 4

The whole computer-animated gang is back—including Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) and Bo Peep (Annie Potts)—for a new adventure with a new homemade toy pal named Forky. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated G.

Men in Black reboot goes nowhere

M

en in Black: International is a wasted opportunity, an admirable attempt to restart things with a new cast that misses most of its marks. Replacing Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones are Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson, playing Agents H and M, respectively. H by is the bold, brash, superhot agent Bob Grimm who, along with Agent High T (Liam Neeson) of the London MIB bg r i mm@ newsrev i ew.c om branch, saved the world from an evil alien force called the Hive. M is a new recruit, having found MIB’s secret headquarters after years of searching. As Men in Black: a child, M witnessed an alien International encounter (and saw her parents Starring Tessa getting their minds erased by MIB Thompson, Chris Hemsworth and Emma agents), which sparked a curiosity Thompson. Directed by that leads her to Agent O (Emma F. Gary Gray. Cinemark Thompson), who gives her a 14, Feather River chance to help save the world as a Cinemas. Rated PG-13. probationary agent. Tessa Thompson is great in anything she does, including this. She brings a fun energy to the role, plus a slight wiseass edge. Hemsworth is a performer who seems to like himself a little too much, but still manages to be likeable. The two proved they worked well together in Thor: Ragnarok, and while it is fun to see them sharing the screen again, it’s a little baffling what the script puts them through. Matt Holloway and Art Marcum, two of the many writers on the original Iron Man, take a hack at sending the duo on a global adventure. After a fairly

2

40

CN&R

JUNE 20, 2019

strong start, the action, presented by director F. Gary Gray (Straight Outta Compton), devolves sloppily into boredom. Each passing location—Paris, Italy, Marrakesh—takes the story nowhere, and scenery changes serve only to disguise the fact that the film has no purpose. A “mole in MIB” subplot doesn’t add much mystery, and the finale in Paris (after an opening in Paris) offers few surprises and no thrills. The movie ends with a big “Huh?” The special effects are pretty good, with a few new aliens, most notably a little one named Pawny (voiced by Kumail Nanjiani), bringing sporadic fun. I also got a kick out of a mini alien posing as a beard on some dude’s face. This project was originally supposed to be a crossover with the Jonah Hill/Channing Tatum 21 Jump Street franchise. I’m guessing Warner Bros. soured on the notion of turning MIB into too much of a comedy, figuring they could reboot and regenerate revenue on the franchise by staying within its own established universe. They figured wrong. A Men in Black comedy with Hill and Tatum would’ve had tons of potential. This one is a dud. Between Men in Black, Godzilla and Dark Phoenix, the big-budget franchises have so far been a disappointment this summer movie season. Ω

1 2 3 Poor

Fair

Good

4 Very Good

5 Excellent

Now playing Aladdin

Guy Ritchie (Sherlock Holmes, Snatch) wrote and directed this live-action adaptation of the classic Middle Eastern folk tale starring Naomi Scott as Princess Jasmine, Mena Massoud as impoverished thief Aladdin, and Will Smith as the genie who can make wishes come true. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

The Biggest Little Farm

A gorgeously shot documentary that follows a young married couple over the course of eight years as they leave city life behind and move to the country to try and start a farm and live in harmony with nature. In the process they encounter challenges and conflicts that lead to a better understanding of biodiversity and a new way of life. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Dark Phoenix

The classic “Dark Phoenix Saga” storyline from Marvel’s Uncanny X-Men comic finally gets its due with a full film that explores the transformation of Jean Grey (played by Sophie Turner) from mild-mannered telepathic/telekinetic to the all-powerful Phoenix, and finally to the all-destructive Dark Phoenix. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

2

Godzilla: King of the Monsters

King of the Monsters does have some terrific monster battles in it, and the special effects are mind-bogglingly good. But the human stuff in between and during the monster scenes is dreadful. The story, such as it is, picks up where the previous film, Godzilla (2014), left off, with a world in a state of disarray after monster attacks on San Francisco and Las Vegas. And how do the humans dust themselves off and find a way to coexist with the likes of giant sea reptiles and moths after the decimation of the Bay Area? Apparently, according to writer-director Michael Dougherty, we deliver inane dialogue really slowly, and inexplicably play with a sonar gadget that calls out to the monsters in a manner that either chills them out or fires them up and, of course, winds up sparking the monster mayhem. The monsters get the only wellstaged scenes, featuring beautiful closeups and battered landscapes. Meanwhile, the poor actors are left to sit around in a situation room looking lost as they observe and comment on the action taking place elsewhere. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

In part three of the film series, “retired” super-assassin John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is in big trouble as a guild of elite killers hunts him down to claim the $14 million price placed on his head. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Late Night

Mindy Kaling wrote and stars in this dramedy about a fading talk-show host (Emma Thompson) who hires young Molly (Kaling) to join her all-male stable of writers with hopes of becoming relevant again. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

2

Men in Black: International

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Rocketman

An appropriately fantastical musical biopic on the life of piano-playing rock legend Elton John. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Secret Life of Pets 2

In this second film in the computer-animated franchise, Max the Jack Russell Terrier (voiced by Patton Oswalt, who replaced Louis C.K.) and his animal friends continue to have adventures whenever their humans aren’t around. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Shaft

Tim Story (Barbershop, Fantastic Four) directs this latest update of the 1970s blaxploitation film series, with three generations of the Shaft detective family—John “J.J.” Shaft Jr. (Jessie Usher); his father, John Shaft II (Samuel L. Jackson, reprising his role from the 2000 entry); and his uncle John Shaft Sr. (the OG, Richard Roundtree) working together to solve a case. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Child’s Play


CHOW NO.

It Is A Complete sentenCe

Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama Counties

342-RAPE

24 hr. hotline (Collect Calls Accepted) www.rapecrisis.org

friday

June 21st @ 6-9pm

Tastes great and less filling?

DeGarmo Park 199 Leora ct.

Over a dOzen fOOd trucks Live Music

tiki LounGe LizarDs

Young craft-beer drinkers seeking less calories, lower alcohol

‘IMichael to search the tap list for higher-alcohol beers,” said LaLonde, president of Deschutes Brewery remember just a few years ago when people used

“Now we’re seeing the exact opposite—people are looking for the lowest-alcohol beers.” This trend is a radical change, one that LaLonde believes craft brewers by have not traditionally been equipped to Alastair handle. For years, he explained, craft Bland beer differentiated itself from mainstream lager brands by offering more flavor and more alcohol. Now, the Bend, Ore., brewery is among many experimenting with ways to continue creating that flavor but without the alcohol that would usually go hand in hand with it. Deschutes has brewed an IPA called Teensy Weensy that, in various pilot renditions, has ranged from as high as 3.7 percent alcoholby-volume to as low as 2 percent. He says this is a fundamentally challenging kind of beer to make, since “flaws can easily show themselves in a low-ABV beer.” Hoppy bitterness can also overwhelm the flavor profile in beers with very low levels of alcohol. Brewer Christian Kazakoff, formerly of Iron Springs Pub & Brewery in Fairfax and now helping launch Canyon Club Brewery, the soon-to-open brewery in Moraga, says he doesn’t think these beers are necessarily especially hard to make. “Any talented brewer can make a great tasting beer and have low ABV,” said Kazakoff, who considers low-ABV beers to be in the same vein of interest as low-calorie beers. Where Kazakoff sees the potential difficulty is in

Free to Attend!

selling the beers, even to people who want them. “People will think that just because it’s a low-ABV and -calorie beer it should cost less—much less,” he said. At State Room Brewery in San Rafael, brewer Larry Berlin has seen the interest from consumers in drinking lighter beers. (The lowest beer he has on tap is a 4.2 percent ABV rice lager.) He believes the explanation is straightforward: “Consuming less alcohol is more healthy,” he says. LaLonde also cited popular health trends as the force behind the growing popularity of super-lowABV beers. He named low-carbohydrate diets, simple caloric intake reduction and the paleo craze, in which followers eat only foods that could hypothetically be found while hunting and gathering (they’ll drink mead and wine but not beer, since it is made from grains). Some people seek out lighter beers simply so they can drink more of them. We see this interest manifest in beers with name like Daytime Ale (Lagunitas Brewing Co.) and All Day IPA (Founders Brewing Co.). If alcoholism is one’s problem, that person should quit drinking. For those concerned about drinking more beer than is healthy, then low-ABV beers may be the remedy. Like the brewpub patrons LaLonde describes who once came in looking for strong beers and now want light ones, my own interest has similarly flipped. I remember the tingle of excitement I once felt when I would find a beer listed at more than 12 or 13 percent ABV. Now, I hunt the aisles and bars for beers less than 4 percent, and I am waiting, hopefully, for something as tiny as the Deschutes Teensy Weensy. Ω JUNE 20, 2019

CN&R

41


ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

h c n u l y frida

This guy saves you money.

join us for

Life seems neither long nor short, and we take no more heed to save time or make haste than do the trees and stars. This is true freedom, a good practical sort of immortality. —John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra

At the speed of summer arts dEVo took a few days off from work last

week for the express purpose of having time to sink into some of the “true freedom” of Chico’s long summer days, spending the hours with Mrs. d and the Honey dog, enjoying time outside and plenty of day beers. Anyone who knows me or reads this column knows I am pretty obsessed with summer, and I could go on for days waxing poetically about how much I love the season, but I may already have said all there is to say in these pages over the years:

The view outside my office window is the entrance to Bidwell Park. The forecast for the next few days is 90-plus degrees. … I can smell the chicken fat blistering on the grill. And since I’m already in the habit of greeting the dawn and staying awake at least until midnight, the ... long summer days offer many opportunities for leisure, romance, Honey, the creek doggo adventure, camaraderie, dog walks and playing music. Summer makes me feel younger, like I’m tapping into the cool well of those never-ending Redding summers of my youth, hopping from one body of water to the next—Whiskeytown Lake, Lake Shasta, Dave’s pool, the Sacramento River, “The Plunge” in Caldwell Park. It’s the time I feel the most free and the most in love. But these days, the real truth is that my personal default playlist for summer doings is the “Hip-Hop BBQ” station on Pandora (now with 100 percent less R. Kelly). Even scrubbing a toilet is a party when “This Is How We Do It” comes on.

13

16

17

345 West Fifth Street, Chico, CA 95928 (530)15891–6328 16 17 Please call for reservations

Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am – 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour Every Day 4:30–6pm 42

CN&R

June 20, 2019

18

18

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

15

13

Arts DEVO has said it before ... I love the heat. Being raised in the hot crotch of the North Valley—aka Redding—I’ve been precalibrated to tolerate the 100-plus days. When a heat wave hits, I’m always taken back to those long summer days traipsing across Diestelhorst Bridge with my crew, and I am more than happy to give into being a little extra moist for a few days. I would love nothing more than to be out cruising around right now with the windows down in my Volvo with the busted A/C, stopping for lunch at a taco wagon in a parking lot, and washing down a plate of carnitas and pickled jalapeños with an ice-chilled bottle of Mexican Coca-Cola. The sun is still setting late, so light up the barbecue and enjoy the many long, hot nights we have left.

deVotions:

• Congrats to slow Theatre! The local theater company was just awarded $12,200 by the California arts Council. The grant will support the theater group’s arts workshops with incarcerated youth at Table Mountain school in partnership with the Butte County office of Education. • adventures on the fringe: inspire school of arts & sciences theater students are heading to Scotland this summer to take part in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and this weekend the school will raise some dough for the trip with a preview of the work they’ll be performing, Witches?! in salem!? The play is billed as “Monty Python meets Mel Brooks meets mass hysteria” (which sounds very promising) and shows twice this Saturday, June 22, at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. blueroomtheatre.com


REAL ESTATE

How Much is Your Home Worth Today? Ask the professionals at Century 21 Select 530.345.6618 www.C21SelectGroup.com 2308 Ritchie Circle 5 bd 3.5 ba, Pool, Solar $529,000 880 Whispering Winds P E N D IN G $1,489,000 505 Windham Way S o lD 3 bd 2 ba $449,000

Steve Ka SprzyK (Kas-per-ziK) You don’t have to spell it for me to sell it! 28 years representing clients in our area Century 21 Select Chico California c21falconer@gmail.com (530) 518–4850 License#01145231

Paul Champlin | (530) 828-2902 Making Your Dream Home a Reality

UpdaTed HoMe in THe avenUes located on a tree lined cul de sac. Home features 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. $334,900 ClassiC CHiCo HoMe across from Lindo Channel! hasG immaculate N D IN P EHome wood flooring and a park like back yard. $285,000

Kimberley Tonge l 530.518.5508 Lic# 01318330

big CHiCo CreeK eStateS beauty! 3 bed/2.5 bth, 2,402 sq ft with a floor plan that flows, new hardwood floors in kitchen, fresh interior paint, lush landspace .30 lot size! $530,000 beautifuL HoMe with updated kitchen, plantation shutters, formal living, formal dining, family G D INlush P E Nwith room, and pristine!! Gorgeous grounds landscape! 4 bed/2 bth, 2,504 sq ft $575,000 Stunning durHaM eState ProPerty! roPerty! Custom one owner home, 4bd/3ba, 3,546 sq ft, 5.79 G P E N D IN acres. Pool, shop, possible horse property, Chandelier walnuts, 3-car garage & so much more! $995,000

DRE #01177950 chiconativ@aol.com

one oWner HoMe! Open floor plan, laminateGflooring, walk in closets in each bedroom! A well ND P Esq maintained home!! 3 bed/2 bth, 1,496 ft IN $379,900

SMILES ALWAYS!

JoYcE TurnEr

1.59 Acre Double Lot with beautiful valley and canyon views. $120,000 3/1 with huge yard in Chico. $269,000

CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l 530.520.3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

Homes Sold Last Week

Lic# 01506350

(530) 570–1944 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

14855 Klamath Ct. Magalia • $259,900 New exterior & interior paint, septic tank, windows, wood stove, appliances & so much more!

PebbLeWood PineS Condo! Wonderful 3 bed/2 1/2 bath, 1,889 sq ft. Lovely courtyard setting, nicely maintained home! 2-car garage and OWNED SOLAR! $365,000

Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925

Curious about your home’s value in today’s marketplace? Call me, I can help!

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

Sponsored by Century 21 Select Real Estate, Inc.

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of June 3- June 10, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

167 Picholine Way

Chico

$525,000

3/2

SQ. FT. 1986

2516 Navarro Dr

Chico

$330,000

3/2

1364

3211 Tinker Creek Way

Chico

$505,000

3/2

1562

30 Saint Francis Dr

Chico

$330,000

4/4

2100

3000 Burnap Ave

Chico

$328,500

2/1

1054

4 Via Flora Ct

Chico

$505,000

3/2

2003

1958 Hooker Oak Ave

Chico

$470,000

3/2

1816

3419 Hackamore Ln

Chico

$460,000

4/2

1786

1170 Gossamer Ln

Chico

$455,000

5/4

2287

453 Brookside Dr

Chico

$451,000

3/2

1705

2725 Grape Way

Chico

$450,000

4/3

2406

890 Saint Clair Dr

Chico

$430,000

4/2

1812

SQ. FT.

1355 Ravenshoe Way

Chico

$327,000

3/2

1233

1904 Palm Ave

Chico

$325,000

3/1

1197

669 E 3rd Ave

Chico

$321,000

3/1

946

503 Wilshire Ct

Chico

$310,000

3/2

1728

265 E 6th Ave

Chico

$294,000

2/1

832

Chico

$292,000

3/2

1205

Chico

$286,000

2/2

1256

1812 Heron Ln

Chico

$425,000

3/2

1731

2770 Keith Hopkins Pl

2977 Bancroft Dr

Chico

$421,000

3/2

1674

270 E 14th St

2749 Camden Ct

Chico

$417,000

3/2

1393

200 Estates Dr

Chico

$285,000

3/2

2024

13 Shearwater Ct

Chico

$410,000

4/2

1588

1497 Hawthorne Ave

Chico

$284,500

3/2

1079

303 Legacy Ln

Chico

$400,000

3/2

1684

53 Glenshire Ln

Chico

$399,000

4/3

1451

2814 Dolphin Bnd

Chico

$395,000

3/2

1234

240 Estates Dr #1

Chico

$395,000

2/2

1540

950 Karen Dr

Chico

$390,000

3/2

1486

222 Degarmo Dr

Chico

$389,000

3/2

1455

3021 Ashburton Ln

Chico

$383,500

3/2

1367

9 Montclair Dr

Chico

$277,000

3/2

1310

1311 Downing Ave

Chico

$269,000

2/1

1068

676 El Varano Way

Chico

$249,000

3/1

929

180 E 12th St

Chico

$230,000

1/1

686

480 E 7th Ave

Chico

$145,000

2/1

756

1483 Hawthorne Ave

Chico

$106,000

2/1

624

Chico

$88,500

4/1

1436

816 Colusa St

Chico

$355,000

4/2

1166

13273 Centerville Rd

26 Redding Ct

Chico

$344,500

3/1

1050

4820 Oro Dam Blvd E

Oroville

$525,000

3/3

3050

555 Vallombrosa Ave #75

Chico

$340,000

2/1

952

34 Hastie Way

Oroville

$412,500

3/2

1796

june 20, 2019

CN&R

43


REAL ESTATE TATE For more information about advertising in our Real estate section, call us at

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

(530) 894-2300

some upgrades.

Need a hand with your home purchase?

only 530-893-0263 You can Google me A Unique Touch by Deja. Full-Body Shower and Massage. $140 per 1hr & 20min session. Ask 4 special rates 4 fire victims (530) 321-0664

Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

OXYGEN - Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All-NewInogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 877459-1660 (AAN CAN) A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1-855-993-2495 (AAN CAN)

bidwell TiTle & esCrOw

With locations in:

DISH TV - Over 190 Channels Now ONLY $69.99/mo! 2yr price guarantee, FREE Installation! Save HUNDREDS over Cable and DIRECTV. Add Internet as low as $14.95/mo! Call Now 1-800-373-6508 (AAN CAN)

Chico: 894-2612 • Oroville: 533-2414 Paradise: 877-6262 • Gridley: 846-4005 www.BidwellTitle.com

Protect your goodies. Insurance & Risk Management Services for: • Farm • Business • Life • Health • Home • Auto

KILL ROACHES-GUARANTEED! Buy Harris Roach Tablets, Sprays, Traps, Concentrate. MOST EFFECTIVE! Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN) Attention Viagra users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call Today 1-844-879-5238 (AAN CAN) Suffering from an ADDICTION to Alcohol, Opiates, Prescription PainKillers or other DRUGS? There is hope! Call Today to speak with someone who cares. Call NOW 1-855-266-8685 (AAN CAN) U VISUALIZE & I’LL CUSTOMIZE Anything masonry brick work stone work concrete driveways patios fireplaces & so much more. License# 810329 Phone (916) 826-9796 CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled - it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-5359689 (AAN CAN)

Need a roommate? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN)

Learn more at Dahlmeier.com Oroville Chico 530.533.3424 44

CN&R

530.342.6421 ju NE 20, 2019

PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP. Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guaranteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DOWN LO, LOST ON MAIN at 319 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. LOST IN CHICO 319 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KYLE ULLRICH, CEO Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000544 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JESSEE EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING at 2434 Dayton Road, Building #2 Chico, CA 95928. JMME NUT MANUFACTURING CORPORATION, INC. 2434 Dayton Road, Building #2 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RICKY D. SIMAS, PRESIDENT Dated: May 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000620 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE,

License #0680951 Claudia’s Relaxing Massage 10am-7pm by appt.

this Legal Notice continues

BIDWELL REALTY, BIDWELL REALTY, INC., CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5 Skyline Blvd Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC. 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES M. GUDERIAN, BROKER/OWNER Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000648 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, BIDWELL REALTY, INC, CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5263 Royal Oaks Dr Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES GUDERIAN, BROKER/OWNER Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000649 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE PROGRESSIVE SCHOOLHOUSE at 2400 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. LORI TENNANT 2657 Cactus Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI A. TENNANT Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000613 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LORI TENNANT FINE ART at 2400 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. LORI ANN TENNANT 2657 Cactus Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI A. TENNANT Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000614 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVING FREE HEALING CENTER, THE WELLNESS COLLECTIVE at 1 Williamsburg Suite E Chico, CA 95926. JANE VICTORIA MINERS 1933 Mars Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JANE MINERS Dated; May 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000568 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIG AL’S DRIVE IN at 1844 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. PEACH TREE RESTAURANT INC 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signd: NAEEM REHMAN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: May 21, 2019 this Legal Notice continues

FBN Number: 2019-0000639 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EVAS ULTRA BLIND CLEANING SERVICE at 530 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. DANIEL VUJIC 530 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANIEL VUJIC Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000658 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following person is doing business as EVERGRACE CRAFTS at 573 Upham Road Bangor, CA 95914. CHRISTINA JACKELYNE PAEZ-SISINO 573 Upham Road Bangor, CA 95914. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINA PAEZ-SISINO Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000578 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STYLE BOMB CLUB at 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE CORONA 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY CORONA Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000660 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOUGHIE BOY at 2607 Forest Ave, Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. JOSEPH LUTHER SELBY 1975 Bruce Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH L. SELBY Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000659 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADOPTION CHOICES OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA at 1469 Humboldt Rd Ste 200 Chico, CA 95928. CHICO FEMINIST WOMENS HEALTH CENTER 1901 Victor Ave Redding, CA 96002. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARIKATHRYN HENDRIX, DIRECTOR Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000622 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE SOCIAL CHICO at 1400 W. Third St. Chico, CA 95928. FPA6 CRAIG HALL, LLC 2082 Michelson Drive 4th Floor Irvine, CA 92612. This business is conducted by this Legal Notice continues

a Limited Liability Company. Signed: M. EURL, VICE PRES. Dated: May 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000569 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROD BROKER at 55 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. BRENT WILLIAM CLINE 55 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRENT CLINE Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000652 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OROVILLE DRY DOCK BOAT AND RV STORAGE at 170 Kelly Ridge Road Oroville, CA 95966. ROBERT LEE POSTIGO 330 Tres Pinos Rd Ste C-4 Hollister, CA 95023. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT L. POSTIGO Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000657 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY MUTUAL AID at 1431 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. ZACHARY D BLUE 1820 Mulberry Street Chico, CA 95928. MALAMA MACNEIL 1252 E 8th Street Chico, CA 95928. MILES MONTALBANO 1206 Salem Street Chico, CA 95928. ALIZA Z SCHER PO Box 686 Hayfork, CA 96041. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: MALAMA MACNEIL Dated: May 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000687 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WHISPERING TREES APARTMENTS at 1501 North Cherry #19 Chico, CA 95926. JESSE E PIPKIN 9500 Crystal Bay Ln Elk Grove, CA 95758. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JESSE PIPKIN Dated: May 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000654 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIVE STAR RANCHES at 470 B Street Biggs, CA 95917. STEPHANIE GWINN 1907 Marin Ave. Berkeley, CA 94707. JONATHAN LAVY 428 Lyndsey Ln Yuba City, CA 95993. MARK LAVY 69 Rio Bonito Road Biggs, CA 95917. GAYLE LELAND 9316 Turner Lane Durham, CA 95938. KELSEY LELAND 4274 Bladwin Ave. Culver City, CA 90232. RICHARD LELAND this Legal Notice continues


9316 Turner Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RICHARD LELAND Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000644 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ZAVALA REAL ESTATE SOLUTIONS at 1280 E 9th Street, Suite A Chico, CA 95928. JOSE ZAVALA CHAVEZ 2070 Mansfield Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSE ZAVALA CHAVEZ Dated: May 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000668 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PEEKING CHINESE RESTAURANT at 243 West 2nd Street, #4 Chico, CA 95928. BRUCE WAI SZE CHENG 10136 Lofton Way Elk Grove, CA 95757. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRUCE CHENG Dated: May 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000662 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WITHINREACH RESOURCES, WITHINREACH RHYTHMS at 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN MARIE NAAS 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. KENNETH NELSON NAAS 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KENNETH N. NAAS Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000712 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY PET HOSPITAL at 2156 Pillsbury Road Suite 160 Chico, CA 95928. WILLOWS WAGS AND WHISKERS 32158 Camino Capistrano Suite A152 San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: CHERI LYON, TREASURER Dated: May 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000675 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GELAYO at 1380 East Ave #136 Chico, CA 95926. MANO GELYAYO, INCORPORATED 1380 East Ave. Suite 136 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHELLE PARK, MANAGER Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000642 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT this Legal Notice continues

The following person is doing business as ELEVATED NATURAL BEAUTY at 3 Governors Lane Ste B Chico, CA 95926. ANASTASIA TERRY 355 E Lassen Ave Apt 31 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ANASTASIA TERRY Dated: June 11, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000722 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KAIA FIT CHICO at 2700 Hegan Ln. Suite 108 Chico, CA 95928. BC SHIRLEY LLC 1681 Park View Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: CARA SHIRLEY, MEMBER Dated: June 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000708 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION at 39 Parkside Ct Chico, CA 95928. BARBARA FURRY 39 Parkside Ct Chico, CA 95928. JOHN FURRY 39 Parkside Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JOHN FURRY Dated: June 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000723 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CJ CONSTRUCTORS at 3029 Esplanade 5 Chico, CA 95973. CRAIG JEFFERY WENNER 13968 Pomegranate Court Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CRAIG JEFFERY WENNER Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000710 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2109 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SUSTAINME COMPANY at 1410 Heather Circle Chico, CA 95926. JORDON LEE VERNAU 1410 Heather Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JORDON VERNAU Dated: May 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000690 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STYLE BOMB, STYLE BOMB CLUB at 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE CORONA 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EMILY CORONA Dated: June 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000734 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE this Legal Notice continues

FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES KELLY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CHARLES KELLY Proposed name: CHARLES HENRY EUGENE KELLY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01403 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SARAH ELIZABETH ADAMS and ANDREW BIGLER BURKE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: FERN BIGLER ADAMS-BURKE Proposed name: WINTER FERN ADAMS-BURKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 20, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01522 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUSTIN JAMES SHULTS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: THOMAS JAMES SKYTTE Proposed name: THOMAS JAMES SHULTS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition this Legal Notice continues

should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 15, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01443 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BERNICE LOUISE MCDONALD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BERNICE LOUISE MCDONALD Proposed name: L AARON MILLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 17, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01551 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ADAM CHASE MERRIMAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ADAM CHASE MERRIMAN Proposed name: ADAM CHASE BYERS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01578 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VICKI LEA WENDT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: this Legal Notice continues

VICKI LEA WENDT Proposed name: VICKI LEE EGGEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: June 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00747 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SU HLAING CHAMM filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: SU HLAING CHAMM Proposed name: EZECAIRA AEINDRA VOZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: June 13, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01701 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT RICKEY LEE CARPENTER and CATRINA MISKELLA CARPENTER aka CATRINA MISKELLA doing business as RICK CARPENTER ROOFING; and, DOES 1 TO 20. You are being sued by plaintiff: DAVID J. MURRAY NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your writen response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may this Legal Notice continues

CLaSSIfIEdS

CONTINUED ON 46

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF June 20, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): Orfield

Laboratories is an architectural company that designs rooms for ultimate comfort. They sculpt the acoustic environment so that sounds are soft, clear and pleasant to the human ear. They ensure that the temperature is just right and the air quality is always fresh. At night the artificial light is gentle on the eyes, and by day the sunlight is rejuvenating. In the coming weeks, I’d love for you to be in places like this on a regular basis. According to my analysis of the astrological rhythms, it’s recharging time for you. You need and deserve an abundance of cozy relaxation.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I hope

that during the next four weeks, you will make plans to expedite and deepen your education. You’ll be able to make dramatic progress in figuring out what will be most important for you to learn in the next three years. We all have pockets of ignorance about how we understand reality, and now is an excellent time for you to identify what your pockets are and to begin illuminating them. Every one of us lacks some key training or knowledge that could help us fulfill our noblest dreams, and now is a favorable time for you to address that issue.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the next

four weeks, you’re not likely to win the biggest prize or tame the fiercest monster or wield the greatest power. However, you could very well earn a second- or thirdbest honor. I won’t be surprised if you claim a decent prize or outsmart a somewhat menacing dragon or gain an interesting new kind of clout. Oddly enough, this less-than-supreme accomplishment may be exactly right for you. The lower levels of pressure and responsibility will keep you sane and healthy. The stress of your moderate success will be very manageable. So give thanks for this just-right blessing!

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Some tra-

ditional astrologers believe solar eclipses are sour omens. They theorize that when the moon perfectly covers the sun, as it will on July 2 over the Atlantic Ocean and parts of South America, a metaphorical shadow will pass across some part of our lives, perhaps triggering crises. I don’t agree with that gloomy assessment. I consider a solar eclipse to be a harbinger of grace and freedom. In my view, the time before and after this cosmic event might resemble what the workplace is like when the boss is out of town. Or it may be a sign that your inner critic is going to shut up and leave you alone for a while. Or you could suddenly find that you can access the willpower and ingenuity you need so as to change something about your life that you’ve been wanting to change. So I advise you to start planning now to take advantage of the upcoming blessings of the eclipse.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What are you doing

with the fertility and creativity that have been sweeping through your life during the first six months of 2019? Are you witheringly idealistic, caught up in perfectionistic detail as you cautiously follow outmoded rules about how to make best use of that fertility and creativity? Or are you being expansively pragmatic, wielding your lively imagination to harness that fertility and creativity to generate transformations that will improve your life forever?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Mythologist

Joseph Campbell said that heroes are those who give their lives to something bigger than themselves. That’s never an easy assignment for anyone, but right now it’s less difficult for you than ever before. As you prepare for the joyous ordeal, I urge you to shed the expectation that it will require you to make a burdensome sacrifice. Instead, picture the process as involving the loss of a small pleasure that paves the way for a greater pleasure. Imagine you will finally be able to give a giant gift you’ve been bursting to express.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1903, the

Wright Brothers put wings on a heavy machine and got the contraption to fly up

by rob brezsny off the ground for 59 seconds. No one had ever done such a thing. Sixty-six years later, American astronauts succeeded at an equally momentous feat. They piloted a craft that departed from the Earth and landed on the surface of the moon. The first motorcycle was another quantum leap in humans’ ability to travel. Two German inventors created the first one in 1885, but it took 120 years before any person did a back-flip while riding a motorcycle. If I had to compare your next potential breakthrough to one or the other marvelous invention, I’d say it’ll be more metaphorically similar to a motorcycle flip than the moon-landing. It may not be crucial to the evolution of the human race, but it’ll be impressive—and a testament to your hard work.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the year

A.D. 37, Saul of Tarsus was traveling by foot from Jerusalem to Damascus. He was on a mission to find and arrest devotees of Jesus, then bring them back to Jerusalem to be punished. Saul’s plans got waylaid, however, or so the story goes. A “light from heaven” knocked him down, turned him blind and spoke to him in the voice of Jesus. Three days later, Saul’s blindness was healed and he pledged himself to forevermore be one of those devotees of Jesus he had previously persecuted. I don’t expect a transformation quite so spectacular for you in the coming weeks. But I do suspect you will change your mind about an important issue and consider making a fundamental edit of your belief system.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

You could be a disorienting or even disruptive influence to some people. You may also have healing and inspirational effects. And yes, both of those statements are true. You should probably warn your allies that you might be almost unbearably interesting. Let them know you could change their minds and disprove their theories. But also tell them that if they remain open to your rowdy grace and boisterous poise, you might provide them with curative stimulation they didn’t even know they needed.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Some children are repelled by the taste of broccoli. Food researchers at McDonald’s decided to address the problem. In an effort to render this ultra-healthy vegetable more palatable, they concocted a version that tasted like bubble gum. Kids didn’t like it, though. It confused them. But you have to give credit to the food researchers for thinking inventively. I encourage you to get equally creative, even a bit wacky or odd, in your efforts to solve a knotty dilemma. Allow your brainstorms to be playful and experimental.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Spank

yourself for me, please. Ten sound swats ought to do it. According to my astrological assessments, that will be sufficient to rein yourself in from the possibility of committing excesses and extravagance. By enacting this humorous yet serious ritual, you will set in motion corrective forces that tweak your unconscious mind in just the right way so as to prevent you from getting too much of a good thing; you will avoid asking for too much or venturing too far. Instead, you will be content with and grateful for the exact bounty you have gathered in recent weeks.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your inspi-

ration for the coming weeks is a poem by Piscean poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. It begins like this: “The holiest of all holidays are those / Kept by ourselves in silence and apart; / The secret anniversaries of the heart, / When the full river of feeling overflows.” In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to create your own secret holiday of the heart, which you will celebrate at this time of year for the rest of your long life. Be imaginative and full of deep feelings as you dream up the marvelous reasons why you will observe this sacred anniversary. Design special rituals you will perform to rouse your gratitude for the miracle of your destiny.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. June 20, 2019

CN&R

45


be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. you may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org.), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court of California, County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: DAVID J. MURRAY, ESQ. 354 E 5th Street Chico, CA 95928 (530) 896-1144 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: April 2, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01024 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JOELENE N GILMAN YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will this Legal Notice continues

46

CN&R

dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: June 29, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02136 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JOANNA FAE SHAPIRO AKA JOANNA FAE DAUGHERTY YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: July 20, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02375 Published: June 20,27, July 3,11, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE MARY LOUISE ROULEAU To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARY LOUISE ROULEAU A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DEBORAH ANN CAMPBELL and ANITA MARIE ROULEAU in the Superior Court of this Legal Notice continues

june 2 0, 20 1 9

California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DEBORAH ANN CAMPBELL and ANITA MARIE ROULEAU be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: PR Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: VANESSA J. SUNDIN Sundin Law Office 341 Broadway Street, Ste. 302 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 342-2452 Dated: May 30, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00259 Published: June 6,13,20, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ELOISE WESTON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ELOISE WESTON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARILYN DE BOARD in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARILYN DE BOARD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority this Legal Notice continues

will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: JUNE 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: MARILYN DE BOARD 1709 River Run Drive Marysville, CA 95901 Dated: June 3, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00169 Published: June 6,13,20, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RODOLFO MARTINEZ CORTEZ, aka RODOLFO CORTES MARTINEZ, aka RODOLFO M. CORTEZ, RODOLFO CORTES M., RODOLFO CORTEZ MARTINEZ To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RODOLFO MARTINEZ CORTEZ, aka RODOLFO CORTES MARTINEZ, aka RODOLFO M. CORTEZ, aka RODOLFO CORTES M., aka RODOLFO CORTEZ MARTINEZ A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RODOLFO C. CORTEZ and FRANCISCO J. CORTEZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RODOLFO C. CORTEZ and FRANCISCO J. CORTEZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal this Legal Notice continues

representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON, ESQ. 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00255 Published: June 13,20,27, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE FRANK EDWARD MERCALDO, aka FRANK E. MERCALDO, aka FRANK MERCALDO To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: FRANK EDWARD MERCALDO, aka FRANK E. MERCALDO, aka FRANK MERCALDO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PATRICIA WISSERT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: PATRICIA WISSERT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and this Legal Notice continues

shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle this Legal Notice continues

Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: May 24, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00249 Published: June 13,20,27, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE STEVEN JOHN MUDERS, AKA STEVEN J. MUDERS, AKA STEVEN MUDERS, AKA STEVE MUDERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: STEVEN JOHN MUDERS, AKA STEVEN J. MUDERS, AKA STEVEN MUDERS, AKA STEVE MUDERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LINDA L. MUDERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LINDA L. MUDERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 9, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. this Legal Notice continues

Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU AREt A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: ERWIN WILLIAMS McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973 (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00263 Published: June 20,27, July 3, 2019


june 20, 2019

CN&R

47


Profile for News & Review

c-2019-06-20  

c-2019-06-20