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ChiCo’s FREE News & eNtertaiNmeNt WEEkly Volume 42, issue 42 thursday, JuNe 13, 2019 www.NewsreView.Com

Rural California is struggling to keep kids in classrooms— and Butte County is facing the challenge head-on

ChroniCally

absent Page

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See FINAL eVeNts, page 25

4 TINY HOUSES, BIG FUNDS 9 UNDERINSURED POST-CAMP FIRE 29 TASTES LIKE POSSUM


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY

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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 42, Issue 42 • June 13, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS

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Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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29 COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Howard Hardee, Miles Jordan, Mark Lore, Landon Moblad, Brie Oviedo, Ryan J. Prado, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Pat Rogers, Larry Smith, Placido Torres, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Managing Editor Laura Hillen N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes, Thea Rood N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN. Circulation 38,650 copies distributed free weekly.

JUNE 13, 2019

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

The village needs the town A lot of people work hard day in and day out to help

others who live on the streets of Chico. Some are employed by government agencies and nonprofit organizations to carry out such efforts. Then there are the angels—the folks who take on the task without compensation or recognition. Within that group of unsung heroes are the folks from the Chico Housing Action Team (CHAT). For years, that volunteer-led organization—even before it was an official nonprofit—flew under the radar to establish programs to get a roof over the heads of needy folks in our community. Don’t forget that CHAT is the group that launched the Safe Space Winter Shelter back in 2013. That first year, it operated out of the Chico Peace and Justice Center. That program has grown substantially over the years—operating each subsequent winter in churches throughout town—and eventually became its own entity focused on offering low-barrier seasonal shelter. Meanwhile, CHAT started delving deeper into housing first approaches, which prioritize moving those on the streets into stable homes. It has since placed more than 100 people into housing—dozens of homes the organization leases around town—and put them on the path to independence.

In spite of CHAT’s successes, one of the organization’s biggest challenges has been securing buy-in from the community on its most ambitious project, Simplicity Village, the concept that involves housing seniors in a tiny-home development. CHAT has been advocating for the project since at least 2014. Over the past couple of years, the project has gained support from the private sector. That, coupled with the City Council’s vote to declare a shelter crisis, has made Simplicity Village a possibility. CHAT overcame one of its biggest hurdles at the policy level in December, when the new incarnation of the council voted to approve its location on Notre Dame Boulevard, near Morrow Lane. Now, the organization is in a new phase of development. It has launched a fundraising campaign with a target of $100,000 to pay for infrastructure improvements at the site, which is currently raw land (gofundme.com/chat-simplicity-village). As of this newspaper’s press time, it had raised about $43,000. Over the next couple of months, Chicoans are going to hear from many individuals and organizations that are competing for funds for projects they believe will better Chico. From our perspective, Simplicity Village is a worthy cause, and we encourage the community to support it. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

Mother Earth is sick and only we can heal her Sin 1859 when the internal combustion engine was invented that it would threaten the survival of the o, here’s the deal. We change or we die. Who knew

planet? That was only 160 years ago, just two lifetimes. The burning of fossil fuels to provide us with electricity and to power our two-ton vehicles is threatening to destroy us. It was an experiment. We didn’t realize the consequences, but now we do and we have to stop living this way. Get rid of your car. Learn to live locally. Let your yard be a fruit tree orchard or vegetable by Brian Anthony garden or let it turn to whatever Kraemer grows naturally without being watered. Water is our survival, for The author is a longtime drinking and raising food. Chico resident and All dairy farms and cattle author with bachelor’s slaughtering farms need to be degrees in psychology, health science and social shut down immediately. No more science from Chico State. breeding of cattle for slaughter.

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No more breeding of pigs or lambs or chickens or fish for slaughter. We need to live off plants, not our fellow animals. Wild species like American bison should be promoted to naturally reproduce and roam the plains as in the past. There were times when an estimated thirty to fifty million bison roamed between the Appalachian mountains on the east and the Rockies on the west. Our human lives are an experiment. No one set out to destroy the planet. We didn’t know how powerful we were, but now we know. The average human body temperature is 98.6 degrees. How comfortable would you feel if your temperature was permanently raised to 100.6 degrees or 101.6 degrees or 102.6 degrees? Our Mother Earth is feeling ill. When Mom is happy, everyone is happy, but when Mom is overheated, everyone is miserable. We need to change our lives now, today. We cannot raise our Mother’s temperature even one degree more. For every action, ask these questions: Is this honoring the earth? Is this honoring the water? Is this honoring the air? If not, then don’t do it. Ω

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Start the countdown Chico City Clerk Debbie Presson on Tuesday (June 11) confirmed that an effort to recall two City Council members had met the requirements to move forward. The folks behind the campaign to unseat Mayor Randall Stone and Councilman Karl Ory have until the end of the business day on Nov. 18—that’s 160 days altogether—to turn in the signatures of at least 7,592 registered Chico voters. That works out to about 47 (valid) signatures per day for roughly the next five months. Can it be done? I don’t see why not. Other local drives have resulted in higher numbers of signatures in shorter time frames. Ory himself was instrumental in gathering more than 9,000 signatures in just a month on a referendum petition intended to compel Chico Scrap Metal to vacate its home on East 20th Street. Granted, that aforementioned effort was led by folks with experience in this sort of thing. Speaking of 9,000 signatures, that’s pretty much the target this group ought to be shooting for. Of course, simply getting those John Hancocks doesn’t mean Stone and Ory will get booted from that dais. That will be up to the electorate to decide. Those behind the recall effort will have to make their case to voters. Likewise, the councilmen will need to convey the reasons they ought to stay put. I’m interested in seeing how each side handles the situation, but readers can get a pretty good indication by simply perusing the petition language. That’s where the recall organizers have laid out their arguments and Ory and Stone have responded with their own takes. It should be noted that Presson’s vetting applies only to, as she put it, “form and wording” requirements under the Elections Code. That is, she has nothing to do with the arguments made on either side. Unsurprisingly, they are quite subjective. Here’s a sneak peek: The No. 1 grievance listed by the petitioners is the councilmen’s purported “inability to uphold Chico’s mission to make Chico a safe place to raise a family, an ideal location for business, and a premier place to live.” Stone and Ory became part of the council majority only in December, but the main folks driving the petition had been griping about Chico’s quality-of-life issues long before then. Given that, I have a few questions: Why now and why just two of the panel’s seven members? Ory clearly has his theories. According to his written response— in which he comes out swinging by calling the effort a “scam”—the petition’s organizers are “a fringe element of local Trump gadflies.” That’s just part of the first sentence. Surprisingly perhaps, Stone’s tone is more reserved and diplomatic. His introduction refers to his family, including his two young boys, whom Stone and his wife are raising “in the best town in California.” Both men invoke the Camp Fire and the subsequent strains Chico’s new population has put on city services. Personally, I don’t get the urgency that the petition seems to imply, especially considering the cost that will be borne by taxpayers should the organizers gather enough signatures to put the issue to a vote. After all, both Ory and Stone’s terms end next year. If replaced, their successors won’t be in office for long. What’s the point?

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Note from Safe Space Re “Walmart decides” (Downstroke, June 6): While we at Safe Space Winter Shelter are deeply saddened by Walmart’s decision regarding financial support for the Orange Street Shelter, we remain committed to our mission and will continue to strive for solutions that benefit the entire community. We hope the organizations to which the money was allocated move forward swiftly with low-barrier shelter options. We need immediate, accessible shelter for those with the greatest needs. Without ready access to shelter and services for these folks, their problems and our problems as a community will continue to escalate. Low-barrier shelter offers the most humane, compassionate solution for those in need, and the most pragmatic solution for the broader community. We’d also like to pause to thank the many supporters of our project. So many of you have bolstered us with your kind words and deeds.

You’ve written letters, helped share the project with the community, volunteered for Safe Space … it’s beyond words. This has truly been a community project, and what a community we have. Lastly, we need to thank Graham Hutton. We were beyond lucky to have found such a patient and supportive landlord as we worked on this project. His openness and unwavering support meant the world to us. Angela McLaughlin Chico

More about Orange Street Re “NIMBY cowardice” and “Deadly status quo” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, May 30 and June 6): Editor Melissa Daugherty has courageously illuminated the dismal performance of CSUC President Gayle Hutchinson and Jesus Center Executive Director Laura Cootsona—both instrumental in dashing hope for a centrally located homeless shelter.

Thwarting progress on the Orange Street Shelter was a human rights violation: When we prevent a class of people from residing among us—precisely what we did—we remove their fundamental right to exist. I know of no other class of people experiencing this level of discrimination, especially discrimination blatantly countenanced by a university president and a highprofile homeless “advocate.” While it was heartening to see Orange Street garner support from a swath of citizens, justice for the visibly poor remains elusive. As of now, even our “progressives”—while making a show of supporting diversity, from LGBTQ to XYZ—support geographic segregation for those without affordable shelter. As of today, Chico’s current “consolidation” plan rests firmly on coercive criminalization and deprivation, as promoted by the most authoritarian among us. Lastly, it should be said, in no uncertain terms, that Safe Space board President Angela McLaughlin LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

o n pa g e 6

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

The Orange Street Shelter is a long-overdue and much-needed resource in Chico for our entire community, and specifically for our LGBTQIA2S+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans*, queer, questioning, intersex, asexual, agender, aromantic, two-spirit) community. With all of the current permanent shelters in Chico being faith-based and/or higher barrier, sex-segregated and without gender-inclusive policies and training, the many unhoused LGBTQIA2S+ people in Chico are falling through cracks that the larger community is responsible for. LGBTQIA2S+ young adults are at a 120 percent higher risk of homelessness, and comprise approximately 40 percent of the homeless youth population. Furthermore, nearly one-third of trans people surveyed in a 2015 U.S. survey had experienced homelessness during their lifetime. And, we know these are low estimates, as many unhoused LGBTQIA2S+ people go uncounted and miscounted. Even so, none of the year-round shelters currently focuses on serving this population, and many of their policies create barriers and conditions that render the space effectively inaccessible for the LGBTQIA2S+ community. Marin Hambley Chico

Sweets at the plaza There will be a free ice cream social on Saturday, June 15, from 2-4 p.m. at the City Plaza. Emily’s Band of Ne’er Do Wells will be providing music. Safe Space Winter Shelter is our sponsor. Donations will not be requested but will be accepted for Safe Space. Volunteers are from Chico Friends on the Street. We will have plenty of ice cream, and hope many people will join us for a laid back, fun afternoon. Nancy Wirtz Chico

Help him plug in At the last City Council meeting a man spoke up with a simple request. He wanted to be able to charge his electric wheelchair while in the downtown area. He described how

he has run out of power multiple times, including being stranded in the middle of crossing the street. He described the difficulty of having to leave his chair behind to come back for later and how it would be impounded by the police. Most people in Chico don’t have to worry about this kind of dilemma. That’s why we have laws like the ADA. The response from the council was silence. Technically, they cannot take action during business from the floor, but it would have been easy for them to acknowledge the request or perhaps offer to email about it later. They do that all the time. Does the council support disabled folks having equal access to downtown? Rain Scher Chico

What about other elders? Re “California’s elderly crises” (Cover story, by David Wagner and Elizabeth Aguilera, May 30): I agree the state should be looking at the increased needs of a growing elderly population. Unfortunately, this article only addresses the increased need for elderly that meet the income qualifications for the state’s In-Home Supportive Services program. Yes, there are thousands of people being paid by the state to care for elderly family members who meet poverty income requirements. But there are millions more Californians who worked and paid taxes their entire lives, yet the high cost of living in California leaves them unable to pay for long-term care, home health care, rent, medical expenses, transportation, energy costs and food, etc. The state guidelines need to address the actual cost of an elderly person’s survival level of expenses subtracted from income. Marion Dearman Chico

Left-wing hypocrisy Re “Chico’s blind eye to racism” (Editorial, June 6): Your claims of racism at the hands of white nationalism are ridiculous. Fake news and the leftist propaganda machine is falsely toxifying the white race in this country in order to discredit and create lies about the president. Leftists are continuing to deny real racists, like Reps. Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, while acting like the white male is the perfect

example of evil. Racists come from all colors and all creeds. This myth that Donald Trump is creating this racist white movement in America is a laughable lie. Propaganda by a partisan left-wing media machine is the root cause for divisiveness in this country. Demonizing the white race is somehow OK with today’s media. This hypocrisy is stunning and blatantly wrong. Brad Pankratz Orland

Editor’s note: The editorial in question does not “demonize” anyone. It asks white folks to do more to counter local incidents of race-based hate.

Right-wing hypocrisy It’s a bit telling that five of the nine states that recently passed brutally repressive anti-abortion laws are ranked within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 15 most polluted states, based on cancer rates and analysis of the average daily fine particulate matter in the air. Republicans and the evangelical faithful proclaim they’re “protecting the children.” Well, at least until they’re born. Then it’s, “Sorry, kid, you’re now an afterthought,” as evidenced by Trump’s efforts to overturn Obama’s Clean Power Plan (and the GOP and evangelical support for his agenda). The plan projected that by 2030 America could expect 90,000 fewer asthma attacks a year, 300,000 fewer work or school days missed, and 3,600 fewer premature deaths annually. Hypocrisy is alive and well. Republicans court the evangelical political leadership vote, and evangelicals turn their backs on Jesus by supporting draconian treatment of immigrants and the impoverished, while ignoring the millions of American families struggling financially. Former House Speaker Paul Ryan, who benefited from Social Security survivor benefits after his father died, declared the Republican Party’s attitude toward those in need: “Government assistance programs are no longer a safety net; they have become a hammock.” Roger S. Beadle Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

Should Trump be impeached? Asked at Thursday Night Market

Pia States registered nurse

I don’t think he should be impeached, but I think the world needs a little bit less anger. I think more positive things would be better.

Patrick O’Leary sustainability coordinator

Yes, I do think he needs to be impeached. He needs to start taking climate change seriously, and we need someone in office who will do that.

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Michael Opp analyst

I do not think so at this point. We survived 2 1/2 years with him, and I think we can ride out another year and a half and be fine. I’m optimistic, though.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE MOBILE CRISIS UNIT NO. 2

Butte County Behavioral Health has launched a second mobile crisis team through a partnership with the Sheriff’s Office. The team began working in March and focuses on south Butte County. It operates similarly to the initial mobile crisis unit, formed with the Chico Police Department in March 2018. The team, made up of mental health counselors and peer specialists, works with law enforcement to de-escalate tense situations and provide support to individuals experiencing mental health crises, with the goal of reducing involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations. The team also follows up with those individuals and provides community outreach. The second unit is funded for three years with $514,000 from the Mental Health Wellness Act of 2013.

VOTING CHANGES FOR 2020

Come the March 2020 primary, Butte County will implement a new system in which every voter will receive a mail-in ballot and can go to any “vote center” in the region. Per the Voters Choice Act of 2016, all counties must make this shift by 2022, but some can choose to pilot the program. Clerk-Recorder Candace Grubbs said her department chose to do so because more than 19,000 voters were displaced by the Camp Fire. Also, as of April, 71 percent of the 122,295 county voters already were registered to vote by mail. About a month before the primaries, voters will receive ballots, and nine drop-off boxes will be set up. Ten days before the election, 13 centers will open with voting machines, ballot drop-off, replacement ballots and registration assistance.

PROFESSOR JOINS SUPES RACE

Sue Hilderbrand is running for the Butte County District 4 Board of Supervisors seat next year. Hilderbrand (pictured), former director of the Chico Peace and Justice Center, is a political science and criminal justice professor at Chico State. District 4, which includes Biggs, Gridley, Thermalito, Durham and part of south Chico, is represented by board Chair Steve Lambert, who is not seeking a fourth term. Biggs Mayor Nathan Wilkinson and Tod Kimmelshue, a county water commissioner, also are in the running. Other seats up for grabs are held by Bill Connelly, of District 1 (Oroville, Cherokee, Yankee Hill), and Doug Teeter, representing District 5, which encompasses Paradise and other Ridge communities. 8

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JUNE 13, 2019

Cancer risks revealed CN&R uncovers document indicating Camp Firezone water could be more hazardous than previously disclosed

Lsupervisor in last November’s Camp Fire. So as the Butte County whose district includes the Ridge, he’s speak-

ike 90 percent of his neighbors, Doug Teeter lost his home

ing up not only for his constituents when he advocates for things like clean water—he’s speaking for his family, too. “Early on, when the contaminants were identified, with benzene being the marker, I did a lot of my own research through [Environmental Protection Agency] documents online,” he told the CN&R. “It can cause an increased risk of leukemia.” Little has been done in Teeter’s opinion to ensure the health of people living in the Camp Fire burn zone, who are bathing in and in some cases drinking potentially contaminated water. He was unaware, however, of a document this newspaper obtained via the Public Records Act that suggests a significantly higher risk of cancer and other adverse health effects in the Camp Fire zone—information that has not been disclosed to the pubstory and photo by lic. The Department of Drinking Water, Meredith J. part of the State Water Resources Control Cooper Board, was provided that information months ago. That department isn’t doing m ere d i t h c @ n ew srev i ew. c o m enough, overall, to protect Camp Fire zone residents’ health, Teeter asserted. “The Board [of Supervisors] wants clean water. Public Health wants clean water. We want the Department of Drinking Water to take ownership of that,” Teeter said. “That should be their cup of tea. That’s what they do. It blows my mind that no one wants to say, ‘Yeah, we’ll take charge of that.’” The aforementioned document was produced by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), which is part of the California Environmental Protection Agency, and provided to the water board in April. It outlines the effects of high levels of benzene—the main chemical compound being found in the water after the Camp Fire—on children and adults, based on daily exposure for one year. For example, an infant drinking water with 26 parts per billion of benzene has a 1 in 40,000 chance of developing cancer. At 1 ppb, the water board’s designated maximum level for

public health, that chance is 1 in a million. “These are estimates, but any cancer case is one too many,” said Sam Delson, deputy director of external and legislative affairs for OEHHA. “I’m a cancer survivor myself. … Our work here at OEHHA, we assess risks but we don’t manage them. [This data] informs the activities of the water board.” The OEHHA short-term exposure data estimates risk based on 1 ppb up to 900 ppb. When asked why it stopped there, Delson said that was the highest level of contamination found—in the Paradise Irrigation District (PID); the highest within the Del Oro Water Co. to date is 46 ppb. According to another state water board document obtained by the CN&R via the Public Records Act, however, a test taken on Jan. 31 on Lancaster Drive in Paradise tested positive for 2,217 ppb of benzene. Delson said he’d have to check on that number, as he was unfamiliar with it. “I do not know why [the water board is] not being upfront with the


Water in the Camp Fire burn zone has been found to be contaminated with benzene—and other chemicals—due to burned plastic pipes.

public about that number,” said Andrew Whelton, a national expert on largescale water contamination who has been consulting with the PID since February. The CN&R contacted three people at the water board for comment; one replied by press time but could not speak to the questions presented. At Tuesday’s Board of Supervisors meet-

ing (June 11), Teeter expressed concern that the water agencies in the Camp Fire zone were operating independently and that little was being done to help homeowners determine their water’s potability. No. 1 on his list of priorities: a standard method of testing the water to ensure its safety. No. 2 is a set of guidelines for homeowners on what they should be doing. “It’s really frustrating,” he told the CN&R. “Here we are, seven months after the fire, and we don’t have a uniform testing procedure that is peer-reviewed across the experts in the potable water field. “And no one has taken ownership of [what happens] beyond the meter,” he added. “Homeowners need to have a procedure so they know their homes have a clean water source.” That’s been the rallying cry for Purdue University professor Whelton since he first was asked to consult on PID’s post-fire system issues. Without a standardized method of testing, the two water purveyors in the region—PID in Paradise and Del Oro in Magalia and its environs—have been left to determine their own. PID has chosen to follow the advice of Whelton and his colleagues and is doing comprehensive testing while maintaining a do-not-drink advisory; Del Oro is conducting simpler testing and has told customers all along that its water is fine to drink. “Del Oro has issued no advisory, even though they have contamination,” Whelton said. In April, three tests in the Paradise Pines area came back positive for more than 1 ppb, the highest being 15.2 ppb, and in May two out of four tests in the Magalia area topped 1 ppb. The key: a standard approach, Teeter said. “It just casts doubt when it’s not uniform. It’s got to be a peer-reviewed testing procedure, not just a couple scientists saying, “Yeah, this is it!’” Ω

Insurance fallout

Tami Ritter, 3rd District Butte County supervisor. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Homeowners face policy cancellations, rising premiums post-Camp Fire Forest Ranch resident Deanna Roesler was

notified a couple of months ago that her annual home insurance premium was set to jump from about $2,700 to $10,000—roughly a 270 percent increase. Roger Campbell found himself in a similar situation. The retired Forest Ranch resident said he received a policy renewal notice in April indicating his annual premium was set to spike 267 percent—from about $3,100 to $11,400. And for Caitlin Dalby, a middle school teacher in the same foothills community, the news was even more dire: She said her insurance company of the last four years, American Reliable, told her in January her policy was not being renewed. It was “shocking” and “disappointing,” Dalby told the CN&R. In the wake of several devastating fire seasons in California, homeowners living in designated high-fire-risk areas have confronted a new reality—home insurance policies that are not being renewed or have become downright unaffordable. Butte County Supervisor Tami Ritter, whose district encompasses Forest Ranch, Cohasset and east Chico, has heard the complaints. On Tuesday (June 11), the Board of Supervisors, at Ritter’s request, approved

sending a letter to California Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara urging his office to consider supporting legislative remedies and other solutions for residents living in highfire-risk areas, including those living in the wildland-urban interface (WUI). Following the Camp Fire last year, the letter states, “we are hearing concerns of a potentially new catastrophic event: the inability to find adequate and affordable property insurance. It has been reported that several major insurers are canceling and pulling back from writing new policies in the WUI. It has also been reported that premiums in higher risk areas have increased significantly, without specific standards being in place to appropriately assess the underwriting of homeowners’ insurance.” Ritter told the CN&R that insurance

SIFT ER Chico cops get an ‘F’ Campaign Zero—an activist organization working to address police violence “by limiting police interventions, improving community interactions, and ensuring accountability”—just published a Police Scorecard with grades for California police departments. Chico got an “F,” scoring only 34 percent and ranking a lowly 92 out of the 100 most populous municipalities in the state. Carlsbad had the highest score, at 90 percent— the only “A”—while Beverly Hills was the worst of the bunch at 20 percent. All told, 78 of the police departments received an “F.” Department grades were based on data from 2016-17 on a range of factors, including police violence (four deadly force incidents in Chico—including two fatalities—25 complaints of police misconduct),

police accountability, approaches to policing (87 percent of Chico’s arrests in 2016 were for low-level misdemeanors or drug offenses) and department policies (they don’t ban choke holds or shooting at moving vehicles, nor do they require de-escalation). Data was collected from official databases (including the California Justice Department’s Open Justice site) and via public records requests to police departments. For the full report, go to policescorecard. org/?city=chico

companies appear to be targeting her rural constituents simply by the ZIP code in which they reside. She said she’s seeking regulations or additional oversight so that “after something like this happens, people cannot be canceled or have a renewal fee that is so outlandishly inflated.” Ritter understands that insurance is a riskbased business, she said, and companies have determined their risk has increased following the Camp Fire and other fires throughout the state. But she added that it’s not appropriate for homeowners’ premiums to be “jacked up” by hundreds of percentage points or not renewed simply because of where they live, or without assessing what a property owner has done to mitigate fire risk. “With climate change,” she said, “we’re all going to be in a ZIP code that’s problematic—whether it’s fire or flooding.” A state law went into effect in January that bars insurers from canceling or refusing to renew policies for homes in and adjacent to a wildfire zone for one year after a state of emergency has been declared. The law, however, does not apply retroactively. Lara, the insurance commissioner, did not respond to requests to his office for an interview. In May, the state Department of Insurance, which he oversees, announced wildfire insurance losses related to fires last November topped $12 billion. A press release further added that the department was working to address “wildfire insurance issues,” targeting insurance affordability and availability, as well as identifying ways to improve the Fair Access to Insurance Requirements (FAIR) plan, “the state’s independent insurer of last resort.” Forest Ranch residents Roesler, Campbell and Dalby all have opted to insure their homes through the FAIR plan, receiving policies that, while more affordable, provide only basic fire coverage. Homeowners can choose to supplement their FAIR plan policies with additional coverage—such as liability and theft—through general insurers. Roesler, who previously held a policy with Scottsdale Insurance Co., said there was no way she could afford the $7,000 to renew her policy. She said she is grateful the FAIR plan exists but is unsure what the future holds. Her neighbor, she said, has decided to move away. The effects of the Camp Fire, both inside and outside the fire zone, have been farreaching, and they are affecting vulnerable populations such as the elderly, Dalby said. “It feels like it just keeps going.” —ANDRE BYIK a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m

NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D JUNE 13, 2019

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CHAT, Torres partner to house families When Kimberly Meriweather arrived

at the Torres Community Shelter with two of her children a few months ago, she was desperate. Her youngest son, Charles Steele Jr., has physical and intellectual disabilities, and she knew it would be a difficult transition for him, she told the CN&R. But she was out of options: They were no longer able to stay with a family member they’d been with since 2015, and finding a place to rent on her limited income proved fruitless. Just the disruption of his normal routine was unsettling—Charles had violent meltReach out: downs at the Visit gofundme.com/ shelter, where chat-simplicity-village for they shared Simplicity Village or call a room with 520-6412 to help HUSH families. other families. It was the first time in his life, however, that Meriweather recalled seeing others respond with a desire to help. The staff of the Torres Shelter didn’t look at the family “like we did something wrong,” she said, tears welling in her eyes. Meriweather, a single mother, shared all of this from the comfort of her own living room in central Chico. She moved in about two weeks ago, along with Charles and two of his siblings. Her family is among the first to be housed as a part of the Chico Housing Action Team’s (CHAT) latest program, 10

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Hand Up Supportive Housing, or HUSH. The organization is partnering on the effort with the Torres Shelter, which provides case management. This is possible via a $455,000 Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) grant awarded to CHAT in March by the Butte Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care (CoC) to house a minimum of 10 families. Five have found homes so far. “This is an awesome program … it means that my kids are stable,” Meriweather told the CN&R. “We feel like more of a family now.” Meanwhile, meeting the needs of families has been a focus of the Torres Shelter as well. Executive Director Joy Amaro told the CN&R that her organization will apply for state and federal grants through the CoC this year, with the goal of establishing a separate family shelter. The shelter had been pursuing low-barrier status. However, families steadily continued to seek its services: for the past two full years of data available, the shelter served 133 children one year and 115 the next. As a result, the shelter—which is at capacity—has continued drug testing and separates families from the rest of the guests. As families have moved into HUSH homes, more have filled their place. “Until there’s an actual family shelter established, we cannot go completely low-barrier

because we do not have a place for [families] to go permanently,” Amaro said. For CHAT, the population became a

priority over time. Co-founder Leslie Johnson said the volunteer organization has about 30 homes it subleasesto single adults, seniors and students via its Housing Now program, in which multiple single tenants pay for their own room and utilities (about $450 per month). “We began to realize that there are a lot of families, and especially after the fire, families living in cars, vans and garages,” she said. “So we definitely wanted to see what we could do to help.” Here’s how HUSH works: CHAT holds the lease on a property and subleases to the families, offering them permanent supportive housing and subsidized rent—and tenants pay 30 percent of their income. Johnson said the organizations work with the families in the hopes that they either will assume the full rental amount or move to another home in two years, when the grant funding expires. CHAT addresses any property or utility issues and delivers food. Amanda Gaylord, the Torres Shelter’s family case manager, says she works closely with the families to create their own plans depending on their needs, including budgeting, cooking and working with schools and medical providers for their children. For Meriweather, Gaylord has been a tireless guide: Most recently,


Same Day Service Kimberly Meriweather (left) recently moved into  a home with three of her children—pictured  are Charles Steele Jr. and Courtney Morrison  and dog Baby Bear—with the help of the Chico  Housing Action Team and Torres Shelter. Photo by AshiAh schArAgA

she found the family a parent-child interaction therapist to help Charles manage his behavior and facilitate family communication. Gaylord says she feels blessed to share the journey with these families. Seeing as the shelter is full, “this program couldn’t have come at a more beautiful time, because these families deserve the housing and they’re working hard.”

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CHAT also has been busy fundraising

for its Simplicity Village tiny-home community. The nonprofit has thus far raised $43,000 toward its $100,000 target; four tiny homes have been built and about five more have been sponsored. The goal is to break ground by August, Johnson said, and to get its first residents housed before the year’s out. It’ll all depend on funding: Because the property on Notre Dame Boulevard is undeveloped, there are significant costs to set up utilities. The completed project is slated to include 33 homes for about 45 seniors (some will be couples) with a central laundry room, restrooms and kitchen. CHAT floated the idea of a tiny-home village five years ago. City staff began working with the organization on the concept in November 2017, but official support arrived in October 2018, when conservative former Councilman Andrew Coolidge joined his liberal colleagues in declaring a shelter crisis, paving the way for CHAT’s project (and allowing organizations to apply for the HEAP funds). The location on Notre Dame Boulevard, however, did not receive a green light until the new council was sworn in this last December. Johnson said there was some “reluctance and resistance” to Simplicity Village at first because people were worried it would establish a shanty town. “I think as a society we’re willing to start looking at alternatives and figure out other ways to house people [now],” Johnson said. “We can go smaller and still have good, solid, nice-looking homes for people … that are of a more modest size and a modest cost.” —AsHiAH sCHArAgA ashiahs@ n ewsr ev i ew. com

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HEALTHLINES Judith Parker hands out treats, homemade by a volunteer, at the Old Orchard RV Park in Orland. She says White Pony Express delivers there to at least 100 Camp Fire survivors staying in 50 trailers. PHOTO COURTESY OF WHITE PONY EXPRESS

Long-range sustenance Bay Area volunteers deliver food, support to Camp Fire survivors by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

W communities last November, Judith Parker took in the disaster from afar. She

hen the Camp Fire enveloped Butte County

and her husband, Charles, live in Walnut Creek. Both volunteer with White Pony Express—a nonprofit that distributes surplus food and donated goods around Contra Costa County—but had no direct connection

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to events here. Since then, she’s become so enmeshed in the lives of survivors that—to her embarrassment—she’s picked up the nickname Saint Judith. Parker coordinates White Pony Express’ program, in collaboration with the North State Food Bank, to serve fire survivors displaced from their homes. From the Bay Area, teams (which sometimes include one or both of the Parkers) drive refrigerated delivery vans full of fresh food, clothing and other necessities to about 300 people living in trailer parks and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) housing

located far from full-service grocery stores; plus, to over 200 people in Concow. They’ve done this every week since December—following daily runs in the immediate aftermath—and recently received a $5,000 grant from the North Valley Community Foundation to continue through October. “Their help has been greatly appreciated,” said Tom Dearmore, who manages the food bank operation in his capacity as community services manager for the Community Action Agency of Butte County. “The fire victims … are so spread out that logistically it would just be [impossible] for us to do without more staff and a vehicle.” Parker knows the challenge—now. When she stepped up, after White Pony Express founder Carol Weyland Conner proposed the Camp Fire outreach, “I thought I was just going to make a few phone calls. Now I spend between 15 and 20 hours a week, and I’m usually up there in person every two weeks.” She’s developed close relationships. More than just sustenance, Parker said, White Pony Express provides support: a hug, a shoulder to cry on, a referral to someone local for assistance. “Some of the stuff is very basic,” she continued, such as making a doctor’s appointment or refilling prescriptions, “but some of those things, if they don’t have help, it turns into a crisis.” As an example, Parker spoke about an older man staying in Corning, in the RV Park at Rolling Hills Casino. (For confidentiality, the CN&R will refer to him as James.) After several deliveries to the trailer park, Parker learned about James, who was recovering from a stroke. “He had not had any good food for over a week—he’d just been eating whatever he could scrounge around,” she recalled, “and he ran out of his medications and had no way to get to the pharmacy.” Parker recruited volunteers to pick up his medicine. James then wrote a note asking for a visit from a pastor. Parker put out a call for clergy, via Facebook, and got an affirmative response. White Pony Express also brings clothing and items from its general store. On the sheet indicating his needs, James wrote that he had no blankets and only one set of clothes. Parker, on her own, bought him a blanket, unpacked it and washed it, “so it would be nice and soft.” She met James the following week.

“He just couldn’t speak; he just started crying—and he just kind of walked off,” Parker said. “He’s on my mind a lot.” White Pony Express launched in September 2013 to realize an opportunity Weyland Conner saw: to give hungry people the food discarded by eateries and retailers strictly for commercial reasons, such as appearance or artificial sell-by dates. In five years, the organization has delivered over 8.7 million pounds of food, plus 500,000 other items, to over 70,000 residents of Contra Costa County. Disaster response—anywhere—wasn’t part of the plan, until the Camp Fire. “Believe me, we’re as surprised as anyone,” Parker told the CN&R by phone. “We hadn’t anticipated this. But because our mission is to reach out to all those in the community who are in need—our slogan

HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT

Pins and needles The smoke may have cleared, but the effects of the Camp Fire still live in the fiber of our collective being. Thanks to the Butte Strong Fund—a relief effort founded by the North Valley Community Foundation, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. and the Aaron Rodgers NorCal Fire Recovery Fund—Chico Community Acupuncture is offering free treatments to Camp Fire survivors, many of whom are still in the throes of grief, anxiety, depression, stress and trauma recovery. A mainstay of traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture has been used for centuries to release the body’s natural pain killers, reduce inflammation and increase blood flow for healing. Treatments are by appointment only—visit chicocommun ityacupuncture.com or call 345-5300 for more information.


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is ‘All of us taking care of all of us’—when we heard of this disaster, it really touched the core of who we are. “Our hearts felt called.” The North State Food Bank, meanwhile, started receiving additional donations. An organic food manufacturer shipped products from Wisconsin. A CSA (community-supported agriculture) in the Davis area offered boxes of fresh produce. But stocking 52 pantries throughout six counties, covering 12,000 square miles, already had Dearmore’s four-person team stretched thin. “We’re a little busy moving food to begin with, and then after the fire, the flow of food probably increased tenfold,” he said. The partnership with White Pony Express proved fortuitous. “They’ve added another, human dimension to this delivery,” Dearmore added. “We’re dropping off food; they’re giving food and [somebody] to lean on. It’s more than just food for them.” As rewarding and important White Pony Express considers the effort, Parker’s group knows it can’t serve as a long-term solution.

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 2

Giving to the givers:

White Pony Express will receive matching funds for contributions made by Sunday (June 16)—visit whiteponyexpress.com for details.

Each run takes eight hours: three to get here, two for deliveries, three to return. Most times, volunteers don’t have time for a break. White Pony Express and the North State Food Bank are working with other local groups to develop what Dearmore calls a Disaster Feeding Plan, for this and any future crisis. “Personally, I have felt very connected to this community,” Parker said, “even though I’m three hours away. Through social media and contact with people, I feel I’m an integral part of the recovery program.” As evidenced by her saintly nickname. “I politely tried to decline [the moniker],” she said with a chuckle, “because I’m just one person. There’s all the people in the organization behind us doing this. “All of our volunteers who sign up for these food runs, it’s what they want to do.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE

Recognize the warning signs

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June is Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, and there is no time like the present to learn the warning signs of the disease and how they differ from general age-related brain decline. Friends and family may become concerned before a person notices any changes in memory, behavior or abilities, while other times a person might recognize indicators of the disease before it becomes apparent to anyone else. Look out for memory loss that makes planning, problem solving or completing simple tasks challenging. Confusion with time and place or difficulty speaking and writing also could be signs of something more serious. Be mindful of mood or personality changes and withdrawal from work or social activities. Poor judgment and the propensity to misplace things also are concerning behaviors. If you or someone you care about are experiencing any of these signs, consult a doctor. Early diagnosis allows for prompt treatment and planning for the future.

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HEALTHLINES

Senior Companion Volunteers Needed Give the Gift of Friendship! Join Senior Companions Today!

The Senior Companion Program is open to volunteers 55 and over who can serve between 5 and 40 hours per week. You don’t need formal experience, just time, compassion and the desire to help. Companionship can include: transportation to medical appointments or the grocery store, going out to lunch, walks in the park, or simply just spending quality time together at your client’s home. You’ll receive pre-service orientation and ongoing training through PASSAGES Volunteer Services.

Orientation Training June 28th, 2019 • 10am-3pm 35 Main Street Room 200 on the second floor. Snacks & a nice lunch are served. *Call 530.898.6761 for more information. Must pre-register for orientation JUNE 13, 2019

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GREEN GREENWAYS

Panels be gone

Butte County to pilot California’s new solar recycling program by

Evan Tuchinsky evantuc hin sk y @ n ewsrev i ew. com

AdentsSteve Rodowick appreciates steps resitake to reduce their impact on the envis recycling coordinator for Butte County,

ronment. Solar-electric systems represent a significant step, reducing a household’s use of fossil fuels—in fact, starting next year, California will require rooftop solar for all new homes. Thing is, panels don’t last forever. They generally have lifespans of 20 years; their effectiveness tends to diminish by 1 percent per year. They’re also subject to damage. As older systems wear out, and more systems go up, the number of panels to dispose of multiplies. The issue: Where to take them? Though the state in 2015 reclassified solar panels from hazardous waste to universal waste—lessening restrictions for handling and disposal, on par with electronics—the California Department of Toxic Substances Control has not finalized regulations. The closest processing facilities are in Nevada and Texas. Landfills and recycling centers don’t accept solar panels. Rodowick said install-

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ers frequently ask him, “What do we do with these?” His answer applies to property owners, too: “What I can tell them right now is, ‘Sit on them, stockpile them, till things change.’ Currently it would be a huge expense to palletize, shrink-wrap and ship these as hazardous waste to whatever facility in the country would take them. “These panels started to go on roofs 30-some-odd years ago; they’re coming off— so there’s a huge backlog of first-generation panels needing to be dealt with, and there’s no place to put them right now.” Rodowick serves on the board of the California Product Stewardship Council (CPSC), an organization representing local governments and businesses seeking solutions to end-of-use problems such as this. Laura Brasch, an industrial economist and scientist who’s special projects manager for the CPSC, said a survey recently conducted by the group found nearly 21 percent of Butte County residents plan to install solar systems in the next five years and just over 11 percent already have solar. “Butte County is at the forefront, especially with all the houses that are going to be rebuilt [from the Camp Fire]—just so many more solar panels,” said Brasch, a Paradise native. “People want renewable energy, and it’s a great option—we just need to make sure, as we switch technological systems, we

Learn more:

Visit calpsc.org/webinars to view a webinar from the California Product Stewardship Council on the solar panel pilot program, which will go live today (June 13) at 11 a.m.

have the infrastructure and education for endof-life management.” Toward that end, Butte County is joining the city of Santa Monica in a pilot program for solar panel disposal. The county, in conjunction with Oroville, received a grant from the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) to help the state move forward. A portion of the grant—which also promotes refillable propane cylinders—will be used to create surveys to determine the amount and types of solar panels in the county, as well as organize a take-back event where the county would accept and ship discarded panels. Brasch anticipates the event occurring early next year. Rodowick, retiring in August after 16 years with the county, won’t be on the job at that point but plans to remain on the CPSC board. Lance Klug, spokesman for CalRecycle, told the CN&R via email that “Butte County’s $100,000 grant project is just one example of the proactive steps California is taking to develop the infrastructure we need to safely manage solar panels and other emerging technologies. CalRecycle will continue to work alongside our state and local partners to pursue innovative solutions to [household hazardous waste] management that protect the health of Californians and their environment without creating undue burdens on local governments or ratepayers.” Solar panels pose a disposal challenge

because their components vary widely. Equipment from different manufacturers and eras contain vastly different materials. Some early models don’t even have a manufac-

turer’s identifier or serial number. Opening up a panel, Rodowick said, can present “a big unknown.” Contents may include heavy metals such as chromium, selenium, lead and arsenic—“so they are indeed hazardous.” “There’s been no tracking of what manufacturer produces what type of panel,” he added. “Some are relatively benign, some aren’t; nobody knows which are which.” CalRecycle and the CPSC hope the pilot program sheds light on what panels are prevalent. Butte County will act as the rural, Northern California sample; Santa Monica will exemplify urban, Southern California municipalities. Brasch’s team will tally the general type of panel returned at each location’s takeback event. “We’ll know when the time comes closer how crazy it will be,” she said. “Will we get thousands of people, [to] where we have to turn them away? Will we only get a few hundred, to where we’re trying extra hard to fill our truck? “At this point, we’d rather fill the truck, have too many and find another way to ship the extra.” Surveying in advance will help with the forecast. Brasch also is hosting a webinar on the program today (see infobox). Rodowick is optimistic about the prospects. “There’s probably a tremendous amount of electronic waste recyclers currently out there who’d be more than willing to take on the task of recycling these panels; however, currently, they’re not allowed to,” he said. “If there’s money to be made, we’ll have companies out there willing to do it compliantly.” Ω

ECO EVENT

Plant parade Just north of Quincy lies a small patch of paradise called Butterfly Valley, protected and managed by the Plumas National Forest. It was named for its shape rather than an abundance of butterflies, but the area is fertile with plant life. It boasts insectivorous plants, orchids, lilies, ferns, poppies, buttercups and wild roses, and the peak blooming season is right now. Join the Mount Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society this Saturday (June 15) at 8:30 a.m. for a day trip to the area. Contact David Popp at 990-3703 or Marjorie McNairn at 343-2397 for details.


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS photo By AshiAh schARAgA

15 MINUTES

Wine, beer and Bible hobbies

electric ride Jasper Hudson already knows what he’ll be getting his son, Ryker, when he goes off to college: an electric bike. This is because e-bikes are an efficient and affordable way for people to get around, and they provide a recreational outlet, too, he told the CN&R. Hudson, who has a business degree and has worked in the outdoor retail industry since 2003, just opened Pedego Electric Bikes in downtown’s Garden Walk Mall. The parent company is headquartered in Fountain Valley and was founded in 2008. The Chico location offers models ranging from cruisers and commuters to more expensive road and mountain bikes (plus trikes and tandems) starting at just under $2,000. Hudson owns another Pedego storefront and Jefferson State Adventure Hub in Redding, where he lives with his son, wife Melissa, and their dog, Zip. Find Pedego Electric Bikes on Facebook, and keep an eye out for a grand opening event in July.

Why go for an electric bike? The average person buying a Pedego [bike] is 65 years old, company-wide. A lot of people are getting Pedegos because they thought that they … couldn’t do anything more, physically. Not that that’s the only people it works for—I’m physically fit enough to ride

THE GOODS by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

We’re still in the midst of Butte County Wine Week and I stumbled upon another tidbit of wine-related news, so here goes. I’ve been eagerly awaiting the opening of The Allies Pub in downtown Chico by the folks behind Bulldog Brewery. The photos on Facebook look really cool—tile ceiling with orbital chandeliers; ornate wood paneling lining the walls; hand pulls imported from historic English pubs. They’re putting the finishing touches on the place and hope to be open in the next few weeks. But wait, there’s wine news here! They recently announced a partnership with Chico’s Roney Wines, whereby they’ll pour four of the winery’s vintages—two zins, two cabs—by the flight, glass and bottle. Pretty cool! For more on Wine Week, see page 25.

Reopened/neWly opened More and more businesses continue to open or reopen

30 miles to get to work, [for example], but if I ride in a hot city like this, I’m going to be all sweaty and nasty when I get to work. So with the electric, you can make the bike do most of the work … [and] add miles to your ride on the way home. I try to go for the average Joe … who wants to go have some fun, back to that first love of biking.

How do the bikes work? It acts just like a normal bike, you just dial up how much assist you want. If you a get a cramp or … can’t ride anymore [for health reasons], they have a throttle [you] can twist and get home. [You plug it in] just like your cellphone. You can get a quick charge in two hours. If you have a full charge, I’ve taken that [mountain bike model] … 60 miles and had juice left.

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What do you enjoy about riding an e-bike? I like all of the different types of biking. The most negative thing that I hear when somebody sees that it’s an electric bike … is, “Oh, that’s cheating.” And I instantly know that person’s never ridden an electric bike. I’ve taken that mountain bike [model] out there into Whiskeytown National [Recreation Area] and done a 60-mile ride and come home dead as I wanted to be. I feel like I just went out and kicked my butt. On a normal, nonmotorized bike, I would have had the same fitnesslevel experience at 20 miles. I get to see a whole lot more. So, you can get as much of a workout out of it as you want, you can get as little of a workout as you want— but you have the option. —ASHIAH SCHARAgA as h i a h s @new srev i ew. c o m

in the Camp Fire area, which is healing for the community even if the rebuilding of homes hasn’t caught up just yet. The trend when it comes to food establishments clearly is leaning toward the mobile model—which makes sense, since potable water is not yet available to Paradise Irrigation District customers. But food is necessary—look at all of the cleanup crews hard at work removing debris and preparing for rebuilding. What’s neat is that I haven’t even heard of half of the trucks currently on the Ridge. Two that stood out: Bootleg BBQ (parked at 7515 Skyway) and Char-broil Burgers (by US Bank on Skyway). Keep it up! After years of refurbishing, the Lovelock Inn reopened a few months ago and will be celebrating its grand reopening this Saturday (June 15) with a show by Soul Posse. The place looks pretty spiffy. Head on over around 7 p.m. and support the “longest serving and surviving restaurant in Magalia.”

A stRAnge one When news hit this past week that arts and crafts chain Hobby

Lobby would be taking over the lease of the old Toys ‘R’ Us building on East 20th Street in Chico, I wasn’t sure what to think. I mean, Hobby Lobby does sell cool stuff for DIY-ers. But then there’s the weird Bible stuff. I’ll explain. First, I have nothing against religious folks. If religion guides you to be a better person, or helps you to get through tough times, more power to ya. What I don’t like is overbearance. Hobby Lobby comes close on that point. The company sued the federal government—based on religious objections—to not have to provide morning-after-pill health coverage to employees. It won. Another sketchy thing: It owns the Museum of the Bible, which opened in 2017 in Washington, D.C. That same year, the Hobby Lobby folks were ordered to return a bunch of Mesopotamian artifacts found to have been illegally taken from Iraq— and pay a $3 million fine because of it. In 2018, the museum’s lauded Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered to be forgeries. None of the above speaks to the company being a good employer or steward of our planet.

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Lost days

The state’s highest rates of chronic absenteeism are in rural areas, including Butte County

by

David Washburn photos by

Julie Leopo

I

t was a wonder Kaylee Adkins ever made it to school. The daughter of two heavy drug users, she lived a transient childhood—rarely staying for long in the same apartment, let alone the same school. She hardly saw her father, who was in jail or prison throughout much of her childhood. Kaylee’s circumstances caused her to routinely miss school days from the time she was in kindergarten through her high school years. The state now identifies students like her, who miss at least 10 percent of the school year, as “chronically absent.” It’s a problem that impacts school districts everywhere but is most acute in rural areas and small towns.

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When Kaylee, now 20, was in grade school, her mother’s pattern was to stay in a place until the eviction notice came, then run. Sometimes it would be to another part of Oroville, where her family was from. Other times it would be out of state to small towns in Texas or West Virginia. Both of Kaylee’s parents died during her high school years and she ended up living with one of her older sisters, who had a teenage daughter about Kaylee’s age who had two

young kids of her own. That made Kaylee a great aunt at the age of 16, and she was expected to stay home to take care of the children. Though they lived just a few blocks from Las Plumas High in the Oroville Union High School District, Kaylee missed all or part of 54 days—nearly a third of her senior year—her attendance records show. “I was always like one step behind,” Kaylee said in a recent interview. “Going to school was always dependent on what my family needed.”

She was among the 26 percent, or about 600 students, at Oroville Union High School District who were chronically absent during the 2017-18 school year, according to an EdSource analysis of California Department of Education data. Statewide, more than 700,000 students, or about 11 percent, were chronically absent. About 10 percent of the 1,000 districts statewide had rates near the level of Oroville Union High’s or significantly higher. Most of those districts were in rural areas,


About this story: Kaylee Adkins, who often had to stay home to care for her family, missed about a third of her senior year at Oroville’s Las Plumas High.

Students who regularly miss school can be found in cities, suburbs and small towns throughout California and the United States. Chronic absenteeism takes a toll on almost all aspects of student success and well-being, according to a large body of research. A student can fall significantly behind in their classwork after missing just a week. As more time is missed, the connections to school begin to fray. Students become more likely to use drugs and engage in other unhealthy behaviors, the research shows. And in the end, they are more likely to drop out.

A call to action

the analysis found: ● Of the 98 districts with rates higher than 20 percent, 84 were in rural areas. ● Of the 27 districts with rates higher than 30 percent, 26 were in rural areas. ● Of the 40 counties where rates were above the statewide average, 30 are rural as identified by Rural County Representatives of California, a statewide group.

These realities have been present in California’s rural districts for decades, yet only recently became visible to educators, parents and youth advocates. The state has long tracked schools’ truancy rates, but that only accounts for unexcused absences. It wasn’t until the 2016-17 school year that the state started reporting details on all absences—unexcused, excused and those due to suspension. The state used that information to generate a chronic absenteeism rate and included it on the California School Dashboard, the statewide report card for schools. On the state dashboard, schools with chronic absenteeism rates ranging from more than 10 percent to 20 percent are labeled as “high.” Rates above 20 percent are considered “very high.” But the state releases only the overall rate, not the breakdowns showing why students were absent. The Oroville Union High School District provided EdSource its records, which showed what’s behind the district’s 26 percent chronic absenteeism rate: 64 percent of days missed by district students in 2017-18 were unexcused, while 29 percent were due to excused absences, like illness and out-of-school suspensions. The rest Matt Reddam, licensed therapist and childhood trauma expert, works with students through a contract with the Butte County Office of Education.

were days missed due to in-school suspensions and independent study. The state’s action to collect more information on why students were missing school came after more than a decade of advocacy on the issue, most notably by Hedy Chang and her San Francisco-based organization, Attendance Works. Chang sees absenteeism as a serious threat to student achievement in every school, but she worries particularly about how it has overwhelmed rural communities. “It’s only in the past year and a half that people have realized they have a problem,” Chang said. “And in rural areas they have the fewest resources and the least access to the newest information about how to combat this.” Educators and advocates in Butte County and a growing number of areas in rural California have become leaders statewide in the search for solutions. They formed a multicounty coalition called the Rural Education Network and made chronic absenteeism one of its signature issues. The Butte County Office of Education (BCOE), along with its counterpart in Orange County and the UCLA Center for the Transformation of Schools, is leading a project, funded by a

$15 million state grant, to develop programs and strategies aimed at creating better school climates and keeping students in school. Yet, these efforts remain in their infancy. And those who are confronting the problem, whether in the classroom or in Sacramento, say they are still feeling their way in a fight against a complex and multilayered foe. The battle has become even more difficult in Butte County since November, when the Camp Fire decimated Paradise and neighboring communities. The wildfire killed 85 people, making it the deadliest in California history. It also destroyed or badly damaged several schools in the Paradise Unified School District and a handful of charter schools. The tragedy upended the school lives of thousands of students and families, leaving many traumatized, scrambling for not only which school to attend but also where to sleep. “We were already hurting for school-based interventions for mental health …. How do we deal with absenteeism? How do we deal with a growing sense of students not feeling a part of their system and their community?” said Matt Reddam, a consulting trauma thera-

This is the first in a two-part series on chronic absenteeism produced by EdSource. Read part two and find more reporting and analysis on California education trends and issues at EdSource.org.

pist with BCOE. “And the fires really just magnified that.” On the surface, explanations of why students don’t come to school can be as simple as the logistics of living in far-flung places and the challenges of getting students to and from school. But also contributing are socioeconomic conditions in rural communities that have deteriorated in recent decades and, in certain remote areas, a long-held cultural distrust of schools and other institutions among residents. Butte County, with over half of its population living in small towns or remote communities, is in the heart of rural California. Starting in the Gold Rush years and lasting into the early 20th century, natural beauty and robust mining and timber industries brought newcomers in droves. By the 1980s these industries were in decline, sapping the area’s economic vitality and opening the door for drugs, higher crime rates and other urban ills that rural areas were once immune to. Butte lags the state averages in most measures of socioeconomic health. It has higher rates of unemployment, poverty and single parent households; a lower median income and a smaller percentage of people with bachelor’s degrees, according to Federal Reserve data and U.S. Census estimates. Butte leads all California counties in reports of what are known as “adverse childhood experiences,” which can include everything from a divorce or a death in the immediate family to parental drug use and physical and sexual abuse.

Kaylee’s story Oroville, where Kaylee Adkins spent most of her childhood, shows the stresses of poverty and crime. Its 20 percent poverty rate among families is nearly twice the statewide number, according to Census estimates. And it has the highest crime rate of any California city with more than 15,000 people, according to an EdSource analysis of 2017 FBI LOST C O N T I N U E D JUNE 13, 2019

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LOST C O N T I N U E D

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Uniform Crime Report data. As the youngest of seven by nearly a decade, Kaylee watched as her father and then her four brothers were arrested for drug crimes and theft. Her two sisters, like her mother, got pregnant in their teens and dropped out of school. Kaylee says she felt like an afterthought throughout most of her childhood. Her mother’s drug addictions got in the way of basic parental duties like taking her to school or picking her up. “I remember just wanting to have parents who were there,” Kaylee said. “I wanted them to take me to the park and take me to Disneyland. I just wanted to do those kinds of things.” There were times when the police would come and force Kaylee’s mother to put her in school, she said. But that would often last only until the next move. At one point, she was sent to foster care. When Kaylee was 15, her mother died after a short battle with lung cancer. But before she died, she made Kaylee promise her that

Bobby Jones, head of the African American Family & Cultural Center in Oroville.

she would be the first person in the family to graduate from high school. “I pushed so hard to graduate because when my mom was sick that’s all she wanted me to do,” Kaylee said.

No more ‘mad mother’ The poverty over generations that afflicts Kaylee’s family touches every corner of Butte County and is something Bobby Jones deals with on a daily basis. As the executive director of the African American Family & Cultural Center, Jones works on prevention efforts to help all students avoid the traps of substance abuse and crime. Black students make up a small proportion of Oroville Union High’s enrollment—just over 4 percent—but they make up a disproportionate share of chronically absent students: 36 percent compared to 26 percent for all students, according to state data. “You look at the dynamic of

“It seems like a lot of the time the parents just don’t care.” –Bobby Jones, director of the African American Family & Cultural Center

Oroville itself, starting with the crack epidemic of the 1980s and now with the opiates, and it’s just a lost generation out here,” Jones said. Jones offers direct and early intervention as a member of the school attendance review boards, known as SARBs, for both the Oroville Union High and Oroville City Elementary districts. Students can be referred to an attendance review board after their third unexcused absence. Parents get multiple letters and, if needed, an invitation to appear before the board. In relatively rare cases, in which parents refuse to cooperate,

state law allows districts to refer them for prosecution. Jones says he is often taken aback by the reactions from parents who are brought before the review boards. “It seems like a lot of the time the parents just don’t care,” he said. “It’s so sad.” Sheri Hanni is BCOE’s SARB coordinator and serves as an overseer of the county’s district boards. She’s a 25-year veteran of the office and has over the decades spent more time than perhaps anyone else in Butte County dealing with these parents and trying to get their children back in school. She says she’s come to realize that punishing students and parents usually makes things worse—further alienating families who already feel like outsiders. “For so many years we’ve taken the ‘mad mother’ approach,” Hanni said, mimicking a mother shaking her finger at a misbehaving child. “If that approach was going to work, it would have worked by now.” The mad mother approach doesn’t go far in the Golden Feather Union Elementary School District, which serves several of the communities scattered in the mountains north of Oroville that are collectively referred to as the Ridge. The district—which is composed of Concow Elementary, a K-8 school, and a continuation high school for at-risk students— enrolled 250 students for the entire 2017-18 school year, state records show. Half of them were Two students (center, right) and an uncle (left) on their family property in a remote area above Oroville.

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chronically absent, according to the EdSource analysis, which is the sixth-highest rate in the state. Many of the families face the same problems of poverty and drugs seen in Oroville. Josh Peete, who is both the district’s superintendent and principal of Concow Elementary, describes how his students turn into noshows. First off, the school bus is the only reliable transportation option for many Concow students and the ride can be 30 minutes or more. So, missing the school bus can easily mean missing a day of school. In other instances, a family trip into town leads to a lost school day, Peete said. “Sometimes they’ll have a big day of shopping or taking care of family issues and won’t be able to pick their kids up after school,” Peete said. “So, we’ve got families basically sending their kids to school when they can.” Annie is in fifth grade at Concow Elementary and though she’s had her ups and downs, she generally likes going to school. She speaks with pride about the trophy she earned for perfect attendance during the 2015-16 school year. But when Annie graduates from the eighth grade, she said she wants to follow in the footsteps of her uncle and her sisters and be homeschooled rather than go to high school in Oroville, where students from the Ridge communities are often ostracized. “Some of the Concow kids, they get bullied because they are different,” she said. “Some of them aren’t able to take showers every night, do their hair all the time … some of us, why we live in Concow is we aren’t very rich and it isn’t the most expensive place.”

The search for solutions Reddam, the trauma therapist, says he regularly hears students express similar misgivings about school as Annie does. “What we see is that children’s experiences in education are associated with failure, with a sense of


Sheri Hanni, the school attendance review boards coordinator for the Butte County Office of Education, in front of one of the agency’s locations.

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teachers like Bethany Dorin, who had Kaylee for anatomy and biology. “I would struggle sometimes in her classes, but she’d always take extra time to help as much as she could,” Kaylee said. Dorin said she mentors anywhere from three to five students like Kaylee each year. She admits that it can “feel a little impossible to know how to move forward” with these students. “It’s hard not to feel resentful of the situation,” Dorin said. “And it’s hard not to immediately judge that student and immediately judge that family.” But Dorin stuck with Kaylee, mainly because she admired her honesty and her grit. “She didn’t have a lot of shame, you know,” Dorin said. “Kaylee would come up and just blurt it all out. But then she would listen and ask questions until she realized, ‘my gosh, I can get a good grade.’” Kaylee graduated last June. And now is enrolled in Butte College with hopes of becoming a dental hygienist. “My mom would be proud of me,” she said. Ω

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not belonging, with the sense of not being understood,” Reddam said. The $15 million state-funded project to improve school climates and keep students in school will design programs to prepare teachers and administrators in restorative justice, social emotional learning and other supports that emphasize mediating conflicts and building healthy relationships in schools. If done right, the programs will lead to schools where the bullying Annie fears rarely happens. If there are any positives coming out of the fire that swept through Butte County last November, it is that resources, including from many mental health professionals, have poured into the region to help with the recovery. Yet, those in the trenches acknowledge that nothing happens unless they meet their students where they are. Over the years, Kaylee got used to the eye rolls and brushoffs from some of her teachers when she’d come back from long absences. But things were different at Las Plumas. Dan Ramos, the school’s principal, wanted to help her. And so did her guidance counselor, who she said was always checking in to see how things were going. Kaylee benefited from the kindness of

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Arts &Culture Spirit OF Kuti Afrobeat torchbearers Antibalas celebrate 20 years of music

W at any given gig, Antibalas is more of a mini orchestra than a

ith 10 to 14 members onstage

band. The long-running Brooklynbased musical collective specializes in Afrobeat, a colorful mashup by of American jazz Howard Hardee and funk and elePreview: ments of traditional Antibalas performs West African music Wednesday, June 19, popularized by the 7 p.m. legendary Fela Kuti, Tickets: $22 one of the group’s Sierra Nevada Big Room guiding influences. 1075 E. 20th St. Saxophonist 892-4647 Martín Perna foundsierranevada.com ed Antibalas in 1998, assembling the original lineup with members of a funk and soul band he used to play with called The Dap-Kings. Though he remains the bandleader in some ways, the role has been democratized over the years. For example, Perna used to act as the conductor, but he passed those duties off to trombonists Aaron Johnson and Raymond Mason. “They are not only better at it, but the trombone works as a giant baton, visible by all,” Perna said in a recent interview. “So, for a lot of songs or cues, the trombone

will conduct.” Other times, the ensemble follows drummer Kevin Raczka. While Perna composed most of Antibalas’ early work, Duke Amayo (known onstage simply as Amayo) transformed into the band’s primary songwriter and frontman after subbing in as a percussionist for a one-off gig in 1999. “He kept coming back and has made an amazing progression into a multi-instrumentalist and dynamic frontman,” Perna said. Amayo grew up in Lagos, Nigeria, and frequented Kuti’s Shrine club. Antibalas comes to the Sierra Nevada Big Room Wednesday (June 19) as part of its 20th anniversary tour. Perna admits that “20 years is a long time to do anything,” and that managing the group’s many iterations has been a rollercoaster. Taking so many musicians on the road makes it difficult for the operation to pencil out financially. As a result, some members have been poached by more commercially successful acts like Arcade Fire, Iron & Wine, Jovanotti and Mark Ronson. “We all get offers,” he said. When bandmates leave for those sorts of opportunities, he says he gets it: Making music is an end in itself, but it’s still important to pay the bills. And he also understands that creative differences are inevitable when you put a dozen musicians in a room together. “I think that it can be stifling to

work in the band if what you want to do is aesthetically different,” he said, “and a lot of guys have gone off to do really fun and interesting projects.” Antibalas’ music is densely complex and colored with moments of free improvisation, emphasizing repetition, call-and-response and returning motifs. Most songs have a prelude section that introduces the melody, an instrumental solo, a vocal verse sung by Amayo, a chorus or refrain, and a restatement of the melody. Close listening is required to pick up on the structure, but that’s not really the point; it’s celebratory music meant to move listeners physically, and perhaps provide an evening’s escape from everyday stressors. “We hope to recharge their emotional batteries and create a space for celebration, positive release and imagining better futures,” Perna said. “Love takes practice and these shows are a workout. I can’t pretend to know what’s going through everyone’s minds. For some people, it’s escapist. For other people, it’s engaging with reality in the deepest sense. Whatever is going on, I see smiles on people’s faces and bodies moving, so we must be doing something right.” Ω

THIS WEEK BLOOMSDAY: Travel back in time to James Joyce’s Dublin streets and find out what would have happened if you had said, “yes.” Play by Steven Dietz. Thu, 6/13, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blureoomtheatre.com

DAMN YANKEES: Classic romantic-comedy about baseball and a deal with the devil. Fri, 6/14, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Suite F. chicotheatercompany.com

PULP: Noir mystery by Joseph Zettelmaier about a private

investigator who takes on the strangest case of his life. Thu, 6/13, 7:30pm. $10. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

14

FRI

Special Events DRAG KING SHOW: Celebrate Pride Month with performances from Mr. Will Ryder, Ty from The Golden Empire and many others. Benefits Chico Pride. Fri, 6/14, 9pm. $10-$12. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds in the park. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 6/14, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music 420 MATINEE MUSIC SHOW: Exhibition Tapes presents The Viles, Crash 45, Teeny Nymph, and Endless Afternoon for an early Friday mashup. All-ages. Fri, 6/14, 3:30pm. $7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

O.B.E.: Chill happy hour tunes. Fri, 6/14, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

IMPROVPALOOZA Saturday, June 15 Chico Live Improv Comedy

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

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JUNE 13, 2019


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

UNI AND HER UKELELE Saturday, June 15 Chico Branch Library SEE SATURDAY, MUSIC

DAMN YANKEES: See Thursday. Sat, 6/15, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

PULP: See Thursday. Sat, 6/15, 7:30pm. $10. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

16

PULP: See Thursday. Sun, 6/16, 2pm. $10.

THREE DOG NIGHT: Grammy-nominated rock band from the 1960s takes you to Shambala. Fri, 6/14, 8pm. $35-$75. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

Theater BLOOMSDAY: See Thursday. Fri, 6/14, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

DAMN YANKEES: See Thursday. Fri, 6/14, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166

15

SAT

Special Events BUTTE COUNTY OLIVE FESTIVAL: Celebrate the olive with food, music and a day full of fun activities. Sat 6/15, 9am. Old Courthouse Park, Oroville. (530) 533-9418 or (530) 877-7436. facebook.com/ButteCountyHistory

BUTTE-E-FULL EVENT: Pro Championship Entertainment presents a free familyfriendly variety show at the Paradise Rec Center featuring music, comedy, a DJ and more. Performers include Mitch Valentine, Robyn Valentine, Jerm Leather, Loki Miller and more. Sat 6/15, 5pm. Paradise Rec Center, 6626 Skyway, Paradise.

Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

DRAG SHOW: Watch your favorite drag performers slay the stage. Sat, 6/15, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

IMPROVPALOOZA: Chico Live Improv Comedy’s end of the season show, featuring Joshua Hegg on keyboard. Sat 6/15, 7:30pm. $10. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

RIB COOK-OFF: Anniversary party for Nor Cal Brewing Co. Proceeds and donations go to rebuilding the Honey Run Covered Bridge. Sat 6/15, 12pm. Nor Cal Brewing Co., 180 Erma Court, Ste. 100. 592-3845.

ROGER’S BIKES, BREWS AND BBQ MEMORIAL FUNDRAISER: Annual fundraiser in honor of

PULP: See Thursday. Fri, 6/14, 7:30pm. $10. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

exploring diverse plant life and seasonal flower display. Contact David Popp 990-3703 or Marjorie McNairn 343-2397. Sat 6/15, 8:30am. Chico Park & Ride, west lot, Highway 99/32.

4:20 MATINEE CONCERT Friday, June 14 Ike’s Place

SEE FRIDAY, MUSIC

Roger Duensing. Music by DJ Ron, all proceeds benefit those impacted by the Camp Fire. Sat 6/15, 12pm. $15. Sierra Steel HarleyDavidson, 1501 Mangrove Ave.

Theater

Special Events

FREE MOVIE: Free movie every week, call 8912762 for title. Sun, 6/16, 2pm. Butte County

share, an acoustic instrument, your voice, a song or your favorite joke. Small donation requested. Fri, 6/14, 5pm. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Meyers St., Oroville.

local cover band playing hits from the 1950s to today. Sun, 6/16, 3pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

DAMN YANKEES: See Thursday. Sun, 6/16, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166

Wildlife Academy 62 for a benefit 5K run. Race starts 8:15am, pancake breakfast following the run. Sun, 6/16, 7am. $30. One-Mile Recreation Area, Bidwell Park.

BUTTERFLY VALLEY BOTANICAL AREA: Full day of

SOUL POSSE: Celebrate Father’s Day with fun

SUN

5K SALMON RUN: Join the Butte College Fish and

POTLUCK, OPEN MIC AND JAM: Bring a dish to

Way, Corning. rollinghillscasino.com

JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION: Chico Honors Africa hosts benefit for Amma Culture – Education, Sciences & Arts, an African inspired resource for educators, family outreach and the general public. There will be food, music, dance, and local speakers. Sun, 6/16, 4pm. $25. Chico Women’s Club, AmmaCulture.org. 354-7018.

Music 11:22: Smooth tunes for vegan brunch with brand new local duo featuring Bradley Relf and Zic. Sun, 6/16, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. totr.org

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MON

Special Events YOUTH SERVICES SUMMIT: Community discussion regarding the challenges and needs that affected areas face during Camp Fire recovery. Mon, 6/17, 10am. The Terry Ashe Recreation Center, 6626 Skyway, Paradise.

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TUE

Music ANTIBALAS: Big-time Afrobeat big band from Brooklyn. Wed, 6/19, 8pm. $22. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

DWIGHT YOAKAM: Country music legend (and occasional actor) performs his award-winning catalog of classics. Sun, 6/16, 8pm. $25. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Everett Freeman

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 26

EDITOR’S PICK

STAND-UP COMEDY SHOW: Hosted by Mitch Valentine, featuring Mizz Alma, Jerm Leather and Dillon Collins. Sat, 6/15, 8pm. $10-$12. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

Music KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Chico’s famous duelers taking your requests. Sat, 6/15, 8pm. $7. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St. RON MATHEWS: Smooth brunch tunes. Sat, 6/15, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. UNI AND HER UKELELE: Summer Reading Series presents live music. This edition: fun singer/ writer and her ukulele. Free. Sat, 6/15, 2pm. Butte County Library. 1108 Sherman Ave.

Theater BLOOMSDAY: See Thursday. Sat, 6/15, 7:30pm. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at newsreview.com/ calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

THE REAL DEAL Longtime country star Dwight Yoakam’s latest album, Swimmin Pools, Movie Stars ... is a bluegrass reinterpretation of his own deep cuts, save for a sweet cover of one of the saddest songs of all time: Prince’s “Purple Rain.” The music legend has been in the business since the 1980s and has remained one of the best songwriters in the country genre, with a catalog of lyrics that will make you wonder how he knows you so well. Witness his honky-tonk stylings in person this Sunday (June 16) in the new amphitheater at Rolling Hills Casino and Resort.

The Viles JUNE 13, 2019

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JUNE 13, 2019

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Art BEATNIKS COFFEE HOUSE & BREAKFAST JOINT: Portrait and Figure Drawing, drawings and paintings on display by Chico Art Center artists. Through 6/28. 1387 E. Eighth St. chicoartcenter.com

BLACKBIRD: Reflections of a Matriarch, exhibit by local artist Ali Meders-Knight, with a focus on indigenous people. Reception Friday, June 14, at 7pm, music by Siana Sonoquie, AKA DJ Thrasher Trasher. Through 6/13. 1431 Park Ave.

CHICO ART CENTER: Small Works, group exhibit of 12-by-12-inch artworks. Through 6/28. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

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REFLECTIONS OF A MATRIARCH

HEALING ART GALLERY - ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Antonio Ramirez, photography by late Northern California artist. The Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 7/19. 265 Cohasset Road, 332-3856.

MAIN EVENT GALLERY: California’s Girl of the Golden Sunshine, Tehama County Arts Council presents retrospective exhibit of late California artist Babette Fickert Dowell›s work. Through 7/6. 710 Main Street, Red Bluff, 391-3259.

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Map It Out, exhibition of Northern California artists presenting works invented and inspired by the theme of maps. Works represent Chico, the Bay Area and Northern California. Through 7/28. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

ORLAND ART CENTER: Triple Exposure Crosscurrents, photography exhibit features artists James Canter, Stephanie Luke and Harvey Spector. Through 7/20. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

Museums BOLT’S ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: This fascinating, unique museum has over 12,000 hand tools on display, charting cataloging the evolution and history of tools. Closed Sundays. Through 6/15. $3. 1650 Broderick St, Oroville.

CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmer’s market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Remarkable Lives, exploring the intertwined worlds of birds and humans, in partnership with the Altacal Audubon Society and Snow Goose Festival. Exhibits include bird songs and behaviors, local photography and a robotic recreation of the late Jurassic Archaeopteryx. Through 7/31. Chico State.


SCENE

A Menu From Around the World • 10 New Menu Items • Breakfast & Lunch

Desiree St. Claire (Sarah Brown) presents her case to Det. Frank Ellery (Jeff Hohimer).

Noir on the Ridge

• Authentic Flavors - Exceptional Service!

PHOTO BY JAY JAMES

Breakfast Grill

3221 EsplanadE | 530.891.4500 | mon-fri 8am-2pm sUn 8am-1pm

chardonnay with scallops on Sunday. Sicilian Cafe, 1020 Main St.

Wine Bottles and Bubbly Mention Wine Week for 40 percent off bottles of champagne and 30 percent off bottles of wine. Crush, 201 Broadway St. chicocrush.com

Thursday, June 13 Paradise theater plays through the blackout

Nbut power blackout at intermission, to Paradise’s Theatre on the ot many plays could survive a

Ridge, which survived the Camp Fire, the show must go on, right? by That true grit Robert Speer served it well on rober tspeer@ Saturday (June newsrev i ew.c om 8), when PG&E pulled the plug powering a large swath of the Review: Sierra foothills. Pulp shows Thursday- It did so, it said, Saturday, 7:30 p.m. to lessen the and Sunday, 2 p.m., through June 23. chance of another Tickets: $12-$16 uncontrollable fire breaking out Theatre on the because of the Ridge 3735 Neal Road, wind—not that Paradise there’s much 877-5760 left to burn in totr.org Paradise. PG&E did provide advance notice of the possible shut-off, giving the TOTR troupe time to set up a backup flood light for the evening’s showing of the noir mystery/comedy Pulp. While it couldn’t salvage Gary Kupp’s clever spot-lighting design that added so much to Act One, at least the big light enabled the actors to finish Act Two, much to the delight of the audience. (By the way, when director Jerry Miller surveyed the crowd just prior to the performance, the theater was

more than half full, a good turnout for a company that has lost most of its Paradise base. In fact, all but about six of the attendees did not live on the Ridge. To Miller, that so many people drove to Paradise from elsewhere was an encouraging sign of how broad the theater’s fan base is.) Set in Los Angeles in 1933, Joseph Zettelmaier’s play is an often hilarious send-up of film noir and the pulp fiction popular during the 1930s and ’40s. As it opens, Frank Ellery (Jeff Hohimer), a hasbeen detective who never was, is sitting in his office, like Sam Spade in The Maltese Falcon, when a sexy dame (Sarah Brown) with an unlikely name, Desiree St. Claire, walks in and hires him to solve a murder mystery. Turns out St. Claire is a writer of pulp romance novels, and the dead man, Bernie Wolcott, was her literary agent. Wolcott was also the agent of three other writers of pulp fiction: Bradley Rayburn (Eric Ricketts), science fiction; R A Lyncroft (Tony Varicelli), horror; and Walter Kingston-Smith (Christopher Jones), hero pulps. The four writers were Wolcott’s only clients, and he was blackmailing every one of them, so to Ellery they were all suspects. The genius of Pulp is in its structure. As Ellery follows the threads that will lead to the unmasking of the killer, he goes

to each of their abodes, plunging us into the worlds of their novels. Lyncroft, for example, is creepy like someone out of the Addams family, while Rayburn, the sci-fi nerd, wears a crazy space helmet with colorful lights going on and off. Kingston-Smith sashays into his scenes like a bizarre Batman, half hiding behind his cape, and St. Claire works her romantic charms on Ellery, who can’t seem to decide whether she’s a murderer or a lover. This is all great fun, and very funny at times. Zettelmaier also injects some romantic tension into the tale, as Ellery and St. Claire work their way to love—or at least sex—in the midst of all this absurdity. Hohimer’s Ellery has a voice like Humphrey Bogart’s, and his character has a sly wit that gives everything he says extra meaning. His encounters with Brown, who makes an excellent St. Claire, are dripping with double entendres, and his first-person off-stage narration has an appropriately noir tone. Pulp sets a frenetic pace, with set changes every few minutes. Sometimes the noise of moving furniture overwhelmed Ellery’s narration, but that’s a fixable problem. Otherwise, this is a terrific show. I urge Chico theater-goers to make that short trip up the hill to support TOTR and enjoy this delightful production. Ω

The celebration continues Through June 16 Boochcraft at Bill’s Boochcraft hard kombucha $1 off all week. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St. billstownelounge.com

Bottles at The Lab Half off the purchase of bottles of wine all week. The Lab Bar & Grill, 250 Cohasset Road, Ste. 10. labbarandgrill.com

Chardonnay and Cheese Flight Try Poppy with goat cheese, Shooting Star with blue cheese and William Hill with brie for $15 all week. Butte County Wine Co., 1440 Myers St., Oroville.

Ciders at The Banshee A dollar off all ciders all week. The Banshee, 134 W. Second St.

Date Nights and Wine Flights Special wine flights and food pairings, “wine of the day” specials and a delicious meal pairing for two. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham. almendrawinery.com

Father’s Day Weekend Wine Treat Bring Dad in for his free wine tasting. Plus, buy one bottle of wine, get second half off Saturday and Sunday. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

Flights, Pairings and Pours Six different wine flights, plus daily by-the-glass wine selections of the higher-end offerings with the Coravin. Plus, locally sourced food specials. Christian Michaels Ristorante, 192 E. Third St.

Sours at B Street New York sours a buck off all week. Fri, 6/7, 11am. B Street Public House, 117 Broadway St.

Spike the Bottle Take 15 percent off all bottles of wine at Spike’s. Spike’s Bottle Shop, 1270 E. First Ave.

Wine and Cheese Free wine and cheese tastings Saturday and Sunday. Bangor Ranch Vineyard & Winery, 5768 La Porte Road, 707-480-1429, bangor-ranch.com

Wine and Dine at Sicilian Cafe Mention Wine Week for $5 glasses of wine, paired with an entrée, every night: chardonnay with prawn scampi on Thursday, pinot noir with seafood on Friday, merlot with butternut squash mezzaluna on Saturday and

Winery Tour • 1pm Take a winemaker-led tour of the Almendra Winery & Distillery—then stay for lunch or enjoy some wine or spirits in the elegant tasting room. RSVP required at facebook.com/AlmendraWinery. Free. Almendra, 9275 Midway Road, Durham. Robert Biale Vineyards Wine and Dinner Pairing • 5pm Join Red Tavern for a winemaker’s dinner with Robert Biale Vineyards. Four-course meal featuring pan-seared duck breast and grilled prime ribeye, paired with amazing wines from Robert Biale. $92. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade. redtavern.com

Market Madness • 7pm Belly Sutra belly dancing with special guest Kaira, plus $8 bottles of Nebbiolo. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

Patriotic Star Painting at Live Vine • 7pm Head over to Live Vine Winery, which overlooks the Afterbay, for a Thursday evening of wine and sweet time with friends painting a patriotic star. Tickets are $40 and include your first glass of wine, a 12-by-12 canvas, and step-by-step instruction. Live Vine, 652 Luds Way, Oroville. livevinewines.com

Friday, June 14 $5 Fun Friday • All day All tastings $5, half off the sparkling wine tasting. LaRocca Vineyards Tasting Room, 222 W. Second St. 800-808-9463. laroccavineyards.com

saTurday, June 15 Sangria and Nachos • Noon-5pm Head out to the vineyard overlooking the Afterbay for housemade sangria, paired with a top-notch nacho bar— pulled pork, melted cheese, all the fixins, for $7. Live Vine Vineyard & Winery, 652 Luds Way, Oroville. 530-566-4259. livevinewinery.com

Nascere Wine Release •

Noon-5pm Nascere Vineyards releases its 2014 Super Tuscan red blend, paired with food, in the beautiful tasting room. Nascere Vineyards, 3471 Durham-Dayton Highway, Durham. nascerevineyards.com

sunday, June 16 Farm to Cidery Dinner • 5pm Special Wine Week dinner and cider pairing, featuring food from TurkeyTail Farms. Tickets for sale at brown papertickets.com. $45. Lassen Traditional Cidery, 26 Bellarmine Court. lassencider.com JUNE 13, 2019

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NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 06/13—WEDNESDAY 06/19

GET SPIRITUAL

Livid

SWAMP ZEN: Local jam band plays the

patio. Thu, 6/13, 7pm. $3. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

THURSDAY NIGHT DJ: Beat the heat with a rotating list of DJs spinning all vinyl til late. Thu, 6/13, 8pm. Bill’s Towne Lounge, 135 Main St.

14FRIDAY

BASSMINT: Every Friday in the Peking Restaurant bar—bass music DJs and producers. Fri, 6/14, 9:30pm. $5. BassMint, 243 W. Second St.

LIVID & WORLD PEACE Tonight, June 13 1078 Gallery

BOSS 501: One-time local crew returns to town to play a mix of ska, rocksteady and reggae. DJs Circuit Tree and Wizz Fiyah join the mix. Fri, 6/14, 6:30pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

SEE THURSDAY

13THURSDAY

BRET BOLLINGER: The Pepper frontman goes solo. E.N. Young and Sensi Trails open. Thu, 6/13, 8pm. $10-$15. Lost on Main, 319 Main St. facebook.com/ lostonmain

EMMA GARRAHY & WILL HARTMAN: Emma Garrahy and Will Hartman cover hit songs from a variety of decades and genres with a bluesy twist. Thu, 6/13, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

LIVID: Doom metal band from Wisconsin is joined by World Peace

from SF for a night of hardcore at the gallery. Local support from End Game, Rogue Squadron and The Choice. Thu, 6/13, 7pm. $7. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

BRODIE STEWART BAND: Popular modern country band plays the Box. Veterans and enlisted military get in half-price at the door. Fri, 6/14, 9pm. $7-$10. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

RETROTONES: Classic rock and country tunes on the patio. Thu, 6/13, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

DJ EMVEE: Late-night happy hour

spins and dancing. Fri, 6/14, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

SOUL POSSE: Oroville Concerts in Park series features local cover band playing hits from the 1950s to today. Thu, 6/13, 6:30pm. Riverbend Park, 60 W. Montgomery St., Oroville.

DRAG KING SHOW: Celebrate Pride Month with performances by Mr. Will Ryder, Ty from The Golden

Soaring in from Baltimore via New Delhi is the visionary sitarist, vocalist and composer Ami Dang. You may have heard her music in a dream—you know, the one where you astro-travel. She weaves dance beats with sitar and crashing ambient noise and has toured with the likes of Grimes and Beach House. Sink into the soundbath this Sunday (June 16) at Blackbird, where she will share the bill with Kendra Amalie Music and local fave WRVNG.

Empire and many more. Benefits Chico Pride. Fri, 6/14, 9pm. $10-$12. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. ERIC PETER DUO: Smooth dinner tunes. Fri, 6/14, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: Four-man funk fusion band GravyBrain will get you dancing. Fri, 6/14, 7pm. City Plaza, downtown Chico.

KATIE BARRETT & ETHAN SWETT: Chill tunes, beer and food. Fri, 6/14, 7pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign up at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 6/14, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

SHANIA TWIN: Shania Twain tribute

to Shambala. Fri, 6/14, 8pm. $35-$75. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

SILENT DISCO: Top 40, old-school and EDM. Pop on your headphones and pick a DJ. Fri, 6/14, 8pm. $7. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St.

STILL KICKIN’: Relaxing end-of-the-

15SATURDAY

week tunes at the winery. Fri, 6/14, 6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

THREE DOG NIGHT: Grammy-nominated

ALEX JENKINS QUARTET CD-RELEASE SHOW: Sacramento jazz quartet

rock band from the 1960s takes you

joined by local jazz project Off the

Good Food, GReAt enteRtAinMent, 1st Anniversary & Rib Cook-Off SAturdAy, June 15 • NOON tO 10PM th

riB Cook-off ConteSt

Call or come by to enter! (530) 892-3845 180 erma Ct. Suite 100, Chico

$5 riB plAte!

donations & proceeds benefit rebuilding the covered bridge.

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Delicious Hot Wings & Nachos! 2-7pm Happy HouCrooRS LiGHt & $3 WeLLS

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Championship Entertainment presents free variety show featuring music, comedy and more. Performers include Mitch and Robyn Valentine, Jerm Leather, Loki Miller and more. Sat 6/15, 5pm. Paradise Rec Center, 6626 Skyway, Paradise.

15th Street

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Free Parking - Orders To Go

JUNE 13, 2019

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Clock. Sat, 6/15, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St. (916) 799-8751. tenderlovingcoffee.com

$2 dRAFt Bu

We now serve beer & wine. Ask about our Mimosas too! Open 5:30am to 3pm - 7 Days a Week

26

Ami Dang

band. Fri, 6/14, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

Your Neighborhood Place for Coffee, Food & More

~

Featuring Specialty Coffees Pastries Breakfast & Lunch Local Wines and Craft Beers 7am to 3pm Monday through Saturday 8am to 2pm Sunday 1414 Park Ave, Ste 120 Chico 530-809-1087 ~


THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22 band pours some sugar. Sat, 6/15, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

DRUG APTS, BLACK MAGNET, SHADOW LIMB

THE ROCKHOUNDS: Local band playing all genres for late-night happy hour. Sat, 6/15, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

Tuesday, June 18 Duffy’s Tavern

STAND-UP COMEDY SHOW: Hosted by Mitch Valentine, featuring Mizz Alma, Jerm Leather and Dillon Collins. Sat, 6/15, 8pm. $10-$12. The Spirit, 2360 Oro Quincy Highway, Oroville.

SEE TUESDAY

VIRGINIA MARLO: Piano and heartfelt vocals. Sat, 6/15, 6pm. Almendra Winery, 9275 Midway, Durham.

Drug Apts

CHRIS WENGER TRIO: Soulful dinner

tunes. Sat, 6/15, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

DRAG SHOW: Watch your favorite drag

performers slay the stage. Sat, 6/15, 10pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

IMPROVPALOOZA: Chico Live Improv Comedy’s end of season show, featuring Joshua Hegg on keyboard. Sat, 6/15, 7:30pm. $10. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

INDIGO GROOVE: Local band playing

soulful originals and covers. Sat, 6/15, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Chico’s famous duelers take your

requests. Sat, 6/15, 8pm. $7. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

MA BARKER: Classic rock, blues, pop and a little bit of country from four-man group. Sat, 6/15, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

MIXTAPE: Local cover band plays songs from yesterday and today. Sat, 6/15, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582

Esplanade.

NOCHE LATINA: Featuring El Yaki. Put on your nice clothes for a night of dancing to a wide range of Mexican beats. All ages. Sat, 6/15, 8pm. $30. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St., 520-3676.

PYROMANIA: Def Leppard tribute

16SUNDAY

AMI DANG: Baltimore-based artist

performs psychedelic ambient tunes with a sitar. She is joined by singer/guitarist Kendra Amalie, Ppoacher Ppoacher from Santa Fe, and Chico’s new favorite band WRVNG. Sun, 6/16, 6pm. $5. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

DIGGIN DIRT: Sierra Nevada Full Moon Series features popular eight-piece funk-rock band along with local jammers Smokey the Groove in the Hop Yard. Sun, 6/16, 7pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Hop Yard. sierranevada.com

DWIGHT YOAKAM: Country music legend (and occasional actor) performs his award-winning catalogue of classics. Sun, 6/16, 8pm. $25. Rolling Hills Casino, 2655 Everett Freeman Way, Corning. rollinghillscasino.com

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON: Smooth dinner tunes. Sun, 6/16, 6pm. 5th Street Steakhouse, 345 W. Fifth St.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a

Annie Fischer. Prize for first place, a portion of the proceeds go to a local nonprofit. Tue, 6/18, 6pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

19WEDNESDAY

ANTIBALAS: Big-time Afrobeat big

band from Brooklyn. Wed, 6/19, 8pm. $22. Sierra Nevada Big Room,

1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

OBE & LOKI: Duo plays 1960s and ’70s

hits. Wed, 6/19, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

OPEN DECKS NIGHT: Wanna be a DJ? Come to the DownLo and spin a set on the open decks. All you need is a USB drive or a laptop with the music you want to play. Wed, 6/19, 9pm. 319 Main St., 487-1050.

bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Sign-ups start at 8pm. Sun, 6/16, 9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

17MONDAY

THIRD MONDAY JAZZ JAM TRIBUTE TO PAT METHENY: Once a month jazz performance and open jam, always all ages, always free. Mon, 6/17, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St., 433-0414.

18TUESDAY

DRUG APTS: Trash Rock Tuesday presents punk band from Sac along with locals Black Magnet and Shadow Limb. Tue, 6/18, 8:30pm. $5. Duffy›s Tavern, 337 Main St.

TENDER LOVING TRIVIA: Test your

PUT SOME JAM ON IT

No-fail recipe for an archetypal hot summer night in Chico: one part funk band, two parts beer, add some bare feet and a bit of the outdoors to taste. This Sunday (June 16) the Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Hop Yard hosts Diggin’ Dirt (pictured), a Nor Cal rock/soul/reggae band reminiscent of Sly and the Family Stone. The booty-shaking starts with local funkadelics Smokey the Groove.

knowledge on a range of topics with

JUNE 13, 2019

CN&R

27


REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week Echo in the Canyon

A documentary on the Laurel Canyon neighborhood in the Hollywood Hills, specifically the music scene of the 1960s and the “California Sound” created by the area’s residents—which included members of the the Byrds, the Beach Boys, The Mamas and the Papas, Buffalo Springfield, etc. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

Late Night

Mindy Kaling wrote and stars in this dramedy about a fading talk-show host (Emma Thompson) who hires young Molly (Kaling) to join her all-male stable of writers with hopes of becoming relevant again. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

Party’s over

Men in Black: International

Disappointing ‘horror’ flick falls short of its promise Ma Trylines deranged, and the plot is so overstuffed with stoyour eyes may cross. But you’ve gotta give it he first hour of

is boring, the last half hour is

to Octavia Spencer in the role of “Ma,” as she likely strained a muscle keeping the film by afloat. Also doing their best are Neesa Sonoquie the great Juliette Lewis and criminally underused Allison Janney neesas@ and Missi Pyle in very minor newsrev i ew.c om roles. (Did they owe the director a favor?) The setup is a familiar one— new girl, new school, new podunk town. Maggie (Diana Silvers) and Ma her freshly single mother, Erica Starring Octavia (Lewis), have moved back to the Spencer, Diana Silvers, small Ohio town her mother grew Juliette Lewis and Luke evans. Directed by Tate up in. Fast-forward to Maggie Taylor. Cinemark 14, being recruited into the popular Feather River Cinemas. clique, which, with five teenagers Rated R. combined, has the personality of a dust mite. They are obsessed with drinking and being immature, but thoughtful, introspective Maggie cares none since she is lonely and has taken to the one named Andy (Corey Fogelmanis). Spencer’s Sue Ann (eventually nicknamed Ma) enters the picture when she agrees to buy them booze to drink down at the “rock quarry.” She says she had some good times there, too, when she was in high school, quickly winning their trust. She anonymously calls the cops on the kids, and the next time she buys them booze she invites them to party in her basement—no cops, there’s a bathroom, she even makes snacks! That a group of teenagers would willingly

2

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CN&R

June 13, 2019

choose to drink in a strange adult’s basement is about as believable as no adult in this small town noticing the cars of local teens parked in front of her house, but never mind. Sue Ann wears her hair in a bowl cut and dons scrubs most of the time. She is a lonely veterinary assistant who is bad at her job. There are sad flashbacks of her being bullied in high school, which ramp up to a humiliating sexual assault, but at her offthe-hook ragers she finally feels like one of the cool kids. Cue cringingly awkward dance scenes in slow motion to “Funky Town” and Ma stalking the teens on Facebook—the swings in tone and content could cause whiplash. Long story short, past injustices soon come to the surface, the teens get bad vibes and stop coming over, and Ma gets pissed. There are allusions to Munchausen syndrome and harsh echoes of the scars Ma carries from past abuse. Spencer emotes this pain with real tears, exhibiting shadows of rejection and fleeting moments of hope with a nuance that this movie doesn’t deserve. Leaning into Ma’s psychology and going full-bore serial-killer crazy would have offered a better payoff. Instead, the grand finale upends any semblance of character development as Ma orchestrates a series of punishments upon her enemies that only a bad veterinary assistant could imagine. Is this a horror film? No. But it is probably better than it should be and not nearly as good as it could have been. Ω

1 2 3 Poor

Fair

Good

4 Very Good

5 Excellent

The alien-fighting organization goes global, with young rookie Agent M (Tessa Thomson) partnering with Agent H (Chris Hemsworth) and traveling around the world to protect civilization from creatures from other planets. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Shaft

Tim Story (Barbershop, Fantastic Four) directs this latest update of the 1970s blaxploitation film series, with three generations of the Shaft detective family—John “J.J.” Shaft Jr. (Jessie Usher); his father, John Shaft II (Samuel L. Jackson, reprising his role from the 2000 entry); and his uncle John Shaft Sr. (the OG, Richard Roundtree) working together to solve a case. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing Aladdin

Guy Ritchie (Sherlock Holmes, Snatch) wrote and directed this live-action adaptation of the classic Middle Eastern folk tale starring Naomi Scott as Princess Jasmine, Mena Massoud as impoverished thief Aladdin, and Will Smith as the genie who can make wishes come true. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

4

Avengers: Endgame

There are tons of questions this movie needed to answer: Is everybody really dead? Where’s Thanos (Josh Brolin)? Where’s Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner)? Is Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) doomed in space? Does Star-Lord (Chris Pratt) still have his Walkman in the great beyond? And, how can I really talk about anything specific in this film without becoming the Spoiler King? I can say that the movie answers many of the questions everyone’s been asking, and more, thanks to another well-balanced screenplay and a crack directorial job from the team of Anthony and Joe Russo. I can also tell you that the movie borrows a lot from Back to the Future Part II, and that the Hulk undergoes a fantastic wardrobe change. Despite a three-hour running time, all of this zips by in spectacularly entertaining fashion and very rarely misses the mark. And in the midst of all the action, Downey Jr. delivers another soulful, endearing perfor-

mance, well beyond anything you would’ve expected from a Marvel movie before he started showing up in them. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

The Biggest Little Farm

A gorgeously shot documentary that follows a young married couple over the course of eight years as they leave city life behind and move to the country to try and start a farm and live in harmony with nature. In the process they encounter challenges and conflicts that lead to a better understanding of biodiversity and a new way of life. Pageant Theatre. Rated R.

Dark Phoenix

The classic “Dark Phoenix Saga” storyline from Marvel’s Uncanny X-Men comic finally gets its due with a full film that explores the transformation of Jean Grey (played by Sophie Turner) from mild-mannered telepathic/telekinetic to the all-powerful Phoenix, and finally to the all-destructive Dark Phoenix. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

2

Godzilla: King of the Monsters

King of the Monsters does have some terrific monster battles in it, and the special effects are mind-bogglingly good. But the human stuff in between and during the monster scenes is dreadful. The story, such as it is, picks up where the previous film, Godzilla (2014), left off, with a world in a state of disarray after monster attacks on San Francisco and Las Vegas. And how do the humans dust themselves off and find a way to coexist with the likes of giant sea reptiles and moths after the decimation of the Bay Area? Apparently, according to writer-director Michael Dougherty, we deliver inane dialogue really slowly, and inexplicably play with a sonar gadget that calls out to the monsters in a manner that either chills them out or fires them up and, of course, winds up sparking the monster mayhem. The monsters get the only wellstaged scenes, featuring beautiful closeups and battered landscapes. Meanwhile, the poor actors are left to sit around in a situation room looking lost as they observe and comment on the action taking place elsewhere. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

In part three of the film series, “retired” super-assassin John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is in big trouble as a guild of elite killers hunts him down to claim the $14 million price placed on his head. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

2

Ma

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —N.S.

Rocketman

An appropriately fantastical musical biopic on the life of piano-playing rock legend Elton John. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

The Secret Life of Pets 2

In this second film in the computer-animated franchise, Max the Jack Russell Terrier (voiced by Patton Oswalt, who replaced Louis C.K.) and his animal friends continue to have adventures whenever their humans aren’t around. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.


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Is California ready to legalize roadside cuisine?

L “Meals under wheels.” “Bumper crop.”

et’s get the jokes out of the way first.

“Gravel-tenderized meat.” Chances are state Sen. Bob Archuleta has heard most of them. A Los Angeles County Democrat, he has a bill advancing through the Legislature that would allow Californians to “salvage” recently deceased wildlife from the by sides of the state’s roads and highBen Christopher ways. The eyebrow-raising (and for the squeamish, stomach-churning) About this effort has been the butt of “many story: jokes here in the Capitol and even in This is an edited my own hometown” of Pico Rivera, version of the he acknowledged. original, published But jokes aside, he insists, “this by CalMatters and available at bill is dealing with very serious calmatters.org. issues.” It would allow outdoorsy and culinarily courageous Californians to engage in a very particular form of roadside dining, so long as they apply for a state permit after the fact. Proponents say that wildlife and highway regulators could then use the data to identify roadkill hotspots and help reduce human-wildlife collisions. It would make California the most populous of a string of states—including Western ones such as Montana, Idaho and Oregon—to permit such highway harvesting. For progressives, there’s the added selling point of not letting good meat go to waste—an argument that has won over many environmentalists and even one of the most zealous of animal protectors, PETA. While roadkill cuisine may not yet be mainstream, it appears to have joined the ranks of bug eating and dumpster diving as a counter-cultural dietary choice once associated with extreme poverty—but now earning the respect of eco-conscious foodies. As High Country News recently observed, “stereotyped hillbilly

eating roadkill has been replaced by an environmentally and food conscientious middle-class urbanite.” Plus, roadkill is nothing if not free range—to tragic excess. While the bill has no formal opposition and has unanimously cleared the Senate’s Natural Resources and Water Committee, not everyone in the room was won over. Judie Mancuso, founder of the animal rights advocacy group Social Compassion in Legislation, argued we “should be protecting the animals, not worried about hitting and eating them.” “It seems insane, I’m sorry,” she said. Other groups have raised concerns that the bill could enable poaching, jeopardize traffic safety and lead to food-borne illness. For decades California law has banned hungry drivers from pulling over to gather bumper-battered wildlife. That’s for safety reasons, but it’s also an artifact of the state’s strict hunting laws. If you want to take a deer out of the wild (or off a highway shoulder), you need a deer tag. No exceptions. Even so, Archuleta and a coalition of wildlife conservationists and hunting advocates want to make that exception for only a handful of big, meaty animals, including deer, elk and wild pigs. (With apologies to squirrel connoisseurs, all other critters are off the menu.) Under the proposal, the state would launch a pilot program in 2022 that would allow people who accidentally hit one of those animals, or come across one on the side of the road, to cart the animal home as long as they apply for a free permit within 24 hours. Applicants could file their permit on an app that would also include information on how to properly dress the carcass and avoid food-borne illness. They would also be allowed to “dispatch” animals that have been wounded, but not killed. At the request of California Highway Patrol, interstates are exempt. Ω

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2396 EsplanadE • 530-895-1195 JUNE 13, 2019

CN&R

29


ARTS DEVO by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

h c n u l y frida

This guy saves you money.

join us for

ultimate playlist Dang! How is it that most of arts dEVo’s favorite bands are

touring California in the next few months? It’s an embarrassment of riches, and I ain’t got enough riches to see more than maybe one of these shows. sebadoh and FidLaR already passed through, and the coming months things get crazy with and you Will Know Us by the Trail of dead (June 22-June 23, Berkeley and Sacramento), Mogwai (Aug. 29, Sacramento), die antwoord (Sept. 15, S.F.), Explosions in the sky (Sept. 16-17, Oakland and Sacramento), Titus andronicus (Sept. 20-21, Davis and S.F.), Vampire Weekend (Oct. 1, S.F.) and nick Cave (Oct. 13, S.F.). If I could choose just one, I’d have to go with Cave, a songwriting hero of mine and someone I’ve always managed to miss when he’s come to the States. The tour is called Conversations With Nick Cave, and though I’d rather have the full Bad Seeds experience, the intimate Q&A/song-request setup sounds pretty amazing as well. It’s sold out, however, and tickets on the secondary market are stupid expensive. Time to jump on something else before nothing is left. There are some really impressivelooking shows coming through Chico this summer worth considering as well. On the calendar as of now: • June 16: dwight yoakam at Rolling Hills Casino amphitheater • June 19: antibalas at the sierra

nevada Big Room • June 24: okkervil River at the Big Room • July 4: Howard Jones and Men Without Hats at Feather Falls Casino • July 23: Bob Log iii at duffy’s Tavern • Aug. 27: shannon and the Clams at the

Nick Cave Big Room • Sept. 5: Black Flag at senator Theatre • Sept. 12: Howlin’ Rain at argus Bar + Patio

13

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345 West Fifth Street, Chico, CA 95928 (530)15891–6328 16 17 Please call for reservations

Open Fridays for Lunch 11:30am – 2:30pm Join us for Happy Hour Every Day 4:30–6pm 30

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June 13, 2019

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more tunes! more tunes! If local bands GravyBrain and Lyfecoach were the ones featured in the “die Hippie, die” episode of south Park, the former would be the Phish-like crew laying down the crunchy grooves onstage at the music festival, and the latter would be the slayer CD played over the sound system that causes everyone to “bail on this whole angry scene.” The beautiful thing about that analogy (and about Chico) is that both groovy funksters and screaming heshers attract and repel, yet at the end of the night, all the dudes would share a beer after the show. Dance all night. Thrash all night as well. Also beautiful: Both bands are releasing new music this week. GravyBrain will be sharing its latest album, Goes to your Head, at the City Plaza during its Friday night Concert gig (June 14, 7-8:30 p.m.). For $20, you receive a thumb drive with the new album, plus all of the band’s previous releases, a copy of the just-completed GravyBrainproduced film, The nibiru Chronicles, plus a ton of random videos of live performances and other she(Groovy jam plays) nanigans. Lyfecoach just released a two-song teaser demo for the 14-track debut that the trio is recording with local engineer Chris Keane. Go burn your eyebrows off at lyfecoach.bandcamp.com


REAL ESTATE

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14855 Klamath Ct. Magalia • $259,900 New exterior & interior paint, septic tank, windows, wood stove, appliances & so much more! CalDRE #02056059

Olivia Larrabee l 530.520.3169 Olivia.Larrabee@c21selectgroup.com

6ac Creekside on Butte Creek $249,000 3.4 ac, well, septic & power in place $98,500 2 bed 2 bath, Senior Park $99,900 Duplex! 1 bed 1 bath each $325,000

3419 Hackamore Lane 4/2 Large yard with a pool. Fruit trees l dabound. So RV parking, Must see! ($450,000)

676 El Varano Way

Two Homes on one LoT 4bd/2ba 1940s era Farmhouse with charm galore PLUS a 2/1 Cottage on Large Lot $599K

Jennifer Parks | 530.864.0336 | BRE# 01269667

Cute 3/1 with fresh paint d unit. and a newer S o lAC Nice yard with lots of opportunity. ($249,000)

Brad Smith | 530.894.4533 DRE #02032624

Mark Reaman l 530.228.2229 Lic# 01265853

Mark.Reaman@c21selectgroup.com

Pebblewood Pines Condo! Wonderful 3 bed/2 1/2 bath, 1,889 sq ft. Lovely courtyard setting, nicely maintained home! 2-car garage and OWNED SOLAR! $379,900

1.59 Acre Double Lot with beautiful valley and canyon views. $120,000 3/1 with huge yard in Chico. $269,000

big ChiCo CreeK estates beauty! 3 bed/2.5 bth, 2,402 sq ft with a floor plan that flows, new hardwood floors in kitchen, fresh interior paint, lush landspace .30 lot size! $530,000 beautiful hoMe with updated kitchen, plantation shutters, formal living, formal dining, family g d inlush P e nwith room, and pristine!! Gorgeous grounds landscape! 4 bed/2 bth, 2,504 sq ft $575,000

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stunning durhaM estate ProPerty! roPerty! Custom one owner home, 4bd/3ba, 3,546 sq ft, 5.79 g P e n d in acres. Pool, shop, possible horse property, Chandelier walnuts, 3-car garage & so much more! $995,000

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homes sold last week

Alice Zeissler l 530.518.1872 CalBRE #01312354

sponsored by Century 21 select Real estate, Inc.

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of May 27- May 31, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

119 Spanish Garden Dr

Chico

$1,195,000

3/2

SQ. FT. 3006

74 N Valley Ct

Chico

$330,000

3/2

1215

2005 Isaac James Ave

Chico

$867,000

3/3

2433

5 Silkwood Way

Chico

$321,000

3/2

1077

9 Cayman Ct

Chico

$319,000

3/2

1502

3856 Cosby Ave

Chico

$800,000

3/3

2548

3 Solar Estates Dr

Chico

$749,000

3/3

2325

1776 Estates Way

Chico

$695,000

3/3

2380

3501 Shadowtree Ln

Chico

$669,500

3/3

3209

1082 Adlar Ct

Chico

$625,000

4/2

2318

3447 Peerless Ln

Chico

$600,000

3/3

2231

41 Parliament Ct

Chico

$585,000

4/3

1881

SQ. FT.

918 Karen Dr

Chico

$255,000

3/3

1747

2099 Hartford Dr #28

Chico

$241,500

3/2

1375

774 Virginia St

Chico

$220,000

2/1

946

570 Cimarron Dr

Chico

$178,500

3/3

2368

4 Lakewood Way

Chico

$147,500

3/2

1111

Chico

$94,000

4/2

1120

2669 Chantel Way

Chico

$575,000

4/3

2253

984 Colorado St

1899 Lodge Pine Ln

Chico

$530,000

3/2

2007

650 Bird St

Oroville

$575,000

1/1

5110

5 Tilden Ln

Chico

$470,000

3/3

1664

35 Rosemel Ct

Oroville

$520,000

4/2

2347

2299 Moyer Way

Chico

$440,000

3/2

1388

125 Deerwood Dr

Oroville

$500,000

4/3

2577

22 Noyo Ct

Chico

$415,000

3/2

1536

1455 14th St

Oroville

$465,000

5/3

2624

172 Rock Creek Rd

Chico

$400,000

3/2

1512

17 Pleasant Oak Ln

Oroville

$430,000

3/2

2107

12 Towser Rd

Chico

$389,500

4/2

1661

159 Lariat Loop

Oroville

$419,000

3/2

1945

879 Lorinda Ln

Chico

$345,000

3/1

1134

467 Mojave Ct

Chico

$344,000

3/3

1610

50 Walter Blume Ln

Oroville

$408,000

3/2

1658

6270 Woodman Dr

Oroville

$380,000

3/3

2147

1366 Manzanita Ave

Chico

$341,000

3/2

1454

869 Inyo St

Chico

$335,000

3/2

1132

2178 De Mille Rd

Paradise

$705,000

3/3

3254

2225 De Mille Rd

Paradise

$588,636

2/2

1833

466 E 9th Ave

Chico

$332,000

2/1

1192

2 San Ramon Dr

Chico

$330,000

3/2

1235

6124 N Libby Rd

Paradise

$361,500

3/2

1732

2302 Fern Ave

Chico

$330,000

3/1

1264

452 Sunburst Dr

Paradise

$350,000

3/2

1606

june 13, 2019

CN&R

31


REAL ESTATE E For more information about advertising in our Real estate section, call us at

(530) 894-2300

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOHN STEWART, PRESIDENT Dated: April 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000543 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019

Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for some upgrades.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as KBIZ, RHEMA WORD OF FAITH, VINCE HAYNIE ENTERPRISES, VINCE HAYNIE MINISTRIES at 574 East 12th Street Chico, CA 95926. VINCENT HAYNIE PO Obx 7508 Chico, CA 95927. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: VINCENT HAYNIE Dated: May 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000605 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MAKABE MUSIC at 1558 Bridge Street #8 Oroville, CA 95965. HARDLEY W BOGLE 1558 Bridge Street #8 Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: HARDLEY BOGLE Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000555 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE WORM FARM at 9050 Lassell Lane Durham, CA 95938. DURHAM WORM FARM INC 9033 Esquon Rd Durham, CA 95938. this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as POMONA APARTMENTS at 813 Nord Avenue Chico, CA 95926. SNET 3 LLC 4324 Orange Grove Avenue Sacramento, CA 95841. This business is conducted by a Limited Liabiliity Company. Signed: WILLIAM SHERIDAN, MANAGER Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000607 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PANINI MACHINI, SHORTCYCLE at 3002 Clark Road Butte Valley, CA 95965. JOEL DAVID MATZINGER 3002 Clark Road Butte Valley, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOEL MATZINGER Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000617 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PAINT PARTIES BY DAWN at 14380 Madonna Court Magalia, CA 95954. DAWN ELISE HICKEY 14380 Madonna Court Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DAWN HICKEY Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000625 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DWYER LOGGING at 331 Black Bart Road Oroville, CA 95966. DOMINIC DWYER 331 Black Bart Road Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DOMINIC DWYER Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000624 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name DWYER LOGGING at 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. DOMINIC SILAS DWYER 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. DAKONA LEE DWYER 331 Black Bart Rd Oroville, CA 95966. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DOMINIC DWYER Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2018-0000176 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BEST USE, SMART ASSET this Legal Notice continues

MANAGEMENT at 259 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. ERIK KENT HINESLEY 271 E 9th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ERIK HINESLEY Dated: May 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000586 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as DOWN LO, LOST ON MAIN at 319 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. LOST IN CHICO 319 Main Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KYLE ULLRICH, CEO Dated: April 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000544 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JESSEE EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING at 2434 Dayton Road, Building #2 Chico, CA 95928. JMME NUT MANUFACTURING CORPORATION, INC. 2434 Dayton Road, Building #2 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RICKY D. SIMAS, PRESIDENT Dated: May 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000620 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, BIDWELL REALTY, INC., CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5 Skyline Blvd Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC. 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES M. GUDERIAN, BROKER/OWNER Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000648 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, BIDWELL REALTY, INC, CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5263 Royal Oaks Dr Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES GUDERIAN, BROKER/OWNER Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000649 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE PROGRESSIVE SCHOOLHOUSE at 2400 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. LORI TENNANT 2657 Cactus Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI A. TENNANT Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000613 Published: May 30, June this Legal Notice continues

6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LORI TENNANT FINE ART at 2400 Notre Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. LORI ANN TENNANT 2657 Cactus Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: LORI A. TENNANT Dated: May 15, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000614 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIVING FREE HEALING CENTER, THE WELLNESS COLLECTIVE at 1 Williamsburg Suite E Chico, CA 95926. JANE VICTORIA MINERS 1933 Mars Way Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JANE MINERS Dated; May 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000568 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIG AL’S DRIVE IN at 1844 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926. PEACH TREE RESTAURANT INC 185 Cohasset Rd Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signd: NAEEM REHMAN, VICE PRESIDENT Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000639 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EVAS ULTRA BLIND CLEANING SERVICE at 530 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. DANIEL VUJIC 530 Windham Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: DANIEL VUJIC Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000658 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following person is doing business as EVERGRACE CRAFTS at 573 Upham Road Bangor, CA 95914. CHRISTINA JACKELYNE PAEZ-SISINO 573 Upham Road Bangor, CA 95914. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHRISTINA PAEZ-SISINO Dated: May 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000578 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STYLE BOMB CLUB at 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. EMILY MARIE CORONA 245 W 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. this Legal Notice continues

Signed: EMILY CORONA Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000660 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOUGHIE BOY at 2607 Forest Ave, Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. JOSEPH LUTHER SELBY 1975 Bruce Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSEPH L. SELBY Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000659 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ADOPTION CHOICES OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA at 1469 Humboldt Rd Ste 200 Chico, CA 95928. CHICO FEMINIST WOMENS HEALTH CENTER 1901 Victor Ave Redding, CA 96002. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARIKATHRYN HENDRIX, DIRECTOR Dated: May 17, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000622 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE SOCIAL CHICO at 1400 W. Third St. Chico, CA 95928. FPA6 CRAIG HALL, LLC 2082 Michelson Drive 4th Floor Irvine, CA 92612. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: M. EURL, VICE PRES. Dated: May 6, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000569 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ROD BROKER at 55 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. BRENT WILLIAM CLINE 55 Herlax Circle Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRENT CLINE Dated: May 22, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000652 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OROVILLE DRY DOCK BOAT AND RV STORAGE at 170 Kelly Ridge Road Oroville, CA 95966. ROBERT LEE POSTIGO 330 Tres Pinos Rd Ste C-4 Hollister, CA 95023. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ROBERT L. POSTIGO Dated: May 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000657 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY MUTUAL AID at 1431 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. ZACHARY D BLUE 1820 Mulberry Street Chico, CA 95928. this Legal Notice continues


MALAMA MACNEIL 1252 E 8th Street Chico, CA 95928. MILES MONTALBANO 1206 Salem Street Chico, CA 95928. ALIZA Z SCHER PO Box 686 Hayfork, CA 96041. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: MALAMA MACNEIL Dated: May 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000687 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WHISPERING TREES APARTMENTS at 1501 North Cherry #19 Chico, CA 95926. JESSE E PIPKIN 9500 Crystal Bay Ln Elk Grove, CA 95758. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JESSE PIPKIN Dated: May 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000654 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIVE STAR RANCHES at 470 B Street Biggs, CA 95917. STEPHANIE GWINN 1907 Marin Ave. Berkeley, CA 94707. JONATHAN LAVY 428 Lyndsey Ln Yuba City, CA 95993. MARK LAVY 69 Rio Bonito Road Biggs, CA 95917. GAYLE LELAND 9316 Turner Lane Durham, CA 95938. KELSEY LELAND 4274 Bladwin Ave. Culver City, CA 90232. RICHARD LELAND 9316 Turner Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: RICHARD LELAND Dated: May 21, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000644 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ZAVALA REAL ESTATE SOLUTIONS at 1280 E 9th Street, Suite A Chico, CA 95928. JOSE ZAVALA CHAVEZ 2070 Mansfield Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOSE ZAVALA CHAVEZ Dated: May 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000668 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PEEKING CHINESE RESTAURANT at 243 West 2nd Street, #4 Chico, CA 95928. BRUCE WAI SZE CHENG 10136 Lofton Way Elk Grove, CA 95757. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRUCE CHENG Dated: May 28, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000662 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WITHINREACH RESOURCES, WITHINREACH RHYTHMS at 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. KATHLEEN MARIE NAAS 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA this Legal Notice continues

95926. KENNETH NELSON NAAS 1060 Adlar Ct Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KENNETH N. NAAS Dated: June 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000712 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 127CC COURTNEY BOYDEN 6x12 (Boxes, Furniture, Suitcases, Misc.) 256SS TODD J. JOHNSTON (Personal items, Office supplies, Safe, Misc.) 278SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6X10 (Personal items, Containers, Misc.) 284SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6x10 (Boxes, Containers, Misc.) 303SS WANYE COLE 5x10 (Personal items, Boxes, Furniture, Misc.) 465ACC SAMMUEL HAZELIP 5x5 (Personal items, Misc.) 494CC CARSON REEK 6x12 (Artwork, Furniture, Boxes, Personal items, Misc.) 504CC DAVID A. DUNCAN 6x7 (Tools, Outdoor Equipment, Car Travel Rack, Personal items) 507AC JASON MATTHEW HEIM 6x12 (Furniture, Tools, Outdoor supplies, Misc.) 519CC GERRARD WHITE 5x12 (Furniture, Boxes, Misc.) 520CC GERRARD WHITE 11x7 (Furniture, Boxes, Misc.) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday June 22, 2019 Beginning at 1:00pm Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: June 6,13, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AMBER LEE FRENCH Proposed name: AMBER LEE ST CLARE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01343 Published: May 23,30, June 6,13, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES KELLY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: this Legal Notice continues

CHARLES KELLY Proposed name: CHARLES HENRY EUGENE KELLY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 26, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 9, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01403 Published: May 30, June 6,13,20, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SARAH ELIZABETH ADAMS and ANDREW BIGLER BURKE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: FERN BIGLER ADAMS-BURKE Proposed name: WINTER FERN ADAMS-BURKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 20, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01522 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUSTIN JAMES SHULTS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: THOMAS JAMES SKYTTE Proposed name: THOMAS JAMES SHULTS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition this Legal Notice continues

without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 10, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 15, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01443 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner BERNICE LOUISE MCDONALD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: BERNICE LOUISE MCDONALD Proposed name: L AARON MILLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 17, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01551 Published: June 6,13,20,27, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ADAM CHASE MERRIMAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ADAM CHASE MERRIMAN Proposed name: ADAM CHASE BYERS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19CV01578 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VICKI LEA WENDT filed a petition with this this Legal Notice continues

court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VICKI LEA WENDT Proposed name: VICKI LEE EGGEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 7, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: June 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV00747 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: JOELENE N GILMAN YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the this Legal Notice continues

CLaSSIfIEdS

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY For the week oF June 13, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): We may not

have to travel to other planets to find alien life. Instead of launching expensive missions to other planets, we could look for exotic creatures here on Earth. Astrobiologist Mary Beth Wilhelm is doing just that. Her search has taken her to Chile’s Atacama Desert, whose terrain resembles Mars. She’s looking for organisms like those that might have once thrived on the Red Planet. I invite you to use this idea as a metaphor for your own life. Consider the possibility that you’ve been looking far and wide for an answer or resource that is actually close at hand.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Philoso-

pher Martin Buber believed that some stories have the power to heal. That’s why he said we should actively seek out stories that have the power to heal. What I wish for you in the coming weeks is that you will find stories like that.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the 1960s,

Gemini musician Brian Wilson began writing and recording best-selling songs with his band the Beach Boys. A seminal moment in his development happened while he was listening to his car radio in August 1963. A tune he had never heard before came on: “Be My Baby” by the Ronettes. Wilson was so excited he pulled over onto the shoulder of the road so he could devote his full attention to what he considered a shockingly beautiful work of art. “I started analyzing all the guitars, pianos, bass, drums and percussion,” he told The New York Times. “Once I got all those learned, I knew how to produce records.” I suspect a pivotal moment like this could unfold for you in the coming weeks. Be alert!

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Your soul

is so rich and complicated, so manysplendored and mysterious, so fertile and generous. I’m amazed you can hold all the poignant marvels you contain. Isn’t it sometimes a struggle for you to avoid spilling over? Like a river at high tide during heavy rains? And yet every so often there come moments when you go blank; when your dense, luxuriant wonders go missing. That’s OK! It’s all part of the Great Mystery. You need these fallow phases. And I suspect that the present time might be such a time. If so, here’s a fragment of a poem by Cecilia Woloch to temporarily use as your motto: “I have nothing to offer you now save my own wild emptiness.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): America’s premier

event creator is Adrienne Sioux Koopersmith, a Leo. When she was going through a hard time in 1991, she resolved to buoy her spirits by creating cheerful, splashy new holidays. Since then she has filled the calendar with more than 1,900 new occasions to celebrate. What a perfect way to express her radiant Leo energy! National Splurge Day on June 18 is one of her favorites: a time for revelers to be extra kind and generous to themselves. That’s a happy coincidence, because my analysis of the astrological omens suggests that this is a perfect activity for you to emphasize during the coming weeks.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Let me keep

my mind on what matters, which is my work, which is mostly standing still and learning to be astonished.” Virgo poet Mary Oliver said that. It was perfectly reasonable for her, given her occupation, although a similar declaration might sound outlandish coming from a non-poet. Nonetheless, I’ll counsel you to inhabit that frame of mind at least part-time for the next two weeks. I think you’ll benefit in numerous ways from ingesting more than your minimum daily dose of beauty, wonder, enchantment and astonishment.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran philosopher Michel Foucault articulated a unique definition of “criticism.” He said that it

by rob brezsny doesn’t dish out judgments or hand down sentences. Rather, it invigorates things by encouraging them, by identifying dormant potentials and hidden beauty. Paraphrasing and quoting Foucault, I’ll tell you that this alternate type of criticism ignites useful fires and sings to the grass as it grows. It looks for the lightning of possible storms and coaxes codes from the sea foam. I hope you’ll practice this kind of criticism in the coming weeks—a criticism that doesn’t squelch enthusiasm and punish mistakes, but instead champions the life spirit and helps it ripen.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Help may

be hovering nearby, but in an unrecognizable guise. Rumpled but rich opportunities will appear at the peripheries, though you may not immediately recognize their value. A mess that you might prefer to avoid looking at could be harboring a very healthy kind of trouble. My advice to you, therefore, is to drop your expectations. Be receptive to possibilities that have not been on your radar. Be willing to learn lessons you have neglected or disdained in the past.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.

21): As much as I love logic and champion rational thinking, I’m granting you a temporary exemption from their supremacy. To understand what’s transpiring in the coming weeks, and to respond with intelligence, you will have to transcend logic and reason. They will simply not be sufficient guides as you wrestle and dance with the Great Riddle that will be visiting. You will need to unleash the full power of your intuition. You must harness the wisdom of your body and the information it reveals to you via physical sensations. You will benefit from remembering at least some of your nightly dreams and inviting them to play on your consciousness throughout the day.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For

the sake of your emotional and spiritual health, you may need to temporarily withdraw or retreat from one or more of your alliances. But I recommend that you don’t do anything drastic or dramatic. Refrain from harsh words and sudden breaks. For now, seal yourself away from influences that are stirring up confusion so you can concentrate on reconnecting with your own deepest truths. Once you’ve done that for a while, you’ll be primed to find helpful clues about where to go next in managing your alliances.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’ve got

a list of do’s and don’ts for you. Do play and have fun more than usual. But don’t indulge in naive assumptions and infantile emotions that interfere with your ability to see the world as it really is. Do take aggressive action to heal any sense of abandonment you’re still carrying from the old days. But don’t poison yourself with feelings of blame toward the people who abandoned you. Do unleash wild flights of fantasy and marvelous speculations about seemingly impossible futures that maybe aren’t so impossible. But don’t get so fixated on wild fantasies and marvelous speculations that you neglect to embrace the subtle joys that are actually available to you right now.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “At times,

so many memories trample my heart that it becomes impossible to know just what I’m feeling and why,” writes Piscean poet Mark Nepo. While that experience is familiar to everyone, it’s especially common for Pisceans. That’s the bad news. But here’s the good news: In the coming weeks, your heart is unlikely to be trampled by your memories. Hence, you will have an excellent chance to know exactly what you’re feeling and why. The weight of the past will at least partially dissolve and you’ll be freer than usual to understand what’s true for you right now, without having to sort through confusing signals about who you used to be.

➡ www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888.

CONTINUED ON 34 June 13, 2019

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court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: June 29, 2018 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 18CV02136 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019 SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: RICKEY LEE CARPENTER AND CATRINA MISKELLA CARPENTER AKA CATRINA MISKLLA doing business as RICK CARPENTER ROOFING; and DOES 1 TO 20 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: DAVID J. MURRAY NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: DAVID J. MURRAY, ESQ. 354 E. 5th Street Chico, CA 95928 (530) 896-1144 Dated: April 2, 2019 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 19CV01024 Published: June 13,20,27, July 3, 2019

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RAFAELA HIGUERA ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA H. ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA ANDRADE To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: this Legal Notice continues

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RAFAELA HIGUERA ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA H. ANDRADE, aka RAFAELA ANDRADE a petition for Probate has been filed by: SUSAN ANDRADE and MARY L. ANDRADE in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: SUSAN ANDRADE and MARY L. ANDRADE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00244 Dated: May 23, 2019 Published: May 30, June 6,13, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE BERNIECE EDNA SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE E. SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE SCHMIDT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BERNIECE EDNA SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE E. SCHMIDT, aka BERNIECE SCHMIDT a petition for Probate has been filed by: JEFFERY L. VAN DREW in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate this Legal Notice continues

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requests that: JEFFERY L. VAN DREW be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decendent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 18, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: REBECCA YUHASZ McKernan, Lanam, Bakke & Williams LLP 55 Independence Circle, Suite 106 Chico, CA 95973. (530) 877-4961 Case Number: 19PR00240 Dated: May 20, 2019 Published: May 30, June 6,13, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE MARY LOUISE ROULEAU To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MARY LOUISE ROULEAU A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DEBORAH ANN CAMPBELL and ANITA MARIE ROULEAU in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DEBORAH ANN CAMPBELL and ANITA MARIE ROULEAU be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if this Legal Notice continues

any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: PR Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: VANESSA J. SUNDIN Sundin Law Office 341 Broadway Street, Ste. 302 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 342-2452 Dated: May 30, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00259 Published: June 6,13,20, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ELOISE WESTON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ELOISE WESTON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARILYN DE BOARD in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARILYN DE BOARD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have this Legal Notice continues

waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: JUNE 25, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: MARILYN DE BOARD 1709 River Run Drive Marysville, CA 95901 Dated: June 3, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00169 Published: June 6,13,20, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE RODOLFO MARTINEZ CORTEZ, aka RODOLFO CORTES MARTINEZ, aka RODOLFO M. CORTEZ, RODOLFO CORTES M., RODOLFO CORTEZ MARTINEZ To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RODOLFO MARTINEZ CORTEZ, aka RODOLFO CORTES MARTINEZ, aka RODOLFO M. CORTEZ, aka RODOLFO CORTES M., aka RODOLFO CORTEZ MARTINEZ A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RODOLFO C. CORTEZ and FRANCISCO J. CORTEZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RODOLFO C. CORTEZ and FRANCISCO J. CORTEZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The this Legal Notice continues

independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: July 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court this Legal Notice continues

clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON, ESQ. 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: May 29, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00255 Published: June 13,20,27, 2019 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE FRANK EDWARD MERCALDO, aka FRANK E. MERCALDO, aka FRANK MERCALDO To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: FRANK EDWARD MERCALDO, aka FRANK E. MERCALDO, aka FRANK MERCALDO A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PATRICIA WISSERT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: PATRICIA WISSERT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be

this Legal Notice continues

held in this court as follows: Date: July 2, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: May 24, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00249 Published: June 13,20,27, 2019

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